The East Carolinian, November 5, 1996






TUE&
November 5,1996
Vol 72, No. 21
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pages
Election Day '96 closes campaigning
Across The State
ASHEVILLE (AP) - North
Carolina's largest cities may have
trouble meeting new standards if
the Environmental Protection
Agency tightens standards for two
pervasive air pollutants, according
to one state official.
The EPA will decide in the next
few weeks whether to further crack
down on the amounts of smog and
other microscopic particles allow-
able in the air, the Asheville Citi-
zen-Times reported today.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Politics
moved from the campaign trail to
the church pew Sunday, as both
sides sought to energize their faith-
ful before today's election.
Evangelical churches across
the state distributed thousands of
Christian Coalition Voter Guides
that attempted to put Republican
candidates in a favorable light to
many congregants.
Across The Country
NEW YORK (AP) - Confident
that holding interest rates steady
this year was the right move, the
Federal Reserve will almost cer-
tainly keep the rates unchanged
when it convenes on Nov. 13, The
Wall Street Journal reported today.
The officials suggested that
they may leave interest rates un-
changed at current levels through
the end of the year, the newspaper
said.
DELAWARE. Ohio (AP) - A
school that discouraged the wear-
ing of satanic T-shirts is trying to
decide whether to extend that
policy to all religious messages, in-
cluding Christian ones.
The issue arose a couple of
weeks ago when students who wore
shirts with satanic themes were
asked by school officials to leave
them at home, said Principal Santha
Stall-Friedman.
Those students then asked that
classmates not wear shirts with
Christian themes. Stall-Friedman
said Sunday.
Around The World
ALEXANDRIA. Egypt (AP) -
Hours of diving in the murky Medi-
terranean and exhaustive mapping
have revealed parts of the 2,000-
year-old city where the love affair
between Antony and Cleopatra took
place.
French marine archaeologist
Franck Goddio said Sunday he had
found the ruins of the ancient court
of Alexandria beneath 16 to 20 feet
of water on the eastern side of
Alexandria's old harbor.
KATMANDU. NEPAL (AP) -
The unpredictable Himalayas claim
the lives of dozens of mountaineers
and adventurers every year. But
Philip and Helen Fialkow weren't
risk takers: They were just trekkers.
hiking through the well-traveled low
mountain forests when they were
caught in a freak snowstorm.
Today, a Nepalese helicopter
was bringing the bodies of Fialkow,
dean of the University of Washing-
ton medical school, and his wife to
Katmandu. They were dug out of
the snow on Sunday.
Officials worry
over voter turnout
Associated Press
RALEIGH (AP) - The last ads
have been bought the signs have been
posted along roadsides, the direct mail
has all been sent, and the candidates
are down to their final stump speeches
as voters go to the polls Tuesday.
Whether that speech is a trium-
phant anthem of victory or a tearful
concession of defeat, depends, in
many cases, on how many voters
show up at the polls.
State elections officials said it
was difficult to determine whether
many voters will bother to cast their
ballots.
"The historical average for presi-
dential elections of registered voters
from 1972 to 1992 is 65.9 percent
said Gary Bartlett, executive direc-
tor of the State Board of Elections.
"The lowest point was in 1988. when
it hit 62.1 percent. The top happened
in 1984 and 1992, when there was
68.4 percent
Bartlett said some of the inter-
est in North Carolina's hurricane-
shortened election season seemed to
wane after polls showed President
Clinton with a consistent, double-
digit lead nationally over Republican
Bob Dole and Democratic Gov. Jim
Hunt with a hefty lead over Republi-
can challenger Robin Hayes.
Bartlett said he was looking for
an average turnout, but that opinion
was not universally shared.
"Some folks are saying that in-
stead of setting a new high, we could
be lucky just to reach average he
said. "Some of my staff is saying the
turnout may be in the high 50s
Fiercely contested legislative,
congressional or local races could
Four named Outstanding
Alumni Award recipients
Honors
presented during
Homecoming
festivities
Angela Koenig
Staff Writer
The ECU Alumni Association
honored the four recipients of the
1996 Outstanding Alumni Awards
during Homecoming festivities Sat-
urday.
This year's recipients were Dr.
Clay Burnett, the late Bertie
Edwards Fearing, Jeanne Smith
Piland and Brian Shul. They were
honored in the parade, at the an-
nual Homecoming Awards Lun-
cheon and during half-time at the
ECU-Arkansas State football game.
Outstanding Alumni Awards
are given annually during Home-
coming. Alumni, faculty and staff
nominate individuals and the
Alumni Association's board of direc-
tors select recipients who they feel
have excelled in their professional
fields or in civic affairs.
"It is a testament to the recipi-
ents' achievements in their respec-
tive fields of endeavor. The honor
and accolades that this award brings
to those who receive it is but a to-
ken recognition of the honor they
bring to their alma mater through
their good works Lisa Benton,
president of the Alumni Association
said.
Burnett graduated from ECU in
1977 and from the School of Medi-
cine in 1984. He also played football
while at ECU.
He studied heart transplanta-
tion at Houston's Texas Heart Insti-
tute for two years. He then served
as chief of thoracic transplantation
and taught in the department of
surgery at ECU'S School of Medicine.
Burnett is now a cardiovascu-
lar and thoracic surgeon in private
practice in Savannah. He also serves
as section head of the residency pro-
gram for cardiothoracic surgery at
Savannah's Memorial Medical Cen-
ter and director of the Heart Insti-
tute there.
See ALUMNI page 3
Registrars work to simplify
registration process
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
Fall semester is quickly coming to
a close, and all students know that
registration for spring is approaching.
Registration will begin on November
11.
"Student schedule books are in de-
partments for students to begin the
registration process Karen Bassetti,
the assistant registrar, said.
ECU has been working on ways
to streamline the registration process
in order to help relieve the stress on
the school's registrars and students.
The registrars office worked with the
ECU mail service to deliver schedules
to students mail boxes and they were
placed in residence halls and individual
departments.
"We are hoping to make registra-
tion more user friendly by increasing
the students' access to registration ter-
minals and literature Bassetti said.
A few years ago, students at regis-
tration lines would have to wait for
hours on end in order to get to a point
in which they would not be able to get
classes or a conflict of schedules would
�'
draw more voters to the polls in some
areas.
Both par-
ties are focus-
ing on get-out-
the-vote efforts
Tuesday, phon-
ing likely sup-
porters and
making sure
they get to poll-
ing places.
Unofficial
voter registra-
tion figures as
of OcL 11 show
54.33 percent
of the state's
3.8 million voters registered as Demo-
crats, while 33.76 percent are regis-
tered as Republicans. Unaffiliated
voters account for 11.83 percent.
with less than 1 percent registered
with other parties.
call for them to sit and change their
choices. The ECU registrar s office has
worked out a faster way to facilitate
the registration process.
"In order to speed up the regis-
tration process, we are opening ter-
minals in all departments for students
to access Bassetti said. "This is the
second year that we have been doing
this and it has helped considerably in
speeding up the registration process
Senior students may have seen
the registration process as a hit or miss
system, but with the greater access to
terminals there is also a greater or
more equal access to classes.
"Since we opened up terminals in
all of the departments last year, the
line at the registrars office would fill
Whichard's lobby at 8 a.m. when we
opened, and the line would be dc
considerably by 8:30 a.m Bassetti
said. "Students tend to spread out
more, lowering the line wait time
The registrar s office also realizes
that registration days are hard on the
staff, as they must deal with the flow
of students. So the registrar's office
has developed "registration spirit
See REG page 3
The one thing
we're worried
about is showing
them how
important it is to
get out and vote
� David Funderburk,
Republican U.S. Rep.
White voters make up 77.49 per-
cent of those regis-
tered, with blacks
accounting for
18.75 percent of
registered voters.
Native Americans.
Asians, other mi-
norities and voters
without a racial
designation ac-
count for the re-
mainder.
Low voter
turnout historically
has favored Repub-
licans, but after
their victories in
1994, they want to be sure their sup-
porters do not take victories this year
for granted.
"The one thing that concerns me
is that I'm not sure we're seeing a
lot of interest in terms of turning out
to vote said Republican U.S. Rep.
David Funderburk. a freshman law-
maker who is facing a strong chal-
lenge in the 2nd Congressional Dis-
trict from Democrat Bob Etheridge,
the state school superintendent.
"The one thing we're worried
about is showing them how impor-
tant it is to get out and vote
Funderburk said. "Some people have
in their minds that some of these
races are already decided, like the
presidential and gubernatorial races.
We're trying to instill in them that
legislative and congressional races
are as important to them as the ex-
ecutive-branch elections
Although the polls normally
close at 7:30 p.m state taw allows
local election boards to hold them
open till 8:30 p.m. if there are voters
waiting to cast their ballots at clos-
ing time.
Book Party honors
published professors
Authors share select pieces of thier work during occassion
Photo Courtesy of ECU NEWS BUREAU
(Lto R)Bradley Dean, Ronald Hoag.Lillian Robinson, PeterMakuck, GayWilentz and Charles
Sullivan gather at the book party and discuss the publishing of their latest works.
Jeff Gentry
News Writer
Six ECU English department members were hon-
ored Wednesday night at a book party held in their honor.
Bradley Dean, Ronald Hoag, Peter Makuck. Lillian
Robinson. Charles Sullivan and Gay Wilentz were all hon-
ored by their peers Wednesday night. Each person read
a selected piece from their works, which were available
for people to look at as well as purchase.
Makuck. a professor at ECU, had Shorelines pub-
lished this year It is a collection of poems that deal
with his different experiences on the North Carolina
coast. Makuck. who is an avid deep-sea fisherman, has
also published three other books of poetry.
"People always seem to want to know where po-
ems come from, but they usually come from the raw
material, or experiences of a person. This book is about
the experience of the North Carolina coastline Makuck
said.
Dean and Hoag co-authored a monograph on Henry
Thoreau. a famous lecturer and author. It is called
Thoreau's Lectures Before Walden: An Annotated Cal-
endar.
"The purpose of this calendar, then, is to flesh out
the record of Thoreau as a lecturer Hoag said. To do
this, the two spent a combined 15 years researching lec-
tures given by Thoreau.
"I went to all kinds of places looking for stuff Dean
said. " We discovered four lectures that no one knew
about. These paragraphs bring everything together
Walter Harding is the only other person to put together
hard data on this subject, but his was only 10 pages long.
After the publishing of the second part. Dean and Hoag's
will be over 200 pages long. It is expected to be released
as a separate book in the future.
Robinson is the compiler and editor of Modern
See FACULTY page 3
ECU Poetry Forum resumes this month
Marina Henry
Staff Writer
Local poets are invited to par-
ticipate in the ECU Poetry Forum,
a casual meeting of poets who re-
cite and critique each other's
works.
"The Forum is for anyone who
wants to improve their poetry, not
just get their ego stroked. The par-
ticipants give good advice and con-
structive criticism said ECU pro-
fessor and Forum Director Peter
Makuck.
Sessions occur the first and
third Wednesday of each month, be-
ginning Nov. 6. The meetings be-
gin at 8 p.m. and are held in Room
248 of Mendenhall Student Center.
"Some people are just touching
the water to see if they are inter-
ested in poetry, while others are try-
ing to polish up their style Makuck
said.
Those who come often vary
in levels of accomplishment, from
beginning poets to those who
have been published locally or na-
tionally. However, sharing work
is not required at the sessions.
Anyone is invited to attend.
"The Forum is a place to let
you know if you like poetry or not.
The only requirement for partici-
pation is interest Makuck said.
See ECU page 3
tiffed fatidc
Romeo and Juliet pleases our reviewerpage 3
OPINION ,rt
Cast your ballot todaypage 4
Basketball shoots into a new seasonpage O
Tuesday
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Phone
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Fax
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2nd floor
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Student Pubs Building;
across from Jovner





-ii r�s� ��-
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The East Carolinian
V
CRIMF QENE
October 25
Disruptive Student - An officer reported that a student was creating a
disturbance on the mall. The student was upset over what a man was preach-
ing on the mall. The student was asked to leave the area.
Intimidation - A resident of Scott Hall reported that he was threat-
ened by several members of an organization, of which he is also a member.
- October 28
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of the license plate from her
vehicle parked in the upper lot at Minges.
Breaking and Entering - A resident of Jones Hall reported the break-
ing and entering of his mailbox and the larceny of his mail in Jones Hall.
Other mailboxes had been broken into in Jones Hall.
October 29
Larceny - A faculty member reported the larceny of a figurine from his
office at the Brody Building.
Unauthorized use of conveyance - A contractor on campus reported
that an employee borrowed the company truck and did not return it to the
job site. The contractor drew warrants on the employee for unauthorized
use of a conveyance.
October 26
Possession of drug paraphernalia - A resident of Belk Hall was issued
a citation for possession of drug paraphernalia that was found in his room.
October 30
Attempted breaking and entering a vehicle - A resident of Belk Hall
reported that unknown persons attempted to break into his vehicle with a
coat hanger. The vehicle was parked south of Belk Hall.
October 31
Failure to appear - A non-student of Greenville was arrested for failure
to appear after being stopped in the Second and Reade Streets parking lot
November 1
Property Damage - An officer discovered a damaged vehicle in the
Reade Street parking lot The owner was contacted.
Property Damage - A student reported damage to the rear wheel of
her bike, which was parked at the bike rack east of Garrett Hall.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Student Stores provide scholarship funds
$200,000
presented for
benefit of students
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Monday morning two checks, to-
taling $200,000, were presented to the
university from ECU Student Stores,
for the purpose of giving scholarships
to students.
The checks were were presented
by the Director of ECU Student
Stores, Wanda Scarborough, and staff
from the ECU Student Stores, along
with Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs Richard Brown and Associate
Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs
Layton Getsinger. They were received
by Chancellor Richard Eakin, Athletic
Director Mike Hamrick and others.
Scarborough said that the money
would be given through two checks
to be used for separate scholarship
purposes.
"Twenty-five thousand dollars is
given to the women athletes, and
$175,000 to the General Scholarship
Fund Scarborough said.
Scarborough said that with the
help of the students, checks like these
are given to ECU every year.
"Through the support of the stu-
dents, we were able to give approxi-
mately 3 percent of the total sales to-
day Scarborough said. "We're glad
that we're able to give this amount of
money back to the students
The ECU Student Stores and
Vending Operations are self-support-
ing services owned and operated by
the university; they do not receive any
state funding or student fees. Even
though they depend completely on
receipts to cover the many costs, such
as merchandise, operating expenses
and capital expenses and reserves,
Scarborough said that all profits ac-
quired from the sale of merchandise
Student driver dies suddenly
are given back to the students
through rebates, scholarships and
other means of contributions.
"We try to give back to every stu-
dent the profits that we make
Scarborough said.
Since 1989, more than
$1,450,000 in scholarships have been
supported by the ECU Student Stores
operations.
Scarborough said that the orga-
nization is not concerned with the
amount of money they make for them-
selves, but how much they make for
the students.
"We're here to serve the students
and the needs of the students
Scarborough said. "We're not here
to form a money making enterprise
Staff Report
After a birthday
dinner with fellow
drivers, 44- year-old
accounting major
Murphy Tiltcn died
from a massive stroke.
Tilton, originally
from Swansboro
transferred to ECU
two years ago after at-
tending Coastal Caro-
lina Community Col-
lege. According to
Transit Manager Carl
Crunden, Tilton drove
for ECU the past two
years. He recorded
over a million profes-
sional miles.
Crunden told
TEC that Tilton left the birth-
day dinner around 8:30 p.m. A
few minutes after arriving home,
he suffered a massive stroke and
brain hemorrhaging. Tilton
passed away at 1:00 a.m. Satur-
day.
"Murphy did what he wanted
to do Crunden said. "He was a
jovial guy who got along with ev-
eryone. He was known for han-
dling tense situations calmly
Although the transit system
operated during Tilton's wake and
funeral services, arrangements
were made for employees to at-
tend. Grunden said this was what
Tilton would have wanted.
t&fc&IKffBK
European Trained Sty lists
Latest In Facial tr Body Wax
Professional Hair Products
Gift Certificates Available
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open MonSat.
9:30 a.m9 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
Tel: 756-620O
STANTON SQUARE CHARLES BOULEVARD
Stantonsburg Road SHOPPES
Open MonFri. Ches & JOthStreet
,n 0 Open MonFn.
10 a.m8 p.m. q � o ,
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Saturday 9 a.m6p.m. Saturday 9 a.m6 p.m.
Tel: 757-0076 Tel: 8305536
HoirCut
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November 30, 1996
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forms or Tanning fockoge I
$500 Off
U L.
Expires
November 30, 1996
; mm
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to Mendenhali Student Center
I
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
FIGARO! FIGARO! FIGARO!
Just like Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd, you'll be singing
"Fig-a-ro, Fig-a-ro, Fig-a-ro" after you see one of the world's most
renowned operas, The Barber of Seville, in
Wright Auditorium as part of the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 8 p.m.
Student tickets are $15 in advance at the Central Ticket Office.
All tickets are $30 at the door.
FAST FREE DELIVERY


IS
i.
B�3 BOp N�UVeaU
Maynard Ferguson and his Big Bop Nouveau Band are coming to
the Wright Auditorium on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 8 p.m. as part of the
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Student tickets are $7 in advance at the Central Ticket Office.
All tickets are $15 at the door.
11 �
BRrB
i
OPENLATE
HOURS
MON. - WEDS.
12 NOON-2 AM.
THURS. - SAT.
11A.M3A.M.
SUNDAY
11 AM. -1.30 A.M.
DELIVERY BEGINS
AT 4:00 P.M.
MON. - THURS.
Pizza
SvwV P
hi
. ng:
� m
Ransom (R) Tuesday, Nov. 5 in Hendrix Theatre.
Tickets are free and can be picked up on the day of the movie
at the Information Desk.
C3ct Carded
Stop by the Multi-Purpose Room to get your ECU I.D.
on Wednesday, Nov. 6 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Be sure to bring your activity sticker and driver's license.
�51
11
1
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Travel to Japan
See A Journey in Japan on Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 4:30 and 7 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. An all-you-can-eat theme dinner is served at 6 p.m.
for $12. Film tickets are free with ECU I.D. at the
Central Ticket Office. Dinner tickets must be reserved
with meal cards, cash, check or credit card.
$ MENDENHALL STUDENTCENTER � Wfac Center of Activity
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8a.m1l p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
1 aiEiiffi&Mi , MfeffSMffewswiiS
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- . .njl �� -II �





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 5, 1996
JC Vv U from page 1
The purpose of the Forum is to
provide a place for students and lo-
cal poets to receive instruction and
positive feedback from peers, and to
give new poetry a sounding board.
Those who wish to participate are
of each work presented for critiqu-
ing.
" We have a very fluid group at
our meetings. It is very relaxed. Po-
etry gets passed around and good
feedback is given for each Makuck
asked to bring about seven copies said.
DISCOVER A
LITTLE CORNER OF
U
COME JOIN US FOR BREAKFAST AND
RECEIVE A FREE
COURTSIDE CAFE COFFEE CUP
MONDAY � FRIDAY 8:00 -10:30
(Serving Greenville cSince 1950
Lunch is served from 10:30 - 5:00, Monday - Friday
757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
The Forum has had many tal-
ented and well-known poets come
to share their works and advice at
the meetings. These include: Na-
tional Book Award winner, the late
William Stafford; Lucille Clifton,
nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for
her African-American poetry; and
Pulitzer Prize winners Louis
Simpson and Carolyn Kizer.
"The Forum has been spon-
sored by the Student Government
Association (SGA) at ECU for 20
years now. I am looking forward
to having many more speakers here
that I believe will benefit the stu-
dents Makuck said.
The Poetry Forum was founded
in 1966 by Vernon Ward. Makuck
replaced Ward after his retirement
from the English staff in 1976. Po-
etry submitted at the Forum can
be published in the national liter-
ary magazine, Tar River Poetry.
"When I took over the Forum
and its magazine in 1976, I was
asked to take the local magazine,
then called Tar River Poets, and na-
tionalize it, so the name was
changed to imply that the works
were compiled near the Tar River,
but were not limited exclusively to
the artists of the Tar River area
Makuck said.
Since then, contributions have
been printed from Canada and
Scandinavia. Volume 34 of Tar
River Poetry, available at ECU Stu-
dent Stores soon after Thanksgiv-
ing, will include contributions from
Japan.
Transportation To Polls
Provided
Vote Vans will be patrolling campus all day
today offering students and faculty rides to polling
places. Polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Students can get a ride by:
1. Hoping on a stopped van.
2. Waving their hands in the air for the van to
stop.
3. Dialing 551 -6900 for pick up.
Vans are sponsored in part by Senator Ed
Warren and State House candidate Charles Ward.
FACULTY from page 1
les.
Wilentz edited and also wrote
an introduction for Salome of the
Tenements originally by Anzia
Yezierska. This is part of a series,
Radical Writers Reconsidered,
which reprints books that were no
longer published due to the radi-
cal nature of the author.
"She was basically a Jewish im-
migrant writer who pre-dated
Woody Allen Wilentz said.
Wilentz has also published an-
other book entitled Binding Cul-
tures: Black Women Writers in
Africa and Diaspora.
Sullivan's The Mabinogi is a
collection of medieval Celtic and
Welsh essays having to do with the
Mabinogi, which was a specific
piece of folklore in that time.
"This particular piece of litera-
ture is as important as Beowulf or
the Iliad, and it comes from about
the same stage of cultural devel-
opment Sullivan said. Sullivan,
who is a professor of folklore and
mythology, has been involved in
four previous books, and is cur-
rently lecturing in Wales.
ALUMNI from page 1
Fearing served on the English
faculty from 1975 until her death last
year. From 1990 to 1992, she served
as acting chair of the department.
She established the Department
of English Excellence in Teaching
Award anonymously in 1991, an award
which has since been renamed in her
honor. The department became the
international center for Henry David
Thoreau studies and the center for
N.C. literature studies under her guid-
ance.
She was also the founding direc-
tor of the Chancellor's Forum. This is
an annual event which brings regional,
state and national leaders together to
improve conditions in eastern N.C.
Piland received her bachelor's
and master's degrees in 1968 and
1969 and then moved on to the world
of opera as a mezzo-soprano.
She has sung with the New York
and Washington opera companies and
flew in from Europe to accept her
award.
She credits ECU and her former
voice professor, Gladys White, for lay-
ing the foundation upon which she
Fod & Drug
Always Good. Always Fresh
Items & Prices Good Thru Nov 9,19
Wed. 6Thurs. 7Fn. 8Sat. 9
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has built her career.
Shul spent 20 years as an Air
Force pilot after graduating from ECU
in 1970. He served during Vietnam
and flew on more than 200 missions.
He also flew an assortment of ad-
vanced military spacecraft, including
the SR-71 Blackbird. This is one of
the highest-flying, fastest aircrafts in
the world.
Since his retirement in 1990, he
has written five books on military air-
craft and owns a photography studio
in California. He received the Golden
Georgi Award for one of these books.
"Our four honorees this year
come from divergent backgrounds-
arts, academia, medicine, the mili-
tary� but they all have one thing in
common. They each chose not to be
satisfied with the status quo. To sim-
ply be good enough is, for them, just
not enough. Each has been driven by
a desire to do and be the best they
possibly can Benton said.
REG from page 1
program, which was designed to in-
crease the morale of the staff during
the high stress period of registration
Bassetti said. "We are going to do a
daily event for the staff, such as a
raffle, a buffet and other exciting
things
ECU registration begins on Nov.
11 and goes until Nov. 15. Each de-
partment at ECU will have terminals
allocated for students of their depart-
ments to use.
"We recommend that the students
talk to their advisers early this week,
so that they will have the registration
forms and special permissions taken
care of for registration Bassetti said,
"The less that the student has to run
around during registration, the easier
it will be on them and the staff in-
volved
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WOMEN WHO ARE RAPED.
WHO ARE TRULY RAPED THE
JUICES DON'T FLOW AND
THEY DON'T GET PREGNANT
Said Henry Alderidge your State House Representative
The Daily Rellectcr. April 22. 1995
Henry A!deridge Premised in Irs 1994 Campaign to "Camp
out on the steps of the State Legislature' for ECU in 994
Yet after his ejection he tried to drastically cut ECU'S budget
two years n a row.
The first cut Mdenige proposed would "ave e Tirated s x;y
two faculty and staff positons.
Why7 Eecause he was offended over a safe sex ad ran in
The rAST CAROLINIAN.
Adencge -acked cuts graduate fellowships and teaching
ass start s'ps and a tuticn hike in 1995
It's time for ECU Students and Faculty and Supporters to
send a clear message on Nov. 5TH
VOTE
TUESDAY NOV. 5TH
PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO ELECT CHARLES WARD
Need a ride to the polls on ELECTION DAY?
Call 551-6900
I
- "mmmi0&maBH
t �� V'





V
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Handy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Crlstle Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Dill Dillard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatlcy, Electronics Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday.The East Carolinian
welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to
edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Election 996
gi
ftw.Crfcle,
Helms is still the best choice
Editor's note: These two columns are the final ones in the
series of political issues columns. TECs goal has been to
give the student body information relevant to today's
elections. Go out and vote today.
Well, the verdict is in! Right here
on our campus a very controversial
question has been answered. This ques-
tion has led to much controversy in
political and marketing arenas. There
have been thousands upon thousands
of dollars spent to prove or disprove the
answers to this question. The question:
Does Harvey Gantt support same sex
marriages? The verdict Harvey Gantt
does not support same sex marriage.
In his own words, "If you are asking me
if I would vote for same sex marriages
the answer is no Also he stated "mar-
riage is an act between a man and a
woman When asked why he believed
that way, he stated, "Because of my
culture, I wasn't raised that way
So this is good. Finally, I agree
with a candidate from the Democratic
party. Now it befalls me as a writer to
write against this man that, just today,
I heard speak and shook his nand. You
know what I am not going to. I am just
going to make some vital points about
Mr. Gantt and Mr. Helms.
Now we all know that Jesse Helms
is not the patron saint of education.
However he is not evil incarnate either.
In fact in 1990 he authored a bill that if
passed would have blocked a $25 mil-
lion pay off to a liberal fringe lobby.
This money was taken out of a $200
million proposal to fund adult literacy
programs that was proposed under then
President Bush's vision 2000 program.
Jesse wouldn't allow the $25 million pay
off and blocked it
Helms is anything but tactful. He
is extreme, unpolished, and at times
rude, but you know where he stands.
Contrary to popular belief Helms has
done some very' productive things. For
instance, he authored s 1357, a bill
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
You may love
htm or hate
him, but Jesse
will do what
he says
which made it law to allow .seniors to
choose their own doctors under Medi-
care. This bill passed and had great bi-
partisan support in fact there was
only one vote difference between the
number of Democrats (40) and the num-
ber of Republicans (39). He even joined
with ultra-liberal Diane Feinstein from
California in a 1995 resolution on for-
eign policy. Helms is afraid of none, it
seems. One resolution he authored in
1995 would have taken control of re-
search for medical funding away from
Congress and given it to individuals in
those business.
Character seems to be the lost is-
sue in this election. However, if you
call character standing up for what you
believe, Jesse Helms has a lot of it You
may love him or hate him but Jesse will
do what he says. This election has seen
millions of dollars in negative advertise-
ments against Republican candidates.
One of the biggest contributors was the
AFLCIO. Even they recognize Jesse's
character. Chris Scott director of N.Cs
AFLCIO says, "He is willing to stand
up and say 'screw you not only to the
other party, but to leaders of his own
party
Jesse doesn't care to sling mud.
Unless you have been under a rock, you
have saw the many advertisements on
television about Helms and Gantt One
thing that makes me particularly angry
is the Medicare issue. REPUBLICANS
HAVE NOT VOTED TO DECREASE
MEDICARE! They have, however,
voted for smaller increases than the
Democrats have proposed. Smaller in-
creases doesn't mean cutting. Really,
this has been my main contention with
the left for a while now, Why must they
continually try to scare people into vot-
ing for them?
Quite frankly, if Harvey Gantt
would do everything that he told us he
would do in his speech on Tuesday, I
would vote for him. He preached in-
creasing Pell grants, and making stu-
dent loans more accessible. He spoke
of hard work and dedication and was
quite inspiring.
He said that he did not support
same sex marriages. Wait didn't he say
that "I can offer no objections to same
sex marriage?" Well yes, but he prob-
ably will keep these other campaign
promises and not flip flop like he did
on this issue, right Sure, I mean Demo-
crats have a fine record on keeping their
promises like Bill Clinton on taxes, well
bad example. Well maybe like Al Gore's
stance on pro-life, I forgot he changed
that after he was nominated V.P. Clinton
said he would have the highest ethics
of any president and he well, going on.
Harvey Gantt's stance on gay marriage
oh, yeah, that's changed too. However
there is no reason to think that Demo-
crats won't do what they say. Just that
they don't usually do what they say.
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
Call 551-6900, and
you will have a van
pick you up, allow you
to vote, and give you a
ride back to your
residence hall.
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
Lack of spirit, not problem
To the Editor,
Once again I have taken it upon
myself to respond to an argument
made in TEC. This time, however, I
would like to show my support rather
than my disapproval. I have to say that
1 greatly appreciate Patrick Ware's ar-
ticle (Oct 31) in which he addresses
the state of "apathy" in this country.
I have been involved in politics
for severa years, but 1 have not yet
cast a vote for anyone. I have found
much truth to Mr. Ware's statement
that there is no such thing as an hon-
est politician. During my years as a
Republican, I have always supported
issues, not people. Our political rep-
resentatives are either too outdated
in their mode of thinking or too cor-
rupt and caught in the system to be
of any use. I throw up my hands in
despair at the shoddy state of our
"great" nation.
I agree with Mr. Ware that the
problems in this country result not
from a lack of spirit, but from the
present inability to alter this political
system that we are used to.
So again, I thank Mr. Ware for his
article, which speaks art not against
politics in general, but against the so-
ciety which employs them-a society
based on pretense and false promises.
Sprint S. Kelligrath
Sophomore
Undeclared major
Apathy equals ignorance
To the Editor,
I am appalled at the column
"Don't Rock The Vote written by
Patrick Ware in Thursday's edition of
TEC. I can't believe the attitude that
he expresses as to why he doesn't vote.
It is the epitome of the ignorance that
abounds among many citizens in this
country. Why should he assume that
a candidate isn't worthy of his vote if
they do not come to his door to tell
him why he should vote for them? Has
it ever occurred to Mr. Ware that a
candidate shouldn't have to go doer
to door to beg for people to vote? A
candidate should be able to depend
on the citizens of this country to up-
hold their civic duty and American
right, and vote on election day, al-
though not necessarily for them.
I also do not understand Mr.
Ware's attitude towards MTV's effort
to get people to the polls on election
day. Certainly we do not all agree on
MTV and their image as it is por-
trayed in society, but the truth re-
mains that people watch MTV, and
whether we like it or not, MTV is an
icon in our society. 1 applaud MTV's
efforts to get out the vote. I hardly
think that any bus that is hopped on
as a result of an effort to support our
constitution and our American rights
is "stupid
It is not important whether MTV
cares if we vote or not, if their ef-
forts are financially motivated, as I'm
sure they are. It is a matter of what
our responsibilities and duties are as
citizens of this great nation. I won-
der if he didn't have the right to vote,
would he be the one fighting for the
right to voice his opinion about who
runs this country?
Knowing Mr. Ware as I do, I am
shocked that he views his priviledge
of living in a democracy as something
of a spectator sport. 1 question why
he doesn't focus as much importance
on this issue as he does the other
issues that he has so passionately ex-
pressed in his columns. If Mr. Ware
cannot support any of the candidates
running for office, for whatever rea-
son, then maybe he should consider
how the issues affect him and his fu-
ture, and cast his vote in support of
an issue and not a candidate. At least
then he would have a right to voice
his opinion on whether a candidate
was worthy of his vote.
Ashley Ratliff
ECU graduate
Here's the day that I've been waiting for, and for
many of you, it's the day that you've been dreading.
"Oh God, is someone gonna, like, call me and
bother me today?"
"I don't have the time to vote
"What does my vote matter?"
"I don't like either candidate
I can just hear comments like that reverberating
throughout the ECU campus. What I'm telling you is
that there is no excuse for you not to vote. For those
of you that don't want to be "bothered" or say you
don't have the time, answer me this question. Do you
have 10 minutes out of your day to do something that
thousands of people have died for? That's right, it only
takes 10 minutes. Ten minutes to do something that
isn't only your privilege, but your duty.
I can also hear freshman students and other dorm
residents saying that it's too much trouble to drive to
the polls. Absolutely not. Listen to me, all you have to
do is call 551-6900. Did you hear me? Call 551-6900,
and you will have a van pick you up, allow you to vote,
and give you a ride back to your residence hall. These
vans will be driving up and down the hill, throughout
central campus. All you have to do is wave your arms
in the air, and it will take you to your poll. Of course,
you can drive there on your own, too, but don't forget
to take a friend. Call your friends, needle your neigh-
bors, and bug your roommates. Make sure that they
go out and vote.
I've made my suggestions to you. I think that stu-
dents do not want financial aid cut, want their school
improved, and want to get a job when they graduate.
With that in mind, on the state level. I urge you to
vote 'W for Ward and Warren. That's Senator Ed
Warren, someone who has been there for ECU. ensur-
ing that we get our medical school, our new library,
and yes, our right to play NCSU and UNC here in
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. The other 'W is Charles Ward,
State House candidate who wants to defeat Henry
Aldridge, the guy who sacked ECU's budget two years
in a row and said that "women who are raped can-
not get pregnant Even Republicans agree that he's
way too extreme.
In the Senate race, I obviously endorse Harvey
Gantt. You may have heard the guy last week, and his
positive message of better education, hope, growth
and opportunity. The race is said to be a statistical
dead heat. Folks, if we go out and vote, we can send
Jesse Helms home after 24 years. It can happen, and it
will happen, if we go out and vote. Just imagine North
Carolina without the lingering embarrassment of Jesse
Helms, and imagine how optimistic we'll feel as Sena-
tor Gantt heads off to Washington to fight for us!
Presidentially, is there really any question? It's
not that Senator Dole is old, but his ideas are old.
He is a good man, but he is from a time gone by. We
must keep going forward, and it is under President
Clinton, and our brilliant Governor Jim Hunt that we
will succeed in doing that
For the first time, we have a woman running for
County Commissioner, Mrs. Edith Warren. You can
elect a true friend of ECU to the U.S. Congress,
George Parrott, and send that puppet, Walter Jones
home!
Friends, the bottom line is that you need to vote.
Please, take 10 minutes out of your day today, and
no matter who you vote for, please do it.
I've enjoyed writing these columns with my
friend, Steve Higdon. Thank you for reading them.
It's been fun. If I was wrong, and Senator Helms won,
then you are going to see the most disappointed opin-
ion columnist in the world. If he lost, then there's a
keg party at my house tonight-See you there!
everyday as the 4th of Jul
Democrats look at
everyday as April 15th.
Today is the day that America will choose its next Presi-
dent With this election, America will also make a decision
against two ideologies. However, the vision of this decision has
been intentionally blurred by Bill Clinton. 1 say this because Bill
Clinton has methodically crafted and image of himself as a mod-
erate almost a conservative, over the last year. President Clinton,
as well as most liberals, know that they cannot be reelected if
they appear too liberal. If you do not believe this assumption,
look at the policies of Bill Clinton before the 1994 election. He
was simply too liberal and because of it the Republicans won
their largest victory in over 40 years.
Bill Clinton rightly took the blame for the smashing defeat
of the Democrats in 1994. This election was not so much a
rejection of the Democrats and acceptance of the Republicans
as it was a referendum on Bill Clinton's blatantly liberal near
socialistic policies. Realizing an immanent defeat in 19, Clinton
has changed, at least that is what he wants you to think. From
1994 until now the President has took a hard turn right He has
convinced the populace that he is a moderate. Still he leaves
room for speculation. With the signing of the welfare reform
bill, he made the statement that they could change it later.
What else will he change when there is no election to win?
Bill Clinton is the chameleon of presidents. He is a pollster,
a man that changes his stated opinion with each new poll. It is
doubtful that his true opinion has changed though. In 1993 he
fought for gay rights in the military; there was a tremendous
political backlash. Today he says he against same sex marriage.
He denounced President Bush for raising taxes then did the
same himself. He called Bush's policy of retiring Haitian immi-
grants inhumane then issued an order stating the policy remain
the same. He said he wouldn't have $5,000 a plate fund-raisers
so he has$10,000 a plate fund-raisers. He even sells visits to the
White House for upwards of100.000. He talks tough on
drugs but admits to using them himself. Even when his wife is
seen posing with a drug dealer and it is proven that the drug
dealer donated $20,000 to his campaign no one seems to care.
Only after the initiation of legal action did the Democratic Na-
tional Committee release campaign funding information.
The Clinton administration has had ethical and legal prob-
lems that would make Richa'd Nixon hide his face in shame. At
any other time in American history this man would have been
defeated by a sound margin. Still he enjoys a broad lead over
the morally solid Dole. The reasons are clear Bill Clinton is
much more likable and charismatic than Dole. The primary
reason however is that this President has successfully stolen
many conservative ideals and is using them to his advantage.
This is deception of the worst kind.
The ironic thing is that many of his so called accomplish-
ments were actually work of the Republican Congress. At the
Democratic Convention he took credit for nearly all the initia-
tives that were passed in the "Contract with America This
congress has been painfully misrepresented. The Republican-
controlled Congress did not cut Medicare, or school lunches
they voted for smaller increases. What the congress did do was
raise our Pell grants and give Bill Clinton line item veto power.
This legislation should show which party has the country at
heart Through twelve years of Republican administrations, the
Democrats refused to allow the line item veto. This congress
gave Clinton that power because it is good for the country.
We should go out and vote Republican today if for no other
reason than the fact that the Democrats believe that we are so
ignorant that we can not manage our own income. Republicans
want you to keep what you earn. Really, aside from character
one of the basic differences is this. Republicans look at every day
as the 4th of Jury. Democrats look at everyday as April 15th No
matter your affiliation you should go vote today. People have
died for us to have this most sacred of all right? of citizenship.
People like Bob Dole fought so that we could have this privilege.
The least we can do is to make the effort to get out and let our
voice be heard. Remember, when you vote, the party that has
made positive changes in this decade and remember the party
whose President jumped on the bandwagon.
I





agmr"
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The East Carolinian
I B BPBP1
cutct eviecv
Shag and Everything
filled Attic last week
if
Jtavce levieon
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
movie reviews legend
see a matinee
see It fcr free
? pay full price J rent It en vldec &k run away
Romeo & Juliet gives
Shakespeare new style
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The highly anticipated contem-
porary update of William
Shakespeares Romeo & Juliet has
finally hit theaters, and the critical
reaction seems to be split. While
many view this '90s translation of
the classic play as a shameful
bastardization of Shakespeare's
work, others see it as a dazzling
piece of vision and style. I am of the
latter group.
Whenever one even attempts to
do Shakespeare, the stakes are im-
mediately raised because everyone
has certain expectations on how
Shakespeare can and should be
done. Within the last few years, Ken-
neth Branagh has established him-
plf as an accomplished thespian
through his faithful film adaptations
of such Shakespearean plays as
Henry Fand Much Ado About Noth-
ing.
Romeo and Juliet does stay
faithful to Shakespeare's text (or at
least most of it), but it dares to be
There is nothing more use-
less than screaming at a wall-
It's just spittle and bricks, bricks
and spittle. However, if you put
enough voices together, that
wall might just be blown over.
So join in another futile at-
tempt to change the status quo
and listen to a "Scream at the
Wall
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Being the day that it is, I'd
like to say a little bit about voting
in this country. We as Americans
are a very privileged group in that
we have the right to put who we
want in office. Or do we?
At the national level, we have
a little something called the elec-
toral college which allows the
populace of the United States to
vote for who will occupy the of-
fice of president and vice-president
This long-lasting tradition
first began at a time when there
was no electricity, and conse-
quently no network of global com-
munication. No popular vote could
be taken because there was no way
to quickly, safely, and honestly
gather a concensus opinion from
the entire nation.
In addition to the complica-
tions that a concensus vote pre-
sented. the government also had
See WALL page 7
Photo Courtesy of 20th Century Fox
Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes play the leading roles
in a new version of "the most popular love story of all time
different by placing Shakespeare's
language within a modern setting.
Fair Verona is now the cluttered and
chaotic Verona Beach in Miami.
Here, the sword has been replaced
with the gun, Shakespeare's chorus
has been transformed into a news
anchor on television, and the war-
ring families of our "star-crossed
lovers" have taken on the guise of
the mafia. In truth, the
Shakespearean stage has become a
military zone where police helicop-
ters constantly hover above in a des-
perate attempt to keep the peace.
The man responsible for this
'90s take on "the most popular love
story of all time" is Australian di-
rector Baz Luhrmann (who also co
wrote the screenplay with Craig
Pearce). Luhrmann's decision to not
do a straightforward take on the
play seems natural and justified
since so many other filmmakers are
trying to capture Shakespeare on
film as he was meant to be. (Very
soon, Branagh will release a four-
hour adaptation of Hamlet, which
is supposed to be one of the most
faithful and complete film versions
See R&J page 7
'Twas a good week for the Attic.
It all started off on Tuesday night
when funk musicians Shag took the
stage. With a seven member band and
an array of funk and jazz tunes, the
band showed sheer confidence.
Although the crowd was small,
the band jammed out all night. Don't
forget, this is the band that Bootsy
Collins, formerly of Parliament
Funkadelic, produces. From the vo-
calist who looked like Paul Stanley
and Lenny Kravitz at the same time
(minus the guitar) to the hard-to-see
Oasis keyboard player, every member
in their own way had an undefinably
unique stage presence.
Shag proved to be one of the
most entertaining acts I have seen
in a long time. You can tell that they
draw big crowds in their hometown.
I'd love to see them here again, with
a bigger crowd of course.
By the end of the week, the At-
tic had once again packed the house.
The night was Saturday, the band was
Everything. It was the most impres-
sive show they have done at the At-
tic in a long time.
The band, led by Craig
Honeycutt (vocalist extroadanaire),
was tighter than ever. One thing I
did notice was the band's ability to
accent their material much differently
than what you might hear on a disc.
I don't know about you. but when I
see a live show I don't want to hear
the CD played for me. This band has
never sounded the same way twice.
Everything is a very intense band and
the members interact so closely that
they seem like family.
As the night wore on, 1 noticed
how much enterprise this band is
gaining. From stickers to websites to
T-shirts, the band has it all. People
really could relate to che band's
sound. They come out every night
and put on a great show, going on at
eleven and off at two.
The best thing about all of this
is having a venue with the right
equipment and atmosphere to enjoy.

2W lectteca
Byzantium takes on epic proportions
John Davis
Staff Writer
Nobody writes epics anymore.
There are some very good reasons
for this, one being that most people
don't read serious poetry. If you
could get to the heart of what an
epic is - a continent-spanning ad-
venture rooted in actual historical
events - and write one in prose,
then you might come up with some-
thing like Byzantium.
Written by Stephen Lawhead, a
respected Celtic scholar and fantasy
writer. Byzantium delves into new
territory for Lawhead: that of his-
torical fiction. While his retelling of
the Arthurian myth borders on be-
ing historical fiction (he left out all
of the sorcery and the knights in
shining armor and portrayed Arthur
and Merlin as king and priest of a
powerful Welsh kingdom, which is
very close to the historical account
of Arthur), this new novel is the real
thing. Lawhead has, at least for the
moment, left the Otherworld for this
world.
Historical fiction can get bor-
ing or cliched. especially fiction
about the Medieval period. This is
mostly because the average writer
has no idea how vastly different the
Medieval world view was. The writ-
ers of this type of prose also seem
to want to fill the pages of their
books up with magic and witches
and the like. Lawhead is above all
of this, and he understands what he
is writing about, which gives him an
edge.
The story cen-
ters around Aidan,
an Irish monk at
the monastery of
Kelis. Aidan is cho-
sen to participate in
a pilgrimage to
Byzantium, to de-
liver the Book of
Kells to the Em-
peror Basil. (The
Book of Kells is a
collection of illumi-
nated Scripture
verses. Completed
by the Irish monks
at Kells, lona, and
Lindisfarne, it is
considered by
scholars to be the
penultimate
achievement in
Celtic art.) The pil-
grimage also has a
hidden agenda, in-
volving monks from
Britain and Caul.
The pilgrimage
gets waylaid, and
Aidan's adventures
begin with an encounter with the
Danish Sea Wolves. Thrust into the
affairs of kings and emperors. Aidan
is forced to put his faith to the test,
and he becomes disillusioned. He
carries around with him the burden
of a vision he has seen: a vision of
his own death. Separated from his
friends. Aidan must come to terms
with his loss of faith and somehow
get the Book to the Emperor.
One of the best things about
Lawhead's treatment of this story
is that while he is fictionalizing the
account, he remains true to the
mindset of the times. He also main-
tains a sense of humor, something
hard to do in a work that could be
so "serious (Four Danish warships
attempt to invade Constantinople,
for example.)
While the Pendragon Cycle is
probably Lawhead's first major
work, Byzantium is definitely his
best to date. His storytelling skills
have vastly improved, and his char-
See BOOK page 6
Photos Courtesy of The Attic
The always popular band Everything (above) and Shag
(below), the new protoges of P-Funkmeister Bootsy Collins,
visited Greenville's own hot nightspot ,the Attic, lact week.
Luckily for Greenville, the Attic has
been around for some time. It started
25 years ago and has held some of
the most entertaining acts imagin-
able. From the Supremes to Hootie
and the Blowfish, the Attic provides
a sense of entertainment that some-
how fits into every Emerald Citizen's
life.
The bands Shag and Everything
don't quite relate at all, but at the
same time they're just alike. They
dance and they play. They laugh and
they scream. It's a place where you
find who you really are. It's a place in
every one of our homes. It's the At-
tic, a place where we can go just to
get away. Relax, and enjoy the scene.
Turn those blah winter
blues into spring fever
(AP)-Have you spent the win-
ter as a couch potato? Do you need
help turning your winter blues into
spring fever? If you are one of the
many Americans who feel lethargic,
fatigued and an overall desire to hi-
bernate in the cold weather
months, you may need an extra
boost to give you the spring spirit.
You are certainly not alone. Ac-
cording to researchers at the State
University of New York (SUNY) at
Stony Brook, between 10 and 33
percent of Americans suffer to some
degree from a problem called Sea-
sonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or
winter sadness.
Studies conducted by research-
ers of chronobiology (the study of
biological rhythms) show that
people's moods are directly influ-
enced by seasonal changes and that
some people become sluggish and
down in the dumps as the winter
days get shorter. Though evidence
points to hormonal changes (since
women are four times as suscep-
tible as men to this problem, ac-
cording to a study conducted by the
American Psychological
Associaton). it's not totally clear
why the human body reacts this
way. But some theorize that there's
a correlation between humans and
animals as far as their winter hi-
bernation instincts go.
The good news is that there are
very simple ways to beat the winter
blahs and jump into spring. Whether
you have hibernation symptoms or
just want an extra edge, the follow-
ing tips can help get you energized,
feeling healthy and in the mood to
make the most of any season.
� Light Up Your Life - If you
don't have the patience to wait for
mother nature to finally end the
short days of winter, it's time to fool
her. Bright-light therapy or
phototherapy is often used to treat
people with more serious cases of
SAD. But anyone can benefit. Expos
ing yourself to bright fluorescent or
incandescent light for two sittings
equaling 30 to 60 minutes a day can
trick your body into thinking the
days are longer. Many people report
feeling better within three or four
days.
� Avoid Energy Busters - Many
foods can actually drain your body's
energy and make you feel lethargic.
Dairy and wheat are the primary cul-
prits. Dairy products contain tryp-
tophan, a natural sedative, and milk
and wheat are both highly aller-
genic. Fatigue, often accompanied
by depression, is a typical allergic
response.
Sugar and caffeine are also
likely offenders. The initial rush of
energy produced by sugar is typi-
cally followed by a drop in blood
sugar, which can make you feel tired.
Coffee and other foods contain-
ing caffeine, such as soft drinks,
tea and chocolate, can actually
make you more anxious and ir-
ritable, disturb your sleep pat-
terns and overstimulate you to
the point of greater exhaustion.
In addition, sugar and caffeine
deplete B-complex vitamins,
which help convert food into en-
See FEVER page 6






Tuesday, November 5, 1996
The East Carolinian
Lady Liberty soon wearing a thong? book f��, P.g��
(AP)-Most Americans have
heard of the Goodyear Blimp. But
what about McYellowstone National
"Park, or perhaps "The Grand Can-
yon Brought To You By Bob's Back-
"hoes"? Believe it or not, such spon-
sorship may soon be common.
Congress is considering and, by
the time you read this, may have
passed legislation that would allow
corporations to sponsor the Na-
tional Park System for marketing
purposes. This commercialization
"of our parks is a symptom of their
troubles.
The parks need over $8 billion
ox campground and road repairs,
wildlife protection, law enforce-
jnent. and fireside chats. This prob-
lem exists because Congress has re-
peatedly shortchanged the National
'Park Service and now we need to
pay up. The national parks need
money, but some believe that cor-
porate sponsorship amounts to sell-
' ing the parks' souls.
In the past, many private citi-
zens and corporations have made
donations without expecting to
T'pwn a piece of the parks in return.
i
THIU1H
flnwn
Answers to Thursday's trivia
questions.
1. Terror in Haunted House
was filmed in PsychoRama - a me-
yj. dium that sent subliminal mes-
sages to the brain, causing you
to cringe in fear and not know
why. For this, the film was banned
for 20 years.
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial,
the nation's most popular memo-
rial, was built entirely with private
donations. The Statue of Liberty-
was refurbished by private funds.
The Washington Monument is
about to be repaired with the help
of $1 million from one retailer. In
early 1996, the Georgia Pacific
Corp. donated $184,500 for na-
tional park repairs and improve-
ments.
None of these donors expected
to own the very spirit of our na-
tional treasures in exchange for
their generosity. We should con-
tinue to encourage private citizens
and corporations to support the
parks out of simple generosity, not
thinly veiled greed. And we must
continue to remind our elected of-
ficials that the parks deserve their
support.
Even the most optimistic sup-
porters of corporate sponsorship
admit that selling the national park
system's image would pay for less
than two percent of the national
parks' needs. And if Congress acts
according to its usual pattern, it
will then cut park funding by an
equal amount and the parks will
gain nothing.
Before we find the Statue of
Liberty sporting a thong bikini and
Mount Rushmore's heads of state
donning designer sunglasses, we
should carefully consider the con-
sequences of our actions.
To learn more about the
threats facing our parks and what
you can do to fight them, contact
the National Parks and Conserva-
tion Association. For a free guide
to planning a park visit, call 1-800-
NAT-PARKore-mail
POPNPCA@aol.com, or write
POP3, NPCA. 1776 Massachusetts
Ave NW, Washington. D.C. 20036.
FE V ER. from page 5
ergy.
� Energizing Supplements-If
you are among the many people who
don't always eat a balanced diet,
there are several dietary supple-
ments that can give you an extra
boost. For instance, supplements
that include the major B-complex vi-
tamins and are also high in antioxi-
dants - particularly vitamins C, E
and beta carotene are effective. Vi-
tamin B12 is especially critical for
boosting energy and for DNA pro-
duction. It also helps prevent ane-
mia, which can decrease the oxygen
levels to the brain. A common food
supplement recommended by many
physicians is desiccated liver, which
furnishes B12 and iron, among a
host of other nutrients essential to
generating more energy and
stamina.
acterization and style are superb.
His command of the English lan-
guage borders on the poetic at
times, and he writes with a delight-
fully Medieval voice.
Aidan is an ideal hero; not since
Umberto Eco's The Name of the
Rose has a monk been such a dra-
matic and heroic figure. Lawhead
writes this adventure story without
resorting to the common cliches of
other adventure stories, and along
the way he presents a very concise
and delving look at the issue of lost
faith.
In Byzantium. Lawhead has
surpassed himself and written a
powerful work of fiction. Without
alienating his fans. Lawhead has
shifted into new territory and
opened himself up to the possibil-
ity of a much larger audience.
Byzantium is a well written piece
of art, intriguing to the mind of the
scholar, probing to the soul of the
faithful, and entertaining to read.
Mot Available on E-mail, CD ROM, or
the World Wide Web
2. In Peter Jackson's Dead
Alive, it was the Rat-Monkey that
caused the world to go haywire.
3. In the film Horror Hotel,
witchcraft professor Christopher
Lee sent one of his students to
the Raven's Inn, which was run
by a never-dying witch named
Elizabeth.
C-CAeCeve A weilA el AU.le�4&-
Accessibility Awareness
Obstacle Course
November 5 and November 6
Mendehall TV Lounge
7:00pm - 9:00pm
naMJX BLM
Thursday, November 7
Friday, November 8
Saturday, November 9
Thirsty Thursday' Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fountain Drink
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Start
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbogs Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
1996
aeW $�vX r-itjj tclf
nov. 26 - nov. 30
cost per person
$145 quad occupancy
$160 triple occupancy
$200 twin occupancy
$310 single occupancy
Call the student union
at 328-4715
to reserve your seat
on a bus to the
big city! 11
Sign up deadline
is nov. 12
The question of whether or not we ire
alone in the universe has been answered.
WH� Mi
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23 8PM
WILLIAMS ARENAMINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 IN ADVANCE FOR STUMNTSFACUTYSTAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1 MO 328-2787 OR 328 4788
MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED
Western Opera Theater
The
Barber of Seville!
Everybody sing Fig-a-ro, Fig-
a-ro, Fig-a-ro.
i(hn'jRi�Smii.
liTVl'i'iilm
swity
ft &'
. isp i i i i mi vn.d
VAI'li VI TOUR
Thursday, November 7,1996
8 pjoa. Wright Auditorium
S. Rudolph Alexander
IVi forming Arts Series
Minltnl I i SI5 ill ;i�l;iiur �ilh .1 ;iliil ICl' 11).
Ml li V�t al flic floor.
Ii .in . i . 111. i h I :il i Ik-(Mli.il liiki-tH'I'ut in
Mtn.l.iiliiill Stud.nl Center. J28-478S
(Jue.�dau
COLLEGE NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $

The Student Union Is Always Looking For New Members!
Come by Room 236 To Pick Up An Application.
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www. ecu. eduStut!entUnionTHEHOMEPAGE . html
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Courtesy of
Tuesday November 5
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
AT&T
Pick Up Free Passes at
Mendenhail Into Desk
& ECU Student Store
Presented Py
The Student Union - Films
Committee
J
ill� MW III





�-i ��.mmiia0tiimifo
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The Department of Health Promotion and Well Being along with
The Wellness Education Foundation presents
Stress Management Seminars:
7cd t4e SeaM
fitovembehere will be a series of seminars which
deal with STRESS. These seminars will feature expert
in the field of alleviating STRESS. All seminars will be
held in the General Classroom Building (Room 1031).
The following are a list of dates and times
of each seminar:
6,1996
tofcOOpm
(GC8I031
November 13,1996
5:00pm to 6:00pm
GCB 1031
November 20,1996
5:00pm to 6:00pm
GCB 1031
Methods of alleviating Mental STRES5.
Guest Speaker: Dr.WO! Ball
Counseling Center
Alleviating STRESS for life
Guest Speaker: Dr. Rob McCarthy from
McCarthy Family
Chiropractic
STRESSBUSTERS: Techniques to unwind.
Guest Speakers: Katie Chenoweth
Comfort Zone.
We encourage everyone to
come and listen to these
experts speak about STRESS
We GUARANTEE it will
make a difference in
your life
3&
RcXj from page 5
of the play ever done.)
Luhrtrann's take on
Shakespeare is more in line with
Francis Ford Coppola's conception
of Bram Stoker's Dracula or Ken-
neth Branagh's vision of Mary
Shelly's Frankenstein. Like those
films. Luhrmann's creation is a re-
visionist take of a classic text. Since
we already know the story of Romeo
& Juliet, the presentation of the
story is what interests us. and it's
Luhrmann's presentation that is ei-
ther going to have audiences prais-
ing this film or laughing at it.
Predictably enough, critics are
already calling Luhrmann's film the
MTV version of Shakespeare, and to
a large extent they are not wrong.
Luhrmann's visual style is filled with
quick edits, flashing photography,
and hip-hop sounds from contempo-
rary musical acts. The characters
even speak with American accents.
But, ironically enough, it works.
Only occasionally do the slick direc-
We're bringing Christmas a month early! We're
going to literally empty our prize vault which is full
of CD's, T-shirts, concert tickets, coupons for area
restaurants and tickets to the ECUNC State Game!
It's WZMB's "CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER and it
begins this Friday! Tune-in and win all this month
from East Carolina's alternative for 15 years!
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
V
� XITTIC
Dance Night
only S2 adm
for members
Ladies Free
Admission
Until 11 p m.
$1 Bottle Beer
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
� 752-7303
Adv. Tix locatfcnt
East Coast
music
Skully's
Wash Pub
Attic
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th yea in
downtown
Greenville
Tuesday
70 A and 80' Dance tfatty.
Ladies free till 11pm!
Bottled
Beer
f
'Hall of Fame'
Wednesday
PINKARD &
BOWDEN
2 Shows
Doors open at 7 & 10pm
John Boy & Billy Network
SpMWfcnt
MARKRUBBEN
Ventriloquist
torial choices distract from the over-
all feel of the film - a scene featur-
ing Pete Postlethwaite, who plays
Father Laurence, superimposed on
a blue screen effect is more goofy
than grand. Despite a few distract-
ing slips. Luhrmann's quirky, dis-
jointed style (which he used to out-
standing effect in the Australian hit
Strictly Ballroom) is so engrossing
and exciting that hopefully teenag-
ers will develop a renewed interest
in what Shakespeare has to offer.
Still, Luhrmann does not sim-
ply rely on his pulsating visuals to
carry the film. He knows when to
pull back and allow his actors to do
their job.
Overall, the cast is wonderful,
but not in the traditional manner.
John Leguizamo's trigger happy
Tybalt and Harold Perrineau's cross-
dressing Mercutio both stand out as
hateful enemies of one another; Paul
Sorvino, though a background fig-
ure through much of the film, is a
menacing threat as Juliet's father;
and Postlethwaite effectively human-
izes Father Laurence, a religious
man who desperately attempts to
help our fated lovers.
That brings us to the central
players in this production -
Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire
Danes, two of the most photogenic
and talented young actors working
in film today. Both are naturals for
their respective roles, although it
does take DiCaprio a little longer to
settle into the Shakespearean
tongue. However, once Romeo and
Juliet share the screen, the two ac-
tors imbue their characters with
such passion and innocent desire
that the film's dreadful conclusion
leaves a gaping sense of loss.
Films of the 90s have prided
themselves on being over-the-top, in-
your-face, don't-give-a-damn escapist
journeys. Filmmakers like Robert
Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino and
even Oliver Stone have legitimized
much of the flashy style we witness
in contemporary filmmaking.
Luhrmann, following this trend in
movies, does not shy away from go-
ing ballistic with his source.
Whether or not the public accepts
this particular production will be de-
termined within the next few weeks.
If nothing else, Luhrmann has
at least made Shakespeare hip once
again.
HLLQWCT
m? rrn ic on
TRii
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St -� aaai Hours:
Pittman Building ra uuu: Monday - I
Greenville, NC
8:00-4:00
WALL from page 5
certain prejudices against the voting
public
It was commonly felt amongst our
elected officials that the average white
man (remember only white men voted)
was too ignorant to make a thought-
ful and insightful decision about the
office of the presidency. This choice
was left instead to certain enlightened
individuals who were thought to pos-
sess the required intelligence needed
for this kind of complicated decision-
making. These men were known as
the electoral college.
Granted there were certainly
problems in the past that made it im-
possible for any kind of popular vote
to be taken. 1 believe that.
What I consider to be a injust
error on the part of our government
is that they once held, and still to this
day hold, the belief that certain people
are better able to judge who should
be president than others. If this coun-
try is founded on the belief that our
government is made by the people for
the people, then wouldn't it stand to
reason that all people should be con-
sidered equal in the decision that is
made?
It's time for a change in this out-
dated, anachronistic process we have
for electing our highest officials. In
modern times, where talking to people
a world away is as simple as hitting a
button, taking a consensus vote of the
populace should be easy.
If we truly want a nation which
is controlled by the people living in
it, and that is what most Americans
believe that our country is, thin
shouldn't we make that idea a real-
ity? As you're watching election re-
sults on the tube tonight and they
tally the electoral votes for each state,
ask yourself whether your represen-
tative in the electoral college is realy
speaking for you. If not, then chanje
things so you can speak for yourself.
"Are you being served?"
.�.
.1
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
� 'J Invites You to Join Us Each Week for . m ,
A
W
Ready For A Miracle? Take A Leap of Faith!
Wednesday Night Sanity Break From Campus!
�5:30pm Student Eucharist � Campus Minister:
�Supper Provided after service Fr. Tom Cure
�ProgramConversation after supper Home 752-1583 Work 752-3482
�Add new friends to your life St. Paul's Episcopal Church �401
�Bring a friend with you! East 5th Street 752-3482
�Be a part of a faith community
Cross 5th St. in front of Garren Hall, walk down
Holly St. and you are here
Natural Life Program
Thursday
jS$r REQUEST DANCE
9k, 'l PARTY
Friday
TOO
specisl quest
eadstone Circus
Saturday Nov 23
MawJUU TiulicA &vJ
tpttitijtttt
Underfoot
(OprifeEttlfeC)
November 7 at 8:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student
Center Great Room.
Come join us for bingo games, fun, food,
and prizes with a Jimmy Buffett flavor!

is
4j
G
,
preS
3
� NATURAL"
Sponsored by Campus Dining, Housing Services & Recreational Services.
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.
j-�





��)"
Y
8
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The East Carolinian
First half surge
S PftBJRSy proves key to win
Basketball set to begin
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The ushering in of cold
weather means the ushering in of
basketball.
It may be early November, but
the ECU men's and women's bas-
ketball teams have been practicing
and scrimmaging in anticipation of
the start of the 96-97 season.
Both teams have scrimmages
this week, with the regular season
beginning Nov. 23. On that day the
men will travel to Fairfield, Conn.
to play Fairfield while the women
will head to Boone, N.C. to match
up against Appalachian State.
The first home games of the
season will be a doubleheader on
Wednesday Dec. 4.
During the annual CAA media
day, the men were ranked third and
the women fifth. This is the high-
est the men have ever been ranked
preseason.
Last season Joe Dooley led his
team to a tie for fourth place in fi-
nal conference standings with an 8-
8 record, while Anne Donovan
guided her Lady Pirates to a sev-
enth place finish, going 6-10.
Dooley said
his newcomers
will definitely see
playing time, but
at this point he
doesn't know
how much.
"The new
kids are defi-
nitely in our
plans but how
much we get out
of them espe-
cially early is
still to be seen
Dooley said.
The newcom-
e:s to this year's
squad are Neil Punt
Blackwelder,
"We're expecting the biggest
contributor to be Alico, along with
Dink and Raphael just because they
are older
Dooley said.
"Alphons, Neil
and Garrett are
all kids we fig-
ure into our
plans, but to
what extent we
don't know right
now
Returning
members of this
year's squad are
Othello Mead-
ows, Don Dou-
glas, Tony
Parham, Morris
Grooms,
"The new kids are
definitely in our
plans but how
much we get out
of them especially
early is still to be
seen
� Joe Dooley, Men's
Basketball Coach
Garrett
Raphael
Edwards,Alphons van Ierland, Dink
Peters and Alico Dunk. Dunk was
on last year's team but was red-
shirted after transferring from the
University of Tennessee.
Dooley said he will look to his
older newcomers as the biggest
contributors.
Lawrence Thomas, Tim Basham and
Jonathan Kerner.
Dooley said his veterans have
progressed nicely since last season.
"Those kids have done a great
job leading so far Dooley said.
"Timmy has been with the program
for four years and knows what to
See BALL page 9
cnn fflEDin dot PRESEnjon pou
women
OMDooiftioft
Joa Modioft
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Top- It was a cold and
wet day for the game,
as 24,000 fans braved
the weather to watch
the Pirates. Right- Larry
Shannon leaps above
his opponent in
anticipation of the ball.
Shannon ended the day
with six receptions for
138 yards, including a
35-yard touchdown
pass.
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
� Volleyball team falls at tournament
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
The ECU women's volleyball team continued to
struggle this past weekend with three losses in a tourna-
ment held at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD.
ECU opened the weekend on Nov. 1 against Navy in
which the Lady Pirates lost in four matches against a
tough Navy squad. ECU got off to a slow start in the
first game losing 6-11. The second game ECU showed
some improvement losing 11-15. The lady netters con-
tinued to rally in the third game winning 15-i3. The
team lost the fourth game 15-7. Jennifer Harris led the
Pirates in kills against Navy with 16.
The team (ECU) would only see things get worse as
the weekend continued. The lady Bucs lost to Lehigh in
three straight sets 8-15,9-15, and 11-15. Shannon Kaess
led ECU in kills against Lehigh with eight Kari Koenning
registered a team high 17 digs in ECU's losses.
ECU Head Coach Kim Walker seemed somewhat
puzzled by the team's play early on.
"I thought the team played poorly the first two
matches Walker said. "We continue to lose ball control
in the first set and that hurts us
� ECU would try to secure at least one victory in the
tournament against rival UNC-Wilmington, but the
Seahawks proved to be too strong for ECU. ECU came
out on fire against UNC-W in the first game winning 16-
14.
The flames would burn out quickly however in the
second game, as ECU lost 15-5 and would continue to
lose the final two games 15-9 and 15-6. Harris had an-
other strong match against UNC-W and recorded a team
high 13 kills. Kaess showed off her defensive talent with
19 digs, leading all scores for ECU.
ECU will face off against Colonial Athletic Confer-
ence foe James Madison on Friday Nov. 8. This is a team
that Walker thinks ECU matches up against pretty well.
"I think we can compete with them (James Madi-
son) Walker said. "They're a good team and they're
pretty consistent They don't make a lot of mistakes, but
we can play with them
The match starts at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8 at Minges. Stu-
dents are admitted free.
It was a slow start for the Pi-
rates, but a second quarter surge
gave ECU the momentum they
needed to produce a 34-16 win over
Arkansas State.
ECU had a slow first quarter
but did manage to get on the board
first with a 1-yard run from Scott
Harley. ASU came back in the first
quarter with a field goal that gave
ECU a 7-3 lead.
"We were a little bit slow get-
ting started and I tried to coach
against it as hard as I could Coach
Steve Logan said. "These weeks off
and this stop and go schedule we've
had made it a little bit difficult
The second quarter was the
turning point of the game. The In-
dians scored a touchdown to take
the lead 10-7. That's when the Pi-
rates got down to business.
Buck Collins caught a 2-yard
pass from Marcus Crandell to go up
14-10. Harley added another run-
ning touchdown four minutes later
to post an 11- point lead. Then with
51 seconds left, Larry Shannon
took a 35-yard pass to end the half
with ECU leading 28-10.
Collins has proven to be a ver-
satile member of this team, play-
ing on both sides of the ball. As far
as a preference between defense
and offense. Collins says as long as
he plays, it doesn't mater what side
he is on.
"I just want to be on the field
and help my team win Collins
said.
Toward the end of the first half.
Crandell took a hit from an ASU
defender that would sit him out for
the remainder of the game.
He suffered a medial strain in
his left knee. Logan is unsure
whether Crandell will be back for
the Virginia Tech game. Crandell
said he and Logan have discussed
whether he will be back and said a
decision won't be made until Sat-
urday.
"That's what we're looking at
Crandell said. "It's a day-to-day
thing and we're just going to wait
and see what happens
If that is the case, then backup
Dan Gonzalez will fill his void like
he did on Saturday.
Gonzalez came in and com-
pleted nine of 18 passes for 74
yards. Logan was pleased with
Gonzalez's performance consider-
ing he hasn't recorded much play-
ing time.
"I was pleased with the way
Danny handled Logan said. "It
takes him a little while to get
warmed up. That's the first mean-
ingful experience he's had and I
thought he did well
ECU would not score another
touchdown, but in the third and
fourth quarters Chad Holcomb
booted two field goals that made it
See VICTORY page 9
Women's soccer team gears up
for CAA championship finals
Upcoming Events ��
Jon Lauterer
Staff writer
Women's basketball vs. Croatia

7 p.m.
I Men's basketball vs. Venezuelan National Team 7 p.m,
tr 1�
ft
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SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The men's and women's cross country championships were held this weekend at Lake Knsti. The ECU
men's team finished third, which is their best finish ever. Jaime Mance placed in seventh place becoming the
first ever Pirate runner to earn All-CAA honors. The women finished in seventh place with Kern Hartling
finishing 15th the best ECU women finish of the day. William & Mary won both team titles while George
Mason took the individual honors. The ECU team will have a week off before competing at the NCAA
District III meet on Nov. 16 in Greenville, S.C.
The men's soccer team split two games this weekend losing to American 0-2 and beating The Citadel o-l.
The Pirates will travel to William & Mary on today before starting play in the CAA tournament on Nov. 13.
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Tournament is just around the
corner, and the ECU women's soc-
cer team is ready to go.
Head Coach Neil Roberts is feel-
ing good about this past season. The
team is 7-11-1, and are looking to
make their mark in the conference
tournament.
"We got off to a great start this
year Roberts said. "We haven't
been very consistent though. We've
ridden the roller coaster up and
down
ECU was hoping to notch a vic-
tory against American University on
Saturday, their last regular game be-
fore the tournament, but came up
short 2-0 in Washington, D.C.
The American game was tight
all through the first half, but the
Eagles outlasted the Pirates in the
second half and came away with the
win.
The Pirates were outshot 19 to
,

four in a 90 minute span. ECU's
freshman goalkeeper Amy Horton
recorded 10 saves.
"We did a nice job of holding
them off in the
first half Rob-
erts said. "We
are just having
a hard time get-
ting quality
scoring chances
right now. We
certainly know
what we need
to work on go-
ing into the
CAA Tourney
"The tour-
nament is espe-
cially exciting
this year be-
cause the win-
ner receives an automatic bid to the
national tournament. ECU will enter
the tournament in sixth place.
"There are many freshmen who
stood out this season. To name a few:
Dana Durbin, defender; Jill Davis, de-
fender; Stacie Cause leads in scor-
�J�a
"We are just
having a hard time
getting quality
scoring chances
right now. We
certainly know
what we need to
work on going into
the CAA Tourney
� Neil Roberts, Head
Coach for Women's Soccer
ing; Karen Blake, high scorer; Sheila
Best, transfer from Brevard
For Roberts he is pleased with
the way his team has been coming
along.
"The big pic-
ture is 1 am very
pleased with the
way this team has
developed. If you
look at our final
scores, we lost five
games by only one
point
The Pirates
have had a few days
to prepare for the
start of the tourna-
ment but their op-
ponent has yet to
be determined.
ECU will match up
against either UNC-Wilmington or
the University of Richmond.
The CAA conference tournament
will begin Wednesday. Nov. 6 and
last until Sunday, Nov. 10, when a
winner will be announced.





rmm
���ii'
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 5,1996
P STRE
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Out-Of-Town?
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15 AlvL from page 8
expect. Jonathan, Morris and
Donny have all been here
Since last season was Dooley's
first as head coach, this year he be-
lieves his players have adjusted and
know the game plan better than
last year.
"It's a lot different than last
year, because now they have
played under me for a year. They've
made the adjustment; I've made the
adjustment. They'll hopefully be
the good leaders we expect them
to be
Dooley pinpointed some of his
team's weaknesses and strengths.
"Adjusting to six new kids into
the program isn't easy Dooley
said. "Early we are not going to
have much familiarity
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Trade in any out of state
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a NC college or university
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Save 10 on a
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Used shires in good condition will be donated
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BE READY TO
BEAT STATE!
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
More than just booksyour dollars support scholars!
Store Hours:
Monday-Friday:
7:30 am � 7:00 pm
Saturday:
9:00 am -3:00 pm
Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Building, just off Wright Circle
328-6731http:www.studentetores.ecu.edu
As for strengths, he pinpointed
team chemistry as an improvement.
"I think team chemistry is bet-
ter. We have hopefully addressed
some of our depth needs in recruit-
ing and familiarity. The guys are
more familiar with me and I'm a
little bit more familiar with them
As for the Lady Pirates, they
have added six new faces to the
roster: Danielle Melvin, Crissy
White. Melanie Gillem. Misty
Home, Ashanta Sellers and Nicole
Mamula. Jen Cox will be playing
this year after red shirting last year,
when she transferred from
Vanderbilt University.
Returners include Justine
Allpress, Tracey Kelley, Laurie
Ashenfelder, Shay Hayes, Beth
Jaynes and Mary Thorn. However
Hayes recently had back surgery
and is not expected to play this
season.
The Lady Pirates will be with-
out last year's three-year starting
point guard Danielle Charlesworth.
Donovan said it will be difficult to
fill the void, but she is looking at
many players to take the point.
"Coming into the season, I ex-
pect Nicole to have the forefront
but I don't know anymore
Donovan said. "Mary Thorn has
done so well in the off season.
Chrissy also has done well. Until
Nov. 23 I can't possibly tell you
The Lady Pirates will have
some added height this season. Cox
is the tallest player at 6'5 but
Donovan says they still come up
short on height.
"We're still a small team
Donovan said. "The nice thing is
Beth Jaynes grew three inches over
the summer
Donovan believes this team is
different than what she worked
with last year.
We're in a whole different po-
sition than we were this time last
year. Across the board, we have
more talented players so it makes
for practices to be much more com-
petitive
Like Dooley, Donovan said hav-
ing new players in the program
makes it difficult.
"I think weaknesses by far is
that we've got six new players in
my system, none of which have had
outstanding fundamental coach-
ing Donovan said.
She thinks the team will
struggle, but come January they
will be in synch.
"I think come January we are
going to be a good team. Until then
we are going to struggle with our
youth and inexperience
As for the starting five, accord-
ing to Donovan that is up in the
air.
"On any given day somebody
else shines. I'm anxious to see; it
though
But she said that isn't neces-
sarily a bad thing.
"It's good Donovan said.
"This is the way 1 want it to be.
You're in danger when you've got
kids who think they have a lock in
the lineup
Donovan is more comfortable
with the system this season, since
she has adjusted from being new last
year.
"A lot of times we were putting
round pegs in square holes. This
year I feel a lot better where we are
Offensively, the Lady Pirates are
looking to be more of a threat.
"We have many scoring threats
this year and last year we didn't
Kelley will have some help down
low with Cox. Donovan feels that it
will take some of the pressure off
Kelley who was the tallest member
last year at 6'0
"Tracey, I think, is going to feel
so much better at the post because
she has somebody who is taller than
she is Donovan said. "Look for
Tracey's game to grow this year be-
cause there will be less pressure on
her alone to get it done in the post
VICTORY from
page 8
34-10. ASU got onto the board one
more time with a touchdown, but
the two point attempt came up
short and the Pirates recorded their
fifth win of the season, 34-16.
The Pirates' streak of not al-
lowing an opponent to score in the
fourth quarter ended with this
game. ECU has outscored their op-
ponents this season 64-6 in the
fourth quarter.
Linebacker B.J. Crane was dis-
appointed to see the streak end.
"We were really upset about
that score in the fourth quarter
Crane said. "We take great pride in
not allowing the other team to
score, and that hurts, but we won
and you have to be excited about a
win
Harley put in another fine per-
formance with 144. yards on the
ground, which leaves him 10 yards
short of 1000 yards for the season,
with four games left.
Harley is delighted about his
performance but said he isn't juct
performing for himself.
"I'm happy Harley said. "I
want to get it for the offensive line-
men because they go through so
much stuff and I want them to feel
good about themselves
Logan knows what kind of a
alone
player he has in Harley.
"The kid has got a great set of
eyes and he's got a tremendous
amount of strength in his lower
body Logan said. "He has taken
those two attributes and made him-
self into one of the better runners
statistically
The Pirates will prepare for the
25th ranked Hokies of Virginia Tech
on Saturday in Blacksburg, Va. With
a win, the 26th ranked Pirates could
move into the AP Top 25.
The game has been moved to 7
p.m. and will be televised live on
ESPN 2. This is the third nationally
televised game for the Pirates.
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10
Tuesday, November 5,1996
The East Carolinian
cms
EHbl
For Rent
j
TAKE OVER MY LEASE. From Dec. 15
until May. One bedroom apartment, 2
blocks from center of campus. $275.00 a
month (furnished) Call Caren 757-3704.
WANTED: ROOMMATE FOR DEC. 1.
Block from campus, two blocks from
downtown. Spacious 3 bedroom with
washerdryer. $150 deposit and $225 rent
Call Michelle 757-9310.
HUGE 5 BR DUPLEX close to campus
and downtown. Pets and smokers wel-
come. Two roommates needed malefe-
male. Call 413-0957 ask for Holly or Mer-
edith.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central
ACHeat WD. Dishwasher. Only $242 a
month and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999.
Available now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share three bedroom duplex. Furnished.
Responsible, clean, 12 utilities, cable.
$250.00 rent, $200.00 deposit Call 754-
8202.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT. 2 or 3 bed
room, 2 12 baths, fully equipped kitch-
en, WD hookups, central heat and air
and patio. Nice neighborhood. Safe envi-
ronment Call today! Chandra 752-0687.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse
at Twin Oaks. 1 12 miles from campus,
ECU bus route, very spacious, low utili-
ties. Call Cara 754-2942.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-
7613. Very Affordable!
ONE ROOM AVAILABLE IN two bed
room house on Summit Street (Next to
Jarvis) $225month and half utilities. No
lease. Deposit and pets are negotiable.
Call Eric at 758-2294 or EricBe-
van@ecu.campus.mci.net
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and
utilities 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very
Affordable.
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
PRESENTATION OF THIS COUPON
NOT VALID WITH ANY
OTHER SPECIALS
EXPIRES MJO-
Choice ol a TV, VCR or a CD Player with
i a on year lease at Wesley Commons I
J North with presentation of this coupon. J
Not valid with any other specials.
Bases n-30-96
I and 2 Bedroom Range, Refridgerator.Washer, j
I Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units, i
j Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5 j
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER, CABLE
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
f�mfttmm "Pmfdk
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, 5
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED 8
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
IW A BROWNLEA DRIVE
7S�-I92I
Other
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants
and scholarships available from spon-
sors! No repayments, ever! SSS Cash for
college $$$� For info: 1-800-400-0209.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6
Billion in public and private sector grants
& scholarships is now available. All stud-
ents are eligible. Let us help. For more
info, call: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
MR. MORTON, Buy Clifford a doll. He
won't know the difference. Hope your
Truth or Dare skills have improved. Oh.
how's the revolution? Mr. Wiggly.
Announcements
ADMIRE VOLUPTUOUS, RUBE-
NESQUE, MAJESTIC, INCOMPAR-
ABLE African-American women? Then or-
der photographic images of Gorgeous full-
figured African-American women model-
ing exotic lingerie! All material is non-por-
nographic and free of nudity. Write: Afri-
can-American Multi-Media Productions.
P.O. Box 28051. Raleigh. NC 27611-8051;
Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E-
mail:amp3@ix.netcom.com A free catalog
is available upon request! Check out our
web site at http:www.best.com
amp3 You must be 18 years of age to
order.
MARILYN MANSON TICKET FOR sale
November 9 at the Ritz.18.50. Call Jaime
at 328-3382.
ACOUSTIC YAMAHA GUITAR. MODEL
FC-401. $200.00 Call Suzanne, 328-8010.
MT. BIKE FOR SALE. 96 Specialized
Hard Rock Ultra. Immaculate condition.
Asking $300 or B.O. Paid $500.752-2221
ask for Frankie.
THOLE SKI RACKS FOR sale with bike
attachment Almost new. Call 830-3764.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural & Dr. recommended. A healthier
you through cellular nutrition. 30 Day
money-back guarantee. Call now 756-
1188.
BOCA 14.4 MODEM internal. Creat for
Internet and E-Mail. $50o.b.o. 757-7795,
ask for Brad.
FOR SALE AKC REGISTERED ROT-
TWEILER puppies. Two big males left
Ready to go today. Great temperament and
bloodline on both Dam and Sir. $400. Call
Patrick at 931-0993.
FOR SALE: 40 GALLON snake set-up.
Will discuss price on phone. Call 758-9120.
'91 RED FORD PROBE CL wsun roof.
Good condition $5500.00. Call 756-9404,
ask for Sarah.
1?
Help
Wanted
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
seek fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
with the fashionsaccessories you love to
wear. Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure,
and Young Men's. Flexible schedules for
the "early birds" (10am-2pm) or "night
owls" (12pm-9pm or 6pm-9pm). All re-
tail positions include weekends. Merchan-
diseclothing discount offered. Applica-
tions accepted each Monday and Tuesday,
1-5 pm, Brody's, The Plaza and Carolina
East Mall.
INVESTORS AND ENTREPRENEURS
wanted. New company starting with large
potential profits. Minimum investment
$550.00. 100 return plus vacations.
Serious inquiries only. Phone 752-9610.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry
level & career positions available world-
wide (Hawaii, Mexico. Caribbean, etc.).
Waitstaff, housekeepers, SCUBA dive lead-
ers, fitness counselors, and more. Call Re-
sort Employment Services 1-206-971-3600
ext R53625.
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MULTI-MEDIA
PRODUCTIONS is now recruiting full-fig-
ured African-American women to model
exotic lingerie during photographic ses-
sions. All work is non-pornographic and
free of nudity. Earn up to100 per hour!
You must be at least 21 years of age to
apply. Call 1-919-321-8218,1-800-921-3855
or e-mail amp3@ix.netcom.com.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT COUN-
TY Memorial is seeking qualified individ-
uals to teach aerobics classes through its
Employee Recreation and Weliness De-
partment. Persons will contract to teach
on a part-time basis. Interested candidates
should contact Gilian Tyndall between 8
am - 4:30 pm at (919)- 816-5590.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53628.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EX-
TRA cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Midwest
Distributors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting for 12-16
part-time youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge of the
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people ages
7-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 pm to 7 pm with some night
and weekend coaching. This program will
run from the end of November to mid-Feb-
ruary. Salary rates start at $4.75hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550 after
2 pm.
THE JOCKEY CLUB, GREENVILLE'S
premier private club and catering facility,
is now hiring experienced line cooks and
banquet staff. Applications accepted Mon-
days through Fridays, 9am - 5pm or call
for an appointment 830-8900.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT needed at
The East Carolinian. Come in, fill out an
application and talk to Celeste. Mac com-
puter experience a must!
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive room &
boardother benefits. For info, call: (206)
971-3680 ext. K53624.
SI750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING
our circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
PART TIME JOBS AVAILABLE. Joans
Fashions has positions for students who
will remain in the area during Thanksgiv-
ing and Christmas breaks. The positions
are not limited to the holiday period and
can be for 7 to 20 hours per week. Indi-
viduals must be available for Saturday
work. The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are flex-
ible. Pay is commensurate with your ex-
perience and job performance and is
supplemented by an employee discount.
Apply in person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions, 423 S. Evans Street. Greenville
(on the Downtown Mall).
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
em
In search of a job after graduation?
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Seniors in
Good Academic Standing
Looking for a High Quality Self Motivated Individual
Must be a success orientated individual with sparkle
Coachable and Spirited
SJ17 COMMERCE STREET f� 9) X
$F Services
x Offered
SPANISH TUTORING AVAILABLE.
ECU Spams! major graduate. Call Eliza-
beth 754-8007.
LICENSED NAIL TECH makes house
calls: Student prices - tips with acrylic
$25 fill ins $15. Flexible hours. Call
Dana for your next appointment.
75207445.
Other
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 6 month old
black Lab puppy. All shots, collar and
leash included. Call 413-0353 anytime and
leave message.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM will meet
on Wednesday, Nov. 6th. in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room 208, at 8 pm. Open
to the general public, the Forum is a free
workshop. Those planning to attend and
wanting critical feedback on their work
should bring 8 or 10 copes of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
FURNITURE MUST GO! WATERBED,
dresser and night table all must go quick
and for cheap. $50 for all of it! Will nego-
tiate, too. Call 758-9672.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-2224
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Personals
MER P. - HAPPY BIRTHDAY. Thank you
for making Halloween Spooky Spook a
success. Who you are makes a difference!
Your friend in Fletcher - CLP.

Greek
Personals
STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA ASSO- by Nov.
CIATION OF EDUCATORS meeting on 6387
Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 4:30 pm in Speight
308. Sue Branch will be giving tips on
finding a job, interviewing, and other re-
lated topics. Everyone is invited to attend!
BUFFETT BINGO - Play bingo, win priz-
es, and have fun with us on November 7
at 8 pm in Mendenhall Great Room. Rec
Services, 328-6387.
ECU LAW SOCIETY: OUR meeting is
open to all majors and will be held Tues-
day. Nov. 5 at 5:15 pm in Ragsdale, room
218A. Stop by to pick up your fundrais-
ing information and hear an interesting
guest speaker. Refreshments will be
served.
ALL INTENDED EXSS MAJORS mass
advising meeting. Monday. Nov. 4 and
Tuesday, Nov. 5 at 7:30 pm in Ward Sports
Medicine Building. Get your folders from
Sandy in the EXSS office first. (Prior to 5
pm)
AKA BOOK SCHOLARSHIP: THE The
ta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc. will award a $200 book schol-
arship for the best essay entitled "What is
the most challenging problem facing our
generation and what can you do to help
change it?" Essays should be 2 typed pag-
es and double-spaced and should be post-
marked by November 30. All applicants
will be required to show proof of Spring
'97 enrollment. Essays should be mailed
to : Alpha Kappa Alpha. P.O. Box 2886,
Greenville. NC 27858.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
STUDENTS Advising: Early registration
for spring semesters will be Thursday, Nov.
7 from 5:30 - 7:30 in room 203 of the Belk
Building. Other advising hours will be
posted in the department
THE ECU COMPUTER CLUB is holding
its annual organizational meeting, Mon-
day Nov. 11, 1996 34 pm in Austin 320.
If you have an interest in computers, come
out and join us.
TUES, NOV. 5 - Senior Recital, Karrie
Brown, voice. AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 6
pm; Wed, Nov. 6 - Senior Recital, Mary
McKinley.voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7pm; Fri, Nov. 8 - Jazz Ensemble A Car-
roll V. Dashiell Jr Director, Wright Audi-
torium, 8pm; Sat, Nov. 9 - Senior Recital
Timothy Christian Weaver, percussion, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm; Sat, Nov. 9 -
Combined ECU Choirs and Orchestera:
Poulenc's Gloria. Rhonda Fleming, con-
ductor. East Carolina Symphony Orches-
tra, concert production of final act of Bi-
zet's Carmen, Stephen Blackwelder, con-
ductor, Wright Auditorium. 8 pm.
INTRODUCTION TO MAP & compass
Learn all about maps and compass read-
ing on November 12 at 7:00 pm in the
Recreational Outdoor Center. Register by
Nov. 8 in 204 Christenbury. Rec Ser-
vices.328-6387.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS: ALL Gen
eral College students who intend to ma-
jor in the Department of Communication
Sciences and Disorders and have Mr. Ro-
bert Muzzarelli or Mrs. Meta Downes as
their advisor are to meet on Wednesday,
November 6 at 5:00 pm in Brewster C-
103. Advising for early registration will
take place at that time. Please prepare a
tentative class schedule before the meet-
ing. Freshmen, bring Taking Charge, Your
Academic Planner, and use the worksheets
to develop your schedule.
BOWLING SINGLES - get your bowling
shirt out! Register in 204 Christenbury
J
DELTA SIGMA PHI WOULD like to con
gratulate A-team soccer and B-team bas-
ketball on their wins this week.
CONGRATULATIONS TO: RAYSHAUN
DEANS, Vaughn Monroe, Dwight Henry,
Kareem Atkinson, Christia Ray and Chris
McKenny, the new brothers of the Xi Nu
Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma.
PI LAMBDA PHI WOULD like to thank
all the contributors who donated money
to the Cardboard Village.
TO DELTA ZETA SISTERS and New
Members: Thanks for all of your support
last week, especially with the Spaghetti
Dinner. We couldn't have done it without
you! love, Tabi and Monica.
PI LAMBDA PHI WOULD like to thank
our alumni for all the support that was
given this past weekend. The tailgate was
a great success and everyone at the Brig
was pretty much a mess.
DELTA SIGMA PHI WOULD like to
thank Neil Terrell and Tracy Mauer for
being our 1996 Homecoming representa-
tives. Good luck. The Bros.
THE SISTERS OF DELTA Zeta would
like to thank Paul Martinez of Delta Chi
and the Phi Kappa Psi Pledges for all of
your help with our Spaghetti Dinner. You
guys are awesome! Love, the Sisters and
New Members of Delta Zeta.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12, 1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
tudent Swap Shop
w
7 at 5:00 pm. Rec Services, 328-
THE MONTHLY MEETING OF the Adult
Student Association will be held on Thurs-
day, November 7,1996 at 4:00 pm in GCB
1010. Election of officers for 96-97 will
be held. AH adult students are invited to
attend.
PILOT MOUNTAIN CLIMBING WEE-
KEND - Come climbing and camping with
us on November 16-17. Interested individ-
uals must register in 204 Christenbury by
November 8. Rec Services.328-6387.
RESUME WRITING WORKSHOPS: The
Career Services staff will hold a workshop
on developing a professional resume and
cover letter on Tue Nov. 12 at 2:00 pm
and Wed Nov. 20 at 4:00 pm. Tips on
writing "computer friendly" (scannable
and faxable) resumes will be included. This
workshop will be held in the Career Serv-
ices Building, 701 E. Fifth Street No reg-
istration is required.
TURKEY TROT - join us for a cross coun-
try run on November 13. Register in 204
Christenbury by November 12 at 5:00 pm.
Rec Service.328-6387
ORIENTATION TO CAREER SERVIC-
ES: Seniors and graduate students grad-
uating in December 1996 or May Sum-
mer 1997 are encouraged to register with
the Career Services Office by attending
one of the following Orientation meetings:
Tues Nov. 5 - 2 pm or Wed Nov. 13 - 4
pm. This overview includes procedures for
employment interviews on campus, re-
sume referral service and establishing a
credentials file with Career Services.
FREE AQUA FITNESS CLASS on No-
vember 12 at 4 pm in Christenbury Pool.
Rec Services, 328-6387.
SAM WILL BE HAVING an information
session on internships this week. Two com-
panies will be at the meeting answering
all questions. The meeting will be on Tues-
day, Nov. 5 in GCB 1028 at 3:30 pm. Food
and refreshments will be served after the
meeting.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB WILL hold its
next meeting on Thursday, Nov. 7 in GCB
1028. Featured guest will be Dr. Joe Kie-
ly. Planning for your financial future, with
an emphasis on Mutual Funds is sched-
uled. Also, a discussion of 40IK plans
should be included. All faculty and stud-
ents invited. Pizza and drinks served at
4:40pm.
B.A. COMMUNICATION MAJORS
ONLY - The Department of Communica-
tion is interested in having a departmen-
tal graduation for ail seniors graduating
in December of '96. All students who are
interested should contact Sean O'Brien
at 830-0850.
BOOK SALE! BOOK SALE! By the
Friends of the Library (Joyner). Wednes-
day, Nov. 6, 9am - 8 pm and Thursday,
Nov. 7, 9am - 5 pm in Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP:
THIS is the season for recruiters to visit
ECU to interview prospective graduates
for employment! Learn how to prepare,
package and present your product - Your-
self - in this important interview. This
workshop includes questions you may be
asked, questions you may ask, interview
attire, and how to follow-up for positive
results. Sponsored by Career Services, the
workshops are scheduled for .Ved Nov.
6 at 4:00 pm and Mon Nov. 11 at 3:00
pm in the Career Services BuiHing, 701
E. Fifth Street
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.
-�





Title
The East Carolinian, November 5, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 05, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1172
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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