The East Carolinian, October 31, 1996






THlJi$j�
October 31,1996 ;
Vol 72, No. 20
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
20 pases
University prepares for Homecoming '96
Across The State
GREENVILLE. N.C. (AP) - Do-
nations by foreign governments
and large corporations to a foun-
dation bearing U.S. Sen. Jesse
Helms' name may have been meant
to curry political favor. Democratic
rival Harvey Gantt says.
The governments of Taiwan
and Kuwait donated $325,000 dol-
lars to the Jesse Helms Center � a
private institution dedicated to
honoring Helms' career, The Wash-
ington Post reported Saturday.
SMITHFIELD, N.C. (AP) -
Trial has begun for a teen-ager ac-
cused of killing his father and
wounding his stepmother one day
after moving into their home.
According to testimony,
Stinnett told his stepmother he
found his new home too quiet and
said he wanted to return to his
mother's home in Virginia. His step-
mother. Maggie Stinnett urged him
to take some time to adjust, but
that night, he knocked on the oor
of this father and stepmother's bed-
room, called them to the door and
started shooting.
Across The Country
WASHINGTON (AP) - You've
heard cigarettes cause cancer and
heart disease but don't think that's
the only danger. Impotence, blind-
ness, stomach ulcers - the list goes
on for 180 pages in the new book
Cigarettes: What the Warning
Label Doesn't Tell You
So now they're debating how
scary the label should be. as a law-
maker begins writing federal legis-
lation that could strengthen the
warning for the first time in 12
years.
TULSA, Okla. (AP) - About
2,900 people have received shots
to ward off hepatitis A after eating
at a Shoney's Restaurant earlier
this month where an assistant
kitchen manager was infected with
the disease.
Health officials said Tuesday
they expect to administer the im-
mune globulin to as many as 2,100
more patrons who ate at the Tulsa
restaurant between Oct. 15 and
Oct 21.
Around The World
BEIJING (AP) - Wang Dan,
one of China's best-known dissi-
dents and a leader of the 1989
Tiananmen pro-democracy protests,
was convicted Wednesday of trying
to overthrow the government.
Wang. 27. was sentenced to 11
year's imprisonment for "conspir-
ing to subvert the Chinese govern-
ment the state-run Xinhua News
Agency said in a brief statement
TOKYO (AP) - A doomsday
cult leader was sentenced to three
years in prison today for his role in
producing the nerve gas that killed
12 and sickened thousands in a
Tokyo subway attack.
Etsuro Ikeda was convicted by
the Tokyo court of welding pipes
used in the construction of the
nerve gas plant at the cult's com-
pound in central Japan.
Events planned for
pirates of all ages
Jacqueline D. Keilum
Senior Writer
The Homecoming football
game won't be played until Satur-
day, but Homecoming activities
have already begun and will con-
tinue throughout this week, culmi-
nating with the football game as
the grand finale.
Amber Huffman, chair of the
Student Homecoming Committee,
said that planning foi this year's
Homecoming events started back in
January, when she first began or-
ganizing this year's committee.
"There are 12 people in the
Homecoming committee, including
the advisor and the chair Huffman
said. "The people that are chosen
for the Homecoming committee are
chosen through the representative
organizations
The first official Homecoming
event was conducted last week,
when the Homecoming Court was
voted on by students. Huffman said
she was pleased with both the voter
turnout�approximately 850 voted-
and with the resulting court.
"I'm really pleased with the
court this year. We have a wide va-
riety. We have some older students,
some younger students. We have a
representative of races, so I was re-
ally excited Huffman said.
The first event of this week will
be meant not for the ECU students,
but for children 14 and under. Rep-
resentatives from each ECU sport
will go out to Carolina East Mall
on Tuesday night and sign auto-
graphs. The first 100 kids will re-
See HOME page 5
ECU, Greenville police gear up for Halloween
Hope to keep
order during
annual downtown
tradition
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Expecting students to continue
the tradition of gathering downtown
on Halloween, police plan to main-
tain their safety while they celebrate.
Major Joe Simonowich agrees
that as long as things go as well as
they went last year, there won't be a
problem.
"Last year, things went excel-
lent Simonowich said. "There were
no arrests made and no property
damage
This good behavior by the
people might have been mostly due
to the small crowd. Officers are still
prepared to take action in accordance
to the turnout size.
"Should the crowd grow to
where they have to get out on the
street we will make a decision to
block off the street Simonowich
said.
Even though no one is sure as
to the what the size of the crowd will
be, Simonowich says that he does not
see the safety of the public as being
a major problem.
To ensure this safety,
Simonowich said that extra precau-
tions will be taken.
"One hundred and twenty police
officers will be on dut during Hal-
loween Simonowich said.
Also, Simonowich said that the
rumors about officers being on the
roofs of buildings are true.
"Police officers will be watching
from on top of buildings
Simonowich said.
Not unlike any other night down-
town, there will be regulations that
the crowd must abide by.
"There will be no open contain-
ers on the streets Simonowich said.
"All alcohol should be consumed in
nightclubs and bars
Although the police are doing
all they can to secure everyone's
safety, each individual must help by
making good judgment and not put-
ting one's self into a dangerous situ-
ation.
"Everyone should be sure to go
downtown in groups Simonowich
said. "If you are wearing a costume,
make sure you can see out of the cos-
tume
The suggestions and rules made
are not to discourage people from
coming downtown, but just to make
sure that everything stays under con-
trol. Simonowich encourages stu-
dents to participate in the festivities,
but to act in accordance with the sys-
tem.
"I welcome the students to come
downtown to celebrate and have a
good time Simonowich said, "but
while doing so, not violate the law
Gantt presents challenge to Helms
Gantt questions
donations in press
conference
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
Harvey Gantt called for incum-
bent Jesse Helms to disclose the
source of over $3 million in contri-
butions to the Jesse Helms Center
in a press conference on campus
Tuesday.
Immediately following a rally i.i
front of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, Gantt cited information re-
leased by The Washington Post
Saturday which stated that the
Helms Center Foundation received
$325,000 in contributions from for-
eign governments. Identified dona-
tions included $100,000 from the
government of Kuwait in 1991 and
$225,000 from the government of
Taiwan. Contributions from Taiwan
were given to the Helms Center
Foundation while Senator Helms
presided as chairman of the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Committee.
The Washington Post said that
while the Foundation refused to
release any sources, the paper iden-
tified that corporations such as R.
J. Reynolds, Phillip Morris and
Milliken and Co. donated
$1,785,000. Approximately $3 mil-
lion in donations were left without
identifiable sources.
"I challenge Senator Helms to-
day to disclose who these people
are Gantt said. "I want him to dis-
close to the people of North Caro-
lina and the country where this
money is coming from
While Gantt said the identified
contributions to the Helms Center
Foundation are not illegal, he ques-
tioned Heims' ethics by suggesting
the senator could not effectively
serve the people of N.C. if he owed
favors to governments and corpo-
rations.
"Senator Helms is in Washing-
ton doing the bidding for some
other folks Gantt said. "We are
See PRESS page 5
Technology fair
ends successfully
Presentations give glimpse into future
Carnival promotes parental involvement
Program stresses
early intervention
for children
Jacqueline D. Keilum
Senior Writer
The Remedial Education Activ-
ity Project (REAP) sponsored a car-
nival for their students and fami-
lies on Tuesday evening, Oct. 29.
This event was intended to encour-
age parents to take an active part
in their children's education.
"We're trying to promote pa-
rental involvement and family in-
volvement, and a lot of things that
we have planned are carnival games
by Dr. James Taylor's (our
director's) Perspectives in Mental
Retardation graduate level class
pre-school teacher Marisa Roach
said.
In an interview before the
event occurred. Roach explained
the purpose of REAP.
"We're a developmental pre-
school. We're sponsored by the
School of Education and the spe-
cial education department. We get
a lot of our children through Pitt
County school referrals, and we're
helping with early intervention
type services�pre-school readiness,
kindergarten readiness, skills like
that Roach said.
The REAP program is staffed
by full-time teachers and also
Photo by ELIZABETH DUNCAN
Two inquirers look on as a host explains a program at one
of 27 booths displayed at the technology fair.
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
The Technology Fair, sponsored by Academic Computing and
Microcomputing services, was held Tuesday in the Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter-Multipurpose Room from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. The people who were able
to stop by got a chance to experience a variety of new technology through
this successful fair.
Among the 27 booths, there were many interesting things such as in-
formation about Web technology, teaching courses on-line, virtual reality.
Co-op resumes on the World Wide Web. and a new e-mail system for ECU
faculty and staff.
Photo Courtesyy of alskdjlaskdjf
REAP student Trabian Spellman receives a face painting
from Wendy Alexander while his mother, Shannon Lynch,
stands by.
serves as a teaching tool for stu-
dents who are majoring in related
fields. They also use volunteers
when they are available.
"We have a lot of praticum stu-
dents, we have a lot of volunteers.
Any volunteers are more than wel-
come Roach said.
In addition to the staff of the
pre-school, the graduate students
that Roach mentioned were instru-
mental in making this event hap-
pen.
"The graduate students in Dr.
James Taylor's class are responsible
for activities. We're going to have
a hot pumpkin game, like hot po-
tato. We're going to have a bean
bag toss, we have cutout pictures.
We have face painting to get into
the carnival atmosphere, and that's
pretty much what we've got
planned Roach said.
This is the first time that REAP
has held this carnival, and all the
staff were hoping for good results.
"This is our first annual. That's
why we're excited about it, because
we've gotten a lot of support from
our staff as well as the parents
Roach said.
After the event concluded,
See READ page 5
t
We have put our
Co-op students
resumes on-line
at the Internet
� Carol Collins, math
department and Cooperative
Education
graduate assis-
display of vir-
grams. One of
sign program
design three-di-
ronments.
students in
complete se-
projects in a
this booth's
was also on dis-
the State Fair.
Earl Lewis, a
tant, showed a
tual reaiity pro-
these was a de-
that allows one to
mensional envi-
This could help
high school to
mester long
matter of weeks.
This was not
first showing. It
play last week at
Lewis said that a lot of ECU students came by. along with many others.
.As far as the technology as a whole. Lewis says that this type of presen-
tation can help bring more people up-to-date in this field.
"I think it is good that they are showing this technology Lewis said.
"The interest that is being shown today will help the program grow and then
help bring this kind of technology into the classroom quicker
At another booth. Caro' Collins, of the math department and Coopera-
tive Education, was disp.aying how to get your resume on the Web. and all
the advantages of it Collins showed how easy it was to publicize your
resume, but still keep your privacy by going through the university.
"We have put our co-op students resumes on-line at the Internet said
Collins said. "Any employer around the world, if they are looking for a coop
See TECH page 6
HFfcye
rfftdtde
15
91.3 praised by Lifestyle's staffpage
Will the Student Recreation Center ever open?page
SPORT$kwKu6t
Head for The End Zonepage I y
?&ieca4t
Thursday
Sunny
High 68
Low 49
Weekend
Sunny
High 55
Low 47
to 1&ZC& u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
� � afluapM





inursaay, uctooer s, ivvo
The East Carolinian
Student runs for state house
October 24
First Degree Trespassing - A non-student of Elm City was arrested
for first degree trespassing in White Hall. Two other non-students were
banned from campus for the violation.
Damage to Property - A student reported the convertible top on
her vehicle, parked in the Fourth and Reade Street lot. had been cut.
Explosion - An officer reported an explosion occurred in a campfire
at the Fletcher Amphitheater during a social. There were no injuries.
Apparently, there was an air or water pocket in the concrete, under the
fire, which exploded when heated.
October 25
Disruptive Student - An officer reported that a student was creat-
ing a disturbance on the mall. The student was upset over what a man
was preaching on the mall. The student was asked to leave the area.
Intimidation - A resident of Scott Hall reported that he was threat-
ened by several members of an organization of which he is a member.
October 27
Auto Larceny - A non-student reported the larceny of her vehicle
from west of Greene Hall, where she had parked it on October 26 at
12:10 a.m. The vehicle was recovered in Georgia by the State Police.
October 28
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of the license plate from
her vehicle parked in the upper lot at Minges.
Breaking and Entering Larceny - A resident of Jones Hall re-
ported the breaking and entering of his mailbox and the larceny of his
mail in Jones Hall. Other mailboxes had been broken into in Jones Hall.
October 29
Larceny - A faculty member reported the larceny of a figurine from
his office at the Brody Building.
Unauthorized Use of Conveyance - A contractor on campus re-
ported that an employee borrowed the company truck and did not return
it to the job site. The contractor drew warrants on the employee for unau-
thorized use of a conveyance.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Call for changes
to benefit younger
generation
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
ji��nninniii in hiumiiwi n
An ECU business managment
major, running for N.C. House dis-
trict nine, offers voters a new ap-
proach by calling for changes and
appealing to his generation.
Johnny Rouse, 25. a registered
Libertarian, supports philosophies
of the party which he said are based
on the founding fathers' ideals for
this country.
The Libertarian party is based
on the founding fathers' ideas that
the least government is best Rouse
said. "Social programs should be
promoted rather than provided by
the government. The Libertarian
party supports legislature which
gives money back to people to in-
vest in the community in the ways
they choose, therefore, giving power
back to the people
Rouse, who is a native of
Greene County, attended ECU for
one year in 1989. before enlisting
in the Air Force. During his four
years in the military. Rouse received
training in meteorology. Rouse is
married and has a nine-month-old
son. While currently attending ECU.
he works for the Department of
Corrections as a correctional officer.
"I work full-time and go to
school full-timeRouse said. "I've
been running an information cam-
paign on the issues
Running a self-proclaimed
grass-roots campaign, Rouse said he
spreads his message by word of
mouth.
Rouse supports choice in edu-
cation and wants to give vouchers
to parents so they can send their
children to the school of their
choice.
"We need to know how many
parents would take advantage of the
vouchers and leave public schools
Rouse said. "Parents should be re-
quired to give at least a one year
notice to give the schools the chance
to reorganize. The major advantage
of this is that parents can send their
children to schools which support
the same things they do when it
comes to issues, such as school
prayer
Rouse also supports the legal-
ization of industrial hemp. Rouse
said the plant, which is currently
grown in England and France, can
be used to make fabric, rope, paper
and paint. Rouse acknowledges that
while industrial hemp is in its in-
fancy, he foresees it as being an im-
portant crop to farmers in eastern
North Carolina.
"With tobacco farmers coming
under heat from the federal govern-
ment, they will need to look towards
other crops Rouse said
Rouse said he is opposed to
Affirmative Action because he be-
lieves it creates more racial tensions
than it resolves.
"I think each individual should
be hired regardless of race or sex
Rouse said. "I think it causes more
resentment and increases race rela-
tions problems
Rouse said his opponents, who
include Republican incumbent M.W.
"Henry" Aldridge and challenger
Democrat Charles S. Ward, are part
of an endless struggle between
Democrats and Republicans which
results in excessive legislature which
citizens pay for.
"Each party is splitting the
American people Rouse said. "The
Republicans and Democrats want to school and has a science education
build their own programs without Rouse said that Ward's support
compromising. There may be cuts in of both government funded abor-
the short tions an cuts in
2 Cookies 4
2 Brownies
2 Bucks V
OFFER GOOD ONLY ON SUNDAYS
Jt a 10"
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0n We now lot
11
'???
WOMEN WHO ARE RAPED.
WHO ARE TRULY RAPED THE
JUICES DON'T FLOW AND
THEY DON'T GET PREGNANT
Said Henry Alderidge your State House Representative
The Daily Rettectcr. April 22. 1995
Henry A dericge Prom sed in his 1994 Campaign to 'Camp
out on the steps of the State Legislature' 'or ECU 2?94
Yet at:er his �lec:icn he tried to drastically cut ECU'S budget
two years n a row.
The first cut Alderidge proposes would 'ave e rrinated s x:y
two faculty and staff posit ons.
Why7 Because he was offended over a sa'e sex ad ran in
The rAST CAROLINIAN.
A der coe :a:kea cuts graduate fellowships and teaching
assstant s-ps and aturticn hike in 1995
It's time for ECU Students and Faculty and Supporters to
send a clear message on Nov. 5TH
VOTE
TUESDAY NOV. 5TH
PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO ELECT CHARLES ttARD
Need a ride to the polls on ELECTION DAY?
Call 551-6900
term, but the
programs just
keep adding
up. The X gen-
eration will
have to pay
for these pro-
grams
Rouse
said there are
problems
with both his
opponents.
" H e
(Aldridge)
doesn't pro-
mote the gen-
eral welfare
Rouse said.
H e
I Aldridge) said if a woman gets preg-
nant while she's being raped she
wasn't really raped. This is coming
from a man who's been to dental
"With Tobacco
farmers coming
under heat from
the federal
government, they
will need to look
towards other
crops
� Johnny Rouse, registered
Libertarian
A.F.D.C. (Aid for
Dependant Chil-
dren) are contradic-
tory policies.
"Together,
these legislations
are going to force
poor women to use
state-funded abor-
tions as a means of
birth control
Rouse said.
Rouse said he
answers people who
question his qualifi-
cations by citing his
experience in the
military.
"I've traveled
around the world
with the Air Force and I'm a self edu-
cated person Rouse said. "I plan
to give as much power as possible
back to the people
Electrical
Card Readers
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Vice-President
Electrical License
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ilt�il
m
Oet 31 llenrJenUil SttfJenl Center
ECU Students admitted with ID. Students may bring one guest. Guest
passes are available beginning October 28 from Community Service
Desks from 8:00am-Midnight and the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am-
6 00pm On October 31, guest passes may be picked up at Community
Service Desks until 9 pm and the Central Ticket Office until 6:00pm All
events are free.





l.if�tWw� m ���" m �� �?� m�mm-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 31,1996
Peking Palace
Restaurant
LUNCH SPECIALS $4.25
LUNCH
Mon-Fri 11:00-2:30
DINNER
Won - Thurs - 5:00 - 9:30
Sat - All Day
Sun - All Day
Take out orders available!
(including one egg roll
and fried rice)
Sorority steps hard to
claim third trophy
Presidental campaign
enters final week
to discount ;or dinner on
weekdays and Sunday -All day
Must have current Student IDs
The ladies of Sigma Gamma Rho,
Inc. traveled to Western Carolina re-
cently and received first place at
Stompfest '96.
Western Carolina University
hosts the annual gathering of black
Greeks who wish to display.their tal-
ent of "stepping" and being creative.
Stepping is a combination of rhyth-
mic dance and choreography unique
to ethnic Greek organizations.
"It's all about uplifting the name
of your sorority or fraternity said
Gwen Crisp, a member of ECU's Eta
Mu chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho.
Crisp said it took over three
months to put their winning routine
together and the trip to Western Caro-
lina took 16 hours in its entirety.
"It takes a lot of hard work and
dedication, but it's somethhig (wej
don't mind because it uplifts the name
Happy
wauo-Wwc!
2nd Annual
' We warned our Buffalo! We told him that
creepy, crawly, scary things lurked in the
'dark. But, Oh no! He knew it all! Just look
I at him now. But that won't stop us from
offering you a goulish delight!

BtCYCtC
Check out
the great
selection at
CLOSE OUT
PRICES!
Cannondale
Sctiwinn
Trek
Gary Fisher
G.T.
store Hours
10-6 Mon-Sat
1-6 Sunday
(Arlington store only)
g
Visit
our
(Inside
Bicycle Post,
Downtown)

12 price
Kelty � Birkenstock � Vasque � NorthSace � Mountain Smith
215 E. Arlington Blvd. Bicycle Pont 75B-3301
530 Cotanche Street Bicycle Pont 757-3B1B
Outpost 757-0713
of (our sorority. I don't care whether
it's eight miles or 800 miles. I will do
whatever it takes for my sorority and
sorors Crisp said.
According to Crisp, it is a com-
mon belief that black Greeks from
predominately white universities can-
not step well. This group of ladies
proved otherwise on several occa-
sions.
The Eta Mu chapter won first
place at a competition at ECU last
Spring and first place at a competi-
tion at Bennet College. Their win at
Western Carolina earned a trophy and
$1,000. The group is scheduled to step
again Friday, Nov. 1 at NC A&T State
University.
Members of the Sigma Gamma
Rho Step Team are Gwen Crisp, Tanya
White, Marquieta Taylor, Selina
Coleman, Twala Sauls, Christine
Greco, Latisha Tabron, Cassandra
Davis, Wanda Daniels, Jessica Mabry
and Nicole Melvin, with special help
from Stacy Hargrove, Lykisha McKoy
Darrell Armstead.
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECK
1 1 4 EAST FIFTH STREET � 758 - 9 1 9 1
Candidates work
to boost, maintain
standings
WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-
dent Clinton is spending more than
$1 million a day on television ads
in the campaign's final week as he
tries to block any path to a Bob
Dole comeback and Rut several tra-
ditional GOP strongholds in the
Democratic column.
With the luxury of a lead,
Clinton has a campaign schedule
that reaches through the final
weekend and included stops today
in Michigan, Colorado and Arizona.
Dole was campaigning in Tennes-
see. Louisiana and Florida today
and scrambling to settle on a sched-
ule beyond that.
inaeea, tne uoie campaign ana
other Republican sources painted
a picture of strategic chaos as the
GOP nominee searched for a for-
mula to overcome Clinton's lop-
sided lead in the Electoral College.
While Dole at every stop pre-
dicts a dramatic comeback, aides
and associates said Dole was under
no illusions about his standing but
was determined to make it a com-
petitive race and help Republicans
in congressional contests.
One senior aide in Washington
said Dole had taken a heavy hand
in scheduling, repeatedly asking for
more polling information as he
looked for states where Clinton's
lead was shaky.
"Something is happening
across America Dole said Tuesday
evening in Colorado, a battle-
ground state where Clinton holds
a narrow lead. "The people are be-
ginning to focus
Clinton, at a Washington fund-
raiser Tuesday night that was
dubbed a "victory" concert, asked
a youthful audience of supporters
and contributors to keep pushing
hard right until Election Day next
Tuesday.
"I ask you to give, I ask you to
give seven more days of your effort,
your voice, your commitment and
your passion the president said,
arousing a chorus of cheers.
Clinton's script called for him
to piay it saie ana spena much oi
the final week focusing on educa-
tion, an issue that Democratic poll-
ing shows has powerful appeal to
independent voters and on which
Clinton and fellow Democrats en-
joy an advantage over Republicans.
On Tuesday, Clinton recom-
mended the establishment of 3,000
charter schools, which operate
without many of the constraints im-
posed by local public school dis-
tricts.
See CAMPAIGN page 5
Graduation Announcements
Each announcement js:
� Emblazoned with Gold School Seal
� Comes with free matching envelopes
� Printed in 7-IO days
� Personuzed with
YOUR NAME and DEGREE
Available at
516 S. Of jnchr Snwi D�m Mtwn GrccmiHr
Order Until Nov. 13th
CaO 758616
Only $19.99
for 25
and 751 each
For Additional
Announcements
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
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Thursday, October 31,1996
The East Carolinian
Gore accused of convient hearing loss
Press says VP to
resemble Reagan
WASHINGTON (AP) - Al Gore has
developed a handy hearing problem late
in the campaign. Shout a question and
it just doesn't reach him. Before reports
surfaced of shady money in the Demo-
cratic campaign, he was all ears.
The vice president's Reagan-like
device for avoiding uncomfortable issues
is only the most literal example of ques-
tions getting lost in the wind this elec-
tion.
When the dust settles after Tues-
day, the country will be scarcely closer
to knowing the fate of Social Security,
whether U.S. troops will be in Bosnia
next year, whether the will can be found
to clean up campaign financing, and
more.
Calls for a bipartisan commission,
sometimes paths to a solution, other
times roads to nowhere, have become
another way to set aside choices too com-
plex or sensitive in the campaign.
A look at some unanswered ques-
tions
PARDON ME? A timely "no com-
ment" ended discussion in the first presi-
dential debate of possible presidential par-
dons for President Clinton's Whitewater
associates. Clinton said "I will not give
anyone special treatment" but did not
rule pardons out Bob Dole had no bet-
ter luck in the second debate.
Why does it matter? Republicans say
that by maintaining the option, Clinton
also keeps alive a possible incentive for
people unc.r investigation to avoid giv-
ing damaging testimony against him - if
they have any. No pardon, and possibly
no reason to hold back.
It's also obvious a Democratic ma-
jority in the next Congress would be less
aggressive about investigating Clinton
and those around him.
Questions swirl around the
Whitewater land deal, FBI files found at
the White House, travel office firings and
campaign spending.
CAMPAIGN MONEY: Corporate
and union "soft-money" donations are
pouring into both parties in record
amounts this year. Those party-building
donations are exempt from limits im-
posed after the Watergate scandals, but
central questions about campaign financ-
ing and spedaHnterest money in govern-
ment are going unanswered. Both par-
ties have avoided pushing campaign fi-
nance reform for at least 10 years.
Questionable contributions to the
1996 Democratic campaign have sur-
faced late; foot-dragging on the release
of the party's latest pre-election finan-
cial report could postpone full disclosure
until after the election.
Dole and Clinton have both backed
a commission to study campaign financ-
ing. Indeed, Clinton and House Speaker
Newt Gingrich shook on it 16 months
ago; it didn't happen.
SOCIAL SECURITY: Big ideas are
in play for the long-term solvency of
America's largest benefits program but
they haven't been discussed in the cam-
paign.
Instead, Clinton and Dole both want
a commission to study Social Security
after the election.
Options include raising the retire-
ment age even more than planned, re-
ducing benefits or increasing taxes on
wealthy recipients in future generations,
and investing a portion of contributions
in the stock market where it could earn
a bigger return but face risk.
Clinton and Dole haven't ruled any-
thing out to save the program.
But the implications for modest
sounding changes could be enormous.
For example, shaving the annual
cost of living increase by one percentage
point would result in a loss of $5,000 in
benefits over a decade for the average
retiree.
TAX CUTS: How Dole would pay
for the dramatic tax cuts at the core of
his campaign remains largely unex-
plained. His campaign declined to sub-
mit the plan to the Congressional Bud-
get Office for pre-election analysis.
A combination of strong economic
growth and spending restraint is sup-
posed to cover the $548 billion cost and
enable the budget to be balanced. But
Dole has not been specific on what big
items he would cut
COLLEGE TAX CREDIT: Clinton
would offer students of low and middle
income $1,500 for the first year of uni-
versity or community college, and the
same for the second year if they main-
tain at least a B average and don't get
caught with drugs. Would he ensure
colleges don't raise costs as a result? A
campaign document speaks vaguely of
"challenging" states with high tuition to
lower it Would setting a B average as
the benchmark for second-year aid dis-
tort grading? What teacher would give a
marginal student a C when $1,500 is on
the line?
GAMBLING: Gambling and efforts
to control it have swept the land like a
prairie fire. If gambling has been golden
for local coffers, so has silence on the
issue in the campaign.
Clinton and Dole support a commis-
sion to study gambling. But the dead-
line passed Oct 2 for appointing mem-
bers. Republicans have named a casino
executive, two social conservatives and
a neutral commissioner but Clinton and
congressional Democrats have put off
making their five choices.
Both candidates say gambling is a
local issue. So are municipal youth cur-
fews and school uniforms, just two such
matters commanding attention.
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YOU'RE IN GOOD COMPANY A"
FINES
mammmm





The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 31,1996
1 V V TV
k Body "B ' Piercing Special 20 Off With 1 L �CUID A
fcVjgi.i "� 1
' '� � -
PI P" (9,9)756-0600 NJ i Autoclave Sterilization LJP 516-A - Hwy b4-A Greenville, MC ,
CAMPAIGN from page i
PRESS
from page 1
The Newman Catholic Student Center
WELCOME
ECU and Newman Alumni
and Invite them to join us
All Saints Day
!�' r i (1 a v N v c m her I
Mass Schedule:
12 noon 7:30pin
1 1
Mass Schedule:
3 0am and 8:30 pin
x
in
t
i �
!
t
I
I
AlbHassesiwin be at the.Ny man; Center- 95,5E. 10th St.
2'hoiiTes'from the FletcherMusic Building 757-1991
Republican governors have
been a major force behind the char-
ter school movement; Dole sup-
ports the idea as part of a broader
initiative, opposed by Clinton, to
allow parents to choose where their
children attend school.
Dole said he had 138 electoral
votes locked up, but a look at state-
by-state polling suggested he could
bank on perhaps half that heading
into the final week.
Dole's count factors in three
generally reliable Republican presi-
dential states: Texas, Virginia and
Indiana. But polls indicate Clinton
is competitive in ail three, and he
served fresh notice Tuesday he
would fight for them.
Clinton is campaigning in
Texas on Friday and his campaign
this week for the first time pur-
chased television advertising in the
state. Overall, Clinton advisers said
he hoped to outspend Dole by
roughly 2-to-l on television in the
final week.
Clinton entered the stretch to-
ward Election Day next Tuesday en-
joying more than a lead in the polls:
As of Oct. 16, the last filing dead-
line, Clinton had more than $34
million to spend, while Dole had
$19.2 million. Both candidates have
spent a good deal of those funds in
the two weeks since the filing.
A Dole campaign official said
campaign accountants had been
put on notice to carefully track
spending in the final week and
make sure the campaign did not
end in debt. Dole's advertising bud-
get was described by Democratic
and Republicans sources as total-
ing roughly $600,000 to $700,000
a day in the closing week.
Clinton, on the other hand, au-
thorized aides to spend at least
twice that. One aide said Clinton
would spend $1.5 million a day in
the final week; another put the
daily figure closer to $1.2 million.
In Texas, Clinton bought time
in the El Paso and Tyler-Longview
media markets, and Clinton strate-
gists were debating whether to air
spots in the more expensive Hous-
ton market, the campaign and
White House aides said.
Similarly, the aides said
Clinton bought time in Virginia's
Norfolk and Roanoke markets as
part of the campaign's effort to
pressure Dole in traditionally Re-
publican states. One said campaign
polling showed Clinton leading by
seven percentage points in Virginia.
Clinton also resumed advertis-
ing in Indiana. And the Democratic
campaign purchased time in several
states where it had gone off the air
because of giant leads, including
Wisconsin, Minnesota and Washing-
ton. There are competitive congres-
sional contests in those states.
both (Helms and Gantt) saying we
are there to work for you (citizen?.
I am making the example that Sena-
tor Helms hasn't been working for
working families in a long time
During the rally, held prior to
the press conference, Gantt took
aim at Senator Helms.
"Next Tuesday, exactly a week
from now, Jesse Helms will be his-
tory Gantt said.
Gantt also outlined.the role he
hopes, students will play in his elec-
tion.
"There is a lot in this election
that is at stake for students Gantt
said. "I'm expecting students to
carry us over the top in this elec-
tion
Gantt promised to expand Pell
Grants and make student loans
abundant when he offered to make
a deal with voters.
"The deal is this Gantt said.
"If you're smart enough to get
through the school system, and if
you get into East Carolina Univer-
sity, or any other university, you
ought to have the right to pursue
as much education as you can pos-
sibly get. And you ought not be lim-
ited by the size of your parents' in-
come Gantt said.
Gantt told students about
growing up poor, his experiences
in college during the Civil Rights
movement, his work as an architect
and his service as Mayor of Char-
lotte.
Toward the end of the rally,
Gantt answered questions from the
crowd. Gantt responded to a stu-
dent who asked about his position
on gay rights and same-sex mar-
riages by saying he supported the
rights of gays and lesbians but did
not support same-sex marriages.
When asked whether or not he
felt tobacco was a drug. Gantt said
it should not be a regulated drug.
"1 am for protecting the 80,000
people who earn their living by
growing tobacco Gantt said. "But,
I am against youths having access
to smoking
In response to another student
who asked what Gantt would do to
ease racial tensions in the state,
Gantt answered that in every elec-
tion in which he has run. he has
formed a coalition across racial
lines.
"I count as a great accomplish-
ment my ablility to get in the same
room or auditorium every facet of
the Charlotte community in two
hours in cases of emergency Gantt
said.
Gantt ended the rally by en-
dorsing George Parrott, a candidate
running for Representative in the
third district.
ECUs 1 CHOICE
TVety @ee& "7uuUA
READ
from page 1
SENATOR
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limited Edition Prints & Sculpture by
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See us also for Horse tack,
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�SM
VOTE NOV. 5TH

ife
I?
5fB2�

,a Ss�o
TOP 10 REASONS TO VOTE
Ed Warren ECU Alumni & Former ECU School
of Education Faculty Member
Secured $30 million for Joyner Library Expansion
Secured funds for the General Classroom Building
Secured planning funds for the New Science & Tech.Bid.
$2.5 million for Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
$2.4 million for the Cancer Center ECU Medical School
$5 million for the Medical School
$12 million in funding for the Life Sciences Bid.
$800,000 for new entrance to campus
Worked to get UNC & NCSU to play ECU in football again
in Greenville
WARREN WORKS
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Compact discs
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Special orders and
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r "homecominc'day"
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Coupon good only 11-2-96
Roach said the carnival events had
been augmented by an appearance
by PeeDee the Pirate, which she
said the children loved.
"Two of the little boys kept fol-
lowing him and holding his hand,
begging him to stay just five more
minutes Roach said.
Roach said that the REAP staff
was very happy with the carnival's
success, and that it seemed to fa-
cilitate communication between
parents, and the parents and teach-
ers. Approximately 50�60 people
attended.
"All of the parents that said
they would be able to crme, came,
and siblings and neighbors who
were interested Roach said.
With the positive reception
that this first annual REAP carni-
val enjoyed, Roach said she was
already looking ahead to a second
one.
"It's something I would like to
see happen next year
Roach is also a member of
ECU'S Kappa Sigma chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta, Inc a sorority
dedicated to family and youth ori-
ented projects.
Walk-inj'we
Tuej-rri 9-6 Sal
W





Thursday, October 31, 1996
The East Carolinian
TECH from page 1 HOME from page 1
student can come to the ECU home
page and find our students' resumes
hot-linked to the home page
Collins said that your name and
any personal information is kept off
your resume. Employers simply search
for the resumes based on the student's
major. Then. Collins said they can con-
tact the university directly and find out
more about a particular resume.
"They can contact us with a hot-
link right there on the resume, by e-
mailing us. or we have our office phone
number and they can call us and say.
I'm interested this particular resume.
Can you set me up with an interview
with the student' " Collins said. "Of
course, then we check out the person
who called to make sure they are a
bonified employer
Collins said they are collecting
resumes this semester. They will wait
and open the site in January, so stu-
dents should go ahead and get their
resumes done.
Joe Norris. network consultant for
Computer Information Systems had
a booth set up with a demo of a new e-
mail system for ECU faculty staff. It
is called Microsoft Exchange, and is
available for Windows 3.1, Windows 95
and Macintosh.
Norris said that they plan to make
the program accessible to staff and fac-
ulty in late January. Students will not
be able to use this new system until
the fall of 97.
Some of the students who at-
tended the fair were very excited about
all the technology that was being
shown. Jeremy Jordan, a sophomore
majoring in computer science, was one
of those students.
"I tuink that it is great that all of
these people are interested in and con-
cerned with staying up with technol-
ogy Jordan sa;d. "Seeing all this gives
me great anticipation to what's to
come.
ceive free autograph books, and
one child will get something more.
"We're getting a treasure chest
and we're going to fill it full of
prizes, and we're going to give that
away to one lucky kid Huffman
said.
The prizes are things like toys,
workbooks and cookies, and all
were donated by the stores at Caro-
lina East Mall.
On Wednesday, the banner con-
test will be held at Mendenhall at
11 a.m. Clubs and organizations
enter their banners, which have to
be at least the size of a double sheet
and can be painted, sewn, or deco-
rated in any way. The winners will
be announced at Piratefest.
Piratefest will be held on Fri-
day at the courtyard outside Men-
denhall. The ECU cheerleaders, The
Pure Gold dancers and The ECU
Gospel Choir will perform, among
others.
There will also be a pep rally
float judging will be conducted at
6 p.m banner winners will be an-
nounced, the homecoming court
will be presented and the Spirit Cup
winner will be announced. There
will be a static fireworks display,
which means they do not shoot up
in the air. but spell out a message.
The Homecoming Committee
will also be collecting canned
goods, which help clubs in their
pursuit of the Spirit Cup.
"When you participate in
events you get points that go to-
ward the Spirit Cup. and when you
bring canned goods you get more
points for the Spirit Cup Huffman
said.
Individuals are encouraged to
bring canned goods also, and can
request that the points from their
donation go to a specific group. The
canned goods are being donat d to
the Salvation Army.
On Saturday, the Homecoming
Parade starts at 10 a.m. The par-
ticipants will line up on 14th Street
and Elm Street, but the parade
route starts when they cross 10th
Street.
"The parade moves down Elm
Street, it takes a left on 5th Street,
passes the Chancellor's house,
takes a right on Reade Street and
ends at the Willis building
Huffman said.
WITN - Channel 7 will be show-
ing the entire parade live, and will
have an area near the Chancellor's
house marked off as the broadcast-
ing area.
The Homecoming Committee
will also be involved in the half-time
show at the game played against Ar-
kansas State that afternoon.
"That's where we have the
pairs step onto the field, we an-
nounce who they are and who
they're representing Huffman
said. "They recognize the Chancel-
lor and this year's SGA President,
last year's Homecoming King and
Queen, and crown the new King
and Queen she said.
The half-time show will be
the last event that the Homecom-
ing Committee will be involved
with, and all the homecoming
events will be concluded with the
end of the game. Huffman said
that she is very excited to see
how all of the committee's events
turn out.
"I think it's so fun, and to
me it's so exciting to watch it all
come Un -her after all the work
we've done Huffman said.
If anyone would like more in-
formation about any of the Home-
coming events, they can call 328-
4711 and ask for J. Marshall or
Amber Huffman.
J
tin ; ;jLKU
Open 7 days A weak - M-Sat 9am-2am - Sun 12-12
g. Tuesday: Dollar Day
All day and Night
�W�d: Ladies JJJigbt
Ladies 91ay 511 day Frea
Everyday: 32oz. Bud draft $2.25
Sunday 9 Ball Tournament 4pm
S&tvice
say's "Get on the Bus
There will be a day trip
by motor coach to the
ECU vs. NC State
game in
Charlotte on Nov. 30th.
We are
offering
seats now
for $60 per
person.
Call
355-5060
our agents
are waiting
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with your
reservations.
Find Your Place To Call Home
Date: Friday, Nov. 1
Time: 8pm-11pm
Place: XTF frat house
1210 dickiitson ave.
For more info, call the Sigma Tau
gamma Frat house at 757-0127.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
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Greenville, NC
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Hours:
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LunchDinner
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15 OFF
etpiiei u-O
Experience
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7 2oi A IdJeeJ
If so then The East Carolinian
wants you to join our staff. We
have two positions open in our
production department.
Do you
want desktop publishing
experience?
like to work designing
advertisment, creating web
and presention graphics?
have a good eye for
graphicly pleasing designs?
like having access to some . ,
of the latest graphic C�� �n � d PPY �� ffice on the
designing equipment? second floor of the Student Publications
Building (across from Joyner).
OlINA 10
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2516 East 10th Street
Greenville, HC Z7855
S30-ZZ3& Fax &30-1735
Sun-Thurs
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U :30am- 10:30pm
Get the Credit You Deserve
with the East Carolina
University Credit Card!
dxZ$ the East Carolina
S University1 Visa� or
MasterCard' ard show your
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with a low competitive annual rate, ard
there's ro annual fee ever, as long as
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university t0 w-oo p.m Saturday
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To apply for your ECU Visa or
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"Mwfl us �hnnl M leatf Mice anmM m �� '� �� �����
Come by the Alumni Center, Taylor-Slaughter Building to
complete your application and receive your FREE T-Shirt!





,
Thursday, October 31,1996
The East Carolinian
opmm
0ufrceca
Our student
fees paid for
the state-of-the-
art recreation
center adjacent
to Mendenhall,
but will we
ever be able to
go inside?
ECU students have seen the promised land of stu-
dent recreation centers, but will we be able to go in?
Four years ago, many ECU students were awak-
ened from their peaceful slumber to the sounds of a
hammering pile driver at 6 a.m. For all who don't
recall, that was the start of the construction of the
new Student Recreation Center beside Mendenhall
Student Center.
You all have heard about its Olympic swimming
pools, juice bars, basketball courts and weight rooms.
You've also heard about the cost through your stu-
dent fees. Hold the music. Cost is not the issue here,
folks. The deal has been signed and sealed; but the
fact is: it hasn't been delivered.
Four years ago, this project was started to give
an activity center to just the students of this cam-
pus, which has everything any student could ever
desire to keep fit. After delays caused by the chang-
ing of contracting companies, the Rec. Center finally
got on track and was expected to open soon. Now,
the opening date of the Rec. Center is more like an
Elvis sighting. You know, that could be it, but don't
get your hopes up. Many times over the students here
at ECU have been told that their new, state of the-art
Recreation Center will be open next month, only to
be delayed another three weeks. When is next month?
Despite the slow process of getting the Center
actually open, we will have to give credit to the ad-
ministration for designing this project just for ECU's
hard working students. If you ever have been to N.C.
State, you'll find they have something very similar,
and they've had it for some time now. At ECU, granted
they serve their purpose, but the facilities we have
now are limited and spread about campus. With this
new facility, students will have a central place to go
for all of their fitness needs .
Some students love free weights for training. They
have free weights. Swimming, they have every pool
imaginable. They also have basketball courts and an
indoor track. Sure, you've seen the bill for all of this
stuff in your student fees bill, but, once again, that's
not the issue.
If you haven't noticed, the Rec. Center has already
been built. It's ready to go, supposedly.
What we want to know is: when will we able to
enjoy it?
Four more years, again?
w
4
The East Carolinian
Brandon Waddell. Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Any L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Gristle Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatlcy, Electronics Editor pu d. Wright, Media Adviser
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
328-6366.
rock the
We are five days from the mo-
ment of truth. There are many im-
portant races, but even the presi-
dential race is small potatoes when
you pit it against the big rematch:
Harvey Gantt versus the "Forrest
Gump" of American politics, Jesse
Helms. Recently, during a debate,
the College Republicans, when
asked about the controversial Sena-
tor, responded, "Well, you know
where he stands
Many students were at the
Gantt rally on campus two days ago.
You know where Gantt stands on
the important issues such as edu-
cation, economic security and the
environment. The purpose of this
opinion column is to let you know
some of the things that Helms has
said.
Helms began his ideological
bomb-throwing in the 60's, as a tele-
vision commentator for WRAL-TV.
He talked about several topics, but
he is best known for his attacks on
the Civil Rights movement. On the
issue of diversity, he memorably
stated that some people "are born
bums
Once elected into the Senate
in 1975, he opposed extension of
the Voting Rights Act in 1975. He
filibustered against continuing fed-
eral legal aid to the poor. When he
tried to kill the Voting Rights Act,
the bill that ensures blacks have the
right to vote, he labeled it as "in-
sulting and degrading" to the
South. He spent an entire month
in 1983 single-handedly blocking
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
No matter who
you pick, please
go out and vote
this Tuesday; It's
not only your
right, it's your
duty.
the creation of the Martin Luther
King, Jr. Holiday. Dr. King was not
a "communist" as Helms put it and
he was not a thug, as he still im-
plies today. He was the most peace-
loving man who walked on the face
of the Earth. The fact that the rest
of the Republican party supported
the holiday shows how behind the
times this man is.
He opposed the quest to end
Apartheid in South Africa, warning
that liberating South Africa would
result in "violence and everlast-
ing tyranny
This man even voted against the
rest of the entire Senate just a few
years ago, when the Ryan White Act
passed 99-1. He refuses to try to find
a cure for AIDS because of his be-
lief that you must be involved in "im-
moral and unnatural" acts to con-
tract the disease. He voted against
the Republican party again when he
opposed President Bush's brilliant
Educational Excellence Act, because
of his dumb crusade to end all fed-
eral funding for our schools.
I guess you know by now that
he's voted against every single civil
rights initiative that has been laid
before him, and he's even voted
against every Environmental bill
that has come down the pike too
(that's why the League of Conser-
vation Voters has given him a ZERO
rating on environmental issues).
Don't forget that he even threatened
our President in 1994, warning that
"he'd better have a bodyguard" to
visit the state. He also has serious
ethical problems this year. Don't
forget about the Helms family's
cockroach-infested rental properties.
Also, this issue over financial gifts
from foreign governments, as men-
tioned on the front of The East
Carolinian, is one to keep your eyes
on. Where did you get that 3 mil-
lion from. Senator?
Ladies and Gentlemen, the man
Bob Dole dubbed as "the Rambo of
the Geritol generation" has had a
quarter of a century to do his job.
Granted, he's done some good
things for this state. He's also been
kind to many of his constituents.
However, I feel that 24 years is long
enough, and I feel it's time to pick a
positive, issue-oriented candidate
like Harvey Gantt. No matter who
you pick, please go out and vote this
Tuesday: It's not only your right, it's
your duty.
Some people say that I am a weebit
random. Some people get a lifetimes'
worth of practice rolling their eyes when
they read my opinions because they are
different we'll say, from the average,
everyday" 1 hate this or" 1 hate that"
column. To this comment. I say thank
you.
My opinion is that 1 hate to write
about what 1 hate to read about If there
is anything that 1 hate to read about it
is people attempting to portray what
will never be: the honest politician.
MTV, listen up!
The honest politician exists only in
the secret dream world where the Pi-
rates beat Notre Dame in the Rose Bowl
and my yard looks like the Chancellor's.
MTV loves to pretend like there is
a candidate who is worth advocating.
In this world, the honest politician
is not written about in any papers be-
cause people simply assume that what
he or she is doing is good for the world.
They are sent little cards by six-year-old
children in towns all over America, like
Zebulon or Lizard Lick. Inside these
cards are crayon-drawn pictures of the
particular politician standing inside of
a circle of children like Michael Jack-
son. They are handing out puppies and
giving their time to the community that
they serve. Okay, enough of this.
MTV. here I come.
1 do not vote!
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
MTV is here
because of our
lack of apathy.
Please do not attempt to adjust
your set your reading glasses or what-
ever. I am afraid that all of my friends
will now disown me and my driver's li-
cense might even be revoked, even
though 1 haven't had a ticket in over
three years. (I hope I didn't jinx myself.)
Why should I vote? Rock the
Vote- whatever. Please someone write
in and give me one reason that I should
take three hours out of my day to go
and check a little box that says that 1
am a Republican or a Democrat Those
two words now mean almost nothing
because of the particular consensus
that people should vote the issues.
What does that mean?
Anyone who runs for office and
does not come to my house and tell,
me why I should vote for them is not
deserving of my time. Is my message
clear yet? This does not sound like
apathy to me. Does it to you?
There seems to be a thought outj
today that this generation is plagued;
by apathy. I haven't met an apathetic?
person in a very long time. There is.
more passion in this generation than,
there is tobacco in North Carolina. �
I think that MTV has simply at
tempted to produce this vision of an;
apathetic community that needs aj
place or a silly bus to drive them toj
vote. I am simply offended that MTVJ
would send out a bus to get people to!
vote, and for what?
They want us to vote for nothing
They do not care if people use;
their right to vote. MTV cares about;
MTV and about their image. They have;
fallen too far into the politically cor-f,
rect toilet. They fear if they do not!
maintain their image as the icon for.
correctness that they will cease to.
make the millions that they do when;
our "apathetic" generation hops on;
board their stupid bus.
MTV is here because of our lack;
of apathy. MTV exists because we havej
spent far too much time arguing about!
politics and silly issues that will take!
care of themselves.
Aett&Ki t t6e Sdtto
Don't believe the hype
To the Editor.
Last week a letter was mailed to
members of the Pirate Club and ECU
football season ticket holders by a
private citizen who criticized Sena-
tor Ed Warren's support for East
Carolina University. To say that Ed
Warren is not a staunch supporter
of ECU is like saying the Pirates are
afraid to play the Tarheels and the
Wolfpack in football-both state-
ments are, in my opinion, absolutely
ludicrous. This latest attack on Sena-
tor Ed Warren is a last-minute, des-
perate campaign tactic by Ed's op-
ponent and his opponent's supporter,
Bill Dansey. and has about as much
credibility as the author of last
week's letter.
Let's look at the facts. Over the
last ten years, while Ed Warren has
served in the North Carolina General
Assembly, ECU has received almost
$78 million in funds to repair exist-
ing buildings and build new ones on
its campus. Some of these projects
include improvements at the School
of Medicine; renovations to Brody
Hall and the Sports Medicine Physi-
cal Education Facility; an addition to
Joyner Library; renovation of Minges
Coliseum: and a major addition to the
Life Sciences Building. In addition,
ECU received $1.7 million in equity
funding this year, which replaces over
half of the university's underfunded
amount. And. over the past 15 years,
ECU's budget has increased by 187
percent. Ed Warren has strongly sup-
ported all of these projects and fund-
ing for ECU.
Ed's opponent would have you
think that he is'a supporter of pub-
lic education, both grade school and
higher education. However, his op-
position to the recent Pitt County
public school bond issue shows his
real position on public education. Yet
he still wants you to believe that he
and his Republican party support
ECU. Let's look at the true Republi-
can position on publicly supported
higher education. The house Repub-
lican budget in 1995 proposed to cut
ECU by over $2 million dollars sic,
or almost 2.5 percent of ECU's total
operating budget. The Democratic
Senate budget in 1995 proposed a
reduction of only .14 percent or
$117,000 dollars sic. The House
budget, had it passed, would have cut
ECU by over $4 million dollars sic
in the first two years and would have
resulted in the loss of 46 faculty po-
sitions.
In all. the budgets proposed by
the Republican House over the pas
two years would have cut the entire
university system by over $115 mil!
lion dollars sic. In contrast, the bud!
gets proposed by the Democratia
Senate over the past two years hav�
contained an increase of almost $4
million dollars sic for our state'?;
public higher education system, in
eluding a 5 percent salary increase;
for faculty instead of the House's 3
percent increase.
Looking at the differences be!
tween the House and Senate bud.
gets, the choice is clear. Ed Warreij
and the Democratic leadership of th�
Senate have supported funding foj
ECU and has protected the campuj
against harsh and unnecessary bud
get cuts proposed by the Republicait
House. Ed's opponent and hi
opponent's party have shown not
only a lack of support for higher edu�
cation in our state, but have propose
budgets which would have torn th�
universities down. Don't be per
suaded by desperate campaign ploys
look at the record of Senator Ed
Warren-the very pages of his record!
could be written in ink that is purplft
and gold. '
Marc Basnight
President Pro Tempore
of the North Carolina Senate �
rr






F
Thursday, October 31,1996 The East Carolinian
John Murphy
OU't� ALK �T ihP�EM(.
U. lOti'Re A SMWft MOtvy
AVD OK) THE CUSP OP
sekious ntrres mut
Spare Time





Thursday, October 31,1996 The East Carolinian
cms
uOm
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse
at Twin Oaks. 1 12 miles from campus,
ECU bus route, very spacious, low utili-
ties. Call Cara 754-2942.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and
utilities 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very
Affordable.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE 2
bedroom, 2 bath apartment at Kingston
Condominiums. Basic cable, sewer, water
included $225month plus 12 utilities.
Call Tiffanie at 328-3689 or 7524618.
HUGE 5 BR DUPLEX close to campus
and downtown. Pets and smokers wel-
come. Two roommates needed malefe-
male. Call 413-0957 ask for Holly or Mer-
edith.
3 BEDROOM � Wilson Acres. Take over
lease. Jan - July. Call anytime. 830-9449.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central
ACHeat WD. Dishwasher. Only $242 a
month and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999.
Available now!
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the
fall! Short walk to campus. Woodlawn
Apts. - next to AOPI house, 3 bedrooms, 2
12 baths � mind condition. 5th Street
Square - Uptown - Above BW3, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 12 baths, sunken living area.
Luxury apartment Will rent for Novem-
ber or December. Also available - "The
Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment If
you see it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share three bedroom duplex. Furnished.
Responsible, clean, 12 utilities, cable.
$250.00 rent $200.00 deposit Call 754-
8202.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-
7613. Very Affordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share two bedroom trailer. $350 per
month includes rent electric bill, phone
and cable. Washer dryer use also. Call Sha-
na 756-9635.
ROOMMATE WANTED, MALE OR fe
male. $260 per month and 12 utilities.
Fully Furnished, pets negotiable. Call 353-
4451.
ONE ROOM AVAILABLE IN two bed
room house on Summit Street (Next to
Jarvis) $225month and half utilities. No
lease. Deposit and pets are negotiable.
Call Eric at 758-2294 or EricBe-
van@ecu.campus.mci.net
Wanted
Help
Wanted
1995 DIAMOND BACK RACING Moun
tain bike "Vertex" Light aluminum, Mani-
tou shock, LX XT components. With ex-
tras, over $1400 invested. First $650. Call
Jason at 551-3844.
1986 HONDA ACCORD LX1, automat
ic, power sunroof, looks great needs mi-
nor work. $3000 neg. 830-2964. If no an-
swer, leave message.
1985 TOYOTA SUPRA, 6 cyl, 5 speed
manual trans, runs great $1800. Must see.
Call Justin� 7521321.
ACOUSTIC YAMAHA GUITAR. MODEL
FG-401. $200.00 Call Suzanne, 328-8010.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural � Dr. recommended. A healthier
you through cellular nutrition. 30 Day
money-back guarantee. Call now 756-
1188.
MT. BIKE FOR SALE. 96 specialized
Hard Rock Ultra, Immaculate condition.
Asking $300 or B.O. Paid $500.752-2221
ask for Frankie.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT needed at
The east Carolinian. Come in, fill out an
application and talk to Celeste, mac com-
puter experience ajmust!
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
WANTED: FEMALE STUDENT WHO is
interested in doing inside housework such
as dusting, vacuuming, cleaning bath-
rooms, halfday per week. $6.00 per hour.
Call 756-2496.
INVESTORS and entrepreneurs wanted.
New company starting with large poten-
tial profits. Minimum investment
$550.00. 100 return plus vacations.
Serious inquiries only. Phone 752-9610.
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 6 month old
black Lab puppy. All shots, collar and
leash included. Call 413-0353 anytime and
leave message.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997
MANAGEMENT POSITIONS, DY-
NAMIC COMPANY NOW HIRING EN-
TREPRENEURIAL STUDENTS FOR
SUMMER MANAGEMENT POSITIONS
ACROSS SOUTHEAST U.S. FOR IN-
FORMATION OR AN INTERVIEW
CALL TUITION PAINTERS 1-800-393-
4521(29)
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6
Billion in public and private sector grants
& scholarships is now available. All stud-
ents are eligible. Let us help. For more
info, call: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
WHERE'S YOUR DIRECTORY? It's
here! Pick up your directory and pick up
the chance to win one of eight exciting
adventures detailed in the yellow page con-
sumer section. Enter the "Name Your Ad-
venture Promotion" there's no telling
where you'll end up. Your 1996-97 direc-
tory is names, numbers and a whole lot
more! Pick up points: Students' dorm lob-
by, Mendenhall Student Center (Extra)
Faculty Staff Department
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants
and scholarships available from spon-
sors! No repayments, ever! $$$ Cash for
college $$$. For info: 1-800-400-0209.
bjje.
Personals
MR. WIGGLY - Things are much better
down south. Clifford won't leave me alone.
Please take him off my hands. Please. And
soon. Thanks. Mr. Morton.
If"
Help
Wanted
Services
Offered

Travel
For Sale
1991 EAGLE TALON TSIAWD, Blk
Silver, leather sunroof.AC.PW.PDL, 6
speaker Cass. wEQ. New:Turbo Valves
Clutch at 60K, new brakes 896. Runs ex-
cellent Great shape. Wholesale $6300.
Call Brian 830-2190.
SCUBA TANK & BC. Hardly used. $170.
RCATV remote 20" like new $65. Elec-
tric guitar & amp $120. Pioneer CDPlay-
er lnew $80. Call David - only interested
754-2862.
YARD SALE: ANTIQUES, FURNITURE,
Chevy van.Kennels, AH computer, mi-
crowave, TV's, desk, dorm refrigerator, gas
grill.keyboard, cell phone, CD player, much
more! 8 am-8pm, Sunday Nov. 3 near ECU.
752-8533 directions.
FOLD-OUT SOFA FOR sale. Good con-
dition. $100.00 negotiable. Call 355-0552
after 6 pm.
96 GIRVIN VECTOR FORK. Aluminum
legs, linkage, and steerer. Hydraulic oil
Elastomer dampening. Stern optional,
$275. Specialized cranks $40. Hershey
Racing pulleys $10. Must sell everything.
Call 55-6754.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry
level & career positions available world-
wide (Hawaii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc.).
WaiUtaff, housekeepers, SCUBA dive lead-
ers, fitness counselors, and more. Call Re-
sort Employment Services 1-206-971-3600
ext R53625.
PART TIME JOBS AVAILABLE. Joans
Fashions has positions for students who
will remain in the area during Thanksgiv-
ing and Christmas breaks. The positions
are not limited to the holiday period and
can be for 7 to 20 hours per week. Indi-
viduals must be available for Saturday
work. The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are flex-
ible. Pay is commensurate with your ex-
perience and job performance and is
supplemented by an employee discount
Apply in person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street Greenville
(on the Downtown Mall).
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting for 12-16
part-time youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge of the
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people ages
7-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 pm to 7 pm with some night
and weekend coaching. This program will
run from the end of November to mid-Feb-
ruary. Salary rates start at $4.75hour.
For more information, piease call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 8304550 after
2 pm.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill. NC.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53628.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL
SUNSPLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT COUN-
TY Memorial is seeking qualified individ-
uals to teach aerobics classes through its
Employee Recreation and Wellness De-
partment. Persons will contract to teach
on a part-time basis. Interested candidates
should contact Gilian Tyndall between 8
am - 4:30 pm at (919)- 816-5590.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague. Budapest, or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive room &
boardother benefits. For info, call: (206)
971-3680 ext K53624.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING
our circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
FOR WOMEN ONLY: INTERESTED in
spicing up your love life? Hostess a sen-
sual toys party! Call Jenn at 752-5533.
SPANISH TUTORING AVAILABLE.
ECU Spanish major graduate. Call Eliza-
beth 754-8007.
LICENSED NAIL TECH makes house
calls: Student prices - tips with acrylic
$25fill ins $15. Flexible hours. Call
Dana for your next appointment.
75207445.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-Z2Z4
jymnosUcsTumbling
instructor
energetic, strong
Pieose coll
Jomes
TradUtoo�l
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f-OHT HENRY'S ARMY NAVY
jft Mitoary � Camping and sporting goods
kjrt Footwear � Combat boots, bat packs.
bomber jackets, etc � Work and ('
casual apparel
1501 Soutn Evans Street Thanks tor shopping wrth US'
GreenvHe. NC 27834 .Henry B ana Sarad L. Heatti
(919)7564781 and Paula
4.500 different items
DAPPCC
(fattypottp & (f(tn�&
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings
�Corporate Events
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�We also rent tables and chairs
"SttOjUcfOc? CM
752-1988
Terry Peaden
ruis i ivss
Hall
oween
SCUBA
SPECIAL
MASK, FINS,& SNORKEL
Retail $179.90
ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
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DID YOU SAYFREE?
YES! When you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartments on West 8th Street, your last months rent is FREE! There
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em
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In search of a job after graduation?
immediate Opportunities for
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� Must be a success orientated individual with sparkle
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Greek
Personals
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ALPHA DELTA PI HOPES everyone has
a great Halloween. Phi Tail - Be prepared
for a spooky night!
DOWN BY THE DOCKS where the Al-
pha Phi's played, they were dressed in
costumes bought and made. After the pre-
party was over and done, they hopped on
the bus to go have more fun. The Cellar
was ruled by the biker gang, while the
70's crowd just danced and sang. The Yan-
kees may have been winning the big game,
but we had DiMaggio and Marilyn spread-
ing their fame. The military stopped by to
keep us in line. Hey there was cheese,
where was the wine? Thanks to everyone
for a great Stranger Mixer '96. All four
dates were the best of the picks. Good job
Wendi, it went well. Don't worry, we'll
never tell.
PI DELTA, WE HAD a great time Thurs-
day night Delta Chi.
HAPPY HALLOWEEN EVERYONE!
HAVE a great day, don't eat too much can-
dy! Happy 3rd Birthday Pam Miller. You
can only get better with age. Love, the
Alpha Phi sisters.
CONGRATS TO JEN NOLAN, Chi Ome
gas Homecoming Queen hopeful! Love
your sisters.
CONGRATS TO ERIN ADAM, Junior
Panhellenic officer! Great job, keep it up.
Love the Sisters of Chi Omega.
PI KAPPA ALPHA - Thanks for Tuesday
night! Let's do it again! Love, Chi Omega.
THANK YOU DELTA ZETA Planning
Board, especially Tabi and Monica, for or-
ganizing the Spaghetti Dinner on Wed-
nesday. It was a great success and we hope
everyone that attended had fun. Thanks
for the support! Love, the sisters of Delta
Zeta.
TO JILL JOHNSON: A very special con-
gratulations on your engagement. We
can't think of any person who deserves to
be happy more than you. You've given so
much to this chapter and we'll miss you
sincerely! Best of Wishes to you and Steve.
Love, your Delta Zeta sisters.
THANK YOU SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon for
treating our pledges right! We had a blast!
Love, Chi Omega.
THANK YOU TO THE Brothers of Phi
Kappa Psi. The Little Sisters of Delta Zeta
really appreciate your help in making our
Big Sis night special. We all had so much
fun going back in time and playing child-
ren's games. You guys are great! Love, the
Sisters of Delta Zeta.
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to wish ECU
a Happy Halloween!
TO THE KAPPA ALPHA Brothers and
pledges. A full moon and trucks filled with
hay, the games we played and the dares
we made. A big ol' fire to keep us hot, we
couldn't have picked a better spot The
music, the woods, and the cold hayride,
yep we got a little on the redneck side!
Until next time! Love, the Sisters and New
Members of Delta Zeta.
PANHELLENIC WOULD LIKE TO wish
Stephanie Hippie and Mica luck this week.
Thank you for representing Panhellenic
on Homecoming Court
PI DELTA SISTERS AND pledges would
like to welcome all alumni! Welcome back
and have a great time.
THE SISTERS OF DELTA Zeta would
like to wish everyone a safe and Happy
Halloween!
CONGRATULATIONS EMILY MARCO
ON scoring last week in the soccer game.
Thanks Chi Omega for a great game and
fun time. Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta
Pi.
ALPHA XI DELTA: WE had a great time
at last Thursday's hall crawl. Let's get to-
gether again soon. The Brothers of Theta
Chi.
ALPHA PHI: CONGRATULATIONS ON
having an awesome soccer team. Keep up
the good work! Love your sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA - Thanks for Thursday
night it was a great way to start off the
weekend! Love, Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA, IT'S ALL Good! We had
a great time as usual! Let's keep the tra-
dition going! Love, the sisters of Chi Ome-
ga.
Announcements
STUDENT ACCOUNTING SOCIETY IN-
VITES everyone to meet Jim Blackburn,
the prosecutor for the Jeffrey McDonald
case, which the movie Fatal Vision was
based on. He was later convicted of em-
bezzling funds from the law firm. GCB
3006. Monday, Nov. 4. Guaranteed to en-
tertain!
ECU LAW SOCIETY: OUR meeting is
open to all majors and will be held Tues-
day, Nov. 5 at 5:15 pm in Ragsdale, room
218A. Stop by to pick up your fundrais-
ing information and hear an interesting
guest speaker. Refreshments will be
served.
ATTENTION STUDENTS IN THE Hon
ors Program. If you are graduating from
ECU in December please contact David
Sanders. 2026 GCB, 328-6373 no later
than Monday, Nov. 4th.
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS - General College stu-
dents should contact their advisers the
week of November 4-8 to make arrange-
ments for academic advising for Spring
Semester 1997. Early registration week
is set for November 11-15.
SATURDAY, NOV. 2,1996 8 am -10 am.
The East Carolina Native American Organ-
ization will sponsor a food drive at Krog-
er. Event will feature Four Winds Dance
Team and Eastern Bull Drum. Items go-
ing to needy families for Thanksgiving.
More info call Nikki at 754-8179.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS: ALL Gen
eral College students who intend to ma-
jor in the Department of Communication
Sciences and Disorders and have Mr. Ro-
bert Muzzarelli or Mrs. Meta Downes as
their advisor are to meet on Wednesday.
November 6 at 5:00 pm in Brewster C
103. Advising for early registration will
take place at that time. Please prepare a
tentative class schedule before the meet-
ing. Freshmen, bring Taking Charge, Your
Academic Planner, and use the worksheets
to develop your schedule.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
STUDENTS Advising: Early registration
for spring semesters will be Thursday, Nov.
7 from 5:30 - 7:30 in room 203 of the Belk
Building. Other advising hours will be
posted in the department
"OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICA-
TIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH DIA-
BETES" November 4,1996. Free program
sponsored by the Pitt Co. Chapter, Amer-
ican Diabetes Association. Gaskin-Leslie
Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial Hospi-
tal at 7 pm. For more info cc!l 816-5136
from 8 - 4 pm Mon-Fri or 1-800-682-9692.
WED. OCT 30 - Premier Performances
of Works by ECU Composers, Mark Tag-
gart. Director, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall.
8pm.
Thurs Oct. 31 - graduate Brass Quintet
Britton E. Theurer, Director, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7 pm. Mon. Nov 4 - Percus-
sion Players and Percussion Ensemble,
Harold Jones and Mark Ford, Directors,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm.
THE EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
School of Anything Goes Anime is dedi-
cated to showing high quality anime. Any-
body interested in enjoying anime, we
show 3 hours every Tuesday at 7:30, room
14 in Mendenhall
AKA BOOK SCHOLARSHIP: THE The
ta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc. will award a $200 book schol-
arship for the best essay entitled "What is
the most challenging problem facing our
generation and what' can you do to help
change it?" Essays should be 2 typed pag-
es and double-spaced and should be post-
marked by November 30. All applicants
will be required to show proof of Spring
'97 enrollment Essays should be mailed
to : Alpha Kappa Alpha. P.O. Box 2886.
Greenville, NC 27858.
ALL INTENDED EXSS MAJORS mass
advising meeting. Monday. Nov. 4 and
Tuesday, Nov. 5 at 7:30 pm in Ward Sports
Medicine Building. Get your folders from
Sandy in the EXSS office first. (Prior to 5
pm)
B.A. COMMUNICATION MAJORS
ONLY - The Department of Communica-
tion is interested in having a departmen-
tal graduation for all seniors graduating
in December of '96. All students who are
interested should contact Sean O'Brien
at 830-0850.
ECU CAMPUS CIVITAN MEETING
Wednesday, Oct 31st in room 129 of the
Speight building. It will start at 6:30pm
and should last no longer than an hour.
Anyone interested is welcome to attend.
We need your help
'�k Lost and
Found
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day
October 31, 1996
Vol. 03, No. 04
Hast Carolina University
Greenville, N(
4 pages
Location - fonesboro,
Arkansas
founded - 1 909
�finrollment - 9,81S
Head Coach. - ohn
Bobo
tficknam- Indians
Colors - Scarlet & Black
Stadium - Indian
(33,410)
Conference-
Independent
Current "Record 3-5
tcv vs tr$K
ECU leads series 1-0
1992- ASr 18
ECU 35
Notes: ECU has not
allowed an opponent to
score in the fourth quarter
all season.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH

Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Clockwise from top left. (22) Daren Hart and (37) Forest Foster discuss
game plans. (33) B. J. Crane gets down the field for a tackle. (95)
Travis Darden makes his presence felt by tackling his opponent.
5) Marcus Crandell. (54) Danny Moore and (59) Jamie Gray complete
a play and get ready for the next call. The Pirates are looking to improve
on their 4-2 record with a win on Homecoming Saturday. After only two
games in Oct the Pirates will play a game every weekend in Nov.
ending with the N.C. State matchup in Charlotte on Nov. 30.
hoto b PATRICK IREL4N
!&&2xtA4ticzt&'i�
Amanda Ross
TEC Sports Editor
"Pirates scalp Indians'
ECU 38
ASU 14
Brandon Waddell
TEC Editor-in-Chief
"Two in a row. Pirates
roll for homecoming"
ECU 28
ASU 3
Brian Paiz
WZMB Sports Director
"Two tomahawk chops
go down in one week"
ECU 40
ASU 10
Dill Dillard TEC ssl. Sports EditorDr. Richard R. Eakin ECU Chancellor
Only suspense is homecoming queenPirates have a happy home coming"
ECU48ECU 35
AST10ASU 10
Brandon Waddell � Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson � Production Manager
Amanda Ross � Co-Editor
Dill Diliard � Co-Editor
Andy Farkas � Staff Illustrator
Pirates
emotionally
charged for
Indians
Cornerback
Kelvin Suggs
makes mark at
ECU
Up to date stats
for both ECU
and ASU
Inside
Saturday
November . I M
J ii.iii-





Thursday, October 10,1996
The End Zone
Players not overlooking
Indians of Arkansas St.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ��L
tard Sports vittimnc Huiidmi
28$8-45$3 � Phone 9W 2S-i
Emotions still
running high as
second half of
season begins
Amanda Ross
End Zone Co-Editor
Get up!
That's exactly what the ECU players are
doing for Saturday's game against Arkansas
State, (ASU.) Some may wonder why they
may be getting excited for the little known
Indians, but the players will tell you emotion
is an important part of the game plan.
"The emotion is going to stay high
Cornerback Kelvin Suggs said. "We're pumped
up. We have to stay at our level
ECU had an interesting Oct. schedule that
only saw them playing two opponents. But
Nov. provides a twist in the action. Every
weekend in Nov. ECU has a game - starting
with ASU and ending with N.C. State.
Coach Steve Logan knows it is going to
be important for his players to be ready for
every game, no matter how big or how small.
"We're famous for playing at whatever
level shows up Logan said.
The on-again off-again schedule has made
it difficult for the Pirates to get into a steady
game plan.
"We're going to hit a five game stretch
where it would be nice to get going, get up
and get some momentum going Logan said.
Suggs agrees.
"These next five weeks are going to be
tough for us, but at least we get to stay in a
rhythm
Now if you think Logan has let up on his
players in practice after the pounding they
gave Miami, think again. That's not Logan's
style. Just ask Linebacker Carlos Brown.
"This week has been one of the hardest
weeks we have had Brown said. "He (Logan)
ran us hard. He keeps pounding it into our
head that we could easily get beat if we're
not prepared
That is a thought that has been echoed
throughout the week.
"This is a golden opportunity for them-
selves to win a football game Logan said.
When a team overlooks somebody they
think will be an easy win, bad things can hap-
pen. Just ask Miami.
Logan knows not many people would be
willing to place their wagers on ASU, but he
points out this team is nothing to scoff at.
"When they come to play, I don't think
anybody wants to give them much of a chance
to win Logan said. "They have jeen very
competitive over the last two years
When the Indians matched up with SEC
opponent Mississippi last week, they lost 38-
21. The ironic twist is ASU led in most statis-
tical categories including total yardage which
included 341 passing yards.
So if you scoff at the Indians, you might
be premature to think they aren't looking to
come in and knock off ECU during homecom-
ing.
But the Pirates aren't overlooking any
aspect of the game. And neither should the
fans.
From the offense and defense to the spe-
cial teams to the players emotions, the Pi-
rates will look to start a wining trend for the
month of Nov. And a homecoming win to begin
the second half of the season, should send
them on their way to a November to remem-
ber.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Dear ECU Students:
It b Homecoming week and I hope each of ou are participating in the homecomir.g festivities. The
Student Homecoming Committee has put forth a great effort to provide an exciting week of activities
for you.
Your Pirates are 4-2 coming off a big win against Miami. There can be no let down this Saturday as
your Pirates begin an important five game stretch in November that could propel ECL" to its third
consecutive post season bow 1. A win on Homecoming will be a great start to a successful month.
It is important that the team. fans, and students be focused on Saturday. I encourage you to welcome
your football team to the stadium with more noise than ever before. Be in your seats by 1.40 pm. get
on vour feet for the team entrance, getloud for every third down by the opposing team, and cheer
for your fellow students on the football team until the final buzzer. Make so much noise you can be
heard in Charlotte!
Let's make it a fun-filled homecoming full of purple and gold enthusiasm. Have a great time Saturday
while being responsible in your actions before, during and after the game.
It's a great feeling when the Pirates are about to win to hear the Hey. Hey. ECYou Look So Good
To Me" cheer at the end of ball games. Filling the stands early. and making noise through to the final
hom create a spirited home field advantage that gies your team the best opportunity to win.
Gel loud and be proud!
Sinccrelv.
Steve Logan -
Head Football Coach
ECU Pirates
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iiiiil





�MIMFVBMMMMHMMiM ���
�aWJP � gjfr-IN&�l'lW-�?
Tfee End Zone
Thursday, October 10,1996
Suggs steps up performances during games
Dill Dillard
Assistant End Zone Editor
On Sunday morning after the huge 31-
6 victory against Miami in the Orange bowl,
subscribers to the Miami Herald were greeted
with a picture of ECU cornerback Kelvin
Suggs intercepting a pass from Yatil Green.
"I saw the picture, and it makes you
feel good to get recognized for hard work,
but the next game is coming up, and I've
got get ready to do it again Suggs said.
After the injury to expected starting de-
fensive back Dwight Henry at the beginning
of the season, many speculated how the rest
of the secondary would react to the absence
of the three year letterman. The answer
The Pirates had to adjust to not having the
speedy DB, but they answered a lot of ques-
tions nationally by stopping a potent receiv-
ing corps down in Miami.
One of the key standouts in the second-
ary to help this effort was a huge night from
Suggs.
The Kinston native had two broken up
passes to go along with an interception and
a broken up pass that could have won the
ballgame.
"We were surprised to see how well ev-
erything was clicking Suggs said. "We knew
we could do it, it was a matter of actually
taking what we did in practice to the feild
That they did. Despite the Hurricane
touchdown scored on the game's opening
drive, the Pirate defense put a lock and key
on the end zone as well as the up rights for
the remainder of the game. Every time the
Miami offense would threaten, the Bucs
would find a way to keep them off the score
board.
A huge play in the game came at the
time where ECU had Miami on their heels,
but they still moved the ball, and on a fourth
down situation in the red zone, Suggs made
another mark in the Orange Bowl. Hurricane
tight end Chris Jones broke towards the
endzone and appeared to be open, but the
out reaching arm of Suggs batted away the
strike to break the backs of the Hurricanes.
"I mean these are the games that you
dream about when you're a kid Suggs said.
"Going to a place like the Orange Bowl, with
nobody giving you a chance to win and you
go shut them down. It's a qood feeling
Suggs, a redshirt sophomore, came into
this season with big several big games al-
ready under his belt, including a huge Lib-
erty Bowl last season, coming off the bench.
Against the Cardinal, Suggs had three solo
tackles alone with a key interception in the
third quarter to help the Pirates bring home
the bell from Memphis.
Coming out of the '95
campaign, Suggs was ex-
pected to be the number
one corner off the bench
but fate had other plans.
Suggs saw plenty of play-
ing time in his freshman
year, along with becoming
one of the team's top tack-
le rs on special teams. So,
Suggs, to say the least, was
not without experience. The
injury mentioned earlier to
Henry, along with a juggle
in the line up put Suggs as
the starting CB for the Buc
defense.
"I've always just took
advantage of any of the op-
portunities to contribute
that I was given Suggs
said. "I'm just trying to im-
prove as a football player,
game by game
If the improvements
continue for this sensational
sophomore, the future looks
secure for the Pirate sec-
ondary.
Cornerback
Kelvin
Suggs has
recorded
18 total
tackles,
two pass
deflections
and two
nterceptions.
Suggs is a
local
native and
played at
Kinston
High.
Photo
Courtesy of
ECU iSD
riow
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, � � � ,
ECU
130
1054
1321
2375
95
48419
.250
ASU
FIRST DOWNS
NET RUSHING YARDAGE
NET PASSING YARDAGE
TOTAL NET YARDS
KICKOFF RETURNSYARDS
PENALTIES (NoYards)
4TH DOWN CONV. (Att.Madc)
.227
(L) Half back Austin Tinsley
will be one player the ECU
defense will have to watch.
He is third on the team in
rushing with 162 yards.
Leading rusher Lamont
Zachery leads the team with
583 yards with three
touchdowns.
Photo courtesy of ASU Media
Guide
ASi RESULTS SO FAIL,
Opponent
at Brigham Young
AUSTIN PEAY STATE
at Alabama-Birmingham
NORTHERN ILLINOIS
CENTRAL ARKANSAS
at Southwestern Lousiana
SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE
at Mississippi
Score
L,9-58
W.24-0
L, 1742
L, 30-31
W, 17-7
L, 3142
W,38-9
L, 21-38
RUSHING
Harley-ECU
Zachery-ASU
Att
155
89
Net
846
583
TD
3
3
LG
43
57
NOTE: In six games this season, Harley has averaged 141.0 yards
per game. This is the third best in the country.
PASSING
-4iSs2S-
At Gmp. Y&. INT TD LG
.22(V m 1295P 14 46
&5 ?0 1178 9' 4 28
V
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Ak Farce ROTC Color Gaard
Outstanding Alamni Recipient
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day Baznen
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Ti � Smith Pilaad
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Homecoming King & Queen 1995
Dee Haakcy Vaughn
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Zett Tan Alpha Sorority Float
June B. Hunt High School Band
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Virginia Walter, CottenFleming
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Alpha Xi Delta Sorority Float
Visual Arts Forum Float
South Lenoir High School Band
American Chemical Society Float
Roanoke High School Cheerleaders
ECU Transit
Homecoming Representative:
Stacy Riggs, Aycock Hall
Steve Battifaranco Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity
Columbia High School Band
Cheerleaders
Purple and Gold Dancers � " �0
The Student Council for Exceptional Children Float $YvOV
Chi Omega Sigma Alpha Epstein Sorority Float
Space
Sigma Lambda Float
Criminal JusticeSocial Work Alliance Float
Space
Eastern Wayne High School Band
Homecoming Representatives
Amy Fitzgerald. Pirates Crew
Brian Dilday, Aycock Hall
East Carolina Dune Buggy
Rocky Mount Senior High School Band
Psi Chi National Honor Society on Psychology Float
Homecoming Representatives
Marsha Fleenor, Adult Student Association
Scott Respess, CottenFleming Hall
ft'
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47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity Float
J.H. Rose High School Band
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Float
Alumni Desoto Car
Homecoming Representatives
Natasha Howard, Tyler Hall
Randy Currin, Alpha Omicton Pi Sorority
D.H. Conley High School Band
Space '
Delta Zeta Sorority Float
ECU Race Car
Northeastern High School Band
Homecoming Representatives
Reberca Perez, Psi Chi National Honor Society
on Psychology
Micah Retzlaff, ECU Panhellenic Council
Kappa Sigma Fraternity Float
Ayden-Gtifton High School Band
ECU Ambassadors Float
Jones Hall Council Float
South West High School Band
Homecoming Representative!
Heather Cox, ECU Ambassadors
Dwight Henry. Criminal JusticeSocial Work Alliance
Space
Dixon High School Band
ECU Chapter of National Student Speech.
Hearing A Language Association Float
Fletcher Hall Council Float
Roanoke High School Band
Homecoming Representatives
Jennifer Nolan, Chi Omega
Mart Woodall, Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority
ECU School of MedicineDepartment of
Pediatrics
Swansboro High School Band
Horses
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Charles Blvd.
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Student Activities Office
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Room 210
328-4711





15
Thursday, October 31, 1996
The East Carolinian
mt&�c
ZoMBie radio station
refreshingly diverse
OCTOBER
31
Thursday
Midnight Madness IV
from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. in Menden-
hall.
Premier performances of works by
ECU composers at 8 p.m. in AJ.
: Fletcher Recital Hall.
Purple Schoolbus at the Attic.
Unsound with Kuttphat at Peas-
ants Cafe.
Squirrel Nut Zippers with Wilco
at the Ritz Theatre in Raleigh.
NOVEMBER
1
Dr. Robert Lee Humber:
A Collector Creates Exhibition at
Gray Gallery through Nov. 23.
? �
Lecture featuring Walter Liedtke
at 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Knocked Down Smilin' at the At-
tic.
Quiver at Peasants Cafe.
Everything at the Cat's Cradle in
� Carrboro.
.� - � -��& �
; Mayflies USA at the Lizard &
I Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Saturday
Mm National PanHellenic
Council Step Show at 7 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
- Cravin' Melon with Everything at
the Attic.
i � ��
i McGraw Gap at Peasants Cafe.
! Jah Daniel with Truth and Rights
i at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
w Exhibition featuring the
� sculptures and wall reliefs of
; Hanna Jubran in Mendenhall Gal-
; lery through Nov. 30.
: Keller Williams at Peasant's Cafe.
i Chokebone with Hippopotamus at
; the Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel
' Hill.
Monday
� Travel Adventure Film
i Series featuring The New South
" Africa at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre with theme din-
! ner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room.
i ��???������
Percussion Players with the Per-
cussion Ensemble at 8 p.m. in AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
The Reverend Horton Heat at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
Though you may be aware of East
Carolina's print media like The Easi
Carolinian and The Rebel, did you
know that there's a radio station, too?
Yes, WZMB 91.3 sends its signal out
every day from the basement of our
very own Mendenhall student center.
Playing an eclectic mix of music
WZMB provides a welcome change for
those who have had their fill of clas-
sic rock and Top 40 music.
Since WZMB is first and foremost
a student radio station, listeners are
encouraged to call in and make re-
quests at any time. Due to its limited
range, a request to WZMB doesn't
have to wait in line with hundreds of
other requests and can usually get
played in a matter of minutes. In fact,
most requests I've ever heard made
Tuesday
J The Chills with Spent at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Wednesda
yj Comedy Zone with Marc
! Rubben at the Attic.
Chvez at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If
so. please send us information (a
schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville. NC
27858
or have made myself were filled within
the time it takes to play two songs.
WZMB is not only the source for
truly alternative music, it also offers
16 different specialty shows that vary
greatly in content The specialty shows
on WZMB offer something for nearly
every college-aged rock fan out there.
One of the newer shows is an in-
terview and surf music show. On the
air Wednesday nights from 5 to 7 p.
m the show mixes excellent surf
tracks with comedic spice. Since the
Attic becomes the Comedy Zone on
Wednesday nights, the surf show of-
ten features a interview with the co-
median who will be performing that
night. This allows listeners to get an
insight into what the Comedy Zone
will be like that night while providing
a little laughter between songs.
Also on Wednesday nights are
See ZOMBIE page 18
Critics remember 13
lost Halloween flicks
Jay Myers
Ufestyles Editor
Dale Williamson
Assistant Ufestyles Editor
All Hallows' Eve is once again
upon us, and tonight witches, ghosts
and ghouls will lurk about
Greenville's otherwise calm commu-
nity. Better lock your doors and stay
inside where it's safe.
While much of the country will
celebrate the season of the witch
through such outdoor activities as
trick-or-treating from house to
house or midnight seances within
the dreary confines of "cemeteries,
many will huddle around the televi-
sion set and get their jolt of fear
through the wonders of cinema.
One of Halloween's most cher-
gDevteco,
Orgy of the Dead
Soundtrack
Vampyros Lesbos
Soundtrack
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Wild art
Happy Halloweeners at
last year's Midnight
Madness strutted their
costume genius.Betcha
she's a green one.
Photos Courtesy of Student Union
TBIfflfl
Answers wiil appear in Tuesday"s
issue.
1. Why was there so much
controversy surrounding the film
Terror in the Haunted House?
2. What was the name of the
animal that reeked havoc (turning
people into zombies and other
such horrific acts) in director Pe-
ter Jackson's film Dead Alive?
3. Christopher Lee starred as
a professor of witchcraft in what
film?
ished activities is staying up late
with a bunch of friends and watch-
ing one horror movie after another.
In an effort to help keep this tradi-
tion alive, we at TEC offer you our
top 13 favorite horror picks.
Word of warning, though. Our
picks intentionally do not include
the horror films that have become
part of cinema's canon. While such
classics as Psycho, Halloween and
Silence of the Lambs truly are wor-
thy viewing on any given night, we
want to spotlight several horror
gems that have either not gained
much critical acceptance or have
been overlooked entirely. So, for all
of you who want to taste fear with-
out risking the outside world, wel-
come to our idea of what horror re-
See 13 page 17
Wash away boredom with new cyber soap
Andy Turner
Staff Witter
So, you're staring at the web, won-
dering if there is a site out there that has
medical scams, attempted murders, an
occasional menage a trois, terrorists and
men named JearvClaude.
It's your lucky day: punch in http:
www.eastvillage.com and enter The
East Village, Manhattan's Land-O-Hip
and, in this case, the first cyberspace soap
opera. Its producers define The East Vil-
lage as a cross between TVs Melrose
Place90210 and director Richard
Linklater's film Slacker (this is supposed
to be a good thing?).
Meet Lila, an aspiring modelpro-
fessor, whose favorite expression is "Lick
me Her man of the moment Owen, is a
wannabe filmmaker who enjoys listen-
ing to Public Enemy and Jonathan
Richman.
Once, Lila went after the slkk Jean-
Claude with a knife after he threatened
her for suspecting she turned him in to
the cops because of his illegal clothing
business. You need not fret they made
up and Lila agreed to pose nude for some
pictures Jean-Claude was taking for no
particular reason. One thing led to an-
other � you know how those pesky nude
horrible
fc
� Ait � anode 19
4UiD Mean 1 Ne� Episode 1 New Alionuuve Epuodc 1 Omicttn i Chqpa
Photo Courtesy of The East Village Homepage
Come to the casbah, my darling. Or better yet come to http:
www.theeastvillage.com for lurid escapist romance.
photo shoots are - and they ended up
doing the horizontal rumble on the floor.
Then there's Maria, Owen's ex. who
is a nice girl, but she has a tendency to
booze it up too often, and she really likes
missionary woman Annie Lennox (the
source of Maria's intoxicative tenden-
cies?). Can't forget Sam, a rock n' roller
who secretly wishes to die young, or
Naomi, who is into Sam, other women
and super-groupie Pamela Des Barres.
At the center of it all is Eve. a writer
and editor whose diary entries serve as
the text narrative of this cybersoap.
These characters, as well as the oth-
ers who make up the soap, are an inter-
esting lot no doubt But is it any good?
Yes. it's a lot of fun.
See NETBYTES paeel6
Horror takes back seat on trip down Green Mile
Bucky Sinister
Staff Zombie
Oh my God! 1 don't know who is in
charge at Strangelove Records, but who-
ever came up with the brilliant idea of
releasing the soundtrack to the film Orgy
of the Dead deserves a big raise.
This film, released in 1965, was one
of the last films that the infamous Ed
Wood was involved with and it bears his
indelible mark. Although he didn't direct
this wonderfully horrendous mess. Wood
wrote the screenplay adaptation from his
novel of the same name (it must have
been an extremely short novel, too, be-
cause there are only about 20 lines of
dialogue in the entire film).
The biggest "star" in the film is that
See ORGY page 16
Writer and director Jess Franco
Manera, known simply as Jess
Franco, has over 160 films to his
credit and yet almost no one in the
States ha? ever heard of him. Born
in Spain. Franco has worked all over
the world and was condemned by
the Vatican in the 70s as one of the
most dangerous filmmakers ever.
Mostly Franco carved a name
for himself with his admittedly B-
movie quicUes that were over-
whelmed with a sort of sexy surre-
alism. He always worked at a break-
neck pace, once completing 13 films
in one year. Yet all of his films,
See LESBOS page 18
Stephen King has never been a
great writer. He's come close, in short
pieces like "Rita Hayworth and the
Shawshank Redemption" and even in
one novel, his multi-layered Misery.
But most of the time, King is merely
effective; he might be able to make
you sweat with fear, but seldom does
he make you think. In his recently-
completed serial novel The Green
MilA however, Stephen King has suc-
ceeded in doing both.
Published in six monthly install-
ments, this novel returns King to two
things he handles very well: prisons
and life in the middle part of the 20th
Century. Set on Death Row at the fic-
tional Cold Mountain Penitentiary in
1932, Green Mile is the story of the
custodians of Cold Mountain's elec-
tric chair and the one prisoner who
didn't deserve its crackling embrace.
That prisoner is John Coffey. a
large, mildly-retarded black man who
is convicted of the brutal rapemur-
der of two young white girls. But Paul
Edgecombe, narrator and guard fore-
man on the Green Mile (the nickname
of Cold Mountain's Death Row
celiblock), sees Coffey's essentially
non-violent nature and doubts his
guilt When Edgecombe discovers that
the prisoner has the healing touch of
a saint he is convinced of Coffey's
innocence and the story really takes
off.
Though less overtly horrific than
much of King's work, Green Mile still
offers plenty of tension, as well as
scenes that will keep your nightmares
fueled for days. Edgecombe's account
of the night John Coffey was arrested
is tense, gripping stuff. Following a
trail of blood with hunting dogs, the
father of the two dead girls and a
small posse of farmers discovers
Coffey kneeling by the side of the
river, weeping and cradling the two
bloody, naked children in his arms.
This sequence is King at his ef-
fective best I found myself obsessively
turning pages late into the night.
caught up in the ugly web the horror
master was weaving around me. Each
ill! SrKIM IHRllirRioVIM'rV
THEGREEVViILE 6
STEPHEN
(Oim ON I Hi Mill
of The Green Mile's six parts features
a sequence of similar tension.
Whether it's the botched execution of
Eduard Delacroix in part four, Coffey's
mission of mercy outside the prison
walls in part five, or even Edgecombe's
See KING page 16
�Jmf





"ORGY from i
ipage 15
wacky magician cat Criswell, a familiar
name in Ed Wood's films (those of you
who have seen Tim Burton's film Ed
Wood with Johnny Depp will remember
1 Criswell as the guy in the cape). In Orgy
�of the Dead, Criswell is the Lord of the
�Dead and. along with the Princess of
Darkness, he rules the Underworld,
I;which in this film is a cheesy cemetery
set
in The plot begins with unlucky hor-
-j ror writer Bob and his mainly clueless
girlfriend Shirley driving along a moun-
tain road to find a cemetery because,
"seeing a cemetery on a night like this
can stir in the mind the best ideas for a
good horror story They end up crash-
ing the car and awaken to find them-
selves in Criswell's domain. In order to
horrify the easily intimidated couple.
Criswell promises to show them how "the
ghouls feast in all their radiance
Now all of that may seem like the
makings for a good horror flick. But then
Ed Wood gets involved and what starts
out as a schlocky B-movie becomes some-
thing much, much worse. The night of
horror that the Lord of the Dead shows
us is an hour and fifteen minutes of strip-
pers. That's right I said strippers. If you
want to scare the wits out of someone,
nothing does it better than strippers.
If the film is so bad, then why does
the soundtrack deserve the highest grade
possible, you may ask. The soundtrack
consists mostly of the music to which
the strippers do their thing interspersed
with the dialogue of the entire film, and
these become the focus of attention
NETBYTES fr.m
page 15
The East Village has entertaining
albeit farfetched � stories and charac-
ters. It goes much farther than Melrose
� 'Place or 90210 with an added bonus -
no characters have sideburns.
n r The format of the cybersoap allows
"visitors to the site to be actual partici-
pants. You can pull up the newest epi-
- sode, the entire week's episodes, charac-
- ter profiles, tips for beginners and a sum-
mary of the past You can participate in
�a chat room dealing with the soap, leave
"feedback and listen to music featured on
The East Village soundtrack CD.
Participants to the soap can also
- join the clique of a particular character,
- who will then e-mail the person and in-
form them of special saucy secrets about
lj future episodes. This seems to blend en-
tertainment with mild patheticness.
Should this be my new life's pur-
suit? Probably not
As I tried to check on The East Vil-
lage daily for the past few weeks, I have
found it can be time consuming and of-
ten frustrating This was sometimes due
to a busy web, but it was also due to the
incredible amount of stuff that is on the
site.
I must also warn prospective visi-
tors to The East Village that they should
be leery of who is around when they pull
the site up. On my first trip, I happened
to pull up that day's episode and be
greeted with the aforementioned menage
a trois. While all you could really see was
blurry, tangled bodies, the persons
around me nonetheless shot pervert
darts out of their eyes at me.
Another time, old Owen and Lila
were going at it and several "What are
you looking ats" where shouted my way.
"I swear, I'm doing it for the paper I
would say. They didn't believe me.
Enter The East Village and have a
blast I really can't scold visitors to the
site for not seeking more useful or edu-
cational material on the net I must ad-
mit last week I was a visitor to the Schlitz
Fan Club web site, and, during that same
day, 1 visited a site where a hot debate
was ensuing over who would win in a
fight between Gary Coleman and
Webster. I did feel better, however, when
I noticed that this site's address origi-
nated from Cornell University - those
zany Ivy Leaguers.
XVxlN VI from page 15
�'description of the pain of a bladder
infection in part three, King delivers
"the punch his fans expect, and he
c does it with just a collection of inter-
esting characters and odd situations.
But with Coffey's healing touch,
The Green Mile also offers horror
�ians a touch of the supernatural. No
�explanation is given for the
Jjjrisoner's powers; Edgecombe be-
Jjjieves it to be divinely inspired. But
when Coffey is done healing some-
one and then suddenly coughs up a
plague of locusts, we can at least be
assured that something spooky is
going on.
Still, at the center of The Green
Mile is its intriguing moral dilemma.
This is where King, amidst a foun-
tain of Christ imagery and other Bib-
lical symbolism, really challenges his
readers. What, after all. would you
do if you were set to execute a man
that you thought was touched by the
hand of God? This is the dilemma
Paul Edgecombe must face, and as
the story unfolds and the religious
significance piles up, his decision
becomes more and more difficult.
Of course, to find out what he
finally does decide, you'll have to
read the book yourself. What do you
think this is, Cliff Notes?
1X6 W. loth St.
Greenville, NC 27834
24 Hour Service
SvPsGs� tqjp ��Alls �vfgiSQsM�
rather than the cheesy sets and bad act-
ing. It is the combination of dialogue and
music that elevates this soundtrack to a
work of art
The album becomes a brilliant piece
of surrealist expression with tracks like
"A Pussycat is Born to be Whipped"
where Criswell speaks the lines, "It will
please me very much to see the slave
girl with her tortures Torture! Torture!
It pleasures me laid over a instrumen-
tal of happy piano tinkling and intercut
with whacking sounds. The record in-
spires awe and is extremely funny.
I doubt if the creators of this
soundtrack realized what they had made,
but they should be commended for their
work. As much as current bands like King
Missile, The Residents, and Primus and
film directors such as David Lynch and
Oliver Stone think that they are on the
cutting edge of absurdist imagination,
they can't hold a candle to what Ed Wood
and his colleagues produced 30 years
ago.
Atlantic Tours
Bus Company
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ECU vs. IMCSLi
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Panther Stadium
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November 3O. 1996
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immediately after game.
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McLawhorn
(919) 355 9659
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L -mwiaawitwiiBiiiiiMWhwrffiffiwr -miimrryj-ti-T1-11 " � n'
me cast dfuiinian
Thursday, October 31, 1996
17
13 from page 15
ally is.
Freaks-Todd Browning's 1932
tour de force was so unsettling that
it was banned for 50 years after its
initial release. The film, which cen-
ters around the bizarre relationships
between a group of sideshow freaks,
featured real-life "freaks which is
the probably the main reason the
public was so disturbed by it. View-
ers are privy to such human "abnor-
malities" as a man and a woman who
both look exactly like infant babies;
a man born with no torso; and
We don't know how to describe her.
You'll just have to see the movie.
Repulsion - In this shockingly
unnerving film from director Roman
Polanski, Catherine Deneuve plays
a young fashion model type who is
much more disturbed than her out-
ward appearance would suggest.
Deneuve is wickedly innocent as she
seduces the camera into following
her day-to-day life. Deceptively pleas-
ant at first, this film truly earns its
OYSTER BAR & GRILL
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title in the end.
Last Man on Earth - This end
of-civilization-as-we-know-it film was
based on Richard Matheson's superb
pseudo-vampiric novel am Legend.
(Matheson's novel also served as the
basis for Charlton Heston's film The
Omega Man.) In the title role,
Vincent Price gives one of his fin-
est performances as a man who finds
himself to be the only human being
left in a world full of vampire-zom-
bies. Desperate, depressing and
claustrophobic, this film should be
considered an essential part of any
horror fan's must-see list.
Scream, Blacula, Scream -
Blaxploitation queen Pam Grier
stars as the only person who can slay
the vampire in this sequel to
Blacula. At the time that Blacula
first appeared, blaxploitation films
.and Hammer horror films were both
going strong and someone had the
bright idea to combine the two. Al-
though it may seem to some that
the genres are incompatible. Blacula
was truly a success. However,
Scream, Blacula, Scream ended up
eclipsing its predecessor in both plot
and characterization.
Young Frankenstein - Director
Mel Brooks is at his comedic best in
this spoof of early horror films. The
cast, comprised of Gene Wilder, Terri
Garr. Peter Boyle and the wide-eyed
Marty Feldman, hit mark after hi-
larious mark as they lift the entire
horror genre to another level with
their satire.
Phantasm - A cheesy mixture
of '70s high school pothead movies
an surrealist horror. Phantasm
comes off as a poor man's Lin Chien
Andalou. Angus Scrimm is intensely
threatening as the Tall Man and his
team of undead jawas are absurd,
frightening and laughable all at the
same time. Phantasm cr'eepily runs
the edge between reality and night-
mare better than any Freddy
Kreuger movie ever will.
Creepshow - We know that
most of the critical community
thinks this film should be flushed
down a very deep toilet, but we love
this collection of cartoonish horror
stories. The entire film is a moving
comic book, just like those horror
comics we read as children. The di-
rection and acting is campy, but that
makes this horror treat all the more
colorful. Creepshow is one of the
very few Stephen King films that
works.
John Carpenter's The Thing -
Released the same year as
Creepshow, this remake of the 1951
classic also does not get the respect
it deserves. This is vintage Carpen-
ter, perfectly exemplifying the tal-
ent he once had. The entire film is
over the top and ludicrous. Kurt
Russell stars as the leader of a sci-
entific team that is trapped in an
artic snowstorm with a menacing
alien that can take the shape of any
living creature. Not for the squea-
mish.
Near Dark - A vampire flick
with a nasty edge. What makes this
film stand out is the simple fact that
the vampires are a group of ren-
egade rednecks reeking violence
across the western wasteland. This
is the only vampire film we have ever
seen where a bloodsucker complains
about the fact that his victim haso t
shaved. �
Henry: Portrait of a Serial
Killer - Filmed documentary style,
Henry serves as a damning commen-
tary on the state of violence in
America today. One of the best and
most graphic serial killer films ever
made, it is definitely not for the faint
of heart. Try to avoid eating before
seeing this movie. Seriously.
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein�
Even though director Kenneth
Branagh takes liberties with
Shelley's novel, this horrifying ad-
aptation is one of the most faithful
we have ever seen. A bit melodra-
matic at points, but still very effec-
tive. Robert De Niro is simply won-
derful as thp tortured creature who
seeks vengeance on his creator.
Branagh's vision of the story is trujy
shocking as Frankenstein's worjd
spirals down into a hellish night-
mare, i
Seven - This is the most recent
example of horror at its best. The f ikn
focuses on the idea of modern hor-
ror in a brutally honest manner as
two detectives (played by Brad Pitt
and Morgan Freeman) track down, a
serial killer who kills according to the
seven deadly sins of the Bible. Filled
with top-notch direction, stunning
cinematography, well-developed char
acters and superior acting. Seven
hopefully will someday become pat
of the horror canon. ,
Well there you have it. We highly
recommend not watching these films
all at one sitting. If you do, then you
need help.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
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I �- . HWMVMMMMI
18
Thursday, October 31, 1v
The East Carolinian
JLliOOOo from page 15
whether they be action, horror, west-
ern or musical, have a distinct
Franconess about them.
The cinematic genius Orson
Welles was so impressed with
Franco that he hired him to be an
assistant on Chimes at Midnight.
Filled with influences as diverse as
jazz, comic books and Cubist art.
Franco made what many have de-
scribed as bad films made by very
intelligent people.
The music that appears in his
movies has some of the same char- .
acteristics. This album contains por-
tions of the soundtracks to three of
Franco's films, Vampyros Lesbos
(Lesbian Vampires), Sie Totete in
Ekstase (Mrs. Hyde. She Kills in
Ecstasy) and Der Teufel Kam Aus
Akasava (The Devil Came from
Akasava), all of which were scored
by the team of Manfred Hubler and
Siegfried Schwab.
Originally released on record al-
bums entitled Psychedelic Dance
Party and Sexadelic. the instrumen-
tal disc includes tracks called "The
Lions and the Cucumber
"Necromania" and "Kamasutra all
of which should give you some indi-
cation of how it sounds. It's a sweet
and sexy treat for any discerning lis-
tener.
At first, the music comes across
as some bass & piano-driven jazz
funk mix. but when the horns cut in
it begins to sound like every porno
soundtrack from the '70s. Yet the
music has an irresistible pull and be-
fore long you'll find yourself tapping
your feet and moving your hips to
the groovy sounds. Everything from
the late '60s and early '70s seems to
be thrown into this music. Fat Albert
here, Streets of San Francisco there.
Beatles on the left speaker. Sly and
the Family Stone on the right.
Out of this amazing hodge
podge of cultural influences comes
a spooky kind of consistency. With-
out even seeing a Jess Franco film,
you can easily imagine how one
would play itself out by listening to
the music.
Just as Franco himself is a com-
plex creative individual, so the mu-
sic of his films is diverse and multi-
dimensional as well. Would that more
films and more music were this un-
conventional. Perhaps with time
Franco's influence will have the im-
pact and get the recognition it de-
serves. Until then, this soundtrack
will be on constant rotation in my
CD player.
ZOMBIE from page 15
the Pirate Talk and Insight shows, as
well as a Grateful Dead show. The
Grateful Dead show includes rare live
tracks from various bootlegs and im-
ports that make the show a must for
any Deadhead.
Thursday's line-up includes the
ever popular Roots Rock show and a
show highlighting British music. Al-
though the content of these shows
may seem to be self-explanatory, the
neat thing about them is that you get
less mainstream artists and more un-
signed, independent artists on WZMB.
In comparison to other radio stations,
WZMB gives listeners more of a jump
on the next mainstream big artist The
station also allows a sneak peak at
the sound of many bands who come
to the Attic or Peasant's Cafe down-
town. Instead of possibly throwing
away money on a band you've never
heard, you can listen to WZMB and
find out what they sound like first for
free.
One of the biggest days for
WZMB listeners is Friday. At 1 p.m
the Friday Request Fest goes into ef-
fect and lasts until 6 p.m. at which
point the Top 25 show takes over.
Then at 8 p.m it's flashback time with
the Retro show. The Retro show lasts
until 2 a.m. and features mostly re-
quests from listeners who are often
at parties, out driving around, or just
reliving part of their youth. Different
from the retro shows found on hit
radio stations. WZMB's Retro show
plays more obscure songs from the
'70s and '80s.
Ranging from Night Ranger's
"Sister Christian" to Nucleus' "Jam On
It all the way to favorites like Dexy's
Midnight Runners' "Come On Eileen
Modern English's "I Melt With You
and "Mickey" by Toni Basil, the retro
show plays something for everyone
who wants to stroll down the road that
was their musical childhood. However,
the Retro show can also give you an
opportunity to hear songs not avail-
able anywhere else.
A prime example is "Mickey" by
Toni Basil. Most people instantly know
"Mickey" and happily sing along, but
WZMB can throw a curve if you're not
careful. WZMB has a version of
"Mickey" with Basil singing every-
thing in Spanish. Don't ever expect
to hear this version on you favorite
Top 40 station, but on WZMB it's
readily available.
Some of the most eclectic music
can be heard on weekend mornings
which are filled with a Jazz show as
well as Crossover and World Music
features. However. Saturdays and Sun-
days on WZMB consist mostly of the
Reggae and Club 91 shows which run
from noon until midnight. Both shows
each run six hours in length. Late
Saturday night listeners can tune into
techno and industrial music on the
Steel Trax show and the fast and
heavy Metal show from 1-6 a.m.
So, no matter what your tastes
are, WZMB probably offers something
to your liking. Even if nothing in-
stantly jumps out at you, next time
you're screaming in frustration at the
lack of musical choices on the Green-
ville radio dial, flip to 91.3 for a few
minutes. The sound coming out of
your speakers might just surprise you.
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19
Thursday, October 31,1996
The East Carolinian
GDADTC
Swimmer dedicated
and focused for season
Team hosts CAA
conference meet
David Councilman
Sports Writer
College is a time for fun, party-
ing, and the most important element
of all college life is an education. For
some, there is the commitment of
sports that sometimes interferes with
the fun of being a college student
These people have to sacrifice in or-
der to excel, and Amanda Atkinson,
a junior on the Pirate womens swim
team has done just that.
Atkinson, just like the rest of her
teammates, puts in long hours in the
gym as well as the pool, to make the
womens swim team the winner that
it is.
"On Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday we do dry land, which con-
sists of weight lifting, and on
Tuesday's and Thursday's we do sit-
ups Atkinson, said.
For Atkinson the road to ECU
was easy to find. Her sister Rachel
Atkinson, was also a swimmer at
ECU. Although her sister swam here,
she soon found out that swimming
in college was a bit different from
swimming in high school. She found
that she was a bit intimidated when
she first started, but she soon real-
ized that the team was like a family,
and everybody there would help each
other out
"Practices were harder, it was a
big change from high school
Atkinson said.
Although the practices are hard
they are also fun, afternoon practices
are not as bad as morning practices.
"The hardest part of morning
practices is jumping into the water,
it is so cold in the morning Atkinson
said 1 never had morning practices
in high school, but it does wake a
person up
For Atkinson there are times
when she would just like to be a nor-
mal college student but, for the most
part swimming is a lot of fun, it is a
good motivational tool. There are
times when Atkinson would like to
come in from class and take it easy,
but she knows she has to keep her
priorities in order.
"Swimming keeps me in line
Atkinson said
With Atkinson's sister being a
swimmer here, she was able to see
what ECU swimming was all about
Head swim coach Rick Kobe re-
cruited her first and he went on to
become almost like a second father
to her. She knows that if anything
was to ever come up, that if she did
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Dava Rhodes, Kerri Hartiing and Karen Reinhard compete in a recent meet. This week end
they ECU will be home to the CAA championship meets at Lake Kristi on Saturday.
Dill Dillard
Assistant Sports Editor
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Junior Amanda Atkinson looks to lead the Lady Pirate
swimmers to their third consecutive CAA Conference title.
not have anybody else to turn to.
Coach Kobe will be there for her, with
the absence of her real father at
school, Coach Kobe performs those
duties when needed.
Her parents, just like the rest of
the swim team parents are very sup-
portive. They go to all the meets, and
after the American swim meet on Sat-
urday, the team was able to get a
good homecooked meal from her
parents.
"Although my father knows little
about swimming, he is still very sup-
portive. My parents never pressured
me to be a swimmer Atkinson said.
One would think that Atkinson
only has time for swimming, and it is
big part of her life, but she is a nor-
mal college student, just like every-
body else here at ECU. She has her
likes and dislikes. Some of the things
that she likes to do most is hang out
with her friends, watch movies and,
whenever she can, she likes to sleep
a lot.
The biggest influence on
Atkinson has been her sister. Even-
tually, she said, she would like to
work with her sister. Atkinson never
had the opportunity in high school
to swim with her sister, so when she
came to ECU as a freshman she fi-
nally got that opportunity.
To say that Atkinson is a team
player is very true, one of her goals
for the season is that her teammates
will be able to capture a third CAA
title and she does have personal goals
as well.
"The biggest goal I have is that
I place in the top three in the confer-
ence and I would like to get the var-
sity record for the 100 and 200 back-
stroke Atkinson said.
All the hard work that Atkinson
has put in is seemingly starting to
pay off, at the Pirates' first meet of
the year at American University she
had a great meet.
"Amanda swam great Kobe
said.
So, Pirates, look for Atkinson to
be one of the stars for the ECU swim
team throughout the year.
Excitement has been brewing in
ECU's Scales field house, especially
in the cross country offices, with
thoughts of hosting the CAA Cross
Country Championships in just a few
days.
The site of the race will be the
cross country course at Lake Kristi
Park in Greenville. This, as most
people may remember, was the site of
the 1996 U.S. Open Ski Champion-
ships and now the park will host the
battle for the CAA crown.
This "ear, cross country fans here
in Greenville can look forward to an
intense battle for the crown with the
usual powerhouses. James Madison
and V'illiam and Mary, but don't for-
get the host team.
For years, the CAA conference
meet was held in Williamsburg, Va. at
the home course for the Tribe of Wil-
liam and Mary.
"The conference was starting to
get tired of traveling up to Virginia
every year, but politics had a lot to do
with that" Women's Coach Choo Jus-
tice said.
After long talks, conference offi-
cials decided to start rotating the meet
throughout the conference and ECU
came up first for the rotation.
Running on their home course
will give the Bucs an advantage when
it comes to the knowledge of the
course's nooks and crannies, not to
mention the emotional lift it will give
a building program, running in front
of ECU fans on the weekend of home-
coming.
"The guys' team will be especially
pumped up for this one, but the girls
are laid back about the situation, but
they're still excited about the situa-
tion Justice said.
ECU's men will have to be
pumped up to stop another powerful
William and Mary team, which will be
defending its title from last season.
Sophomore Jeremy Coleman will try
to improve on last year's 27th place
finish in last year's meet, which was
good enough for him to be the top
Pirate finisher.
Other runners that may catch the
crowd's attention will be transfer An-
drew Worth, and Jamie Mance, as well
as Justin England.
"This is an improved guys' team,
and they're ready to make some noise
on Saturday Justice said.
The womens race will be a dog
fight as it was last season with James
Madison leading the way, but the
Dukes have cause for caution.
"James Madison always has a
strong team, but if they aren't care-
ful, George Mason could slip in and
take it" Justice said.
The Lady Pirates will be coming
into the meet as a dangerous team,
finishing fourth in last season's CAA's
with returning runners such as CAA
Rookie- of-the- Year Suzanne Bellamy.
The excitement is building and
preparations are being made for
Saturday's race.
"That's the only problem with
being the host" Justice said. "You
have to do so much to put on the race;
you have to divert your attention away
from the team the week of the meet"
The meet will be held at Lake
Kristi on Saturday, beginning with the
women's race at 10 am.
ECU'S
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Program offers weekend trips
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
Tired of doing the same old thing
every weekend? Come and join Recre-
ational Services' Adventure Program
for an exciting adventure trip.
The Adventure Program offers
Outdoor Living Skills Workshops. It
is the perfect opportunity to learn more
about adventure skills if you don't have
the time for a weekend trip. The work-
shops are on a variety of different top-
ics that apply to the outdoors.
! Introduction to Map & Compass
Reading is on Nov. 12 and Holiday
Guide to Adventure Gifts is on Nov.
26. Each workshop is from 7-8:30 p.m.
in the Adventure Rental Center. To be
a part of these free, fun and interest-
ing workshops, you must register in
204 Christenbury the Friday before
each workshop.
The Adventure Program is de-
signed to provide you with whatever
you are looking for in an exciting envi-
ronment. Spend two days at Pilot
Mountain State Park top rope climb-
ing and camping on Nov. 16-17.
I No experience is necessary to par-
ticipate in this trip. Register in 204
Christenbury by Nov. 8 and come ex-
plore how the Native Americans in
North Carolina used this mountain as
a way to guide them.
If you're not interested in climb-
ing, get your skis waxed and boards
tuned up to hit the slopes. Take ad-
vantage of the early season before
break on December 7 for a day a ski-
ing trip at Wintergreen, Virginia. In-
terested individuals must register by
December 2 in 204 Christenbury.
Head up north for an unbelievable
week of skiing in the heart of Vermont
with students from all over the coast
Jan. 5-11. We will spend two days trav-
eling and five days skiing on six moun-
tains with over 70 miles of trails. Be
sure to register by Nov. 15 in 204
Christenbury for an exciting week of
fun.
If none of the Adventure Trips fit
your schedule, plan your own exciting
weekend of fun with the Adventure
Rental Center (ARC). The ARC offers
a variety of camping equipment from
canoes and backpacking �cdr to vol-
leyball sets.
The Adventure Rental Center is
for the use of ECU students and staff
only. A valid ID must be shown to rent
equipment Reservations can be made
up to two weeks in advance. Stop by
the ARC located in the basement of
Christenbury Gym.
The Adventure Program also al-
lows you to climb the Tower. The Climb-
ing Tower is open Monday through
Thursday from 2 p.m7 p.m. Private
instruction is available upon request
Contact the Adventure Rental Center
for more climbing details at 328-1577.
Men's
basketball
exihibition
game against
Court
Authority
Mon at 7
p.m. in
Minges
Coliseum.
East Carolina senior Chris Padgett has been named
as the Kellogg's Colonial Athletic Association Men's Soc-
cer Player-of-the-Week. The Habeit NC native was in-
strumental in the Pirates' two wins last week, a 4-1 de-
cision over Charleston Southern and a 3-0 win over Vir-
ginia Military.
Padgett the ECU team captain the past two sea-
sons, scored two goals, including the game-winner, and
added an assist against Charleston Southern. He scored
one goal and notched two assists against the Keydets of
VMI. Padgett now has six goals and seven assists on the
year.
"Chris Padgett emulates every aspect of the East
Carolina men's soccer program ECU head coach Will
Wiberg said. "He is a tremendous competitor who gives
110 percent in everything he does - conditioning, train-
ing and matches. He has really led the team by example
this year
Padgett is the first ECU player to win player-of- the-
week honors this year. He is also an All-CAA candidate.
East Carolina's Nov. 9 football game at Virginia Tech
will be televised nationally on ESPN2, the network an- !
nounced Monday.
The kickoff time will be at 7:00 p.m. in Lane Sta-
diumWorsham Field, pushed back from the original start-
ing time of 1:00 P.M.
"We are excited about another national television
exposure opportunity for our program said East Caro-
lina Director of Athletics Mike Hamrick. "Having this
many games televised nationally by ESPN this season is
a credit to our program and its fans
The Virginia Tech game will represent the third na-
tional televised appearance for East Carolina in the past
four games. The Pirates' home game with Southern Mis-
sissippi Oct 10 was carried by ESPN2 while East Caro-
linaMiami contest Oct 19 at the Orange Bowl was aired
by ESPN. In addition, ECU's game against North Caro-
lina State Nov. 30 in Charlotte will also be televised by
ESPN2.
Panthers hunt for playoff spot
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Midway
through their second season, the
Carolina Panthers are in position
to make a run at the playoffs.
They're also in position to take a
tumble.
The Panthers go into Sunday's
game in Atlanta against the Falcons
with a 5-3 record. A similar mark
in the second half of the season
could land Carolina in the
postseason.
But there are several warning
signs, most significantly the Pan-
thers' inability to execute on the
road.
Carolina is 3-9 away from
home, including 1-3 this season.
The most recent loss, 20-9 Sunday
in Philadelphia, began a stretch in
which the Panthers play five of
seven on the road.
Carolina has just two rushing
touchdowns on the road in the 1
12-year history of the franchise
and is constantly plagued by prob-
lems with penalties and turnovers.
The Panthers' defense, which has
been impressive at home, also runs
into trouble on the road, as evi-
denced by Ty Detmer, a career
backup quarterback in the NFL,
throwing for 342 yards Sunday.
Cornerback Eric Davis, who
joined Carolina in the offseason af-
ter spending his first six years with
San Francisco, said the Panthers
need to develop a different mind set
on the road.
'You guys don't understand the
power and enjoyment you feel when
you see 60,000 or 70,000 or 80,000
people out there screaming, yelling,
hating you, and you make a play
and they all just get quiet Davis
told reporters. "And you know you
just did that. It's a great feeling
Road woes aren't the Panthers'
only obstacle.
Carolina has failed to reach the
20-point plateau in three of its last
five games, including Sunday's
three field-goal performance.
The Panthers are 0-7 when
they have more turnovers than
takeaways.
And Carolina needs to start
winning outside the NFC West. The
Panthers are 5-0 in the division this
year and 0-3 outside of it. Five of
their remaining games are against
non-NFC West teams.
Tight end Wesley Walls said
much of the blame for the Pan-
thers' troubles in the first half of
the season can fall on the offense.
"Our defense right now could
stand over there and point fingers
at us all day long he said. "But
we're pulling for each other. Every-
See PAN page 20
�.
W1





IMHWMMHM

HHINHHIMMHHi I MM
20
Thursday, October 31, 1996
The East Carolinian
Injured Cox out for Sunday's game
LAKE FOREST, 111. (AP) -
Bryan Cox's thumb is broken in
three places, but he said today he's
changing the date for surgery and
plans to play Sunday against Tampa
Bay.
The surgery he expected to
have Friday, which would have
forced him out of Sunday's game,
will now take place Monday. After
consultations with numerous spe-
cialists, he decided to give it a try
against the Buccaneers. Doctors
approved of his decision.
Cox broke the bone at the base
of his left thumb in the third quar-
ter of Monday night's win in Min-
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nesota.
"It didn't hinder me from mak-
ing plays in that game, so that gives
me reason to believe 1 can play with
this type of injury this week Cox
said.
He added that surgery was still
necessary so the bone wouldn't
heal incorrectly.
"I guess there is probably a
danger of doing some more dam-
age he said. We are going to
get a special cast made up and try
to play with it, so I don't see any
reason where there should be any
more damage
Earlier Tuesday. Bears trainer
Fred Caito said the normal healing
time for any fracture is 4-6 weeks.
Football players, however, have
been known to take the field with
broken bones protected by casts or
splints.
Cox said an assessment will be
made after surgery on how long he
will be out.
Cox remained in Monday
night's game and made a crucial
play, sacking Brad Johnson to force
a fumble and then recovering the
football at the Bears' 35-yard line
with 1:47 to go.
"It's my decision. My wife
wasn't very happy and my agent is
not really happy with it Cox said.
"I just feel now is the time for the
team to make strides in the right
direction and I want to be out there
playing.
"As long as I can continue to
hit people and not worry about if
my hand is going to hurt. 1 should
be fine
The linebacker also has been
bothered by shoulder and back
problems, and he came under fire
for criticizing teammates after a
game earlier this season.
With the things that have hap-
pened to me. I feel fortunate and
blessed that I'm still standing he
said. "You can only play through
so much.
"My wife was worried about
the lingering effect this would have
after my career. The position of the
break is potentially dangerous. I
could lose the use of my thumb
Cox's injury is just another in
a series that the Bears have had to
endure.
Quarterback Erik Kramer
made it through only four games
before two herniated discs in his
neck ended his season. Backup QB
Steve Stenstrom, tight end Chris
Gedney and defensive tackle Chris
Zorich also are out for tht year.
The list of Bears to miss games
includes: running backs Rashaan
Salaam. Raymont Harris and Rob-
ert Green: tight end Keith Jennings:
cornerbacks Donnell Woolford and
Walt Harris; defensive tackle Jim
Flanigan; guard Todd Burger, and
receiver Michael Timpson.
Several injured players - in-
cluding Raymont and Walt Harris.
Woolford and Flanigan - returned
for Monday's victory, which im-
proved Chicago's record to 3-5 and
gave the team cause for optimism
about the second half. .
A middle linebacker who
switches to defensive end on pass-
ing downs. Cox leads the Bears with
three sacks and three fumble recov-
eries. He also is tied with Marty
Carter in tackles. 89.
The season has been frustrat-
ing for Cox, who was signed to a
four-year. $13.2 million contract af-
ter five successful but tumultuous
seasons with the Miami Dolphins.
The Bears, expected to contend
for the NFC Central title, kept los-
ing games. And the fiery Cox lost
his composure during and after an
Oct. 6 loss to Green Bay.
During the game, he raised his
middle finger to on-field officials.
cursed repeatedly, threw his helmet
and stood in the end zone,
helmetless, during a Packers extra-
point attempt. He later was fined
$87,500 by the NFL.
Also injured against the Vi-
kings was nickel back Kevin
Miniefield. who is expected to miss
about a month with torn knee car-
tilage. Miniefield. who blocked a
punt for a safety in the game, was
scheduled to undergo arthroscopic
surgery today.
PAN
from page 19
w
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etro
or
MM! Hi �
w
Celebrate Homecoming
weekend with fine dining
tt M caeual atmosphere
ket vesevoatiens, call
355-1111
653 E. Arlington Blvd.
in Arlington Village
body wants everybody to do well.
This is not a pointing-fingers
team
As for the Panthers' positives,
they are allowing opponents to
score an average of 13.9 points per
game, the second-lowest figure in
the league.
Carolina also is developing a
reputation for late-game toughness,
outscoring opponents 36-13 in the
fourth quarter.
The Panthers have been penal-
ized fewer times than their oppo-
nents in all eight games.
The Panthers' special teams
are emerging into one of the best
groups in the league, and their
rushing game has bounced back
nicely after losing halfback
Tshimanga Biakabutuka, Carolina's
No. 1 draft pick, to a season-end-
ing knee injury.
Carolina has five games left
(against losing teams: the Falcons
(0-8), Giants (3-5). Rams (2-6). Buc-
Icaneers (1-7) and Ravens (3-5).
"Everything is in front of us,
land the success of our season will
be determined by how well we do
in the second half coach Dom Ca-
pers said. "We all know in this busi-
iness it's not how well you start but
how you finish that counts
Greenville Blvd.
Plaza
I VANT TO GO TO
r,mr,ooooooo'S!
tB3je 5tl) street prttoerp
live EtttettMHrneHt wU
(PfVMt)
fh tfa l9(t,
ONE FINGER
SALUTE
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�i Owen





Title
The East Carolinian, October 31, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 31, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1171
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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