The East Carolinian, November 14, 1996






November 1 4, 1996
Vol 72, No. 24
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Across The State
GASTONIA, N.C. (AP) - Gun-
men fired on soccer players and spec-
tators at a Gastonia park on Monday
night, but did not hit any of the
people on the field.
Gastonia Police said the gunmen
were firing .22 caliber bullets at the
crowd.
Police still had not caught the
gunmen on Tuesday, but parents of
the children playing soccer said they
had taunted the crowd before flee-
ing prior to police arriving.
NEW BERN, N.C. (AP) - A fed-
eral jury has found four alleged mem-
bers of a New York-based gang guilty
of a laundry list of charges related to
drug trafficking and four killings.
Jurors on Tuesday found
Dushawn Gardner, Barkley Gardner,
Bernard Troy Celestine and Randolf
Moore guilty of 30 charges, ranging
from racketeering to carjacking and
murder.
The men all face possible
federal life sentences without parole,
The Herald-Sun of Durham reported
today.
Across The Country
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Ahhh.
The rich, robust aroma of fresh-
brewed Hawaiian Kona coffee. Or was
it'
For nine years, millions of Java
lovers who believed they were enjoy-
ing the expensive Hawaiian brand
might actually have been drinking
cheaper Central American coffee, fed-
eral officials said.
A well-established U.S. coffee
supplier is accused of mislabeling the
beans in order to make millions in a
scandal that has rocked the indus-
try.
WALLINGFORD, Conn. (AP) -
A 16-year-old boy's in-line skates have
landed him in trouble with the law.
Ross Newell was on his wheels
Sunday, the day a new anti-skating
ban went into effect His seemingly
innocent ride through downtown
ended with a trip to police headquar-
ters.
The Town Council originally
passed the downtown ban on skat-
ing and skateboarding in August
Around The World
BEUING (AP) - Chinese Presi-
dent Jiang Zemin made a splash with
fellow Pacific Rim leaders and re-
gional media last November by prom-
ising to slash import tariffs as proof
of China's commitment to freer trade.
Yet a year later, foreign busi-
nesses feel barely a ripple of effect
Many foreign businesses want
Beijing to focus on tearing down
more barriers to trade and invest-
ment
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - Delegates
to the Middle East economic confer-
ence got down to the business of
business today, discussing how build
the region's economy.
U.S. Commerce Secretary
Mickey Kantor pointed out that the
Middle East and North Africa get less
than 1 percent of global investment
and won't be able to stimulate their
economies � and improve the living
standards of their people - unless
that increases.
Volunteering a strong program on campus
Students give
60,000 hours to
organizations
Erika Swarts
Staff Writer
Last month the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill was ranked one
of the top volunteer schools in the coun-
try, but as far as the number of student
volunteers goes, ECU tops Carolina with
over 7,000.
The two main groups which helped
Carolina receive their ranking were the
Student Environmental Action Coali-
tion (SEAC) and their National Student
Coalition for Action in Literacy (SCAL).
ECU also has a volunteer program
which places student volunteers into
organizations throughout Pitt County.
One organization that receives as-
sistance from student volunteers is the
Literacy Volunteers of America-Pitt
County. Student volunteers help with
the annual corporate spelling bee.
"You really cannot compare the
two (programs) Volunteer Director
Judy Baker said. "We are about answer-
ing the needs of the community, regard-
less of who or what it is for. However,
air level of volunteer work shouid be
commended, but our main objective is
the community
Baker feels that volunteer work is
the most important thing a student can
do. It helps them find out what is go-
ing on in the community. It also coun-
teracts the emphasis that is placed on
bad press.
"People are more interested in the
fights Baker said. "Our students are
marvelous. Most of the community or-
ganizations rely on our volunteers for
fund-raising and other programs
The program is expanding. In 1989
they worked with eight agencies. To-
day, they work with 60 agencies, com-
piling over 60,000 hours of volunteer
See VOL page 2
Corporation welcomes
female science majors
GlaxoWellcome
offers
scholarships,
mentors
Jacqueline D. Keilum
��t� lif n
DQMOr rwmSf
Two ECU female students are cur-
rently participating in a program spon-
sored by Glaxo Wellcome, which provides
them with scholarships and pairs them
with mentors in their field. This program
also provides a $25,000 endowment to
the school
This program is specifically geared
toward female students in science ma-
jors. The objective of this scholars pro-
gram is to encourage women to pursue
scientific careers. The two ECU recipi-
ents are Braden Boone and Nikki Noren.
"Ifs basically just to glorify women
in science and make sure that women
know there are other women out there
that are pursuing careers in science, and
that ifs possible, and to encourage it
Noren said.
Nancy Pekarek, manager of Corpo-
rate Communications at Glaxo Wellcome,
said that the program began with a
former chief executive officer, Dr. Charles
A. Sanders. He was concerned that
women did not seem to be going into
science careers in
significant numbers.
"Women do
not go into the sci-
ences in the same
percentages that
men do, and that
means we are losing
out on a lot of tal-
ent Pekarek said.
So in 1993,
Glaxo Wellcome
started this pro-
gram, which not
only provides finan-
cial support to fe-
male science stu-
dents, but also pairs
each student with a
mentor who is there
to help however she can.
Noren said that her mentor, Dr.
Chris Boytos, was in the cancer biology
department at GlaxoWellcome and had
been very helpful.
"She's trying to help me grow as a
student If I have any questions about
how I want to pursue the path that I'm
going to pursue, I can ask her Noren
said.
All of the mentors are employees at
Glaxo Wellcome, and according to
Pekarek, had responded well to the op-
portunity to be mentors.
"The men-
tors are volun-
teers. It's an in-
credibly popular
program. We have
more volunteers
that we have stu-
dents Pekarek
said.
Both Noren
and Pekarek both
said that they felt
the mentor pro-
gram set this
scholarship apart
from others.
"It's good for
every person in
school, either
��������� jg or fernaje to
have a role model that's outside the edu-
cation perspective of it, that you can look
to and ask questions pertaining to what
you're going through Noren said.
Pekarek said the mentor program
had been so successful that she knew of
some students and mentors who stayed
in touch after the students graduated.
She said the employees seemed to enjoy
the chance to influence the future scien-
See WOMEN page 2
"Women do not
go into the
sciences in the
same percentages
that men do, and
that means we are
losing out on a lot
of talent
� Nancy Pekarek, manager of
Corporate Communications at
GlaxoWelcome
Criminal justice students honored
N.C. Police Corps
scholarships
awarded
Amena Hassan
Staff Writer
Recently two ECU students were awarded the N.C.
Police Corps Scholarships for the '9697 year. Sandra
Vaughn of Reidsville and Ted Sauls of Kinston, who are
students in the criminal justice department, received
the two awards.
"We are simply elated that two
of our ECU students were lucky
enough to get such a significant
honor said, Professor James
Campbell, who submitted the names
of the two students. "They are cer-
tainly top notch students who passed
the scholarship tests with flying col-
ors
The scholarship, based in Wash-
ington D.C consists of federal funds
which are offered to students who
have a keen interest in law enforce-
ment. Vaughn and Sauls, who were chosen out of 20
students receiving scholarship money in North Caro-
lina, will receive $7,500 for each year to cover their
college expenses. Each recipient receives a maximum
of $30,000 which is not to be paid back, provided the
requirements of the scholarship are fulfilled.
The Greenville Police Department, for which the stu-
dents will be working after graduation, sponsored both
students from ECU and also will receive $10,000 per par-
ticipant for each year worked under the agreement of the
scholarship. After the employment with the department,
the students are free to choose employment anywhere in
the nation or they may continue working with the de-
partment
"It is an honor to get the Police Corps Scholarship
and I'm excited to receive it Vaughn said. "Our names
were submitted and we had to speak to the Greenville
Police Department corporal, as well as undergo a series
of physical and psychological tests
Vaughn will participate in gen-
eral police work for four years at the
Greenville Police Department and
then later hopes to acquire a federal
job in the FBI. "I was extremely sat-
isfied and pleased after hearing the
news Sauls said. "It was a big re-
ward, considering I had loans to pay
off from the past years at college
"It's very exciting to be in a na-
tional program and be a part of some-
thing that's just getting off the
ground said Professor Paul Knepper
of the criminal justice department said. "I think it's out-
standing that our two students got it, and it's a great
opportunity to work closely with the Greenville Police
Department"
"It is an honor to
get the Police
Corps Scholarship
and I'm excited to
receive it
� Sandra Vaughn
Top Places Students Volunteer
American Red Cross
The Boys and Girls Club of Pitt County
Greenville Community Shelter
New Directions � shelter for battered women
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
Ronald McDonald House
Special Olympics
For moro information on volunteering contact
Judy Baker at 328-6432.
Program eases Veterans
transition to Workforce
Photo Courtesy of the Internet
Phil Gramm speaks with veterans during a service held on
Veterans Day, Monday
Govenor Hunt porclaims Nov 10-
16 "Employ a Veteran Week"
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
With the many veterans and military families honoring veterans this
week, the state of North Carolina is honoring veterans in its own way.
On Oct. 23 1996, Governor Jim Hunt proclaimed Nov. 10-16 1996 as
"Employ a Veteran Week This veteran assistance program will serve
many of the hundreds of veterans each month who are discharged from
the military.
"There is no better applicant than a veteran said Cal Faulkner,
director of veterans employment and training department of the Em-
See VETERAN page 3
Industrial hygienists
offered graduate fellowship
Angela Koenig
Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Office of Worker
Safety and Health is sponsoring a fellowship opportunity for students
who are working towards a master's degree in industrial hygiene.
The goal of the Industrial Hygiene Graduate Fellowship is to increase
the number of industrial hygienists at the master's degree level so that
healthful working conditions may be maintained at the DOE research
and development facilities across the country.
Increasing the visibility of industrial hygiene as a career option,
strengthening the profession and strengthening the connections between
the academic community and the DOE are also goals of the program.
Industrial hygienists anticipate, recognize, evaluate and control en-
vironmental factors or stressors arising in or from the workplace which
may cause noticeable discomfort sickness or inefficiency among work-
ers.
Appointments into the program last for 21 months and participants
must complete a renewal application after the first year.
In addition to this, students have the opportunity for hands-on work
or research in this field as well. The participants will complete a three-
month practicum at one of more than 20 designated DOE facilities.
"The fellowship is open to U.S. citizens who have a baccalaureate
See HYGIENE page 2
The Magic of Lyn at Wrightpage I i
OPIWIOHU�
Apply now for "Campus Viewpage 4
S PO WtLuddcut
Make a run for The End Zonepage 1 4
Thursday
Sunny
Weekend
Partly Cloudy
High 63
Low 39
tii
High 65
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Phone
6366
(newsroom) 328
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.C1S.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
� ��





� �� -
MMBMMBH
.
Thursday, November 14,1996
The East Carolinian
November 4
Lewd phone call - A staff member reported receiving a lewd mes-
sage on her voice mail at her desk in Human Resources.
Larceny - A staff member reported seeing a former ECU employee
in the Scales Field House at 5:52 pm. After the former employee left,
the master keys for the Ward Sports Medicine Building interior doors
were discovered missing.
November 5
Warrant served - At 7:30 am, a student was served two criminal
summons for worthless checks.
Unathorized use of conveyance - At 5:12 p.m student reported
that he loaned his van to an unknown person. The person was supposed
to return after his class. The student was intoxicated and did not rerprn-
ber the license number to his van.
November 7
Suspicious Activity - Two juvenile non-students were banned from
campus and transported to their parents' house at 1:05 a.m after being
found around the bicycle racks on College Hill Drive, behaving in a
suspicious manner.
November 12
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of his boots and socks
from a locker in Christenbury Gym.
Larceny - A faculty member reported the larceny of a computer
from a room in the Flanagan Building.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
HYGIENE from page
degree in life sciences, physical sci-
ences, environmental science, or en-
gineering said Milton Constantin of
the Oak Ridge Institute for Science
and Technology (ORISE), the group
which the program.
Students also must not have
completed more than one year of
graduate studies by the appointment
date.
Students are selected by a re-
view board, which evaluates the stu-
dents based on their application.
"The review board is comprised
of people from academia, DOE facili-
ties and private industries
Constantin said.
There are several sections of the
application on which the reviewers
base their evaluations.
"The parts are undergraduate
grade point average, GRE exam
scores, letters of recommendation,
extracurricular activities, employ-
ment experience and a career state-
ment, which includes career goals
and objectives. Of all the parts, the
career statement is the most impor-
tant Constantin said.
The program pays an annual sti-
pend of $15,600 in monthly install-
ments, full tuition and fees, reim-
bursement for travel expenses to and
from the practicum site and a $400
per month dislocation allowance.
The program began in 1992 and
has had approximately 590 partici-
pants. There are currently 15 stu-
dents in the program.
For applications and further in-
formation on procedures, policies
and guidelines concerning the
program's operations, contact
Constantin or Mary Kinney at (423)
576-9655.
Students may also send e-mail
to kinneym@orau.gov or visit
ORISE on the Internet at http:
www.orau.govseedseedfact.htm.
The deadline for applications is
Jan. 27, 1997, and students will be
selected for participation beginning
with the academic year in Sept.
1997.
Experience
Elegance & Fine
Chinese Cuisine
7 Days A Week
Serving Lunch & Dinner
WOMEN from page 1
tists.
"These are women who have all
been through the educational sys-
tem, and they know the pitfalls. They
know how valuable it can be to be
able to pick up the phone and talk
to someone who's been there
Pekarek said.
The Glaxo Wellcome scholars
are chosen by their respective
schools, not the company, and appli-
cations are due sometime in the
spring. In addition to the $25,000
endowment for the school, out of
which comes the student's scholar-
ship, Glaxo Wellcome also donates
five laptop computers to each school.
The scholars are given the opportu-
nity to use one of the laptops until
they graduate.
According to Noren, the main
goal of the program, to encourage
women scholars in science, has been
reached. While attending a banquet
to induct the new scholars, she said
she heard several speakers who had
multiple degrees, successful careers
and also had families.
"When I went to that banquet,
it was amazing what these women
have accomplished throughout their
lives. You look (at them) and you
think, women have done it. It is pos-
sible Noren said.
VO JL from page 1
work. Some of the agencies that the
program aids are: The Boys and Girls
Club of Pitt County, the Ronald
McDonald House, the Real Crisis
Center, the Soup Kitchen and the
American Cancer Society.
"The volunteers are the heart of
what we try to do, which is give stu-
dents one on one contact" said Ann
Burden from the Pitt County
Schools. "We receive outstanding vol-
unteers every year and have never
had anything but the best help. With-
out the resource of the volunteers,
some of the students would go with-
out tutors. Even more importantly,
these volunteers act as role models
and mentors to children who lack a
good support system. We are sin-
cerely grateful
One benefit to going through
the volunteer office is that they pro-
vide accident insurance. The plan
covers you from the time you leave
the school to the time you return
back. Baker feels that students who
are covered by the insurance, which
is paid for by the Student Govern-
ment Association, makes students
feel more comfortable with donating
their time, especially when working
with mentally or physically handi-
capped children.
More importantly, it gives stu-
dents an extra incentive to use the
volunteer program. Students who do
volunteer need to turn in their time
sheets. That is important because the
more students who participate, the
more funding they are able to receive.
A few of the awards the volunteer
program has received are the
President's Point of Light Award, the
N. C. Governor's Award and the Award
for Most Outstanding Program in the
Nation.
"The implications of our program
are very great because of the number
of students Baker said. Some stu-
dents will become lifelong volunteers
because of the work they did through
school
Students who are interested in
volunteering can contact Baker at 328-
6432. She will help find a personal pro-
gram which fits a student's schedule
and interests.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
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� 24-Hour Message Service ��
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 14, 1996
BBB
TRI-BETA
ANNUAL PLANT SALE
NOV. 14 & 15 all day
LOCATION - BIOLOGY
LOBBY
HOWELL SCIENCE
COMPLEX
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VETERAN from page I
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Walk-ini'uJ.ekome
Tues - rri 9-6 Sal 1-12
Wilson Acres Apartments, Ltd.
752-0277
P.O. Box 772
J I860 E. 1st St.
Greenville, N.C. 27835-0772
� PETS ARE ALLOWED
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�ALL UNITS HAVE WALK-IN CLOSETS. FROST FREE REFRIG-
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� WATER. SEWER. AND BASIC CABLE ARE INCLUDED IN
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� ADDITIONAL SECURITY LIGHTING AND DEADBOLTS
� 24 HOUR ON- SITE MANAGEMENT
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Bring this ad and recieve $200
off your security deposit.
Discount applied only to leases
beginning in January.
LOCATION: 5
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2 BEDROOM
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1350 SQUARE FEET
4
ployment Sec urity Commission.
"With the changes in the military, we
find a mure highly skilled profes-
According to the Employment
Secui ity Commission (ESC), with the
N C. unemployment rate being rela
low, potential employers are
looking ' �� ethic and train-
veterans have to rill
penings.
Employers look hard for the
good work history, team-oriented
work ethic, highly motivated and
tramability of military veterans.
Faulkner said.
North Carolina's economy is in
atly b the six major mili
ises. The ESC's veteran em-
ployment representatives work hard
to help veterans make the transition
from military to civilian jobs.
"We have 50 local offices in
North Carolina, and each member of
. : service statt of each of
focus their full attention
on serving the needs of the
ans Faulkner said.
Last year the ESC's local job ser-
vice placed almost 32 percent of the
veterans that applied, filling almost
$0,000 openings.
Vco rding to Faulkner, the N.C.
ESC s veteran service department
i leader in the nation for
: ran employment services.
"Employers in our state play a
huge role in the success of our pro-
i Faulkner said. "They show-
great support for the program and
the veterans that use it
In the last year, over Ml,796 vet-
erans have registered for some type
of employment assistance. Of those
numbers 78,736 received some type
of direct service and 62,526 were ac-
tualK referred to one or more jobs.
The N.C. ESC's 32 percent place-
ment is the highest percentage in the
Southeast tor placing veterans with
jobs.
According to Faulkner, veteran
employment representatives have
given almost 200 Transition Assis-
tance Program (TAP) classes to al-
most 14,000 service personnel await-
ing discharge from the military.
Classes provide employment and job-
seeking skills in order to assist in the
change from the military to the civil-
ian work force.
"If veterans are out of the mili-
tary and in the need of a job, they
need to get in touch with a veteran
.representative Faulkner said. "We
have statewide access along with
Internet access to federal jobs. This
is free quality service to veterans
Those veterans interested
should contact their local ESC office
or their Educational Services Officer
(ESO).
� �
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Bu (ne Pai
Get The Second
TRICE
� � � �
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K � � �� �'�� � � �
I
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23,8PM
WILLIAMS ARENAMINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 IN ADVANCE FOR STUDENTSFACULTYSTAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED
PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
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756-3301
ROL L ERBLA D� A





Thursday, November 14,1996 The East Carolinian
OuVtec
As Americans,
we need to
stop making
excuses and
start acting
responsibly
when it comes
to picking our
leaders.
The elections are over a week old now, and people
have either been boasting about the results or complain-
ing about them. Anyone keeping up with the news knows
the outcome of the major elective offices. Bill Ciinton is
still the President of the United States and Jesse Helms
is still North Carolina's senator.
North Carolina has some bragging rights in this year's
political race. Apparently, our fair state had one of the
strongest voter turnouts. We were one of the most ac-
tive states in the nation when it came to voicing our
opinions.
We should be proud.
Or should we?
As strong as our state appears when talking on a
national level, voter turnout for N.C was at its lowest in
quite some time. According to the Nov. 7 issue of The
News & Observer, "only about 60 percent of the state's
4.3 million registered voters went to the polls, the small-
est figure since 1972, the latest year for which records
are available
If N.C. was one of the more active states in this year's
elections and we weren't up to par, then what about the
rest of the country? The figures for the national voter
turnout indicates that voter turnout was at its lowest
since the 1920s.
There are any number of excuses for the lackluster
interest in the '96 political campaign. The candidates
weren't impressive; people didn't get their absentee bal-
lots in time; the weather was bad; one person's vote
doesn't affect anything; etc etc etc.
Whatever the reason (or excuse), we at TEC don't
understand why Americans aren't willing to take the time
and effort to play a part in our nation's future. Sure, the
political choices in any campaign may be limiting. Sure,
many people live in areas where they aren't registered
to vote. Sure, waiting in line on a rainy day is a miser-
able experience. As Americans we need to stop making
excuses and start acting responsibly when it comes to
picking our leaders.
As cliched as it may sound, we Americans are very
blessed to be able to vote at all. Like many of our other
luxuries, we have just taken our right to vote for granted.
As far as TEC is concerned, low voter turnout is
shameful, whether it be a national election, a local one,
or the SGA. Anyone who didn't bother to vote, don't
complain about the results. Anyone who did, good for
you and complain to your heart's desire.
Blaming the
�T
c,OF
JLUl
The East Carolinian
&
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor
Andy Farias, Staff Illustrator
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
David Southeriand, Asst. Prod. Manager
Jennifer Andrews, Prod. Assistant
Ashley Settle, Prod. Assistant
Carla Cole, copy Editor
David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For Informatton, call (919)
32M366
it
Beware of the space stealer
- - ��aumiiiBiiiiMaiiHHHiHHIiBHHBilHnm a. lIJal�.io nuiiklirk m nnt
Well, the election is finally over.
This results in two things. The first is
that the evening news is once again
entertainingly informative. Not that I
don't find politics interesting, I've
probably written more articles on
politics than any other columnist since
I began in the Fall of '94. The second
is that I have regained my Thursday
edition opinions column. I'm sure that
all my readers reacted like a teenager
whose parents went out for the
evening-they had a really good time
and wished that it would happen a
little more often.
Well, barring an invasion by over-
weight militant Grand Old Opry refu-
gees sent by the Branch Davidians, it
won't In the words of the "nature
boy" Rick Flare, "You may not like it
but you had better leam to love it
because it is the best thing going to-
day
It is good to be home, and yes I
do have column.
One night Kyle and Eric
Menendez murdered their parents.
Their defense tried to prove that it
wasn't their fault They were not to
blame because it was the natural re-
action to years of oppression and
sexual molestation. The question
people began to ask was: were the
actions taken by the brothers justi-
fied based on their reasoning?
Lorena Bobbit cut off one of her
husband's most personal possessions
while he slept Her defense stated that
it was a natural reaction to the sexual
assault and oppression he had sub-
jected her to. Again, the question
asked: was did she have the right to
coujmit the action given the circum-
Christopher S. Arline
Opinion Columnist
��BMB
stances?
The Unabomber's decision to
bomb high level industrial technolo-
gists' personnel was based on two
things. The first was their seemingly
apparent lack of concern for what
impacts their actions had on the en-
vironment The second reason was
that top level researchers and execu-
tives didn't pay heed to the common
working class people who were sup-
posedly being affected by their ac-
tions. A big question that arose is
whether or not his actions, though
brutal, were necessary to get the point
across.
The a forementioned examples
exhibit a big problem that our soci-
ety faces that, aside from tort law, is
the biggest problem facing our legal
system today. If we look very closely
we see that the most important ques-
tion to ask has. in fact, been left out.
Don't worry if you didn't catch it
you're not alone. The unasked ques-
tion was "DO, they or did they not
commit the crime?"
The problem that we are facing
is that we have lost focus as to what
is right and wrong based on what the
motivations were. One of the things
that makes our society such a great
place to live is that no matter what
the cause, we can always find a way
to pursue solving our differences le-
gally.
Back in high school I was known
to have a pretty rowdy bunch of
friends (about a hundred of them) over
from time to time (particularly when
my parents were out of town). I had a
neighbor who was always was the one
to call the police (something that I
am convinced that he took a little too
much pleasure in). Well, one day his
dog crossed into enemy territory and
fell asleep in my back yard. Being one
to capitalize on the opportunity I
called the dog catcher. Even though
leaving his car on cinder blocks would
have given me an equal sense of jus-
tice being served, I acted within my
rights; the oppressor was brought
back to even terms, and my parties
were never broken up again.
By committing the crimes men-
tioned, the accused gave up their
rights to be heard by taking the law
into their own hands. This is some-
thing that is against the law in
America. Through the inherent nature
of wanting to forgive, we have become
a society that fails to place the blame
for the wrong-doing with the person
of whom it should rest.
The victim may not be free of sin,
yet it is still they who are the victim.
Remember, its the criminal commit-
ting the crime.
Now that the elections are over,
what is there left for me to run my
mouth about? Hmmm I could write
about buying a chicken sandwich for
$2.99 from a certain student snack
shop, only to discover it was a
chicken nugget on a bun. I could
write about politics, I could even
write about your mama, but NO!
Parking etiquette is today's topic, my
friends.
This is a problem we cannot over-
look. A reliable source tells me that
there are seven cars for every ECU
parking spot I believe it! However,
this travesty is miniscule in compari-
son to the most cursed individual to
roam the parking lots of this hal-
lowed campus. Yes, the space stealer.
Let's imagine you wake up nice
and early, get your cup of coffee or
soda, get yourself a bite to eat, and
cruise over to the parking lot. The
sun looks beautiful, birds are chirp-
ing; life is good. You pull up to the
lot, and it's full, but no problem! You
just pull up in front of a row of parked
cars and cut on some tunes. You're
jammin and all of a sudden you see
a person walking towards his car.
Yessss! Just to be safe, you cut on
your turn signal. Well, you put your
drink back in the holder, put the car
in drive, and all of a sudden, here he
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
You give
space sleafc
fuges, but it's no
use. The space
stealer has
again.
comes, the dreaded space stealer.
The space stealer zooms his
high-powered sports car around the
corner, sees the car leaving, and the
jerk flies in and steals your space.
You've waited for half an hour, and
some slack-ass loser takes your spot
You give the space stealer the fin-
ger, but it's no use. The space stealer
has struck again.
Scary, but true, fellow students.
Well, you non-commuters are prob-
ably going "Huh? so I'll fill you in
on another crisis of epidemic pro-
portions, and that if the nosy guy
at the ATM machine. That ATM line
can get pretty long before heading
to the downtown establishment of
your choice, but is there any need
to be looking over my shoulder at
my pitiful bank balance? Boy, I hate
that!
There are two places that you
need some space, and that is ATM's
and urinals. As Jerry Seinfeld says,
"anytime you're taking valuables out
of your pants, you really need some
distance
If these problems can be allevi-
ated, then this great society of ours
can continue to exist in harmony,
and besides that ingrate Jesse Helms
winning, I'm a happy man. Speak-
ing of which, I want to congratulate
each and every one of you who took
the time out of your schedule to vote
last Tuesday. Some of you waited for
two hours inside of the Willis Build-
ing, and I am still in awe over the
number of you that turned out to
vote. The seventh precinct of Green-
ville, which our campus is in, I be-
lieve achieved its highest turnout in
history this time around.
Each and everyone of you that
came out and voted should pat your-
selves on the back. The greatest
thing about that is, you now have
the right to bitch and moan as much
as you want.
Hey, it works for me!
ScUt&i
Rec Services needs new direction
To the Editor,
The ECU Recreation Center was
in planning when my grandmother
graduated in 1955. Finally, two years
ago they broke ground in the first
stages of construction. At first I could
not wait to see such a modern display
for all the students to enjoy. I sud-
denly got struck by lightening and
realized the Underwater Hockey Club
would be using the pool while the
Free Throw Shooting Club would re-
serve the basketball court for their
national tournament Will somebody
give me an Amen?
I have been in the gym five times
in the past month and each time I have
been turned away because paleontolo-
gists were carbon dating the floor to
determine its era in history. I have
become thoroughly disappointed with
the way Recreational Services handles
scheduling of Alcatraz's hours. If the
gym is not reserved for a club sport it
is reserved for intramurals. What
about the students who have a few
spare hours every now and then?
The current hours for free play
directly interfere with class hours.
What good is it to open the gym if
students are in class? Why am I sup-
posed to believe things are going to
be any different when the Taj Mahal
opens? Is this new facility really for
the students on campus or is it just a
tool to increase enrollment?
When the next class of freshmen
come to orientation, I will be sure to
tell them they can look but not touch.
Recreation Services needs to clean out
their ears and listen to the students
for a change!
Jonathan Huggins
Senior
Nutrition
: Guest columnist application for "Campus View"
I This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain topic.
Please return this form to The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
� . - ��
� Phone number
�Topic(s) about which I would like to write
�Please consider me for a position as guest columnist for TEC. I agree to allow TEC's staff to edit my submission for
grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be notified of any changes that may
�affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am selected, TEC wiH
�notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for submission will be assigned by the editor. �





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5 Thursday, November 14,1996 The East Carolinian
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Thursday, November 14,1996 The East Carolinian
e
Travel
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. KING-
STON Condominiums townhouse. Own bed-
room and bathroom. Free cable. Furnished
and pool $190 rent, deposit, 13 utilities.
Call Susan, Nicole, Stephanie at 551-6766.
1 BEDROOM FOR RENT. Sublease from
January 1 to August 1. Wesley Commons.
Call 830-9585.
VERY, VERY QUIET UPSTAIRS furnished
bedrooms for rent in modern home on 17th
fairway. Brook Valley. Shared bath. Semi-pri-
vate entrance. Limited kitchen privileges.
Central AC. $210 for each bedroom. All util-
ities included except cable TV and your tele-
phone. Available immediately. Semester lease
and $100 deposit No smokers.Graduate or
professional students only. References re-
quired. Call (919)-756-2027.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED- Furnished
bedroom with private bath. Convenient to
campus. Call 3211848 after 6:00 pm.
CLOSE TO ECU - Woodcliff Apts 10th
Street - 2 bedrooms, very energy efficient,
washerdryer hook-ups, watersewer includ-
ed. 7564)944
WANTED: GRADUATE STUDENT SEEK-
ING 1 male housemate $170mo. Includes
utilities. Close to campus. Call Kevin 752-
5557.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! Short walk
to campus. Woodlawn Apt. - Next to AOTT
house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths - mint con-
dition. 5th Street Square � Uptown - Above
BW3 - 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Luxury Apartment "Available Now!
Will lease for December or January (6 month
or year leases available) Also Available - "The
Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment - if
you see it, you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-
2616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
apartment 12 blocks from campus, two
blocks from supermarketlaundromat and
three blocks from downtown. Rent includes
utilities, phone and cable. Call 757-1947 af-
ter 3 pm.
SUB-LEASE AVAILABLE: I'M graduating!
Studio Apartment in Ringgold Towers. New
furniture and carpet Call 830-2214 for more
information. Please leave a detailed message.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
NICE house, close to campus. 752-8682.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
ROOMMATE WANTED IMMEDIATELY.
MALE or female. $260 per month and 12
utilities, fully furnished. Call 3534451.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central AC
Heat WD. Dishwasher. Only $242 a month
and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999. Available
now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 bed
room, 2 bath, Dogwood Hollow Apts wash-
erdryer, $23750 rent and 12 utilities, non-
smoker. Call Jennifer at 752-8555.
WANTED: ROOMMATE FOR DEC. 1.
Block from campus, two blocks from down-
town. Spacious 3 bedroom wjth washerdry-
er. $150 deposit and $225 rent Call Michelle
757-9310.
MF NEEDED TO MOVE into 2bdr apt sur-
rounded by fun and friendly neighbors. Lo-
cated on Fifth Street across campus, down-
town. $200 a month. Available Jan. 1st Call
757-3434.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT. 2 or 3 bedroom,
2 12 baths, fully equipped kitchen, WD
hookups, central heat and air and patio. Nice
neighborhood. Safe environment Call today!
Chandra 752-0687.
THREEFOUR BEDROOM HOUSE AT
201 East 13th . All hardwood floors five
blocks from campus. Rent $450month. Call
757-3191.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED START-
ING spring semester. Two bedroom, 2 12
bath, fully furnished, pool, on ECU bus ro-
ute. Please call 752-0813.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments, WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse. All
furnishings except BDR. WasherDryer in-
cluded. Pets negotiable available mid Decem-
ber. Must be clean and sociable. Rent
$217.50month. Must see! 756556
P100 COMPUTER WITHOUT ANY ram,
hard drive, or CD-rom. Has SVGA 15" moni-
tor. Call 754-8261.
BUS TRIP TO AND from Charlotte to the
ECU - State game. Includes travel to and from
Charlotte (leaving Friday, Nov. 29th and re-
turning Sunday, Dec 1st), Friday and Satur-
day night hotel, and shuttle to and from game
on Saturday. $300couple. Tickets to game
also available. Call 523-1192
MOVING SALE
Help
11 wanted
RECLINER, WALL unit
coffee table, TV stand, chair, sleeper sofa: All
must go! Best offer taken. Call 752-4457.
VACATION FOR SALE: FOUR night hotel
accommodations in Fort Lauderdale, Flori-
da Cruise to Bahamas, two night hotel ac-
commodations on Grand Bahama Island, two
tickets, $398. Call 931-0419.
ADMIRE VOLUPTUOUS, RUBENESQUE,
MAJESTIC, INCOMPARABLE African-
American women? Then order photographic
images of Gorgeous full-figured African-Amer-
ican women modeling exotic lingerie! All ma-
terial is non-pornographic and free of nudi-
ty. Write: African-American Multi-Media Pro-
ductions. P.O. Box 28051, Raleigh, NC 27611-
8051; Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E-
mail:amp3@ix.netcom.com A free catalog is
available upon request! Check out our web
site at http:www.be4t.comarnp3 You
must be 18 years of age to order.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100 Nat-
ural & Dr. recommended. A healthier you
through cellular nutrition. 30 Day money-
back guarantee. Call now 756-1188.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Eam up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies. World travel. Sea-
sonal & full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For more information
call 1-206-971-3550 ext. C53628.
HELP WANTED: WAITSTAFF DAYTIME
and night shifts available. Must be able to
work at least two weekday lunch shifts. NO
CALLS. Please apply in person between 8
am and 10 am or 2 pm and 4 pm. Professor
O'Cools, Winn Dixie Market Place.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
SOMEONE TO PICKUP AND take care to
two children after school nine hours per
week. References required. Call 931-6904 and
leave a message.
INVESTORS AND ENTREPRENEURS
wanted. New company starting with large
potential profits. Minimum investment
$550.00.100 return plus vacations. Seri-
ons inquiries only. Phone 752-9610.
AAAA! CANCUN & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel $399! Prices
Increase Soon - Save $50! Save $150 on
Food, Drinks & Free Parties! 111 Lowest
Price Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK '97. The reliable spring
break company: Hottest destinations! Coo-
lest Vacations! Guaranteed lowest prices!
From $99. Organize small group! Travel free!
Sunsplash Tours! 1-800-426-7710.
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-67&6386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Par-
ty Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes All Meals,
Parties, Taxes! Great Beaches & Nightlife!
Prices Increase Soon - Save $50! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-6786386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel & Lo-
cation! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Loca-
tion $139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-67&6386

Greek
Personals
t
Services
w Offered
Spring Break '97
Book Now & Save! Lowest prices to
Florida, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, &
Carnival Cruises.
Now Hiring
Campus Reps!
Endless
Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
t� ��i"1�
Jamaica Cancun Panama City Daytona
Key West South Padre
m
- He,P
11 Wanted
TYPING, FAST AND ACCURATE. $1.00
per page, call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
KIM'S TYPING SERVICE: TERM papers
and resumes, reasonable prices. Call 756-
5813 after 2:30pm.
Other
PART TIME WORKERS NEEDED for lo-
cal business. For free details, send a self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope to: S.P.E.L Dept
D3, 106 Dogwood Drive, Washington, NC
27889
WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for part time employment Flexible
hours - Earn extra money for Christmas.
Please apply at Kmart Greenville, NC. Bet-
ween 9am-5pm.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc.). Waitstaff,
housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness
counselors, and more. Call Resort Employ-
ment Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53625.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive room & boardother benefits.
For info, call: (206) 971-3680 ext K53624.
WANTED: BASKETBALL OFFICIALS
FOR Creenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment winter basketball league. Position pays
$10-$12 a game. Clinics will be held to train
pew and experienced officials. However, a
basic knowledge and understanding of the
game is necessary. Mandatory organization-
al meeting will be held Tuesday, Nov. 19 at
7:30 pm. For more information, please call
830-4550 or 8304567.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EXTRA
cash stuffing envelopes at home. AH materi-
als provided. Send SASE to Midwest Distribu-
tors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051. Im-
mediate response.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. Top Pay. All
shifts. Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-
7686, Snow Hill, NC.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MULTI-MEDIA
PRODUCTIONS is now recruiting full-fig-
ured african-american women to model ex-
otic lingerie during photographic sessions.
All work is non-pornographic and free of
nudity. Earn up to100 per hour! You must
be at least 21 years of age to apply. Call 1-
919-321-8218, 1-800-921-3855 or e-mail
amp3@ix.netcom.com.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible. Let us help. For more info, call:
1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997 MAN-
AGEMENT POSITIONS, DYNAMIC COM-
PANY NOW HIRING ENTREPRENEURAL
STUDENTS FOR SUMMER MANAGE-
MENT POSITIONS ACROSS SOUTHEAST
U.S. FOR INFORMATION OR AN INTER-
VIEW CALL TUITION PAINTERS 100-
393-4521 29
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! No
repayments, ever! SSS Cash for college SSS.
For info: 1-800-400-0209.
LAW SOCIETY: COME BY our next meet-
ing on Tuesday, Nov. 19th at 5:15 in Rag-
sdale, room 2 ISA. A guest speaker will be
present and t-shirts will be ordered with a
$5.00 deposit The meeting is open to all
majors.
�rty�ToWov�sl U tow Dbe�r Cart
AnoSavuUpTbS- To Apply hr A Cart.
c i - 800 - rr - PAYS -TO.
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
S Otft � H - � e� fH�ss � kM T�
Cancun '399
7 NfcjM � Mrrt � StM M� on hjoo 4 M
Jamaica '419
Florida ii9
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$�ttltTf�wOwiaY�fi
1-800-678-6386
ALPHA DELTA PI - We had a great time
with you guys last Thursday night We hope
to get together with you again soon. Love,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
KRISTI ROSE: THANKS FOR doing such
a great job with the Homecoming Alumnae
Brunch! Love the sisters and new members
of Alpha Xi Delta!
ALPHA XI DELTA BETA Omegas - We can't
wait until this weekend! We love you - your
Big Sisters! You're all so awesome!
ALPHA XI DELTA HALLOWEEN Stranger
Mixer: Thanx Alayne and Megan for such a
"ghoul" time. The costumes were strange,
the strangest got even stranger, but we're
not strangers anymore! Let's make it a tra-
dition! Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATS TO THE WINNERS of the cos-
tume contest at the Alpha Xi Delta Hallo-
ween Stranger Mixer Dale Emry, Brad Co-
oper, Heather Atkinson, and Rusty Conway.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD like to
congratulate Scott Hobbs, David Johnson,
Ryan Tarantino, and Scott Leonard on re-
ceiving their respective awards. You guys tru-
ly deserve them!
ALPHA XI DELTA WOULD like to thank
everyone who participated in the Blood
Drive! It was a great success.
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL - thank you so
much for the special gift you gave us. We
really appreciate it. Love, Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon'
TO ALL DELTA ZETAS and their dates:
Rose Formal was a huge success! The Hil-
ton did not know what hit them! Thanks to
Torri and Stacey and everyone that helped
to plan the evening. And to our New Mem-
bers, we hope you enjoyed your night Love,
the sisters of Delta Zeta.
ALPHA XI DELTA - Congrats on winning
the soccer garr - against Chi Omega. Keep
up the great work!
SIGMA PI - We had an awesome time Fri-
day night The social was a blast Love, your
favorite Alpha Xi Delta Cavewomen Fuzzies!
NATALIE ROCKE: CONGRATULATIONS
ON your engagement and your upcoming
wedding! Have a wonderful time on your hon-
eymoon! We wish you lots of happiness. We
are proud to have you as our advisor! We
really appreciate all you do for us! Love, your
Gamma Sigma Sigma sisters.
CONGRATS TO MRS LEE and Dr.
Schwartz, Chi Omega's Professors of the
month. Thank you for all your hard work
and dedication.
THE NEW MEMBER CLASS of Delta Zeta
would like to thank the sisters for Rose-For-
mal '96. We had a great time! Thanks a
bunch, we love you! The new members of
Delta Zeta.
KAPPA SIGMA: THANKS FOR helping us
welcome in our new sisters. We always have
a good time with you. Love, the Alpha Phis.
Announcements
No experience necessary oonsored by Uni-
versity Folk and Country nince Club.
SINGERS WANTED: CHORAL SINGERS
are needed for MUSC 1895, Section 2 in the
spring semester. Course is open to anyone
who has sung in a chorus. No tests - good
attitude and regular attendance are only re-
quirements. Class offers a chance to devel-
op your singing voice in a non-threatening
group setting. No audition required. Meets
from 2:00 - 2:50 on Mondays and Wednes-
days. Qualifies for Fine Arts credit For more
information contact Dr Rhonda Fleming in
the School of Music:32&6243.
TIBETAN BUDDHIST TALK: A talk enti-
tled "A Source of Unending Joy" will be given
by Lama Gyurme Chotso at 7:30 PM, Thurs-
day, Nov. 21 in Room 1026 in GCB. A native
of Ohio, Lama Gyurme (Kathy Wesley) has
been a student of Tibetan Buddhism sfrice
1977 and recently nmpleted a traditional
three-year retreat The talk is sponsored in
part by the Buddhist Meditation and Study
Group of ECU. Everyone is welcome. Call
756-8315 for more info.
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA, pre-med hondT
society invites you to attend its meeting c
Tuesday, Nov. 19 in GCB 1032 at 7:00 pm.
Pledge meeting at 6:45 pm. Our distiS-
guished speaker will be Dr. Richard Rurfc-
ley.
CHRISTMAS BREAK SKI WEEK head
up north to Vermont for a skiing vacation
January 5-11. Interested individuals mustrejr
ister by November 15 in 204 Christert
bury.Rec Services 328-6387t
THURS. NOV. 14 - ECU Steel Orchestra)
Mark Ford, director, AJ Fletcher Recital Haft,
7:00 PM Thurs. Nov. 14 - Guest Reotet
Meadowmount Trio, Ensemble-in-Resid
of the Meadowmount School of Music in
York, Stephen Shipps, violin, Owen Carnjg,
cello, Eric Larsen, piano, with Deborah Ctro-
dacki, clarinet AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:15
PM Fri. Nov. 15 - Senior Recital, Michail A.
Weaver, viola, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall 7:00
PM Fri, Nov. 15 - Senior Recital, John Pres-
to, saxophone, 9:00 PM SatNov.16 - Sen-
ior Recital, Russell Knight saxophone, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall 7:00 PM Sat. Nov. 16 -
Senior Recital, Jennifer Cantania, flutea1)d
Ryan E. Featherer, viola, AJ Fletcher Recitl
Hall, 9:00 PM Sun. Nov. 17 - Senior Rt-
cital, Renee Wilbur, clarinet AJ Fletchar
Recial Hall 2:00 PM Sun.Nov. 17 - Senior
Recital, Jennifer Wilmouth, voice and Kelly
Wheeler, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:fJ0
PM Mon. Nov. 18 - TuesdayThursday Jatz
Ensemble, Peter Mills, director, with guest
artist Ben Kono, saxophone, Contemporary
Jazz Ensemble, Paul Tardif, Director

Greek
Personals
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YES! When yon sign a one year tease on our newly renovated
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are also special rates on third floor apartments for a limited time only
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON - Congratulations
on receiving your charter this weekend. You
guys have worked so hard and definitely de-
serve it We had a great time Thursday night
Thanks! Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi.
THANK YOU TO DELTA Sig for the Beach
Social Thursday night! It was a blast and we
hope we can do it again! Love, the sisters of
Chi Omega.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA -It was good getting
together Wednesday night. Hope to see you
again! Alpha Xi Delta.
LAMBDA CHI - We enjoyed getting togeth-
er Thursday night Let's do it again soon!
Alpha Xi Delta.
THE GREEKS OF THE week: Alpha Delta
Pi - Stacey Hughes, Kristie McNellan; Alpha
Xi Delta - Andrea Luther Alpha Phi � Mary
Page Early, Teresa Belton; Alpha Omicron
Pi - Amy Seal, Laura Husenita; Chi O - Dar-
cei Ranoser, Jen Nolan; Delta Zeta - Jessica
Theobald; Sigma - Sarah Cregg; Zeta - Bian-
di Cox; Pi Delta - Jennifer Keller. Great job
girls!
DELTA CHI: CONGRATULATIONS DER-
EK, Foster and Gary (Sweet Chuck) on your
initiation Sunday. We're all proud of you.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD like to
thank all our dates, parents, and distin-
guished guests for participating in Satur-
day's events. We could not have done it with-
out you.
CONGRATS ALPHA XI DELTA on winning
the Sorority Volleyball championship! We are
proud of you - the sisters and new members.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEWEST
sisters of Alpha Phi. We love you very much
and are proud of all you've accomplished.
Love, your sisters!
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to congratu-
late Sigma Alpha Epsilon for receiving their
charter this weekend. Great job guys, all your
hard work finally paid off!
Announcements
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS, and Al-
lies for Diversity. Our next meeting will be
on November 20 at 7:30pm in Room 221 of
MSC. Hope to see you there.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANIZA-
TION will be held on Nov. 21 at 4:30 pm in
GCB 1028. International programs will pres-
ent information about its study abroad pro-
grams;
FREE CONTRA DANCE! SAT Nov. 16,
1996, 7:30 pm at Baptist Student Union, on
Tenth Street Come alone or bring a friend.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN WORKING
with children and families should attenjjfa-
reer Opportunities on Monday, Nov. WMn
the Rivers Building, room 155C. This�ill
be a chance 10 meet people working in dif
ferent agencies in the Greenville area aijel!
as talk with former graduates. For mortln-
formation, call Dr. Judy Bohannon 328-1956.
THE EAST CAROLINA NATIVE American
Organization will hold its next meeting on
Thursday, November 14, 19 at 7 pm in
Mendenhall, room 8C,D & E. All members
are urged to attend! Any questions call Tina
at 758-7239 or Nikki at 754-8179.
PPHA WILL MEET THURSDAY, Nov. U
in MHSC Room 14 from 6:00-7:00 p$.
Please come to meet and network with yorjr
peers. Refreshments will be served! -
NEED A CHALLENGE TO excite your
mind? Changing your major? Join us for our
1st Annual Career Fair for Interior Design,
Nov. 19, 1996. Rivers Bldg 9am - 4pm. Re-
freshments will be served
The East Carolinian
Advertising Department -
is now hiring Advertising
Account Executives for the
Spring 1997 semester.
Gain valuable experience
that will follow you into the
real world. Come by the
The East Carolinian's office
in the Student Publications
Building.

Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
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& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Student swap shop





H.
cUuf
Novemeber 14, 1996
Vol. 03, No. 05
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC
4 pages
Luck Seniors!
h
SdcUe &z6tiee
.Ctte&ac&et
Safety
gDzvtdfant
"piee Safety
PUce'Keaien
i 07?tzi6 0Wtc&zll S4izte 0WtcP&e4i Scott CcAtvuU Setut TUvuUol
i 0et4tve 7at6l& 0euiue $uaid 7i$6t Sd ?C$6t 2ut
SW SutUitJi
(Uprt&4ttCctVl4,

i
Amanda Ross
TEC Sports Editor
"Seniors get victory in final
game at Dowdy-Ficklen"
ECU 28
Ohio 7
Brian Bailey
WNCT Sportscaster
"Pirates break the bone"
ECU 31
Ohio 14
Brandon Waddell
TEC Editor-in-Chief
"Keep an eye out for
public safety while tailgat-
ECU
Ohio
.
28
0
Dr. Richard R. Eakin
ECU Chancellor
"The Pirates bounce back"
ECU 21
Ohio 7
?04� 'pCLCfo
Location. - Athens, Ohio
bounded - 1804
Enrollment - 19,143
Head Coach. - Jim Grobe
ITickname- Bobcats
Colors - Ohio Green &
White
Stadium. - Peden
Stadium (20,000)
Conference- Mid-
American
Current "Record 6-4
tCXT v$ Ohio
This is the first meeting.
Votes: Danny Gonzalez will
get the start against Ohio.
Marcus Crandell is still
questionable for Saturday.
Due to construction, the student gate on the
north side of Dowdy-Ficlden has been changed
for Saturday. Instead of using gate 5 students
will have to enter through gates 1 & 6.
Seniors bid
farewell to
Dowdy-Ficklen
Inside
3
Travis Darden
shines on
defense
4
Up to date stats
for both ECU
and Ohio
Saturday,
November If. 193f
2 ii.iii.





�MM
Sm ����
Thursday, November 14,1996
The End Zone
Seniors bid farewell to Dowdy-Flickien
Amanda Ross
End Zone Editor
For the seniors, Saturday's game will be the
end of an era. An era that has seen two Liberty
Bowl appearances, one of those being a win, and
a greater amount of respect for a growing pro-
gram.
Many seniors said they can't believe this is
it
"It hasn't hit me yet linebacker Marvin
Burke said.
Safety Darren Hart said that coming into
ECU he had his mind set on creating a tradition
that would carry on.
"When I came here, I wanted to build a
tradition of defense Hart said. "That's the main
thing I want to install is that East Carolina does
play defense
And defense they have played. Up until the
Arkansas State game, ECU had not allowed an
opponent to score in the fourth quarter.
Last season, the defense ranked seventh in
the nation in pass efficiency defense and 38th
for overall total defense.
On the other side of the ball, last season the
offense finished 42nd in the nation with the help
of Marcus CrandeU who personally finished 10th
in total offense around the nation.
For Burke, it is important that the younger
players carry on with the playing methods that
the seniors have built up over the years.
"We've still got to carry on a legacy Burke
said. "We have to teach younger guys the phi-
losophy
For the younger players, the seniors have
provided a wealth of knowledge.
"They help a lot of the freshmen out, just to
have somebody to look up to sophomore full-
back Scott Hartey said. "I want to win the game
for the seniors
Head Coach Steve Logan knows the talent
his seniors have provided for him.
"They're going out of here as one of the
winningest groups that have come through here
Logan said.
Logan has a special bond with all his players
and said he can recall something special about
ali of his seniors. He mentioned Marcus CrandeU,
Lorenzo West and the Hart twins, Darren and
David.
"There is a story to each one of them Logan
said. "I'm not going to sit here and tell you I
thought Marcus would be everything that he's
been. I thought he was a gifted athlete but you
never know - there are so many things that have
to be learned about a young man
Logan mentioned the consistency of West
"Lorenzo West - coming in and being a 44
game start or whatever If s been, that's unique
Logan said.
He also talked about the performance of the
Hart twins.
"The Hart twins - who would have ever
guessed they would be four year starters?" Logan
said. "If s been a good dass
Logan said that his se-
niors should receive the credit
they have earned.
"They deserve all the
good things that might be
said about them Logan
said. "They've been through
a lot They've really pushed
this program to a point where
we can go out on Saturdays
now and be competitive
Not only do the coaches
and players form bonds, but
so do the players within them-
selves.
"We really play well
Hart said. "We've built a
bond. We're real coachahle,
which has helped us this year.
We've go a lot of senior lead-
ership
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PlMTE
Foomu.
V ird tfmlH Mttt.nnr RHtldln B f.ffrniillr Ml
Clfrini I'B4� 4
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Detr ECU Sludenft:
I KjpM �i9Mino
This Saturday it your Pirates final home fame this fall. This tame, alone; ;ih the Final two fames.
are important. Wins in each of these fames could put the Pirawa in another bow fame (his wimcr.
The finil home fame is always special. This year, each senior football player will he individually
introduced prior to the fame. These seniors have been a pan of consecutive bowl fames and three
consecutrve winnuif seasons. This'will be a lime to show appreciation for their efforts representing
you on the ECU football team.
AKo. prior to the game t fly-over by � AirForcc KC-135 will rattle Dowdy-Ficklcn followed by a
smoke Filled entrance by your ECU Pirates.
There can be no Id down iha Saturday. 1 encourage you to be in your seats by I 40 pm. and get loud
for your Pirates on Saturday.
Have a great lime �BMaVJ wMf being revpumihk in your admits before, during and after tl�e cnnc
Get loud and be p -ud!
Sincerely.
Sieve Login
Hud Fooihall Cotch
ECU Piniei
1fXU
fyl
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Hours:
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Mon. -Fri. 9-6
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$7.00
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- Free Cable TV
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- 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
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FREEFREEFREEFREE
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MINUTES AWAY FROM ECU
e
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU
at regional competitions to be held at James Madison University the weekend of
February 14-16, 1997. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Sunday, November 24
1:00 p.m. � '
Mendenhall Billiards Center ���'
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Saturday, November 23
1:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the
ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711,
for more information.
� J
THE LADIES OF
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
SORORITY INC.
THE THETA ALPHA CHAPTER
PRESENT
THINK PINK WEEK

MON. NOVEMBER 18,1996
7:08 pm
Hendrix Theater
Admission:Free!
TUES. NOVEMBER 19,1996
'Tae Kwan Do: A Lesson in Defense
7:08 pm
Mendenhall Rm. 244
Cost: Free!
V
THURS. NOVEMBER 21,1996
-�aw
9 pm - 2 am Cost: TBA
LWE AT THE TEXAS TWO STEP
"FEATURING D.J. IUD�
We've
A Pair Of Tickets To See ECU VS. N.C. State Game,
Package Includes Bus Trip To And From The Game!
Register Now To Win. Drawing Will Be Held During
A Live Remote With 103.7 On Wed. Nov. 20th 7-lopm
Fiesta All Day With These Specials:
$1.50 Imports
0.95 Bud Draft
12 PRICE
Pizza & Nachos Grande
after 9pm dine in only
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
757-1666
all ABC permits
i
���-j�ffl





The End Zone
Thursday, November 14,1996
arden helps anchors defensive line
Dill Diilard
End Zone Writer
With another Pirate football season
winding down and the final home game
approaching, the common thought goes to-
ward the seniors and how they will be
sorely missed. If you look at a now feared
Pirate defensive unit, you'll see eight
proven contributors leaving the program,
but the coaching staff isn't in shambles
about the future - not when you have
building blocks like sophomore nose guard
Travis Darden to return for two more sea-
sons.
Darden, a native of Kelford, N.C saw
his first action as a starter last season
when the Bucs took on the Tennessee Vols
in front of 93,000 hostile Volunteer fans.
"That place was big Darden said, "I
tried to drown out the crowd, but it was
hard to tune out that 'Rocky Top' song
Darden left his mark in Knoxville,
causing all sorts of trouble for the Vols in
his first ever division one start.
"They put me in at nose guard, and I
really didn't know what to do, so I just
shot the gaps and tried to cause trouble
for their offensive line Darden said.
Defensive Coordinator Paul Jette was
impressed by Darden's performance
against a nationally ranked team, which
led to Darden starting the remainder of
the season as the starting nose guard.
For the remainder of the '95 cam-
paign, Darden racked up 47 tackles - 27
were unassisted, one sack and three quar-
terback pressures as a freshman.
"Well, I had an advantage over the
other freshmen Darden said, "I went to
prep school and then I came into the pro-
gram a semester early and got in spring
drills before my first season. So, I kind of
knew what to expect when it came to the
speed of a college football game
Before transferring to ECU for the
spring semester, Darden played one sea-
son at Hargrave Military Academy after
graduating from Bertie Senior. Because of
Darden's decision to enroll a semester
early, he was able to get used to college
life as well as get a feel for the program.
"I'm really not with this sophomore
class, so to speak Darden said.
Described as a "Tasmanian devil
Darden used heart and athletic ability to
cause a rukus in the trenches. After ter-
rorizing many offensive fronts in the '95
season, Darden stayed in Greenville to
work on school as well as his skills as a
defensive lineman.
"I really didn't know how to play
nosegaurd, so I stuck around here, bulked
up a little, and I spent hours with coach
(Cliff) Yoshida, working on my technique
and learning how to play the position
Darden said. "I knew that folks were start-
ing to figure out that I was just shooting
the holes and relying on my speed to carry
me
And learned the position he did.
Darden is now one of the bigger headaches
for opposing offensive line coaches, on the
Pirate schedule as one of the top tacklers
on the defensive front.
Darden, along with the rest of the
Purple Haze Crew, strutted their stuff in
front of a national television when they
whipped nationally ranked Miami 31-6. The
ECU defense dominated the line of scrim-
mage for the entire evening.
One of the more interesting match-ups
was with Darden and Ail-American center
K.C. 'ones.
' That was a game that you dream
about when you're a kid Darden said.
"Go to Miami, and you're up against an
Ail-American - it was a dream come true
Maybe for Darden, but for Jones and
the rest of the Canes, it was the reality of
their worst nightmare.
"The week before the game, I took
film home on him a watched it over and
over Darden said. "I felt like I could take
him, so I went at him as hard as I could, it
was great
With all of this in mind, one may think
you're talking about a senior. Unfortunately
for the opposition, the Bertie Basher has
two more years to don the Purple and Gold.
If the next two years are anything like the
last two years, the Pirates defensive line
will remain secure for seasons to come.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Noseguard Travis Darden continues
to improve throughout his career.
fldrigaf J)inners
Celebrate the holiday season with
the annual ECU Madrigal Dinners.
Feast your eyes and ears on
Elizabethan dancers, jugglers, and
entertaiment galore.
Feast your stomach on a four course
gourmet dinner.
You may use your ECU meal plan
to purchase your tickets. Bring your
meal card and ID to the Central
Ticket Office. 328-4788.
Order Early. MSC Great Room.
Dec 5, 6, 7 at 7pm
Dec 8 at 5pm.
Tickets must be reserved no later
than 3 days in advance.
Brandon Waddell � Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson � Production Manager
Amanda Ross � Editor
Andy Farkas � Staff Illustrator
Atlantic Tours
Bus Company
1 -BOOB 7 1-0161
Bus Trips to
ECU vs. IMCSU
Football Game
Panther Stadium
Charlotte, 1UC
$25seat - transportation only
November 3D, 1996
Departs at 8:OOam - Returns
immediately after game.
Call Sharon
McLawhorn
(919) 355 9659
the world is getting smaller
3mell better.
0)
SUPER SATURDAY
it a not what you've got
it's where jou. put it.
i fer the. Urban Collectibles
i tdu dt- toilette spray,
ago key chain .and the
$35 worth of stuff.
Yours for $30.
40 OFF special
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EXTRA 20 OFF
red-lined sale items
10 OFF sift items
20 OFF ALL
gray sweatshirts
20 OFF Purple Gear Jacket
Gear up fer winter in this warm, hooded jacket. PeeDec
applique on front, ECU on back. Style 556749.
Reg. $78.95 XX Reg. $80.95
One day tale Saturday, November 16 No other discounts may be taken in conjunction with these sale prices
OPENING EARLY at 8:00 am!
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Saturday: 9jp0-am. - 3:00 pm
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w
Student Stores
More than just booksyour dollars support scholars!
While Supplies Last
http:www.hugo.com
Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Bulletins, just off Wright Circle
328-6731http:www.studentstores.ecu.edu
-m�
��.
5 ��.





Thursday, November 14,1996
The End Zone
ECU
171
1267
1865
3132
10-133
10-5
FIRST DOWNS
NET RUSHING
NET PASSING
TOTAL YARDS
INTERCEPTIONS RETURNS-YARDS
FUMBLES (NoLost)
ECU
RECEIVING
REC YDS. AVG. TO
SHANNON 33
GALLOWAY 31
583 17.7 6
313 10.1 2
LG
74
43
OHIO
RECEIVING REC YDS. AVG. TO
ECU
RUSHING
HARLEY
Top- Sophomores Kareen
Wilson (14) and Steve
Hookfin (39) led the
Bobcats in rushing last year.
Bottom- Dennis Fitzgerald
(left) and Justin Anderson
crush their opponent. Both
players have new positions
on this year's squad.
Photo courtesy of Ohio
Media Guide
ATT. GAIN LOST NET AVG. Til LG
202 105 41 1044 5.2 5 43
OHIO
178
2599
577
3176
13-193
45-22
MAXWELL 17
FRANKLIN 12
184 55.2 7
187 15.6 2
LG
54
43
G-GS ATT. COM?. YDS. INT TO
136 1507 10 16
LG
48
74
OHIO
RUSHING
WILSON
ECU
PUNTING
BAYES40
ATT. GAM LOST MET AVG. TO
238 1175 200 975 4.1 12
NO. YDS. AVG. LG
1645 41.1 58
LG
65
OHIO
PUNTING
BEIER 58
NO. YDS. AVG. LG
2140 36.9 52
Come join the rest of the Pool Sharks at
Pastime Billiards on Monday Nights
for the 9 Ball Tournaments
Pastimes
Monday
Men shoot pool 12 price
Tuesday
Domestic $1
Ladies shoot free
Wednesday
Men shoot 12 price
$2 Pitchers
Sunday
Natural on tap $1
Pastimes Billiards and Pub
in Carolina E. Center
Memorial Drive � 756-5575
ELLtOTT USmmtBff t TPUSr NO PWWCWHS
PROPS TO HIP HOP
Saturday, November 23, 1996
at The Cumbeiland County Civic Center
301 South - Fayetteville. North Carolina
"Peqf&zwvong live"
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performing Hit Singles
"Ain't No N'gga" & "Can't Knock The Hustle"
Crucial Conflict Tha Alkaholiks
performing Hit Singles Loud Records
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Hosted by Comedian Freeze Luv ol Def Comedy Jam
Advance tickets available at
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Charge by phone 1-800-727-8499
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(910) 323-5088
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For more information call 758-4591
wmmmmm
mammrn �����"�'�'� �� ����W�wm





11
Thursday, November 14,1996 The East Carolinian
LIFe
Iron pour inaugurates
new Edenton art center
Andy Turner
Senior Writer
Thrill to the
Magic of Lyn
NOVEMBER
Thursday
14
The Truth About Cats and
Dogs at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Dr. Robert Lee Humber: A Collector
Creates Exhibition at Gray Gallery
through Nov. 23
Exhibition featuring the sculptures
and wall reliefs of Hanna Jubran in
Mendenhall Gallery through Nov. 30.
Lecture featuring Odeda Rosenthal
it 7 p.m. in Speight Auditorium.
a,
ECU Steel Orchestra at 7 p.m. in AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall.
LB. at 8 p.m. at McGinnis Theatre
through Nov. 19.
Guest recital featuring the
Meadowmount Trio at 8:15 p.m. in
AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Bio Ritmo at the Attic
Zen Tricksters at Peasant's Cafe.
15
Friday
There was fire in the sky in
Edenton last Saturday night
However, the 50 or so people
gathered to witness the sparks didn't
seem to mind at all. It was all part of
an iron pour organized by the ECU
School of Art Elizabeth City State
University, the College of the
Albemarle and the Chowan Arts Coun-
cil.
The iron pour was the inaugural
event at Edenton's new arts center,
located on the site of an old cotton
mill.
Students and faculty from ECU
were joined by visitors from Buffalo
(N.Y.) State College, UNC-Charlotte,
UNC-Asheville, Elizabeth City State
University, the University of Wiscon-
sin-Milwaukee and artists from South
Carolina.
The iron pour, originally slated
for last Friday night was postponed
due to poor weather conditions.
Carl Billingsley, sculpture coor-
dinator of the ECU School of Art di-
rected the iron pour.
During an iron pour, Billingsley
explained, recycled metal is melted at
very high temperatures for the cast-
ing of sculptures. A furnace, known
as a cupola, was constructed at the
site of the event to melt the iron.
The visual effects of an iron pour,
Billingsley added, are similar to a fire-
works display.
"It's spectacular at night he
said. "It's kind of one of those activi-
ties people don't think much about;
however, once they see it, they think
it really is something
Due to the high temperatures and
sparks created from the melting pro-
cess, safety is a major concern during
a pour, Billingsley said. Participants
wear protective gear to prevent inju-
ries.
In order to avoid problems, he
added, planning is imperative.
"It's not something you could do
on the spur of a moment" Billingsley
said.
An iron pour also requires a tre-
mendous amount of labor as the
pieces of iron have to be broken into
certain sizes before they can be
melted.
Communal cooperation is a must
Billingsley added.
In all, 4,230 pounds of iron were
melted during the iron pour.
Along with the iron pour, partici-
pants and onlookers were treated to
a barbecue chicken dinner prepared
by the Windsor Cook Club.
Billingsley applauded the efforts
of Ann Perry, director of the Chowan
Arts Council, in organizing the din-
ner and other events slated in con-
junction with the pour.
Further cooperation with the
arts center is likely, Billingsley said.
The School of Music and Theater
Department may also schedule activi-
ties at the center.
Billingsley said he believes the
center will have a good regional im-
pact and he thinks the iron pour was
beneficial to both students and fac-
ulty.
"I think it was a wonderful op-
portunity for ECU - the School of Art
specifically - to expand its relation-
ship with Eastern North Carolina .�
Everyone seems to benefit from these
kinds of activities
Free F.A.N. Club wants you
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Gibb Droll Band with
Cravin' Dogs at the Attic
Hypnotic Clambake at Peasant's Cafe.
Michelle Shocked and the Casualties
of Wah with Pony Stars at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Photo Courtesy of Family Fare Series
Touted as one of the most talented illusionists working
today, Lyn Ditties will be bringing her engaging show, The
Magic of Lyn, to Wright Auditorium this Saturday at 2 p.m.
16
Saturday
The Magic of Lyn at 2 p.m
in Wright Auditorium.
2 Skinny Js with the Almighty Sena-
tors at the Attic.
����������������
Rasta Rafeeki at Peasant s Cafe.
�����?��������
Tim McGraw with Faith Hill at 8 p.m.
at the Dean Smith Center in Chapel
Hill.
� ������???���o
Indian Summer and Greyscale at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill
?����������
Bio Ritmo at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Sunday
17
John Wesley Harding at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Monday
18
� � Jazz Ensemble with Ben
Kono, saxophone, at 8 p.m. in AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Arlo Guthrie at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
19
Tuesday
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
As a wee child I was always
amazed with the idea of magic, and
I was mystified by magicians. I re-
member staying up to watch Bill
Bixby play some type of magician
hero on the cleverly-titled early
'70s television series The Magi-
cian. I remember going to birth-
day parties where some guy who
needed a little extra cash on the
side v.ould dress up in a typical
magician's outfit (cape, hat and
magic wand in place) and pull col-
orful handkerchiefs out of his
sleeve.
I loved magicians and every-
thing they stood for. They under-
stood magic better than anyone.
They were otherworldly. They
walked the fine line between our
sense of what is real and our sense
of what is fantastic. They were my
greatest sense of what magic was.
According to Webster's Colle-
giate Dictionary, the word "magic"
literally means "the use of means
believed to have supernatural
power over natural forces Well,
this Saturday ECU will be witness
to an extraordinary supernatural
power defying natural forces in
mind-boggling ways when one of
the country's premier magicians
makes a mystical appearance in the
Magic of Lyn, part of the on-going
ECU Family Fare Series.
In an effort to bring family-ori-
ented fun to Greenville, the Fam-
ily Fare Series chooses to sponsor
shows that are suitable for audi-
ences of all ages, and the Magic of
Lyn perfectly meets this criteria.
Featuring such eye-popping spec-
tacles as floating audience mem-
bers, disappearing and reappear-
ing animals, and a daring stunt in-
volving 1800 watts of electricity,
the Magic of Lyn is one magic
show that has gained national
popularity and earned critical
praise, especially from the younger
audiences.
Jenneth Webster, who works
for the Lincoln Center for the Per-
forming Arts in New York, con-
firms how thrilled children have
been with the Magic of Lyn.
"About 7,000 children saw this
excellent performance when it
played at the Lincoln Center
See MAGIC page 13
Wake up, campus!
The Student Union is trying
mighty hard to serve you, so you
guys and gals should try and pay
attention to their efforts. From
what I understand, student support
has been severely lacking for many
of the functions that the Student
Union has put together.
As an effort to service the en;
tire student community (not just
those who like hearing Widespread
Panic or the Allman Brothers), the
Student Union is bringing A Tribe
Called Quest and Busta Rhymes to
Minges on Nov. 23. Not only that,
they've been able to get sneak pre-
views of first-run movies like Sense
and Sensibility and Ransom at
Hendrix Theatre for our (free) view-
ing pleasure.
Also, they've been providing a
Pirate Pride extravaganza over sev-
eral Friday nights this semester.
Called the Friday AU-Nighter (or
F.A.N.) Club, this series of totally
free events includes an afternoon
live music jam with bands that play
everything from blues to roots rock
to international music to ska; a pep
rally starring the ECU Cheerlead-
ers, the Purple & Gold Dancers,
and Pee Dee the Pirate; a block-
buster movie on Hendrix Theatre's
big screen (the best movie screen
in Greenville); and finally, the pool
tables, the bowling lanes, and the
ping pong tables are open and free
until the wee hours when Menden-
hall shuts down.
This Friday night, Mendenhall
Student Center will be playing host
to the super-fantastic ska outfit
from Chapel Hill, Regatta 69. There
are seven core musicians in the
band and they bring everything
from saxophones to trombones to
keyboards to guitars to drums on
stage when they bust out their own
"Kill Johnny Dale a spo-
ken word performance at 8 p.m in the
School of Art's Speight Auditorium.
?���������?���
Maynard Ferguson and his Big Bop
Nouveau Band at 8 p.m. at Wright
Auditorium.
Comedy Exam Jam II featuring
J'vonne Pearson and Michael
Blackson and SNAPS contest at 8
p.m. at Hendrix Theatre.
100 Iced Animals at Peasant's Cafe.
SW KecAtec
John Davis
Staff Writer
C.S. Lewis once lamented that
20
Wednesday
Journey in Japan Travel-
Adventure Film at 4 and 7:30 p.m. in
rfendi�ix�Ttoeat!re�wth than limner
at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall's Multi-Pur-
pose Room.
Symphonic Wind Ensemble and Con-
cert Band at 8 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium.
Rosco at Peasant's Cafe.
the original vitality of science fiction
had disappeared from the genre. He
had noticed that science fiction had
been swallowed up by popular culture
and was now nothing more than a pe-
riphery copy of popular
literature: adventure sto-
ries in space, mysteries in
space, westerns in space.
Being a fan of the
genre, I had noticed that
this was true. With the
exception of some of the
earliest sci-fi, such as H.G.
Wells, Jules Verne, Isaac
Asimov, and even Lewis
himself, science fiction
had become a pop cul-
ture, a shadow of modern
entertainment culture.
I was first encour-
aged to read Orson Scott
Card by a friend of mine.
He had read Ender's
Game, and had not been
able to put the book
down. I was further in-
trigued because Card is a
North Carolinian (he lives in Greens-
boro). So, I read Ender's Game and,
in succession, the rest of the series
based on that novel, of which Chil-
dren of The Mind is last
Briefly told, the series concerns
the life of one Ender Wiggin, and his
quest to become a whole person. In
Ender's Game, he commits the ter-
rible crime of xenocide (like genocide,
except that it is the eradication of an
entire species) as a child, and repents
for his crime by publishing a compas-
sionate, passionate history of that
alien race under an assumed name,
Speaker for The Dead. The book has
far-reaching consequences: because it
looks at the war through the eyes of
the aliens instead of from a human
perspective.
In the sequel, Speaker for the
Dead, Ender encounters a new alien
race and, determined to prevent the
replay of his crime, begins to negoti-
ate between the human race and their
neighbors. Unfortunately, in doing so,
See CARD page 12
skankin' com-
bination of alt-
rock, reggae
and pop.
In case
you didn't
know it, ska is
the next big
musical trend
that is going to
spread across
the nation. It's
already started
with ska pre-
tenders No
Doubt. But if
you want to
catch the real
deal, then you
ought to come
down and see
Regatta 69.
They will defi-
nitely wear you
out. Loca
band Offcenter
will also be per-
forming.
Also,
showing in
Hendrix The-
atre this Friday
will be The
Truth About Cats & Dogs starring
Janeane Garofalo and Uma
Thurman. The story concerns a Ra-
dio DJVeterinarian (Garofalo) who
is too shy to go out with one of her
listeners and sends her stunningly
gorgeous friend (Thurman) on the
Photos Courtesy of Student Union
Regatta 69 and The Truth About Cats and
Dogs are free this Friday for the F.A.N. Clubj.
date instead. Needless to say, hilae-
ity abounds. �
For the many of you who migM
be heading downtown to get out e?f
your heads on Friday night, I have
See FAN page 13
Wild art
For the first time
ever, a guest artist,
Ben Kono (lead alto I
saxophonist with the"
U.S. Army Jazz Am- �
bassadors) will per- I
form Monday, Nov.
18 at 8 p.m. in AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall
with both the Tues
Thurs. Jazz En-
semble and the Con
temporary Jazz En-
semble. This is a
testament to the
level of proficiency
ECU'S music stu-
dents have reached
Photo Courtesy of School of Music





12
Thursday, November 14, 1996
The East Carolinian
CARD from page 11
he brings the planet of these aliens
into the rebellion against the Starways
Congress, and they send a fleet of
ships armed with a doomsday device
to destroy the planet.
In the third novel, Xenocide,
Ender and his friends race against
time to stop this fleet and to dismantle
a nearly-sentient virus that threatens
to destroy the human race.
Which brings us to Children of
the Mind. Though this novel is basi-
cally the conclusion of the events set
in motion by the first three, it is by
far the most important of the four
novels. Because, unlike most sci-fi out
there today, the Ender Saga is not
really about space or technology or
interstellar war, but instead about
what it means to be human.
Throughout the series, Card
uses the story of Ender to draw the
reader into a fantastic and awe-inspir-
ing philosophical inquiry concerning
the meaning of existence. Along the
way. he brings out some very inter-
esting hypotheses about politics,
some engaging debates about the
sanctity of human life, questions
about the nature of freedom, inquir-
ies into the existence of God, a re-
vealing picture of our attitudes to-
ward the disabled and a moving pic-
ture of unconditional love. He does
all of this within the context of the
story, indirectly at times, but always
in a manner relevant to the moving
action.
And the action is well-paced.
Never for a moment is the reader too
omniscient; never is he or she left in
the dark for too long. Like
Shakespeare himself. Card delivers a
tale that can appeal to both the popu-
list audiences of mainstream sci-fi,
while also writing a story that en-
gages intellectual and philosophical
minds. His descriptions are vivid and
alive: not since C.S. Lewis'
Perelandra has a sci-fi author ren-
dered beauty this well. (Card's style
is, however, decidedly less medieval
than Lewis) He delivers his tale well,
wrapping it up in a multicultural
kaleidoscope: his characters are in-
fluenced by Brazilian, Chinese and
Japanese cultures. Card's character-
izations are superb; the inner work-
ings of his character's minds are vi-
tal to the effectiveness of his story,
and he deftly encapsulates the com-
plex and very human personalities in
his epic.
It was only after reading this
novel that the obvious occurred to
me: science fiction is an ideal medium
for exploring the nature of human-
ity. What better way to understand
our glories and our shortcomings
than by giving us an alien mind
through which to look at ourselves?
In this way. 1 mean no blas-
phemy, this series of novels is like
the Bible, in that it presents human-
ity with an outside view - this is how
silly you look sometimes: this is how-
wonderful you really are. if only you d
let go of your stubborn pride to see
it. The Bible presents how we look
to God; Card gives us the image we
present to four alien races.
I find myself moving through the
day. pondering the many questions
raised by these novels. I see that,
even now, 1 have already evaluated
many of my preconceived notions
about culture and humanity because
of these books. My mind races a mile
a minute at times, weighing new
ideas and concepts birthed in my
mind because of the questions and
possibilities these books have
opened my eyes to. In these very
stories, Card created a character
(Ender Wiggin) who is able to see
through the eyes of strangers and
write from the perspective of the
"Other By writing these novels,
Card has become such an author
himself.
SILVER
Doors Open
7:30 pm
Stage Time
9:00 pm
756-6278
BULLET
A TtuuJt oi C&m
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Skd$n
Western Night
FRI & SAT: Silver Bullet
Exotic Dancers
DON'T
DRINK AND DRIVE!
Call Aladdin Taxi at 830-5466 and
�; receive $2 off at the door -
Located 5 Miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt.(Behind John's Convenient Mart)
1109 S. Charles Blvd.
758-4251 OR 758-9999
Goodluck Pirates!
We're open 10am - Midnight, Everyday!
We buy, Sell, & Trade used CD's
ON SALE TUESDAY � BUSH � Shaquille O'Neil � Dm Hill
$11.99 CD
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"the dog father"
RENT
NINTENDO64
today!
HEWDRIX FILMS
Thursday, November 14
Friday, November 15
Saturday, November 16
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fountain Drink
Buy lused CD
Get 1 FREE!
(Same Price or less)
good only 111696
2 for 1
VIDIO RENTAL
good only 111696
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(One guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
Xdj
$�'
'cSK?S
'@S
Not Available oil E-mail, CD ROM, or
the World Wide Web
MAYNARD FERGUSON
and his BIG BOP
NOUVEAU BAND
Big Bop,
Big Band,
Funk,
and Jazz
Also featuring the
ECU Jazz Ensemble!
Tuesday, Nov. 19,1996
8 p.m. Wright Auditorium
S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series
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h . � i m i���-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 14,1996
13
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
i
a 4
Sale Begins Wednesday,
October 30,1996
Mwmj
����
Fresh Baked In Sauce
BBQ
President's Choice
Soft
Drinks
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Triple Chocolate
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President's Choice
Cookies
12 Oz. P
FJesidfirs Choice
Kettle Cooked choice ;
Potato Chips SALE
Original
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" Caribbean
eoz.
President's Choice
Garden
Salad Mix
16 Oz.
PRESIDENTS
� ?CHOICE'
SALE
Mt. DewDiet Pepsi
or
2 Liter
1 �
HhkMtt
We Gladly Accept j&
Prlui 1 Tkli Ad Eff.d Tkn.fh Nonmbo 21 Ik 1996 At four Gcmh.IIIi H.rrli hMt tawN Tka Ri�k Tt Halt Q.i.lili.i Nom Sold To D.il.ri
MAGIC from page 11
Webster states. "All of them were
completely spellbound by Lyn,
whose delightful personality and
magical skills captivated the
youngsters
The woman behind all the
magic is Lyn Uillies, one of the
most accomplished female illusion-
ists working today. With more than
20 years of professional stage ex-
perience on her resume, Lyn has
used her magical skills to carry her
show all around the U.S. and
Canada. So far, she has thrilled
audiences everywhere from New
York's Lincoln Center to Atlantic
City.
Lyn's live performance has
even made it to the wonderful
world of television, including the
popular TNN series The Statler
Brothers Show. She has also
worked with such noted celebrities
as Marvin Hamlisch. Crystal Gayle
and Mikhail Barishnikov.
Lyn's skills in the magical arts
have not gone unnoticed within
the world of magic. The Society of
American Magicians has marked
Lyn as the "fastest rising superstar
in the realm of magic
Whether you are a child, an
adult or somewhere stuck in be-
tween, don't miss out on this won-
derful and exciting opportunity to
experience true magic at its spell-
binding best.
The Magic of Lyn will amaze
you on Saturday, Nov. 16 at 2
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Ad-
vance tickets for the public are
$8, $7 for ECU faculty and staff,
and $5 for ECU students and
younger audiences. All tickets at
the door will be $8. For tickets
or further information, call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-
4788. toll free 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
or deafspeech-impaired access
328-4736.
FAN from page 11
this piece of advice. You'll be do-
ing the same thing on Saturday
night. If you save yourself some
money by going to the F.A.N. Club
on Friday, then you'll have that
much more extra cash to spend on
Saturday. The F.A.N. Club is totally
free. You can't beat that deal with
a stick.
Do yourself a favor and partake
in some of the great things that are
happening on campus. Before you
know it, you'll be out there - you
know, in the real world. No one, and
I mean no one, will provide you any-
thing for free out there. Take ad-
vantage of the free stuff while you
can.
For additional info, call the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center at 328-4788, toll
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0"
ii�iwiniiniiivnr�i�
14
Thursday, November 14,1996 The East Carolinian
Loss suffered in final
exhibition game
Runner takes strides
toward improvement
Tracy Laubach
Staff Writer
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The Lady Pirates had a tough
battle Monday night, matching up
with Athletes in Action, (AIA).
AIA is a group of former college
players that travel around and plav
exhibition games with other colleges.
Nancy Liberman-Cline, regarded
as one of the best female players, be-
gins her first tour with AIA.
Liberman-Cline is the seventh player
inducted into the Hall of Fame and
has won numerous awards.
ECU's Laurie Ashenfelder had
the task of guarding Liberman-Cline
who scored 25 points in the Pirates'
5846 loss.
"It was a great opportunity to
guard someone with her talent
Ashenfelder said.
ECU started off slow not record-
ing a basket until the 16:50 mark
when Justine Allpress nailed two free
throws. The Lady Pirates did not
score for another seven minutes
when Allpress came to the rescue
with a layup.
Coach Anne Donovan was visibly
frustrated with the way her team
played.
"Offensively, we couldn't put the
ball in the hole Donovan said. "We
were getting great shots - we just
couldn't knock them down
Ashenfelder agreed.
"We were too focused on defense
and didn't execute when we needed
to Ashenfelder said.
ECU started
scoring toward
the end of the
first half and
were down by six
at the half, 23-17.
The only
scorers in the
first half were
Allpress with 11
points, Tracey
Kelley with four
and Crissy White
notched two
points.
"We were getting
great shots � we
just couldn't
knock them
down
� Coach Anne Donovan
pointer and a Kelley free throw.
Melanie Gillem sank an 18-foot jump
shot to give the Lady Pirates their
closest chance, 37-35. with 7:20 left
AIA proved to be too much and
the Lady Pirates fell behind and lost
by 12, 5846.
Allpress led
all scorers with 18
points, Kelley
added nine, Jen
Cox and Home
each added six.
Kelley
grabbed 16 re-
bounds for the
game and said
that is what the
team will rely on
her for this sea-
son.
Defensively, Kelley thought
there could have been some improve-
ments.
"We need to concentrate on han-
dling the pressure Kelley said.
"Zone pressure - we couldn't handle
it inside. The guards need to handle
it outside
The second half was better for
the Pirates as more people began to
score and the offense started to click.
But it wasn't enough.
ECU cut the deficit to within
four after a Misty Home three
"That's my bread and butter this
year Kelley said. "My biggest con-
tribution is going to be rebounding
The Lady Pirates won't play un-
til their season opener later this
month, but these exhibition games
gave some of the younger players a
taste of what is to come.
"These two games give them
(freshman) a taste of the next 26
games Kelley said.
ECU will open up the season on
Nov. 23 against Appalachian State in
Boone, N.C.
Women's basketball player
i looks to make impact on team
Mike Daniska
Staff Wrltor
For junior Jen Cox, just playing
basketball for the Lady Pirates is a
triumph. Cox, who transferred to
ECU from Vanderbilt has been lim-
ited to only nine games in the past
three years, due to a stress fracture
that kept her out of action.
In high school, Cox was named
an Ail-American by the Women's Bas-
ketball News Service and honorable
mention by USA Today and Street
and Smith's. As a senior, she was
named South Carolina's Player of the
Year and led her team to a 51-11
record in her last two seasons.
Such winning ways continued
when she chose to attend Vanderbilt
a national powerhouse in women's
basketball. She traveled with
Vanderbilt to the Sweet 16 her fresh-
man and sophomore years, but some-
thing wasn't quite right
"Vanderbilt was ranked number
one in the nation when I picked it
! but I didn't really fit in the system.
I Plus I had some injuries Cox said.
Cox's coach at Vanderbilt recom-
; mended ECU's Head Coach, Anne
Donovan, and Cox soon became a Pi-
! rate.
"I love ECU Cox said, a biol-
I ogy major. "I love the people, the
school
Cox had to sit out last year be-
cause she was a transfer. But her
presence was felt even before she
played a game this year.
"Jen is interesting Donovan
said. "She is the first transfer that 1
have had, and her presence was re-
ally felt in practice. I put a lot of de-
mand on this team, but because of
the prominent program that she had
come from. Jen was already at the
level that I am accustomed to
Cox knows hard work is the only
way to get ahead.
"The whole team has a really
good work ethic added Cox. "They
look to me because I have been in a
winning program and have had ex-
perience at the national level
On the court, Donovan looks to
Cox to anchor a promising defense.
"With her size and height alone,
she will have a good impact on the
team. She will give us a great post
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Cross Country Championships
were held earlier this month at Lake
Kristi.
While the men headed into the
competition hungry for a third place
or better team finish, sophomore
Jamie Mance was determined to be-
come the first ECU runner to earn
All-Conference honors. By finishing
seventh overall in the five mile race,
with a time of 24:52, his mission was
accomplished. AI1-CAA honors are
awarded to the top 12 finishers in
the race.
Mance, who has been running
cross country for six years now,
comes to ECU from Wilmington, Del.
He chose ECU because he was im-
pressed with the unity and overall
atmosphere displayed by the team.
"In looking at different schools,
I knew that these were the p�ople
that I wanted to run with because
they were real Mance said. "Every-
one else just put on an act and didn't
seem to care much about what they
were doing. I have never seen a team
with so much depth and I couldn't
wait to be part of it"
Mance's primary focus is on stay-
ing healthy and in optimal physical
condition, with his main goal being
to improve each year.
"I came into this meet with
hopes of a third place team finish and
the personal goal to earn All-Confer-
ence honors, and I did just that Next
year, I will expect even more out of
both the team and myself Mance
said.
With about half of the team from
North Carolina and the other half
coming from various parts of the
country, the men often turn their
practices into North vs. South com-
petitions. They run each practice as
if they are performing at an actual
meet This rivalry among teammates
forces each member of the team to
strive for improvement and as a re-
sult of this competitiveness, the team
has been stronger than ever this sea-
son.
With 5:30 a.m. practices three
times a week, two hours of running
and conditioning each afternoon, and
meets on most weekends, members
of the cross country team are obvi-
ously dedicated to their sport
Mance feels that the team has
been so successful because of the tre-
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Jamie Mance runs for the finish line finishing third in the
CAA's. This run earned him All-Conference honors.
mendous effort put in by the team
and coaches alike. Together, the
coaches and athletes strive for excel-
lence and improvement and together,
their long-term goals have been ac-
complished.
Assistant Coach Mike Ford pre-
dicts that the team will be unstop
pable within the next two years.
With a team consisting mostly of
freshmen and sophomores, there is
plenty of time to learn, improve and
grow.
"This meet has definitely had a
positive effect on the overall motiva-
tion and attitude of the team Ford
said. "The guys are confident that
they are representing a legitimate
program that has the ability to com-
pete at the top. Setting our goal and
working hard to achieve it was a lot
different than actually doing it. 1
didn't come off cloud nine until the
Wednesday after the championship
For the past 12 years, the CAA
Championships have been held at
William & Mary. Ford, who has been
coaching cross country for four years
now, began lobbying for the compe-
tition to be rotated among schools.
For the first time in over a decade,
teams from William & Mary, James
Madison, UNC Wilmington, George
Mason, Richmond, Old Dominion,
American University, Virginia Com-
monwealth and, of course, ECU met
here in Greenville.
As one of the smallest sports on
campus, the cross country team
works with perhaps the smallest of
See RUNpage 15
INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The ECU golf team won the Charleston South-
ern Invitational after defeating UNC Wilmington on
the first hole of the playoff. Both teams finished at
591 after 36 holes
The Pirates shot a combined 297 on Tuesday to
overcome the two-stroke lead the Seahawks held af-
ter the first day of play. The two teams were even
going into the final hole of the day. ECU senior Richie
Creech sank a 15-foot putt for birdie to put the Pi-
rates in the playoff. On the first hole of the playoff,
ECU made four pars to defeat UNC-W, which made
just three.
"It was nice to see the freshman respond the
way they did today ECU head coach Kevin William
said. "They hung in there and gave us a chance to
win this thing at the end
Marc Miller shot the best score of the day for the
Pirates as he carded a 70. Freshman Matt Riggs fired
a 73 and Creech shot a 76. Robbie Perry and Shane
Robinson each shot scores of 78.
The Pirates have now won this tournament two
consecutive years as they won the team title last year
as well. ECU will not play in another tournament until
the spring season.
The ECU volleyball team tied the school record for
consecutive losses in a season (10) as the Pirates were
defeated by UNC-Wilmington.
The Seahawks took the first game easily 15-3 and
then took an early lead in the second game. The Pirates
answered with a run of their own to take the second 15-
10. In the third game, ECU began with a five point lead
before letting the Seahawks in the game. UNC-W went
ahead late before the Pirates ended it 16-14. In the fourth
game, the Seahawks took control and never relinquished
it beating ECU 15-5. In the fifth game, control went
back and forth before UNC-W took a 14-11 lead. The
Pirates played hard though coming back with two points
before UNC-W ended the game 15-13. Final for the match
UNC-W 15-3, 10-15, 14-16, 15-5, 15-3.
Individually for the Pirates, Shannon Kaess had 14
kills and 11 digs while Kari Koenning added 13 kills
and 18 digs.
This was the final conference match for the Pirates
(6-25,0-6). ECU'S final home match is against Campbell
on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m.
Photo Courtesy of ECU media guide
Jen Cox, a transfer from Vanderbilt University, hopes to
bring her knowledge of basketball to the Lady Pirates.
Cy Young winner announced
game Donovan said.
In early exhibition games this
year, Cox's presence has been felt. In
31 minutes, she scored 14 points,
grabbed three boards, had three as-
sists, one block and a steal in a 60-
50 victory over the Croatian National
Team on Nov. 6. And on Nov. 11
against Athletes in Action, Cox had
six points rebounds in 21 minutes of
play.
With the regular season opener
at Appalachian State quickly ap-
proaching, Cox is eager and excited
to play.
"We are looking forward to
something other than just exhibition
games Cox said. "ASU is pretty
good, but with some good recruits
and transfers, we are an all around
better team than last year. I think
that we are going to be a really good
defensive team, and that the defense
will take us far
As for conference foes, Cox fore-
sees Old Dominion as the only true
obstacle. In the preseason Top 25 AP
college women's basketball poll, the
Lady Monarchs are ranked seventh.
For Cox, a strong work ethic and
winning background translate into
an unequaled desire to win. A desire
that should carry the Lady Pirates
far this season.
NEW YORK (AP) - Given the
hype during the baseball playoffs,
Andy Pettitte figured he would win
the AL Cy Young award. Pat
Hentgen did, too.
"To be honest, I definitely pre-
pared myself to come in second
the Toronto right-hander said Tues-
day after his upset victory was an-
nounced. "I was a little shocked. I
think I'm overwhelmed right now
Hentgen, who turned 28 today,
was 20-10 with a 3.22 ERA for the
fourth-place Blue Jays, winning his
20th on the final day of the sea-
son. In matching the second-clos-
est vote in the history of the AL Cy
Young, he received 16 first-place
votes, nine seconds and three thirds
for 110 points.
Pettitte, 21-8 with a 3.87 ERA
for the World Series champion New
York Yankees, was considered the
favorite. He drew 11 firsts, 16 sec-
onds and one third for 104 points
in balloting by the Baseball Writ-
ers Association of America.
"All the talk was that I would
definitely win Pettitte said. "I'm
like, these people know something
I don't. I was a little surprised
Hentgen led the majors in com-
plete games (10) and innings (265
2-3) and was second in ERA in the
AL behind teammate Juan Guzman
(2.93). Hentgen pitched three shut-
outs, tying Ken Hill of Texas. Rich
Robertson of Minnesota and Kevin
Brown of Florida for the major
league lead.
"When the season ended and
I was talking to my wife. 1 told her
Pat deserved it Pettitte said. "He
was totally dominating. 1 didn't go
out and dominate games. Of course.
I didn't get complete games with
the set-up we had
Yankees set-up man Mariano
Rivera earned the other first-place
SeeYOUNGpagel5
Am
-W' -





The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 14,1996
15
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����MMi
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager,
WZMB
and
General Manager,
Expressions
for the Spring, 1997 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, November 22 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
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Each year you serve on
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ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
YOUNG from page 14
vote and finished third with 18
points.
The closest vote came in 1969,
when Mike Cuellar and Denny
McLain tied. In 1972, Gaylord Perry
beat Wilbur Wood 64-58.
Hentgen, who became the first
to win the award for a Canadian
team, was 8-6 with a 3.86 ERA be-
fore the All-Star game, then went
12-4 with a 2.58 ERA after the
break.
"Things just snowballed for me
in the second half Hentgen said.
"There was just a point where I
knew I could go out and pitch a
good game
He got his 20th win when he
led Toronto over Baltimore 4-1 at
SkyDome. He had a chance to win
his 20th against Baltimore on the
final weekend three years ago, but
Toronto lost to Rick Sutcliffe 8-4.
"I think when I look back at
'93 in Camden Yards, going for my
20th win, I was a little nervous
Hentgen said.
Pettitte, 24, led the AL in vic-
tories and went 13-3 after Yankees
losses. He pitched for many months
despite a sore throwing arm.
"I didn't even think I'd make
it through the season if you asked
me in the middle of the season
when by elbow was killing me he
said.
Charles Nagy of Cleveland was
fourth with 12 points, followed by
Mike Mussina of Baltimore with
five. Alex Fernandez and Roberto
Hernandez of the White Sox were
tied for sixth with one point along
with Hill.
Hentgen, who made $2.25 mil-
lion, gets a $50,000 bonus for win-
ning the award.
IV U JN from page 14
any athletic budgets. However, the
men have been able to use this depri-
vation of funds to their advantage.
"Not having the extra luxuries
that most of the other athletic teams
have has made our kids tougher Ford
said.
So what's expected to happen in
the future? Ford guarantees that the
team will run the best ever in ECU his-
tory at regionals, which is scheduled
to be held this Saturday at Furman Uni-
versity in Greenville, S.C
"About 55 schools will be repre-
sented at regionals and only the top
three will get a bid for nationals Ford
said. "We are heading into this meet
for a good experience, and 1 expect that
we will finish somewhere within the
top 50 percent"
As for Mance, Ford is confident
that he will be able to represent ECU
at the Penn Relays, which will host over
70,000 athletes from around the na-
tion. The Relays, held in April each
year, usually serve as a good preview
for nationals, which are held in June.
"Jamie has definitely exceeded my
expectations of how successful he
would be as a sophomore Ford said.
"He is up there with the top guys in
the country. His excellent mental atti-
tude is going to help him stay at the
top
Ford feels that all of the athletic
teams are likely to benefit from having
a football team that is consistently mak-
ing a huge positive statement about
ECU's Athletic Program.
"In beating Miami, our football
team opened the eyes of sports fans
all over the country. People are start-
ing to learn a lot about ECU and our
terrific program Ford said. "It's been
great for recruiting potential athletes
The team has also received an in-
credible amount of parental support
Ford feels that the parents and fami-
lies of his athletes truly are interested
and care about the well-being and suc-
cess of the team.
The men will continue to set per-
sonal goals, work hard to achieve them,
and improve each day. With a solid
team, motivated and dedicated, contin-
ued success is guaranteed.
FEATURING "I'MAPf COHTEfT"
'MAP" COMTBT"
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14,11AM
IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT STORE.
THE WINNER WILL RECEIVE TWO
FREE TICKETS TO THE COMEDY JAM II.
J'VOMNB PEARJOH
MICHAEL BLACK" OM
atj
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,8PM
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$5 FOR THE PUBLIC pfcr
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $5
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION CULTURAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 14, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 14, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1175
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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