The East Carolinian, October 29, 1996






MMMMMMaNMm�ft� �� ���,
TUES
October 29,1996
Vol72.No. 19
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pages
Across The State
NORTH TOPSAIL BEACH,
N.C. - Seven weeks after Hurricane
Fran hit the state, most residents
of North Topsail Beach are still
without water.
Only about a 2-mile section of
the town along N.C. 210 now has
water.
Residents say they only see a
few crews working to restore wa-
ter service, although county offi-
cials say there are several.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - A nurs-
ing student who says she'll to give
back to her community is asking
business across Charlotte to step
out in faith and give to her first
Kathy Hedrick has mailed
more than 900 letters over the past
few months to Charlotte-area busi-
ness operators requesting dona-
tions to pay for the $14,000 she'll
need for three years of nursing
school.
So far her one-woman mail
campaign is working. She's re-
ceived $4,375 - and even a mar-
keting job offer. About two dozen
companies have given her dona-
tions, ranging from a $10 gift cer-
tificate for printing supplies to
$500.
Acorss The Country
CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) -
Gasoline pump prices rose nearly
three-quarters of a cent per gallon
on the strength of crude oil price
hikes, an industry analyst said.
The increase over two weeks
put the average retail price for all
grades, including taxes, at about
$1.28 per gallon, according to
Friday's Lundberg Survey of
10,000 stations nationwide.
ATLANTA (AP) - Richard
Jewell, cleared of suspicion in the
Olympic Park bombing, thinks he'll
never fully recover his reputation
or fulfill his hopes for a law enforce-
ment career.
Jewell scheduled a news con-
ference for today. He was expected
to tell how he got caught up in the
FBI's hunt for the person who
planted a pipe bomb at a crowded
event.
Around The World
MOSCOW (AP) - President
Boris Yeltsin today canceled all
meetings for the rest of the week
because of unspecified medical
tests during what his spokesman
called "the final stage of prepara-
tions" for heart surgery.
Yeltsin spokesman Sergei
Yastrzhembsky told a Kremlin news
conference that Yeltsin's doctors
had recommended complete rest
while he undergoes the tests. He
said even the president's weekly
meeting with the prime minister
would be canceled.
CAIRO. Egypt (AP) - Rescue
workers pulled four injured people
today from the ruins of a collapsed
12-story apartment building, but
said dozens more were still trapped.
Some of the residents of the
40-apartment building leapt from
their balconies as the concrete-
block and plaster building
crumbled, neighbor Ahmed
Mohammed said.
Student leaders bring Gantt to ECU
Senatorial
candidate speaks
tonight on student
related issues
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
With fast-paced campaign pro-
cesses quickly coming to the wire,
campus organizations have worked
hard to bring Harv�y Gantt to ECU
to outline his agenda.
The ECU College Democrats, Stu-
dents for Gantt, ABLE (Allied Blacks
for Leadership and Equality), Sigma
Gamma Rho, Delta Sigma Theta. Zeta
Phi Beta, Kappa Alpha Psi and the
National Pan Hellenic Council com-
bined efforts to bring U.S. Senate
challenger Gantt's campaign to Men-
denhall Student Center Tuesday Oct.
29, at 1:45 p.m.
"We are very excited that the
North Carolina College Democrats
and Students for Gantt were able to
get Mr. Gantt to tour all of the North
Carolina schools said John Lynch,
a student at ECU and the co-chair of
Students for Gantt
Gantt was at Pitt Community
College on Friday and will be touring
most of eastern N.C. on Tuesday.
"Mr. Gantt is a large supporter
of helping to ease the effects of tu-
ition costs. He strongly supports edu-
cation, and the issues that surround
it Lynch said.
Gantt is challenging Senator
Jesse Helms who has been in office
since 1972. Gantt is expected to bring
new ideas and new life to the N. C.
representation in Washington if
elected.
"It is very important that he
Gantt is reaching out to the stu-
dents Lynchsaid. "Gantt is working
toward increasing student loans, and
getting a $10,000 tax credit for fami-
lies for the first two years of college
The former mayor of Charlotte,
Gantt expects this race o be close,
and the polls agree.
Gantt is no stranger to ECU. He
visited in 1994 as a courtesy to the
College Democrats.
"Harvey Gantt is willing to invest
in education; obviously the senator
we have now has not done anything
for N.C. universities said Larry Free-
man, president of the College Demo-
crats.
The College Democrats have
worked hard to increase the voice of
college students in the national and
state elections. This visit is another
way of getting college students in-
volved in the issues that affect them.
" We are trying to get as many
students to come out as possible and
show their support for their next U.S.
Senator Lynch said.
Harvey Gantt
Nobel Laureate visits
Medical School
Noted speaker
presents "Nuclear
War" address
Staff Reports
Campus crime on the rise
Dr. Victor W. Sidel, co-founder of
Physicians for Social Responsibility,
Nobel Peace Prize winner and an in- �
ternational leader in health and the
consequences of war, will be the fea-
tured speaker Tuesday, OcL 29, at the
ECU School of Medicine.
Sidel, distinguished university
professor of social medicine at the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
in New York, where he was also chair
of the department of social medicine
at Montefiore Medical Center, will
present a lecture titled. "The Social
Responsibility of the Physician: Les-
sons for the Movement to Prevent
Nuclear War His talk lasts from
12:30 p.m. to approximately 1:30 p.m.
in Room 2W-50 in the Brody Medical
Sciences Building on the ECU School
of Medicine campus.
Sidel has been involved with nu-
merous international health organiza-
tions and has written and lectured
extensively on the social, health and
economic consequences of armed con-
flict. He also has written several
books and articles on the U.S. Health
care system, its organizational prob-
lems and possible alternatives.
In 1971, Sidel was a member of
the first U.S. medical delegation in-
vited to the People's Republic of China
in 20 years; he has returned for fre-
quent study visits and has published
two books and many articles on health
care in China. He has just returned
from a visit to China on the 25th an-
University officials
search for
answers, remedy
Angela Koenlg
Staff Writer
Dr. Victor Sidel
niversary of his initial visit. He has
also studied health care in a dozen
other countries, and has been a con-
sultant for the World Health Organi-
zation and the United Nations
Childrens Fund (UNICEF).
Sidel graduated from Princeton
University. Harvard Medical School
and the National Heart Institute in
Bethesda, Md. He helped found Phy-
sicians for Social Responsibility in
1961, and was its president in 1987-
88.
Sidel received the 1985 Nobel
Prize for Peace, and since 1993 he
has been Co-President of the Interna-
tional Physicians for the Prevention
of Nuclear War (IPPNW).
His latest book, "War and Public
Health will be published this fall.
Sidel's lecture is sponsored by the
local student chapter of Eastern North
Carolina Physicians for Social Respon-
sibility and the ECU department of
medical humanities.
With an ever increasing
crime rate, many students are
questioning their safety on cam-
pus.
In 1995, there were nine re-
ported accounts of aggravated as-
sault and seven arrests for these
attacks. That was in increase from
seven attacks and four arrests in
1994.
Hattie Pink is a withdrawn
junior who was attacked in her
dorm room on the first day of
classes. She had her door
propped open and was studying
in her room when someone ran
in and hit her on the head with a
fire extinguisher. The assailant
stole her purse but disposed of it
after finding no cash.
Pink was forced to withdraw
from school after missing two
weeks of classes because of her
injuries. She plans on returning
to campus next semester, but
does not feel safe any longer.
"When I did try to go back
to class I was looking over my
shoulder hoping someone
wouldn't come after me and try
to hurt me she said.
Pink worked with freshmen
at orientation last summer and
warned them of the dangers on
campus, but like many students
never thought it could happen to
her.
"Before (the assault) I heard
about things happening on campus,
people getting attacked or what-
ever, but I never really thought
about it happening to me. I guess I
was naive she said.
Her attacker remains at large.
Freshman Jill Broadway
learned about the
reality of on-cam- - � �
pus attacks dur-
ing orientation.
She was attacked
in the stairway of
Scott Hall by a
student who
lunged at her and
pushed her back
against the stairs.
Her assailant
was apprehended
later that night af-
ter punching a po-
lice officer.
"I was very
angry. To have
someone assault you, that you don't
know, that you didn't do anything
to is difficult to live with Broad-
way said.
Like Pink she is now more cau-
tious when on campus.
"I'm very cautious now. I have
mace with me wherever I go and
it's out and ready to fire, unless I'm
in a big group of people and even
then I sometimes keep it out
Broadway said.
Her attacker received a prayer
for judgment which means that un-
less he does anything else illegal
he can have the attack taken off of
his record after one year.
In addition to this he was sus-
pended from campus and may not
return. He can not approach or at-
tempt to approach Broadway or he
will be arrested.
Broadway found it difficult to
concentrate on her schoolwork af-
ter the attack.
"The court date kept bein�
moved. I wouldn't sit and work be-
cause I would think about how I
had to be in court. It's just too
much pressure added to the pres-
sure of being
a freshman
she said.
When stu-
dents are at-
tacked on
campus they
have several
options to
consider. The
office of the
Dean of Stu-
dents assists
students in
deciding what
action to take
and can help
the students
get counseling.
If the attacker is apprehended
and is an ECU student, the stu-
dent will have to face the campus
judicial process as well as appear
in the local courts.
"The campus judicial process
is independent of downtown. The
case is reviewed by a judicial com-
mittee and taken to the honor
board before downtown even gets
it on the docket said Assistant
Dean of Students Karen Boyd.
ECU'S judicial process is stu-
dent run and the students decide
what happens to the students.
They have an adviser who deals
only with aiding the students in
matters of procedure.
The punishment given to the
student, if found guilty, depends
See CRIME page 5
"When I did try to
go back to class I
was looking over
my shoulder
hoping someone
wouldn't come
after me and try to
hurt me
� Hattie Pink, withdrawn
junior
Professor comments on TEC textbook poll results
Says the books
are not the real
problem
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
Over the past few weeks, stu-
dents have questioned both the ris-
ing cost of textbooks and their
value.
In an Oct. 8 article in TEC stu-
dents commented that textbooks
are overpriced and under-used.
Students said the purpose of pur-
chasing textbooks was to supple-
ment lectures.
According to Dr. Roger
Rulifson. a biol-
ogy professor at
ECU. students
don't get the full
worth of a text-
book because
most of them
don't read them.
"We profes-
sor get the idea
that we are better
than the textbook
writers Dr. Gary
Peterson, associ-
ate professor for
the deptartment
of anatomy and
sub-biology, said.
"We create our
"You need to
create a format
where the student
will have to read
the text in order to
take part in the
class
��
� Dr. Gary Peterson,
associate professor,
department of anatomy and
sub biology
read the text-
book
Peterson
said a lot of the
problems stem
from the way in
which the pro-
fessors use the
text that they
assign for class.
A large portion
of the univer-
sity lecture is
the professor
taking the time
out to write out
the lessons to
make sure the
students get
own set of handouts, but we don't the information they need.
"If the students and the pro-
fessors would both read the text
and use it, it would relieve a huge
burden on the professor, and stu-
dents would spend less time trying
to second guess what is going to
be on the tests Peterson said.
In the Oct. 8 TEC article.
Rulifson stated that students worry
more about the price instead of the
long term benefits which the text
may provide. He believes that text
books can be valuable tools, un-
less professors are asking students
to buy expensive textbooks for just
a few chapters. Course packets are
now being used to supplement the
few chapters in the text that the
professor might use.
"We know our subject so well
that there's an ego involved
Peterson said. "What we need to
do is pick the right book for the
lesson, and follow the book directly.
The concept is so easy it's almost
like re-inventing the wheel. The
textbook should be used as the tool
it was made for
College professors spend nu-
merous hours each year preparing
and performing lectures for stu-
dents who are required to retain
and use that knowledge for their
future careers. A large percentage
of these professors use lecture
notes that they have been develop-
ing for years, and never even read
the book they require.
See TEXT page 5
lIFfc
ecjide
Student Center scares your pants oftpage
OPINIOfll,
Dole's not a third-party supporterpage O
Women's ultimate ready for battlepage I 2.
'P&iecoAt
Tuesday
Sunny
High 70
Low 67
Wednesday
Raining
jA
High 69
Low 59

&& t& xeocA u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
HI





0
nw���I'll IM�MMMMKMIW
2
Tuesday, October 29,1996
7fte East Carolinian
Volunteers needed for vaccination day
Local program
offers free
vaccines for
senior citizens
Becky Alley
News Writer
ECU students have been pre-
sented with a new way to give back
to Pitt County and its citizens by par-
ticipating in Senior Vaccination Day
this November.
Senior Vaccination Day is Nov.
3 and it is a chance for senior citi-
zens to receive free flu and pneumo-
nia immunizations at local high
schools. This is the first time it has
been held in Pitt County; it is mod-
eled aftpr a pilot program in
Mecklenburg County called Vote and
Vaccinate.
"This year the North Carolina
State Department of Environmental
Health and Natural Resources
thought it would be a great idea to
hold a vaccination day statewide
Becky Young, director of training and
Pitt County Volunteer Services, said.
Nurses and doctors will be pro-
viding and administering the immu-
nizations, while several community
groups will be providing refresh-
ments. Young said student volun-
teers would assist in registering,
meeting and greeting and directing
senior citizens where to go.
"There will be a lead registrar
at each location and they will tell the
students what to do. The informa-
tion from the registration is very im-
portant because that is what we are
channeling back to the state and to
Medicare to let them know our re-
sults Young said.
The service will be provided to
all senior citizens, regardless of if
they have Medicare or not.
"We will not be turning any se-
nior citizen away. What we are try-
ing to do is to reach those seniors
who have not had these immuniza-
tions and want to receive them in
their communities rather than have
to go to the doctor's office. We are
recruiting seniors through commu-
nity groups and churches to get ev-
eryone involved in looking out for
our seniors Young said.
There will not be transportation
provided from the Volunteer Ser-
vices, but many local churches and
organizations are providing rides for
those who need them.
Young believes that health edu-
cation majors, dietetic majors, social
work majors and anyone interested
in working with the elderly popula-
tion would benefit from volunteering
on Senior Vaccination Day.
"We already have several dietetic
majors signed up to volunteer and
we really are just thrilled at that
Young said.
"I'd like to mention to students
at ECU that not only is this a great
event for volunteers, but we have a
special event every month that we
need volunteers for. We'd love to
have any ECU students or organiza-
tions help do special projects to give
back to the community. We also have
special site based assignments where
we pair volunteers with paid employ-
ees in particular areas they are in-
terested in Young said.
Senior citizens can receive im-
munizations at area high schools in-
cluding Ayden-Grifton, D.H. Conley,
Farmville, North Pitt and J.H. Rose.
The service is being provided in
cooperation with the Public Health
Center, Medical Society, Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, Council on Aging,
community schools, United Way, N.C.
Cooperative Extension Service, Fam-
ily Practice Center, AARP Chapter
2016, Pitt County EMS and Volun-
teer Services.
For more information on volun-
teering for this and other events
please contact Becky Young at the
Pitt County Government Volunteer
Services at 830-2560.
Grants awarded to Injury Prevention Program
Freshmen
program received
$740,000
Erika Swarts
News Writer
In its first year, the Eastern
Carolina In-
�TJ
If these projects
are effective, we
should be well on
our way to
achieving our
core purpose,
which is
improving the
health of the
citizens of
eastern North
Carolina by
reducing
injuries
� Dr. Herb Garrison,
director of the Eastern
Carolina Injury Prevention
Program
jury Preven-
tion Program
received grant
money total-
ing $740,000
from the Na-
tional High-
way Traffic
Safety Admin-
i s t r a t i o n
(NHTSA) and
Duke Univer-
sity in order
to find ways
to reduce
traumatic in-
juries and
deaths in east-
ern N.C.
"We feel
extremely for-
tunate to have
received fund-
ing for these
important in-
jury preven-
tion projects
during our
first year in operation director of
�������m
the Eastern Carolina Injury Preven-
tion Program, Dr. Herb Garrison
said.
One of the two grants to be
funded by NHTSA was given to the
Pitt Initiative for Safe Communities
Evolving Successfully. This grant,
worth $4,470 over three years, is
one of just two such programs in
the country.
According to a medical center
press release in
1993 over 13,000
patients were ad-
mitted to the emer-
gency department
at the medical cen
ter. Between 1988
and 1993 trauma
admissions to the
department rose
60 percent.
The first step
in this three year
process is to deter-
mine the injury
problems facing
Pitt County. The
group researching
the problems will
be made up of lo-
cal leaders. To-
gether they will
decide the best way
to attack the prob-
lems.
The second
project funded by
NHTSA will go to
the Rural Enhance-
ment of Access and Care from
Trauma, or REACT. This project,
receiving the majority of the grant
money, will be led by Garrison, Dr.
Kathleen Dunn and Dr. Paul
Cunningham. The goal of this
project is to reduce the amount of
unnecessary traumatic deaths.
This is a follow-up study to one
that Cunningham did in 1995. He
found nearly 29 percent of all trau-
matic deaths in eastern North Caro-
lina could have been prevented.
According to his research, too
much time in the emergency depart-
ment, delays in going to surgery
and improper or harmful medica-
tions were responsible for the in-
appropriate deaths.
They hope this new project will
develop standards for the region in
trauma care. They also hope to
teach emergency medical techni-
cians the best methods for treating
trauma patients.
The third project will build on
the National Fire Protection
Association's "Learn not to Burn"
campaign. This project, funded by
University Housinn Services
is now accepting applications for
the position of Resident Service
Representative at the three area
service desks. Preference is
given to residential students. All
applicants must have a clear
judicial record and a minimum
2.2 GPA. Applicants must be
customer service oriented.
Outgoing, friendly with good
organizational and
administrative skills. Apply at any
community service desk.
I VANT TO 60 TO
CmCOOOOOOO'S!
Thurs. Oct. 31 st 13th Annual Halloween Fiesta!
COSTUME CONTEST
1st Place $100 Gift Certificate
Downtown Greenville
757-1666
Duke University, will train 16
teacher volunteers at five Pitt
County schools. They will be
taught safety and injury prevention
techniques to bring back to the stu-
dents. Their plan is to test the stu-
dents before and after the project
in order to measure its success.
"If these projects are effective,
we should be well on our way to
achieving our core purpose, which
is improving the health of the citi-
zens of eastern North Carolina by
reducing injuries Garrison said.
Our dMiWads can help
you co :�.
Traffic
Announcements
� The turning lanes of northbound
College Hill Drive at the intersection of
E. Tenth Street have been changed. The
right lanes is for RIGHT TURNS ONLY. The
left lane has the option of proceding
across E. 10th Street to the core of
campus, or turning left onto westbound
E. Tenth Street.
This change was implemented on
October 17, but regardless of attempts
to notify people of the change, there
have been several near accidents at this
intersection.
� Effective December 2, the twenty-
seven parking spaces north of Slay Hall
and south of the Flanagan building
which are currently designated for staff
parking, will be redesignated for
resident permit parking.
11 JftT, HtMi ����� �
U-turn
W
I
c
I
f
I
1

l�
s
v
3
cr
U
(A
1
&
3
C
(A
V
o
ft
c
s
()
Free Mugs with Hugs!
Wednesday, October 30
10:00 a.muntil they're all gone!
Sponsored by ECU Ambassadors and ECU Alumni Association





0
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 29,1996
NC inmates help improve state LA Times tracks
Community
service gives
prisoners
productive outlet
Marina Henry
Staff Writer
North Carolina inmates are par-
ticipating in community service ac-
tivities, varying from scraping bar-
nacles off of the ferries in Mann's
Harbor to shoveling ice and snow
from storms in the upper part of the
state.
"Non-profit organizations can
call us and fill out request forms for
labor assistance. We provide the in-
mates, the transportation and the
supervision. All the agency needs
to do is tell us what needs to be done
and show us where said Pitt
County Correctional Center Assis-
tant Supervisor Larry Dale.
Each work squad consists of 12
inmates and one supervising officer.
The inmate must meet many qualifi-
cations dealing with temperament,
desire to help the community and
determination to become a produc-
tive member of society. Each appli-
cant is carefully evaluated by a panel
of law agents.
Each squad member works an
eight hour day, totaling about 72
hours of work per day, per
squadsaving the community an av-
erage of $300 per day for a project.
Anywhere from one to five
squads are used to complete a
project. Typical projects include
painting schools and school buses,
cleaning up after natural disasters (
like the recent hurricanes) and
cleaning cemeteries and dumps.
They also construct picnic areas and
steps for the upkeep of the many
North Carolina parks.
"What one inmate lacks the
knowledge to do, another will teach
Food JL Drug
Always &ood. Always Fresh
REGULAR. HOMESTYLE
Kroger Premium
Orange Juice,
12-C3!kn
Tamarack Farms
Apple Oder
Kroger
Potato Chips
140Z.
ALL VARIETIES
Kroger
Donuts
12-Ct.
ALL VARIETIES
Tyson
Chick n'Quick
9-10.5u. Pkg.
z
FEPPERONI. DELUXE OR SAUSAGE
Mama Rosa
Pizza
mm.
�15 VARIETIES TO CHOOSE FROM'
LOW-FATOR REGULAR
Gourmet
Jumbo Muffins
SELECTED VARIETIES
Healthy Choice
Entrees
�fM
Oreo
i Cookies
7-15.5-QZ.
2&z.
VIRGINIA
Red or Golden
Delicious Apples
5. Bag
him. They really help each other
out Dale said.
The two year old community
work program has provided 906,159
hours of labor for N.C. communities,
and 1,260 new jobs for the inmates.
Originating in 1994 at Greene
County Correctional Center, it be-
gan with only 56 squads from 16
prisons and has now grown to 90
squads from 33 prisons this year.
Another 51 squads are expected to
be added next year. The program
was originally started by Governor
Jim Hunt as a way to get the work
done and get the inmates out of the
centers and working.
"The Governor wants to see
more inmates working said Patty
McQuilllan, the N.C. director of pub-
lic information.
The program has saved the com-
munities $4,666,718. However, the
communities receive more than just
monetary savings from these work-
ers.
In Raleigh, downed trees left by
Hurricane Fran have been moved
and chopped into firewood, which
was donated to Wake Opportunities,
a welfare organization that donates
wood to about 100 families every
one to two weeks during the win-
See INMATE page 5
Dole at polls
WASHINGTON (AP) - Trying to
shore up his support in the tradition-
ally Republican South, Bob Dole was
courting Georgia and Florida in an
accelerated mode.
Dole's campaign plans hopscotch
stops in several other states, includ-
ing up to three days in California - a
54-vote electoral prize the Republican
nominee will contest to the end.
A new poll today indicated it will
be an uphill battle - one the Dole
seems to relish; Clinton holds a 20-
point lead over Dole among likely
California voters, according to a Los
Angeles Times poll.
"I fought for America before, and
I'm ready to fight for America's future
again and again and again Dole said
Tuesday in Westerville, Ohio, referring
to his World War II service.
"We're very excited about this
race
The Times poll put Clinton ahead
54 percent to 34 percent, virtually the
same as a month ago when he led 53
percent to Dole's 36 percent
The Times poll interviewed 1,551
Californians over a five-day period
beginning the day after the final
Clinton-Dole debate in San Diego on
Eating & Drinking
WIN USATenvois A gMtplace to
RELAX. WWE FUN AND ENJOY GOOD SPORTS
Absolutely the best
Buffalo Wings
in town
LADIES NIGHT FEATURING:
THE GROOVE RIDERS
NO COVER CHARGE
$1.75 CORONA AND
CORONA LIGHT
WINE BY THE GLASS
JUST 10 (t
Winn Dixie Market Place
355-2946
OcL 16. The sample included 1,038
registered voters who said they are
likely to vote Nov. 5. The margin of
error is plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
At a series of stops Tuesday in
Michigan and Ohio, Dole repeatedly
urged people not to count him out
despite Clinton's solid double-digit
lead in the polls, including some bed-
rock Republican states.
Dole vowed to pull an upset akin
to Truman's narrow 1948 victory over
Republican Thomas E. Dewey.
"I never did meet President
Dewey, did you? No. I'm like Harry
Truman. I'm from the Midwest and
I'm plainspoken, and I'm going to win
whether you like it or not Dole said
at one rally, brimming with optimism
despite a cold that has left him hoarse.
One of the most famous political
photos in American political history
is Truman holding aloft a newspaper
mistakenly proclaiming his defeat at
the hands of Dewey. Now, Dole insists
the country is in for a similar surprise,
that voters will turn t� his message
of honest leadership.
"The headline for Nov. 6 will be:
Ohio goes for Dole - Bob Dole elected
president of the United States de-
clared Ohio Gov. George Voinovich.
"Regardless of what the pundits are
saying, this election is about charac-
ter and keeping your word
Although Dole enjoys the sym-
bolism of Truman's victory, there are
some important differences:
-Truman was the incumbent
president, with all the political advan-
tages of the White House. He used
that edge to the utmost on a 9,504-
mile train trip through 18 states that
drew hundreds of thousands of people
as the election hit its stretch run.
-A Gallup organization survey
showed that Truman had shaved
Dewey's lead from 13 points in mid-
August to just 5 points in mid-Octo-
ber - before the train trip that drew
intense media attention.
The Dole campaign has not
shown the same kind of movement
at least in opinion polls. And the
former Kansas senator is still battling
to shore up states that should be cer-
tain GOP strongholds like Alabama
and Arizona.
Still, Dole repeatedly urged his
audiences Tuesday to work hard in his
behalf, taking heart in the boisterous
response he got from GOP partisans.
"This is the kind of spirit that will
win the election he said in Troy,
Mich. "America's worth fighting for.
Let's give America back to the
people
Play to win
on our turf.
Please
attend our information session at
Career Planning & Placement scheduled for
6pm on Wednesday, October 30th. On-Campus
interviews are scheduled for Thursday,
October 31st.
At TruGreen-ChemLawn,
we've got everything you
need to make your sales
career a success.
TruGreen-ChemLawn is
one of the fastest grow-
ing, most profitable
service companies in
America with 10,000
employees and over 170
offices in 43 states,
including a new office
in Greenville, NC.
From our headquarters
in Memphis, Tennessee,
TruGreen-ChemLawn

serves more than 2.5
million residential and
commercial customers
nationwide. We are the
nation s largest lawn
and tree care company,
with close to S600
million in sales.
At the helm of this
dynamic, progressive
company is a well-
trained, highly motivated
sales team dedicated to
increasing our customer
base and leading the
company to even
greater heights.
Quality Service Setuork
Vf nUMaittr � Ikrmlntx - Mrry MM.t?
' TrvOrctn ChtmUwn � V�t'ic�� Ifemc $hiu
TRUGKENdtWlUrW
A Hatter eft ZasU � Bar & Bistro
Celebrate Homecoming
weekend with fine dining
in a caeual atmoei
per fesevoatiens, call
355-1111
Plaza
Q
RIGGAN
SHOE REPAIR
TRekatiUHf SA�c it-
$ecHUU fox 24 If tax
iw &t - f?c 2calUu
Our SfitcitUtif U Sale &
"Zee. "RcjhUx
Men's and Women's shoes for
sale $5 to $35.
Rivergate East
Shopping Center
3193 a East 10th st
Phone 758-0204
Mon-Fn 7:30am - 6 pm
Sat 900 a.m. � 2 pm.
A. R. RIGGAN,
OWNER







Tuesday, October 29, 1996
The East Carolinian
Senator expecting eighth-term win
93 year-old Strom
Thurmond looks
for another victory
COLUMBIA. S.C. (AP) - Sen.
Strom Thurmond's race for an
eighth term has the air of a victory
lap. Even those who say it's time
for the 93-year-old Republican
warhorse to call it a day are paying
grudging homage.
Thurmond, leading his 43-year-
old Democratic opponent. Elliott
Close, in the polls, is content to
keep it that way.
The nation's oldest senator
ever - he set the record earlier this
year - campaigns mostly on week-
ends at parades, festivals and foot-
ball games.
He poses for pictures, shakes
hands and occasionally gives a ge-
neric stump speech about how "it
would take my opponent 60 years
to catch up to what 1 can do in the
next six years
Close, heir to a textile fortune,
is in a quandary. While he wants
voters to retire Thurmond, he finds
it necessary to acknowledge
Thurmond's legendary ability to
help constituents.
"I think he used to get results.
I'm not sure how much is done for
this state specifically by Strom
Thurmond and how much is done
by his staff Close said.
Thurmond, chairman of the
Senate Armed Services Committee,
has been criticized in recent years
as dependent on his staff and out
of touch with the intricacies of
public policy. Recent disclosures
about Thurmond's use of state po-
lice as chauffeurs also caused a few
grumbles.
But Thurmond has loomed
large in South Carolina politics
since he won an extraordinary
write-in campaign for the Senate in
1954.
Two years later, fulfilling a
promise to seek election in the tra-
ditional manner, he resigned and
won the seat back. He left the
Democratic Party for the GOP in
1964, and hasn't had a tough cam-
paign since 1978, when Democrat
Charles "Pug" Ravenel held him to
55 percent of
the vote.
"Thurmond's
done a good bit
for South Caro-
lina, but I still
say he should
get down said
72-year-old Rob-
ert Lewis Griffin
of Greenville.
But then
there are those
like Ray
McAdams, a 67-
year-old retired
Duke Power Co.
employee from
Cherokee County.
"A lot of people, when a man
gets to be a little up in age, they
like to turn him out to pasture
McAdams said. "I think
(Thurmond) is a person who really
goes to bat for the little people.
What I mean by that is the work-
ing class of people
Close admits his family's reac-
tion to the prospect of his challeng-
ing Thurmond was hardly positive.
"Mainly, they thought I was nuts
for thinking about it he said.
He most often addresses the
age issue obliquely by promising to
serve no more than two terms and
frequently mentioning that
Thurmond began his public life in
the late 1920s.
But in a recent
Close commer-
cial, elderly ac-
tors talk about
how Thurmond
is too old and
needs to "come
home
If he wins
and completes
his six-year term,
Thurmond,
whose birthday
is Dec. 5, would
be 100. But he
has never been
one to let age
stand his way. At the age of 66, for
instance. Thurmond married 22-
year-old beauty queen Nancy
Moore. The couple separated in
1991. though Thurmond continues
to wear his wedding band. One of
their four children. Nancy, was hit
by a car while walking and killed
in 1993.
In tune with his conservative
state, Close supports a balanced
SeeSENTORpage5
"A lot of people,
when a man gets
to be a little up in
age, they like to
turn him out to
pasture
� Ray McAdams, a 67-year-
old retired Duke Power Co.
employee from Cherokee
County
115 � j 3
ARTS AND LITERARY MAG AZINE
HAS EXTENDED IT'S LITERARY DEADLINE TO.
Monday, NOVEMBER 4th
WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TQ SUBMIT THEIR BEST WORK
THERE WILL BE A. $2 FEE PH IN1RY Al I I MM! S MUSI Al SU UiMAIN A i iH'v 11
MAXIMUM OF THREE SUBMISSIONS PHI PI HSON
DISCOVER A
LITTLE CORNER OF
U
CONE JOIN US FOR BREAKFAST AND
RECEIVE A FREE
COURTSIDE CAFE COFFEE CUP
MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:00 -10:30
(Serving Greenville Since 1950
Lunch is served from 10:30 - 5:00. Monday - Friday
757-1716 � 300 Evans SLreet � 757-1716
4A faA to4 irt tei iii ifti Ail M Ml Ml Ml
f W � � W Wr Wr
�ctober 3� through November 2nd�
25 OFF Marvel, DC & Image Back Issues
50 OFF All Other Back Issues
Boxes & Boxes of 10 Comics, Including:
X-Titles, Spawn, Spider-Man, Batman, &
Many Others!
Register for Great Giveaways!
Manv Other Great Deals
757-�94
"Get Yours At Heroes
v x k 44
P T f f WW T T T
TO CHRISTIE FOX
THE WINNER
OF OUR
-
��� �
�� ?
� �

MASTERCARD
ACTS CONTEST!
GOOD LUCK
AT THE
�4

- '
t
I
SEMIFINALS!
ALSO TO DUALITY
& BRUCE STEVENS
OUR 2ND AND 3RD
PLACE WINNERS!
��it!(M (OlUllMEUlimUICH
SPONSORED BY ECU STUDENT UNION SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE

4�-un





0MNHMBHHH

Tfre East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 29, 1996
TEXT from page 1 SENATOR from page
"Studies have shown that the
lecture format is the worst way to
learn Peterson said. "You need to
create a format where the student
will have to read the text in order
to take part in the class. The most
important aspect of teaching is
finding a student's misconceptions
and being able to correct them
Peterson recommended that in
order for a professor and a student
to get the most out of a lecture or
a textbook they must center the lec-
ture around interactive or "hands-
on" use of the information in or-
der for the professors to find out
what the students do and don't un-
derstand.
budget amendment and campaign
finance reform and sometimes
speaks about "fighting Ted
Kennedy and the liberals" in the
Senate if elected. He refuses politi-
cal action committee donations.
In one-on-one exchanges he's
forceful and animated. On the cam-
paign trail, however, it's clear Close
is unlikely to ever become a
Thurmond-style gladhander. "I'm
shy Close says.
He has tried to get Thurmond
to debate him, but Thurmond, who
says he last debated an opponent
in 1950, refuses.
"I run my own campaign, let
them run theirs Thurmond said.
The senator focuses mostly on
Graduation Announcements

Each announcement is:
� Emblazoned with Gold School Seal
� Comes with free matching envelopes
� Printed in 7-10 days
� Personlized with
YOUR NAME and DEGREE
the constituent service that even
Close praises: getting passports
and wayward Social Security
checks for people or grants for lo-
cal communities.
"Probably you ought to come
up here and look through all of
what we are doing Thurmond said
in a recent telephone interview
from Washington. "It's just amaz-
ing the things we do
Thurmond rarely campaigns on
national issues, speaking instead of
what he wants to deliver or has de-
livered for the state.
His commercials use "real
people In one, an elderly widow
with a lilting Southern drawl talks
of how Thurmond made sure she
got her husband's Social Security
money after his death.
A few years ago, asked by a re-
porter for a suggested epitaph,
Thurmond responded: "How about,
'He loved the people, and the
people loved him?
Find it in our
classifieds. Only $2
for 25 words with
vaild student I.D.
INMATE from page 3
ter. From clearing Umstead Park
alone, 40 to 50 hardwood logs were
cleared. This will provide warmth
for many elderly citizens this win-
ter. Houses of needy people are also
being renovated.
At the North Carolina Sword of
Peace Historical Site in Alamance
County, where many historical out-
door dramas are performed for the
public, trees have been cleared so
that performances may continue.
Trees were also cleared and the
grounds raked at the Alamance
Battleground. Debris was cleared,
holes were filled and walking trails
were cleaned up at Jones State Park
by Bladen Youth Center inmates.
Bush axes, shovels and rakes were
used to clearing the Aycock birth-
place near Pikeville. Carolina Beach
State Park, Fort Fisher and Kure
Beach recreation areas have also
been cleaned by work squads.
"We get letters from the com-
Available at
-The�?�$$l
HAPPY
516 S. Coonche Snrei Don mown Gieenvwr
Order Until Nov. 13th
CaD 758-2616
Only $19.99
for 25
and 751 each
For Additional
Announcements
Tuesday
20C Wings
Prizes!
Giveaways!
Best Halloween
Party in
Greenville
We warned our Buffalo! We told htm that
creepy, crawly, scary things lurked in the
dark. But, Oh no! He knew it all! Just look
at him now. But that -won't stop us from
offering you a goulish delight!
and Anniversary
Party Tonight!
Brace Frye
on the Patio
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECK
1 14 East Fifth Street � 758 - 9191
munity and government agencies
saying how much money was saved
and praising the inmates for the
high quality of work they have done.
But the best response is the eager-
ness of the inmates to do these jobs.
They really enjoy doing things to
help the community McQuellan
said.
Closer to home, the inmates
from the Pitt County Correctional
Center are scheduled to clean up
hurricane and flood damage in the
next few weeks in Winterville and
Ayden.
"It is a good program because
it helps the smaller communities get
jobs done that they ordinarily
wouldn't be able to afford doing.
They have a limited number of em-
ployees and the work is good for the
inmates as well as society said Lois
Sowers from the Pitt County Cor-
rectional Center.
(JvlJVlJCi from page 1
on the severity of the crime.
Attacks have also been occur-
ring close to campus involving ECU
students.
Senior Josh Paucher was at-
tacked at Fourth St. and Library.
St. recently. He was walking home
from downtown at about 1 a.m.
when he was attacked from behind
by two males. The males stole his
wallet and have not been arrested.
However, he does not feel un-
safe on campus or the surrounding
area now.
"1 have been on campus many
times at night alone over the past
four years and have never had any-
thing happen Paucher said. "It's
just a nuisance having to get a new
license, credit cards and stuff
The 1995 Crime in N.C. Report,
published by the NC Department
of Justice and the State Bureau of
Investigation (SBI) reports that
there were 30.230 reports of aggra-
vated assault in Greenville that
year. This was an increase from the
29,888 accounts in 1994.
Checkers
BURGERS FRIES � COLAS
Show
Student ID
and recieve
15 off!
8pm to closing.
Not valid with any other discount.
Men's SEXY Boxer
Contest
Tuesday, October 29th
1996
9pm-2pm
Hours:
Sam-lOpm Sun-Thur
8am-llpm Fri & Sat
Phone in orders 321-6779
� E " TFREETmalF Fry
Chicken with Purchase of;
Sandwich, Get! any Sandwich
ONE FREE!
Champ
Burgers
$3,96
Expires Nov.
30th. 1996.
Checkers
Sale U not axajaexl On� coupon pa' pa'aon pai vtart Nol valid
and Medium
Grilled or Fried.
Expires Nov.
30th. 1996.
Checkers
Drink.
Sales tan nol included One c
I
I
I
I
I
I
3U,n- �" g5iiut.eaud
NM vaho I Sales ia ml mciudeo Oi coupon pe peraon par mail Not vaad I
participating More only
I
Expires Nov.
30th, 1996.
Checkers
1st prize $100 cash
2nd prize $50 cash
3rd prize $25 cash
"Buy "One" T guy "Four Vim- i
� Sandwiches, j Champs j
Get ONE of , witn chCcse!
�Equal or Lesser;
! Value FREE! !
Champ,
get ONE
FREE!
i
i
i
i
i
i
admission $1 members
$3 guests
Expires Nov
30th. 1996
Checkers
r�utw��n�m
I
I
J I
OLUt
Expires Nov
30th. 1996
Checkers
i
Expires Nov.
30th 1996
Checkers
aM I Saw? ta� included One coupon pat peraon pat viaa Nol aho
' eating akxee only
hB3"iF7ee" i Milfehakes i
Make any
sandwich
a combo!
no coupon necessary.
Coffee!
8am-llam
with any purchase.
Milkshakes
HALF PRICE
3pm - 6pm
Contestants can call 758-4591 or 752-4715 or come by The Elbo!
i
I
I
Checkers
.VVWW.V.VJ
fa u ira n �� ��if �coiJ I
no coupon necessary.
Checkers
no coupon necessary.





00m�mmm$ ifmmmmmW
Tuesday, October 29,1996
The East Carolinian
4
"
O2
The East Carolinian
�- !w Brandon Wadded. Editor-in-Chief
Bob Dole
would prefer
Ross Perot to
step down
from the
presidential
election race.
It's America;
shouldn't we
encourage
active
participation
by all
interested
parties?
The times, they are a-changin As we move into the next
millenium, the face of politics is undergoing major plastic surgery.
When was the last time that a politician was so scared of the
damage he might face from an opponent that he asked him to
step down? Well it happened with Bob Dole. Dole has recently
asked presidential candidate Ross Perot to take himself out of the
race so that the G.O.P won't suffer a split in direction and motiva-
tion.
Whether or not you support Dole, you have to admit that this
request is a bit out of line. We wonder if this might not set a new
standard for our political races. In what has for countless years
been a two-party race, the run for president was unexpectedly
given a wake up call during the '92 election, when Perot made
himself a viable candidate with the support of close to 20 percent
of the voting public
Although Perot never seemed to be a serious contender, the
simple fact that he was present gave voice to an outcry that has
been building for several decades. The people want more than
two choices. Now that we have a second election in which three
parties are running, the time seems viable for a multitude of op-
tions.
Yet Dole doesn't seem to want this. He is scared of a political
system that involves more than two sides.
And you can be sure that the Democrats are as well. If Clinton
were the one who would suffer from Perot's presence in the race,
than he would likely want Perot gone too. There's no way to tell if
Clinton would actually ask Perot to remove himself as Dole did,
but it's a sure bet that Clinton would wish that Perot wasn't run-
ning.
Which brings us again to Dole. So what if Dole is slipping in
the polls? So what if Perot comes out of nowhere at the last minute
to include himself in this race? So what if many people feel that
Perot is annoying and doesn't stand much of a chance? The point
is that a number of people do believe in Perot, or at the very least
believe that support should be given for a third choice.
If Dole were to have his way and Perot dropped out of the
race because of Dole's whining, then what kind of precedent would
that set for the races to come? It seems to go against some of our
American principles, like fairness, healthy competition, working
hard, striving to win against all odds and so on.
Politics may be black and white now, but with determination
and luck, perhaps that will change in the future and vvith shades
of gray, we won't be stuck choosing between Dole and Clinton.
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
"y Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
IV � Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Andy Farfcas, Staff Illustrator
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Any L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 192S, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366
ECU needs a new congressman
To the Editor,
I am writing in response to Jay Myers' article of
Oct. 8, in which he (or she?) attacked a particular
senator from North Carolina, while vilifying the South
in general. Although 1 have no objections to the criti-
cisms of the senator, who is very much as Myers paints
him, I do object to these cliche criticisms of the en-
tire South. I have no doubt that we are less than per-
fect, but I don't think we are quite the ogres this
article suggests.
One point that Myers attempts to make is that,
so far as face relations are concerned, the South has
changed very little and lags far behind the rest of the
country. This is blatantiy untrue. Though it certainly
is true that there are racists in the South, the same
can be said about any other region of the country.
Look at the beating of Rodney King in California, or
more recently, the acquittal of the police officer in
New York who strangled to death a young Hispanic
male. There are Klan marches in the Midwest and
skinheads in the North. On the other hand, while the
South is perhaps no better sic the rest of the coun-
try as regards racial bigotry, I think it is obvious to
anyone with even a cursory knowledge of history that
it is a paradise compared to what it once was.
Also, I am not really clear what this article is
saying about censorship. If Myers is saying that it's
bad, I certainly agree. But if the suggestion is that
censorship is commonplace in the South, I have to
disagree. The fact that he (or she) was able to get
this unpleasant article into print destroys the censor-
ship argument.
I'll close by simply saying that I am very tired of
bigoted, stereotypical characterizations of the South
as a whole, since we are as diverse in our views and
behaviors as anyone else. And I might also add that I
am not the slightest bit interested in the gastric dis-
turbances of Myers' grandmother.
Daniel Ketchum
Senior
HistAnth Doable Major
To the Editor,
As the writer of this particular article, I would like to
respond to Mr. Ketchum's letter (I will go ahead and make the
assumption that Daniel is a man's name).
I believe sir, that thou dost protest too much. If you had
paid closer attention to the theme of the article, you would
have been able to pick up the fact that my article was never
intended to make any cliche criticisms of the South. 1 love the
South I'm a Southerner.
What I did intend to do was make other Southerners who
had read the article aware of what I find to be a major problem
that we share at a cultural level. Southerners try to cover up or
dismiss or ignore problems that should be dealt with, and I
used my family as well as Senator Jesse Helms as examples of
this error in judgment
I attacked Helms in particular on the subjects of family
values, racism, gun control, sex education, censorship and de-
segregation because I feel that his stance on these issues is
indicative of the cultural problem to which I referred. As a
Southerner, I personally don't agree with his position, and I
actively protest against him at every' election. However, he has
been reflected so often that 1 made the assumption that there
must be a large number of Southerners who do agree with his
position.
This is where you come in, Mr. Ketchum. You yourself
serve as a perfect example of the problem to which I was refer-
ring.
You make a concerted effort to deny that anything is wrong
here in the South and vilify me for even proposing that it
might be so. Also, you refer to my grandmother's problem as
"gastric disturbances" when in actuality what my grandmother
was trying to cover up with that infamous match was much
more than mere gas. She had a bowel movement okay. Every-
one has them. I have them, you have them, and my grand-
mother certainly has them. What I want for the South, what I
want from you, Mr. Ketchum, is to stop denying that it hap-
pens.
Let's all forget the pretty face and the nice smile. Sure,
things have changed. If you want proof of the fact that I have
noticed the changes, then read my column that ran in the Oct
22 paper. However, we still have a long way to go.
That's what you need to admit Mr. Ketchum. If things are
ever going to really change down here, and I mean really change,
then we're going to have to deal with the fact that things haven't
changed as much as we would like to believe that they have. I
hope that that is clear enough for you
If you take the time to read this letter, then you might just
realize that we're really on the same side. I don't want to be
pigeonholed as an "ogre" for being Southern anymore than
you do. But there are plenty of "ogres" down here, and they
haven't changed since they first set foot in this country hun-
dreds of years ago. Let's you and I change things, Mr. Ketchunt
Let's stop the "ogres" from speaking for us. Let's show the
world what the South is really about
If I can answer any othei questions that you have about
my stance on things, please feel free to contact me at The East
Carolinian.
Jay Myers
Graduate Student
English
ECU needs a new congressman
In this big election year of 1996,
forget all the big, glossy political cam-
paigns on the national level and think
closer to home. Our congressman is
arguably the most powerful govern-
ment official we have over our local
lives. That is why it is so important for
ECU to have a good congressman and
that's why we should consider George
Parrott
Currently, ECU'S congressman is
Walter Jones, Jr. and Representative
Eva Clayton also presides over other
parts of Greenville. Congressman Jones
has one incredible asset and that is the
legend of his extraordinary father.
Walter Jones, Sr. governed over the
first district for many years and did an
incredible job. Jones Sr. encouraged
his young son to get involved in poli-
tics, and indeed, he took after his fa-
ther. He was appointed to the State
House, where he served as an able state
representative for 12 years. After Jones
Srs unfortunate passing, Eva Clayton
was picked to fill his shoes. Jones Jr.
left the State House to run against
Clayton, and was soundly defeated.
Walter Jr. was upset. He knew he
couldn't defeat Clayton, so he did two
unconscionable things.
First he ran in 1994 as the only
U.S. Representative not to live in his
district' Secondly, he sold his soul and
changed every political belief he had
held for years and changed his affilia-
tion from Democratic to Republican
just to win. He was pro-choice for years,
and all of a sudden, he became a pro-
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
congressman
voted 100
percent of the
time with the
Speaker of the
House.
life ultra-conservative. He was a cru-
sader for campaign finance reform, and
all of a sudden, he raked in thousands
of dollars from the special interests.
He changed his core beliefs just to get
elected, and got away with it He de-
feated Martin Lancaster in 1994, and
here we are.
An important thing to ask is: What
has our congressman done for ECU? In
the words of my grandmother, he hasn't
done diddly-squat In fact he voted to
cut $10 billion out of the College Loan
program. He has voted to eliminate the
Department of Education, has cut fund-
ing for Public Broadcasting and has
vowed never to support an increase in
the minimum wage as long as he is in
Congress. He has cut $2.3 billion from
the Environmental Protection Agency.
He also cut $270 billion- out of Medi-
care while offering a $245 tax cut to
the wealthiest one percent of the popu-
lation.
These are all facts.
His opponent is George Parrott He
is a man who wants to represent each
and every student at East Carolina Uni-
versity, as well as the rest of the third
district He wants to right the wrongs
committed by the extreme Gingrich
Congress. Parrott, though, is a moder-
ate Democrat He is tough on crimeV
vowing to work on reducing the length
of the ridiculously slow appeals pro-
cesses and he wholeheartedly supports
victims' rights. He is a small business-
man and wants to promote eastern
North Carolina businesses. He supports
Governor Hunt's successful Smart Start
program, and he wants to strengthen
our flimsy environmental laws. It's time
to quit talking about it as Parrott say$
and get the job done.
Finally, on deficit reduction
Parrott states "I want to work to elimi-
nate the deficit and balance the bud
get but not on the backs of students,
the elderly and the environment" Most
importantly, Parrott wants to work for'
us, and not Newt Gingrich. What do I
mean? If you exclude several meaning-
less votes orchestrated to dilute their
compared voting record with Mr.
Gingrich vsuch as voting no on the Daily
Journal), the fact is that our congress-
man, Walter Jones, Jr. voted 100 per-
cent of the time with the Speaker of
the House. 100 percent!
That's not a congressman, that's a'
puppet
We need someone to represent'
ECU. We need George Parrott
Support progressive change on the bench
, , � j iii.4 in A�tv.oct-1-
Over a year has passed since OJ.
Simpson was found not guilty for the
murders of Nicole Brown and Ron
Goldman. During the Simpson trial and
the media circus that surrounded it the
subject of domestic violence was brought
into the spotlight Domestic violence
tears at the very fabric of family and is
an extremely troubling issue.
Women's advocate groups are to be
commended for their efforts to end spou-
sal abuse. However, as with any cause,
an extremely liberal view can prove det-
rimental to one's efforts. Columnist John
Leo points to an importanL study of do-
mestic abuse. The study began in 1975
and was most recently updated in 1992.
In the May 13,1996 issue of U.S. News
and World Report. Leo states that due
in large part to the efforts of women's
organizations, husband abuse toward
wives has declined since 1975. During
that same time, though, spousal abuse
toward husbands has remained static As
a result instances of wives assaulting
husbands are now higher than husbands
abusing wives.
Ironically, under mandatory arrest
laws, states are now seeing more wives
arrested for petty assaults than husbands.
By focusing on one side of the issue and
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
So, ladies think
twice before you
slap your
boyfriend, under
liberal legislation
you may be the
one arrested.
demonizing men, Leo maintains that far
left groups have missed a prime oppor-
tunity to lower all domestic abuse cases.
Also in typical liberal fashion, arrest laws
that were supposedly meant to help
' women are now getting them arrested.
So, ladies think twice before you slap
your boyfriend; under liberal legislation
you may be the one arrested.
This is not to say that women's
abuse is to be trivialized; it is a very le-
gitimate issue. Instances of husband-to-
wife violence are much more violent
Women are much more likely to be seri-
ously injured or killed in a domestic vio-J-
lence incident The time has come for
solid reform that protects the rights of�
women and children, rather that penal-
izing victims.
It is good to know that people are'
working to stop such violence. Ann Ht
Barnhill is such a person. Barnhill is a-
trial lawyer specializing in domestic vio1
lence and family law. Since 1979 Barnhill'
has fought for the rights of abused1
women here in Pitt County.
With sexual harassment and domes-
tic violence so prevalent in society, Mrs'
Barnhill is a bright light on the horizon; -
In an unprecedented move, Barnhill is'
running for election to the district court'
bench in Pitt County. She is the first
woman to ever file for election for this
position in Pitt County's history. If elected.
Barnhill will be the first woman and the
first Republican to be elected to this po�
tion. In the true Republican tradition she
will fight for individual rights, this time
the rights of battered women. Help to
show that Pitt County is - progressive com-
munity with the interests of women and
family at heart Let's help to break Pitt
County's "Good 01' Boy" network with
the election of Ann H. Barnhill to District
Court Judge.





mMHBMM ����
��MMMMM
BHaMRMHHMHMMMMMHHHH
Tuesday, October 29, 1996
ffre East Carolinian
"tcfie
Midnight Madness
mauls Mendenhall
Sty� oi �&& f4t&
Classical music comes to campus

-4
W
�"lk
vffo'fl
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
Last year, Midnight Madness had a ghoul, a pumpkin carving contest, and a buffet of
scrambled brains, vulture gizzards, ghost blood, quicksand, wolf biscuits and mummy skin.
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
The oldest chamber orchestra
will perform both classical and
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Think classical music isn't your
thing? Well, think again.
�� The London Chamber Orchestra
has been convincing people to change
their minds about classical music for
years. One of the Orchestra's goals is
to reach as many people as they can
while still maintaining the quality of
good classical music. How do they do
that? Easy - by convincing even hard-
core rock fans that classical music isn't
so bad.
Led by musical director Christo-
pher Warren-Green since 1988, the
London Chamber Orchestra gave its
first European tour in 1992 when it
traveled to over ten countries. Dur-
Photo Courtesy of Columbia Artists Managements Inc.
of its kind in Great Britain, The London Chamber Orchestra,
contemporary pieces in Wright Auditorium tonight at 8 p.m.
ing that tour, they performed success-
ful concerts at traditional classical
venues as well as at many venues that
were traditionally for "rock" music.
Their ability to draw broad audi-
ences is a tribute to the vision of
Warren-Green. His career began at an
early age. At 19 he joined the Acad-
emy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields and was
named concertmaster of the
Philharmonia Orchestra of London
(POL) when he was only 21.
Think about that - I'm twenty
and all I've done so far is write a few
articles for a college paper. Maybe I
should have paid more attention to
my violin during elementary school?
For six years Warren-Green
served as concertmaster of the POL
until, in 1985. he returned to the Acad-
emy to serve as concertmaster. A per-
former as well as a concertmaster.
Warren-Green has performed as solo-
ist with the London Philharmonic
Orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra, the City of Birmingham
Symphony and the Singapore Sym-
phony, among others. He has worked
with such famous conductors as
Giuseppe Sinopoli and Michael Tilson
Thomas. He has conducted the Lon-
don Philharmonia in a performance
for Princess Diana. In short, the man
knows his stuff.
I know you're sitting there think-
ing, "Why should I go see them in
concert?"
Let me tell you why.
The London Chamber Orchestra
is unlike any orchestra you will ever
See LONDON page 10
"I'm gonna wait 'til the mid-
night hour, that's when my love
comes tumblin' down rhythm and
blues singer Wilson Pickett once
sang.
With no disrespect to "Wicked"
Pickett, Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter and the Division of Student Life
hope that you'll reserve that time
spot for them as they let the fun
tumble down during Midnight Mad-
ness on Halloween night.
The best part: it's free for all
students.
Midnight Madness will be held
from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the stu-
dent center. Activities slated to run
through the night include video
karaoke, a psychic hotline and open
bowling, billiards, and table tennis;
also planned are a DJ dance, for-
tune tellers and, at midnight, a cos-
tume contest.
New this year to Midnight Mad-
ness is Illusion N' Fusion - virtual-
reality based fun specially geared
for Halloween. Illusionist and comic
Adam Steinfield will perform at
10:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
If after all these events you
find your self thirsty or hungry,
that is covered, too: Witches Brew
will be served throughout the,
evening, and from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.
the dining hall will serve up a free
breakfast buffet.
The buffet menu may be of in-
terest to you: scrambled brains, vul-
ture gizzards, ghost blood, quick-
sand, wolf biscuits and mummy
skin. Somehow that translates into
eggs, sausage, grits, sausage gravy,
See MIDNIGHT page 10
0D IZevceuA
Academy Award animation available
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Toy Story, the first ever fully
computer-animated feature film, is
due out on video today, and it's sure
to generate boffo business in rent-
als and sales. While this animated
phenomena deserves all the atten-
tion and praise it receives, another
animated wonder that deserves the
same respect is currently out on
video.
The dynamic team of Wallace
& Gromit (a dense inventor and a
rather brilliant dog. respectively)
has become a huge hit on the BBC
in Britain and is developing a
strong cult following here (so far,
over 100.000 Wallace & Gromit vid-
eos have been sold in the United
States).
While the Wallace & Gromit
series is just as impressive as Toy
Story, there are some distinct dif-
ferences. First, Wallace & Gromit
are not products of the computer
age. Instead, they are given life
through the classic style of
claymation, but of a much higher-
than-usual quality than is normai
for the art form. The ciaymation of
Wallace & Gromit is just as cutting
edge as any computer-generated ef-
fect, and it has not gone unnoticed
from the critical community. Thus
far, the Wallace & Gromit series has
been nominated for three Academy
Awards and has won two.
The second difference is a mi-
nor one but should still be pointed
out. The Wallace & Gromit films are
animated shorts instead of features,
meaning they only last approxi-
mately 30 minutes each. Still, each
30-minute tape is filled with fea-
ture-film quality.
The final distinction centers
around the humor of Wallace &
Gromit. They are creations of the
Brits, and. as many know, the Brit-
ish notion of humor can be a bit
The Jon Spencer
Blues Explosion
Now I Got Worry
Rusted Root
Remember
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
Photo Courtesy of BBC productions
Claymation artist Nick Park's dense inventor, Wallace, and
his rather brilliant dog, Gromit, bring fun to the Oscar level.
more subtle and bizarre than the
American and sometimes it's just
plain silly.
But that only makes Wallace &
Gromit all the more delicious. The
films exhibit not only animation at
its best but also humor filled with
wit and intelligence, a nice alterna-
tive to most animation I - the
market.
The genius behind the ani-
mated duo is Nick Park, who be-
gan his life-long project back in
1983 when he started working on
the first Wallace � Gromit story. A
Grand Day Out. Park's expertise in
claymation is the result of a career
filled with ground-breaking mo-
ments in animation. He was one ol
the masterminds who thrilled the
eye with dazzling animated effects
in Peter Gabriel's award-winning
video for the song "Sledgeham-
mer With successes like that on
his resume. Park soon found him-
self able to freely explore his own
narrative ideas through Wallace &
Gromit.
Credit must be given to Park
for his ability to imbue his clay-
characters with so much personal-
ity. These characters immediately
grow on the viewer through their
idiosyncrasies. As Park points out.
Wallace is the denser of the two,
whereas Gromit is more clever
he's on top of everything. He's also
the more sensitive of the pair. He
is Wallace's faithful friend, and
that's been his biggest problem.
See AWARD page 9
Finally. The Blues Explosion is
back with a new album. That's not
to say that the members of the band
haven't been busy.
Since their last album. Orange,
Jon himself has recorded an album
with Boss Hog (a band which in-
cludes his wife Cristina Martinez).
Russell Simins. the drummer, has
played backing tracks for Fred
Schneider's (of the B-52's) last solo
album. Fred, and was part of a group
called Butter (which also includes
members of Cibo Matto) who re-
leased an album and toured in sup-
port of it last year. Finally, all three
members of the Blues Explosion,
Spencer, Simins and guitarist Judah
Bauer, also performed as the back-
ing band for the veteran blues art-
ist R.L. Burnside on his last album.
A Ass Pocket of Whiskey.
The result of all of that hard
work and all those disparate influ-
ences is the phenomenal tour de
force. Now I Got Worry. The Blues
Explosion is possibly more riveting
and powerful on this new album
than they have ever been.
The album opens with Spencer
screaming for over 15 seconds
straight, making sound almost as if
Where this sextet is coming
from no one will ever know. Rusted
Root, the band from Pittsburgh, Pa.
that originally formed in 1990, has
been taking the underground by
storm for six years. With this new
album. Remember, the band seems
to have made their way into the
mainstream.
The album starts off with "Faith
I Do Believe an unbelievable track.
They take it to you right from the
get go. The sound is identifiable and
people will hear melodies that will
take them as far as India. It's a hell
of a journey.
The album then proceeds to
keep your attention with classical
guitars and mandolins on the sec-
ond track, "Heaven Falsettos ring
out from singer-songwriterguitar-
ist Michael Clabicki and Liz Berlin,
who plays percussion and provides
supporting vocals. It's an impressive
array of harmony. Take the time to
close your eyes and listen; 1 guaran-
tee it will be worth it.
The most amazing thing about
this band is their timing. The band
is composed of six members and five
of them are percussion players. If
anything, they've got the groove.
Above all, the band is very di-
See JON page 8
See ROOT page 10
There is nothing more use-
less than screaming at a wall.
It's just spittle and bricks,
bricks and spittle. However, if
you put enough voices together,
that wall might just be blown
over. So join in another futile
attempt to change the status
quo and listen to a "Scream at
the Wall
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
I grew up loving Chuck .
Connors. He was my childhood
idea of the hero. He was strong,
sturdy, brave, and undefeatable.
He was. and to this day still is,
The Rifleman.
Ah, The Rifleman, that vin-
tage TV western series of my
youth. Sure, the show was made
long before my parents even
thought of my existence, but it still
came on local television stations
courtesy of reruns.
Just the thought of that show
carries me back to an idealized
time of my life when I had noth-
ing better to do than lounge
around the TV after a grueling
day's work at elementary school;
or when I would bury myself in
the colorful comic-book worlds of
Stan Lee. Jack Kirby and count-
less other storytellers who dared
to defy the laws of physics; or
when i would focus all of my en-
ergy and imagination into the
plastic molds of Star Wars figures.
G.I. Joes or Shogun Warriors. I
was a child then, and loving ev-
ery minute of it.
I'm grown now (at least physi-
cally), but like much of my gen-
eration I have a desire to recap-
ture some of my childhood. I get
a special, undefinable joy when
hearing the School House Rock
song "Conjunction Junction My
heart skips a beat when I'm at a
See SCREAM page 11
� � � mm





8
Tuesday, October 29,1996
The East Carolinian
JON from page 7
he is giving birth to this new album.
The first track, "Skunk sounds like
a perfect mixture of Boss Hog's
gothic punk and Spencer's own wail-
ing tendencies.
The album quickly moves into
classic Blues Explosion territory
with "Identify a fast rocker with a
one-word lyric, and "Wail which
has sonic links to "Sweat one of
the best tracks from Orange.
Next, there's a change-up when
the band covers a Dub Narcotic
track, "Fuck Shit Up in which
Bauer takes lead vocals over a syn-
copated drum loop and a smatter-
ing of guitar. This is definitely new
and strange for the Blues Explosion.
It's always good to see a band chal-
lenge themselves and move into
uncharted territory.
"2 Kindsa Love" and "Love All
of Me" are primo power punk blues
from Spencer and company. They're
the kind of songs that you know will
serve get a crowd dancing and sweat-
ing, two things that definitely hap-
pen during the intense Blues Explo-
sion shows.
The legendary Rufus Thomas
makes his first appearance on a
Blues Explosion record with
"Chicken Dog a vintage blues track
he wrote himself. Only Jon Spencer
could get a blues statesman like
Thomas to play, sing and bark (that's
right I said bark) on a record for him.
This track has to be heard to be
believed.
Following the caterwauling end
of "Chicken Dog" comes the fantas-
tic track "Rocketship Possibly the
best song on the album,
"Rocketship" features a slide guitar,
a slowed down pace, and vocals that
sound a bit like old Aerosmith. Al-
though this might sound like a di-
sastrous combination to some, here
it works wonderfully. This tune is
one that demands repeated listen-
ing.
"Dynamite" and "Hot Shot" re-
turn back to familiar Blues Explo-
sion territory with their full-on au-
ditory attack. "Dynamite" features
Spencer doing his patented Mick
JaggerElvis Presley cross-over im-
personation. "Hot Shot" is a throb-
bing rockabilly instrumental that is
shot through with small vocal yelps.
The first time that I heard "Can't
Stop" I couldn't get the saloon pi-
ano roll that runs through the song
out of my head. It came as no sur-
prise to me to learn that the piano
was played by none other than Mark
Ramos-Nishita, also known as Money
Mark, a successful solo artist and
erstwhile keyboardist for the Beastie
Boys. Money Mark also contributes
to two other tracks on the album as
well.
And the Beastie's influence
doesn't end there, either. One of the
engineers that worked on Now I Got
Worry was Mario Caldato, Jr. who
produced the extremely successful
Beastie Boys albums Check Your
Head and III Communication.
"Can't Stop" is probably neck-
in-neck with "Rocketship" for best
track on the album, if only for the
reason that it includes these sarcas-
tic lines: "This is the part of the
record, Where I'd like everybody
to stand up Throw their hands in
the air and in typical Jon Spen-
cer fashion, he doesn't say "and wave
'em like you just don't care but in-
stead, "and kiss my ass, Cuz your
girlfriend still loves me Beautiful.
The album continues the Money
Mark keyboard influence on "Firefly
Child which rotates a constant wall
of guitar noise with that of a cheesy
clavinet organ.
"Eyeballin" churns its way
through the latter part of the album
and the slide guitar returns. At the
end, it suddenly breaks into a short
but powerful drum attack by Simins.
This leads into the instrumental
"R.L. Got Soul" which is under-
pinned by a low chant much like
those of the Buddhist monks on the
Beasties' Communication.
"Get Over Here" explodes out of
the stereo in more typical punk fash-
ion like Spencer used to do back in
his Pussy Galore days. All of the amps
are definitely turned to 11 on this
one.
Finally, "Sticky an instrumen-
tal oddity that sounds like the
soundtrack to some wacko perfor-
mance art, closes out the album on
a weird note.
Spencer has certainly redefined
the labels "alternative "punk" and
"blues" that people in the music in-
dustry like to pigeonhole acts into,
and in the process he has created a
masterpiece of modern music. If you
don't do yourself the favor of going
out and buying this record right now,
then you'll be missing out on a true
gem. No recent music deserves the
"pay full price" rating more than Now
Got Worry.
NaturalLifel �
ifAx
College students spend more money for booze than they do for books.
�Antonio Novella, MD, U.S. Surgeon General
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
Bring Your Talent To Life!
i,
Fine Tobacco 6 Gift
505 South Evans St.
413-0900
a
It's showtime at Busch Gardens Williamsburg No other
place offers you such a variety of performance possibilities
including sewn highly energized mainstage shows, a
rockin' band of roving musicians, and dozens of street
actors, mimes, jugglers and variety artfsts. As a cast mem-
ber you'll have the opportunity to hone your skills by per-
forming hundreds of shows to thousands of guests. Free
classes and seminars in dance, voice and drama conduct-
ed by our production staff and guest instructors offer you
a means to continue growing your talents. We have an
excellent sports medicine program and a housing coordi-
nator to assist you in finding the best accommodations.
Cast members enjoy free access to Busch Gardens
Williamsburg, and our sister park Water Country USA.
More than 250 positions available:
Singers, Dancers, Musicians,
Actors, Variety Artists.
Technicians
including stage managers, audio engineers,
lighting and follow spot operators and wardrobe dressers
with sewing experience
All age groups are welcome, as along as, you are 16 years
old by June 1997. 1996 cast members ages ranged from
16 to over 80years old. So whether your talent has
improved with age or your testing your skills for the first
time, we invite you to Busch Gardens Auditions 1997.
Tuesday
November 5th
3:30pm to 7:30pm
University of NC, Greensboro
Dance Theater
HHP Building,
RM306
Greensboro, NC
For more information call:
1-800-253-3302
or write to: Auditions co
Busch Gardens Entertainment
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8785.
An equal opportunity employer.
iiUlli BOWL
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1996
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
PICK UP COLLEGE BOWL INFORMATION AND
REGISTRATION PACKET FROM THE INFORMATION DESK,
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
LOTS OF PRIZES-CASH, T-SHIRTS, MUGS, AND MORE
fi
to JVlendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
���
1996
ixeW tj�rk rU ij I
nov. 26 - nov. 30
cost per person
$145 quad occupancy
$160 triple occupancy
$200 twin occupancy
$310 single occupancy
Call the student union
at 328-4716
to reserve your seat
on a bus to the
big city!I!
Axnben CkmmUt Otchestta
Check out the Mick Jagger of classical music for only $5.
See the coupon on page 161 of your Clue Book.
All tickets at the door will be $20. Discounted tickets available
until 6 p.m. tonight at the Central Ticket Office.
Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
�Ml
THE PAN. CLUB
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1 - PIRATEFEST
f SKEETER BRANDON & HWV.61)
R&B Blowout!
W7 SPECIAL GUEST: MEL MELTON & WICKED MOJOS
SHOW STARTS AT 4:00 PM ON THE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER BRICKYARD AND IS FREE!
SKEETER BP� t
HWV.61
IB"
m
���
m
5
?
Midnight Madness
DJ Dance, Costume & Pumpkin Carving Contests, Open
Recreation, Video Karaoke, Free Midnight Buffet and more
THURSDAY, OCT. 31 9 P.M. - 2 A.M.
Students admitted with I.D. and may bring one guest.
Pick up guest passes beginning Oct. 28 at the Community Service Desk from
830 a.m. until Midnight and the Central Ticket Office from 8:30 a.m. until 6
p m On Oct. 31, tickets will be available at the Community Service Desk until
9 p.m. and the Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m.
FIGARO! FIGARO! FIGARO!
One of the world's most renowned operas, The Barber of Seville, is in
Wright Auditorium as part of the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 8 p.m.
Student tickets are $15 in advance at the Central Ticket Office.
All tickets are $30 at the door.
Ransom (R) Tuesday, Nov. 5 in Hendrix Theatre.
Tickets are free and can be picked up on the day of the movie
at the Information Desk.
Travel to South Africa
j,
The Student Union Is Always Looking For New Members!
Come by Room 236 To Pick Up An Application.
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.eduStuden.JJnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html
See The New New South Africa on Monday, Nov. 4 at 4:30
and 7 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. An all-you-can-eat theme dinner is
served at 6 p.m. for $12. Film tickets are free with ECU I.D. at the
Central Ticket Office. Dinner tickets must be reserved by Oct. 30
with meal cards, cash, check or credit card.
flifrUDEKigCENTER � "YourGenter of
HOURS: Mon -Thurs. 8 a.mll p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.





mwmmmmmmwmmmwmtmi � -
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 29,1996
!�
S07 Vorth 6re�?ne Street
7S2-36CC
Info line - 7S7-2789
wtcm
4th Annual
Hallomeen
Partg
$i Kite
lrt. 2nd, � 3rd place prizes for
best costume
AWARD from page 7
Wallace is simpler, and somewhat
foolish
A Grand Day Out perfectly ex-
emplifies the two characters' per-
sonalities. In this story. Wallace,
who is an intense lover of cheese,
is horrified to discover that he has
run out of cheese on a day when
all the stores are closed. What does
one do in such a situation? How
about building a rocket ship and
blasting off to the moon, which is.
of course, made of cheese. Gromit.
being the loyal friend he is. be-
grudgingly tags along to make sure
that Wallace doesn't do something
stupid.
A Grand Day Out features the
top-notch animation that has be-
come a staple of Park's work, but
it is mainly a goofy little adventure
with little plot. However, The
Wrong Trousers, the second short
in the series, decidedly focuses
more effort on plot and creates a
classy film noir-esque treat with a
Hitchcockian edge. In this story, a
mysterious penguin, who has some
sort of evil plan up his wing, be-
comes a boarder in the home of
Wallace & Gromit. While Wallace
finds the penguin to be an enjoy-
able housemate, the wiser Gromit
has suspicions. By focusing more
on plot. Park's work on The Wrong
Trousers won the 1993 Academy
Award for best animated short film.
This focus on plot carries
through to the third short. A Close
Shave, with the same results. Park
and co-writer Bob Baker both pay
homage to the classic mysteryde-
tective films of days past with
storylines that would seem ludi-
crous in any genre other than ani-
mation. Where else but in an ani-
mated film could one write about
a man and his brilliant dog who be-
come entangled in a conspiracy in-
volving disappearing sheep, a mys-
terious woman who owns a wool
shop, and a menacing dog with su-
perior strength? The result: A Close
Shave won another best animated
shortjilm Academy Award for Park
last year.
Other notable aspects of the
Wallace & Gromit series include the
amusingly appropriate musical
score of Julian Nott: the extraordi-
nary lighting effects created
through Parks' eye for enticingly-
detailed visuals; the edge-of-your
seat, action-packed climatic endings
for each story; and, last but not
least, the impeccable voice of- Pe-
ter Sallis. who helps brings the
character of Wallace to glorious
life.
So. when you rush out this
week to rent Toy Story and find
that every copy within eastern N.C.
has been checked out. don't over
look Wallace & Gromit. They will
not disappoint.
WZMB is looking for dependable persons to
work from 12am to 6am Sunday-Friday. If you are
interested in a time slot, call Jim at 328-4752 or
come by and pick up an application.
Listen out for WZMB's Christmas in November! We
nil be giving out prizes each day this month.
Q1.3 FM
F East Carolina University
uo9 chaius aw
0U fuCLE KJUA -Toy 9ToXY
Ut S ClOoS JAdKko ttZA VEA) 'S &�w&
o
�P
Check out our classifieds
every Wednesday during
the summer, and every
Tuesday and Thursday
during the fail and spring
semesters. Whether
you're looking to rent or
just a new roomate,
your always on target
with The Eool Cai olinian!
wr. . � ��-





10
Tuesday, October 29,1996
The East Carolinian
ivvlOJL from page 7
verse. Their sound ranges from a
jungle-like rhythm to beats played
behind a slide guitar, as on track
four, "Virtual Reality The band's
roots remain prominent, however,
they take on a whole new sound. It's
different. Different is good.
The band tends to get crazy on
songs like "Voodoo" and "Silver-N-
Gold mainly because of Glabicki's
voice. His presence is there and it
shines.
The seventh song, the lucky
number, is called "Dangle It has a
change that picks up so smoothly
and takes you back to the ever im-
pressive "Dancing Nancies which
was written by Dave Matthews in his
early twenties. It's always great to
see artists using the influence of
others around them, even if these
influences happen to be alive and
kicking today.
The most surprising thing
about this album is the acoustic
sound. From the way it w?s written
to the way it was recorded, you can
tell that the band is really stretch-
ing out and opening their minds to
new sounds and recording tech-
MIDNIGHT fem page 7
biscuits and bacon.
Marketing Director Carol Woo-
druff said Midnight Madness,
hosted and planned by staff mem-
bers, is intended to provide an al-
ternative for students in an alco-
hol-free environment.
"It is an activity that came out
of a desire to give students some-
thing different to do on Halloween
night she explained.
Woodruff and her staff will
make the student center an appro-
priate site for Midnight Madness as
they plan to decorate Mendenhall
on every level with ghosts, goblins,
cobwebs and other Halloween-in-
spired decorations.
The event has been well-at-
tended in the past, and Woodruff
expects nothing less this year.
"I'd like to encourage people
LONDON from page 7
see. First of all, the London Chamber
Orchestra performs without a conduc-
tor. All of their soloists are members
of the orchestra - not big names
brought in to draw a crowd. And they
pei-orm standing up. I don't know
about you, but I'd pay money to see
an orchestra that performs a two-hour
concert standing up. Don't get me
wrong, I wouldn't do it so I could see
them fall down from sheer exhaustion,
I'm not that much of a mascchist
The London Chamber
Orchestra's repertoire includes pieces
from Mozart Glass, Haydn, Elgar, and
Vivaldi, among others. There are 13
members in the orchestra, and to-
gether they provide 17 strings worth
of sound.
It is the oldest chamber orches-
tra of its kind in Great Britain and
was the only British Orchestra to be
invited to play at the 1996 Olympic
Games in Atlanta. It will be stopping
at ECU as part of its Eastern United
States tour, so don't miss this" excit-
ing opportunity to see one of Great
Britain's most popular classical en-
sembles.
Tickets are on-sale now at the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. The performance will
be held at Wright Auditorium tonight
at 8 p.m. Tickets for ECU students are
$10 with a valid ID. Tickets for ECU
faculty and staff are $16, and all tick-
ets at the door are $20.
to come out she said. "I think this
year is going to be an awful lot of
fun.
Woodruff also encouraged stu-
dents with any other ideas the Di-
vision of Student Life can use in
the future to contact her.
"Student Life is always very in-
terested in any ideas students
have she added.
Students must bring their valid
ECU ID to attend. Any students
who are interested in bringing a
guest can pick up one guest pass
at the Central Ticket Office from
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. They can also
pick up a guest pass at one of the
many community services desks
which are located in the residence
halls, from 8 a.m. to midnight, ex-
cept on Halloween when passes will
only be available until 9 p.m.
niques.
jim Donovan, Jim DiSpirito,
Patrick Norman, John Buynak and
Liz Berlin all play percussion and
sing on this album. The communica-
tion levels are up. They sound like a
family. I guess if you've been work-
ing on your sound for six years and
don't seem to mind the wait, you've
found a place called home.
The last two songs on this
record, "Scattered" and "Circle of Re-
membrance" stand out and leave you
with a record fulfilled. Just like the
rest of the album, the songs are dif-
ferent, but they relate. You can tell
they're coming from the same place
- Glabicki's cerebral cortex. (That's
his mind if you're not into the psy-
chology thing.) It's the fire inside this
man that has kept this band going.
1
And with each additional member, it'sj J
just like adding gasoline to the flameJ
Growing brighter by the moment
they are Rusted Root
I
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
ECUs 1 CHOICE
SENATOR
ED WARREN
VOTE NOV. 5TH
11 Itl & TRUE
Consignment Mu b
924 Dickinson Ave. �
y�l;t I' upiiiI tin �Sc . ci'i ssurii s
I. ))li;iiid s Joiisiliolcl Itl HIS lt 11 I T1��
Dr.sscs 1 1 h.lroxwi SOff
10IT �.il. vll IX l 1.1)
10-5 Tues - Fri & 10-2 Sat � 752-2139
TOP 10 REASONS TO VOTE
Ed Warren ECU Alumni & Former ECU School
of Education Faculty Member
Secured $30 million for Joyner Library Expansion
Secured funds for the General Classroom Building
Secured planning funds for the New Science & Tech.Bid.
$2.5 million for Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
$2.4 million for the Cancer Center ECU Medical School
$5 million for the Medical School
$12 million in funding for the Life Sciences Bid.
$800,000 for new entrance to campus
Worked to get UNC & NCSU to play ECU in football again
in Greenville
WARREN WORKS
� �� FOR ECU
'IO FOR HY THE COMMITTEE TO REELECT ED WARREN TREASURER: JOHN MINCES
1. Greenville Police Department
2. ECU Police Department
3. Air Force ROTC Color Guard
4. Outstanding Alumni Recipient
Brian Sbul
5. Onutandini Alumrj Recipient
Clay Burnett
6. Onutandini Alumni Recipient
Jeanne Smith Piland
Dee Vangban and Zac Stone
7.Outstanding Alumni Recipient
Bertie Fearing
8.Student Homecoming Committee
9.ECU Marching Pirates
10.Alpha Delta Pi Sorority Float
11.Homecoming King and Qaeen 1995
12.Space
13.Zeta Tuu Alpha Soroority Float
14.lame B. Hunt High School Band
IS.Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority Float
16.Homecoming Repreaentativea
17.EA.laney
18.ECTC
19.BCTC
20.Perquimans County High School Band
21.Water -Ski Club Float
22.Exercise Majors Club Float
23.Rosewood High School Bnd
24.Alpha Xi Delta Sororieeety Float
25.Visual Arts Forumn Float
26.South Lenoir High School Band
27.American Chemical Society Float
28.Space
29.ECU Transit
30Homecoming Representatives
31.Columbia High School Band
32.Cheerleaders
33.Purple and Gold Dancers
34.The Student Council (or Exceptional Children Float
35.Chi Omega Sigma Alpha Epstein Sorority Float
36Richhlands High School Band.
37.Space
Sigma Lambda Float
Criminal JusticeSocial Work Alliance Float
Space
Eastern Wayne High School Band
Homecoming Representatives
East Carolina Dune Buggy
Rocky Mount Senior High School
Psi Chi National Honor Society on Psychology Float
Homecoming Representatives
Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity Float
J.H. Rose High School Band
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Float
Alumni Desoto Car
Homecoming Representatives
D.H. Conley Band
Child Development
Delta Zeta Sororiety Float
ECU Race Car
Northeastern High School Band
Homecoming Representatives
Kappa Sigma Fraternity Float
Ayden-Grifton High School Band
ECU Ambassadors Float
Jones Hall Council Float
South West High School
Homecoming Representatives
Space
Dixon High School Band
ECU Cahpter of National Student Speech, Hearing
& Language Association Float
Fletcher Hall Council Float
Roanoke High School
Homecoming RReptesentatives
ECU School of MedicineDepartment of Pediatrics
Swansboto, High School Band
Horses
Sweeper
Charles Blvd.
Student Activities Office
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 210
328-471!
:
i
i

?
lemwitiiiLi i .inipniiisa





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 29, 1996
11
TOje 5tl) Street pretoerp
ottffk ttm
Uvt EhtittMHmeHt wit6
ONE FINGER SALUTE
Ia4.U( ftt till M4n5if
l$t Annual
Open House
Spaghetti
Pinner
fundrai$er
Qfm�3s toim c37-3i5M
hosted by:
Delta Zeta
"Wednesday
October 30th
4-7pm at th.e
Delta Zeta tfous
$4 in advance
or
$3 at the door
Come dressed in your
Halloween Costume and
tecieVe a Special Prize!
j$&t
Tuesday
70s & 80s
Dance Night
only 92 adm
for members
Ladles Free
Admission
Vntil 11 p.m.
$1 Bottle Beer
y
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Adv. Tix locations
East Coast
music
Skully's
Wash Pub
Attic
NX's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th year in
downtown
Greenville
Tuesday
,85 r ooe Horn
W SHAG,
BoHhi Beer
a
11
- ���:�.
&" : PLRPLE.
lift. jrf� VI ??!
Hr
50to3U6
allotoeen
, $artp .
toi.�
Friday
Knocked Down Smilin'
special guest
SCREAM from page 7
flea market and I see an action figure
of The Six Million Dollar Man. And.
yes, 1 collect Star Wars merchandise.
But there is a dilemma when one
tries to recapture those items of one's
childhood. Things change, that's a
simple fact. Still, some changes are
not always for the better. 1 can no
longer turn to a local TV station and
watch The Rifleman, or Wild. Wild
West, or any of those old westerns. I
can't even enjoy local weekend pre-
sentations of creature feature (filled
with such flicks as Godzilla vs. Mothra
or Was a Teenage Frankenstein).
Why? The answer centers around
the fact that local stations no longer
carry the shows of my childhood. They
have a'l (and I mean it when 1 say ALL)
been bought up by larger corporate
cable stations. If I want to see Chuck
Connors empty his deadly rifle on
some poor villain, I have to fork out
some hard-earned cash to my local
cable company. Same goes for all the
monster movies and cartoons of my
youth. The likes of Ted Turner now
own the whole idea of the creature
feature.
My point to all this is that our
childhood (not just the childhood of
the twenty-somethings, but the child-
hood of every adult) has become a
profitable commodity. Chances are, if
you had some special item during your
childhood but lost it along your life's
journey, to get it back now will cost
you some serious money.
I've gone to several comic book
and toy shows within the last year,
and I've seen dealers charging a for-
tune for things from my past. All the
Star Wars toys I had as a mindless
kid could feed a family of live for sev-
eral months. Two hundred dollars for
a three-inch plastic toy - are you
crazy?
Well, the collectible market is
bigger know than it has ever been,
and many people are earning their
livelihood off of it. As happy as I am
to see people sharing interests with
me. I see the collectible market as
quickly becoming a greedy perversion
of what should be a silly hobby, and
an abuse on consumers who truly find
pleasure in regaining some of their
past.
For instance, the other week I
was in Target checking out what new
Star Wars merchandise had come out
and I saw a man about my age also
browsing. Hoping to strike up a con-
versation about our similar interest, I
informed him about the Star Wars
toys Wal-Mart had. He smiled and in-
formed me that he already owned ten
each of all the new items. He then
further added that he bought out
what the stores had and just threw
the unopened packages into a closet
where they will rise in value.
Value? Value to whom, I won-
dered? This gentleman didn't buy the

has arrived.
429 South Evans Stroo
(On th bustling Evans Street Moll)
561-PIPE ;
MLco to Idcco M
toys for any respectable reason other
than to make a quick profit. Worse
yet. people like him are making it !
harder for honest collectors who sim- :
ply want to enjoy the products for
what they are. If everyone is buying i
ten of each figure hoping the value
will rise, then my chances of getting
the new Han Solo are slim to none.
And - hat about today's children '
who want to get into the Star Wars
craze? As silly as this may sound, the '
greed of the collectible market is, in a
small way, cheating the new genera-
tion of their deserved childhood. Kids
these days have to compete with big-
ger kids with bigger incomes to sim- ;
ply purchase a toy.
If you think I'm overreacting, just '
hop on down to Target. In an effort
t combat this collectible craze. Tar- '
get has posted signs indicating that
they have changed their policies on
when toys will be placed on the floor.
Now, employees of Target can't get
first dibs on the merchandise, the
schedule for stocking merchandise has
been altered so that people can't come "
in first thing in the morning and buy
the store out, and, more importantly,
sales on single items have been lim-
ited to individual customers.
If the collectible market has be-
come such a joke that even a major n
corporation like Target has taken ac-
tion against it, something must be ;
amiss.
What it all comes down to is that .
the collectible market has become :
greedy. As a result, being a collector i
is more of a pain in the ass than it
should be. 1 enjoy the hunt to find i
those treasures of my past and I don't �'
mind paying a little extra for this privi-
lege, but things have gotten a little
too stupid for me lately.
I am a nostalgic collector of child- �
hood things. As childish as this may
seem. I have no insecurities about this �
fact. Still, I think it's about time for .
everyone within the collectible mar- .
ket to grow up and start behaving with i
a little more responsibility.





Tuesday, October 29,1996
The East Carolinian
oiwtn-TjC , Nine game sUde
S PW&wmends Wlth wms
J I Jon Lauterer
Netters suffer two
x
conference losses
Team loses to
George Mason
and American
.
Sean R. O'Brien
Steff Writer
ECU women's volleyball contin-
ued to fight for some respect, as the
iady Pirates lost in three straight
games to George Mason in a match
ithat was unbalanced from the begin-
ming.
r ECU was well aware that George
tlason was top in the conference and
22 in the nation going into Friday
Slight's ball game and that is exactly
-jhow they played. Mason came out
astrong in the first g�:ne and made
�jtheir presence known early, establish-
-(ing their front line on the net that,
ygreatly out-matched the Lady Pirates.
Virag Domokos, 6'3 middle
blocker for George Mason, was a force
to be reckoned with in the middle, as
she dominated the middle of the net
uThe Pirates had their hands full and
-only managed to come away with
three points that resulted mostly from
Ljfason mistakes. ECU lost the first
game 15-3.
v. The second game did not get any
lobetter for ECU, as George Mason set
ithe Pirates on their heels early. Ma-
son seemed to be able to cover the
entire court with relative ease and
they rolled to a 15-1 victory in the
second game. Once again, Mason ral-
lied behind the play of Domokos.
In the third game Mason came
out ready to put the Pirates away and
�rolled off an eight straight points be-
fore the Pirates could even get a side
�out The Pirates would try and make
a late game rally behind the play of
freshman Julia D'Alo. D!Alo was able
Jto catch Mason by surprise several
times with lobs over the net that
caught Mason looking. Senior Kristen
�Woodruff would also try to get into
�the action with a hard shot to the
� middle of the court to make the score
j 144. George Mason would eventually
come away with the third game win
154, after a smashing shot by Woo-
druff went sailing out of bounds.
"I complimented Kristen Woo-
! druff on taking that last swing at the
' ball that went out of bounds head
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Junior Kari Koenning spikes the ball while her opponent
from George Mason tries to block. ECU lost in three straight.
coach Kim Walker said. "She really
ripped that ball. If that ball would have
been playable, we would have had an-
other side-out; and who knows what
would have happened?"
Susan Woodward was especially
pleased witfi ECU'S effort against
such a strong team.
"We hung in there and played
tough against them and nobody ever
backed down Woodward said. "We
played hard until the very last point
of the game; that makes me happy
Walker was also pleased with the
team's determination in this big of a
game.
"For a team that is ranked 22 in
the country, I thought we fought the
entire match Walker said. "It was
14-1 and we were still playing like
it's 14-14; I keep telling them were
getting better and we are
Walker also pointed out that
while the team is struggling, they are
showing signs of improvement and
continue to show her positives.
"I'm happy that we are seeing a
lot of positives; it's not showing up
in the win-loss column but we're see-
ing other things on the court
Walker said. "Our players are not
quitting and they're hanging in there.
All of this adversity will pay off in
the long run
ECU continued to slump as they
lost to American Saturday night in
three straight games (10-15, 8-15,
11-15). D'Alo led the team in kills
with eight against American. Fresh-
man Shannon Kaess was second on
the team with seven kills.
With these two conference
losses, ECU now stands at 04 in the
CAA and 6-20 overall.
Women's ultimate flying high
i Frisbee team
preparing for
upcoming games
�. Tracy Laubach
' Staff Writer
The name of the team is "Helios
5 a woru of Greek origin, meaning "sis-
! ters of the sun The 'Women's Ulti-
� mate Frisbee team, which currently
; consists of 17 "sisters has had an
J extremely successful fall season thus
far.
The team placed third at the sec-
tional competition, which was held at
! UNC-Wilmington on the weekend of
� Oct 5-6. The top three finishers at
! sectionals qualified to proceed to the
regional competition, which was held
� Oct 19-20 in Philadelphia.
Making it to the regionals was
quite an accomplishment for the girls.
However, they were eliminated in the
first round of competition.
So what is it exactly that these
girls get out of playing ultimate
I frisbee? Mona Sarafa, president of the
I club, values the things that she has
gained through her experiences as a
I player.
"The excitement of competing
I and having the opportunity to travel
t
is so rewarding Sarafa said. "Play-
ing frisbee is great exercise, and has
helped me to make so many close
friends
The club is broken down into two
seasons: the fall and the spring. In
the fall, the team participates in
mostly non-collegiate competitions,
while in the spring, all of the battles
are against teams from other univer-
sities.
"The fall season is a great time
for learning Sarafa said. "Sometimes
we go head on against a more experi-
enced or mature team, which helps
us learn a lot about our strengths and
weaknesses
Perhaps the most unique thing
about the sport is that it integrates
many concepts used by other sports,
including soccer, football and basket-
ball. While the playing field has the
same dimensions as a soccer field, the
frisbee can be intercepted (as in foot-
ball), and the players often complete
a pivot turnas in basketball) to get
around their defenders.
At the start of the game, seven
players rush the field and begin pass-
ing the frisbee among teammates until
a point is scored in the end zone.
Throwers have 10 seconds to pass the
frisbee. If any player possesses the
frisbee for more than 10 seconds,
there is a turnover, which calls for a
change of defense. If the frisbee is
dropped, sent out of bounds or inter-
cepted, the other team gains posses-
sion.
ECU hosts a bi-annual ultimate
frisbee tournament called "Ultimate
XXVII The tournament, which is
held once in the fall and once in the
spring, brings in teams from all over
the east coast. Ten women's teams
and 18 open (coedteams will meet
on the fields surrounding Dowdy-
Ficklen stadium on Nov. 23-24. The
competition is held so that teams can
get an idea of where they stand in
relation to their opponents.
The captain of the team, Hobbs
Wolcott, had the opportunity to com-
pete as part of the women's team at
nationals in 1994. Her background
and experience have helped her lead
her teammates up the ladder of suc-
cess this year.
The team is registered as a mem-
ber of the Ultimate Players Associa-
tion. Any club that wishes to com-
pete in sectionals, regionals or nation-
als must be a member of this national
organization.
As president of the organization,
Sarafa is pleased with the overall suc-
cess of the club. However, she feels
that the players are at a disadvantage
due to the destruction of their prac-
tice fields.
Staff writer
The ECU men's soccer team had
an exceptional pair of bouts with
Charleston Southern and Virginia
Military on Bunting Field last week.
The men's team has had to deal
with a nine game losing streak this
season, but things are beginning to
look up for the young team. With two
consecutive wins against two tough
teams, the offense seems to be step-
ping up.
"We are beginning to play smart
soccer Head Coach Will Wiberg
said. "We are getting some width to
our attack, and gaining a lot of expe-
rience for this young team
Under windy and threatening
skies, ECU took on the Charleston
Southern Buccaneers in a Wednes-
day afternoon skirmish.
The Buccaneers made it look
like a long game laid ahead with a'
pounding offensive drive. The Pirates
were slow to start off, but picked up
their game quickly.
On the 11th minute of play,
Wyatt Panos dished to Chris Padgett,
who rocketed a goal past the boggled
goalkeeper. This play inspired goals
to come for the rest of the game.
Shortly after, Jay Davis was
fouled and the Pirates were awarded
a penalty kick. Padgett scored again
on the kick.
ECU kept up the pressure by
making a shot attempt on nearly ev-
ery drive. The Buccaneers didn't
break their defense and crowded the
goal box often.
About 14 minutes into the half,
Panos scored off a combination of
passes from Padgett and Brian Tay-
lor.
Charleston then scored their one
and only goal from a penalty kick
midway through the second half.
As the sun came out of the
clouds, Charleston woke up. Realiz-
ing the hole they were in, the Bucca-
neers attacked the ball in despera-
tion. The field began to look like a
tumbling exercise when the two
teams clashed at midfield.
ECU overcame the Charleston
attack and Panos scored again in the
87th minute, after an assist from Josh
Sklar.
The game concluded with a
score of 4-1, Pirates.
"We played well today Wiberg
said. "We stressed keeping the ball
wide on our attacks and today it paid
off. We felt good with a 2-0 lead at
halftime. We were able to play a lot
of people which was nice
The action continued with a suc-
cessful venture against the Virginia
Military Institute on Sunday.
A large audience assembled to
watch the clash.
Revenge was in order after a loss
to VMI last season, which was de-
cided over a last minute play. The
Pirates were still pumped from
Wednesday and it showed on the
field.
VMI started off by attempting to
score early on the Pirate goal de-
fended by Kevin Smith. Their efforts
resulted in frustration on VMI's part.
Freshman
Andy Crawford
converted a pass
from Padgett to
put ECU on the
board in the 11th
minute of play.
Five minutes
ahead, Crawford
scored again from
another well played
pass from Padgett,
leaving the score at
2-0 in the Pirates'
favor
The more ECU
pulled ahead, the
more aggressive
VMI became. Vari-
ous yellow cards
were issued against
both teams
throughout the
game.
After the half,
Padgett continued
his game by finding
the back of the net
and upping the
ECU advantage.
Pirate goal-
keeper Kevin Smith
held especially
strong in the box,
not allowing any goals throughout the
first half, and into the second half. Jay
Davis was substituted in for Smith and
did an equally good job attacking the
ball. Smith recorded four saves, Davis
had one.
The game came to a close after
an eventful second half bout, leaving
the final score at 3-0 a Pirate victory.
"We showed a good effort today
Wiberg said. "We always seem to play
well with a confident lead at the half,
and that's what we had. Chris Padgett
had a tremendous game today, and I
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
(Top) Freshman Andy Crawford knocks
the ball downfield against a VMI opponent;
on Sunday. (Bottom) Another freshman-
Bryan Lamartin sends his ball towards:
theVMIgoal. ECU beat VMI 30, snapping:
a nine game losing streak.
was able to play 23 players, which;I
am happy about"
Padgett currently leads the team
in scoring and assists with six goals
and five recorded assists.
The Pirates will return to confer-
ence play in Fairfax, Va, when th$y
face up against George Mason.
"This team is very tough Wibeig
said. "We are a huge underdog going
into this game, but we are ready to
give it our all
The game will take place Oct. 3,0
at 1 p.m.
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
See FLY page 13
The ECU men's tennis team
wrapped up play at the Univer-
sity of South Carolina Fall Invi-
tational this Sunday. Senior Jay
Freeman advanced to the third
round of the C-l singles draw
and sophomore Nils Alomar
played his way into the semifi-
nals of the A-l singles consola-
tion to lead the Pirates.
Freeman advanced to the
end of the second round after re-
ceiving a first round bye. He de-
feated Robert Deneaer of East
Tennessee State by a 6-1, 6-1
score and then lost to
Richmond's Matt Hancock in the
third round, 6-1, 6-0.
Alomar dropped his first
round match on Friday and be-
gan play in the consolation
bracket He defeated Sasha Pare
of UNC-Charlotte 6-3, 6-1, and
then beat Davidson's Alex
Okulski 6-1, 6-1 to earn a place
in the quarterfinals. The
Mallorca, Spain native then de-
feated Vinicius Carmo from UT-
Chattanooga by a 6-1,6-1 score be-
fore defaulting in the semifinals to
USC's Messay Abebe.
The Pirates will play their next
tournament of the fall season on
November 8-10, when they will be
in Chapel Hill for the Rolex Fall In-
vitational.
The ECU women's tennis team
continued competition at the third
annual James R. Nisbet Invitational
at Campbell University this week-
end.
In the fourth round, Anne-
Birgette Svae beat Jill Pertsch 6-2,
6-2. She then went on to lose to
Siri Mittet 6-2, 6-2.
In other singles action, two
ECU teammates played each other.
Rachael Cohen and Mona Eek faces
off after beating their early oppo-
nents. Cohen came out the victor.
6-2, 6-4. In the consolation draw,
Gina MacDonald defeated two op-
ponents to move into play for day
two of the tournament.
The Pirates doubles team of
Svae Cohen advanced to the fi�
nals after having both their third
and fourth round matches de;
faulted by the opponents.
In day two of the tourna)
ment, the Lady Pirates' team of
Svae and Cohen lost in the final
round of the tournament. They
were defeated by Jelena Kriskapa
and Uta Dittmer of Georgia State
8-6.
In singles consolation, Eek
lost to Carrie Minton from the
College of Charleston, 6-4 and 6-
1.

The ECU men's and womenls
swimming teams opened their
1996-97 seasons at American Uni-
versity with victories. The ECtJ
men (1-0) won by a score of 143-
94, while the Lady Pirates (1-0)
defeated the AU women 138-88.

See SID page 13
��





000' IIMi

The East CarolinianTuesday, October 29,199613 i 1
l 1
v)lX) from page 12t 1 1
ITALIAN
GARDEN
W
-Sa
BBSsssBsaaBasaHanHBaHBi
Italian Garden Restaurant
3005 E. 10th &l
(Corner Greenville 5tvd. & 10th St)
Greenville, NC
Phone 919-757-1215

FINE ITALIAN RESTAURANT
All roads lead the right way for the best Italian food!
We are Preparing something just for you during Homecoming.
Make your reservations today.
Come home to Greenville's own "Little Italy
The "Best Selection of Appetizers, Pasta, Veal, Seafood, Steak,
Chicken, Pizza, Desserts, and Much More
Prepared authentically by Italian chefs!
The Lady Pirates dominated
their opponents by claiming first
place in all 13 events and taking
the top three spots in eight differ-
ent races. They were led by senior
Melanie Mackwood and freshman
Casey Sloan. Each won two events.
Mackwood took first place in the
50 and 100 freestyle competitions.
Sloan was victorious in the 500 and
1000 freestyle events. She was also
on the winning 400 relay-freestyle
team.
The men's team placed at least
two Pirates in the top three in
seven different events. Leading
them was freshman Patrick
McGonigal. He brought home first
place in the 500 and 1000 freestyle.
McGonigal also helped the Pirates
win the 400 relay-freestyle event.
Sophomore Paul Pinther won the
only other event for the men, 200
backstroke.
"This was a great way to start
off our season head coach Rick
Kobe said. "We completely domi-
nated them

The 1996 ECU women's soccer-
team downed Georgetown on Friday
in Washington D.C 1-0.
The Pirates and the Hoyas du-
eled for 76 scoreless minutes until
junior midfielder Sheila Best drew
a foul inside the Hoya goalie box.
Junior midfielder Stacie Cause
nailed the penalty kick for ECU as
the visitors took a 1-0 lead.
, ECU's defense took it form
there and prevented any scoring op-
portunities while allowing 11 shots
on goal in the second half. Fresh-
man goal keeper Amy Horton
notched five saves for ECU while her;
teammates registered nine shots on;
goal. GU's Keisha McDonald re-
corded two saves as the Hoyas had;
14 shots on goal.
"We played very well today, es
pecially in the early part of the sec-
ond half ECU head coach Neil Rob;
erts said. 'Shelia Best did a great
job getting into the box and draw-
ing that foul. Stacie Cause did a
nice job finishing off the penalty
kick
"So many things have gone
against us this year, it is good to be
on the plus side of this one Rob-
erts said. "This is a very good win
for us going into the GMU match
The second half of the Lady
Pirates' road trip didn't go as well
as they fell to the Lady Patriots.
ECU fell to George Mason University
3-0 at GMU Stadium.
The 17th ranked Patriots
rattled off their early first half scor�
as the team remained unbeaten in
the CAA. Led by junior forward Tay-
lor Eubank's one goal and one as-
sist, the Patriots controlled most of
the game. Mason's Jenn Gross and
Jill Ford added the finished touches
to the 3-0 defeat
"It was an incredibly physical
contest today Roberts said. "I am
pleased with the way our players
hung there against a very good
George Mason team.
The Pirates will meet American
University in Washington D.C. Sat-
urday, Nov. 2 at 2 p.m. The Pirates
will wrap up their season with the
Eagles as they look to prepare for
the CAA Tournament on Nov. 6-10
in Wilmington.
FLY
i
from page 12
"If I could change one thing about
our club, I would definitely attempt to
improve the conditions of the fields
that we practice on Sarafa said.
"They have been destroyed by people
walking and riding their bikes through
them. There is actually a bike trail that
runs directly through our field
The girls practice three times a
week, and although attendance is not
mandatory, most of the members are
completely dedicated to the program
and show up at all of the scheduled
practices. I
After all, playing frisbee allows
them to hang out with their best of
friends, keep in good shape and most
importantly, have fun.
Attention all High Schoo! quiz bowlers!
Bet those buzzer fingers ready for the
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Wednesday, November 6, 1996
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information and Registration
Packet from the Information Desk,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Lota of prlzea - cash, t-ahlrta, mugs, and morel
For more information, contact the
Student Union Office, 23E Mendenhall, 328-47 15.
Sponsored by the
ECU Student Union
Special Events
Committee
ECU will send a team of five College
Bowl players to the Regional
Tournament, February 14-16, 1997,
at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, VA.
FAST FREE DELIVER Y
OPENLATE
HOURS
MON - WEDS.
12 NOON-2 AM.
THURS. - SAT.
11A.M. -3A.M.
SUNDAY
11 AM. -1.30 A.M.
DELIVERY BEGINS
AT 4:00 P.M.
MON. - THURS.
Pizza
321 - 4862
NAKED GUMBYGUMBY GALORE
LARGE 14"LARGE PIZZA WITH UP TO 6
CHEESE PIZZATOPPINGS AND QNE LARGE PIZZA
WITH 2 TOPPINGS
ONLY $5.99 TAXONLY $14.95TAX
ADDITIONAL TOPPINGS $1.25
12 SPECIAL BUY ANY REGULAR PRICED PIZZA GET A SECOND PIZZA OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR 12 PRICE NO GIMMICKSCREATE YOUR OWN SPECIAL MED 2 ITEM PIZZA MED POKEY STIX 10 HOT WINGS 6 PACK OF SODA 3 PEPPERONI ROLLS CHOICE OF 2 $9.99tax CHOICE OF 3 $14.99tax YES, YOU MAY CHOOSE 2 OF THE SAME ITEM
STROMBOLI
FRESH PIZZA CRUST STUFFED WITH CHEESE AND YOUR CHOICE OF 3 TOPPINGS
(THIS PRODUCT COMES UNCUT)
LARGE$9.99 tax
EXTRA LARGE$11.99 tax
y

H
'�"gJ lJi JfMB.ii "mw111
I






14
Tuesday, October 29, 1996
The East Carolinian
cms
US.
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 bedroom apartment $185month plus 1
2 utilities. Very nice and on ECU bus route.
A must see. Call 758-8927.
VERY, VERY QUIET UPSTAIRS furnished
bedrooms for rent in modem home on 17th
fairway, Brook Valley. Shared bath. Semi-pri-
vate entrance. Limited kitchen privileges.
Central AC. $210 for each bedroom. AH util-
ities included except cable TV and your tele-
phone. Available immediately. Semester lease
and $100 deposit No smokers. No under-
graduates except physical therapy accepted
majors. Call (919756-2027.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE 2 bed-
room, 2 bath apartment at Kingston Condo-
miniums. Basic cable, sewer, water included
$225month plus 12 utilities. Call Tiffanie
at 328-3689 or 7524618.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
�-wo bedroom trailer. $350 per month in-
cludes rent electric bill, phone and cable.
Washer dryer use also. Call Shana 756-9635.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
CLOSE TO P.C.C, 1 bedroom $280.00; 2
bedroom $330.00 Call 321-7746.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central AC
Heat WD. Dishwasher. Only $242 a month
and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999. Available
now!
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the fall!
Short walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next
to AOTT house, 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths -
mind condition. 5th Street Square - Uptown
-Above BW3,3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sun-
ken living area. Luxury apartment Will rent
for November or December. Also available -
"The Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment.
If you see it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
HUGE 5 BR DUPLEX close to campus and
downtown. Pets and smokers welcome. Two
roommates needed malefemale. Call 413-
0957 ask for Holly or Meredith.
ROOMMATE WANTED, MALE OR female.
$260 per month and 12 utilities. Fully Fur-
nished, pets negotiable. Call 3534451.
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information hi U.S.
19.278 TOPICS - All SUBJECTS
Order Calalog Today with Visa IMC or COD
ESfr 800-351-0222
Or. rush $2.00 to: Rntarch Assistance
11322 Kiaho Ave . 1206-RR. Los Angeles CA 90025
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ff
96 GIRVIN VECTOR FORK. Aluminum
legs, linkage, and steerer. Hydraulic oil
Elastomer dampening. Stern optional. $275.
Specialized cranks $40. Hershey Racing pui-
leys $10. Must sell everything. Call 551-6754.
BRAND NEW NBA JERSEYS, only $20
each with tags still on! Sizes 44 and 48 of
Shaq, Hardaway and Olajuwan in black or
blue. Please call Peyton at 328-8791.
FOLD-OUT SOFA FOR sale. Good condi-
tion. $100.00 negotiable. Call 355-0552 af-
ter 6 pm.
SCUBA TANK & BC. Hardly used. $170.
RCATV remote 20" like new $65. Electric
guitar & amp $120. Pioneer CDPlayer 1
new $80. Call David - only interested 754-
2862.
MOVING SALE. ITEMS MUST go. Sears
electric typewriter with correction key. Like
new, $50. Various household furniture in
good shape. Each item under $100. Call 355-
6359.
SONY STEREO 135 WATTS channel,
$500. Large entertainment center, $150.
Kicker box two 12" woofers, $150. GT Agres-
sor mountain bike, $200. Brian 752-1891.
1995 DIAMOND BACK RACING Mountain
bike "Vertex" Light aluminum, Manitou
shock, LX XT components. With extras, over
$1400 invested. First $650. Call Jason at 551-
3844.
BROTHER WP 2200 WORD Processor and
typewriter. Small for easy storage. Like new
$300. Call 328-3373.
1991 EAGLE TALON TSIAWD, BlkSil-
ver, leather sunroof,AC,PW.PDL, 6 speaker
Cass. wEQ. New:Turbo Valves Clutch at
60K, new brakes 896. Runs excellent Great
shape. Wholesale $6300. Call Brian 830-
2190.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100 Nat-
ural & Dr. recommended. A healthier you
through cellular nutrition. 30 Day money-
back guarantee. Call now 756-1188
(faxtjjfiottjp & (?�&
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings �
�Corporate Events
�Special Events
0Ce also rent tables and chairs
752-1988
Terry Peaden
i1
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
I PRESENTATION OF THIS COUPON t
NOT VALID WITH ANY
OTHER SPECIALS
EXPIRES 11 -�-�6
"choTceofaTV, VCR or a CD Player withj
I a one year lease at Wesley Commons i
j North with presentation of this coupon, j
Not valid with any other specials.
Expires 11-30-86
"j I and 2 Bedroom Range. Refridgerator.Washer, J
I Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units, i
J Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5 J
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER, SEWER. CABLE
����� 0mmt
1 BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
I 2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable. S
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
IMA BROWNUA DRIVE
75S-I92I
K it aci � ; a a u m ae it? I
Services
Offered

Travel
A Possible Greek Dream
For Motivated brothers or sisters,
who, want their own Camelot!
FraternitySorority house just remodeled. 3 blocks from ECU.
5,000 plus square feet. 23 Rooms. A huge chapter room,
4 baths, 4 kitchens, sauna (for 10), Jacuzzi (for 8) with bar room.
Bedrooms have private exterior entrances!
Latticed privacy fence surrounds kingdom on 3 city
lots, front street to rear street. Mega parking.
A golden opportunity! You are qualified.
No red tape. Owner financed.
7 down and you are camelotized in 10 days.
City authorized Special use permit that goes
with land sales contract.
Go for it! First come 752-J533
Help
fi wonted
$ 1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting for 12-16
part-time youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the bas-
ketball skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 7-18, in
basketball fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from the
end of November to mid-February. Salary
rates start at $4.75hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 830-4550 after 2 pm.
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for a quality assurance clerk hours 5:30
pm to 8:30 pm $6.00houn tuition assistance
available after 30 days. Future career oppor-
tunities in operations and management pos-
sible. Applications can be filled out at 104
United Drive (near the aquatics center)
Greenville.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICAI-
TONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
seek fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
with the fashionsaccessories you love to
wean Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure, and
Young Men's. Flexible schedules for the
"early birds" (10am-2pm) or "night owls"
(12pm-9pm or 6pm-9pm) All retail posi-
tions include weekends. Merchandisecloth-
ing discount offered. Applications accepted
each Monday and Tuesday, 1-5 pm, Brody's,
The Plaza and Carolina East Mall.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
BABYSITTER NEEDED MONDAYS AND
Wednesdays, 12:30 until 3:30 or 4:30. Non-
smoker, must have car and provide referenc-
es. Call 355-6359. Other times may be avail-
able also.
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for package handlers to load vans and
trailers for the am shift, hours 3:00 am to
8:00 am, $6.00hour; tuition assistance avail-
able after 30 days. Future career opportuni-
ties in operations and management possi-
ble. Applications can be filled out at 104 Unit-
ed Drive (near the aquatics center),Green-
ville.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
PART TIME JOBS AVAILABLE. Joan's
Fashions has positions for students who will
remain in the area during Thanksgiving and
Christmas breaks. The positions are not lim-
ited to the holiday period and can be for 7
to 20 hours per week. Individuals must be
available for Saturday worK. The jobs are
within walking distance of the university and
the hours are flexible. Pay is commensurate
with your experience and job performance
and is supplemented by an employee dis-
count Apply in person to Store Manager.
Joan's Fashions, 423 S. Evans Street, Green-
ville (on the Downtown Mall).
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies. World travel. Sea-
sonal & full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For more information
call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53628.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague. Budapest, or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive room & boardother benefits.
For info, call: (206) 971-3680 ext. K53624.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. Top Pay All
shifts. Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-
7686, Snow Hill, NC.
LICENSED NAIL TECH makes house calls:
Student prices - tips with acrylic S25 fill
ins $15. Flexible hours. Call Dana for your
next appointment 75207445.
FOR WOMEN ONLY: INTERESTED in
spicing up your love life? Hostess a sensual
toys party! Call Jenn at 752-5533.
A WAY TO MAKE extraand earn virtual-
ly unlimited long distance telephone calling!
Contact Mike at 328-8837 or leave a mes-
sage;
Other
j
ATTENDANT: VALID DRIVER'S LI-
CENSE. Up to $8.00 an hour. Apply in per-
son. Must work ail holidays. Adams Auto
Wash.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
three bedroom duplex. Furnished. Respon-
sible, clean, 12 utilities, cable. $250.00 rent
$200.00 deposit Call 754-8202.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sectc- grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible. Let us help. For more info, call:
1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! No re-
payments, ever! $$$ Cash for college $$$.
For info: l-800-40fr0209.
1986 HONDA ACCORD LXI. automatic
power sunroof, looks great, needs minor
work. $3000 neg. 830-2964. If no answer,
leave message.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! SSS cash for college SSS
for info: 1-800-400-O209.
WHERE'S YOUR DIRECTORY? Its here!
Pick up your directory and pick up the
chance to win one of eight exciting adven-
tures detailed in the yellow page consumer
section. Enter the "Name Your Adventure
Promotion there's no telling where you'll
end up. Your 1996-97 directory is names,
numbers and a whole lot more! Pick up
points: Students' dorm lobby. Mendenhall
Student Center (Extra) Faculty Staff Depart-
ment
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Par
ty Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes All Meals,
Parties. Taxes! Creat Beaches & Nightlife!
Prices Increase Soon - Save $50! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
NOW IS THE TIME to call Leisure Tours
and get free information for spring break
packages to South Padre, Cancun, Jamaica
and Florida. Reps needed travel free and
earn commissions. 800-838-8203
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! wwwspringbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel & Lo-
cation! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Loca-
tion $139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! CANCUN & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel $399! Prices
Increase Soon - Save $50! Save $150 on
Food. Drinks & Free Parties! 111 Lowest
Price Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
Personals
MR. MORTON - Try placing an ad for your
money. I asked you not to say anything about
the lip fungus. BTW, how's the jock itch?
Mr. Wiggly.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-ZZX4
GymnasticsTumbling
Instructor
energetic, strong
Pkfseco11 t
Spring Break 497
Book Now & Save! Lowest prices to
Florida, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, &
Carnival Cruises.
SPY
Now Hiring
Campus Reps!
Endless
Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
Jamaica Cancun Panama City Daytona
Key West South Padre
rmfm
Be in a Movie
"Back With the Dead
A comedy about the return
of Jerry Garcia.
Dead rock star look alikes
and extras needed :
Jimijanis, Jim Morrison,
Marilyn Monroe, etc.
Free photo shoot
going on now!
Get great pictures
for friends &
family.
An 8x10 wil be kept
on record for
movie parts.
SPORTS FUW!
CAiLNOWm
CXT. t�2I
Sorv-tf St�) 64S-8434
OATESt
AND GALS
mrmm
LOCAL AREA!
l-9C0a4-1700
OCT. 4f 3
SJUSSf pw nrtit
Hunt be 18 yrs�
3rvV (�I9) 64S-8434
M
Greek
Personals
PI KAPP: IT WAS great hanging out in vour
"neck" of the woods. Can't wait to do it again.
Love, the Alpha Phis.
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEWEST
initiated members! Krista Claggett. Susanne
Dozier. Noell Ellingsworth. Tanya Fowler,
Sarah Carriques. Brooke Gordon. Michelle
Gottschalk. Laura Husenita, Tina Justice.
Becca Kreitzer, Cina Larson. Cheryl Mann,
Chassidy Millsap. Jessica Orsini, Heather
Otto. Nell Pettier, Stephanie Phillips, Mindy
Schaefer. Elicia Scherer, Ashley Settle,
Megan Simpson. Meri Spencer, and Wendy
Wright. Love, your Alpha Omicrou Pi sisters.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, WE enjoyed getting
together with you guys Tuesday night Love,
the sisters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta.
ALPHA SIG. THANKS FOR the great time
Thursday night We enjoyed doing some line
dances and watching the game (Co Yankees)!
Love, the sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi.
CHI OMEGA, YOU GIRLS are right! Great
things do happen in small groups! We want
to thank you girls for comin' out to the pre-
fall break social. We had a good time and
hope to do it again soon. Love, the Brothers
and Pledges of Alpha Sig.
THETA CHI - Thanks for a great time Thurs-
day night. Next time let's leave off the
"whipped cream The sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Xi Delta
THANKS TO ALL GREEK organizations
who participated in Gamma Alcohol Aware-
ness Week: Zeta, Alpha Phi, Sigma, Chi-
O.AZD, ADPi.Kappa Sig, Phi Tau, Delta Sig,
Phi Psi, Sig Ep, and Lambda Chi. Don't miss
Gamma Officer elections Dec. 3 at 6 pm in
room 14 of Mendenhall.
CONGRATULATIONS KRISTI HOLMES
ON getting 3rd runner up in Pledge of the
Year. Great job also to Peyton Moore. We
love you guys. The sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATS TO OUR NEW little sisters!
We couldn't be happier about what happened
after you "unraveled" the mystery! We love
you, your Pi Delta big sisters!
HOLLY BLACK - We are so proud of you
for representing us! Love the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta.
THE SISTERS OF EPSILON Sigma Alpha
would like to welcome the Iota pledge class:
Michelle Bagby, Laurie Baron, Jennifer
Deard, Sloan Hawley, Amber Hines, Susan
Hoskins, Janet Sharpe, Heather Stull. Love,
the ESA sisters.
KAPPA SIG. THANKS FOR the social Wed-
nesday night. Let's get together again soon.
Love, the sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON. IT is alway-
great to get together with you. Thanks for a
great end to our Sisterhood Retreat Love,
Alpha Xi Delta.
BILL STEPHENSON - Thanks for represent-
ing us in Greek God. Congrats on being in
the top 10! You did a great job. Alpha Xi
Delta.
THANKS SIGMA PI FOR cheering for us.
We're looking forward to Pebbles and Bam
Bam. Love, your Alpha Xi Delta Fuzzies!
WELL, THERE'S NOTHING QUITE like
baseball and dancing to a little night music,
so let me clear my throat and thank you cra-
zy Delta Chi's for having us over Thursday
night We had a blast and we'll have to do it
again soon! Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Pi Delta.
KATE JONES, AMANDA CALICH, Ronna
Jo Edwards. Randi Seamon: Great job in
Greek Goddess. Congrats Kate on making
top 10! We love you - the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta
WAY TO GO ALPHA Xi Delta Flag Foot-
ball Team. Champions once again! Love the
sisters and new members of Alpha Xi Delta.
CHI OMEGA AS ALWAYS, thanks for a
great time last Tuesday! Can't wait to do it
again. PIKA
ALPHA OMICRON PI. CONGRATULA-
TIONS on the win in soccer. Keep up the
good work girls!
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Announcements
WED. OCT 30 - Premier Performances of
Works by ECU Composers, Mark Taggart, Di-
rector, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8pm.
THURS. OCT. 31 - graduate Brass Quintet
Britton E. Theurer, Director. AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7 pm. Mon. Nov 4 � Percussion
Players and Percussion Ensemble, Harold
Jones and Mark Foj-d, Directors, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8 pm
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS: ALL General
College students who intend to major in the
Department of Communication Sciences and
Disorders and have Mr. Robert Muzzarelli or
Mrs. Meta Downes as their advisor are to meet
on Wednesday, November 6 at 5:00 pm in
Brewster C-103. Advising for early registra-
tion will take place at that time. Please pre-
pare a tentative class schedule before the
meeting. Freshmen, bring Taking Charge,
Your Academic Planner, and use the work-
sheets to develop your schedule.
HARVEY GANTT, CANDIDATE FOR US
Senate will be here at ECU, in front of Men-
denhall TODAY at 1:45 pm. Come and meet
your next U.S. Senator!
SAM IS HAVING FRED Hunnecke speak
this Tuesday, Oct 29. The meeting will be
held in GCB 1028 at 3:30. Mr. Hunnecke will
be talking about the experiences that he has
encountered as a local entrepreneur. Food
and refreshments will be served after the
meeting.
ECUSS: ATTENTION SOCIOLOGY MA-
JORS and minors: The ECU Sociological So-
ciety would like to invite you to bt part of
The ECUSS Workshop. IT will be held on
Oct 30 in Brewster B, room 301 at 4:00 pm.
The workshop will feature skills for writing
resumes.
SENIORS! ITS TIME TO flash your Pur-
ple Pirate Pass! Get your free Mug with Hugs.
Wednesday, Oct 30, 1996 in the front of the
Student Stores. Starts at 10 am so get there
early! Purple Pirate Passes will also be give
out Sponsored by the ECU Ambassadors and
the ECU Alumni Association.
ALL FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS and
friends of ECU are invited to attend the ECU
Computer and Technology Fair to be held
Tuesday, Oct. 29 from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm in
the Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room. For
more info visit our web site at http:
www.ecu.eduacadfair.htm or call 328-6798
SATURDAY, NOV. 2, 1996 8 am - 10 am.
The East Carolina Native American Organi-
zation will sponsor a food drive at Kroger.
Event will feature Four Winds Dance Team
and Eastern Bull Drum. Hems going to nee-
dy families for Thanksgiving. More info call
Nikki at 754-8179.
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS - General College stu-
dents should contact their advisers the week
of November 4-8 to make arrangements for
academic advising for Spring Semester 1997.
Early registration week is set for November
11-15.
THE JAPAN EXCHANGE AND Teaching
Program offers an excellent opportunity for
U.S. citizens, who hold or expect to obtain a
bachelor's degree, to participate in interna-
tional exchange and foreign language educa-
tion throughout Japan. Application forms can
be obtained from the office of International
Affairs. The office of International Affairs will
hold a briefing in the International House,
Wednesday, Oct 30th, at 4:00 pm. The JET
Program is open to ALL majors.
"OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS
FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES" Novem-
ber 4, 1996. Free program sponsored by the
Pitt Co. Chapter, American Diabetes Associa-
tion. Gaskin-Leslie Center next to Pitt Co.
Memorial Hospital at 7 pm. For more info
call 816-5136 from 8 - 4 pm Mon-Fri or 1-
800-682-9692.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS WILL meet
Wednesday Oct 30th @ 7:00 pm. in the Un-
derground in Mendenhall. Tom Lamprect.
who is running for State senate will be our
guest speaker. (A debate with CD's will be
on WZMB @ 8:00 PM) ?'s, call Cristie @ 355-
6474, e-mail UGFARLEY@ECUVM or David
� 353-0808.
Forms for
Classifieds and
Announcements
can be picked
up in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the Student
Publication building.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students
Non-students
Each word over
25, add
For bold, add
For ALL CAPS,
add
Al! Greek organizations must be spelled out � no
abbreviations. The East Carolinian rwerves the right
to reject any ad forlibel, obscenity andor bad
taste
$2
$3
5t
$1
$1
Student Swap
hop
jVre Yotr SjvrisriED with yotr cr'S tkt-erior?
"SERVING , AND HELPING YOL GET THE
MOST FROM VOl'R CAR IS OUR GOAL"
SPECIjULlilVri IN THE REMOVAL Of TTVWAWTED SPOTS STAIVS AND ODORS FRO
YOTTR AUTOMOBILE FULL INTERIOR ("LEAVTVcl IS STABTtVC, AT Q
VE ALSO OFTER f CLL AUTO DETAILIWC, r'
9 9 531-1504 � �





Title
The East Carolinian, October 29, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 29, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1170
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy