The East Carolinian, November 7, 1996







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November 7,1996 �
Vol 72, No. 22 �
Circulation 12,000
Across The State
HIGH POINT (AP) - Police de-
tectives found a human skeleton in
a deep culvert after a search was
prompted by Surry County officials
in connection with a missing persons
case.
Surry County Sheriffs Depart-
ment investigators had asked High
Point police to search the area based
on a lead they received about the
case.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Central
Piedmont Community College will
open computer labs in two public
housing projects to help adults im-
prove their basic reading and math
skills.
The school has offered free, self-
paced basic skills instruction on com-
puters at its neighborhood centers
since 1983. But that setup shuts out
some adults.
CPCC is teaming with
Charlotte's Web, the community's
computer network, to launch the
project
Acorss The Country
PITTSFORD, N.Y. (AP) -Three
teen-agers are accused of beating a
woman in her home on Halloween
and stealing cash, jewelry and a
Mercedes-Benz, all at the direction
of her 16-year-old daughter, police
said.
Renee Shanly, 50, was awak-
ened after midnight Thursday by
masked intruders and pistol-whipped
so severely that the gun's metal butt
broke off.
She was hospitalized for four
days with severe head cuts, a broken
nose, nerve damage behind her ears
and internal bleeding.
Her daughter, Marie, is accused
of driving the three attackers to her
house and giving them a key to the
door.
NEW YORK (AP) - USAir will
order 120 small jetliners from Air-
bus Industrie, marking another coup
in the European consortium's battle
against Boeing Co The Wall Street
Journal reported today.
The planes are valued at $5.3
billion, but the actual price paid by
USAir Group Inc. will be discounted.
Airbus is also making generous fi-
nancing available, the Journal said,
citing anonymous sources.
Around The World
ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) - Signal-
ing a shift in U.S. policy, a senior U.S.
official has warned Croatia that it
risks losing U.S. political and eco-
nomic support if it does not extra-
dite indicted war crimes suspects.
John Shattuck. the Assistant
Secretary of State for Human Rights.
delivered the warning Tuesday on a
one-day visit to fhe Croatian capital
Zagreb, where he met witn Croatia's
foreign minister.
KABUL. Afghanistan (AP) -
Anti-Taliban jets bombed the .Afghan
capital today, wounding two people,
including the wife of a former gov-
ernment military aide.
Jets belonging to northern war-
lord Rashid Dostum also bombed
Taliban positions about 12 miles
north of Kabul, where fighting has
taken place for the past several
weeks.
Clinton wins
olinian
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pages
more in landslide
Republicans
continue to hold
House, Senate
WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Clinton won a landslide re-election and
political redemption Tuesday night as
voters put their faith in his economic
leadership and brushed aside Bob
Dole's challenge to his character. Re-
publicans battled to temper Clinton's
win by keeping their hold on the House
and Senate.
Clinton polled strongly in every
region for a coast-to-coast victory that
made him the first Democratic presi-
dent re-elected since Franklin
Roosevelt It was a dramatic rebound
from the Democratic defeat that deliv-
ered Congress to the Republicans in
1994.
"They have affirmed our cause and
told us to go forward Clinton said of
the voters who returned him to office.
The president addressed a crowd
of thousands jamming the streets of
Little Rock, Ark to hear his victory
speech at the Old State House. Vice
�r
President Al Gore called it a "glorious
evening" and in-
deed the numbers
were very good
for the Demo-
cratic ticket.
Clinton was on a
pace to match if
not exceed the
370 electoral
votes he won in
1992, and he was
close to the majority vote that eluded
him in 1992.
"I wish him well and I pledge my
They have
affirmed our
cause and told us
to go forward
� President Clinton
support" Dole said in conceding the
race. Dole and
other Republican
leaders took solace
in returns suggest-
ing that voters
would keep the
Congress in GOP
hands even as they
gave Clinton four
more years.
"We're going
to keep the Senate, we're going to keep
the House Dole said.
It was Dole's last speech as a can-
� wjy
didate. ending a remarkable political
career that included 35 years in Con-
gress and a record 12 years as the Sen-
ate Republican leader. "Tomorrow will
be the first time in my life I don't have
anything to do Dole said.
Reform Party candidate Ross
Perot was a distant third everywhere
and well below the 19 percent he won
in 1992. He conceded defeat but was
not ready to fade into the shadows. "We
going to have to stand at the gate and
keep the pressure on and we will
Perot said in Texas, looking ahead per-
haps to 2000.
Helms defeats Gantt
by narrow margin
Senator reclaims
office for fifth term
RALEIGH (AP) - U.S. Sen.
Jesse Helms won a fifth term Tues-
day, defeating Democratic chal-
lenger Harvey Gantt as the former
Charlotte mayor failed to dig deeper
into Helms' support from white vot-
ers than he did in 1990.
With 67 percent of the vote
counted. Helms defeated Gantt 52
percent to 46 percent.
Helms opened his victory
speech returning fire to the major
North Carolina newspapers which
refused to endorse him and former
President Jimmy Carter, who cam-
paigned Monday in a last-ditch at
tempt to boost
Gantt
Carter said he
was campaigning
for someone away
from his home
county for the first
time since leaving
the White House
in part because
Helms had con-
tinually blocked
nuclear arms and
chemical weapons
treaties.
. MMMHMMMMMMMH
"I like Jimmy
Carter personally, but I'm certainly
relieved that his four years in the
White House are behind us and not
ahead of us
said Helms, the Sen-
ate Foreign Re-
lations Commit-
tee chairman.
To his op-
ponents. Helms
said: "I can
guarantee you
one thing,
there will be six
more years of
torment for Ted
Kennedy and
all those other
liberals
Gantt said
he would not
make any excuses for his loss, nor
See DEFEAT page 3
"I can't think of
one thing I would
have done
different. The
voters clearly
decided to keep
the incumbent
� Harvy Gantt
�MMMMMMNHM
ROTC names Cadet of the Month
Byron A. Mintz
Contributing Writer
Cadet of the Month is one of the
most distinguished honors a cadet in
ROTC can receive.
Cadet Jonathon Long received the
award this month after a military screen-
ing on basic military training and knowl-
edge. Long, a 20-year-old junior from
Havelock is a political science major at
ECU. He is also a member of the Ranger
Challenge Team and a member of Air-
borne Assault
The ROTC officers nominate out-
standing cadets at the beginning of the
month and the board who votes on
performance meets two weeks later.
They are graded on their leadership,
overall military bearing and appearance
and other advanced activities.
The award of Cadet of the Month is
open to all classes of students. It is
weighed differently for the cadets who
are freshmen as compared to seniors,
who have more military experience and
knowledge.
"Being Cadet of the Month is about
setting an example, standing out in front
of your peers and giving them a stan-
dard to shoot for Long said.
The board meets in the ROTC
Persing Rifle Room and the grading pro-
(Above) The Ranger team
goes through inspections be-
fore every military exercise.
Left to right are Cdt. Long,
Cdt. Kim, Cdt. McDonald, Cdt.
Parks, Cdt, Coochran, Cdt.
Poe, Cdt, Gagan and Lt.
Coi.Terry Newman. (Right)
The cadet battalion leader
Lt. Col. Terry Newman con-
gratulates Jonathon Long
who was named the cadet of
the month.
cess begins.
"It is very special to be Cadet of
the Month and I hope everyone gets a
chance to to win this award Long said.
The ROTC Battalion went to Fort
School of Education receives grant
Money to help
retain beginning
teachers
Erika Swarts
News Writer
The University School of Education received a $100,000
state grant to help find ways to retain talented public school
teachers in North Carolina classrooms.
A study by the State Board of Education found that 40
LIFjg
Robert Lee Humber's Art on Exhibitpage I
Elections are finally overpage O
S PO RT fucxCa
Gear up for Pirate basketballpage
10
Thursday
Mostly clcudy
-
High 70
Low 54
Weekend
Sunny
High 64
Low 42
Greeks camp out
for homeless
Event hopes to raise awarness
Jeff Gentry
News Writer
ECU fraternities and sororities which are members of the National
Pan-Hellenic Council have organized a Sleep Out to help raise awareness
about the struggle of the homeless.
Members of the sororities Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta.
Zeta Phi Beta, and Sigma Gamma Rho. as well as members of Phi Beta
Sigma and Kappa Alpha Psi fraternities are all participating in this event.
A representative from each sorority and fraternity will spend the
night on the campus mall starting at 7 p.m. tonight. The Sleep Out will
run through Friday night.
Zeta Phi Beta member and Sleep Out co-organizer Candace Turner
said, "This was an idea that each organization collaborated on together.
Our goal is to raise money and canned goods or whatever the community
would like to give us to donate to the homeless shelter
Franklin Shipp also helped to organize the event and is a member of
Kappa Alpha Psi.
"We heard about other organizations doing this type of thing and
decided it would be a good idea for our fraternity to do something like
this in Greenville Shipp said. "There are only eight brothers in Kappa
Alpha Psi, so we decided it would be a good idea to involve the other
fraternities and sororities on campus that are members of the National
Pan-Hellenic Council
"1 cannot take any credit for this said Laura Sweet, an advisor
working with the fraternities and sororities. "It was mainly Franklin and
Candace who put this together
There will be a performance by the East Carolina Gospel Choir Fri-
day night at 8 p.m and there are also plans to have some of the staff and
residents of the Greenville Homeless Shelter stop in periodically through-
out the event.
The National Pan-Hellenic Council, established in 1930 at Howard
University to nationally coordinate the historically African American fra-
ternities and sororities, has grown to include over 1.5 million members.
People wishing to make a donation are asked to bring canned goods,
non-perishable food items or money to the Sleep Out site on the mall.
State links up for 'Net Day '96'
Jeff Gentry
News Writer
Photos Courtesy of ROTC
Jackson, S.C. recently to compete in a
Ranger Brigade Challenge.
They finished sixth place overall in
See ROTC page 4
to 50 percent of new teachers leave the profession within five
years.
According to Interim Dean of the School of Education.
Dr. Henry Peel, the goal of the grant program is to explore
current new teacher orientation programs that have been suc-
cessful.
Senator Ed Warren said he helped to secure the grant
for ECU.
"If we are to prepare our students to lead us into the 21st
century, we must find better ways to prepare, support and
retain all good teachers, especially our beginning teachers
See GRANT page 4
An estimated 26,000 volunteers
turned out on Oct. 26 to help link over
6,000 classrooms to the Internet as
part of North Carolina NetDay 96.
N.C. NetDay '96 was funded
through ExplorNet, a non-profit cor-
poration, as well as many local busi-
nesses and state institutions, includ-
ing ECU. Dave Boliek, one of the or-
ganizers of ExplorNet and a reporter
for WTVD Channel 11 News, said.
"Business support for this project is
critical. We asked businesses for vol-
unteers, for funding and for other
support Businesses in North Carolina
have come through for our schools
NetDay organizers estimated that
the cost for labor and materials to wire
this many classrooms through normal
methods would have cost $13.5 mil-
lion. But due to the tremendous ef-
fort by businesses and volunteers, the
project was completed at no cost to
taxpayers.
The National Guard also helped
with the effort by delivering the wir-
ing kits to schools. Helicopters deliv-
ered some kits to area schools in Snow
Hill and Iron Station, just east of
Lincolnton, while other kits were de-
livered by truck to schools across the
state. N.C. National Guard NetDay
Coordinator Baron Hignite said, "This
is a program that contributes to all of
our citizens. Our guard personnel live
and work within our state. This is a
win-win situation
BellSouth, the state's largest tele-
communication provider, was also a
major contributor to NetDay '96. The
corporation agreed to contribute $4
million to the project, and after learn-
ing that approximately 30 more wir-
ing kits would be needed, they made
arrangements to supply those as well.
"NetDay '96 is important for all
school systems because of the infor-
mation technology it puts within stu-
dents' reach. But it is especially criti-
cal for rural schools, which may al-
ready have fewer resources said J.
Billy Ray Jr BellSouth President for
N.C. Operations.
BellSouth is contributing $25
million to NetDay throughout the
Southeast, and will contribute more
than 500 wiring kits to schools in
North Carolina alone. It is also con
tributing free telephone computer
lines, Internet accounts for schools
and teachers' homes, and teacher
training for using the Internet.
�?W to- react uj
Phone.
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.FCU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Jovner





m
Thursday, November 7,1996
The East Carolinian
Doctors at UNC perform state's first living donor
liver transplant
A mother and her 11-month-old daughter are doing well following
the state's first living donor liver transplant, UNC doctors said Friday.
The operation, the first of what doctors hope will be many success-
ful liver transplants from a living donor, was performed Wednesday.
The mother donated a portion of her liver to her daughter, who suf-
fered from a congenital disorder that prevented her bile ducts from
fully developing.
"This is a big deal said Dr. Robert Brown, medical director of the
liver transplant program at UNC Hospitals. "We think the families will
drive this (more transplants), not us
Nationally, living donor liver transplants have been performed since
1989. Between 80 and 90 a year are now performed across the country
at a handful of hospitals.
University of South Florida dropout awarded
$500,000 contract
Lee Vaccaro may have dropped out of USF before finishing his
bachelor's degree, but that didn't stop him from building a $10 million
company and landing a $500,000 computer contract with USF.
Tuesday, USF awarded Vaccaro's company, BCD Computer Distri-
butions, Inc. of Tampa, a contract to supply and service computers for
the university. The company outbid 10 other companies for the con-
tract
Vaccaro said getting the USF contract was important to his com-
pany.
"Getting this contract has been a goal of mine for a long time
Vaccaro said. "I have had my eye on this contract since I started my
business
Vaccaro, 24, started his company out of his apartment with $3,000
when he was 21 years old. Vaccaro began servicing and supplying whole-
sale computers. His company's profits grew from $400,000 to $2.4 mil-
lion in the first year through word of mouth. Now into his fourth year,
he expects to make $10 million in profits.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from various college
newspapers and CPS.
No News Writers1 Meeting today
SB
Chlamydia infections on the rise
ErikaSwarts
The U.S. Center for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention, which tracks 52 in-
fectious diseases, received reports of
477,638 cases of chlamydia in 1995,
which is more than any other infectioa
Chlamydia is an asymptomatic bac-
terial infection. It can be spread through
sexual or oral contact with an infected
persoa Since chlamydia is usually with-
out symptoms, the American Social
Health Association (ASHA) reports 75
percent of cases in women and 25 per-
cent of the cases in men go undetected.
"Because chlamydia is usually with-
out symptoms, many people are infected
without knowing it ASHA President
Peggy Clarke said. "Estimates of new
chlamydia infections in the U.S. each year
are as high as four million, making it the
fastest spreading STD
According to ECU Health Educator
Jennifer Phillips, there are a few symp-
tom-like indicators to look for. They are
pain andor burning during urination
or unusual discharge. There could also
be a heavy feeling.
Although chlamydia is not life-
threatening, ASHA urges students to un-
derstand there are severe consequences
if it goes untreated. In women, it can
lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PTD),
which can cause severe, chronic pain. It
can also cause infertility. PID invades a
woman's upper reproductive tract and
causes scarring of the fallopian tubes.
PID also increases the risk of ectopic
pregnancy, in which the fetus develops
outside of the uterus.
"More aggressive screening and
treatment of chlamydia is needed Clark
said. "The great irony is that if it is de-
tected, chlamydia is easily treated and
cured. We could virtually eradicate it"
According to Phillips, the test for
chlamydia is fairly simple, she said it is
similar to a throat culture. The test is
available at the Student Health Center.
It is a regular part of the yearly exam for
See INFECT page 4
Writers, please
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board!
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SPRING SEMESTER 1997
ANTH1000Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH2000Archaeology Around the World
ANTH2010Societies Around the World
ANTH2015Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANTH2016Biological Anthropology Laboratory
ANTH3003Cultures of Africa
ANTH3005North American Indians
ANTH3050Ethnographic Field Methods
ANTH3075Archaeological Methods
ANTH3076Archaeological Laboratory
ANTH3252Medical Anthropology
ANTH4000Selected Topics - Language & Culture
ANTH4225Human Evolution
ANTH5010Advanced Archaeological Methods & Theory
ANTH5015Advanced Ethnographic Methods & Theory
ANTH5125Historical Archaeology
ANTH5202-001Graduate Language and Culture
ANTH5202-002Graduate Medical Anthropology
ANTH5203Graduate Human Evolution
ANTH6103Core Course: Physical Anthropology
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weekly speci
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$2.00 Budlight Pitchers
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$1.50 Imports
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Managers choice specials
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Back by popular demand at the
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Saturday November 9
$2.00 Admission
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Tuesday - Saturday
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. .
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 7,1996
The Department of Health Promotion and Well Being along with
TheWellness Education Foundation presents
"7C1 t&e SetiMut
In November there will be a series of seminars which
deal with STRESS.These seminars will feature experts
in the field of alleviating STRESS. All seminars will be
held in the General Classroom Building (Room 1031).
The following are a list of dates and times
of each seminar:
mi .vi?v:
November 13.1996
-4:00pm to fcOOpm
GC& I03I
November 20.1996
5:00pm to 6:00pm
GCB 1031
GiMSt'

Alleviating STRESS for Mi.
Guest Speaker: Dr. Rob McCarthy from
McCaiyfilmJfy
Chiropractic 15
STRESSBUSTERS: Techniques to unwind.
Guest Speakers: Katie Chenoweth
Comfort Zone.
We encourage everyone to
come and listen to these
experts speak about STRESS
We GUARANTEE it will
make a difference in
your life
DEFEAT from page 1
could he tell what brought his sec-
ond loss to Helms.
"I can't think of one thing 1
would have done different. The vot-
ers clearly decided to keep the in-
cumbent Ganttsaid.
Gantt won the votes of fewer
than four in 10 white voters Tues-
day - about the same as 1990. He
again garnered more than 90 per-
cent of the black vote, according to
results of surveys conducted with
voters.
"I thought the state had made
more progress than what the voters
have given us Ulysses Bell of
Greensboro said at Gantt headquar-
ters in Charlotte. "As we move to-
ward a new millennium, we haven't
progressed very far from where we
were 20 years ago
"This vote says North Carolina
is more comfortable living in the
past than trying to build a positive
bridge to the future said Bell, who
is black.
Helms led among men, while
Gantt held a narrow lead among
women.
"Jesse, for all his faults, when
he speaks, you know exactly where
he stands. He doesn't hide any-
thing said Jeff Griffits of Raleigh.
Helms also won the votes of one
in five Democrats. In their first con-
test, Helms took about a quarter of
the Democrats voting away from
Gantt
Helms' support among conser-
vative Democrats has led to the seg-
ment being labeled "Jessecrats
The rematch offered voters con-
trasts as sharp as their 1990 con-
test, though the edges were some-
what smoother this year.
There were plenty of attack ads
on both sides, but Helms offered
some softer images - as a grandfa-
ther and as a senator who was one
of the most effective on Capitol Hill
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for his constituents.
Gantt proposed government ac-
tion to make college more afford-
able, health care broadly available
and pensions more secure. Helms
promised that he would fight to cut
foreign aid and other spending and
champion a balanced budget amend-
ment to the Constitution.
Voters showed that they under-
stood the candidates' differing views
on the role of government.
Helms won two-thirds of the
votes of people who said govern-
ment is doing too many things bet-
ter left to businesses and individu-
als. Gantt won by the same margin
among people who said government
should do more.
Helms left no doubt that he
planned to hold onto his chairman-
ship of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, a position he prized for
years before taking over in 1995.
Helms said he could use the job to
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push foreign investment and jobs to
North Carolina.
But so few voters surveyed
counted foreign policy as their top
concern in casting their ballots that
neither candidate held an advan-
tage.
Gantt focused on domestic is-
sues, proposing initiatives to help
smooth the jolts of an economy in
transition. Voters said the two na-
tional issues foremost in their minds
were the economy and jobs and the
future of Medicare and Social Secu-
rity. Gantt captured six out of 10 vot-
ers concerned with those two issues.
Helms drew about eight out of
10 people who called themselves
conservative, a description which
makes up more than a third of trie
state's voters. Four out of 10 Helrrs
supporters said they were moder-
ates.
About six out of 10 of Gantt!s
supporters were white voters, while
more than 90 percent of Helms's vot-
ers were white.
The survey of 1,185 voters 4s
they left 40 randomly selected poll-
ing places around North Caroliija
was conducted by Voter News Ser-
vice, a partnership of The Associated
Press and television networks. The
margin of sampling error for each
result was plus or minus 3.5 percent-
age points for all voters, higher far
subgroups.
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MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
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752-7529
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Sunday 12 Price Chili Cheese Fries
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Monday 12 Price Pitchers of Draft
$5.75 Hungry Pirate
Twosday Buy One Appetizer
Get one Free
$2.50 Lime Margaritas
Wednesday 12 Price Pizza &
Nachos Grande
$ 1.50 Imports
Thirstday 12 Price Wings
$1.99 Hi-Balls
:&
V$un-Thurs. After 9 p.m. DiiHn only
Jiks

Mexican Restaurant
ALL ABC PERMITS - 757 1666
i
U- �





!�
Thursday, November 7,1996
The East Carolinian
GRANT from page 1 ROTC from page 1
Warren said.
The grant program is going to con-
centrate on introducing new teachers to
experienced teachers.
"We are delighted to have been cho-
sen to develop this program that will
assist in supporting and retaining qual-
ity teachers Peel said.
However, the School of Education
is working on programs to help pre-
pare new teachers. Their Model Clinical
Teaching Program (MCTP) has increased
the number of teachers sticking with the
profession. According to Peel, over 97
percent of teachers who participated in
the MCTP were still teaching during a
-five year follow-up study, compared to
.approximately 50 percent nationwide.
Seniors this year will spend their
;fall semester in classes and the entire 15
weeks in the spring working in a school.
Educators say this will help prepare new
teachers for the challenges of the class-
room.
INFECT from page 2
Wnen, or can be tested separately for
$10 dollars. This also includes the test
for gonorrhea.
1 At the national level, the CDC's In-
fertility Prevention Program has had
jlramatic results by providing free screen-
frig for chlamydia and gonorrhea to the
general public
"In states where the program has
ijeen fully implemented, chlamydia infec-
tion rates have declined by as much as
the competition, with 25 schools com-
peting.
This competition consists of events
in physical fitness, written exams on gen-
eral military knowledge, marksmanship,
weapons assembly and a general assault
course. The assault course consists of a
one rope bridge and 10 kilometer march
carrying a 40 pound pack on their back.
Nine students went to Fort Jack-
son to compete in military exercises.
"They spent a lot of time preparing and
their efforts clearly showed this. This was
the best performance the Pirate Batallion
has exercised Captain Tom Cooke said.
On Nov. 8, the Pirate Batallion has
an air mobile excercise where blackhawk
helicopters pick up the cadets for a mis-
sion at Camp Bonner, located near Wash-
ington, N. C.
Sgt 1st Class Byron Gray said the
success in the competition has raised
the motivation level of not only the
ranger challenge team but the ROTC
unit as a whole.
I I
61 percent Clarke said. "However, lack
of funding has prevented the CDC from
fully implementing the programs in all
states
For confidential information or test-
ing you can cail the Student Health Cen-
te. at 32S6317. Or. to receive ASHA's
free guide for women, "My Health Mat-
ters: How to Talk to Your Doctor About
Sexual Health call 1-800-972-8500.
STUDENT.
DISCOUNTS
Walk-in
Tuej - Fri 9-6 Sat
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Q& l
WAve.
Be and ECU Peer
Health Educator
Peer Health Educators present
educational programs in classes,
residence halls, Greek houses
and for clubs and student
organizations.They also help with
health fairs and awareness events on
campus.Take the class for
1,2, or 3 Independent Study
hours, time TBA. Join us
this Spring Semester.
J
For more
information,
call 328-6793,
Health
Promotion
and
Well-Being.
Wellness Awarness for Virtually Everyone
Natural Life Program
November 7 at 8:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student
Center Great Room.
Come join us for bingo games, fun, food,
and prizes with a Jimmy Buffett flavor!

yxxv
?S39!
KECHIATtOXAL
Sponsored by Campus Dining, Housing Services b Recreational Services.
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Begins Wednesday, November 6,1996
Diet Coke or
Coca-Cola
�SVISA
ffifis!f�� .VM
k
PRESIDENT'S
� CHOICE �
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President's Choice
Soft
Drinks
lO Oz. Selected &rieties
Harris Teeter
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99
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Ralston
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The Best DeliBakery Around
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Roast Beef &
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2
49
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Italian Combo
8 Piece
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Selected pieties
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Prices and Offers (kood Wednesday, October 16th, Through Tuesday,
November 12, 1996 �t Your dreenville Harris Teeter.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers.
mmmsmmimm
m"J v-





-��
5 Thursday, November 5,1996 The East Carolinian
opjmm
0ufi1tecm
The elections
are over.
America has
made its bed;
now we must
lie in it.
v
The elections are over.
America has made its bed, now we must lie in it.
According to the Associated Press, "less than half of
the American electorate cast ballots in this year's
presidential election
However, North Carolina has the distinction of
being named as "heavy" in regard to voter turn-out.
In some places in our state, voters waited over an
hour to vote.
"Americans are turned off by campaign attack ads,
consultants telling candidates what to say and mis-
aligned political parties-one party 'way to the right
of the American center' and the other 'following opin-
ion polls said Curtis Cans, an election expert.
Issues like increasing the minimum wage and a
middle class tax break really matter. Even if you don't
have a job or you don't pay taxes, we're sure your
parents do. Think about: no extra funds at home may
mean one less care-package being sent to you, and
even worse, you might have to start paying your own
phone bill.
It's unbelievable, we know, but there actually are
some students who think the only elections that di-
rectly affect them are the ones that happen on cam-
pus. People! Wake up and smell the politicians! State
and national elections are probably the most impor-
tant things in which you could ever become involved.
If you're the guy with the red Chevette bearing a
bumper sticker that reads: DIE, Jesse, DIE and you've
never taken the initiative to vote before, then guess
what You are part of the problem. How do you
think these people keep getting re-elected?
Another excuse we've heard? "I'm only one per-
son. My vote wouldn't make that much of a differ-
ence Haven't you ever heard of a 31 to 30 victory
or defeat? Not all elections are landslides, and if you
and the three people you spend your time complain-
ing to will take some action, that's four votes right
there.
In other words, if all you do is sit around and
complain about the politicians, that's all there ever
will be - reasons to complain.
if Y�?u jJanl a complaint osi. cmmNt
WR.ITL A LLTTR. JO Tit LDIT�.
All letters must be:
H typed
� 250 words or less
�� include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
Editor, Student Pubs, bter$v
NC 27858-4353.
Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
OPINION
lumnists wanted
For more
information stop
by our office.
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for opinion columnists. stop
by our office on the second floor of the
student publications building (across
from joyner).
The East Carolinian
Am
Waddcll, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Any L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Cristfe Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bloelew, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crnmnton, Copy Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehie, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor pM d. Wright, Media Adviser
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor j�et Resoess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject lettm for puWkatton. All lettm must be sifted. Ut
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU. Greenville, NC 27854353. For information, call (919)
326366.
Hgn fc�v�t ,n-
���.
?��'
Lr
cv I c4n't
en
�ft $
ELECTION DAY EDITORIALS FROM AROUND THE NATION
Nov. 6
New York Daily News, on Presi-
dent Clinton's re-election
Bill Clinton's resounding vic-
tory is a victory for all Americans. Eco-
nomic growth, prosperity and peace.
They are real achievements and, when
the political smoke and innuendo are
cleared away, they are the hallmarks
of the four years. They are now the
promise of the future as the nation ad-
vances to the brink of a new century.
Nov. 6
The New York Times, on Presi-
dent Clinton's re-election
President Clinton started out
ahead in the polls, and nine months of
campaigning and an estimated $800
million in spending seem not to have
made a dent The last two weeks of
the campaign will be remembered more
for their surly tone and alarming hints
of White House scandal than for memo-
rable debate.
Still, the morning-after reality is
that the man voters are returning to
office should be - indeed must be - a
very different politician from the one
elected four years ago
But if he wants to avoid being re-
membered simply as the most-investi-
gated President in the modern era, Mr.
Clinton must first do something dra-
matic about ethics.
Oct. as
Vindicator, Youngstown, Ohio, on
election fund-raising
Even if there was nothing to hide,
the asinine ploy by the Democratic
National Committee to avoid filing a
pre-election financial report has again
turned the spotlight on the DNC's fund-
raising practices and given Republicans
more ammunition with which to attack
President Clinton on the question of
ethics.
There is only one way the com-
mittee can extricate itself from this
politically sticky situation: full disclo-
sure. Anything less, such as the an-
nouncement that "raw data" would
be provided to the Federal Elections
Commission, will simply feed the sus-
picion that someone is trying to bury
embarrassing information.
Nov. 4
Valley Morning Star, Harlingen,
Texas, on campaign contributions:
The questionable and possibly il-
legal contribution of substantial funds
from Indonesian sources to President
Clinton and the Democrats is generat-
ing a welcome new look at the whole
process by which huge and ever-increas-
ing amounts of soft money are pour-
ing into the war chests of the major
parties.
Recently, Bob Dole, who opposed
virtually every major piece of campaign
reform legislation that was proposed
during his years in Congress, called for
new laws prohibiting unregulated con-
tributions to political committees from
corporations, unions and wealthy in-
dividuals, as well as instituting an out-
right ban on contributions from all
noncitizens
Dole's latter-day conversion is
welcome, particularly if he's really se-
rious about checking the influence of
well-heeled special interests, foreign
and domestic on the political process.
Oct. 31
The Times-Picayune, New Or-
leans, on Mexico's economy:
Mexico's government has
signed an economic growth plan for
1997 with business and labor leaders
that analysts believe is achievable but
lacks any bold new revitalization ini-
tiatives.
Further complicating Mexico's
fragile recovery is an escalating crime
problem in Mexico City that has
prompted U.S. officials to urge Mexi-
can authorities to take stronger action.
President Ernesto Zedillo's admin-
istration has made significant progress
toward stabilizing Mexico's struggling
economy, but it needs to move mote
forcefully to improve the business cri-
mate and draw up a new social con-
tract
�etten& fo t6e S&to
WAKE UP AMERICA!
To the editor:
Is it four more years? Or is it
four more queers? OR IS IT BOTH?
This is not a really great choice
to offer the American people!
On the one hand, a large num-
ber of the Republicans are the types
that would sell guns and whiskey to
the "Indians" if they thought they
could make a profit
On the other hand, many of the
noble Democrats are the types that
would hug and kiss the "Indians
promise them welfare checks in ex-
change for votes, plus encourage
them to fornicate with our sons and
daughters (just make sure you use a
condom) or join the ever growing
homosexual community
The other parties are just spoil-
ers who will end up taking votes away
from either the Democrats or Repub-
licans to cause one of them to lose
out!
But thank God there is a way
out of this whole mess. I just hope I
live to see the day when God will end
man's misrule and send His Son
Jesus Christ to set up the Govern-
ment of the Kingdom of God on this
earth.
There will be no more voting!
No more money wasted on political
campaigns! No more mudslinging!
No more this and that gate!
No more wars! No more racial
tensions! The races will be separated
and put in the lands where they were
originally placed by God!
No more homosexuals and ho-
mosexual "rights No more abor-
tion clinics! No more pornography!
No more gambling!
No more delay in punishment for
criminal acts! No more OJ. trials!
No more getting off if you're guilty!
No more money wasted on na-
tional defense! No more hospitals!
No more cancer! No more disease
epidemics!
No more illegal drugs! No more
pimps and prostitutes!
In summary, no more pie-in-the-
sky "campaign promises known in
the Bible as lies, but a real God main-
tained Utopia not subject to corrup-
tion by the governments of men!
WAKE UP AMERICA The Gov-
ernment of God is the only solution
to the problems of mankind! God is
going to allow man to make his fu-
tile attempts to bring Utopia and
come to the one conclusion that
God's Kingdom is the only viable
solution to the problems that beset
this wicked world!
With your vote or not, God is
going to send the King of Kings and
Lord of Lords- Jesus Christ to rule
on this earth for a thousand years!
He is going to once and for all
end man's misrule over mankind!
And of the increase of His Govern-
ment and peace there shall be no end
and it will last forever and ever! In
other words- NO TERM LIMITS
Again, I say, WAKE UP RE-
TURN TO GOD BEFORE IT IS TOO
LATE
Donald Wheatley
Greenville resident





b Thursday, November 7,1996 The East Carolinian
Lake Imp USA
John Murphy
Spare Time
PUfeWH Sy-foato-i
SKIP Y. EASTWooD
USA EARTW
-
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Thursday, November 7,1996 The East Carolinian
LIFe
Stye Qt t rftte
Barber of Seville's
Greenville native COmedy CUtS deep
NOVEMBER
Thursday
Dr. Robert Lee Humber:
A Collector Creates Exhibition at
Gray Gallery through Nov. 23.
serves as focus of
artwork exhibit
�������
������?
Exhibition featuring the sculp-
tures and wall reliefs of Hanna
Jubran in Mendenhall Gallery
through Nov. 30.
?����������?���
Barber of Seville at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Buffett Bingo at 8 p.m. in
Christenbury.
����?����������?
Grinch with Schleigho at
Peasant's Cafe.
Andy Turner Staff WriterV )
Robert Lee Humber's love is com-
ing home. An art exhibition honoring the Greenville native entitled Robert Lee Humber: A Collector Creates opened last Friday at the Wellington B. Gray Gallery located in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center and will run through Nov. 23.MMw
8
Friday
Jazz Ensemble with
Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr. at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.
?��������������
Far Too Jones with Frog Legs at
the Attic.
Dayroom at Peasant's Cafe.
Purple Schoolbus with Knocked
Down Smilin' at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro.
Saturday
Macross Plus at 4 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre.
��������???�����
Poulenc's Gloria featuring the
ECU Choir and Orchestra and
Bizet's Carmen featuring the
East Carolina Symphony Orches-
tra at 8 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium.
Headstone Circus with Underfoot
at the Attic.
Hipbone at Peasant's Cafe.
Marilyn Manson with NY Loose
at 9 p.m. at the Ritz in Raleigh.
??�?������??��
The Slackers at the Lizard &
Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Humber, a longtime patron of the
arts and humanities, died in 1970.
Before his death, he made a lasting
impression on North Carolina and es-
pecially on the arts in the state.
Through the efforts of Humber
and others, a $1 mil-
lion appropriation
was secured from
the North Carolina
General Assembly to
acquire artwork and
this amount was
matched in artwork
obtained from the
Samuel H. Kress
Foundation. The art-
work acquired
formed the initial
collection of the
North Carolina Mu-
seum of Art
In addition to
contributions to the
arts, Humber also
served as a North
Carolina Senator,
founded the Pitt
Technical Institute,
and worked on the
Tryon Palace Commission.
A Rhodes scholar, Humber was
educated at Wake Forest, Harvard,
Oxford and the Sorbonne in Paris. He
was an international lawyer, practicing
in Europe until his return to Green-
ville in 1940.
Robert Lee Humber
Photos Courtesy of Gray Gallery
This painting by Giovanni Cariani is just
one of the pieces from the Humber exhibit.
The exhibition features a stunning
array of art including 13 works on loan
from the North Carolina Museum of
Art in Raleigh; the North Carolina se-
ries of etchings by Louis Orr on loan
See LEE page 8
���������
Athenaeum with Hobex at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
WEEKEND
Sunday
Monday
10
� Super 8 with K's Choice
at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
11
Career Development
Workshop at 6 p.m. in Bloxton
House.
Korn with The Pharcyde & The
Urge at 9 p.m. at the Ritz in Ra-
leigh.
���������������
Melissa Etheridge at 7:30 p.m. at
the Dean Smith Center in Chapel
Hill.
Reggae Dance Night at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Tiims
Hendrix
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
It's doubtful that anyone could
ever reproduce the style and perfec-
tion of Alfalfa's Barber of Seville, but
the Western Opera Theatre is going
to give it the old college try.
The first encounter I ever had
with The Barber of Seville was watch-
ing re-runs of The Lil' Rascals on tele-
vision. Years later, I still haven't seen
the whole thing, so I'm thrilled that
the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series is bringing it to ECU.
The Western Opera Theatre was
created with two purposes in mind.
First, to present quality opera to au-
diences who might not otherwise at-
tend the opera, and secondly, to give
young performers, musicians, and
technicians valuable experience. They
were created in 1967 by Kurt Herbert
Adler, and were the first opera com-
pany to tour throughout the West
with English performances of the clas-
sical operas.
Their repertoire has included
such successful operas as Madame
Butterfly, Don Giovanni and
Carmen. In 1994, they began perform-
ing operas in their original language
with the aid of English supertitles
(projections above the stage with the
English translation.) Their newest
production. The Barber of Seville,
promises to be at least as successful
as (if not more so than) their past
performances.
The Barber of Seville is a love
story with a twist (surprise, surprise).
Count Almaviva has fallen in love with
the beautiful Rosina. ward of Doctor
Bartolo. Unfortunately (for the Count
and for Rosina). Bartolo wants to
marry her himself. The Count decides
to serenade Rosina outside her win-
dow, but gives his name as Lindoro,
instead of using his real name.
Now here is where I have a ques-
tion. Why is it that in all of these love
stories the relationships start off with
a lie? I can think of countless plays
(Shakespeare was really big on this)
in which the lovers disguise them-
selves, give false names, and basically
lie, cheat, and steal to be together. 1
suppose if they didn't, there wouldn't
be much of a story, but what are we
Photo Courtesy of ECU Performing Arts Series
Tonight at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium, The Western Opera
Theatre will present a comedic opera, The Barber of Seville.
teaching ourselves?
At any rate, the Count doesn't
disguise himself just once. Oh no, that
would be too easy. Two times he gives
a false name, which eventually leads
Rosina to think she is being toyed
with.
Here's another question. Are we
supposed to believe that the women
in these stories are really fooled by
these disguises? I'd like to try an ex-
periment one day. Some guy should
come serenade me at my window and
give me a false name. Then the next
day, he should show up at my door
with a false nose and funny hat (I
wouldn't object to flowers, either) and
give me yet another false name. I'd
just like to see if it's really possible to
fool me. (1 also want the flowers, but
you can't blame a girl for tryin)
I'm not going to tell you the end-
ing, but I strongly suggest you run
right out and get a ticket. Even if it's
not exactly true to life, it's guaranteed
to be a lot of fun. Tickets are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office for
tonight's performance. Students can
purchase advance tickets for $15 with
a valid ECU ID, and facultystaff can
get advance tickets for $25. All tick-
ets at the door are $?0. The perfor-
mance will begin tonight at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Tuesday
1Q
� Smashing Pumpkins
with Garbage at 7:30 p.m. in the
Dean Smith Center in Chapel
Hill.
Six Finger Satellite with Trans
Am and Joby's Opinion at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Wednesday
13
� Minority Student Aca-
demic and Leadership Recogni-
tion Program at 6:30 p.m. in
Hend'ix Theatre and the Ledonia
Wright African-American Cultural
Center.
� � � �
� � � � �
Jimmie Dale Gilmore at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Ominous Seapods at the Lizard
& Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Attention animation fans! Do you want an alternative to the innocent
rare of such cartoons as Mickey Mouse and Scooby Doo? You're going to get
our chance this Saturday when Hendrix Theatre presents a special screen-
ng of Macross Plus, a Japanese animated treat that promises to amaze and
;xcite in a truly unique fashion.
Japanimation, the term applied to Japanese cartoons, has become a huge
-narket here in the U.S. Most major video stores dedicate entire sections to
lapanimation titles. The popularity for Japanimation is so strong that ECU
ias a Japanimation club for anyone interested, and it is this group that has
lelped bring Macross
Plus to our campus.
Macross Plus has
:he distinction of being
:he most expensive OVA
Original Video Anima-
:ion) to date, and it is
)acked with stunning
;omputer graphic tech-
lology and a
soundtrack by the Israel
'hilharmonic Orches-
:ra.
The story's main
:oncept deals with the
uture of aviation, while
the varied subplots in-
;lude a love triangle in-
volving rival friends and
i past lover, a virtual
�eality rock star, and gi-
int robots (or
'veritechs" as fans prefer to call them).
Originally a television series in Japan, Macross Plus was later translated
nto a 1985 movie entitled Do You Remember Love, which turned out to be
i popular success. As a result of the success of the movie, other Macros
ieries were made, including Macross Flashback 2012, Macross II: Lovers
Again, Macross Plus, and Macross 7.
While Macross Plus is available on video, Hendrix Theatre is offering a
�are opportunity to see the film free of charge on the big screen. Any fan of
inimation should not miss out.
Macross Plus will be shown on Nov. 9 at 4 p.m.
@D1�evteev4,
Van Halen
Best of Volume 1
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
Okay, so a band releases a greatest
hits album. Not a big deal; bands do it all
the time, right? Well, it has turned out
to be a huge deal for Van Halen and their
fans in the past few months. Line-up
shake-ups, accusations, and near fist
fights have made the release of Van
Halen's Best Of Volume 1 anti-climatic
compared to the other events surround-
ing the band.
The problems started last year when
the band embarked on its Balance world
tour. Eddie Van Halen limped around the
whole tour and had to use a cane at times
due to a bad hip. Early in the tour, Alex
Van Halen hurt his back and played the
rest of the tour in a neckbrace. The band
obviously needed a breather. That's when
the idea of a greatest hits album first
arose. The concept was met with opposi-
tion by frontman Sammy Hagar, who felt
greatest hits were for bands with nowhere
else to go. He preferred the idea of mak-
ing a new album.
Hagar was soon out-voted, so he
half-heartedly committed to the greatest
hits. Then, on Father's Day, after 11 years
with the band, Eddie called and fired him,
pure and simple or so Hagar says. The
Van Halens insist that Hagar quit
Either way, the rock world was defi-
nitely shaken when Van Halen an-
nounced that Hagar was gone and the
band was in the studio recording with
David Lee Roth, the man Hagar replaced
in 1985. Then, the newly regrouped Van
Halen made an appearance at the MTV
Video Music Awards. Roth was his typi-
cal flamboyant self, and, during a press
conference, he basically told Eddie Van
Halen to take a backseat because he was
running things. Eddie proved Roth
wrong by kicking him out of the band
again.
Then, a little over a week before the
arrival of the greatest hits album in stores.
Van Halen announced that Gary
Cherone, the former lead singer for '80s
hair band Extreme, was their new lead
singer. While the Van Halen brothers are
excited about the new addition, fans seem
less than pleased.
But, the fans haven't been left
empty-handed in all the bedlam. Best Of
Volume 1 contains 17 songs of Van Halen
at their best, crossing the line from early
Van Halen to "Van Hagar
The first eight songs feature Roth
and the pure energy of the early Van
Halen. From the opening blistering gui-
tar stylings of "Eruption" until the last
shout of "Panama the album is raw
musical fury. Diver Down, an album of
mostly covers, is the only album not rep-
resented in the first half of the album.
Then it's Hagar's turn. All four al-
bums made with Hagar have songs on
the hits album. "Why Can't This Be
Love "When It's Love and "Right
Now" are all highlights among highlights.
In other words, there simply is not a bad
track on the album for Van Halen fans.
Also included in the Hagar section of
the album is the song "Humans Being"
from the Twister soundtrack. The fury
of early Van Halen combined with the
vocal talent of Hagar make their last track
together truly memorable.
However, for most fans the highlight
of the album will be the last two songs,
which feature new Van Halen songs with
David Lee Roth on vocals. Many fans
wrote off Van Halen the minute Roth
was fired while others accepted Hagar
but still missed Roth. Best Of allows both
crops of fans to be satisfied. "Me Wise
Magic" was the first song shipped to ra-
dio stations and sounds just like one
would expect All the guitar prowess of
the older, wiser Eddie Van Halen, with
the drive and power of the young one.
The other new song is the appro-
See HALEN page 8
(W





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8
Thursday, November 7,1996
fie East Carolinian
HALENfrompage7 LEE from page 7
priately titled, "Can't Get This Stuff No
More With laid-back, bluesy grooves,
"Stuff No More" most closely resembles
the era of Women And Children First
1984 Van Halen. "Stuff No More" also
marks a surprising event for Eddie Van
Halen fans. The guitar virtuoso has used
drills on his guitar before, but rarely uses
standard special effects. However, for the
guitar solo on this song he incorporates
a voice box, a tool that allows a guitarist
to "speak" through the guitar. This sets
up a Van Halen meets Peter Frampton
situation that proves interesting
So, in the midst of turmoil and mud
slinging that is still ongoing somehow
the three core members of Van Halen
have managed to release an excellent
collection of songs that represent every
facet of Van Halen. The one thing that
some fans are wondering though, is
where has Michael Anthony, the bassist
been all this time? Roth, Hagar, and both
Van Halen brothers have all been in in-
terviews, but no Anthony? Has he been
shut out for a reason, or is he afraid for
his job as well? Only he knows right now.
As far as finding the truth in all the
stories and rumors, the best thing to re-
member is that there are three versions
to every story: side a, side b, and the
truth somewhere in between.
from the Greenville Museum of Art;
and Rembrandt prints and plates from
the National Gallery of Art and Kramer
Collection. Two and three dimensional
artwork and memorabilia from the
Humber family collection will also be
on display.
As part of the exhibition, the ECU
College of Arts and Science and the
School of Art sponsored a twcKiay sym-
posium on Nov. 1 and 2.
The symposium featured a lecture.
"Rembrandt True and False by Dr.
Walter Liedtke, curator of the
Rembrandt Not Rembrandt exhibit at
the Metropolitan Museum of Art in
New York City. The symposium also
included a tour of Humber's former
Greenville home and the dedication of
a plaque recognizing Humber's accom-
plishments.
The Gray Gallery has other events
planned for early 1997. In January, the
National Tapestry biennial will be held
at the gallery, and in February, the
International Photography and Digital
Image exhibition will take place.
Anyone desiring additional infor-
mation about the Humber exhibition
or other upcoming events at the Gray
Gallery may contact Gil Leebrick, gal-
lery' director, at 328-6336.
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
amount is greater, up to a
$55,000 limit. The offer
applies to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
Come join us at BW-3
your ECU clubhouse lor
Virginia Tech.
Saturday, November oth
7:00pm
bw-3 Cluck-off ??!
Chicken Wing Eating Contest
Monday, November 11th
s;(L wings f�r
$19.00 all day
Sunday ladies Night
All DaySpeeials
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECKlli
1 1 4 EAST FIFTH STREET � 758 - 9 1 9 1
PREUflSlHG FOR JANUARY 97
PITT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
919-118-1521
GO
fkJedieu Gommovi flfosUU
1�1
Choice off a VCR, a color TV, or a CO j
plaver with a one year lease at
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager,
WZMB 91.3 FM
for the Spring 1997 academic term
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
74e S&U 1��ue Ik mm " Juat Got BettfltH!
- Free Cable TV
- Free Water and Sewer
- Big Walk in Closets
- Central Air Conditioning
- Central Heat
- Kitchen Appliances
- Nice Carpeting
- 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
- On Site Management
- ECU Bus Servi d
- Window Blinds
FREEFREEFREEFREE
$SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS $
FREE.FREEFREEFREE
1 BEDROOM $285
2 BEDROOM S370. $380
2 BEDROOM l�1'
3 BEDROOM $465
ECONOMICAL
$400
We're giving away FREE HEAT THIS WINTER in our 2 bedroom townhomes
FALL SPECIAL
2 BEDROOM$285
(WE HAVE ONE LEFT)
MINUTES AWAY FROM ECU
OPEN EVERY DAY
EASTBR00K &
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
752-5100
KA�
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Wesley Commons North. Not Valid
with any other specials.
Expires 11-30-96
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On Site Management and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Volleyball Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
PRESENTATION OF THIS COUPON
NOT VALID WITH ANY
OTHER SPECIALS
EXPIRES 11-30-96
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A professional management team that cares!
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NATIONAL
PANHELLINIC
COUNCIL
(Presents
I st Annual
Sleep-Out for
the Homeless
Friday Nov. 8 at 7:00pm
on the Mall
Guest Speakers
Dr. Poulson and Coordinators from
Pitt Co. Homeless Shelter
ECU Gospel Choir
non-perishible food items will be collected on the mall
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I
Thursday, November 7, 1996
The East Carolinian
ems
LTDm
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
l bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
3 bedroom � Wilson Acres. Take over lease.
Jan - July. Call anytime. 830-9449.
Female roommate wanted for apartment 1
2 blocks from campus, two blocks from su-
permarketlaundromat and three blocks
from downtown. Rent includes utilities,
phone and cable. Call 757-1947 after 3 pm.
Female roommate wanted to share 3 bed-
room, 2 12 bath townhouse at Twin Oaks.
1 12 miles from campus, ECU bus route,
very spacious, low utilities. Call Cara 754-
2942.
Non-smoking female roommate wanted. 3
blocks from campus. Central ACHeat. W
D. Dishwasher. Only $242 a month and 13
utilities. Call 752-6999. Available now!
Huge 5 BR duplex close to campus and
downtown. Pets and smokers welcome. Two
roommates needed malefemale. Call 413-
0957 ask for Holly or Meredith.
Townhouse for Rent. 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 1
2 baths, fully equipped kitchen, WD hook-
ups, central heat and air and patio. Nice
neighborhood. Safe environment. Call today!
Chandra 7520687.
One room available in two bedroom house
on Summit Street. (Next to Jarvis) $225
month and half utilities. No lease. Deposit
and pets are negotiable. Call Eric at 758-
2294 or EricBevan@ecu.campus.mci.net
Wanted: Graduate student seeking 1 male
housemate $170mo. Includes utilities.
Close to campus. Call Kevin 752-5557.
Female roommate wanted to share three
bedroom duplex. Furnished. Responsible,
clean, 12 utilities, cable. $250.00 rent,
$200.00 deposit Call 754-8202.
male roommate wanted: Players Club Apart-
ments. WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways. Call
Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
Wanted: Roommate for Dec. 1. Block from
campus, two blocks from downtown. Spa-
cious 3 bedroom with washerdryer. $150
deposit and $225 rent. Call Michelle 757-
9310.
Take over my lease. From Dec. 15 until May.
One bedroom apartment, 2 blocks from cen-
ter of campus. $275.00 a month (furnished)
Call Caren 757-3704.
female roommate wanted: Players Club
Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all ameni-
ties, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
For Sale: Golf clubs: Palmer Axiom II 3-PW
$150. Excellent shape. Hogan bag, $175. 2-
3 woods, one driver, $45 each. CD Player,
Kenwood Portable $80, limited use. Com-
puter desk, $60 like new, chair included.
Mountain bike GT Teqvesta in good shape,
$130. Contact Karl 754-2862.
For sale: 40 gallon snake set-up. Will dis-
cuss price on phone. Call 758-9120.
Admire Voluptuous, Rubenesque, Majestic,
Incomparable African-American women?
Then order photographic images of Gor-
geous full-figured african-american women
modeling exotic lingerie! Ail material is non-
pornographic and free of nudity. Write:
African-American Multi-Media Productions,
P.O. Box 28051, Raleigh. NC 27611-8051;
Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E-
mail:amp3ix.netcom.com A free catalog is
available upon request! Check out our web
site at http:www.but.comamp3 You
must be 18 years of age to order.
Acoustic Yamaha guitar. Model FG-401.
$200.00 Call Suzanne, 328-8010.
For sale AKC registered Rottweiler puppies.
Two big males left Ready to go today. Great
temperament and bloodline on both Dam
and Sir. $400. Call Patrick at 931-0993.
Marilyn Manson ticket for sale. November
9 at the Ritz. $18.50. Call Jaime at 328-3382.
Auction: Antiques & Miscellaneous. Neces-
sary apartment items. 752-8533. 618 S. Pitt
Street call first 9:00 am Saturday, Nov. 9th.
'91 Red Ford Probe CL wsun roof. Good
condition $5500.00. Call 756-9404, ask for
Sarah.
'80 Chevy 1-ton van, $1800 OBO. 752-8533
or see at 618 S. Pitt Call first
Thole Ski Racks for sale with bike attach-
ment Almost new. Call 830-3764.
look better & FEEL GREAT 100 Natural
& Dr. recommended. A healthier you
through cellular nutrition. 30 Day money-
back guarantee. Call now 756-1188.
It
Help
Wanted
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-2224
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
0Ce also rent tables and chairs
"SMeiatiftotf (it
riaiftej tuul
ifiteint evemta"
752-1988
Terrv Peaden
opportunity is knocking You could be
earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH. Call 756-
1188 for Info.
Tropical Resorts Hiring - Entry-level & ca-
reer positions available worldwide (Hawaii.
Mexico, Caribbean, etc.). Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53625.
The Jockey Club, Greenville's premier pri-
vate club and catering facility, is now hiring
experienced line cooks and banquet staff.
Applications accepted Mondays through Fri-
days. 9am � 5pm or call for an appointment
830-8900.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
Part time jobs available. Joan's Fashions has
positions for students who will remain in the
area during Thanksgiving and Christmas
breaks. The positions are not limited to the
holiday period and can be lor 7 to 20 hours
per week. Individuals must be available for
.Saturday work. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with your ex-
perience and job performance and is supple-
mented by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager, Joan's Fashions,
423 S. Evans Street, Greenville (on the Down-
town Mall).
Teach English in Eastern Europe - Conver-
sational English teachers needed in Prague,
Budapest, or Krakow. No teaching certifi-
cate or European languages required. Inex-
pensive room & board other benefits. For
info, call: (206) 971-3680 ext K53624.
em
In search of a job after graduation?
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Seniors in
Good Academic Standing
Looking for a High Quality Self Motivated Individual
Must be a success orientated individual with sparkle
� Coachabje and Spirited
ai 7 COMMERCE STREET � t9t'$M
DID YOU SAYFREE?
YES! When you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartments on West 8th Street, your last month's rent is FREE! There
are also special rates on third floor apartments for a limited time only
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
2 full baths
Water and sewer included
Close to campus and downtown
Laundry facilities on site
6 month or 1 year leases
CAMPUS POfflTE
Professionally
Managed by
I�
remco
inc.
355-1313
AFRICAN-AMERICAN Multi-Media Produc-
tion is now recruiting full-figured african-
american women to model exotic lingerie
during photographic sessions. All work is
non-pornographic and free of nudity. Earn
up to $100 per hourl You must be at least
21 yean of age to apply. Call 1-919-321-8218.
1-800-921-3855 or e-mail
amp3@ix.netcom.com.
Attention Students: Earn extra cash stuff-
ing envelopes at home. All materials pro-
vided. Send SASE to Midwest Distributors,
P.O. Box 624. Olathe, KS 66C51. Immediate
response.
Cruise �hipt Now hiring � Earn up to
$2,000 month working on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies. World travel. Sea-
sonal & full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For more information
call 1-206-9713550 ext. C53628.
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335.
Wanted: basketball Official for Greenville
Recreation & Parks Department winter bas-
ketball league. Position pays $10$ 12 a game.
Clinics will be held to train new and experi-
enced officials. However, a basic knowledge
and understanding of the game is necessary.
Mandatory organizational meeting will be
held Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 pm. For more
information, please call 8304550 or 830-
4567.
t
Services
Offered
LICENSED NAIL TECH make house calls:
Student prices � tips with acrylic $2Sfill
ins $15. Flexible hours. Call Dana for your
next appointment. 75207445.
rTi Other
fl
Mr. Wiggly, Mr. Morton for SGA dictator!
The time has come for new solutions. But
no one takes me seriously. Mr. Morton � PS.
Clifford is pleased with his new love. I don't
have the heart to tell him the truth.
The town crier is now available to eastern
NC. To receive an issue via e-mail, send email
address to sperkins6iecu.campus.mci.net
Attention all Students! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All students are eli-
gible. Let us help. For more info, call : 1-
800-263-6495 ext. F53629.
Attention ALL Students! Crants and schol-
arships available from sponsors! No repay-
ments, ever! $$$ Cash for college $$$. For
info: 1-800400-0209.
Everything must go. Yard Sale. Plants, ap-
pliances and furniture. Sale on November 9.
2501 East Fourth, corner of 4th and Sy-
camore. 7 am.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997 MAN-
AGEMENT POSITIONS DYNAMIC COM-
PANY NOW HIRING ENTREPRENEUR AL
STUDENTS FOR SUMMER MANAGE-
MENT POSITIONS ACROSS SOUTH-
EAST U.S. FOR INFORMATION OR AN
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION PAINTERS
1-800-393 4521-29
East Carolina
School of
Mrwmtna
- Earn extra money
� 2 week mixology school
5t0 cotanch street
752-1115
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19,378 TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
Or. rush $2.00 to Research Assistance
1132? Idaho Ave 206-RR. Los Angeles. CA 90025
F-OHT HENRY'S ARMYNAVY
Military � Camping and aportmg goods
Footwaar � Combat boota. back packi. ?, 1
bombar jacka's. ate. � Work and "f1
caaual apparai
1501 South Evam Siraai Thanka tor ahoptHog wrtt Ml
Graanvma NC 27834 4aW B and Sarah L HMth
B1975C-87ei .nd Ptuto
4,500 different items
&.
Travel
Spring break '97. The reliable spring break
company: Hottest destinations! Coolest Va-
cations! Guaranteed lowest prices! From $99.
Organize small group! Travel free! Sunsplash
Tours! 1-800-426-7710.
AAAA! Spring break Panama City! Board-
walk Beach Resort! Best Hotel & Location!
7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Location $139!
Cocoa Beach Hilton $169!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! Spring Break Bahamas Party
Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes All Meals,
Parties, Taxes! Great Beaches & Nightlife!
Prices Increase Soon - Save $50!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! Cancun & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel $399! Prices
Increase Soon � Save $50! Save $150 on
Food, Drinks & Free Parties! 111 Lowest
Price Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
Hundreds of students are Earning Free
Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell 8 Trips &
Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279, Cancun &
Jamaica $399, Panama CityDaytona $119!
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
Spring Break '97
Book Now ft Sv�! Lowcit prlcn to
Florida, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, A
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3r& Now Hiring
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Personals
HAPPY 21ST SUNSHINE! My love always,
Buttercup
4.
Greek
Personals
ongratulations to the new sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi: Christina Alexander, Angi Barnes,
Mindi Carter, Chrissy Dukiet, Amy Garner,
Candace Gray, Emily Greene, Melissa Home,
Stacey Hughes. Suzy Jones, Melissa Kling,
Alison Lewis, Carolyn Lewis, Emily Marco.
Betsy Merricks, Nikki Mills, Megan Packard,
Mary Margaret Porterfield, Amber Reed.
Jamie Reeves, Kelly Rhodes. Jenny Sanger,
Shannon Schmidt Greta Sutton and Paige
Williams. We're looking forward to the many
memories and great times to come. Love,
your Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
Alpha Phi: Thank you Ellen Burleson and
Jill Wells for representing us in Rookie of
the Year. You two did a great job. Love, the
Alpha Phis.
Many thanks to Audra Kennedy and
Samantha Styons for doing such a wonder-
ful job representing us in the Rookie of the
Year contest Great job girls! Love, your Delta
Zeta sisters.
Phi Tau - Thanks for such an awesome time
at "Smashing Pumpkins" on Halloween. You
guys really went all out Can't wait to do it
again soon. Thanks again, the sisters of AI-
pha Delta Pi.
Way to go Chi Omega soccer team for your
6-1 win over Zeta! Keep it up girls.
The sisters of Delta Zeta would like to thank
Chi Omega, Delta Chi, and Sigma Alpha
Epsilon for our Halloween pumpkins! Love,
the sisters and new members of Delta Zeta.
Congratulations Kara Buttermore on your
engagement to Hunter! We love you. Love,
your Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
Theta Class, Congratulations on induction
to Phi Kappa Psi. Thanks to all the Broth-
ers for a good time. I'm proud to be a Phi
Psi. Thanks, Brother Shep.
The sisters of Delta Zeta would like to thank
the New Member class for the great home-
coming decorations! They were great despite
the rain! We love you guys - keep up the
good work! Love, the sisters.
Congrats to Chi Omega's Darcie Reasoner
for winning the Undergraduate Biology
Scholarship. Great job Darcie, keep it up!
Love, your sisters.
Congratulations to Maggie Lewis on her
acceptance into Nursing School! We are very
proud of you! Love, your Delta Zeta sisters.
Great Job Lauren Causey and Beth
Roberson for winning the intramural tennis
tournament Love, the Sisters of Chi Omega.
Hey Delta Zeta sisters and new members -
get psyched for Rose Formal this weekend,
it's gonna be a blast!
Alpha Delta PI: The sisters of Alpha Phi
hope you have a great week. We hope you
had a great homecoming weekend. Love your
sister sorority.
FORMALS, PARTIES??,
YOU NEED THE
-Lt JQBiLfjLJEts,c JB-P
PARTY TO GO
NO ITS NOT THE CD, ITS SCtOt'S
HD'J"J'Ji�S' UJ 8ISB VXCMWITH A
KTiDSS-StfiDIP DANCE MV& THAT
WILL KEEP YOUR PARTY PUMPIN
CAll LEE AT 758-4644 FOR BOOKING, HOLIDAY DATES
ARE FILLIN6 FAST SO CALL EARLYff
4
Greek
Personals
Thank you Tract Sorrell for the great job
you did on Homecoming. The festivities were
enjoyed by young and old, ready to party
despite the cold. Love your sisters of Alpha
Phi.
Congrats to Chi Omega and Sigma Alpha
Epsilon for winning first place on the Home-
coming float. All your hard work paid off!
Announcements
Orientation to career Services: Seniors and
graduate students graduating in December
1996 or MaySummer 1997 are encouraged
to register with the Career Services Office by
attending one of the following Orientation
meetings: Tues Nov. 5 - 2 pm or Wed Nov.
13 � 4 pm. This overview includes procedures
for employment interviews on campus, resume
referral service and establishing a credentials
file with Career Services.
Buffett Bingo - Play bingo, win prizes, and
have fun with us on November 7 at 8 pm in
Mendenhall Creat Room. Rec Services, 328-
6387.
ECU Investment Club will hold its next meet-
ing on Thursday, Nov. 7 in GCB 1028. Fea-
tured guest will be Dr. Joe Kiely. Planning for
your financial future, with an emphasis on
Mutual Funds is scheduled. Also, a discussion
nf 40IK plans should be included. All faculty
and students invited. Pizza and drinks served
at 4:40pm.
The ECU Computer Club is holding its an-
nual organizational meeting, Monday Nov. 11,
1996 3-4 pm in Austin 320. If you have an
interest in computers, come out and join us.
Bowling singles - get your bowling shirt out!
Register in 204 Christenbury by Nov. 7 at 5:00
pm. Rec Services, 328-6387
free aqua fitness class - on November 12 at 4
pm in Christenbury Pool. Rec Services, 328-
6387.
Interview Skills workshop: This is the sea-
son for recruiters to visit ECU to interview
prospective graduates for employment! Learn
how to prepare, package and present your
product � Yourself � in this important inter-
view. This workshop includes questions you
may be asked, questions you may ask, inter-
view attire, and how to follow-up for positive
results. Sponsored by Career Services, the
workshops are scheduled for Wed Nov. 6 at
4:00 pm and Mon Nov. 11 at 3:00 pm in the
Career Services Building 701 E. Fifth Street
The Women's Studies Alliance will be hold-
Announcements
ing an organizational meeting on Tuesday,
November 12, at 4 pm in Rawl, room 105.
Anyone with an interest in Women's Stud-
ies is welcome.
Tues, nov. 5 - Senior Recital. Karrie Brown,
voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 6 pm; Wed,
Nov. 6 � Senior Recital, Mary McKinley.voice,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7pm; Frl, Now. 8 �
Jazz Ensemble A, Carroll V. Dashiell Jr Di-
rector, Wright Auditorium, 8pm; Sat, Nov.
9 - Senior Recital Timothy Christian Weaver,
percussion, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm;
Sat, Nov. 9 - Combined ECU Choirs and
Orchestera: Poulenc's Gloria, Rhonda
Fleming, conductor. East Carolina Symphony
Orchestra, concert production of final act
of Bizet's Carmen, Stephen Blackweider,
conductor. Wright Auditorium, 8 pm.
Attention ODK members: There is a Gen-
eral Body meeting Nov. 12 at 6 pm in
Mendenhall Student center. New tappee's
will be approved and tapping schedules will
be given. This will be a short but impor-
tant meeting. For more information, call 328-
4732.
introduction to map & compass - Learn all
about maps and compass reading on Novem-
ber 12 at 7:00 pm in the Recreational Out-
door Center. Register by Nov. 8 in 204
Christenbury. Rec Services,328-6387.
Book Sale! Book Sale! By the Friends of
the Library (Joyner). Wednesday, Nov. 6,9am
� 8 pm and Thursday, Nov. 7, 9am - 5 pm in
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room.
Resume writing workshops: The Career Ser-
vices staff will hold a workshop on develop-
ing a professional resume and cover letter
on Tue Nov. 12 at 2:00 pm and Wed Nov.
20 at 4:00 pm. Tips on writing "computer
friendly" (scannable and faxable) resumes
will be included. This workshop will be held
in the Career Services Building. 701 E. Fifth
Street. No registration is required.
Turkey Trot � join us for a cross country
run on November 13. Register in 204
Christenbury by November 12 at 5:00 pm.
Rec Service.328-6387
ESL Tutors Needed: Volunteers are needed
as tutors for English As A Second Language.
A workshop will be held on Friday, Nov. 15
at Pitt Community College from 8:15 AM to
12:30 PM in the Henry Leslie Building to
train volunteers to be ESL tutors. For more
information or to register, all Literacy Vol-
unteers at 752-0439. Help an adult to learn
English.
Pilot Mountain climbing weekend - Come
climbing and camping with us on November
16-17. Interested individuals must register
in 204 Christenbury by November 8. Rec
Services,328-6387.
DOYOUNEEDMQNEY2
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD, SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Student Swat S
THE HARD WAY.
THE EASY WAY.
Try the easy way by advertising
in our classifieds.
328-2000
- �
f Peebles
Store Manager Trainees
At Peebles Department Slore, as our commitment to maintaining customer satisfaction
continues to grow into the next century, we will look to our last century o( experience
(or guidance. We'll also look to our people. If vou're as customer service oriented as
we are and want a challenging career, the one and only name you need to know is
Peebles Department Stores.
We're looking for Store Manager Trainees who believe customers come first, who have
an eye for fashion and who know what it means to give great service.
Since the 1890's, Peebles Department Stores have furnished the highest quality
merchandise to customers at the lowest prices. With 76 stores in twelve mid-Atlantic
states, Peebles is not only getting older, we're getting bigger and better.
Preferred Background:
� Retail experience
� Strong Leadership Skills
� Relocation Essential
� Strong Communication
Skills
Peebles Offers You:
� Starting Annual Salary, S22.000
� 40Vk)
� Health Insurance � Paid Holidays
� Tuition Assistance � Purchase Discounts
� Pud Personal Leave � Life Insurance
Mail resume to:
Peebles Inc.
Gavin Harper, Store Management Recruiter
One Peebles Street � South Hill, VA 23970
FAX ; (804) 447-5453
Peebles
An Cqual Opportunity Employer � We Promote a Drug-free Environment
J-





irtTiiirnTii
10
Thursday, November 7,1996 The East Carolinian
Men finish CAA's with
highest placing ever
Men's basketball
nets first win
Amanda Ross
Sports MM
Zina Briley
'Staff Writer
The ECU men's cross country
team made history when they placed
third at the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Cross Country Championships on
Saturday. ECU hosted the event at
Lake Kristi.
The men had never placed so
high in the championships before. The
Pirates were led by sophomore sensa-
tion Jamie Mance, who became the
first ECU runner to ever earn AU-CAA
honors. Mance placed seventh over a
five mile course in 24:52.
Other Pirate finishers were Jer-
,emy Coleman, Brian Beil, Justin En-
gland, Rod Reeves, Larry Lewis, Matt
Cox, Andrew Worth, John Doub, David
Balon and Ryan Smith.
Assistant Men's Coach Mike Ford
said he was glad to see that all the
hard work had paid off.
"I was in awe of the men Ford
said. "They worked hard all season
long and deserved to run like cham-
pions
It was the William & Mary's
men's and women's teams who took
home the meet titles, with both head
coaches selected as the league's
coaches of the year, but it was the
Pirates who took home the glory.
"For the team as a whole, it was
an emotional day that will be remem-
bered for years to come Ford said.
The William & Mary men finished
with 36 points, James Madison with
48 points. ECU's highest previous fin-
ished was fifth in 1994.
On the women's side, William &
Mary finish first with 31 points and
last years winner James Madison
placed second, scoring 61 points.
ECU placed seventh, with 172
points. Kerri Hartling was the high-
est finisher for the Lady Pirates, in
15th with a time of 18:38.
Other Lady Pirate finishers were
Karen Reinhard, Erin Cottos, Dava
Rhodes, Tara Rhodes, Kerry Vinsel,
Robin Bates and Cindy Szymanski.
The next meet for ECU will be
the NCAA Regional Championships
held in at Furman.
:�
Rugby team wins championship
Mickey Crawford
Contributing Wrtter
The ECU Rugby Club won the
North Carolina Rugby Union State
Championship for the fifth year in a row
and the seventh time in eight tries Oct
26-27.
The two day tournament was held
in Wilmington on the campus of UNO
Wilmingtoa The six team field consisted
of ECU, Duke, and UNC-W in the East
bracket along with N.C. State, UNC and
j UNO Charlotte rounding out the West
ECU was matched up against Duke
Sfor its first match. From the outset it
was evident that Duke was outmatched
iand out manned.
Kendall Jones ran for the Pirates
, first sijpre on a 60 meter try around
Lithe right wing. After the ensuing kick-
roff, the ECU pack gained control of the
! scrum and the ball was quickly gotten
! outrjysorurrmalfMikeCultigantofryhalf
' Mike "Keebler" Myers, who then raced
40 meters for ECU's second try of the
j game in less thafa two minutes. Myers'
! second conversion was successful, to
take the score to 14-0.
Jones scored the next time he
touched the ball, to bring the score to
19-0, but the conversion failed. Jones
would pull up lame with a hamstring
pull and would come out after the first
half. The first half ended with the score
ECU 45 and the Blue Devils nothing.
Tries were scored by Eric Kunkel, Vinny
For the first time ECU fans got a
glimpse of what they can expect from the
men's basketball team this seasoa
Monday night the Pirates hosted
Court Authority, a group of players from
colleges around the natioa When the fi-
nal buzzer sounded, ECU had notched the
82-71 victory.
Along with the fans, Head Coach Joe
Dooley caught a sneak preview of the tal-
ent he will be working with. He got a lot of
his players in the game, and thaf s what
they were hoping to do.
"For the most part we accomplished
what we wanted to accomplish Dooley
said. "We were abfe to get everybody a lot
of minutes
Court Authority jumped outtoaqirick
lead, when ECU's Tim Basham hit a shot
at the top of the key to start the scoring.
The Pirates were down by seven at
one point in the first, but with six minutes
left ECU took the lead off an Alico Dunk
lay up that gave them a 26-25 lead. The
Pirates didn't look back after that shot and
led throughout the remainder of the game.
Lawrence Thomas ended the first half
with an exclamation point - a slam dunk
to give ECU a 10 point lead.
Junior college transfer 6'8 290
pounds Dink Peters led ECU scorers with
nine points in the first Dink said this was a
great experience for him.
"Coming from a junior college, every-
thing is more high and intense - the pres-
sure, the demand Peters said. "I was just
glad J was able to compete at this level. For
anybody who is trying to make it here, this
is probably the greatest feeling I have ever
had in my entire life"
Because of Peters' size, he realizes he
will have many roles.
"I'll give my body up for the team as
much as I can Peters said. "I probably
slow them down a little bit when they want
to run, but other than that I feel I can help
the team in a lot of aspects
Other top scorers were Tony Parham
with eight points, Basham and Dunk each
with seven.
Court Authority tried to make a come-
back in the second half but to no avail
Jonathan Kemer opened up the scoring in
the second half with a turnaround jumper.
The Pirates kept their lea J from six to 10
points until the 952 mark when Court
Authority came within three, 60-57.
Peters nailed two free throws to put
Dink Peters
Tim Basham
Raphael Edwards
These were the leading scor-
ers in Monday's game. All
had 10 points except for Pe-
ters who finished with 20.
them up by five, and again ECU was roll-
ing. But one more time Court Authority
came within three. This time it was Kemer
who got them out of the drought with an-
other turnaround jumper.
The Pirates went on to win by 11
points, and again to close out the half, there
was another dunk; this time by Raphael
Edwards.
Offensively, Dooley liked the team ef-
fort
"Offensively we played very selflessly,
to a point where we sometimes over passed,
but that's not a problem right now Dooley
said. "That will all clear up
Five players reached double figures
in scoring, with Peters leading the pack
with 20. Basham, Kemer, Parham and
Edwards all added 10 each
AydervGrifton native Alico Dunk, who
sat out last season after transferring from
the University of Tennessee, said he was
Tony Parham
Jonathan Kerner
glad to be playing again
"Just the opportunity to play and
compete against other people is the great-
est feeling in the world right now Dunk
said
Many of Dunk's family and friends
now get a chance to see him play - some-
See B-BALL page 11
IRec Sewtcea,
Cathy Biondo
Recreational Services
See RUGBY page 11
Photo Courtesy of Mickey Crawford
Matt Stewart steals another lineout against the Seahawks
of UNC-W. ECU won the North Carolina Rugby Championship.
Freshman swimmer adjusts to new life
David Councilman
i Sports Writer
I wmommmmmmmmmtmimimmmmmmmmm�m


Mike Julian, a freshman distance
swimmer from Stafford, Va, is doing a
! juggling act this year. Not only does
! he balance school work, but he also
i has to think about the swim team.
� While others may be out partying or
j just hanging out with friends, he is in
the pool or in the classroom, with not
J much time for a social life.
"Mike is an outstanding distance
J swimmer Head Coach Rick Kobe
! said.
The ECU swimming program has
� Julian's two older sisters to thank for
getting him interested in swimming.
� One sister even swam in college at
� Brigham Young University.
"When 1 was a child, my two older
sisters would bring me to the pool,
! and my second oldest sister coached
! my summer league team Julian said.
Julian does not call himself a
i sports nut. but he does keep up with
� all the sports. If you don't find Julian
1 in the pool, or in the classroom, you
j may find him out on the golf course,
J or at the ECU football games when
! he does not have a swim meet.
! Just like any college student,
! Julian has his likes and dislikes about
I school.
"I really like the class scheduling,
� I don't have that long haul like I did
in high school Julian said. "I do not
like the type of studying I have to do
in college in high school the teacher
told you what to look for in a test in
college you have to find the answer
yourself, and I do not like being away
from home
The transition for Julian from
high school swimming to college has
been somewhat easy. In high school
he still had a routine like he does here
at ECU, but the only difference is the
level of competition.
"There is a lot more yardage the
practices are more intense and
harder Julian said.
Just like any college athlete,
Julian has ambitions of becoming a
professional athlete, but his ambitions
are leaning more toward coaching. He
wants to further his education after
ECU as a graduate student.
"I really want to coach; I am go-
ing to try to get a job and coach
Julian said.
Although Julian wants to coach,
if something develops where he can
swim professionally, he will, but as of
right now he wants to swim his four
years, and leave his mark here at ECU.
He had a long list to choose from
when he was planning on attending
college. He got offers from schools
such as Florida Atlantic, Penn State,
Indiana and Virginia Tech. The main
factor that attracted Julian to ECU
was the education value, and the
Yell "Bingo when you win.
Come play Buffett Bingo with Rec-
reational Services Natural Life Pro-
gram.
The Natural Life Special Events
are designed to give students fun
and exciting non-alcoholic social
events. Other Natural Life events
include King and Queen of the Halls,
Exam Jammathon and Double Dare.
Tonight at 8 p.m. the Natural
Life Program is offering Buffett
Bingo in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter Great Room. Any student, fac-
ulty and staff member that enjoys
bingo will love Buffett Bingo.
This fun-filled event consists of
18 different bingo games and 18
bags full of prizes for each game
winner. Some of the prize bags in-
clude Natural Life T-shirts and
squeeze bottles. Winners can also
look forward to winning gift certifi-
cates and prizes from local busi-
nesses, such as the Student Stores,
East Coast Music, Papa Johns, Bi-
cycle Post, Ragazzi's. Shear Image,
Hickory Hams, Krispy Kreme Do-
nuts and Courtyard Tavern.
While playing bingo you can en-
joy an assortment of Jimmy Buffett
music and a variety of free food, pro-
vided by Aramark.
For more information contact
Rec Services at 328-6387.
's basketball foam will ba In action
tonlakt in Mlnaas Collsoum. ICU will bast tno Global Snorts
All-Stars boajaaina at 7 p.m.
Monday nigbt tho woman's baskotball toant will play host
to Athlatos In Action In Minges. Gamo tins Is also 7 p.m.
Mike Julian
scholarship offer. He also liked the fact
that ECU was not too close to home,
and also it was not too far either. It
also helped that his current roommate
is from the same hometown.
Julian's parents have been very
supportive of him throughout his
swimming career. According to Julian
they have never been overbearing or
too pushy. They are not the type of
parents to cause an athlete to burn
out.
"My parents have been real sup-
portive they let me do my own thing
and they do not push me to swim
Julian said.
Look for Julian to make a big
splash for the ECU swim team in his
next four years at ECU.
I s O0J-1 O
Notes
ECU
Virginia Tech
NAV
A"
� ECU and Virginia
Tech will be
meeting for the 10th
time.
� The Hokies lead
the series 5-4.
� VT took a 1994
decision in
Greenville, 27-20.
� Out of five trips to
Blacksburg, ECU
has won twice �
1987 and 1991.
� VT is currently
ranked 25th while
ECU is 26th.
Hokie quarterback Jim Druckenmiller 1996
stats:
GComptAtt.YardsTDLong
7811531166971
p"sAv
a
ECU vs. Virginia Tech Flashbacks
1956
1987
1988
1989
1990
199.1
1992
1993
1994
- VT, 37-2 cVT
-ECU, 32-23 at VT
-VT, 27-16 at VT
-ECU, 14-10 at ECU
- VT, 24-23 at ECU
-ECU, 24-17 at VT
- ECU, 30-27 at ECU
-VT, 31-12 at VT
- VT, 27-20 at ECU
kAV
AyvW
���"�





X
The EastyCarolinian
Thursday, November 7, 1996
11
Lupton's Almost
Famous Raw Bar
Grand Opening
Saturday
November
9th
The freshest
oysters & seafood in tow!
e weather may be getting colder
but were always steaming
shrimp that is!

Located on the corner of
14th & Greenville Blvd.
752-4174
B-BALL from page 10 RUGBY from page 10
tiling they couldn't easily do at Tennessee.
"It's great to be hack home Dunk
said "My mom got a chance to see me
play, a lot of my hometown friends get to
see me play"
1 Hxjley. who has been watching Dunk
.since high school said it was nice to see
him out there on the court
"It was good to see Alico out there
after the many years we chased him while
he was over at Ayden Grifton Dooley said.
"I know he was excited about being out
there. I know it felt good for him
As for the newcomers on the Pirate
squad, Dooley was impressed with what
his players gave him.
"1 thought Dink did a very good job
after he got his feet wet" Dooley said. "I
thought C.arrett Blackwelder came off the
bench early and did some especially nice
things
Edwards and Neil Punt also caught
Dooley s eye.
"1 thought Raphael, once he got into
the flow, did a couple nice things - rebound
the ball, ran in transition. I thought Neil,
once after he got over the jitters, did some
nice things
The Pirates return to the floor tonight
to host Global Sports All-Stars at 7 p.m. in
Minges.
Sisti, Morgan Gwynn- Williams and two
more by Myers.
In the second half, it was more of
the same. The pack was led by strong
play of the first row. who surged against
the weaker Duke pack. Matt Stewart
and Todd Ward won and spoiled line-
outs all match long. Consistent tackhng
and crisp execution of plays contributed
to the 62-10 lashing of the Blue Devils.
ECL" went on to play in the semifi-
nal match against I'NCW. who beat
Duke 41-3.
The Pirate ruggers got off to a slow
start against the Seahawks. UNC-W
scored on a penalty kick and then scored
on a 20 meter try to put them ahead 8-
0. Then one of the most pivotal plays of
the tournament occurred. A Seahawk
back ran into the try zone for an appar-
ent score but he failed to touch the ball
down for the score and ran out of the
back of the try zone.
"I thought Forrest Gump was out
there playing for them UNCW
Stewart said.
The score remained 8-0 and that
was just what the doctor ordered for
the Pirates. ECU moved right down the
field winning rucks, mauls, and line -
outs.
Outside center Kunkel took a pass
from fellow inside center Matt Oathout
and banged into the try zone for ECU's
first score. The conversion was good and
the score stood 8-7.
After the kickoff, the Pirates did
the same thing with Kunkel taking it
from 10 meters out and Myers convert-
ing the try to make it 14-8 at half.
The Seahawks did not give up and
made it 14-13 with 20 minutes to go in
the game. After tough play from both
teams. Myers amazed the crowd by boot-
ing a drop goal from 35 meters out to
make it 17-13. Myers then scored an-
other try and a penalty goal to bring
the final to 27-13.
"1 was just in the zone Myers said.
"The uprights looked a mile wide
"The packies played a great game
Culligan said, "They got in there and
pulled, pushed, scratched, and clawed.
It was great"
ECL" played UNC for the champi-
onship on a rainy afternoon. The
Tarheels got off to a quick start by scor-
ing on a 50 meter run around the week
side, which caught the Pirates napping
to take the 5-0 lead.
Both teams played a hard fought
first half. Neither team could get any-
thing going until Culligan scored a well
earned 15-meter try Myers' conversion
was successful to make it 7-5 at half-
time.
Myers scored on a penalty aided
try to make the score 12-5 after the
missed conversion.
Both teams continued to attack
and counterattack with kicks and long
runs, but neither team could put any
points on the board.
At about the 65th minute mark,
the Tarheels put a penalty kick through
the uprights to make it 12-8. but the
Pirate ruggers stormed back to put one
through of their own to make it 15-8.
Rookie Dan scored on a 35 meter
run to put the game out of reach. The
Heels added a late try. but it was too
late as the Bucs went on to win 22-16.
Some of the team members shared
their feelings on the win.
"It feels great to be the champs
Chris Woody said.
Ward agreed.
"The team really deserved to win
this thing Ward said. "We just wanted
it more than the other guys
Stewart said nobody expected
them to come out on top.
"ECU Rugby is like the NWO in
wrestling; nobody wanted us here: no-
body liked us, but nobody could stop
us Stewart said.
J&mtXX HLMfr I
The question of whether or not we are
alone in the universe has been answered.
Thursday, November 7
Friday, November 8
Saturday, November 9
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fountain Drink
VODEV
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
II films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
o BackpacksBpokbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
rf
IIIMIIEKE lit
Peking Palace
Restaurant
LUNCH SPECIALS $4.25
Greenville
Square
Shopping
Center
756-1169
Don i make ptons lor -ut:ii
-as?
LUNCH
Mon -Fri 11:00
DINNER
in the
K-mart
Shopping
Center
2:30
9:30
Mon - Thurs - 5:00
Sat - All Day
Sun - All Day
Take out orders available!
(Including one egg roll
and fried rice)
10�o discount or dinner on
weekdays and Sunday � All doy
Must have current Student IDs
The largest collegiate 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament in the World is coming to:
East Carolina University
Schick
Super Hoops
Play Begins Monday, October 28th
Entry Information
tresented by
Where: Christenbury Gym
Contact: Paulette Evans
This Baby Gets You Going!
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M press-
"so realyoul! sweat"
� Men's and Womeris Divisions
� Exciting Prizes from Schick and Microsoft
� Winners advance to Regional Championships
www.scfifck.com
Ki
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OFFICIAL
COLLEGIATE
30N3
BASKETBALL
TOURNAMENT
"t?"






12
Thursday, November 7,1996
The East Carolinian
Registration
Terminal Locations
Sj&fifi! si QssL
School of Allied Health
Total - 7
School of Art
Total - 3
School of Business
Total - 6
School of Education
Total -10
School of Health
Human Performance
Total - 5
School of HESC
Total - 4
School of Ind. & Tech.
Total -6
School of Musk
Total ji
School of Social Work
Total � 3
School of Nursing
Total - 5
Anthropology
Totaljj.
Biology
Total - 4
Chemistry
Total -1
Communications
Total -1
Economics
Total 11
English
Total -3
Foreign Language
Total - 2
Location
Anx 1CSDI Office
310 EHLBIOS
306 OCQ Office
302 PA Dept
Anx 3PTHE Office
308 CLSCHIMA
312 REHB Office
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
BW Senior Gallery
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
3rd floor Media Center
GCB 3209
GCB 3411
GCB 3413
GCB 3422
GCB 3105
GCB 3203
Speight 102A
Speight 109
Speight 134
Speight 137
Speight 204
Speight 230
GCB 2318
Flanagan 357
Joyner 215
MC A-15
MC 171
MC 177
MC174
Christenbury 203
HESC 130
Flanagan 103
Flanagan 105
Rawl 343
Rawl 327
Rawl Ann. 139
Wright Ann. 307
Fletcher 102
Fletcher 119
Ragsdale 102
Ragsdale 104 A&B
Nursing 108
Nursing 119
Nursing 157
Brewster A214
BN-108
Flanagan 204
Erwin 113
Hours Open
8:00-12:00
8:00-10:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-10:002:00-4100
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-3:00
8:00-3:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-4:45
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-4:00
8:00-4:00
8:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-10:002:00-4:00
8:00-1:002:00-5:00
8:00-4:00
8:00-11:001:004:00
8:00-11:001:00-4:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-9:0011:004:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-11:001:004:30
8:00-12:003:00-5:00
Spec. PermissionProblems
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-11:302:004:30
it site
Allocation of
Registration Days
rll
srl2
Jber 13
Graduate students, students with
physical disabilities, registered
with Department for Disability
Support Services, and students
with 75 or more semester hours
credit.
Students with 46-74 semester
hours credit and those eligible
prior to this period.
Students with 1-45 semester
hours credit and those prior to
this period.
Brewster A429
Geography
Total -2
Geology
Total-1
History
Total - 3
Mathematics
Total-4
Philosophy
Total-1
Physics
Total-1
Political Science
Total -1
Psychology
Total - 1
Sociology
Total - 2
Theatre Arts
Total -1
Undergraduate Studies
(ATP only)
Total -10
Registrar's Office
Total -16
Honors Program
Total - 2
GCB 2201
FL Reception Area
GCB 3324
Brewster A227
Brewster A229
Graham 101
8:00-11:301:004:00
8:00-11:002:004:00
8:00-12:003:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-2:00
8:00-12:002:00-5:00
8:00-11:001:304:30
iber 14 All students eligible,
smber 15 All students eligible.
to using the on-line registration system, each student will
ft schedule containing no more than 18 hours of primary
and no more than IS hours of alternate courses that
with Insher adviser's approval as indicated by the
adviser's signature on the registration form. AH special
permission (e.g extra hours, majors only courses,
rperson's permission, etc) for course registration must
secured in writing prior to using the on-line registration.
Brewster A311
Brewster A314
Brewster A316
Austin 129
Brewster A327
Howell 209
Brewster A124
Brewster 126
Rawl 135
Brewster A411
Brewster A414
Messick 106
Brewster B101
Brewster A102
Brewster B103
Whichard 100
Whirhard 101
Whichard 102
Whichard 104
Whichard 105
GCB 2026
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:304:30
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-5-00
8:00-12:30
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:30
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:001:00-5:00
5
1
4
5
2
2
2
5
till university
indebtedness must be
paid before registering or
making schedule changes, Jn
order to register, each
undergraduate student must
y have a registration form
V signed by hisher
adviser,
fill students are encouraged to check the web for course schedules and
availability, tags, and registration terminal locations on the Office of the
Registrar's home page at cast Carolina University, ou canjjo there
directly by typing:
httpi7 uw.ecu.edu 'imagemap files Registration.html
-
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 7, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 07, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1173
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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