The East Carolinian, November 19, 1996






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TUESU
November 19,1996
Vol 72, No. 25
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pages
Organizations bring movie legend to ECU
Across The State
SNEADS FERRY, N.C. (AP) -
Scores of Topsail Island
homeowners who bought federal
flood insurance coverage are be-
ing told by their insurance com-
panies that they live in an
uninsurable area.
Instead of settlement checks,
homeowners will be receiving re-
funded premiums. Hardly enough
to pay for some homes that have
been demolished.
BESSEMER CITY, N.C. (AP)
- Hundreds of people around a
lithium plant were evacuated from
their homes early Monday follow-
ing a series of explosions in the
plant
A dispatcher with the Gaston
County sheriffs department said
no one was injured in the accident
and residents were able to return
to their home this morning.
The explosion occurred
shortly after midnight at the FMC
Corporation chemical plant
Across The Country
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP)
� With the weather improving,
NASA aimed for a Tuesday launch
of space shuttle Columbia while
keeping close watch on high waves
offshore that could hamper re-
trieval of the booster rockets.
Waves of up to 16 feet in the
Atlantic Ocean could make if diffi-
cult if not impossible for NASA to
recover the solid-fuel booster rock-
ets once they burn out and fall into
the sea as planned a few minutes
after liftoff.
PHOENIX (AP) - Hundreds
of inmates angry over conditions
in their "tent city" jail set fires and
trapped 11 guards for nearly three
hours before landing a jail yard
meeting with the "toughest sher-
iff in America
Sheriff Joe Arpaio, known for
hard-core tactics such as chain
gangs and a ban on cigarettes, met
Sunday with a three-man commit-
tee of prisoners and more than 200
inmates.
Around The World
ROME (AP) - Delegates to a
U.N. gathering on world hunger
have promised to reduce by half
the number of people without suf-
ficient food supplies, agreeing to
expand harvests and improve food
distribution.
The pledges, however, are
only non-binding guidelines. And
some of those at the World Food
Summit, the last big U.Norga-
nized conference of the decade,
openly questioned the value of
staging costly international gath-
erings without any requirements
for action.
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) -
After a 24-hour lull, rival militias
renewed an artillery duel in
Mogadishu today, killing at least
11 people, witnesses and local of-
ficials said.
The fighting was between
militiamen loyal to Hussein Aidid
and rival faction leader Osman
Hassan Ali Atto over control of the
southern part of Somalia's divided
capital
James Earl Jones
meets students in
Hendrix today
Demetria A. Gordon
Contributing Writer
The efforts of the Greek fra-
ternity Kappa Alpha Psi, Pan-Hel-
lenic Council, Inter-Fraternity
Council and other student organi-
zations will be bringing an enter-
tainer to campus today in Hendrix
Theater at 2 p.m.
African-American actor James
Earl Jones, famous for his roles in
"Coming to America" and "Hunt for
Red October will be here to speak
supporting theMake-A-Wish Foun-
dation.
Make-A-Wish is a non-profit or-
ganization that serves to initiate
fundraising for terminally ill chil-
dren who have dreams they want
to see come true. Jones is also a
spokesperson for the organization.
"We're hoping that people will
want to get involved just by seeing
someone famous supporting the ef-
forts said Kappa Alpha Psi Presi-
dent Franklin Shipp.
According to Shipp, Terrence
Evins, a member of Kappa Alpha
Psi and Chairman of East Carolina's
Make-A-Wish Fundraising Founda-
tion, collaborated with the Inter-
Fraternity Council, Pan-Hellenic
Council, and other fraternity mem-
bers about having a possible
fundraising charity appear on the
campus to spread awareness and
gain advocacy.
"After meeting, we all con-
cluded that an entertainer could
help gain further support for the
organization and decided to put
forth the effort in gettting Jones'
to appear on campus Shipp said.
"Because James Earl Jones is
an African American advocate for
the organization, we think that this
will also give other blacks more mo-
tivation to get involved
In addition to Jones and other
speakers, the East Carolina Gos-
pel Choir will also perform. Admis-
sion is free.
Open house
Cultural center awards
minority achievers
Honors given for
academics,
leadership efforts
File Photo
At a weekend admissions open house, prospective students lined up for their
chance to win a universtiy t-shirt from Housing and Dining Director Manny Amaro.
Approximately 3,000 students attended the open house.
Teresa Woodard
Contributing Writer
The Ledonia Wright African
American Cultural Center presented
the first annual Minority Student
Academic and Achievement Awards
Wednesday at the Hendrix Theatre.
The program awarded minority
students for their achievements in
academic and leadership excellence.
The student academic award recipi-
ents are undergraduate students who
have completed and have earned a
cumulative grade point average of 3.0
or better. Among those who were hon-
ored in leadership were members of
university organizations such as
ABLE, the ECU Gospel Choir and
minority C eek organizations.
The goal of the program is to
provide an incentive for students who
are striving to reach the award level
and encourage them to try even
harder, Center Director Taffye
Benson-Clayton said.
"I saw a need for African Ameri-
can students to be recognized for their
academic achievements Benson
Clayton said.
Addressing the keynote issue of
the program was guest speaker, state
Senator Frank Ballance. He chal-
lenged the audience to continue in
academic excellence, accept social re-
sponsibilities, and continue to be lead-
ers who are involved. He also stressed
that the audience continue the legacy
of African-American excellence.
"I would like, as a result of this
program, for African-American stu-
dents to become so gratified with their
ECU experience that they become not
just successful in their fields of work,
but to also be active contributing
See AWARDS page 3
Grad students speak for
confining education
Eight papers presented at national
conference in Charlotte
Construction Management
teams to compete again
Matt Flippin
Contributing Writer
Eight ECU graduate students presented papers at the 45th an-
nual National Conference for Continuing Education held in Char-
lotte.
Dr. Elizabeth Knott and Dr. Vivian Mott, professors of continu-
ing Education at ECU, accompanied 12 graduate students to the
national conference, which was held from Oct. 29-Nov. 2.
"The adult education faculty is excited about giving the oppor-
tunity for these students Mott said. "This conference is a chance
for students to gain national recognition for their research and edu-
cational efforts
Eight of the 12 students Adelaide Beeker, Terry High-Taylor,
Rudolph Knight, Loretta Langley, Robin Proctor, Dorothy Riddick-
Saunders, Kim Walker and Ray Young presented papers for the con-
ference.
Robin Proctor, a graduate student in continuing education, told
the conference about her research on different learning styles.
"The research on learning styles were done on a group of four
community college women in developmental studies. I would inter-
view and talk to the students about study skills and how they can
improve in the classroom Proctor said. " The main goal was to learn
how to learn better and to give these students increased self-esteem
and to facilitate success in college
Two other students , Kristen Lanier and Patricia Peele, partici-
pated in a panel discussion on women's leadership in education.
Mott and Knott presented papers to the leadership confer-
ence. Phyllis Broughton, a graduate student of adult education at
Pitt Community College, also presented a paper to the conference.
Mott served as Promotion Coordinator for the national confer-
ence. She said that her main responsibility as Promotion Coordina-
tor was dealing with the media.
"I promoted and marketed the conference with the newspapers
and media Mott said I also developed a web page for the confer-
ence so it could be seen throughout the U.S
The conference is held annually for educators, students and prac-
titioners of adult education. The theme this year was Common
Themes for Uncommon Times: Educating Adults and Continuing
Education. The conference is sponsored by the Association for Adult
and Continuing Education.
Groups hope to
return as
successful as
1995's
competitors
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
The Construction Management
Program is once again sending teams
of students to participate in the two
competitions from which they re-
ceived regional and national recogni-
tion last year.
The first competition is spon-
sored by the Associated Schools of
Construction. Two groups of five
people and one alternate left last
Thursday to compete in this South-
east Region competition. It is region
two, out of the six in the nation.
ECU competes with teams from
places like Clemson, Virginia Tech,
University of Florida, UNC-Charlotte
and others.
Jim Kennedy, lecturer in the con-
struction management department
and faculty coach for these teams,
knows just how much hard work goes
into the competitions.
"We have an annual regional
meeting and at this time we have an
estimate competition Kennedy said.
"Students have 12 hours to do a com-
mercial construction project com-
pletely
Kennedy said that at 7 a.m. stu-
dents go into their hotel rooms with
a couple of computers, and do a com-
plete detailed construction estimate
schedule, cash flow analysis and work
plan. The work has to be done by 7
p.m. that night or they don't get to
rum in their bids.
"Saturday morning they have a
20 minute presentation to the board
of contractors, the judges, and they
determine who wins the competition,
who has the best proposal Kennedy
said.
Last year at the ASC competition,
ECU students tied for third, and
Kennedy said that he thinks they will
do very well this year.
In January, one out of five teams
and an alternate will travel to Hous-
ton for the NAHB competition.
To compete in this, students have
to come back to school two weeks
before everyone else to work on their
proposal. During this time they will
See CONSTRUCT page 3
World AIDS Day provides hope
Program focuses orvdeadly disease locally, internationally
Marina Henry
Staff Writer
LIFfeyfe
Jazzing it up with Maynard Ferguson at Wrightpage
OPINICWIe
Letters to the Editor returnspage H-
Pirates victorious for last home gamepage O
The 13th annual World AIDS Day will be held Dec.
1. The theme for this year is "One world, One hope
and focuses on AIDS as a worldwide issue, not just a
local problem.
"The purpose of this World AIDS Day is to get people
to look at AIDS as an international issue, to realize that
AIDS observes no borders, that it will cross those bor-
ders to go out into the world and then cross back said
John Beleutz, executive director of PICASO, the Pitt
County AIDS Services Organization Incorporated.
PICASO, the sponsor of the Pitt County World AIDS
Day Program, provides services for those in Pitt County
who have AIDS or are HIV-positive. Such services.
elude being provided a social worker around the clock,
financial assistance for the medical bills and medications,
social support in groups and buddy programs and a food
pantry. Seminars on nutrition and health education, to
keep participants physically fit are offered. They also
sponsor many activities to educate the public and to stop
the spread of the virus.
The activities will begin at 4 p.m. with a free organ
recital at the First Presbyterian Church of Greenville with
such internationally known recitalists as Colin Andrews
and Janette Fishell. A freewill collection will be taken
with proceeds going to PICASO.
"This isn't really a fund-raiser. This is simply a way to
get people to Keep thinking about the issue and give them
time to reflect Beleutz said.
See AIDS page 2
icesun- See AJUb page 2
Tuesday
Sunny
High 67
Low 32
Wednesday
Partly sunny
r
High 64
Low 30
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
�j





Tuesday, November 19,1996
The East Carolinian
Students invited to study abroad in Spain and Europe
Announcements
Jacqueline D
Senior Writer
Kellum
Parking During Thanksgiving Break
The following information pertains to parking on campus
during Thanksgiving Break 27-29, 1996.
Qil� loading passes will be available to vehicles with
Freshman permits beginning Monday, Nov. 25, at 4:00 p.m. Per-
mits are obtained at the community service desks, and are good
in "R" (Resident) areas only. They are not valid in staff, handi-
cap, fire zones or metered spaces.
Unregistered vehicles and Freshman parking permits will
be honored on campus in steot parking areas (not in Staff or
Private) beginning Tuesday, Nov. 26, at 4:00 p.m. Students with
unregistered vehicles desiring to utilize the 30-minute loading
permit prior to 4:00 p.m on Nov. 26 must first obtain a One-Day
Parking Permit from Parking and Traffic Services, the fee for a
One-Day Parking Permit is $2.00.
Student vehicles are not authorized to park in staff zones
Wednesday, Nov. 27, as this will be a regular business day for
state employees. The holiday schedule for staff does not begin
until the close of business on Wed. Nov. 27.
All questions pertaining to parking on campus during
Thanksgiving Break should be directed to Parking and Traffic
Services, 328294.
For students interested in study
abroad, there is an on-line resource
which provides the information they
need in one place. Right now is a
good time to check it out, because
studyabroad.com is sponsoring a con-
test to celebrate their first anniver-
sary.
Mark Landon is vice president
of Liberty City College Promotions,
of which studyabroad.com is a divi-
sion. He says that registering is a
matter of getting on the site and
answering a few simple questions.
Anyone can enter, and there is still
plenty of time to do so.
"The contest runs through the
end of this month, and we will be
doing the random drawing around
the beginning of December Landon
said.
The grand prize is a two week
Spanish course in Granada, Spain,
along with a round-trip flight to any-
where in Europe. Other prizes in-
clude travel smoke detectors, travel
door bolts, flags from different coun-
tries and studyabroad.com
mousepads.
Landon said that both he and
site co-founder Mark Shay felt they
had accomplished a great deal with
their site.
"We've put together a complete
on-line resource for students who
want to study abroad, where they can
see virtually all their options in study
abroad. We've worked real hard to
make this a complete resource for
students Landon said.
The site includes free listing for
all study abroad programs that want
to be included and additional infor-
mation for those programs that have
paid for the advertising. It also in-
cludes generalized information on
study abroad.
"We have an on-line study
abroad handbook, written by Bill
Hoffa, one of the premier authorities
in the field, which addresses legal
issues, health and safety issues, and
exploring cultural differences
Landon said.
When exploring the web site,
students can search programs by host
country, or request information
based on language or subject mat-
ter, methods that were added to the
site recently.
"Something we've just launched
in the past 10 days is a search menu
to search by subject area Landon
said, "We also have an area of our
site that is entirely devoted to inten-
sive language programs
Landon said that many of the
web pages also provide access to fi-
nancial aid information or related
topics. Some of the web pages have
electronic forms which the students
can use to apply to programs right
there on the web site.
To get onto the site, type http:
www.studyabroad.com into the web
browser.
NC State offers more on-line grade distribution reports
Students who are having trouble deciding which classes to take now
have more readily accessible information at their disposal.
Grade distribution reports, which list the total number of As, Bs, Cs, Ds
and Fs recorded in each class section, are now available for every class with an
enrollment over 20. In the past grade distribution reports could only be
obtained for classes with enrollments over 50.
Students can access the reports on-line by clicking the academic infor-
mation prompt on N.C. State's homepage.
Assistant Provost Frank Abrams said previous reports were available
only for classes with high enrollments because of concerns aNnit student
privacy.
Abrams said the number of reports was increased only after it was deter-
mined that no one's privacy would be at risk. Student requests for more
information also influenced the decision, Abrams said.
AID'S from page 1
The recital will be followed by a
candlelight walk from Jarvis Memo-
rial Church to the Town Commons at
5 p.m. The program will include seven
speeches by Greenville Mayor Nancy
Jenkins, Marty Daugherty and others.
A young girl who won an award for
her essay on AIDS will be reading it
for the public, and cheery songs will
be interspersed to lighten the mood.
"Pitt County has the third high-
est number of AIDS patients in the
state. This is a chance for the com-
munity to realize the seriousness of
the problem. I believe that the lack
of openly advertised free HIV testing
is a real problem, especially at ECU.
Many students may be HIV positive
and not know it Beleutz said.
The World AIDS Day Reception
will occur immediately following the
vigil, at the Percolator Coffee House
in downtown Greenville, with free re-
freshments for all.
Kami PrtcttGoodThU!Nov.23,19
Wed.20 Thut2l FrL22 Sat23
Copyrtojrt 1996 - The Kroner Co. Items
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the rtBht to In quantities. None sold
to dealers.
& Drug
Always Good. Always Fresh
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Red Home
Apples.
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FRESH M-STORE BAKED
variety
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FRESH FROM OUR OVEN
French
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Sliced lunchmeats � i
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Corn Dogs
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Collect
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AW.
Brass Button Bear Collection
This Week's Special! djQl
"Taylor"
Each
All other bears $9.99
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager,
WZMB
and
General Manager,
Expressions
for the Spring, 1997 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, November 22 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
W;
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23,8PM
WILLIAMS ARENAMINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 IN ADVANCE FOR STUDENTSFACULTYSTAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED
PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CAIL 328-6004 OR 1 800 ECU-ARTS
OR VISIT OUR HOME PAGE AT: www.cis.MU.MtoStudentUnwnTHEHOMEPAGE.html.
'





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 19, 1996
AWARDS from page 1
alumni to this university the direc-
tor said.
The award program also recog-
nizec1 those who dedicated their time
and service to students in need of
academic assistance. The recipients
ranged from faculty, administrative
and alumni association members.
CONSTRUCT from page 1
The award honorees were nominated
by faculty and staff campus-wide.
They were evaluated by faculty mem-
bers and an administrative panel.
Family members, faculty, staff
and community leaders were present
to congratulate and support those
who were being honored at the cer-
emony. Benson-Clayton said she an-
ticipates that this program will es-
tablish a tradition of continuing ex-
cellence in minority students.
"1 think that establishing insti-
tutionalized programs like this at
ECU will serve to make that desire a
reality Benson Clayton said.
f We've Got 'Em
A Pair Of Tickets To See ECU VS. N.C. State Game,
Package Includes Bus Trip To And Front The Game!
Register Now To Win. Drawing Will Be Held During
A Live Remote With 103.7 On Wed. Nov. 20th 7-1 opm
Fiesta All Day With These Specials:
$1.50 Imports
0.95 Bud Draft
12 PRICE .
Pizza & Nachos Grande
after 9pm dine in only
a
FEATURING "fMAPCOMTIT"
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 19,8PM
HEftDRIX THEATRE
$3 FOR STUDENTS
$5 FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $5
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTRAL
TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL
M1CHAH. ILACKOM
Carroll Dashiell and Students
from the School of Music
Friday, November 22, 1996 � MSC Great Room
8:00 PM - 11:00 PM � Mendenhall Student Center
FREEH!
Sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events Committee & ECU School of Music
IrrTOC
i4
o
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23,8PM
WILLIAMS AREKAMINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 IN ADVANCE FOR STUDENTSFACULTYSTAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1 800 328-2787
MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED
CHEW
ON THIS.
Food for Your Brain)
Lecture
12:00 Noon -1:00 PM
Mendenhall Underground
Monday, November 25)
Count All About Beer!
Presented by Dr. Jennifer Crouch
Assistant Professor, School of
Human Environmental Science
Bring Your Lunch or Grab a $3.99 Special in "The Spot'
FREE Drinks and Gourmet Dessert
Presented by the ECU Student Union, For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.eduStudent UnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html
have to work day and night to get it
completed in time to send it to Cali-
fornia about two weeks before the
national convention.
There they will give a 15 minute
presentation, where the judges ask
them questions.
Kennedy said that at the compe-
tition last year, ECU's students placed
fifth overall and received the Rookie
of the Year award.
"That was the first time a rookie
had placed in the top few Kennedy
said. "For our first time competing,
we were real pleased with that"
Kennedy said that he thinks the
trip last year was a great learning ex-
perience.
"Out of the six that went last year,
I think only two of them had ever been
on a plane before, and very few of
them had ever been west of Char-
lotte Kennedy said.
During these competitions stu-
dents also have an opportunity to
improve many of the skills that will
help them in many other areas of their
careers.
"It's wonderful taking all the
things that they have learned in our
classes and pulling them together into
one mass project under a lot of time
restraints Kennedy said. "They re-
ally improved their computer skills,
working as a team and public speak-
ing
Time and effort are not the only
things that have to be put into these
competitions. Money is also needed
for the students. Kennedy said that
it takes approximately $10,000 to do
all of this.
So, to help raise money, a draw-
ing will be held on Dec. 11. The win-
ner and a companion will win a three
day cruise to the Bahamas. The trip
also includes air fare from Raleigh.
Kennedy realizes how much each
student puts into these competitions
and hopes that people will help sup-
port them, by either purchasing a
ticket or just giving a direct donation.
"We'd like to give recognition to
the students for all the hard work that
they're putting in for it, and hopefully
people will help support this fund-
raiser to help pay for the expenses
Kennedy said.
Students participating in these
competitions are Heather Banks, Mat-
thew T Cave, George E. Hamlett, Jo-
seph D. Mobley, Craig S. Smith, Jimmie
J. Goodman, Peter J. Huffey, Thomas
E. Dunning, Bryan Paul Metzger, Wil-
liam O. Wood and Philip N. Singleton.
Students can purchase tickets
for $2 at any of the following loca-
tions:
Carolina Builders, Home Build-
ers Supply, Garris-Evans Lumber, Peli-
can Building Center, or ECU'S con-
struction management department.
Contact Jim Kennedy at 328-6216 or
Sue Williams at 328-6707 for ticket
purchases or further information.
WZMB is now hiring for all DJ, sportscaster, newscaster positions
for the Spring '97 semester. Any student interested please call Jim
Matheson at 3284751 or stop by the WZMB studios on the ground
floor of Mendenhall Student Center and pick up an application.
Listen to WZMB this week for your chance to win a Tribe Called
Quest Prize Pack which includes 2 tickets to the November 23rd
show, a Tribe CD and a Tribe headband and wristband.
Ql .3 FM
East Carolina University
w P
MW5
.
to Mendenhall Student Genter
:
in
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY SS
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B�a BOp N�uv�au
You've heard his music in the movie Rocky, now hear it live!
Maynard Ferguson and his Big Bop Nouveau Band are coming to
Wright Auditorium TONIGHT at 8 p.m. as part of the
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Student tickets are $7 in advance at the Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m.
All tickets are $15 at the door.
Boot Scootin Boogie
Free Country Line Dance Lessons taught by Becky Fuller and Marvin Wells
from the Texas Two-Step. November 21 from 8-9:30 p.m.
in the Social Room
v

m
Bowl the night away at the Mendenhll Bowling Alley
Saturday, Nov. 23 from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. for only $5
which includes shoe rental and all the games you can bowl,
plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
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Courage Under Fire (PG-13) Nov. 21-23 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID
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TAKE A MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL 5
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Take a break from your hectic class schedule to enjoy 10 frames of the
best bowling for students. Monday, Wednesday and Friday from
1 p.m. until 6 p.m bowling is only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
Travel-Adventure Film
See Royal Hawaii: By One Who Lives There on Wednesday, Dec. 4 at
4:30 and 7 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. An all-you-can-eat theme dinner is
served at 6 p.m. for $12. Film tickets are free with ECU I.D. at the
Central Ticket Office. Dinner tickets must be reserved
with meal cards, cash, check or credit card.
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Tuesday, November 19,1996 The East Carolinian
S&o
V
Ouftlteoii
We pay for
our
education,
hoping that
we will
graduate in
four years.
But if we
have to
take
classes that
are not
required of
us, we are
just wasting
time and
money.
Registration is finally over and for most, it brings a
sigh of relief. No more waiting in hour-long lines just to
find that the classes you want and need are closed or not
being offered anymore. For many it is a nightmare but
underclassmen have it the worst
It was 5 a.m. on a cold, dark, rainy morning when
many underclassmen bundled up in winter coats and jack-
ets and walked to the registration terminals, while up-
perclassmen were nestled snug in their beds. They waited
and waited just to find that the classes their advisers said
they had to have were closed and no exceptions were
being made.
Why?
If they are required to have these classes, why does
the school not offer enough class times to accommodate
the need? We pay for our education, hoping that we will
graduate in four years. But if we have to take classes that
are not required for us, we are just wasting time and
money.
What about fines parking tickets, unreturned books
and tuition? Most students had no idea that they had a
fine until the computer said in big red letters "account is
tagged What a shame; you have waited for two hours
just to find out that you have to go to the cashier's office,
pay your fine then go and get back in line. By this time
you have definitely lost all hope for getting in the classes
you want. When the school sent out fine notices the stu-
dents either didn't receive them or their parents got them
at home. What do your parents know about registration?
We realize that the upperclassmen deserve the privi-
lege of registering early, they have all been there before,
but there has to be a better way of working things. The
majority of freshmen register on the same day. Consider-
ing there are thousands of freshmen anxious to get the
classes they want, it turns into a chaotic mess. What if we
registered in alphabetical order or by our social security
numbers?
You would think that the way the university is pro-
gressing we would have the on-line registration system
running by now. We realize it is not an easy process and
there is a lot of work involved, but for a university on the
rise, the students feel like they are in the dark ages when
it comes to registering.
This tedious process of registration will just have to
be a fact of life until on-line registration arrives. We will
just have to keep our fingers crossed and hope that some-
day our school will come out of the dark ages. For now,
close your eyes, take a deep breath and exhale that sigh
of relief but don't get too complacent because registra-
I inn fa
-feiti-
f�kllf�llMIH'��'
"if solhen TheEastCarolinian"J
lave good grammar skills? j wants you to join our staff. We
I
I
.J
lave an expressive way of
stating you opinion?
. LJ I have positions for opinion
writ well with deadlines? i ,
columnists.
Imk mm mm mm mm mm mi
ike seeing your name in the
)aper?
Guest columnist application for "Campus View"
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain topic.
Please return this form to The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print.
Name FrQ SophQ ?? Go ?
Phone number
Topic(s) about which ! would like to write
Please consider me for a position as guest columnist for TEC. I agree to allow TEC's staff to
edit my submission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those
changes I will be notified of any changes that may affect the length or content. I understand
TEC reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two
weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for submission will be assigned by
the editor.
I
.
The East Carolinian
ED 19 25.
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dillard Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
David Southerland, Asst. Prod. Manager
Jennifer Andrews, Prod. Assistant
Ashley Settle, Prod. Assistant
Carla Cole, Copy Editor
David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reect letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
326366.
Mao r -
&16 faky
K Jj
m�etten& to. t6e SeUto
Evaluation goes both ways
To the Editor,
Once again its that time of the
year when we the students get to
grade our instructors on their per-
formance. My goal is to inform all
students of the importance of class
attendance, especially at this time.
I never quite understood why so
many people could have a problem
with a certain instructor and yet
nobody would be in class at the end
of the semester. It seems as though
several peopie have already accepted
failure. In a certain chemistry class,
many people have stopped attend-
ing because the instructor has a
mission to personally embarrass
each individual. Could this be be-
cause he wants to reduce class size
before evaluations?
In approximately four weeks, we
the students will receive the evalua-
tions that our instructors recorded
on us, whether we were in class or
not. I would like to encourage ev-
eryone to attend class and voice
your concerns. Overall, I am sure
that everyone has had a wonderful
semester, which leads me to my sec-
ond point. Reward the instructors
who have done an excellent job.
Make sure their peers know exactly
how much time and effort they put
into teaching a class. You have the
choice to either feel important or
powerless.
I am very much in favor of mak-
ing ECU a highly esteemed institu-
tion. As admission requirements
continue to increase, we are insur-
ing only the best applicants attend.
It is now up to the students to se-
lect only the best instructors to lead
us in our quest for an education.
Please continue to attend class.
Jonathan Huggins
Senior
Nutrition
Be part of the Great American Smokeout
To the Editor,
Each day we read more about
the issues related to tobacco, such
as potential government regula-
tions, economic issues in North
Carolina, and the health dangers of
tobacco use. This year the Surgeon
General's Report states that nearly
3,000 American teenagers will start
smoking each day. The report also
indicates that if they choose not to
smoke by the age of 19, they will
probably never start. But many of
the students on the ECU campus
have already started, and estimates
are that 70 percent of the students
who started smoking one to five
cigarettes a day as a high school
senior will still be smoking five
years later. They will have begun a
habit that can lead to an addiction
that is tougher to break than the
use of alcohol or cocaine. For those
of us who have chosen not to
smoke, more than 3,000 will die
each year from lung cancer with-
out ever touching a cigarette! Sec-
ondhand smoke will be the cause
of these deaths.
So, what can we do? The first
thing is to become more informed
about the issue. Come and browse
the information booth that will be
in front of the Wright Place on
Thursday, November 21, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
The most important thing we
can do is to join the American Can-
cer Society's Great American
Smokeout on Thursday, November
21. If you smoke or use chew, stop
for the day. This could be the sta
of a new lifestyle that is tobaccQ;
free. If you don't use tobacco proct
ucts, support someone who doesJh
hisher effort to stop. For further
information about the issues, con-
tact the Office of Health Promotion
and Weil-Being, located in 303
Erwin, or call 328-6793.
Julie Allen
Graduate Student
Ann Barnes
Master of Social Work Intern
Sports section needs work
To the Editor,
I, as well as much of the ECU popu-
lation, am very unhappy with the cov-
erage (or lack thereof) in The East Caro-
linian for the Virginia Tech game. It was
one of the more important games of
the season and the only coverage was a
3 by 5 inch series history (which any
serious Pirate fan knows anyway).
This is just one instance of the spo-
radic and inconsistent coverage that has
been the standard for The East Caro-
linian. What happened to the good old
days of '91 and '92 where each game
was covered thoroughly? It has been
downhill for sports coverage at The East
Carolinian since the era of Tim Hamp-
ton ended (am I showing my age?) I will
assume that I am speaking for all Pi-
rate fans when I say that we want and
deserve comprehensive and intelligent
coverage of ECU football and all other
Pirate athletic programs. Take this as
constructive criticism and improve the
sports coverage at The East Carolin-
ian. Pirate fans are counting on you!
Go Pirates!
David Lamascus
Graduate student
Business
"We need a free press to keep
politicians on the straight and
narrow. We need those
opinions
� Alan B. Shepard, trustee, The Freedom Forum 1994

� .ii i II in ���tgni'JWi
Ti





5 Tuesday, November 19,1996 The East Carolinian
Maynard Ferguson
blows Wright away
Andy Turner
Senior Writer
Local jazz and big band enthu-
siasts need to look no further for
entertainment than Wright Audito-
rium tonight as Grammy nominated
trumpet player Maynard Ferguson
is slated to perform with his Big
Bop Nouveau Band.
The event, part of the S.
Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series, will begin at 8 p.m.
Ferguson is in his fourth de-
cade as a big band leader.
The 68-year-old Montreal na-
tive is perhaps best know for his
recording of "Gonna Fly Now the
theme from the film Rocky. That
song earned him a top-ten single, a
gold album and a Grammy nomina-
tion in 1978.
He has received two other
Grammy nominations along with
numerous other awards, including
being named Downbeat magazine's
Readers Poll "Hall of Fame
Ferguson was also named Campus
Activities Today's Readers Poll
"Jazz Entertainer of the Year
Ferguson and his band draw
upon an array of musical styles;
bebop, straight-ahead jazz, funk,
swing, classical and contemporary
music are all part of the band's mix.
Music fever overcame Ferguson
at a young age. He was playing pi-
ano and violin by four and trumpet
by nine. At 13, Ferguson soloed as
a child prodigy with the Canadian
Broadcasting Company Orchestra.
Photo Courtesy of S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Maynard Ferguson, the man responsible for "Gonna Fly
Now the theme from Rocky, will be on-campus tonight.
When big band greats came to
Montreal, Ferguson (still only 16)
often led the warm-up band. Count
Basie, Duke Ellington, Woody
Herman. Stan Kenton, Dizzy
Gillespie, and Tommy and Jimmy
Dorsey all witnessed the talents of
the Ferguson.
In 1949, Ferguson came to the
United States and played in bands
led by Kenton, Boyd Raburn,
Charlie Barnett and Jimmy Dorsey.
After leaving those bands, he
worked as a studio musician, re-
cording movie soundtracks for
Paramount Pictures, including The
Ten Commandments.
He lived overseas for a period
in the late '60s and '70s, before re-
turning to the United States in
1974. He found success soon after
with his Rocky theme.
In the '80s, he fronted High
Voltage, a fusion-funk band, record-
ing two albums with the band,
The Big Bop Nouveau Band
came into being in the late '80s and
has been home to a host of jazz
stars. Don Ellis, Chuck Mangione,
Bill Chase, Wayne Shorter, Chick
Corea, Bob James, Joe Zawinul,
Slide Hampton, Greg Bissonnetter
See MAYNARD page 7
Travel-
Film
Series
This Buddhist shrine is
just one of the many
sights to be visited on
A Journey to Japan. The
film will be shown in
Hendrix Theatre
tomorrow at 4 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. with a
Japanese theme dinner
served up at 6 p.m. for
your dining pleasure.
Can you say "sushi"?
Photo Courtesy of ECU Travel-
Adventure Film Series
(�D1Revieio&
Kill
Johnny
Dale!
Crazy, blue-haired,
nose-ringed, goateed,
spoken word performer
Johnny Dale will
present himself to be
killed by the audience
at 8 p.m. in The School
of Art's Speight
Auditorium tonight
(that's in the Jenkins
Art Building, not the
Speight Building). Don't
be a fool and miss your
chance to destroy him.
Photo Courtesy of Johnny Dale
J
Sc ql t6e s4t&
J.B. raises question about
unwavering faith in God
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
"J.B. Must Suffer To Learn
This is the title of Act 1. Scene
4 of Archibald MacLeish's modern
adaptation of the Book of Job J.B.
Never was a scene more aptly
named, for this is the moment when
all hell breaks loose for poor Job.
He is a God-fearing man who gives
thanks for his blessings and takes
nothing for granted. But where
does that get him? Lost, alone, suf-
fering extreme torture as his skin
literally boils away - for no reason
other than "God's Will
For the first time in the two
and a half years I have been attend-
ing East Carolina Playhouse perfor-
mances, I sat completely mesmer-
ized and lost myself in the action
on stage. 1 forgot where I was and
who I was with, blocked out the rest
of the audience, and experienced,
for the first time, the "Wrath of
God In the end. I begged right
along with Job for God to show us
his guilt - make sense of the hor-
rible-suffering Job was living
through - and in the end, I was un-
satisfied with God's answer.
That, however, is a problem I
have with the script. I guess I'll
have to take it up with God, because
this adaptation was really faithful
to the original Book of Job.
Is J.B. truly a "modern" adap-
tation? Sure, it takes place in a trav-
See JB page 7
r if
i
u
ew
New book only for simpletons
Joseph Elchehabi
Staff Writer
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
Dayroom
Contagious
1 wed
When the guys in Dayroom de-
cided to record Contagious they must
have known what type of credit it
would gain from local and national
critics. It's a good album; however, I
wouldn't rule out the possibility of a
bigger release.
The album starts of with the title
track, a song that strikes upon the
band's message. If you think about it,
and look at the cover, the band seems
to be a reaction against the media.
The title song (and the album itself)
asks questions and points fingers at
the few who make the bad 'ook bad.
but bigger: "Someone plants a bomb
in the back of a car And they know
you're sitting there and watchin' it all
Doesn't matter what or where you
want 'em to be You're gonna put
'era up and make em big on the T.V
And that's just one example of their
fashionable media bashing.
If you're really in the mood, check
out the tune "Once I Was A Monkey
It's a real tear-jerker, a song that leaves
you wondering if maybe lead vocal-
istguitarist Michael Winger has fi-
nally come out of the closet to let ev-
eryone know he's a monkey. Isn't that
nice.
The most impressive aspect I have
witnessed in this material is the band's
ability to function as one. They work
together well. There is plenty of di-
versity in the music, but not in the
band's musical ability - everyone
seems to be right on. They all deserve
See DAYROOM page 6
If you find writing a term paper
about as fun as a trip to the dentist's
office, you might want to take a look
at Steven Posusta's Don't Panic: The
Procrastinator's Guide to Writing an
Effective Term Paper.
A slim 62 pages, the how-to book
grew out of Posusta's experiences as a
composition tutor at Colorado Univer-
sity, where he noticed a lot of fresh-
men repeating the same kinds of mis-
takes on their research papers. In his
book he takes a simplified approach
to a complicated problem. Using clear-
cut examples, he gives students formu-
las for creating "instant" thesis state-
ments and conclusions, and organiz-
ing their thoughts on paper.
Bandanna Books. Don t Panics
publisher, claims that Posusta's book
"gives immediate relief to freshmen
who need help writing a decent col-
lege paper, with straight answers only
a tutor can give. That's what sets it
apart from The Harbrace College
Handbook and Strunk and White's
Elements of Style Bandanna Books
also publishes "classic texts (Milton,
Whitman, Sappho, Socrates) without
footnotes edited to eliminate sexual
bias
If you constantly struggle with
writing assignments, and have no idea
what a thesis statement is. I highly
suggest that you rush out and buy
Posusta's book. It was written espe-
cially for you. You
should also pur-
chase Strunk and
White's Elements of
Style, and either a
copy of the MLA
Handbook or The
Harbrace College
Handbook. These
are books that
should be on every
freshman writer's
shelf.
At best. Don't
Panic offers a
simple blueprint for
a simple term paper,
and if you simply
follow its guidelines,
and if your English
professor is a simple-
ton, you might get
by with a cookie-cut-
ter essay that just
might earn you a
C, possibly a B, if
you show enough
critical insight. But
there are no formu-
las for critical in-
sight
Posusta's book
troubles me because
it confirms my worst
fears: that higher
education in this country has suc-
cumbed to the same demands that we
put on fast food. American education
has turned into McEducation. Books
like Posusta's become more valuable
Cover Courtesy of Bandanna Books
Simple solutions are not always the
best nor the most educational way to
tackle last-minute term paper anxieties.
(and more lucrative) as academia con-
tinues to lower its standards in order
to teach freshmen college students
what they should have learned as fresh-
men in high school.





Tuesday, November 19,1996
The East Carolinian
gZ&ecec�6
Desdinova
Desdinova 1
Pat Reid
Staff Witter
From the heartland of Indiana,
birthplace of John Mellencamp and
David Lee Roth, comes a band called
Desdinova. What? You've never heard
of them? Well, if you're lucky you never
will.
Their debut CD, Desdinova 1, is
nothing more than a lackluster attempt
at today's "cool" music by a garage band
who still has a lot to learn. The 12-song
CD has no really shining tracks and only
a couple of decent ones.
From the opening notes of "Dead
Parade Desdinova sounds like they
might have promise. The lead guitar
weaves a neat little riff that sounds ex-
citing. Then the rest of the band kicks
in. Take one overly distorted guitar, a
drummer that doesn't do anything par-
ticularly interesting, and a vocalist that
sounds like a deeper version of Better
Than Ezra's singer, and you have "Dead
Parade The band's approval rating was
falling fast
Things didn't get any better when
the band's "standout track "On My
Own gave me a headache. "On My
Way" weaved it's hypnotically bad self
right on to the next track. Unfortunately,
"When I'm Gone" is a heavy, driving
tune that actually isn't any better than
the previous songs. It's merely a differ-
ent version of bad.
At this point in the album,
Desdinova took on a sound very much
like the Hazies, only the Hazies sound
so much better. "Diomed "Somebody
Said "Need and "Slow Healings" all
sound like rejected Hazies songs. By no
means are the Hazies a groundbreaking
group, or even all that wonderful, but
next to Desdinova they sound like the
best thing ever to come along.
Thankfully, Desidinova included
"Doubt" on their debut "Doubt" is the
first song that is actually enjoyable on
the album. The band claims to have been
influenced by Led Zepplin, but "Doubt"
is the first time that influence can be
heard. With shades of "The Rain Song"
evident "Doubt" is the first song for
which Desdinova deserves something
like praise. They managed to do the
whole song without falling into the
power ballad trap. They start it acousti-
cally, remain acoustic throughout and,
surprisingly, they end up with a decent
song.
In fact the band would be much
better off if they'd stick to what they're
good at According to the band's press
release, they have "mastery of the acous-
tic realm While I wouldn't go quite that
far, I will admit that the band is better
when they play acoustically. The last
three songs on the CD are all basically
acoustic and are quite good. "Leap Of
Faith" makes two appearances almost
back to back, one with drums, and the
"acoustic" version without Drums or no,
the song is just as good either way.
The other "acoustic" version they
do is of "On My Own While the first
version is by far the worst song on the
CD, the acoustic version really is a
"standout track as they put it Now if
the band would only take a listen to their
own CD and realize that they suck when
plugged in, Desdinova could be well on
their way.
In short, Desdinova is more proof
that most bands who claim that they
cannot be categorized as alternative, folk,
etc can be categorized as crap. Unfortu-
nately, most of these bands think they're
really breaking new ground. Actually,
they are all putting out albums that
sound terribly alike and are merely clut-
tering up shelves in record stores. So do
us all a favor, Desdinova. Come back
when you've decided what you really do
best
YOUR
could be here
ADVERTISING IN THE EAST CAROLINIAN CAN GET
YOUR MESSAGE OUT AROUND THE ECU CAMPUS.
For more
information call
328-2000
rf

DAYROOM from page 5
a great deal of respect for being the
musicians that they are.
Ryan Kelly (bassvocals), Brad
Zimmerman (drums), and Jimmy
Riddle (keyboards, vocals) did a great
job of holding the beat down. They
went into the studio, evidently know-
ing the sound they wanted and
needed in order to make Contagious,
and got the tracks laid down.
As a result, the band has an al-
bum that is strong from start to fin-
ish. They work your listening capabil-
ity better than other bands I have
heard in the past few months. Gener-
ally, as someone listens to a disc, they
can grow tired and unfamiliar with the
message by the time it comes to a
clore. The way in which this band
blocks this scenario out is quite funny.
They use songs like "My Way Or No
Way which includes a series of weird
hums and gestures - "Yum, Yum,
Yum" to be exact - to keep your at-
tention. It seems weird when you only
get the visual aspect; however, once
listened to, the audio takes control
and everything else seems to flow-
naturally.
You'll find that even if the band
makes no sense to you at all, you'll
still come back for more from
Dayroom, even if you don't want to.
Why? Well, have you ever kept a cold
that you actually wanted? Of course
not You keep it because it's Conta-
gious.
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU
at regional competitions to be held at James Madison University the weekend of
February 14-16,1997. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Sunday, November 24
1:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Saturday, November 23
1:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the
ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711,
for more information.
J
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FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St - ftnft Hours:
Pittman Building ! uuu-3 Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC 8:00-4:00
Get the Credit You Deserve
with the East Carolina
University Credit Card!
I!
Ooin us -foot
the experience
of a lifetime.
The East Carolinian is now hiring
Advertising Account Executives for
the Spring semester.
Come by our office to complete an
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3t's experience ifoutt never forget.
Apply for
the East Carolina
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with a low competitive annual rate, and
there's ro annual fee ever, as long as
you use your card at least once per
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1ust use the eaitl n least once aimualK or $30.00 fee is assessed.
Come by the Alumni Center, Taylor-Slaughter Building to
complete your application and receive your FREE T-Shirt!
��� �.
m





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 19,1996
MAYNARD frompagcS
It sounds like such a simple thing.
Someone needs money. You send. They get it.
But if it was so simple, you could use any
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Because only Western Union has more than
30,000 locations in over 120 countries.To
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Faster, in fact than any other money
transfer service � or any overnight service.
There's only one way to send money.
Western Union. Available at:
westerni imioney
union! (transfer
The fastest way to send money worldwide;
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and Peter Erskine are among the
alumni of Ferguson's band.
Tonight's show is part of the
band's national tour and is
Ferguson's first trip to Greenville.
Ferguson will also be leading a jazz
Master Class which the FRIENDS
of the S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series will be able to
attend.
Tickets for the show are $15
University Commons Shopping Center
Green ille Blvd. & S. Evans Street
Greenville, NC
919-321-5522 Open 7 days
Advcrliwrd prices do ntit appl
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Employer discount and oiher promotional
offers not applicable to advertised items.
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
ReadingChinaMM
The Kitchen Superstore:
Shop us on the World Wide Web at readingchina.com
in advance for the public, $12 for "
ECU faculty and staff and $7 for
ECU students and youths. All tick- �
ets are $15 at the door. The event "
is an added attraction, so it is not
part of the subscription series.
For more information, call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788
or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. For deaf or
speech impaired access, call 328-
4736.
JO from
page 5
TM
Grand Opening � November 22 thru 24
Friday; Nov. 22
READING CHINA & MORE! WILL
DONATE A SHARE OF THE DAYS
PROCEEDS TO THE GREATER
GREENVILLE WOMAN'S CLUB TO
BENEFIT NEW DIRECTIONS.
10-2 The Greater Greenville
Woman's Club tabletop decorating
contest. Come in and vote for your
favorite table! Tables will be displayed
until Sunday, December 1st.
11:30-2:30 Join WRNS 95.1 FM
radio personality Wayne Garble and
a chef from The Italian Garden
for a live remote, cooking demonstra-
tion, and tastings. Register to win
a $250 shopping spree from
Reading China & More! and a
New Year's Eve package from
Christinne's, including dinner for
two, champagne toast, dancing,
and breakfast the next morning.
Saturday, Nov. 23
11-1 The Upper Crust Bakery will
present an array of delectable baked
goods for sampling.
1-3 Meet Pia VanCoutren. Chef and
Owner of Christinne's. for a cooking
demonstration and tastings of
Mediterranean specialties.
3-5 Ragazzi's will present a cooking
demonstration and tastings of some of
their famous Italian dishes.
Sunday, Nov. 24
1:30-3 Join Chef Jonathon Gillespie
from Christinne's at Ironwood
Country Club for a cooking demon-
stration and tastings.
3-5 Meet Paul Morrow, Executive
Chef of Pargo's, for a cooking demon-
stration and tastings of some of their
fabulous American Bistro recipes.
PLUS demonstrations
of the latest products from
Cuisinart. as well as an assort-
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throughout the weekend!
Register to Win
A 7-piece Professional
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Retail Value WO.
Bridal & Gift Registry Available
The first 25 people who
register will receive a pair of
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Value $22.
eling circus, covers a time span
from the '50s to the '90s, and some
of the characters wear red ribbons.
But that is all icing on the cake, a
superficial layer of "stuff I want
to know if a person today would re-
ally have the devotion to God that
Job had way back then? Does reli-
gion still have such a substantial
impact on our lives? Call me a
doubting Thomas,
but I just don't
think so. I think
that people today
are way too con-
cerned with them-
selves - their faith
is too weak - to
suffer such an-
guish and gasp out
through teeth
clenched with
pain, "Blessed be
the name of the
Lord
However,
what I saw on
stage was nothing
short of brilliant.
Brinley Arden
Vickers stars as
Nickles (or Satan)
and Ryan Cox
plays Mr. Zuss (or
Cod). In the begin-
ning, Vickers
seemed like any ordinary popcorn
seller at a circus, but the transfor-
mation she underwent as she ac-
cepted the role of Satan was truly
a sight to behold. As soon as she
changed into the black velvet skirt
and lacy see-through blouse, she be-
gan a metamorphosis into an
otherworldly figure who exuded in-
iquity and depravity. In the end, she
was pure evil for evil's sake.
Vickers' performance was full of
such energy, vitality and realism
that I wonder if the masks she and
Cox wore weren't actually channels
through which God and Satan re-
ally played their parts.
1 was also thrilled to see Cox
in a "good guy" role, although I
think that maybe "good guy" is the
wrong phrase to describe it. What-
ever the term, however. Cox gave a
performance worthy of God.
And the God costume is abso-
lutely beautiful. From my seat it
looked like a long robe of flowing
blue velvet, embroidered with beads
and crowned with a wreath of
webbed ivory. The mask for God was
just as exquisite, edged in sparkling
wisps of material and covered in glit-
ter. The Satan mask, while it can
hardly be called beautiful, was, in
As soon as Vickers
changed into the
black velvet skirt
and lacy see-
through blouse,
she began a
metamorphosis
into an
otherworldly
figure who exuded
iniquity and
depravity. In the
end, she was pure
evil for evil's sake.
its own way, stunning. It was a mix-
ture of red and white glitter which
resulted in a strangely flattering gro r
tesqueness. Costume Designer
Kathleen Gossman has only been
with the ECU Playhouse since the
beginning of the semester, but there
has been absolutely no lapse in the
quality of the costume designs.
The role of J.B. was realistically
portrayed by
Michael
Scialabba, who
moved me to
tears in the fi-
nal scenes.
When Sarah
(played by
A 1 a y n a
Hamilton)
begged him to
"Curse God
and die" to end
his suffering, I
prayed he
would. And
when he cried
out to God to
explain his
guilt, I was an-
gered at the re- '�
sponse he was
given. In the
end he re-
mmmmmmmmmmmmmm pented of sins
he did not com-
mit, and my heart went out to him.
Hamilton's Sarah is worthy of
praise as well. I felt that her love
for J.B. literally shone from her face
and was a genuine reason for her to
come back to him.
Set Designer Robert C. Alpers
is also to be commended. I was es-
pecially impressed with the
"Heaven" area which was a scaffold-
ing-like platform high atop a spiral
staircase painted in shades of blue
which complemented God's cos-
tume. On the other end of the spec-
trum, Satan's home was dark and
black and studded with spikes.
Another spot of brilliance in
this show was the lighting. Designer
Ken White deserves either an award
or a copy of my optometrist's bill
for the intensity and violence that
the bursts of light which assaulted
the stage had.
I think the entire cast and crew,
and especially director Cedric
Winchell, deserve a standing ovation
for their hard work on such a diffi-
cult piece of theater. I strongly sug-
gest that anyone who hasn't seen this
show go see it tonight at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre. For ticket informa-
tion, call the East Carolina Playhouse
Box Office at 328829 or 328-1726.
TO PmrSH YOlli.SK)�(� �M.U.
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8
Tuesday, November 19,1996 The East Carolinian
Swimmers improve
overall recorcfto 4-0
Seniors record final
victory at home
David Councilman
Sports Writer
The ECU Swim Team let the
Duke Blue Devils of the ACC know
just how powerful the swimmers at
ECU are, Sunday, here at Minges
Aquatic center. Both the men's and
women's team improved their over-
all record to 4-0, with the women win-
ning by a score of 134-72 and the
men winning 132-93.
"We totally dominated Duke
from start to finish said Head Coach
Rick Kobe.
The ECU women dominated
their competition, winning 11 of the
12 events, including the relay com-
petitions and the diving events.
Freshman diver Casey Dodge led
the Lady Pirates in the diving com-
petition; she won both the one and
three meter events. The freshman
group for the Lady Pirates was out-
standing Sunday. Freshman Casey
Sloan set a new ECU varsity record
in the 1000 freestyle with a time of
10:24 70.15 seconds faster than her
nearest competitor. She also finished
first in the 500 free.
"Casey's record is remarkable in
the fact that usually does not hap-
pen till the end of the season at the
championships Kobe said.
Other winners were Amanda
Atkinson, Nikki Kreel, Sandra
Ossmann and Melanie Mackwood in
the 400 Medley Relay.
Other winners were Hollie But-
ler, Melanie Mackwood, Kim Field,
Kristen Olson, Laura Williams, and
the 400 relay team of Butler, Robyn
Williford, Adrienne Cross and Teresa
Hockman.
The Lady Pirates showed just
how dominant they are in their quest
for a CAA championship crown.
On the men's side, the score was
a little bit closer, but the men were
just as impressive. The men finished
first in nine of the 13 events. The
men had two multiple winners on the
day.
Senior Tony Novak finished first
in both of the diving events, and Matt
Jabs finished first in the 50 and 100
free.
Victors in the 400 medley relay
were were Paul Pinther, Brandon
Tilley, Andy Byrnes and Matt Jabs.
In their respective events, Lee
Hutchens, Richard Chen, Pinther and
Tilley recorded wins. The 400 Free
Relay team of Hutchens, Craig Rob-
erts, Jay Noles and Chen also finished
first
The men's team looks to have a
good chance at a CAA championship
crown as well.
Kobe was also very pleased with
the win. He had nothing but good
things to say about his outstanding
See DUKE page 9
Golf team edges out rival UNC-W
Mike Daniska
Staff Writer
The men's golf team closed out
the first half of the season by win-
ning the Charleston Southern Invi-
tational last week in South Carolina.
The team beat UNC-Wilmington in a
one hole sudden-death playoff. This
evened out ECU'S record against ri-
; val UNC-W to 1-1 this season.
Coach Kevin Williams' lineup in-
cluded senior Richie Creech and
freshman Mark Miller, who have
started in all four tournaments this
fall. The lineup also included three
other freshmen, Matt Riggs, Robby
Perry and Shane Robinson.
"I started three new freshmen
in order to give them some experi-
ence for the upcoming spring sea-
son Williams said.
Creech led the team the first day
with a 69 and Miller and Robinson
led the team the second day, both
shooting a 70. The victory at Charles-
ton Southern was the final piece to
a successful fall campaign, which saw
ECU play in three other tourna-
ments.
The season started with a fifth
place finish at a tournament that was
supposed to be held in Wilmington,
but was held at ECU due to Hurri-
cane Fran. Then the team traveled
to Chattanooga, Tenn. where they
placed 13th out of 15 teams.
"That was our worst tournament
of the year. We shot a 311 in the
first round and basically knocked our-
selves out of it Williams said.
The team rebounded however to
a seventh place finish out of 21 teams
at the Old Dominion tournament
which was held OcL 28-29.
"We have a lot more depth this
year than last year Williams said.
"The turning point of the season was
at the ODU tournament At one point,
we were tied with Duke, who is
ranked 19 in the nation. We had
talked in the fall that we had a good
team. Tying Duke gave the boys the
confidence that they could play at the
national level
"The ODU tournament showed
what we could do team co-captain
Kevin Miller said.
The improvement in the ODU
tournament and the victory at
Charleston Southern are both reflec-
tive of a much improved team from
last year.
"Last year in 11 tournaments
and about 28 rounds, we shot under
300 only five times Williams said.
"But this year, in just nine rounds,
we have shot under 300 seven times.
Also, we have had a different person
shoot under par in each of the last
four tournaments
This improvement comes during
See GOLF page 9
Houston heads to Liberty Bowl � ECU waits.
The Liberty Bowl announced Monday that Houston would be
attending the Liberty Bowl this year and not ECU. Bob Martin of the
Liberty Bowl Committee said that some of the main reasons ECU was
not invited back was, 1) ECU had been the past two years and 2) the
committee did not want to see a rematch between ECU and a Big-
East team. The other opponent will be the 4 seed of the Big-East.
Martin said the committee still respects ECU and when the Pirates
join Conference USA nex season, the decision will be made by the
players. "We hold East Carolina in absolutely the highest respect
Martin said. "All decisions next year will be made on the field ECU
is still waiting to see if they will receive a bowl bid this season. ECU
is on the list of the Independence Bowl committee, but nothing is
official.
Tournament ends men's soccer season
Pirates claw
Bobcats in
55-45 win
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
It was the last time the seniors
would play at home, and they made
sure they went out with a bang. ECU
scored 17 points in the first quarter,
en route to a 5545 win over Ohio
University.
For the seniors, it was a time to
reflect on their careers as Pirates.
"It's a lot of things coming back
to you tight end Scott Richards said.
"You start parting ways and reminisc-
ing
By the looks of the score, it may
seem the game was closer than it was,
but in actuality, it wasn't Ohio scored
21 unanswered points in the final five
minutes of the game off the second
string ECU defense.
Coach Steve Logan said his
younger guys needed the playing time,
despite giving up three touchdowns.
"They need the experience -
that's the way it goes Logan said.
Junior backup quarterback Dan
Gonzalez got his second straight start
against Ohio and his first win as a
starter. Gonzalez passed for 383 yards,
which is just nine yards short of the
record for passing yards gained. The
record, held by Marcus Crandell, was
set last year against Syracuse with 392
yards.
Gonzalez had a hard time believ-
ing he threw for that many yards, and
joked that maybe the statisticians
weren't doing their math correctly.
"I think somebody added up the
yards wrong Gonzalez said.
Logan was pleased that the team
put together a win with Gonzalez tak-
ing snaps.
"We found a way to win a game
with Danny at quarterback Logan
said. "He has a win as a starter and
that's significant"
Out of all those yards, Gonzalez
threw for only one touchdown. Full-
back Scott Harley did the rest of the
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Top- Scott H arley breaks through opponents during Saturday" s
game. Harley recorded a school record six touchdowns
against Ohio. Bottom- Dan Gonzalez takes the snap from
Danny Moore. Gonzalez threw for 383 yards and got his first
win as the strarting quarterback.
work on scoring, recording a school ning season. Before 1994, the last time
record six touchdowns in one game.
Harley finished with 205 total yards.
"I'm just happy to get positive
yards Harley said.
This isn't the first time Harley has
rushed for six touchdowns, but it's the
first time he has done it in college.
"I haven't done this since high
school Harley said. "I'm kind of sur-
prised I did this at the college level
Harley doesn't just get the ball
downfield, he gets through his oppo-
nents and that is something Logan
likes.
"Scott is having to break some
tackles - that is his forte, his
strength Logan said.
The Pirates recorded no turn-
overs in the game but caused five.
Linebacker Marvin Burke said Defen-
sive Coordinator Paul Jette got a feel
for their offense which made causing
turnovers a lot easier.
"We knew we had to cause turn-
overs Burke said. "Coach Jette got
a good feel for their offense
This win also signifies the third
season ECU has put together a win-
ECU had back-to-back winning sea
sons was in '82'83 - now they have
three.
"To put together three winning
seasons together, that's big - it's
meaningful Logan said.
Logan hopes that the younger
players will follow the example set by
the seniors.
"I'm very anxious to see if the
youngsters can measure up - not
physical talent but from the heart"
Logan said.
That "heart" was shown, as the
underclassmen wanted the win for the
seniors.
"We sent the seniors out with a
winning season Harley said.
Gonzalez said everyone gave the
extra effort for the seniors.
"We picked it up for the seniors.
We made a conscious effort
Gonzalez said.
Linebacker Carlos Brown
summed it up when he talked about
his last home game.
"We're a very proud senior class
Brown said. "Everything we've done,
we gave it our all
Tracy Laubach
Staff Writer
The men's soccer team closed out
their season with the CAA tourna-
ment last week. After being defeated
by UNC Wilmington 3-1 earlier this
year, the men headed into the game
looking for revenge. With no points
scored by halftime, the game was in-
tense and the outcome was unpredict-
able. However, in the end, UNC-W
came out on top score of 2-1.
In the 60th minute, senior
midfielder Kevin Johnson sent a long
pass to sophomore Wyatt Panos, who
then dribbled the ball directly into the
goal. Minutes later, UNC-W tied the
game with a corner kick. With 17
minutes left in the game, UNC-W
scored once again to win the game
As the tournament continued,
William and Mary defeated UNC
Wilmington 3-0, George Mason 3-1,
and finally became the conference
champion on Sunday with a 2-0 win
over James Madison.
As the CAA conference champi-
ons, William and Mary has earned an
automatic bid into the national tour-
nament
ECU's men's soccer team is lead
by Captain Chris Padgett along with
seniors Kevin Johnson, Darrec Jones
and Kevin Smith. With a team con-
sisting of many new faces, Coach Will
Wiberg feels that the men have
learned a lot this season and he is
looking forward to the spring season.
"This season was definitely much
better than last because not only did
we win more and lose less, but we were
also much more athletic Wiberg said.
"The players made a much bigger com-
mitment and have also improved im-
mensely in terms of speed and size
Eleven of the games played this
season were held on home grounds.
The entire team would like to thank
all of the fans who displayed their
support by coming out to Bunting
Field to cheer them on.
"Ten of our 14 season losses were
games that we lost by only one or two
goals or overtime Wiberg said. "So
many games were so close in the end
The coach expects the young re-
turning players to emerge next sea-
son as the new leaders of the team.
In the spring, he will be recruiting
players to replace the graduates as
well as some new players who will be
able to fill in some of the "team
needs
The spring season, which is
known as a "nontraditiona! season
lasts from February to April.
"The spring is a great time for
learning for the team. We play a lot
of different teams and we also enter
tournaments. Playing a variety of
teams will hopefully give us the expe-
rience we need to come out on top in
the future Wiberg said.
For the time being, the men now
have the opportunity to concentrate
on academics. They will continue to
lift weights until the spring season
begins, but for coaches and players
alike, now is the time to take a break.
"The guys worked really hard this
season. They have improved a lot
since last year, and from here on out,
I expect to see bigger and better
things out of them each year Wiberg
said.
PASSING
Gonzalez
RUSHING
Harley
RECEIVING
Shannon
Galloway
T. Smith
Nichols
Richards
ATT.
28
NO.
3
6
2
5
5
ATT-COMR-INT YARDS
44-23-0 383
GAIN LOST NET
208 3 205
TD LONG
1 53
TD LONG
6 32
YARDS TD LONG
96 0 48
78 0 9
78 0 53
66 0 26
30 1 9
ECU'S
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
SID - ECU'S men's cross country team had its highest team finish ever at the NCAA District III Regional meet hosted by
Furman University on Saturday. The Pirates placed 25th of 43 teams. ECU's Jamie Mance wrapped up an outstanding
sophomore campaign, placing 50th of over 300 runners with a time of 31:28. Mance finished seventh at the 19 CAA
Championships, earning All- CAA honors and he also received All-State at this year's North Carolina Collegate Cross Country
Championships.
Sophomore Jeremy Coleman was ECU's next highest finisher, placing 125th in 32:22.
"We definitely completed the season with flying colors said ECU assistant coach Mike Ford. "We've set personal
records every single week we've run. Today's race was the best performance ever in ECU history for our men's team, finishing
25th
ECU'S women's team was represented by sophomore Kerri Harding who finished 94th in 18:46 and junior Karen
Reinhard who placed 153rd in 19:16. There were 317 competitors in the women's race.
"The girls ran great today. They represented ECU well said Ford.
�PI I ��! ����





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 19,1996
Recreational Services Announces:
W�'(ze 5ruMp�D coarser
OUK.E from page 8
swimmers.
i am happy to have guys and
girls undefeated Kobe said. "This
was the best total team meet of the
season
The Pirates look very strong go-
ing into the Nike Cup on Nov. 21-23
in Chapel Hill. This is a very presti-
gious tournament, a tournament that
will feature the top swimming schools
in the country. The Pirates will get a
true test at this tournament and
hopefully they will come back to ECU
with a strong showing
"We are looking forward to the
competition at the Nike Cup; it is one
of the most prestigious tournaments
in the nation Kobe said
The Pirates should be able to go
into this tournament and make a very
strong name for themselves and ECU
as well. If the Pirates have the same
type of showing at the Nike Cup as
they did against Duke, they should
have no problems with showing the
rest of the country that ECU swim-
ming is making a name for itself.
When will the Student Recreation Center open??
You tell us
Available to ECU Students, Faculty, and Staff.
One Entry per participant.
Prize winner receives:
Complimentary Hang Gliding Lesson- Kitty Hawk Kites
� University Book Exchange- Gift Certificate
� Mike's Deli-Two Complimentary Pizzas
� East Coast Music Video- Gift Certificate
� Gordon's Golf & Ski- Gift Certificate
� Celebrity status at Grand Opening
CjOLx from page 8
what would look like a rebuilding
year. Seven of the team's 11 mem-
bers are freshmen. One of the rea-
sons for the young team's success,
however has been team unity.
"The whole team gets along so
well said Williams. "We do every-
thing as" a team
"We all get along great Miller
said. "We just like hanging out with
each other
With a successful fall season be-
hind them, the team can't wait to get
back out on the links for the spring
season which starts Feb. 22 at the
Ron Smith tournament in South
Florida.
"I'm really excited about it
Miller said "We will be playing big-
ger schools. I think we'll be tough
to beat
As the season progresses
thoughts of an NCAA berth linger in
the air.
"At this time last year, we were
number 27 in our district. Now we
are number 13. Only the top eight
teams get an NCAA berth, so we have
to put it all together in the spring
Williams said.
The team for ECU to beat will
be nationally ranked Virginia Com-
monwealth, to whom the Pirates have
already lost once this year. They will
get three chances in the spring for
revenge.
As for the future of golf at ECU.
Williams thinks it will thrive.
"We have raised our talent
level Wiiliams said. "We are on the
right track, it's just a matter of get-
ting the right people
Name:
Address
Phone:
SS:
My guess for the SRC opening is Month, Day, and ah Yeafl
Tie Breaker: How many gallons of water are in the 3 indoor pools?:
(Juedau
COLLEGE NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
Return this form to 204 Christenbury by
5:00 p.m. on November 27. Contest winner will be notified by phone.
Call Recreational Services at 328-6387 for more information.
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
FEATURING "HAP COHTJET
��
J'VOHNB PEARON
MICHAEL BLACKOH
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 19,8PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
$3 FOR STUDENTSFACULTYSTAFF
$5 FOR THE PUBLIC &e
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $5
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION CULTURAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004





10
Tuesday, November 19,1996 The East Carolinian
cms
;
EH3ol
For Rent
5f Services
Offered
&.
Travel Announcements
TYPING, FAST ANU ACCURATE. $1.00 per
page, call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
MF NEEDED TO MOVE into 2bdr apt
surrounded by fun and friendly neighbors.
Located on Fifth Street across campus,
downtown. $200 a month. Available Jan.
1st Call 757-3434.
THREEFOUR BEDROOM HOUSE AT
201 East 13th . All hardwood floors five
blocks from campus. Rent $450month.
Call 757-3191.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED Fur
nished bedroom with private bath. Con-
venient to campus. Call 321-1848 after
6:00 pm.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-
7613. Very Affordable!
1 BEDROOM FOR RENT. Sublease from
January 1 to August L Wesley Commons.
Call 830-9585.
WANTED: GRADUATE STUDENT
SEEKING 1 male housemate $170mo.
Includes utilities. Close to campus. Call
Kevin 752-5557.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
RENT $190,12 electric and phone. East-
brook Apt Two bedroom, two bathroom,
dishwasher. Nicely furnished. Can move
in December 1st Must be drug free. 758-
9157.
ROOMMATE WANTED IMMEDIATELY.
MALE or female. $260 per month and 1
2 utilities, fully furnished. Call 3534451.
ONETWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
ACROSS from campus. Own parking.
$325$425. Call Rizz (919)-821-3225.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse.
All furnishings except BDR. WasherDry-
er included. Pets negotiable available mid
December Must be clean and sociable.
Rent $217.50month. Must see! 756-6556
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central
ACHeat WD. Dishwasher. Only $185 a
month and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999.
Available now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
to share Tar River Apartment own bed-
room, pay 14 utilities close to campus.
Call 758-7542.
CLOSE TO ECU - Woodcliff Apts 10th
Street - 2 bedrooms, very energy efficient
washerdryer hook-ups, watersewer in-
cluded. 756-0944.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share three bedroom house close to cam-
pus. $190 per month plus 13 utilities.
Call 321-6176.
VERY, VERY QUIET UPSTAIRS fur
nished bedrooms for rent in modern home
on 17th fairway, Brook Valley. Shared
bath. Semi-private entrance. Limited kitch-
en privileges. Central AC. $210 for each
bedroom. All utilities included except ca-
ble TV and your telephone. Available im-
mediately. Semester lease and $100 de-
posit No smokers.Graduate or profession-
al students only. References required. Call
(919)-756-2027.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE WANT
ED. NICE house, close to campus. 752-
8682.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! Short
walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - Next
to AOTT house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths
- mint condition. 5th Street Square - Up-
town - Above BW3 - 3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths, sunken iiving area. Luxury Apar-
tment 'Available Now! Will lease for De-
cember or January (6 month or year leases
available) Also Available - "The Beauty
Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment - if you see
it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
SUB-LEASE AVAILABLE: I'M graduat-
ing! Studio Apartment in Ringgold Tow-
ers. New furniture and carpet Call 830-
2214 for more information. Please leave
a detailed message.
11 Wanted
WILSON ACRES, TWO BEDROOM
apartment Sublease January through
May. 1 12 bath. Washerdryer hook-up.
Close to campus. Call Paige or Paula af-
ter 7.30. 830-1705.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease. Great house 1 block from
campus. Mid Dec or Jan. 1. Call 830-5419.
ROOMMATE WANTED DEC. 1: 3 bed
room house one block from campus, 13
utilities, you get own bath. Washer and
dryer included. Male or female call Tam-
my 757-9310
m
Help
11 Wanted
BUS DRIVERS NEEDED. PAID training
provided - no experience necessary. Must
be a student in good standing with a GPA
of at least 2.00. Contact Carl at 328-4724
for more information
DON'T READ THIS UNLESS you're mo-
tivated, ready for a change. Looking to
make $2-$5Kmonth bonus. Training and
travel available. Call 353-7106.
MAIL AND FILE CLERK for law firm.
Must be able to work afternoons. Call Jane
Barber at 756-4787 10:00 am -12:00 noon.
CUSTOMER SERVICE - part time. Take
payments, assist with inquiriesreturns.
Day hours (9am-2pm schedules) needed for
15-25 hours per week. Position includes
weekend hours. Applications accepted
Tuesday, l-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza. For
information, call 756-3140.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
STARTING spring semester. Two bed-
room, 2 12 bath, fully furnished, pool,
on ECU bus route. Please call 752-0813.
HOUSE FOR RENT NOW. 3 bedrooms,
walking distance to ECU, washerdryer
hook-ups, central heatair, excellent loca-
tion. $600month. Call now, ask for Todd,
758-5261.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and
utilities 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very
Affordable.
HELP WANTED: WAITSTAFF DAY-
TIME and night shifts available. Must be
able to work at least two weekday lunch
shifts. NO CALLS. Please apply in person
between 8 am and 10 anuor 2 pm and 4
pm. Professor O'Cools, Winn Di"ie Mar-
ket Place.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR Men are
accepting applications for additional Part
Time year-round positions. Take advantage
of the extra holiday money and a merchan-
dise discount Applications accepted Tues-
day, l-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza and Caroli-
na East Mall.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
CRUISE STOPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53628.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING
our circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
WANTED: BASKETBALL OFFICIALS
FOR Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment winter basketball league. Posi-
tion pays $10-$12 a game. Clinics will be
held to train new and experienced offi-
cials. However, a basic knowledge and un-
derstanding of the game is necessary. Man-
datory organizational meeting will be held
Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 pm. For more
information, please call 830-4550 or 830-
4567.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EX-
TRA cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Midwest
Distributors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
LAB TECHNICIAN: ENCELLE, INC a
medical device company in Greenville, NC
has in immediate opening for a lab tech-
nician with a BS degree in Biology or a
related science. This position requires ex-
perience in cell isolation and maintenance.
Duties will include development and im-
provement of islet isolation and testing
techniques. Salary commensurate with ex-
perience. Mail resumes to: Personnel Di-
rector, PO Box 3371, Greenville, NC
27836.
GOING 2 COLLEGE YOUNG, dynamic
company looking for energetic, motivat-
ed individuals to fill full time and part time
positions. People skills a must For an in-
terview, 321-4864.
THE CENTER COURT IS now hiring.
The juicebar in the new recreation center
is in search of staff that are willing to work
in a fun and exciting atmosphere. Success-
ful candidates will be enthusiastic, respon-
sible and very dependable. We offer flexi-
ble hours around school schedules. Come
by the ARAMARK Dining Office in Men-
denhall Student Center and get your ap-
plication today! EOE
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive room &
boardother benefits. For info, call: (206)
971-3680 ext. K53624.
RECEPTIONIST NEEDED FOR OF-
FICE furniture store. Must work well with
people, have an interest in the sales at-
mosphere and have good computer skills.
Call 931-6904
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry
level & career positions available world-
wide (Hawaii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc.).
Waitstaff, housekeepers, SCUBA dive lead-
ers, fitness counselors, and more. Call Re-
sort Employment Services 1-206-971-3600
ext. R53625.
KIM'S TYPING SERVICE: TERM papers and
resumes, reasonable prices. Call 756-5813 af-
ter 2:30pm
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19,2TB T0FICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
ES5 800-3510222
Or rush $2.00 to. Research Assistance
11322 Iflaho Pm 206-RR. Los Angeles. CA 900?5
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 49�-S4
AAAA! CANCUN & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel $399! Pric-
es Increase Soon - Save $50! Save $150
on Food, Drinks & Free Parties! 111
Lowest Price Guarantee! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399. Panama City
Daytona $119! www.springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel &
Location! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Lo-
cation $139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169!
springbreaktravel.com l-80(678386
Personals
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings
�Corporate Events
�Special Events
Xfe also rent tables and chairs
iectnt uaoU"
752-1988
Terry Peaden
TODD, IF YOU ARE my turgid man you
can find me in the same place on page
203. P.O. Box 1!40. Call me back.
M
Greek
Personals
Wanted
AKA BOOK SCHOLARSHIP: THETA Al
pha Chapter will award a $200 book schol-
arship for the best essay entitled "What is
the most challenging problem facing our
generation and what can you do to help
change it?" Essays should be 2 typed pag-
es and double-spaced and should be post
marked by November 30th. Essays should
be mailed to: Alpha Kappa Alpha, P.O. Box
2886, Greenville, NC 27858.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants
and scholarships available from spon-
sors! No repayments, ever! $$$ Cash for
college $$$� For info: 1-800-400-0209.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6
Billion in public and private sector grants
& scholarships is now available. All stud-
ents are eligible. Let us help. For more
info, call: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53629.
GO ALPHA DELTA PI soccer! Let's stay
undefeated!
DELTA SIG - Thanks for the great social
last Thursday night We had a blast on
the Big Wheels! Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Delta Pi.
AMELIA, CONGRATULATIONS ON
GETTING into nursing school. Love your
Zeta Big Sis and Sisters.
CHI OMEGA. THANKS FOR the great
time Thursday night We hope to go beach
combing again with you soon. The Broth-
ers of Delta Sigma Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS NIKKI NOREN
ON your Glaxo Wellcome Scholarship! We
love you! Love, your Alpha Delta Pi sis-
ters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO SIGMA AL-
PHA Epsilon on receiving their charter!
You are a great bunch of guys and we hope
we can get together soon. Love, the Sis-
ters and New Members of Delta Zeta.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Phi Kappa Psi,
congratulations on such a successful mid-
semester rush. We are really proud of you
and we wish you the best Love, the -Sis-
ters and New Members of Delta Zeta.
5fc
Travel
Announcements
THE HOME GROWN MUSIC Network
needs you! We are currently accepting ap-
plications for future interns. Learn about
the music business and earn course cred-
its. Call Leeway Productions 753-8566.
HELP WANTED: EXPERIENCED WAIT
STAFF and cashier. No phone calls. Ap-
ply at Szechuan Gardens, 909 S. Evans
St, Greenville.NC.
SEEK DEPENDABLE AND EXPERI-
ENCED non-smoking babysitter to help
M-F lpm-6pm with two children in our
home. Long term position preferred. Call
355-8932.
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MULTI-MEDIA
PRODUCTIONS is now recruiting full-fig-
ured African-American women to model
exotic lingerie during photographic ses-
sions. All work is non-pornographic and
free of nudity. Earn up to100 per hour!
You must be at least 21 years of age to
apply. Call 1-919-321-8218,1-800-921-3855
or e-mail amp3@ix.netcom.com.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
30 SHOPPING DAYS LEFT! NOW is
the time to guarantee the lowest rates and
best hotels for spring break. Leisure Tours
has packages to South Padre, Cancun, Ja-
maica and Florida. 800-838-8203
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
Party Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes All
Meals, Parties, Taxes! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! Prices Increase Soon - Save $50!
springbreaktravel.com 1-80(678-6386
SPRING BREAK '97. The reliable spring
break company: Hottest destinations! Coo-
lest Vacations! Guaranteed lowest prices!
From $99. Organize small group! Travel
free! Sunsplash Tours! 1-800426-7710.
one is welcome. Call 756-8315 for more
info.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANI-
ZATION will be held on Nov. 21 at 4:30
pm in GCB 1028. International programs
will .present information about its study
abroad programs.
NEED A CHALLENGE TO excite your
mind? Changing your major? Join us for
our 1st Annual Career Fair for Interior
Design, Nov. 19,1996. Rivers Bldg 9am -
4pm. Refreshments will be served.
CAREER SERVICES ORIENTATION
REGISTRATION: Students who will
graduate in December, 1996 or MaySum-
mer 1997 are invited to attend an Orien-
tation to Career Services program to get
an overview of the programs and services
available to you to help you in the job
search. The staff will explain procedures
for establishing a credentials file, partici-
pating in campus interviews and register-
ing with the Career Services Center, 701
E. Fifth Street on Tuesday, Nov. 26 at
10:00 am.
PUTTING YOUR RESUME ON Line Dr.
Uma Gupta will present a program on how
to put one's resume on line on Thursday,
Nov. 21 at 4:30 pm. It will be held in the
Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
Street All students who want to have more
exposure to employers are invited to hear
about this free service.
HOLIDAY GUIDE TO ADVENTURE
GIFTS - learn how to make gifts in the
outdoors November 26 at 7:00 pm in the
Recreational Outdoor Center. Register by
Nov. 22 in 204 Christenbury. Rec Servic-
es 328-6387.
SAM WILL BE HAVING Danny Smith
from Rubbermaid as their speaker this
week. He will be talking about the impor-
tance of strategic planning and mergers
and acquisitions. The meeting will be held
in GCB 1028 at 3:30 pm on Tuesday, Nov.
19. Food ind refreshments will be served
after the meeting.
ECU POETRY FORUM WILL meet on
Wednesday evening at 8:00 pm in 248
Mendenhall. Visitors welcome. Those wish-
ing feedback, please bring six or eight cop-
ies of each poem.
ACOUSTICAL MUSICIANS NEEDED
FOR the AMA's Music Cafe to take place
at the Wright Place during the first week
of December to raise funds for the Leo
Jenkins Cancer Center. Call Rob at 752-
4988.
BUS TRIP TO AND from Charlotte to
the ECU - State game. Includes travel to
and from Charlotte (leaving Friday, Nov.
29th and returning Sunday, Dec. 1st), Fri-
day and Saturday night hotel, and shuttle
to and from game on Saturday. $300cou-
ple. Tickets to game also available. Call
523-1192.
AMERICA'S 1 STUDENT TOUR OPERATOR
Cancun from $359
Jamaica from $359
Florida from $119
Guaranteed Lowest
Prices on CampusiH
On Campus Contact:
Anthony @ 758-3318
Phillip @ 328-7579
1344 Ahton Rd . Itt Hoar
Hanoww, MD 21076
http:tstrovei.com
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865

I a OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
I PRESENTATION OF THIS COUPON I
NOT VALID WITH ANY
OTHER SPECIALS
EXPIRES M-JO-
f ChoTceol a TV, "vCR"o" a CD playar "wttti ,
i a one year lease at Wesley Commons I
North with presentation of this coupon, j
Not valid with any other specials.
EwfK 11 30-96
I I and 2 Bedroom Range. Refridgerator, Washer.
I Dryer Hookups Decks and Patios in most units, f
j Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5 j
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER, CABLE
���,?,��
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefndgeratorDishwasher
Washer. Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
By 7iui
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable. 5
� blocks from campus. Mew owcrsinp. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
.06 A BROWNI.EA DRIVE
7SHM.
lpBtfS.
Possible Career Opportunity
Now hiring personalities,
all shifts available.
Above Average Pay
Come by Today!
CALL STS @ �00-648-4849
Spring Break'97
Book Now & Save! Lowest prices to
Florida, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,
Carnival Cruises.
Now Hiring
Campus Reps!
Endless
Summer Tours
I -800-234-7007
Jamaica Cancun Panama City Daytona
Key West South Padre
FINANCIAL
Are you seeking a solid career where there is opportunity far growth? If so. consider a career
with NOHWEST FINANCIAL, You'll find cipporturifly. challenge, and variety as a
TRATMRR - HMgniT M ANAOKR
We seek professional, career-oriented ixidividuals with leadership abilities and analytical
skills. We offer a competitive salary with regular increases based an performance
Inin rr team s�) MAMAfHJTR TRAINED � r.RRTlTT and youl enjoy
an intensive training program on all aspects of branch management
learning credit investigation, loan interviewing, loan analysis and sales techniques.
learning collection problem-solving, delinquency, and bad debt control.
Send (or FAX) resume to:
Norwest Financial
Mark A. Ciinnlngharn.Manager
3501Capital Blvd. 121
Raleigh, NC 27604
FAX 91B-878-3M8
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Paid Internships Available
ItraviToDbcovefl lit row Otscowr Cart
And Save Uo To $ZSt To Apply for A Cart.
Call 1-800-IT-PAYS-TC.
Bahamas Party
Cruise 279
I Days � � Maaa � c-m Piitss � HBBM T��S�
Cancun '399
7 ffa � AirHast � sssf tt0 en foee a MM
Jamaica 4i9
? NqW� � U � -� � Sjw H 50 c Pood na
Florida sii9
1 Mgra � a�nsm� Oly, DbJMs. 4 Cocoa Baser.
Sprhtj treakTravel -Oar :0A Yearl
1-800-678-6386 I
LAW SOCIETY: COME BY our next
meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 19th at 5:15 in
Ragsdale. Room 218A. A guest speaker
will be present and t-shirts will be ordered
with a $5.00 deposit The meeting is open
to all majors.
TUES.NOV. 19 - Senior Recital, Dawn
Beckwith, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7pm; Wed, Nov. 20 - Symphonic Wind En-
semble and Concert Band, Scott Carter
and Christopher Knighten, Conductors,
Wright Auditorium, 8 pm; Thurs, Nov. 21
- Graduate Recital. Kathleen Bernesky,
choral conducting, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 pm; Fri, Nov. 22 - Senior Recital,
Megan Gray, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 pm; Fri, Nov.22 - Jazz at Night
Carroll Dashiell Jr Director, The Social
Room, Mendenhall Student Center, 8 pm;
Sat, Nov. 23 - Graduate Recital, Sharon
Denise Walker, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 2 pm;
Sat, Nov. 23 - Sophomore Recital, Kim-
berly Ledford, flute, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall. 7 pm; Sat Nov. 23 - Senior Recital,
Scott Beckett trumpet AJ Fletcher Reci-
tal Hall, 9 pm; Sun, Nov. 24 - Memorial
Concert for James Mark Hamilton, Lou-
ise Toppin, soprano, Sharon Munden, mez-
zo-soprano, Jane Kline, mezzo-soprano.
Perry Smith, tenor, Jay Pierson.baritone,
John O'Brien, piano, Fritz Gearhart vio-
lin with guest Alan Arnett dancer, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4 pm; Sun, Nov. 24
- Junior Recital, Mitch Butler, trombone,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm; Sun, Nov.
24 - Senior Recital, Paula Denton, trum-
pet AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 pm; Mon,
Nov. 25 � Guitar Ensemble, Elliot Frank,
Director, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm.
APPRENTICESHIPS AND INTERN-
SHIPS WITH the NC Dept of Public
Transportation - Information is available
at Career Services on these paid one-year
experiences for graduating seniors and
students enrolled or enrolling in gradu-
ate school. The application deadline is Fe-
bruary 14th, 1997. For more info, 328-
6050.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS, and Al
lies for Diversity. Our next meeting will
be on November 20 at 7:30pm in Room
221 of MSC. Hope to sec you there.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB WILL hold its
next meeting on Thursday, Nov. 21 in GCB
3009. Our guest speaker will be Wendy
Raines from On Line Information Services.
She will be discussing credit For example,
"How do 1 establish a credit record?" Stu-
dents, faculty, and staff welcome. Refresh-
ments to be provided.
TIBETAN BUDDHIST TALK: A talk en
titled "A Source of Unending Joy" will be
given by Lama Gyurme Chotso at 7:30 PM,
Thursday, Nov. 21 in Room 1026 in GCB.
A native of Ohio, Lama Gyurme (Kathy
Wesley) has been a student of Tibetan Bud-
dhism since 1977 and recently completed
a traditional three-year retreat. The talk
is sponsored in part by the Buddhist Med-
itation and Study Group of ECU. Every-
VrVTTAR V635 35MM SINGLE reflex
camera with autofocus 28-70mm macro
300m lens. Manualsmall case included.
Barely used. $100. Call 321-8572 after 5
pm.
DRUM SET FOR SALE. Pearl Export
Five piece. Black. Sounds excellent! Makes
a great gift Negotiable. Call Matt at 752-
5221.
FORD ESCORT 1985, NEW battery,
stereo, standard shift 4 gears, runs great
$1400 or best offer. Call now 353-7152.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS! SONY STEREO
135 wattschannel, $400. Large entertain-
ment center, $150. Kicker box two 12"
woofers, $150. Alphasonik amplifier, 300
watts. $150. Brian 752-1891.
LEATHER SOFA AND CHAIR $700
(paid $1800): contemporary canopy bed
$175; black ceiling fan $25; Polk audio
speaker box $175. 321-7183.
'87 NISSAN SENTRA - runs great AC,
Alpine CD. 5 speed - $1400 or best offer.
Call 752-1741.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural & Dr. recommended. A healthier
you through cellular nutrition. 30 Day
money-back guarantee. Call now 756-
1188.
P100 COMPUTER WITHOUT ANY ram,
hard drive, or CD-rom. Has SVGA 15"
monitor. Call 754-8261.
GRADUATION SALE. EVERYTHING
MUST go! Best offers taken. Call 353-1769
and ask for Maria or Susan,
MOVING SALE: RECLINER, WALL unit
coffee table, TV stand, chair, sleeper sofa:
All must go! Best offer taken. Call 752-
4457.
PEAVY ELECTRIC GUITAR and crate
amp. with awesome reverb. Comes with
case, stand, and tuner. All for $350.00.
Call 830-0921.
GREAT DEALS MUST SELL. 1982 Toyo-
ta Supra 6-Cyl 5 speed. $1800. Covercraft
car cover, never used, fits 15-16' car, $70;
weight bench squat rack 300 lbs 2 bars,
$300. Call 752-1321.
ADMIRE VOLUPTUOUS, RUBE-
NESQUE, MAJESTIC, INCOMPAR-
ABLE African-American women? Then or-
der photographic images of Gorgeous full-
figured African-American women model-
ing exotic lingerie! All material is non-por-
nographic and free of nudity. Write: Afri-
can-American Multi-Media Productions,
P.O. Box 28051. Raleigh, NC 27611-8051;
Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E
mail:amp3@ix.netcom.com A free catalog
is available upon request! Check out our
web site at http:www.best.com
amp3 You must be 18 years of age to
order.





Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 19, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1176
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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