The East Carolinian, November 21, 1996






November 21,1996
Vol 72, No. 26
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
Charity bowl ignites Pirate, Wolfpack rivalry
ECU, N.C. State
start fund-race for
Make-A-Wish
Across The State
W1NSTON-SALEM (AP) - Ad-
ministrators with the North Caro-
lina community college system are
facing a dilemma that, all things
considered, is better than the al-
ternative.
Enrollment is expected to rise
dramatically over the next decade.
Officials operating the state's
58 community colleges project en-
rollment in the 2005-2006 school
year will be 966,941 students, a 24
percent increase over current en-
rollment, the Winston-Saiem Jour-
nal reported Tuesday.
DURHAM (AP) - He was in-
vited for a spot on Letterman and
Leno. but now a 14-year-old boy
who has remained anonymous
since casting his ballot in the Nov.
5 election may be facing a few le-
gal hurdles.
Officials said Tuesday that
county Elections Supervisor Carol
Booth officially will challenge the
registration of the youth, who lied
about his age when he registered
to vote at a Rockingham rock con-
cert last summer.
Across The Country
NEWARK, Del. (AP)-The FBI
has joined the search for a college
freshman charged with murder in
the death of his girlfriend's new-
born boy, who was dumped in a
trash bin.
A federal fugitive warrant was
issued Tuesday for Brian C.
Peterson Jr 18, of Wyckoff, NJ.
Peterson is charged with murder
along with 18-year-old Amy
Grossberg, his high school sweet-
heart and the baby's mother. The
baby was put in a plastic bag and
dumped in a trash bin outside a
motel last week, authorities said.
CHICAGO (AP) - Arguing that
the effects of crack and powdered
cocaine are similar, two psycholo-
gists say federal sentencing guide-
lines that now impose harsher pen-
alties for crack are excessive and
should be reduced.
In response to the outbreak of
crack-related crime in the 1980s,
Congress enacted tougher punish-
ments for crack cocaine a decade
ago.
Around The World
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -
Hurricane Marco spun eastward
through the Caribbean toward Ja-
maica today, threatening to inflict
further damage on an island where
severe storms have already forced
families from their homes.
Jamaica's government issued
a flash-flood watch and urged fish-
ermen to return to port. Storm-
force winds from the first effects
of the hurricane could begin as
early as tonight in western and
southern Jamaica.
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) -
Eager to forge stronger ties to Asia,
President Clinton today committed
the United States to improving re-
lations with China and defended his
administration's handling of ques-
tions about campaign contribu-
tions linked to Asian interests.
Angela Koenig
Staff Writer
ECU and N.C. State University are
competing on and off the football field
this year. The colleges have been in com-
petition to raise money for the Make-A-
Wish Foundation.
Bell Atlantic Communications, the
title sponsor of the Make-A-Wish Foun-
dation of Eastern North Carolina, chal-
lenged the schools' organizations to raise
as much money as possible for the char-
ity. This is the first year of the event
Chairman of ECU's Make-A-Wish
Foundation Fundraising Campaign and
member of Kappa Alpha Psi Terrence
Evins proposed working with the foun-
dation to his fraternity and contacted the
charity.
"I happened to call at the right time.
Bell Atlantic Communications had just
had a meeting with the Make-A-Wish
Foundation. They wanted to do some-
thing but didn't know what to do. They
wanted to involve the schools and de-
cided this would be a great way to kick
off the ECU and NCSU football game
Evins said.
"They chose us (ECU and NCSU)
because of the ball game. They thought
it would be a neat way to tie it together.
Also because ECU and NC State have
two of the best communications depart-
ments and that is what Bell Atlantic is
interested in Kelly Gillispie said. Gillispie
worked with the fundraising at NCSU.
ECU and the communications com-
pany worked together with the theme
"Bell Atlantic and ECU Making Dreams
Come True
The Make-A-Wish Foundation is a
non-profit organization that raises
money to make the dreams of terminally
ill children come true. The funds raised
will go directly to the charity.
ECU's Kappa Alpha Psi, the Inter-
Fraternity Council and Pan-Hellenic
Council of ECU worked together to get
students involved in the fundraising.
Kappa Alpha Psi held a Mr. Univer-
sity pageant in which contestants and
the organizations sponsoring the contes-
tants raised money for the charity. The
Inter-Fraternity Council and the Pan-
Hellenic Council worked with a local res-
taurant which had a daily meal special
and gave a portion of the profits to the
organization. The National Pan-Hellenic
Council collected money from the orga-
nizations under its guidance, and the Tae
Kwon Do Club held a Kick-a-Thon at the
Carolina East Mall to raise funds for the
charity.
In addition to this, James Earl Jones
visited the campus on Tuesday to speak
See BOWL page 4
ECU to become
world center for
athletic training
Campus gets international exposure
after Olympic committee's approval
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
James Ear! Jones
ECU is always looking for a way to give itself national exposure. Now ECU
will be receiving international exposure as we become a mainstay for the develop-
ment and training of the world's athletes.
In the last week, ECU representatives and athletic officials from around the
world approved a proposal to make ECU a center for international human perfor-
mance. This proposal had been in process for some time but had not been made
public
"This will be a center used for the assessment of athletes, and to prescribe
training for international athletes said Christian Zauner, dean of the School of
Health and Human Development
The Association of National Olympic Committees met last week in Mexico to
See TRAIN page 5
Photo by Jeffery Gay
Actor James Earl Jones of Field of Dreams, The Lion King and Star UteAsvisited
campus Monday on behalf of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.
Stadium expansion gets green light
First phase begins
on Dowdy-Ficklen
north side
Jennifer Sparboe
Contributing Writer
Plans to expand the north side
of Dowdy-Fickien Stadium were made
a reality at the project's
groundbreaking Friday, Nov. 15.
About 100 people including uni-
versity officials, donors, supporters,
fans and others joined together at 4
p.m. on the north side of the stadium
to begin the first phase of the expan-
sion.
The first phase of the expansion
is currently underway, beginning
with the removal of the north side
light towers.
"The expansion has been talked
about for the last seven or eight
years said Henry VanSant, associ-
ate athletic di-
et
rector.
The
project will be
completed by
Sept 13, 1996,
for the game
against Wake
Forest Univer-
sity. The idea
that the project
won't be fin-
ished on time will not be thought
about
"It is not even a consider-
ation. It will be done VanSant said.
The work that will take place at
Dowdy-Ficklen is different from the
construction of the library or recre-
ation center. There is not the same
amount of electrical, plumbing, and
finishing work such as painting and
countertops.
It is not even a
consideration. It
will be done"
� Henry Van Sant, associate
athletic director
In order to keep track of the
progress on the expansion monthly
meetings will be
held. The first
meeting since the
groundbreaking
took place yester-
day.
An 8,000
seat upper deck
will be added,
which will bring
Dowdy-Ficklen's
seating capacity of
35,000 seats up to 43.000. N. C.
State University's Carter-Finley Sta-
dium currently seats 53,000 while
UNC-Chapel Hill's Keenan Stadium
now seats 52,000. ECU's expansion
efforts will not make the stadium
larger than surrounding universities,
but it will bring it closer to the seat-
ing capacity of larger schools such
See EXPAND page 5
Construction will not put a
stop to Fall Commencement
Erika Swarts
StaffWriter
November celebrates Native American history
Display to appear in
Mendenhall on Sunday
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
As the ECU Native American Association recog-
nizes November as Native American Heritage month,
they hope to use this month to educate the students
more about Native Americans and their culture.
North Carolina, has the largest Native American
population east of the Mississippi, and this month is
designated to recognize these Native American peoples
and their tribes.
Joey Crutchfield, an alumni elder adviser for the
EC Native American Association said that they are
really involved with Native American Heritage month.
"We sponsor a food drive where can goods and
food are collected and distributed to Native American
families and Native American communities
Crutchfield said.
Crutchfield also said that they do a lot of educa-
tional things in the local school system in Pitt County.
"We are involved in promoting Native American
culture through public exhibitions Crutchfield said.
Some other things that are being done to encour-
age interest in the Native American culture are pow-
wows and displays.
There will be a special function held at Wolf Creek
Trader's, on Sun Nov. 24 from 1-3 p.m. Crutchfield
said that he hopes the dancing, crafts, and other things
will offer a way for ECU Native American students to
try to help educate non-native people about Native
American culture.
Along with this, a display will go up on Nov. 24 in
See NATIVE page 4
With Fall Commencement nearing, the construction of Dowdy-Fidden
Stadium, weather and the hopeful graduates are the main concerns of
the Commencement Committee.
Commencement is scheduled for Dec 7 at 10 a.m. m Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium, if weather permits. However, in the event of unfavorable weather,
two ceremonies wilt be held that day at Minges Coliseum in William's
Arena.
According to Commencement Committee Chair C.C. Rowe, two cer-
emonies are needed because of limited seating. The morning exercise,
which starts at 10 am will honor doctors of philosophy, educational
specialists, certificates of advanced study, master's degrees, and bacca-
laureate degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences. The afternoon
ceremony, which starts at 2 p.m will honor all other Baccalaureate de-
grees.
If weather permits. Rowe does not foresee many problems. Their
biggest immediate concern is the power and water to the facilities in the
stadium. Both have been cut off due to the construction. This seems to
be the only problem caused by the construction because the lower sec-
tion used for the ceremony, should be left untouched.
A problem that faces the hopeful graduates is the fact that final
exams are taken after Commencement. The ceremony is held before
exams because the Commencement Committee understands that after
exams, students are ready to leave. They know the last thing students
want to do is hang around and wait for the ceremony.
Rowe stresses that just because you take part in the ceremony does
not mean you have graduated. After final grades are in graduates have
their diplomas mailed to them.
As for preparation goes, Rowe advises students to finish picking up
their cap and gowns. Students also need to finish sending out invita-
tions. This is especially important for out-of-town guests. If your guests
plan to stay in Greenville they should call now for hotel accommodations.
Another problem with students has been the $25 Commencement
fee.
"We have the Commencement fee in addition to other fees to pay for
cap and gowns, diplomas, and to help pay for the mailing of the diplo-
mas Rowe said. "Our fee barely covers these costs. We are not making
any money
The school subsidizes the remaining costs. The money is used to
pay for overtime to facility service employees, security ,and traffic direc-
See FALL page 5





Thursday, November 21,1996
The East Carolinian
Student
Government
Association
Update
Fraternities enter
new millenium
Honor Co-eds
challenge popular
stereotypes
Brandon Waddell
Edltor-tn-Chhf
Joe Horst
Contributing Writer
Mating flfM Nnvemhcr 18. 1996
The SGA meeting held Monday evening primarily focused on student
fee changes for the 1997-1998 school year. Campus departments requested
money for their organizations, then each department spoke briefly to the
legislature defending their proposed budgets. Once the budget is approved
by the student legislature, the amended version is forwarded to Chancellor
Eakin's office for consideration. The student legislature is comprised of day
student representatives, residence hall representatives and class officers.
According to Jonathan Phillips, SGA treasurer, the Chancellor's office
has not made any changes to the budget approved by SGA in four years.
The Chancellor presents his recommended fees to the Board of Trustees
who can either approve or amend the fees submitted. According to Phillips,
the Board of Trustees has not made any significant changes in three years.
Finally, the proposed increases in student fees are forwarded from the Board
of Trustees to the Board of Governors, who is the final approval authority.
The following is a breakdown of the requested student fees per student and
changes made by the student legislature for the 1997-1998 school year.
Recently in Chapel Hill, fraternal
organizations were shocked when
members of the Phi Gamma Delta fra-
ternity were killed in a fraternity house
fire. After this tragedy, a new focus has
illuminated these organizations and
their struggle to remain in the chang-
ing society of educational institutions.
Though some may still see frater-
nities in the common "Animal House"
image, that image has been disdained
and discarded by many of the frater-
nal organiza-
Ordanization
'SGA
Transit
Media
Fin Arts
Rec Services
�Student Fund
Accounting Office
�Minaes Operations
'9fr'97
$25
$20.75
JL

�Student Union
Mendenhall Operations'
Athletic fee
Student health fee
�Education and technology fee
$3
$1850
T7B"
P�ntpH'Q798

Annmved '9798
$25
$18.75
M.
H2P
$3
$.
125.
$18.75
��.
1121.
$235
$130
$60
$18.50
$242
$140
$60
$3
tions. Phi
Sigma Pi Na-
tional Honor
Fraternity is
one such orga-
nization that,
on its base
alone, has
shown to be
one of the
most unique
"Tradition puts a
pressure to strive
to be the best
� Jonathan Taylor, Tau
alumnus
$18.50
38Z
$242
$137
$60
denotes fees that the student legislature did not have to discuss be-
cause there was no change from the 1996-1997 school year. The university
is required to get student input when there is an increase in student fees;
therefore, the only areas the legislature voted on were increases from the
previous school year.
According to SGA the following members of the legislature were ab-
sent when role was taken: Laurie Godfrey, Laura Benfield, Katrina Flad,
Lisa Smith, Mike Davis and Tim Riley.
and diverse groups to survive the in-
coming millennium.
Founded on February 14, 1916,
Phi Sigma Pi immediately set itself
apart from the rest of the traditional
organizations, basing itself on a tripod
of qualities - fellowship, leadership and
scholarship.
By 1984, only six active chapters
of Phi Sigma Pi remained. However,
through a wide scope of internal im-
provements, Phi Sigma Pi saw an un-
precedented upswing in enrollment
Five years later, Phi Sigma Pi had
broadened itself into a total of 18 ac-
tive chapters around the country.
"The reason for this unprec-
edented growth is due to two things:
quality leadership at the national and
chapter levels and the phenomenal in-
terest generated by the uniqueness of
our organization said current Na-
tional President Jeffrey L. Johnson.
"We are essentially one-third honor
society, one-third service organization,
one-third social fraternity, welcoming
both men and women into our ranks
Elder chapters in Phi Sigma Pi
provide the fraternity with a base of
tradition and experience that paves the
way for future chapters.
"Tradition puts a pressure to
strive to be the best said Tau alum-
nus Jonathan Taylor. "The new chap-
ters push the older ones to improve
upon those traditions, to fight compla-
cency
What sets Phi Sigma Pi apart from
other campus organizations is the em-
phasis on making its members well-
rounded, President Jeremy Kraybill of
the Alpha Gamma chapter at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania said.
"I believe that by encouraging ex-
cellence in all areas, and at the same
time placing a high value on building
friendships between members, Phi
Sigma Pi fills a void that exists on many
campuses Kraybill said.
Tau alumnus David Batts said,
"Our service belief will keep Phi Sigma
Pi well past the year 2000 and on the
cutting edge. Doing good for the com-
munity doesn't just stop at education
- it continues for the rest of your life,
fostering an attitude
Within the past decade, the in-
crease of newer chapters has grown in
epic proportions. With this upswing,
the push to remain
up-to-date has be-
come paramount to
the fraternity's suc-
cess.
"Phi Sigma Pi
can take on any issue,
any subject form, any
service project, any
social activity, any
mmmmmmmmmm educational opportu-
nity because of the
diversity its own members bring to it
President Julie Kraft of the Beta Psi
chapter at Middle Tennessee State said.
Kraft also echoes the sentiments
of the elder chapters in recognizing
that service is a vital part of the
fraternity's future.
"A national philanthropy will give
new chapters some sort of foundation
to work from, and give them the op-
portunity to see some of the projects
which other chapters engage in Kraft
said. "It will also work to bring together
chapters who are geographically very
far apart, unite them in such a way
that they will be able to communicate
Do you have some
things you need to get
rid of?
Advertising in our
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It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU
at regional competitions to be held at James Madison University the weekend of
February 14-16,1997. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Sunday, November 24
1:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
i "��

All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Saturday, November 23
1:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the
ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711,
for more information.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23,8PM
WILLIAMS ARENAMINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 IN ADVANCE FOR STUDENTSFACULTYSTAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED
PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 328-6004 OR 1 800 ECU-ARTS
OR VISIT OUR HOME PAGE AT: www.cis.ccu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html.
lODEArff






�iJ�.
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 21,1996
New physicians assistants introduced
J You're fun, outgoing and have great interpersonal skills. You believe that work
J and play can go together. And yc j have the natural, American style that
� defines Abercrombie & Fitch. Fit this description? Then maybe you should be
working at Abercrombie over the holidays.
If you're heading back home for the holidays and want to have fun (and get
great discountsl), you can be a Brand Representative at Abercrombie & Fitch
while you're hanging out during break. Just stop by an Abercrombie store near
' you and fill out an application when you're horns for Thanksgiving.
Check out our North Carolina or nationwide store locations on the internet
www.abercrombie.com
Abercrombie & Fitch
EOE
Reception started
PA studies
program
Angela Koenig
Staff Writer
ECU'S School of Allied Health
Services introduced the faculty of its
new Physician Assistant (PA) Stud-
ies Program at a reception in the Relk
Building yesterday.
ECU was granted permission for
the program in February by the Uni-
versity of N. C. General Administra-
tion.
The school has been officially
trying to bring this program to ECU
since 1994, when Jim Keller was
hired to begin research for the pro-
gram.
This will be the first program of
its kind in a public univerty in the
state. There are three private schools
in North Carolina with PA programs.
The program will admit 20 stu-
dents for the first session of summer
ct
have been made by interested stu-
dents, some from as far away as
Puerto Rico.
The program
will remain small
at first, until
things get fully
organized and set
up and due to the
low student
teacher ratio
which must be
maintained in a
program of its
kind.
"To teach
medical diagnosis,
it has to be an al-
most one-on-one
setting. It must be
a real hands-on at-
mosphere said Edward D.
Huechtker, MPA, PA-C, chair of the
department of physician assistant
studies.
Other faculty members for the
program are Pam Bailey, PA-C, Nicole
Drury, Jim Keller and Charles C.
Lewis, MPH, PA-C.
The deadline for applications is
of their selection by the middle of
March.
A committee of science faculty
from ECU, prac-
ticing PAs in the
community and
one physician
from the commu-
nity will narrow
the applicants
down to a field
of approximately
100 and then
perform per-
sonal interviews.
Preference
will be given to
North Carolina
residents and
students in
�"����'��,ll,��llll�,ll� states which cur-
rently do not have accredited PA pro-
Many have been
in health care
and now want to
be able to
diagnose and treat
patients
� Edward D. Huechtker,
MPA, PA-C, chair of the
department of physician
assistant studies
grams.
It is a 27 month program which .
requires students to have complete
two years of courses prior to enter-w
ing and will give the students a BS in
Physician Assistant studies.
Many of the interested applicants i
are college graduates currently work- ;
ing in a health care related profession. j
"Many have been in healthcare
. . and now want to be able to diagt'
nose and treat patients Huechtker
said.
PAs practice medicine under the
supervision of licensed physicians and-
provide patient care services that
would otherwise be performed by ;
physicians. They take medical histo-
ries, order and interpret lab tests,
perform physical examinations, diag-
nose and treat illnesses and injuries, i
suture wounds, assist in surgery and
in some states, write prescriptions.
UNC Chapel Hill invites
minorities to law conference
Groups converge to offer free law
dents for the first session of summer The deadline for applications is II :n�-rmrii:r,n on enorinl rlnv
school. More than 3300 inquiries Jan. 5 and students will be notified SChOOl information On SpeCIOI aOV
Staff Report
DESTINATION:
HAWAII
p��e 7s?.0?;f-
Come by tt
tickets
rE�ct�p
Sl� CotoncftfS6 PostJ
Willis Moore - Royal Hawaii:
By One Who Lived There Wednesday, December
4, 1996. 4:30 &. 7pm. in Hendrix Theatre.
An allynuan�t theme dinner is lerved in the M.S.C Multi-purpoac
room at 6pm. for$l 2. Film ticket. �re free with ECU LD. t the
Central Ticket Office. Dinner tickett must be reserved with meal caria,
cash, check or credit card by December lit.
MENU: Mixed greera with lime vinaigrette,
ftcific Rim chicken kaboba, Hawaiian mango
marinated jteaks, grilled marinated vegatablo, fruited wild rice with
palm nuts and currants, pineapple cinnamon rolks coconut custard pie,
tea. Coffee, water.
Deadline to order Dinner Tickets: Dec.lst.
Minority students who are interested in learning more about careers
in law and the law school educational process are invited to attend a
conference at UNC-Chapel Hill on Friday.
The university's School of Law, the Black Law Students Association
(BLSA) and the Student Bar Association (SBA) are hosting the day-long
conference, a way for minority students to participate in Law School In-
formation Day.
The conference is designed to give students a realistic look at law
school and the demands on students as well as to provide information
about preparing for law school, admission policies and procedures and
employment opportunities.
The conference is free to students and will be begin at 8:45 a.m. in the
UNC Law School. Interested students should contact Assistant Dean of
Admission to the law school and Director of International Programs J.
Elizabeth Furr at (919) 962-5109.
Body
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Recreational Services Announces:
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Choice of a VCR. a color TV. or a CD
plaver with a one year lease at
Wesley Commons North. Not Valid
with any other specials.
Expires 11-30-96
S tBH�SK8 ?il�KJ 3S03 (S&KjUXJJJS
On Site Management and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Volleyball Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
' 12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
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EXPIRES 11-30-96
P
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4
i"
When will the Student Recreation Center open??
You tell us
Available to ECU Students, Faculty, and Staff.
One Entry per participant.
Prize winner receives:
Complimentary Hang Gliding Lesson- Kitty Hawk Kites
� University Book Exchange- Gift Certificate
� Mike's Deli-Two Complimentary Pizzas
� East Coast Music Video- Gift Certificate
� Gordon's Golf & Ski- Gift Certificate
� Celebrity status at Grand Opening
Name
Address
Phone:
SS:
My guess for the SRC opening is Month, Day, and ah YeaH
Tie Breaker: How many gallons of water are in the 3 indoor pools?:
a?! &"j
A professional management team that cares!
Return this form to 204 Christenbury by
500 p m on November 27. Contest winner will be notified by phone.
Call Recreational Services at 32$-6387 for more information.
1
1

m
taaei





Thursday, November 21,1996
Foundation offers employees a break HONOR t��
� on a wide level
$15,000
sabbatical offered
to non-profit
organizations
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
Thanks to the Z. Smith
Reynolds Foundation, full-time em-
ployees of non-profit organizations
have an opportunity to take a three
to six month sabbatical. Recipients
will receive $15,000 from the foun-
dation to finance their activities
during their sabbatical.
According to Ms. Becky Wiles,
the sabbatical coordinator for the
foundation, this program was devel-
oped seven years ago by the board
of trustees in an attempt to reward
those hardworking leaders of non-
profit organizations who often re-
ceive little recognition.
"The Board of Trustees real-
ized there were a lot of people in
the non-profit sector who did not
seem to have an opportunity to do
this Wiles said.
There are usually five recipi-
ents of this reward, each of whom
will receive $15,000 to use however
they choose toward their sabbati-
cal activities. The activities they
pursue vary widely, and are entirely
up to the individual's choice.
"The majority of them travel,
and they have the freedom to de-
sign their sabbaticals however they
want. A few return to school or
just stay home and spend time with
their families Wiles said.
In addition to rewarding these
recipients, the program also at-
tempts to improve the performance
of the employees by returning them
to their careers with a reaffirma-
tion of their commitment to their
organization.
"When these leaders go back
to work, they are renewed, and have
a much better outlook on their ca-
pabilities in their jobs and every-
thing Wiles said.
The Z. Smith Reynolds Foun-
dation is a general purpose foun-
dation which was established to
benefit the people of North Caro-
lina. The sabbatical program is
available only to N. C. non-profit
programs and N. C. residents. The
foundation has a tradition of sup-
porting non-profit organizations.
"We make grants twice a year
to non-profit organizations in
North Carolina Wiles said.
Wiles said there are usually
about 50-75 people who apply for
the sabbatical, and they are chosen
on the basis of their accomplish-
ments, the difficulty of their work
environment, their need for a sab-
batical, and their potential for fur-
ther contributions to their organi-
zation.
The initial elimination process
is done by the applications, and the
final is selection made by interview.
"They narrow it down to 10 fi-
nalists, who are interviewed during
a weekend program, and the recipi-
ents are chosen from those 10
Wiles said.
Wiles said that all of their past
recipients have appreciated the
break from their duties that this
sabbatical program gave them. A
surprising number of participants,
she said, tell the foundation that
this was their first vacation.
"They're eternally grateful
Wiles said.
NATIVE from page 1
Mendenhall. This will add to the dis-
play already being shown in the
medical school.
Steve Warden, another alumni
elder adviser for the EC Native
American Association, wants these
things to help people get over their
p-econceived ideas about Native
Americans.
"I hope that we can get rid of
some the stereotypes about Native
people Warden said.
Crutchfield agrees with this
hope and thinks people might real-
ize that the Native Americans have
not gone anywhere.
"We, as native people, are still
here Crutchfield said. "We may
not all look like the buffalo nickel,
but we're still here
Crutchfield said that the Native
Americans don't always look the
same, but they do feel the same.
"Regardless of how we look
sometimes, it is what is inside of us
that identifies us as Native peoples
Crutchfield said. "The strong fam-
ily ties and a sense of giving to Na-
tive and non-Native people
Crutchfield thinks that this
could help everyone as a whole.
"Hopefully by non-Native
people seeing how Native people
continue to give can benefit soci-
ety Crutchfield said. "This can
benefit society by maybe others pick-
ing up on that aspect, and helping
each other out"
Crutchfield feels overall this
month could prove to be very essen-
tial in helping not just the Native
Americans, but everyone.
"The whole purpose, I think, be-
hind specifying a specific month is
so that we can learn from each other,
because we ail have something to of-
fer each other Crutchfield said.
"The more that we learn from each
other, the better it will be for all of
us, and the more respect that we will
have for each other
on a wide level
Other newer chapters agree that
Phi Sigma Pi, and its basis on the tri-
pod, has greatly influenced their lives
and will continue to do so in the fu-
ture.
In September of 1993, the Profes-
sional Fraternity Association (PFA)
extended an invitation to Phi Sigma
Pi to join its growing membership of
campus associations. At a recent PFA
convention, the question arose as to
how the fraternity can keep its tremen-
dous growth in such a volatile frater-
nal environment Current National
Vice-President of Chapter Development
Lindsay Fernandez said that Phi Sigma
Pi gives students the tools they need
to interact in the society of the future.
"Today's incoming college stu-
dents are looking for more than a good
college life Fernandez said. "Phi
Sigma Pi tries to remain in touch with
its students and provide them with the
skills that they will need to succeed in
life f
ECU Dean of Students Ronald
Speier said that Phi Sigma Pi offers
students a unique chance in their col-
lege career.
"(Phi Sigma Pi offers an oppor-
tunity to work with other students not
only of different gender, but also with
high academics Speier said. "They
have strong administrative support,
quality members who pay an active
interest in activities; they should con-
tinue to be a strong group on campus
in the future
Alumni also provide a valuable
source of history for chapters, allow-
ing their own experiences to aid the
growth of not only the chapter, but the
fraternity as a whole. Dr. Jack
Thornton, Tau alumni and current
chapter adviser, said that changes and
the ability to adapt to it is integral to
the fraternity's future.
"Change will, happen in the fu-
ture Thornton said. "Our ability to
adapt to change is one of our stron-
gest assets that we have which will help
us accept what the future will bring.
In addition to adaptability to change,
our service to community is also a
strong asset"
With a current membership of
4,000 undergraduate members, 21,000
alumni and 70 chapters nationwide,
Phi Sigma Pi has poised itself with a
strong internal family to take the next
step into the year 2000.
"Phi Sigma Pi changes the indi-
vidual lives of the brothers as each
learns what it means to be a commu-
nity Tau alumna Amanda Hines said.
"Phi Sigma Pi is a fam'ly, my fam-
ily and all my brothers' family as well
Kraft said.
The East Carolinian
BOWL from page 1
to students about being aware of the
charity and the children it heips. Jones
is a spokesperson for Bell Atlantic Com-
munications, which recently made a
$10,000 contribution to the Make-A-Wish
Foundation.
His speech was part of a program
in which ECU presented $2,500 to the
Make-A-Wish Foundatioa
Assistant Dean of the School of
Medicine Thomas Irons was the Master
of Ceremonies for the event Evias, Ex-
ecutive Director of the Make-A-Wish
Foundation of Eastern NC Linda Barrett,
Director of Bell Atlantic Communications
Paula Scanlon and a parent of a Make-A-
Wish recipient also spoke at the program.
By next week the final fundraising
contributions should be collected and
given to the charity.
"I'd like to congratulate ECU. It
turns out we NCSU raised close to
$1,000. We'd like to thank the Make-A-
Wish Foundation for letting us have the
competition with you guys because over-
all, the main point of the competition
was to raise money for such a great char-
ity Gillespie said.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St 7C7 AAA, Hours:
Pittman Building 7S7-UUUJ Monday - Fnday
Greenville, NC
8:00-4:00
YOUR
could be here
Advertising in The East Carolinian
CAN GET YOUR MESSAGE OUT AROUND THE
ECU CAMPUS.
For more
information call
328-2000
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense . hpa il�4Q
� 24-Hour Message Service m 13� 13�3
STUDENTS DON'T MISS !
Saturday Nov. 30th.
After the E.C.U. VS. n.c.s.u.
game.
"7fe 8ee 1lue Ik mt" Jnd 6ni Bettfldlf
Free Cable TV
Free Water and Sewer
Big Walk in Closets
Central Air Conditioning
Central Heat
Kitchen Appliances
� Nice Carpeting
� 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
- On Site Management
� ECU Bus Service
- Window Blinds
FREEFREEFREEFREE
$SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS $
FREEFREEFREEFREE
1 BEDROOM S28r
2'BEDROOM $370. S.S80
2 BEDROOM wmhmi
3 BEDROOM $465
ECONOMICAL
�$400
ENTERTAINMENT BY
STEVE HARRY
1S�
EasCoast
1-800-950-BAND
We're giving away FREE HEAT THIS WINTER in our 2 bedroom townhomes
MINUTES AWAY FROM ECU
OPEN EVERY DAY
EASIBROOK&
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
752-5100
THE post game CELEBRATION
headquarters!
SOUTH END BREWERY
2100 South Blvd. Charlotte, N.C.
704-358-3424
Has school got you stressed?
Designing Women Salon
Invites you to experience
AVEDA-
stress relieving treatments
� Aromatherapy, Manicures & Pedicures
� Men's skin and shave consultations,
for product and care recommendations.
� Skin cane consultations and facials that
beautify skin with plant technology.
� Finest hair care services to complete your look.
AVEDA
pure plant products for pe
r and planetary sustainabilit
For Consultations and Appointments call 758
D.W. Salon 602 E. 10th st. (across from ECU publi
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager,
WZMB
and
General Manager,
Expressions
for the Spring, 1997 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, November 22 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
Mwrihi





The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 21, 1996
EXPAND from page 1
as L'NC-CH and NCSU.
"It will be magnificent VanSant
said.
This $13 million project has re-
ceived S3 million in state funding and
approximately S10 million in pledges
from alumni and supporters. The
money from the state came from a
state discretionary account. The
money raised for the stadium was
part of the Shared Visions campaign.
"Shared Visions was a coopera-
tive effort between the Alumni Foun-
dation, Medical School Foundation,
and the ECU Education Foundation
(Pirate Club) and raised a total of
over S65 million, according to Mark
Hessert. associate director of the Pi-
rate Club.
The total raised was about S15
million over the original goal of S50
million.
A second phase of expansion is
planned which will add more club
level seating and 3.000 end zone
seats.
"The second phase will begin as
quickly as possible, but will be deter-
mined by the availability of money
VanSant said.
The amount of increase in num-
ber of seats sold will influence the
start of the second phase.
Currently there is no projected
starting date for the second phase.
The expansion will not only add
seats to Dowdy-Ficklen. but it will also
change its appearance.
"Number one. the expansion is
going to change the entire look of the
stadium. There's a real emphasis on
the aesthetics of it VanSant said.
The north side of the stadium.
opposite College Hill, will be enclosed
and the light towers that are being
removed will be anchored on the up-
per deck.
Student seating that is normally
used will be changed in the fall of
1997 probably to both upper and
lower levels.
"The students will not be given
inferior seating VanSant said.
There has been no decision made
on whether or not there will be an
increase in reserved ticket prices.
ECU's current $18 price is lower than
the $20 to $22 tickets at other uni-
versities.
Although the price of reserved
tickets may go up, there will be no
charge for student tickets and half-
price tickets will still be available.
"There is a possibility of a change
in reserved ticket prices. As far as
the policy of students getting half-
price and free tickets, that will not
change; that's what your student fees
pay for said VanSant.
Davidson, Jones and Beers is the
general contractor for the stadium
expansion project. Roddy Jones, of
Davidson. Jones and Beers, is an ECU
alumni and in the past served on both
the N. C. Board of Governors and the
ECU Board of Trustees.
"Roddy Jones is a big supporter
and has a personal interest in the
project. We. in my opinion, owe grati-
tude to Roddy Jones VanSant said.
The construction has begun and
along with it, the noise that ECU has
been surrounded by since the recre-
ation center construction began.
"1 think it sounds pretty
VanSant said.
1. IxAJ.lN from page 1
discuss plans for the new center. Dr.
James Lanier, assistant chancellor of
institutional advancement traveled to
Mexico to present the association with
the proposal.
"The program is going to serve not
only athletes, but also coaches, trainers
and athletic administrators Zauner
said. "We will primarily be serving de-
veloping nations that don't have the
training facilities. However, we will hope-
fully serve athletes from all over the
world
According to Zauner, a pilot pro-
gram is going to start out this summer.
It will be split into two parts and is go-
ing to have approximately 40 partici-
pants per section. Each section will last
about two to three weeks. The partici-
pants will try new techniques in train-
ing.
"Since this is only the approval of
a concept we are hoping that we do a
good job this summer so we can send
these athletes home with a good impres-
sion of ECU and the program Zauner
said.
Funding for the program and the
proposed facilities will be done by the
.Association of National Olympic Com-
mittees. There may also be funding from
the private sector for science test equip-
ment and training equipment The pro-
posed facility may bring new develop-
ment to the ECU campus, which may
also mean new fields, such as soccer.
"This program will bring new re-
sources into the university Zauner said.
"A lot of the work will be done in labs,
giving graduate students access to their
field of study. The program may also
serve as an academic function for stu-
dents
According to Zauner, ECU could
have up to 500 international athletes
participating in the athletic develop-
ment program. Athletes and trainers
will come to learn from local and inter-
national researchers who will be devel-
oping new training techniques, then re-
turn to their countries with the knowl-
edge to help enhance the development
of other athletes.
JrAJLJL from page 1
tors.
The only problem the committee
is not worried about is student behav-
ior. Traditionally, behavior has not
been a big problem.
"We expect our students to cel-
ebrate and to be happy Rowe said.
It is a day in their life that will prob-
ably never happen again. ECU stu-
dents act far better than the students
at many other schools. We do appre-
ciate that
E.C.U. Campus MINISTRY Association
Sponsors A
24 HOUR THANKSGIVING FAST
Sunday Nov. 24
to Noon Monday Nov. 25
Ends with soup and bread lunch
Baptist Student Center
Proceeds from fast will go to OXFAM
International.
For information call: 752-3482
Tired of Relatives?
Wing in the holiday
withBW-3!
Open Thanksgiving
Saturday November 23rd
. MEMPHIS
TAILGATE SPECIAL
wings for
$19-00
EXP I1Z49
z:oo pm
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECK






I til I'll'
Thursday, November 21,1996
The East Carolinian
Spirit Cup
ECU Ambassadors
1996 Homecoming King Si Queen
Heather Cox, ECU Ambassadors
Brian Dilday, Aycock Hall
1996 Homecoming Court
Dwight Henry
Brian Dilday
Eric Rivenbark
Steve Battifarano
Scott Respess
Mark Woodall
Randy Currin
Micak Retzlaf f
;inia Walser
Jennifer Nolan
Rebekah Perez
Heather Cox
Natasha Howard
Amy Fitzgerald
Marsha Fleenor
Stacy Riggs
Hall
1st Aycock Hall
2nd CottonFleming Hall
3rd Fletcher Hall
House
1 st ECU Ambassadors
2nd Delta Zeta Sorority
3rd National Speech,
Language & Hearing Association
Banner
ECU Ambassadors
Float
1st Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity
Chi Omega Sorority
2nd ECU Ambassadors
3rd Alpha Delta Pi Sorority
PIRATECHEST
Ester Satterwhite
atticipating
mmmmmwm�ft
. -���- �"� S -L





Thursday, November 21,1996 The East Carolinian
?
Help
wanted
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share Tar River Apartment own bedroom, pay
14 utilities close to campus. Call 758-7542.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE want-
ed. 3 blocks from campus. Central ACHeat
WD. Dishwasher. Only $185 a month and 1
3 utilities. Call 752-6999. Available now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED STARTING
spring semester. Two bedroom, 2 12 bath, fully
furnished, pool, on ECU bus route. Please call
752-0813.
THREEFOUR BEDROOM HOUSE AT 201
East 13th. All hardwood floors five blocks from
campus. Rent $450month. Call 757-3191.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! Short walk
to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - Next to AOTT
house. 3 bedrooms. 2 12 baths - mint condi-
tion. 5th Street Souare -1 Ijrtown - Above BW3
- 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken living area.
Luxury Apartment 'Available Now! Will lease
for Decemoer or January (6 month or year
leases available) Also Available - "The Beauty
Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment - if you see it
you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
ROOMMATE WANTED DEC. 1: 3 bedroom
house one block from campus, 13 utilities,
you get own bath. Washer and dryer included.
Male or female call Tammy 757-9310.
CLOSE TO ECU - Woodcliff Apts 10th Street
- 2 bedrooms, very energy efficient washer
dryer hook-ups, watersewer included. 756-
0944.
ONETWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
ACROSS from campus. Own parking. $325
$425. Call Rizz (919)21-3225.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
NICE house, close to campus. 752-8682.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3 BR, 2
12 BA townhouse. Prefer older student or pro-
fessional. Must be neat and responsible. NS.
$270month & 12 utilities. Call 355457.
Start Dec 1.
WANTED: GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING
1 male housemate $170 mo. Includes utilities.
Close to campus. Call Kevin 752-5557.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse. All furnishings
except BDR. WasherDryer included. Pets ne-
gotiable available mid December. Must be clean
and sociable. Rent $217.50month. Must see!
756556"
ROOMMATE WANTED IMMEDIATELY.
MALE or female. $260 per month and 12 util-
ities, fully furnished. Call 3534451.
MF NEEDED TO MOVE into 2bdr apt sur-
rounded by fun and friendly neighbors. Locat-
ed on Fifth Street across campus, downtown.
$200 a month. Available Jan. 1st Call 757-3434.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BY Jan. 1 to
share 2 bedroom apartment 5 blocks from cam-
pus. $187.50 plus 12 utilities. Call Mike at
752-8291.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO take
over lease. Creat house 1 block from campus.
Mid Dec or Jan. 1. Call 830-5419.
FUN-LOVING, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN room-
mate wanted ASAP to share 4 BR house on
Jarvis Street WD, $200month & 14 bills.
Own room, walk to campus. 752-9102.
WILSON ACRES. TWO BEDROOM apart-
ment Sublease January through May. 1 12
bath. Washerdryer hook-up. Close to campus.
Call Paige or Paula after 7:30. 830-1705.
FREE DECEMBER RENT! MF roommate
wanted. Close to campus. Private bedroom and
bath. Free cable, water and sewer. $190month.
Call Keith after 6pm 551-3799.
1 BEDROOM FOR RENT. Sublease from Janu-
ary 1 to August 1. Wesley Commons. Call 830-
9585.
3 BEDROOM � Wilson Acres. Take over lease.
Jan - July. Call anytime. 830-9449.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR apart-
ment 12 blocks from campus, two blocks from
supermarketlaundromat and three blocks from
downtown. Rent includes utilities, phone and
cable. Call 757-1947 after 3 pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
THIRD Roommate for a four bedroom house
on 406 Rotary Avenue. 2 houses from center
of campus. Call Jason or Jamie at 752-3552.
3 BRM DUPLEX FOR rent starting Jan. 1st
Rent $525. cheap utilities, big backyard, great
neighbors, close to campus and downtown. Pets
allowed. Call 758-3788 now!
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
RENT $190,12 electric and phone. Eastbrook
Apt Two bedroom, two bathroom, dishwasher.
Nicely furnished. Can move in December 1st
Must be drug free. 758-9157.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO share
three bedroom house close to campus. $190
per month plus 13 utilities. Call 321-6176.
'87 NISSAN SENTRA - runs great, AC,
Alpine CD. 5 speed - $1400 or best offer.
Call 752-1741.
P100 COMPUTER WITHOUT ANY ram,
hard drive, or CD-rom. Has SVGA 15"
monitor. Call 754-8261.
MOVING SALE: RECLINER, WALL unit,
coffee table, TV stand, chair, sleeper sofa:
All must go! Best offer taken. Call 752-
4457.
FORD ESCORT 1985, NEW battery,
stereo, standard shift, 4 gears, runs great
$1400 or best offer. Call now 353-7152.
DRUM SET FOR SALE. Pearl Export
Five piece. Black. Sounds excellent! Makes
a great gift Negotiable. Call Matt at 752-
5221.
ADMIRE VOLUPTUOUS, RUBE-
NESQUE, MAJESTIC, INCOMPAR-
ABLE African-American women? Then or-
der photographic images of Gorgeou full-
figured african-american women modeling
exotic lingerie! All material is non-porno-
graphic and free of nudity. Write: Afri-
can-American Multi-Media Productions,
P.O. Box 28051, Raleigh, NC 27611-8051;
Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E-
mail:amp3@ix.netcom.com A free catalog
is available upon request! Check out our
web site at http:www.best.com
amp3 You must be 18 years of age to
order.
NEED STATE VS. ECU tickets? Call 321-
5790, ask for Jeff. I have 6 tickets, will
sell for $20 apiece, $110 for all 6.
LEATHER SOFA AND CHAIR $700
(paid $1800); contemporary canopy bed
$175; black ceiling fan $25; Polk audio
speaker box $175. 321-7183.
IBM PSI WITH 386 processor, color
monitor, mouse and modem $499.29 gal-
lon aquarium setup: tank, hood, light un-
dergravel filter, filter powerhead, rock &
. plants, with stand. Call Chris 752-3552.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural & Dr. recommended. A healthier
you through cellular nutrition. 30 Day
money-back guarantee. Call now 756-
1188.
GRADUATION SALE. EVERYTHING
MUST go! Best offers taken. Call 353-1769
and ask for Maria or Susan.
GREAT DEALS MUST SELL. 1982 Toyo-
ta Supra 6-Cyl 5 speed. $1800. Covercraft
car cover, never used, fits 15-16' car, $70;
weight bench squat rack 300 lbs 2 bars,
$300. Call 752-1321.
2 TICKETS FOR ECU NCSU football
game. $25.00 each. Call 328-7557. Good
seats.
BUS TRIP TO AND from Charlotte to
the ECU - State game. Includes travel to
and from Charlotte (leaving Friday, Nov.
29th and returning Sunday, Dec 1st), Fri-
day and Saturday night hotel, and shuttle
to and from game on Saturday. $300cou-
ple. Tickets to game also available. Call
523-1192.
Help
Wanted
1?
Help
Wanted
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
HELP WANTED: EXPERIENCED WAIT
STAFF and cashier. No phone calls. Apply
at Szechuan Gardens, 909 S. Evans St,
Greenville.NC.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive room & board
other benefits. For info, call: (206) 971-
3680 ext K53624.
HELP WANTED: WAITSTAFF DAY-
TIME and night shifts available. Must be
able to work at least two weekday lunch
shifts. NO CALLS. Please apply in person
between 8 am and 10 am or 2 pm and 4
pm. Professor O'Cools, Winn Dixie Market
Place.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING
our circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53628.
LAB TECHNICIAN: ENCELLE, INC a
medical device company in Greenville, NC
has in immediate opening for a lab techni-
cian with a BS degree in Biology or a relat-
ed science. This position requires experi-
ence in cell isolation and maintenance. Du-
ties will include development and improve-
ment of islet isolation and testing tech-
niques. Salary commensurate with experi-
ence. Mail resumes to: Personnel Director,
PO Box 3371, Greenville, NC 27836.
WARRENS 'HOT DOGS NOW accepting
applications for third shift, 10:00 pm - 8:00
am. Very flexible. Call Jan at 752-3647.
GOING 2 COLLEGE YOUNG, dynamic
company looking for energetic, motivated
individuals to fill full time and part time
positions. People skills a must For an in-
terview, 3214864.
HELP WANTED: WAREHOUSE HELP
needed. Apply in person. Carpet Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Avenue
BUS DRIVERS NEEDED. PAID training
provided - no experience necessary. Must
be a student in good standing with a GPA
of at least 2.00. Contact Carl at 3284724
for more information
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
DON'T READ THIS UNLESS you're mo-
tivated, ready for a change. Looking to
make $2-$5Kmonth bonus. Training and
travel available. Call 353-7106.
GET ON THE JOB Experience and a pay
check! Child care center needs early child-
hood majors for part-time work. Monday-
Friday, 3:00pm-6:00pm and 2:00pm-
4:00pm. $5.00hour. Apply in person at
Cornerstone Christian Child Development
Center, corner of Stantonburg and Allen
Road, Greenville, NC.
SEEK DEPENDABLE AND EXPERI-
ENCED non-smoking babysitter to help M-
F lpm-6pm with two children in our home.
Long term position preferred. Call 355-
8932.
RECEPTIONIST NEEDED FOR OFFICE
furniture store. Must work well with peo-
ple, have an interest in the sales atmosphere
and have good computer skills. Call 931-
6904
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EX- "
TRA cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Midwest
Distributors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
THE CENTER COURT IS now hiring: The
juicebar in the new recreation center is in
search of staff that are willing to work in a
fun and exciting atmosphere. Successful
candidates will be enthusiastic, responsi-
ble and very dependable. We offer flexible
hours around school schedules. Come by
the ARAMARK Dining Office in Menden-
hall Student Center and get your applica-
tion today! EOE
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-
level & career positions available worldwide
(Hawaii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc). Waitstaff,
housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness
counselors, and more. Call Resort Employ-
ment Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53625.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES. The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the winter
youth basketball program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 7 -18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range from
3:00pm until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.75 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 8304550 after
2pm.
EARN UP TO $500 per day working from
home. For more information call 704-286-
2350.
otic lingerie during photographic sessions.
All work is non-pornographic and free of
nudity. Earn up to $100 per hour! You
must be at least 21 years of age to apply.
Call 1-919-321-8218, 1-800-921-3855 or e-
mail amp3@ix.netcom.com.
MAIL AND FILE CLERK for law firm.
Must be able to work afternoons. Call Jane
Barber at 7564787 10:00 am -12:00 noon.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997
MANAGEMENT POSITIONS, DYNAMIC
COMPANY NOW HIRING ENTREPRE-
NEURIAL STUDENTS FOR SUMMER
MANAGEMENT POSITIONS ACROSS
SOUTHEAST U.S. FOR INFORMATION
OR AN INTERVIEW CALL TUITION
PAINTERS 1-800-393-4521 (29).
f
Services
Offered
KIM'S TYPING SERVICE: TERM papers
and resumes, reasonable prices. Call 756-
5813 after 2:30pm.
TYPING, FAST AND ACCURATE. $1.00
per page, call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
Other
East Carolina
school of
Bartending
� Earn extra money
� 2 week mixology school
5iocotanch Street
752-1115
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.278 TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today wrm Visa MC or COD
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Or. rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
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LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(9X9) 496-2224
Other I Announcements.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS Grants
and scholarships available from spon-
sors! No repayments, ever! $SS Cash for
college $$$. For info: 1-800400-0209.

Travel
GET MUSIC CLIPS, TOUR dates and
more by calling Buzz-A-Band at 753-8567.
It's a free local call. A service of the Home
Grown Music Network!
AKA BOOK SCHOLARSHIP: THETA Al-
pha Chapter will award a $200 book schol-
arship for the best essay entitled "What is
the most challenging problem facing our
generation and what can you do to help
change it?" Essays should be 2 typed pag-
es and double-spaced and should be post
marked by November 30th. Essays should
be mailed to: Alpha Kappa Alpha, P.O. Box
2886, Greenville, NC 27858.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6
Billion in public and private sector grants
& scholarships is now available. All stud-
ents are eligible. Let uo help. For more
info, call: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
"WHO'S WHO IN HEALTH CARE FOR
PITT COUNTY" December 2,1996. Free
program sponsored by Pitt Co. Chapter
American Diabetes Association. Gaskin-
Leslie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial
Hospital @ 7:00 pm. Refreshments will be
served following the program. For more
info call 816-5136 from 84 pm Mon-Fri
or 1-80(682-9692.
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
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Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel &
Location! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Lo-
cation $139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-67&6386
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399. Panama City
Daytona $119! www.springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK '97. The reliable spring
break company: Hottest destinations! Coo-
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From $99. Organize small group! Travel
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raak -Ml - On toft ttrf
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Spring Break '97
� Florida,
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Now Hiring
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Endless
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1-800-234-7007
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Guaranteed Lowest
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On Campus Contact
Anthony @ 758-3318
Phillip� 328-7579
CALL STS @ 800-648-4849
M
Greek
Personals
College Money
Employment Opportunities
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MULTI-MEDIA
PRODUCTIONS is now recruiting full-fig-
ured african-american women to model ex-
Army Reserve IVs
UploS20.000
Cash bonus
up to $3,000
. $7,124 GIBill


US Army Pays
Up to $55,000
student loans
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up to $8,000
Up To $30,000
College fund
Plus other part time and full time benefits.
For more information contact
Part time benefits Staff Sgt. Be�ri WiDiams
Full time benefits: Staff Sgt. Finn Cariton
756-9695
DID YOU SAY.
FREE?
YES! When you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartments on West 8th Street, your last month's rent Is FREE! There
are also special rates on third floor apartments for a limited time only
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
2 full baths
CAMPUS P0INTE
Water and sewer included
Close to campus and downtown
Laundry facilities on site
6 month or 1 year leases
Managed by
iftff
i�
remco
easr.
inc.
355-1313
financial
Are you seeking a solid career where there is opportunity for growth? H so, oenskter a career
wutoTOHWEOT FINANCIAL YouTlfcppartuiuty a
MATJAfTKR TRATMTCK - CREDIT MANAGER
We seek professional, oareerariented individuals with leadership abilities and analytical
skills. We otter a competitive salary with regular increases based an performance.
� -1 MAMArnr.IHriB-rnmTTMMA"mMld youil enjoy.
an intensive training program on all aspects of branch management
learning credit investigation, loan interviewing, loan analysis and sales techniques.
� learning collection problem-solving, delinquency, and bad debt control.
Send (or FAX) resume to:
Norwest Financial
Mark A. Cunningham,Mannger
3501CaptUU Blvd. 121
Raleigh, NC 27604
FAX 919478-3046
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Haid Internships Available
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE new
chairmen. Love, your Sigma Sisters.
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to thank Sig-
ma Nu, Phi Kappa Psi, Pi Lambda Phi, and
Sigma Tau Gamma for participating in our
male auction! You guys were great!
TO ALL THE OUTGOING Sigma offic-
ers, get ready for our last get together,
CONGRATULATIONS CHRISTIE JOHN-
SON ON your acceptance into Nursing
school! Love, your Sigma sisters.
THANKS TO CARRIE BARRETT for be-
ing the best soccer coach! Love, your Pi
Delta sisters. PS. WE SCORED!
PI DELTA LADIES ARE you ready for
formal? Just don't get lost on your way to
Charleston because Saturday will be a
night to remember!
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW sis-
ters of Sigma Sigma Sigma: Brooke An-
derson. Kelly Black, Holli Bowling, Beth
Dudley, Denise Evans, Anna Greene, Sar-
ah Gregg, Meredith Griffin. Emily Johnson,
Alison Kimnach, Katie Matish, Katie Mc-
Cabe, Lynne Modlin, Meredith Parker, Sen-
ya Piraneo, Ashley Rankin, Kristy Schalles.
Valerie Springle, Stacy Sutton. Alison Til-
ley, Maya VanDyken, Anna Walker, Hilary
Watson, Jennifer Whitlow, and Jaime Wil
Hams!
HEY NEW MEMBERS. YOU guys are do-
ing a fantastic job! We can't wait to hear
you sing and see you stylin Saturday night!
Love your Pi Delta sisters.
PUTTING YOUR RESUME ON Line - Dr.
Uma Gupta will present a program on hrjw
to put one's resume on line on Thursdcr,
Nov. 21 at 4:30 pm. It will be held in the
Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
Street All students who want to have more
exposure to employers are invited to heir
about this free service !
SKI DAY TRIP - hit the ski slopes in W"4
tergreen, VA December 7. Be sure to reg-
ister by December 2 in 204 Christenbury.
Rec Services 32&6387.
THE ECU STUDENT CHAPTER of the
American Choral Directors Association is
sponsoring a Messiah Sing. The "sing
along" will be held in the AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall on the ECU Campus, at 7:0b
pm on Tuesday, December 3. Only the
Christmas portion of the work, plus the
"Hallelujah Chorus" will be sung. Trje
ECU Symphony Orchestra will participate
as the instrumental ensemble for the ev-
ent which will feature advance conduct-
ing students and solo singers from the
School of Music Event is open to all in-
terested musicians who would like to par-
ticipate as singers in the choruses. Sing-
ers should bring their own score to the
event It will also be possible to purchase
a score at the door. There is no admission
charge for the "sing For more informa-
tion, please contact Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
Professor of Choral Music and Music Ed-
ucation at the School of Music, 328-6243.
COSIMUNITY FORUM, NOV. 21, 7:3$
8:30 pm. Topics: National origin discrimi-
nation, facial discrimination, sexual har-
assment in the work place. Place: Pitt Com-
munity College, Fulford Building, Rooii
110. For more information call: T.M. Cot
dough at 8564150 or Cassandra Daniels
at 8304494. Presented by EEOC of Greeifc
ville.1
ACOUSTICAL MUSICIANS NEEDED
FOR the AMA's Music Cafe to take place
at the Wright Place during the first week
of December to raise funds for the Leo;
Jenkins Cancer Center. Call Rob at 752
4988.
GREAT AMERICAN ! COME visit and.
browse our information booth at th$.
Wright Place on Thursday, Nov. 21st trotyl
10:00 am - 2:00 pm
APPRENTICESHIPS AND INTERN
SHIPS WITH the NC Dept of PubB$:
Transportation - Information is availably
at Career Services on these paid one-yew5
experiences for graduating seniors ani;
students enrolled or enrolling in gradtV;
ate school. The application deadline is Fe�;
bruary 14th, 1997. For more info, 326?;
6050
TUES.NOV. 19 - Senior Recital, DawjJ
Beckwith. voice, AJ Fletcher Recital HaflJ
7pm; Wed, Nov. 20 - Symphonic Wind Er
semble and Concert Band, Scott CarteJ-
and Christopher Knighten, Conductors-
Wright Auditorium, 8 pm; Thurs, Nov. 2f-I
"Graduate Recital, Kathleen Berneskjjl
jhoral conducting, AJ Fletcher Recital I
lall, 7 pm; Fri, Nov. 22 - Senior Recital.
Megan Gray, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital;
Hall, 7 pm; Fri, Nov.22 - Jazz at NigfejJ;
Carroll Dashiell Jr Director, The Socitf
Room, Mendenhall Student Center, 8 pnJJ;
Sat, Nov. 23 - Graduate Recital, Shared,
Denise Walker, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 2 pm;�
Sat, Nov. 23 - Sophomore Recital, Kim
berly Ledford, flute, AJ Fletcher Recital!
Hall, 7 pm; Sat Nov. 23 - Senior Recital
Scott Beckett, trumpet AJ Fletcher Red'
tal Hall. 9 pm; Sun, Sov. 24 - Memorial.
Concert for James Mark Hamilton, LoiK
ise Toppin, soprano, Sharon Munden, meit-J
zo-soprano, Jane Kline, mezzo-soprano
Perry Smith, tenor, Jay Pierson.bariton
John O'Brien, piano, Fritz Gearhart virJ
lin with guest Alan Arnett dancer, A
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4 pm; Sun, Nov. 24V
- Junior Recital, Mitch Butler, trombone
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm; Sun, Nov
24 - Senior Recital, Paula Denton, trum
pet, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 pm; Mon
Nov. 25 - Guitar Ensemble, Elliot Frank
Director, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm
DROP-IN AEROBICS - get in shape
Drop-in any aerobics class December 2-12;
between 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm. Purchase your
Drop-In ticket today in 204 Christenbury
Rec Services 328-6387-
DON'T BE LEFT BEHIND! Learn all you
want and need to earn about the internet�
Come join ECUSS in the Kim lab, BD 213
3:00 pm today, November 21 for our in-3
ternet workshop. �
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB WILL hold its:
next meeting on Thursday, Nov. 21 in GCB, J
3009. Our guest speaker will be WendJJ
Raines from On Line Information Service
She will be discussing credit For example
"How do I establish a credit record?" Stu-
dents, faculty, and staff welcome. Refresh"
ments to be provided. I
HOLIDAY GUIDE TO ADVENTURE'
GIFTS - learn how to make gifts in the'
outdoors November 26 at 7:00 pm in tMJ
Recreational Outdoor Center. Register b$,
Nov . 22 in 204 Christenbury. Rec Servir�
es 328-6387.
jn
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
TEC
classifieds
more for your
dollar
Mt
-� Uy�





8
Thursday, November 21,1996 The East Carolinian
Oust Vtec
Once again our
student fees will
probably go up
next year. Take
a look at where
our money goes.
"Go Pirates"�
all the way to
the bank.
In Monday's SGA meeting, the student government
voted on changes in student fees for the 1997-1998 school
year. Several fee increases were recommended and later
voted on by the legislature. The legislature tries not to
increase student fees by more than five percent, close to
the rate of inflation
Representatives from the various departments that
receive student fees defended each of their proposed in-
creases and answered questions from the legislature.
When the representatives stood before the legislature,
virtually all the departments representatives were thor-
oughly questioned as to why they needed the proposed
increases.
Except for one department: athletics.
Mike Hamrick, ECU athletic director, asked for an
additional $7 per student next year to "maintain" the
athletic programs at their level. This year, each student
at this university paid $235 via student fees directly to
the athletic department. Next year, each student will pay
$242 to our athletic department if the increase is ap-
proved by the Board of Governors. However, no one who
attended the meeting could recall a cut ever being taken
by the athletic department in the history of this univer-
sity.
Hamrick stood before the SGA and one member of
the legislature cheered "Go Pirates" as the proposed stu-
dent fees went up. Other departments defended having
secretaries, but Hamrick's department gets close to twice
as much money as the next most expensive department
and our student representatives cheer him on: no ques-
tions asked.
Hamrick did not mention a word about how much
money the athletic department received from the nation-
ally televised games on ESPN this year, he did not state
how much money was generated for the athletic depart-
ment by the Pirate Club and he did not tell how much
money was generated in season ticket sales.
He doesn't have to. No one bothered to even ask about
his department's other sources of income.
Our infirmary's building is broken down and needs
to be expanded. Next time you get sick and go to the
infirmary, you'll see. Student health requested a $10 in-
crease and only received $7. This year, we pay $130 per
student for health services
Our student fees have been paying for a housekeep-
ing staff at the student recreation center and it's not
even open yet.
If this is the way you want your student fees spent,
your representatives are doing a bang-up job. Just pray
you need your varsity athletic teams to have winning
seasons more than you need adequate health care.

you
iave good grammar skills?
work well with deadlines?
iave an expressive way of
stating you opinion?
!ike seeing your name in the
aper?
I
If so then The East
Carolinian wants you to
join our staff. We have
1 positions for opinion
1 columnists. I
Came cm in and apply at our office oil the
second floor of the Student Publications
B uilcfitng (across from Joyner).
Guest columnist application for 'Campus View"
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain topic.
Please return this form to The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print.
NameFrQ Soph JrStGrad ?
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write
'Please consider me for a position as guest columnist for TEC. I agree to allow TEC's staff to edit my
�submission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be notified
�of any changes that may affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my
submission. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a
deadline for submission will be assigned by the editor.
ft��E
s�lo
S,rrv-1Q-e 1
'I
IEDL192L s
The East Carolinian
�$ix
&
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Any L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor
rtatt HcatJcy, Electronics Editor
Heather Burgess, VY're Editor
Andy Farfcas, Staff Illustrator
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
David Southerland, Asst. Prod. Manager
Jennifer Andrews, Prod. Assistant
Ashley SetHe, Prod. Assistant
Carla Cole, Copy Editor
David Blgelow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies eveiy Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366
Tobacco regulation good
In North Carolina's Democratic
sweep two weeks ago on Election
day (except for that certain cantan-
kerous old Senator without a col-
lege degree), voters across the
country overwhelmingly placed
their confidence in the Democratic
Party, and President Clinton. Hey,
50 percent of the vote in a three-
man field isn't too bad. While
America voted to extend Clinton's
reign, they also voted in favor of
his policies. One such policy that
hits home is the FDA's regulation
of tobacco. With the proviso that I
care deeply for, our hard-working
farmers, let's see why this is a nec-
essary step.
First of all, a vast majority of
non-smokers and ,yes, a majority of
smokers agree with the FDA plan.
The major parts of the plan are to
get rid of vending machines where
minors can get to them (they'll re-
main in 'adult areas' like night-
clubs), require ID's for age-check-
ing, and forbid free samples. Also,
billboards are to be banned within
1,000 feet of schools and only black
and white text is allowed in tobacco
ads in magazines with a greater
than 15 percent youth readership
(that means no pictures or color in
these situations). Finally, brand-
name sponsorship of sporting
events are limited to using the
corportation's name (not the
brand), and giveawayssales of ciga-
rette-related clothing and accesso-
ries (hats, t-shirts, gym bags) are
prohibited.
All these measures are backed
by a majority of people surveyed.
In the poll administered by the
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation,
for example, 59 percent supported
ending billboard advertising, 91
percent favor a ban on vending
machines that children can use, and
70 percent support a ban on all
promotional items. It's about time
we had a President with the guts
to stand up to the big tobacco cor-
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
adult smokers
won't be" J,
arreciea
whatsoever by
these
regulations.
porations, and Clinton has done it.
Banning these gratuitous ads
will work. It's no coincidence that
Marlboro, Newport and Camel are
the three most preferred cigarettes
by teens. They are also the three
most heavily advertised. Hmmmm.
Isn't it also funny how these three
brands, according to a government
study, make up 86 percent of the
teenage smoking market, yet only
garner 35 percent of overall sales?
An FDA study showed that in
1989, 71 percent of tenth graders
had purchased tobacco from vend-
ing machines. Eleven percent of
sixth graders have smoked accord-
ing to a recent USA Today poll.
This trend is sickening and it is ob-
viously premeditated.
An important distinction to
make is that between our good,
well-intentioned farmers and the
big, tobacco corporations. Farm-
ers are simply trying to put money
on the table, and don't worry, adult
smokers won't be affected whatso-
ever by these regulations. The cor-
porations, however, are exploiting
and targeting our children. With
the exception of the Budweiser
frogs (and underage drinking could
be another column), can you think
of any other "adult" product that
uses cartoon characters to help sell
it? McDonalds uses Ronald
McDonald, because it wants kids to
buy their hamburgers. It doesn't
take a genius to conclude that Joe
Camel is a gimmick for children to
latch onto. One study showed that
91 percent of six year olds identi-
fied Joe Camel as a symbol for
smoking. Countless psychological
studies prove my point.
This strategy of targetting
youth is reprehensible, and our
farmers don't like it either. The
problem is it will keep happening, if
something isn't done. Teen smok-
ing has skyrocketed over the last ten
years. Former Surgeon General C.
Everett Koop and several tobacco
industry documents prove that to-
bacco industries KNEW their prod-
ucts were deadly and addictive, and
lied to the American people, and to-
bacco companies target younger and
younger users. Almost all first-time
use occurs before high-school gradu-
ation. Then, economics kicks in.
If tobacco companies can target
youths, and if those youths purchase
two or three packs of cigarettes a
week, well, that's a much bigger
profit margin over that child's life-
time than the average smoker. They
get five to ten more years of profit
if they target a kid, until, of course,
that kid dies an early death due to
cancer or emphysema. Still, that's
forty or fifty years of profit from
each kid they capture. It's brilliant!
Yes, but it's also sick, and illegal.
Cigarettes are the 1 killer, kill-
ing more than auto accidents, AIDS,
alcohol, drugs, murders, suicides,
and fires combined. Again, let me
stress this does not affect an adult's
right to smoke. What it does is stop
those sleazy crooks in the tobacco
industry from targeting children. I
encourage you to read the statistics,
read the books describing the years
of deception by the shameless to-
bacco industry. I only wish I had
more room, but can we agree that
this just might be a good idea?
"Advertising may be described
as the science of arresting
human intelligence long
enough to get money from it

Stephen Leacock, Canadian humorist, c. 1910





mMhms �.�����
9 Thursday, November 21,1996 The East Carolinian
Lake Imp USA
John Murphy
IT'S TW� W'SYf4H fed COPE ;
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11
Thursday, November 21,1996 The East Carolinian
LIF&We
21
Thursday
Courage Under Fire at
8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre through
Nov. 23.
Dr. Robert Lee Humber: A Collec-
tor Creates Exhibition at Gray Gal-
lery through Nov. 23.
Exhibition featuring the sculptures
and wall reliefs of hL . Jubran in
Mendenhall Gallery through Nov.
30.
U.S. Marine Band at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
"Louis Remy Mignot The Rediscov-
ery of a Southern romantic a lec-
ture by John Coffey at 7 p.m. in
Speight Auditorium.
���������������a
Funkomatics at Peasant's Cafe.
WXYC Early '80s Dance at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
��������
������
22
Friday
Star Trek: First Contact
opens. Go see it
The Other People at Peasant's Cafe.
� � � � �
�����
The Wedding Present at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
23
Saturday
Book signing and discus-
sion with Terry Mancour, author of
Star Trek The Next Generation:
Spartacus, from 4-6 p.m. at Barnes
& Noble.
Yep! at Peasant's Cafe.
Stone Temple Pilots with Local H
at the Dean Smith Center in Chapel
Hill.
24
Sunday
Memorial concert for
James Mark at 4 p.m. in AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
����������������
Black Crowes at 8 p.m. in the Ra-
leigh Memorial Auditorium.
25
Monday
"Chew on This" lecture
series featuring "All About Beer" by
Jennifer Crouch at 12 p.m. in Men-
denhall Underground.
���?������������
Guitar Ensemble at 4 p.m. in AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
����&��
��������
Combustible Edison at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcom-
ing event that you'd like
listed in our Coming At-
tractions column? If so,
please send us informa-
tion (a schedule would be
nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858
Science fiction
hits new highs
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
This Friday, the new Star Trek
movie, entitled Star Trek: First Con-
tact, will beam into theaters across
the nation, and it is destined to pull
in some major money at the box of-
fice. Within the last few years, sci-
ence fiction has experienced a surge
in popularity, and the public can't
seem to get enough of it Indepen-
dence Day, which featured some
nasty aliens terrorizing our peaceful
planet looks to be this year's biggest
box office blockbuster, The X-Files
was nominated for best drama series
at this year's Emmy awards show; and
Star Wars is once again a profitable
commodity thanks to tons of new
merchandise and the impending new
movie trilogy.
This massive popularity in sci-
ence fiction does not stop with mov-
ies and TV, though. Science fiction
is also a vibrant force within the lit-
erary world.
Science fiction writing has been
popular for a long, long time. Jules
Verne and H.G. Wells were dabbling
with science as fiction long before
George Lucas or Chris Carter became
the icons they are now. But for what-
ever reason, this popular genre has
not been taken seriously as literature.
Whe" compared to the other estab-
lished forms of writing, such as po-
etry or drama, science fiction is typi-
cally seen as childish.
"Science fiction has long been
thought of with disrespect, as fiction
for children or immature adults
notes Susan Ambert, an English
graduate student at ECU who was
pulled into science fiction at the age
of six when Star Wars first hit the-
aters. "But many respected authors
chose this genre for their work. They
write intelligent stories for thinking
adults who are not afraid of the
imaginative
Terry Mancour concurs.
Mancour is one Greenville author
who chose science fiction writing as
his creative form. Mancour is the
author of the 1992 Star Trek: The
Next Generation novel Spartacus.
which went on to become a New
Times bestseller. "With any genre at
any point in time, you'll have a cer-
tain amount of good stuff In some
cases, we have some really talented
writers dealing with science fiction,
even here in N.C
Mancour, who lives in Greenville
with his wife and works at Nease Per-
sonnel, sees science fiction writing
as a perfect way to examine humans
and their relation to the future, and
this to him is a big reason why the
genre has remained a viable form of
storytelling.
"Science fiction has maintained
a steady popularity since the golden
age in the mid '50s Mancour
stresses. "It's hit a high now prob-
ably because of the new millennium.
The future is staring at us in the
face
This future takes many forms,
depending on who's telling the story.
While many current hot sci-fi novels
paint a picture of a bleak future Oust
read the Blade Runner series for
such an example), many others are
more optimistic. Greenville resident
Matt Davies is a sci-fi fan who sees a
positive future through his sci-fi read-
ings.
"When I read science fiction
Matt says, "my mind takes me to
worlds just so beautiful I have to pick
up another book, then another, just
to see where the author will take me
next"
Any way one looks at the future,
science fiction is, according to
See SCI-FI page 13
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� FmULEtU.MITItCUiMU-
The Backsliders
From Raleigh,
North Carolina
The Why Store
The Why Store
PatReid
Starr WilUff
Andy Turner
Senior Writer
A Tribe Called Quest and
Busta Rhymes at Minges
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Well, it's just two days until the
Tribe Called Quest and Busta Rhymes
concert have you purchased your tick-
ets yet? If not you might want to skip
your skinny butt over to the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall and
snatch up a couple of those magic
pieces of cardboard before they're all
gone. Definitely don't wait until the
last minute on this one.
For those of you who don't know
(and who doesn't by now, since word
spread across campus like wildfire),
A Tribe Called Quest is scheduled to
headline the Williams Arena in Minges
Coliseum this Saturday at 8 p.m. Ap-
pearing with Quest will be crazy, big-
mouthed rappermajor motion pic-
ture star Busta Rhymes.
On the national scene ever since
the release of their debut album.
Peoples Instinctive Travels and the
Paths of Rhythm, in 1990, A Tribe
Called Quest has continued to be a
ground-breaking and innovative force
in rap music. Q-Tip, Phife and Ali
Shaheed Muhammed, who make up
the Tribe roster, have risen to (and
remained at) the top of an industry
that is often plagued with f lash-in-the-
pan, one-hit wonders.
Tribe has released a total of four
full-length albums in their six-year
career, including the aforementioned
People's Instinctive Travels, as well
as The Low End Theory, Midnight
Marauders and the recent Beats,
Rhymes and Life, which they are cur-
rently touring in support of. Their first
album went gold, the following two
went platinum, and Beats, Rhymes
and Life seems to be well on its way
to being their best-selling album ever.
Why are they so insanely popu-
lar? Because their message is clear.
They write music that is intended to
cross cultural boundaries, that has a
stong lyrical base and that, in short
makes you think.
For example, take some lyrics
from their song "Jazz (We Got the)"
from The Low End Theory: "Do it for
the strong, we do it for the meek
So push it along, trails we blaze
Don't deserve the gong, don't deserve
Bands like the Bottle Rockets, Blue
Mountain, Five Chinese Brothers and the
Scud Mountain Boys piss off the label-
insistent
"What are they? Alternative coun-
try? Country rock? Alterna-twang? Cow-
punk? What what what' We need clas-
sification
The Backsliders, being good old
boys from Raleigh, want to appease the
tormentors of tag. So, in big ole letters
on the front of their live EP From Ra-
leigh, North Carolina, they state forth-
right what they are: hard core honky
tonk.
They aim to prove it
The EP, recorded live this past sum
See SLIDERS page 13
Who says you have to be able to
sing to be a singer? Apparently not The
Why Store. Following in the footsteps of
the Crash Test Dummies comes this quin-
tet from Indiana with a most unusual
sound. The band is musically sound with
a sparkling array of six- and 12-string
guitar stylings and a tight rhythm sec-
tion, not to mention a keyboardist who
fills in the holes. But these vocals need
work.
The Why Store's self-titled debut
starts out interestingly enough. While
one guitar runs up and down a scaled
riff, the rest of the band basically does
random warm-ups until they all converge
with a driving, raw-edged song However,
this edge fizzles out within seconds, and
then all hell breaks loose when the "sing
See WHY page 12
the praise The
tranquility will make
ya unball your fist
For we put hip-hop
on a brand new
twist"
A Tribe Called
Quest is all about
peace and under-
standing from a hip-
hop perspective. No
gangsta rap is here.
No guns, no glory,
no fury. They strive
to be intelligent and
thoughtful when the
industry pushes
them to act strong
and angry.
As Q-Tip (who
converted to the Is-
lamic faith this year)
said in a recent
magazine interview,
"The prophet
Muhammad said that
the best thing for
Muslims to do is to
seek the middle
course. When you
seek the middle
course it means you're not too far left
You're not too far right You're recog-
nizing that you're not perfect You're
recognizing your humanistic qualities,
different nuances to your emotions.
We make ourselves vulnerable with
Photos Courtesy of Jive and Elektra Records
The Student Union shows their diversity by
bringing A Tribe Called Quest (above) and
Busta Rhymes to Williams Arena Saturday
the music and everyone can dig that"
Go out right now to get your
ticket for Tribe and Busta Rhymes.
Send a message to the Student Union
that you're grateful they're bringing
diversity and positivity to campus.
7&e 0te& ?&� fyts4cA�Uf .
Some films never make it to the
Emerald City. Some are too contro-
versial. Some are too smalL What-
ever the reason, we just never get to
see some mighty good movies on the
big screen. When they hit video, how-
ever, they're ours for the taking. This
series will look at some of the films
that didn 't make the Greenville cut,
the ones that got away
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The English Patient, the new criti-
cally-acclaimed film starring Ralph Fiennes
and Wiilem Dafoe. hit theaters this week.
But not in Greenville. Our theaters are, of
course, very mainstream, so we instead
got the Michael JordanBugs Bunny slam-
dunk buddy film"commercial" Space
Jam.
Space Jam, which features live ac-
tion and animation Billy Murray and bas-
ketball is destined to be this week's block-
buster hit but The English Patient stands
to be one of this year's most praised films
as well as an Oscar contender. Chances
are, if The English Patient does earn a
few nominations from the Academy of
Motion Pictures, Greenville theaters might
carry the film after the Oscars. Case in
point The Postman arrived at the Plaza
over a year after it was first released, and
only because it was an Oscar winner.
My point to all of this is simple
enough - Greenville only shows a frac-
tion of the films available for viewing, and
much of what our theaters don't show
are worth seeing because they are alter-
natives to the standard Hollywood film.
This column exists to showcase films that
might otherwise be overlooked by the
Greenville community.
Since I. the elitist movie reviewer, had
no desire at all to see Michael Jordan play
ball with a bunch of cartoon animals, I
decided to instead pull from the many titles
currently available on video. The movie I
found in my hand has left me with an
interesting dilemma. What does a reviewer
do with a film that doesn't fully meet the
expectations one had hoped for, but is
still worth seeing because it offers a unique
cinematic experience unlike anything seen
in a mainstream movie?
Bernardo Bertolucci has
never been a mainstream direc-
tor, and his most recent film to
hit the video market perfectly ex-
emplifies this point Stealing
Beauty was a critical hit and it
did get quite a bit of press. The
film's star, Liv Tyler (who was
also in Torn Hanks'rock-and-roll
flick That Thing You Do was
marketed as the next big thing
when Stealing Beauty came out
Her performance in the film was
praised, Rolling Stone featured her on its
cover, and the media pushed her as this
year's symbol of seductive beauty.
As a director, Bertolucci has been
cited as one of the most talented visual
artists working in modem cinema. His
films carry with them a majestic beauty
that exudes an epic mood. To put it in
layman's terms, a Bertolucci film is pretty
to look at
When one thinks of a Bertolucci
movie, one typically imagines something
of an epic, something that works on a
grand scale. Bertolucci swept the 1987
Oscars with The Last Emperor, and his
film Little Buddha was daring enough to
cast Keanu Reeves as a spiritual leader.
While Stealing Beauty does not
qualify as an epic, it still works on more
levels than one. The story, written by
Bertolucci, revolves around a young
American girl named Lucy (played by
Tyler) who goes to Italy to stay with some
friends of the family. In Italy, Lucy is ex-
posed to an open way of life with which
she is not totally accustomed. The people
she meets and the friends she makes all
indulge in earthly pleasures - constantly.
They drink to excess, they dance late at
night they smoke pot they skinny dip,
they lounge around late in the afternoon,
they work on their art and they lose them-
selves in sex.
On a simple level the film can be
seen as an unfocused exercise in eroticism.
On a deeper level the film can be viewed
as an individual's search for identity and
one's desire to indulge in the many plea-
sures life has to offer.
The film doesn't qualify as being
"great" because the pacing seems off.
some character relationships are foggy.
Photo Courtesy of 20th Century
annoying pop tunes play throughout
much of the movie, and the film's conclu-
sion leaves one unfulfilled. Still,
Bertolucci's vision as a director makes
Stealing Beauty very much worth seeing
as an illustrative example of filmmaking
of a different sort
Like a Mapplethorpe photograph,
Bertolucci's camera transforms the hu-
man body into an erotic work of art
Bertolucci captures the physical beauty
of his characters in remarkable ways, even
Alex Parrish (played by Jeremy Irons),
whose body is slowly decaying due to a
deadly illness.
Also standing out are some key per-
formances from the cast Liv Tyler not only
shines as a physical presence but also as a
talented actress. She effectively conveys
a tost soul who is caught in a transition
between the innocence of a girl and the
experience of a woman.
As impressive and as central as Tyler
is, though, she is almost outdone by the
always incredible Jeremy Irons. Even
though Irons character is a background
figure who shares limited screen time, he
is one of the more complex and interest-
ing players in Bertolucci's story. Playing
a dying playwright who is immediately
enamoured with Lucy Irons blends his
character with lustful greedy desire and
honest truthful love. Irons breathes vi-
brant life into a dying character who wants
to protect Lucy as much as he wants to
overcome her.
Stealing Beauty ultimately suc-
ceeds as much as it fails. Bertolucci does
create an erotic piece filled with sexual
tension. He does paint some delicious
See AWAY page 12
�ij�ms
w
4





12
Thursday, November 21, 1996
The East Carolinian
rTHY from page 11
ing" starts. The voice and the music to-
tally clash, and the weak songwriting
does nothing to help ease the rough
transition. Things didn't look promis-
ing.
"Father" shows the same early
promise of its predecessor with a haunt-
ing 12-string guitar intro and a won-
derful web of guitar loops, but the words
get in the way. The only up-side is that
the vocals don't seem quite as out of
place as before. Maybe they fit the song
better or maybe they just take some
adjusting to, who knows.
One good thing about The Why
Store is that they are truly different Un-
like most new bands whose sounds are
totally interchangeable, The Why Store
has truly unique songs. In fact at least
three of the songs on the album remind
me of pub music It's easy to close your
eyes and picture The Why Store in some
European pub, playing a jovial song like
"Good To Me" or "Nobody" and having
all the patrons swaying and drinking
and singing along. In fact the chorus
of "Nobody" repeats, "nobody, nobody,
nobody, nobody drinks with me" over
and over. Songs like these save the al-
bum from being a total loss.
That's not to say that The Why
Store is all good, either. While they may
do Irish drinking songs well, this leaves
them limited. Whenever they try to put
an edge on their music or tackle a dif-
ferent genre, they come up short "Fool's
Bargain" and "Sunrise" are two prime
examples. "Fool's Bargain" tries to rock
but ends up a mediocre, melodramatic
mess. Meanwhile, "Sunrise The Why
Store's attempt at blues, goes unchal-
lenged as the album's worse song. Not
only are the words and vocals weak, but
even the music borders on unlistenable.
Fortunately, the good outnumbers
the bad. "Lies" proves to be one of the
most well-written songs included here.
TWS has an interesting way of saying
one thing first and then augmenting it
later. For example, in "Lies the first
verse includes the line "A little puppet
on a string while the second verse
elaborates the song with "I'm not your
puppet on a string
If I sound like I'm both slamming
and defending The Why Store, I am.
What they do well, they do really well.
But when they don't do something well,
they really stink. If any of their stuff
sounds interesting, try finding it for free,
perhaps from a friend. If all else fails, at
least buy it used. Hopefully though, with
a little more experience and develop-
ment The Why Store's next album will
be well deserving of your hard-earned
money. I wish them luck.
AWAY from page 11
visuals with his camera. He does pull
some powerful performances from his
actors. But Bertolucd's story isn't as re-
alized as he may have intended it to be. I
don't expect (and in many ways don't
desire) the typical linear narrative exem-
plified in countless other films. Still, I
expect a greater sense of purpose from
narratives than I got out of this one.
However, Stealing Beauty still quali-
fies as quality filmmaking, and it illus-
trates how Hollywood's method of
storytelling is not the only game in torn
That is why Stealing Beauty deserves
to be recognized as one of the ones that
got away.
J� I
Still Paying
The Cover .
Charge? gQQK I
TiJZLtU! WAREHOUSE)
Books Discounted
10 To 90
Always!
Free gift wrap, too.
3525 S.
Memorijl Drive
35S-5758

as

2m
� �
I



� �-�


tain us �0
the expedience
0$ a Lifetime.
The East Carolinian is now hiring
Advertising Account Executives for
the Spring semester.
Come by our office to complete an
application or call 328-6366 for more
information.
3t's experience you'LL nevet faytfet.
SILVER
s
Doors Open
7:30 pm
Stage Time
9:00 pm fl Jwdl ojl CEoAft
J 756-6278
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY. Country &
Western Night
FRI & SAT: Silver Bullet
'SmtoC
Exotic Dancers
DON'T
DRINK AND DRIVE!
Call Aladdin Taxi at 830-5466 and
receive $2 off at the door .
Located 5 Miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt.fBehind John's Convenient Mart)
HBfflRK ME
Thursday, November 21
Friday, November 22
Saturday, November 23
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fountain Drink
Compliments of ARAMARK DINING SERVICES.
�)DEvr
O -v- O
For More InformationCall the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
"Powerful And Gripping. A Magnificent
ACHIEVEMENT.The First Oscar" Worthy Picture Ana
Performances This Year. An Epic Dramatic Triumph
Don Sioncr ENTTRTA1NMEM TIMt OUT
"Moving, Highly Entertaining
And Brilliant Filmmaking.
Another Award-Caliber Performance
From Denzel Washington
Paul Wunder WBAi RADIO
Courage Under Fire'
Goes Above And Beyond
Most Summer Movies.
it Will Touch Places Deep
Inside Your Heart That Few
Films Ever Reach?
ionti Corc.Han KCALTV LOS ANCEUS
"Sensational A Winner.
Denzel Washington Is Oscar1
Nomination Bound?
Jim frrguson. PUVUE CHANNEL
"Nothing Less
Than A
Masterpiece"
Susan iji.iniitr
CRN INTERNATIONAL &
AMERICAN MOVIE
CLASSICS
Denhl Washington mkRyan
COURAGE
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dinnerware, 3.000 different table linens, 175 crystal patterns. 1,350
kinds of glasses, 140 kinds of flatware, plus top-brand appliances. cxk
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I nivcrsity Commons Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd & S. Evans Street
Greenville. NC
919-321-5522 Open 7 days
Advcitiacd prices do not apply
n mail or pbonc ORicn
Employee cflacooni and other promotional
i iiutn not applicable t advertised teema
All. MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
ReadingChina
The Kitchen Superstore
Shop us on the World Wide Web at readingchina.com
'TM
Grand Opening - November 22 thru 24
Friday, Nov. 22
READING CHINA & MORE! WILL
DONATE A SHARE OF THE DAYS
PROCEEDS TO THE GREATER
GREENVILLE WOMAN'S CLUB TO
BENEFIT NEW DIRECTIONS.
10-2 The Greater Greenville
Woman's Club tabletop decorating
contest Come in and vote tor your
favorite table! Tables will be displayed
until Sunday. December 1st.
11:30-2:30 Join WRNS 95.1 FM
radio personality Wayne Cariyle and
a chef from The Italian Garden
for a live remote, cooking demonstra-
tion, and tastings. Register to win
a $250 shopping spree from
Reading China & More! and a
New Year's Eve package from
Christinne's. including dinner for
two. champagne toast, dancing,
and breakfast the next morning.
Saturday, Nov. 23
11-1 The Upper Crust Bakery will
present an array of detectable baked
goods for sampling.
1-3 Meet Pia Van( aiutrcn. Chef and
Owner of Christinne's. tor a cooking
demonstration and tastings of
Mediterranean specialties.
3-5 Ragazzi's will present a cooking
demonstration and tastings of some ot
their famous Italian dishes.
Sunday, Nov. 24
1:30-3 Join Chef Jonathan Gillespie
from Christinne's at Ironwood
Country Club tor a cooking demon-
stration and tastings.
3-5 Meet Paid Morrow. Executive
Chef of Pargo's. for a cooking demon-
stration and tastings of some of their
fabulous American Bistro recipes
PLUS demonstrations
of the latest products from
Cuisinart, as well as an assort-
ment of gourmet food tastings
throughout the weekend!
Register to Win
A 7-piece Professional
Calphalon Cookware Set
Retail Value S3S0
Bridal & Gift Registry Available
The first 25 people who
register will receive a pair of
Mikasa Crystal Candlesticks.
Value $22.
�r
������- � JM '
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I
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 21,1996
13
SLIDERS from page 11
mer at the Brewery in Raleigh, is a warm-
up for the Backsliders fulHength debut
album on Mammoth Records expected
out in January.
Hope January comes soon.
Containing only six songs, the EP
works you into a quick frenzy and leaves
you lonesome, wanting more. About half-
way through, just after the nearly eight-
minute long swamp jam, "Hey Sheriff
reminiscent of Dale "Suzie Q" Hawkins
and Creedence Clearwater Revival, Back-
sliders lead singer Chip Robinson asks
the Brewery staff (or anyone) to please
turn up the AC. Listeners may find them-
selves requesting the same sort of tem-
perature toner downer.
Not that all the songs are as sweat-
inspiring as "Hey Sheriff but the Back-
sliders know how to make the toe-tap-
pers worthy of heat exhaustion, too. The
jKBt? mm wi
mm mew
The only cover we require is a Sombrero
Hungry
Pirate
Burrito
$3.75
2-5pm M-F
11-5pm
Sat & Sun
Voted Best
Mixed Drinks!
Best Place to
Meet Woman!
Best Wait
Staff!
And, of
course,
Best Place
for Fun!
EP starts off with the back porch friendly
"The Pain of Love "Night after night
she goes downtown where the lonely
people go and she goes through the
scattered dreams that the broken hearted
know but before the pain can come
her way, she's found a remedy just one
more glass of wine, she says, is all she'll
every need Heartbreak and dependence
on drink are not new themes in country
music but sounding like you mean it and
know what you're talking about ain't
easy, and Chip Robinson does both con-
vincingly.
Complementing Robinson's vocals
and acoustic guitar well are guitarist
vocalist Stephen Howell and guitarist
Brad Rice, late of the Raleigh-based band
Finger. Danny Kurtz (bass) and J.D.
(drums) command the gut-hard rhythm
section.
On From Raleigh North
Carolina's penultimate track, the Back-
sliders drink to the memory of Gram Par-
sons with their excellent cover of The
Flying Burrito Brothers' "High Fashion
Queen a trashy stomp that the New
York Dolls would have done if there was
such a thing as hillbilly glam rock.
They end the EP by slagging the
Blues Explosion's Jon Spencer as "the
rich man's Captain Beefheart" before
wailing into the last track, "Yep ensur-
ing if you haven't already been properly
perspiring, you will be before the night
is through.
Luck)' for you. you can sweat to the
twang this Saturday night when the
Backsliders open for the Marshall Tucker
Band at the Attic.
"But what the hell does hard core
honky tonk mean?" the marker-manda-
tors still demand.
Well, I could explain hard core
honky tonk in terms of ingredients (one
fifth of sour mash, two Webb Pierce al-
bums, a box of safety pins, etc.), but I
think perhaps the fellow Triangle defend-
ers of the country cause said it best in
song: "So I started this damn country
band cause punk rock's too hard to
sing
�H�idrif)a J)inners
-srr �
-jiwi '� K yyj �;
SS-Sjsripr
Celebrate the holiday season with
the annual ECU Madrigal Dinners.
Feast your eyes and ears on
Elizabethan dancers, jugglers, and
entertaiment galore.
Feast your stomach on a four course
gourmet dinner.
You may use your ECU meal plan
to purchase your tickets. Bring your
meal card and ID to the Central
Ticket Office. 328-4788.
Order Early. MSC Great Room.
Dec 5, 6, 7 at 7pm
Dec 8 at 5pm.
Tickets must be reserved no later
than 3 days in advance.
Ov-l.rl. from page 11
Ambert, "a breeding ground for new
science thought Sci-fi is an enter-
taining way to learn about what may
be. The best of it goes in-depth into
the human condition, answers some
of our 'what if questions, and even
educates
Mancour agrees. His favorite sci-
fi author is Kim Stanley Robinsdfl,
who, according to Mancour, is a "phe-
nomenal writer, able to make astro-
physics and microbiology seem roman-
tic"
Like the best writers of any genre,
Mancour doesn't forget the human as-
pect of fhe sci-fi he writes. Spartacus
examines such issues as slavery, cul-
tural laws, one's right to freedom, and
an individual's struggle with either fol-
lowing orders or following one's con-
scious - all of which are familiar hu-
man problems for the crew of the U.S.S.
Enterprise.
Mancour is totally comfortable with
his status as a science fiction writer. Sci-
ence fiction has given him the recogni-
tion of being a New York Times best-
selling author before graduating from
college ("which really pissed my profes-
sors off Mancour notes), and he is
slated to write another Star Trek novel.
"I've been a hardcore sci-fi fan since I
was eight and sci-fi is the only thing
I want to do Mancour proudly state's.
Any fan of science fiction who de-
sires to discuss science fiction writing
and its future with an accomplished sci-
fi author will gel a chance this Saturday,
Nov. 23 when Barnes & Noble plays host
to Mancour from 46 p.m. in their store,
located on 3040 Evans St Mancour will
be signing his book and leading a dis-
cussion on Star Trek and any other sci-fi
related topic Mancour will also be sign-
ing his book at the Plaza theater in
Chapel Hill this Friday night in celebra-
tion of the new Star Trek film.
If the events planned for this week-
end are any indication as to the solid
popularity of science fiction, then sci-fi
will continue to, in the immortal words
of the lovable Mr. Spock, "live long and
prosper
For further information about the
book signing, call Barnes & Noble at 321-
8119.
only�arob�
Thursi Nov. 21
Inferno
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Fri. Nov. 22
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Irates host Ultimate
frisbee tournment
Mike Daniska
Staff WritBf
Pirates hunt for bowl bid
Amanda Ross
SportsEdltor
This week it was announced that
Houston would be attending the lib-
erty Bowl after being crowned Confer-
ence USA champions. Ironically, the
Pirates will head to the host city of the
Liberty Bowl as they take on the Mem-
phis Tigers this Saturday.
But don't think ECU is out of a
bowl prospect all together. Believe it or
not, the Pirates could snag the other
slot in the Liberty Bowl. It's a slim
chance, but a chance nonetheless. Con-
fused? Read on.
Houston's opponent will be the
number four seed from the Big East
However, the Big East has failed to
qualify a team for that number four spot
If that happens, ECU'S Athletic Direc-
tor Mike Hamrick believes ECU could
get another chance.
"If they have another spot open
this year, I believe they would give us
serious consideration Hamrick said.
There are a number of reasons ECU
was not selected as the Liberty Bowl's
first choice. The committee selected
Houston since they won the conference
title. Also, Houston beat Southern Miss
and Southern Miss beat ECU.
"It was no surprise Hamrick said.
"Houston was Conference USA cham-
pions - that was one of the main fac-
tors
Bob Martin, who sits on the Lib-
erty Bowl Committee, said they wanted
to invite someone else since ECU had
gone the past two years. Also, as men-
tioned above, the other opponent
should be from the Big East and they
didn't want to see a rematch between
ECU and a Big East team.
Tight end Scott Richards thinks
that they should just allow fate to take
its course.
"We just have to keep winning
these last two games and let stuff just
pan out for itself Richards said.
ECU is still in contention for a bowl.
The Independence Bowl, for which
Army has been, does have ECU on its
list along with the Copper Bowl and of
course, the other slot in the Liberty
Bowl.
Defensive tackle Buck Collins be-
lieves that hard work will see ECU into
its third consecutive bowl game.
"We're just going to do the best
we can to try to get to another bowl
game Collins said.
Martin said despite the absence of
ECU, the committee still regards the
Pirates very highly.
"We hold East Carolina in abso-
lutely the highest respect" Martin said.
ECU and the Liberty Bowl have
been going hand-in-hand the past two
years, and Hamrick believes that they
have been good for each other.
"We've been good for the Liberty
Bowl and the Liberty Bowl has been
good for us Hamrick said.
This weekend, ECU will host
Ultimax XXVII, an Ultimate Frisbee tour-
nament on the intramural fields behind
Ficklen Stadium.
Ultimax is held during the club sea-
son in the fall and the school season in
the spring. The club season is consid-
ered more difficult because club teams
generally have more experience and have
been playing together longer.
A total of 16 mens and eight
womens teams will be competing for the
tournament title.
"This tournament is just basically
for fun Irates' memberTim Doran said.
The ultimate frisbee has a rich tra-
dition of winning with the current and
former players.
The Irates have won the past three
spring editions of Ultimax. Also in the
men's division, the X-rates, a collection
of ECU alumni who formerly played for
the Irates, are ranked first
"The X-rates are a bunch of good,
older Ultimate Frisbee players who used
to go to ECU Doran said. "They have a
really good team because they are expe-
rienced
The X-rates provide some good com-
petition for the Irates, according to Fuller
Reeves who plays for the Irates.
"We usually try to schedule the X-
rates to play us Reeves said. "It's sort
of like a homecoming for them. When
we play them, we just go out and have
fun
The Raleigh club team, Ring of Fire,
and the Wilmington club team, Port City
Slickers, are ranked second and third
respectively, while the Irates are ranked
fourth in the tournament
Other teams are traveling from the
Washington, D.C. area and Virginia to
compete. In the past teams have come
from as far away as Minnesota and Cali-
fornia.
"We like to have the most wide va-
riety in competition Doran said.
This year's tournament will be a
See ULTIMATE page 15
Photos Courtesy of Tim Doran
(Top)- Becky Ross, right, wards off her opponent while,
(Bottom) Josh "Pouch" Poucher stretches for the frisbee.
Volleyball team prepares for CAA tourney
Tracy Laubach
Staff Witter
Teams hit the road for games
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The men's and women's basketball teams will hit the
road this weekend to play in their first regular season games.
The men will have a lot of traveling ahead of them as
they open up the season at Fairfield, Conn then come back
down south to Boone to visit Appalachian State. But the
stint is over after that One more trip up north is to Halifax,
Nova Scotia to play Boston University. This is all in a one
week span. They play Nov. 23,26 and 30 respectively.
Head Coach Joe Dooiey said his players are ready to hit
the court and start the seasoa
"The players always look forward, more so to the season
starting, than the coaches Dooiey said. "I'm one of those
guys that I'd probably like to take another two or three weeks
and practice
Dooiey thinks his squad is ready for some competitioa
"I think we have come to the point as a staff that the kids
are ready to play Dooiey said. "They have hit each other as
many times as they can and they're about ready to hit some-
one else
The practices have produced some good results in
Dooley's eyes.
"The guys have played with a tremendous amount of
energy Dooiey said.
As with any squad, senior leadership skills are a must
and Dooiey likes what his seniors are showing him.
"The senior leadership in the six years I have been here,
this is the best we have had Dooiey said. "We've got a strong
group of seniors
The seniors will have to put those skills to use as they
skip from state to state to begin regular season play.
"In coaching I think this is a difficult way to start the
season Dooiey said.
But he is trying to remain optimistic about the trip.
"What's bad about it is the fact we're having to travel, we
have all these games without much time to really prepare
Dooiey said. "The good part of it is we're spending a lot of
time together Saturday the men will tip off against Fairfield
at 7:30 p.m.
The Lady Pirates will travel for their regular season opener,
but not as far as the mea They open up at Appalachian State
Nov. 23, then head to Raleigh to take on the Lady Wolfpack of
N.C. State Nov. 26. On Nov. 30 they head up to South Orange,
N J. for the Seton Hall Tournament
Entering her second year as head coach, Anne Donovan
is looking forward to a productive season with positive results.
"We are really excited about this season Donovan said.
"We feel really good about the players we got"
Those players are a mix of veterans and newcomers who
Donovan feels will make a good combination - seven newcom-
ers and six returners.
The Lady Pirates will be hindered with injuries this Sat-
urday. Jen Cox most likely won't see action, while Nicole Mamula
and Mary Thorn have been out of practice for four days with
knee injuries.
"We travel to Boone very unsure of who exactly will be
healthy, come Saturday at eight o'clock Donovan said.
Despite the uncertainties for the first game, Donovan is
confident that her team will take their game to the next level.
"But I tell you, we've got a great group of girls who are
very excited about taking the next step and turning this pro-
gram around Donovan said. "I think we've got the kind of
quality kids, quality students and the quality players that can
help us take the next step
The Lady Pirates will take on some tougher non-
conference opponents this year than in years past. They
will play N.C. State, Wake Forest and UNC-Charlotte just
to name a few. That was an important aspect of prepar-
ing the team for the tough conference schedule the Pi-
rates will face come January.
Old Dominion, a conference foe, is projected as num-
ber one preseason in women's basketball in some polls.
"When you've got Old Dominion and James Madi-
son in the conference you better be prepared come Janu-
ary Donovan said. "1 don't think we felt we had that
last year
The Lady Pirates will play at 8 p.m. in BooneSaturday.
Both the men's and women's teams will return to
Minges Coliseum on Dec. 4 for a double-headei home
opener. The Lady Pirates will tip off at 6 p.m. with the
men to follow around 8 p.m.
The CAA women's volleyball
championships are scheduled to be
held this weekend at UNC Wilmington.
The Lady Pirates are determined to go
into the tournament and fight their way
to the win that will close out their sea-
son.
The first match of the champion-
ship for ECU will be against James
Madison. Shannon Kaess, a freshman
from Minnesota, is confident that the
team is capable of defeating the Dukes
by playing to their potential. Although
JMU has claimed victory over the Pi-
rates in the past it is expected that
the fight for advancement in the cham-
pionship will be intense. Either team
could walk away the winner.
"Our record certainly does not
reflect our potential Kaess said. "Our
skill level is much higher than our
record shows
Teammate Julia D'Alo expects to
see a great amount of offense from the
opponents.
"JMU attacks a lot from the right
side of the net from behind the set-
ter D'Alo said. "$r$is technique is
more difficult to defend, because A is
so uncommon and there is a high risk
for making errors because there is less
room to work with. They don't have a
big team, but they are very physical,
and they have a lot of depth
Each member of the volleyball
team carries with her a good amount
of experience. What they are lacking
is a good amount of experience to-
gether as a team.
"We all have very strong skills
Kaess said. "Now we just need to make
our talents connect We have been in-
consistent because our team hasn't
been working together long enough to
make the most of our skills
The team is also at a disadvantage
due to its size. While the average team
carries about 12 players, there are only
seven girls to represent ECU.
"We started our season with 10
girls and unfortunately, we have lost
three players since then D'Alo said.
"Having such a small team has been
hard because not only do we have no
room for injuries, but we are also forced
to work much harder out on the court"
Since six girls play throughout the
game, only one player can sit out at a
time. Practices are more challenging
because it is difficult for the team to
scrimmage, which is the essential key
to success for must clubs.
"It's really hard to run drills dur-
ing practice senidr Captain Kristen
Woodruff said. The only time we have
the opportunity to play an actual six-
on-six game is when it counts
It is predicted that the team will
be much stronger next year. They are
hoping to have 12 girls on their roster
at the start of the season next fall.
Having more people will give them
more skills and strengths to build on.
The girls expect their upcoming
weekend in Wilmington to be full of
challenges, but coming out on top of
JMU is definitely a realistic goal. Their
showing at the tournament could end
up surprising a lot of people.
"Earlier in the season when we
played JMU, they beat us, but we made
See VOLLEY page 15
ECU
vs-
Memphis
mr
yJ
VECUand
Memphis will be
meeting for the
seventh time.
� The Pirates lead
the series 4-2.
� ECU beat
Memphis last
season in Greenville
31-17.
� Two weeks ago
Memphis handed,
the then ranked
number six
Tennessee
J Volunteers, a 21-17
oss
Quarterback Quadry Anderson has moved into
the top 10 all-time passing yards at Memphis.
GGS
10-10
ComptAtt.
131-267
Yards
W
TD
Long
82
ECU vs. Memphis Flashbacks
p
�ECU, 24-17 at UM
111 990
11991-ECU, 20-13 at ECU
11992- UM, 42-7 at UM
II 993- UM, 34-7 at UM
ll 994- ECU, 30-6 at UM
11995-ECU, 31-17 at ECU
AA





a-r �- HUnk �� MM
���-� ' ' ' � "h �toi � �i - rTli �� ��-� � ,� JW. 1,L ,
The fast Carolinian
Thursday, November 21,1996
15
ULTIMATE from page 14
combination of club teams and school
teams.
"Of the 16 teams, eight are club and
eight are school Reeves said.
In the women's division, UNC-
Chapel Hill, Raleigh and Pennsylvania
will be represented, as well as two teams
from Wilmington.
Laura Beers, of the ECU women's
team, believes the Helios have a good
chance of winning.
"I think that we will do well Beers
said. "Especially against the college
teams
Earlier this year, both the Irates and
the Helios competed in the N.C. sectional
tournament in Wilmington. The Irates
placed third, advancing them to the
regionals in Philadelphia. They finished
behind the first place Wilmington Port
City Slickers and the second place team,
Raleigh's Ring of Fire.
"The whole team did really well in
the sectionals Doran said.
However, playing in cold 40 degree
temperatures and in the rain and mud,
the Irates failed to advance against the
more seasoned club teams in Philadel-
phia.
On their way to a third place finish
in the sectionals like the Irates. the Helios
defeated N.C. State. UNC-CH and Duke.
In the regionals, the Helios were unabie
to place in the top two. which is required
to advance to nationals.
"The club season is pretty difficult
for us team captain Hobbes Wolcott
said.
Throughout the demanding fall sea-
son, players from both teams have been
able to help take their respective teams
to the next level.
In practice, players continue to
pump each other up and push everyone
to do their best
"Fuller Reeves has continuously
fired us up in practice Doran said. "Al-
most every practice, he is wired up. He
always makes stuff fun. He is able to get
people to do their best His whole atti-
tude towards Ultimate and the Irates is
intense
That goes for the women too.
"Lindsay Kollconay gets everyone
motivated emotionally, and Hobbes gets
everyone motivated physically Helios'
Sarah Boudreau said.
After Ultimax, both the Irates and
the Helios will be getting ready for the
spring season, hoping to improve from
the fall season.
"I'm really looking forward to school
season in the spring" Boudreau said.
"We will be playing people who are our
peers, near the same skill level. I think
that we can make the nationals
Teammate Beers agrees.
"I think that we are going to do real
well in the spring" Beers said.
Both the Irates and the Helios
Ma
tle
calV.
would like for everyone to come out this
weekend and support them.
"I like to say to women, not to be
intimidated by an athletic sport like Ulti-
mate, to come out in the spring and try
it" Beers said. "If you have ever heard
about it and want to find out what it
means to play Ultimate, then come out
this weekend
The tournament is this weekend
from 9 am. - 5 p.m Saturday and from
10 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Sunday.
V vIJLIjJC jL from page 14
such a strong, positive showing Kaess
said. "We won the second game 154
and the third and fourth games were
so close
According to D'Alo, a native of
Pittsburgh, the most rewarding aspect
of being a member of this young team
has been sticking with it and continu-
ing to work hard.
"The season has had its share of
disappointments and at times has been
frustrating" D'Alo said. "But by hang-
ing in there and fighting together as a
team, we have learned a lot"
And so as the season closes out
with the CAA tournament no one can
say for sure how the team will stand in
the end. But one thing for sure is that
this season has been a great opportu-
nity for learning, and the girls are look-
ing forward to growing in the future.
Save The People You Call UpTo 44
For long-distance calls. Savings based on a 3-min. AT&T operator-dialed interstate call.
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
amount is greater, up to a
$55,000 limit. The offer
applies to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
STUDENT
DlSpi
Walk-in!
Tuei - rri 9-6 Sat 1-12
E
O
in
u

V D
It -
a
ui
Q
D
-
m
o
i
mm i mmmmmmmm





"JW ' � "
Thursday, November 21,1996
The East Carolinian
Sfieclol UcUfJl Of044,1
Student Government Association
University Book Exchange
Mr. Michael Phelps of Phelps Chevrolet
Jack Boston
ECU Marching Pirates
Lee Workman, ECU Athletic Department
Barry Gaskins, Pitt County Schools
Joan Warner, Carolina East Mall
ECU Ambassadors
Blockbuster Music of Carolina East Mall
It's A Buck of Carolina East Mall
Kaybee Toys of Carolina East Mall
Lynn's Hallmark of Carolina East Mall
Claire's of Carolina East Mall
Homecoming Steering Committee
Mrs. Sherry Pernell, Risk Management
Andy's Cheesesteaks and Cheeseburgers
Elm Street Gym
Pure Gold Dance Team
Williams Auto Center
Ms. Becky Brown
Mr. Jeff Guffey
Mr. Jerry Baltis
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
CottenFleming
water Ski Club
The Daily Reflector
The East Carolinian
City of Greenville
The Salvation Army
Alan Everette, Greenville Fire Prevention
Bevill Searcey & Greenville Jaycees
Wanda Scarborough & ECU Student Stores
Jeff Davis, ECU Athletic Department
Staples Office Supply
Johnnie Eastwood, ECU Parking and Traffic
Don Leggett, ECU Institutional Advancement
Belk of Greenville @ Carolina East Mall
Miami Subs
Shear Locks of Carolina East Mall
K&W Cafeteria of Carolina East Mall
Kerr Drug of Carolina East Mall
Waldenbook's of Carolina East Mall
Chick-Fil-A of Carolina East Mall
National Speech, Language & Hearing Assoc,
Jostens
Brody's
Air Force ROTC
ECU Cheerleaders
Greenville Jaycees
Mr. Alan Stancil
Ms. Taylor Jones
Mr. David Stevens
ECU Gospel Choir
Action Advertising
Chi Omega Sorority
The Pirate
Wal-Mart
Ms. jane Carr
Mr. Murice Moodey
Mr. Les Gardner
Fletcher Hall
B-GLAD
Mr. Doug Tripp
WZMB
Bicycle Post
Trade Oil Company
Papa John's
Staples
Chico's
J.C. Penney
1
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 21, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 21, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1177
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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