The East Carolinian, October 24, 1996






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THURSt
October 24,1996
Vol72, No. 18
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
More construction projects foreseen
Across The State
RALEIGH (AP) - North
Carolina's top legal official claimed
a major victory after a federal ap-
pellate court agreed that the state's
prisoners can live in less space than
was agreed to seven years ago.
The 4th Circuit Court of Ap-
peals ruled Tuesday that inmates
can continue to allow prisoners less
than 50 square feet each - citing
the tremendous burden that more
inmates has placed on the state and
taxpayers.
WILSON (AP) - The highest
and most stable price in years
helped tobacco farmers recover
from damage caused by two hurri-
canes this year.
Since Sept 12, the top price
for nearly every grade of flue-cured
tobacco sold on three sales belts in
South Carolina, North Carolina and
Virginia was $192 per hundred
pounds.
Across The Country
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
polls are screwy. Voters have yet to
make up their minds. The elector-
ate is volatile. Upsets have hap-
pened before. The tide is about to
turn, any day now. Really.
Jittery Republicans are con-
cocting all kinds of theories to ex-
plain why Bob Dole still trails Presi-
dent Clinton by double digits in na-
tional opinion polls � and to help
them propound a comeback for-
mula.
HAMILTON. Ohio (AP) - A
couple whose 7-year-old daughter
became tangled in a lightweight
hammock and suffered severe brain
damage won a $6.25 million settle-
ment from the distributors of the
hammock.
Michael and Penny Brown's
daughter. Kelly, was in a coma for
several months after becoming en-
tangled in the hammock in 1990.
Kelly, now 13. uses a wheelchair
and has the cognitive ability of a 1-
or 2-year-old, said Thorn Jackson,
the Cincinnati couple's lawyer.
Around The World
OSLO, Norway (AP) - Cro
Harlem Brundtland. the most popu-
lar and influential figure in Norwe-
gian politics, announced today that
she was stepping down as prime
minister nearly 15 years after form-
ing her first government.
In a surprise announcement in
Parliament. Brundtland said she
would deliver her letter of resigna-
tion at a regular meeting of the
government on Friday. Thoerbjorn
Jagland. leader of the Labor Party,
was expected to succeed
Brundtland.
QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - A
cargo plane crashed in flames in
the downtown area of an
Ecuadoran port, killing at least 23
people and raining fiery debris on
dozens of homes, authorities and
radio reports said today.
The Boeing 707 had just taken
off for Miami with a cargo of fro-
zen fish when it slammed into the
bell tower of a church in Manta at
10:40 p.m. (11:40 p.m. EDT) Tues-
day, the reports said.
Flanagan in need
of Chemistry lab
repairs
Erika Swarts
News Writer
The chemistry department re-
ceived $1 million in much-needed
funds to go toward the renovation and
reconstruction of labs in one of the
university's oldest buildings.
Flanagan was built in 1939.
At that time it housed all of the sci-
ence departments, science education
and home economics. After biology
and physics moved to the Howell com-
plex, the building was remodeled in
1972.
There are several problems with
the Chemistry Department, but the
main one is overcrowding. With an
increase of 3.500 students over past
years. Department Chair Dr. Chia-yu
Li feels that overcrowding only hurts
the students.
'The students are the ones to
suffer Li said. "Classes are running
until 10:00 most nights. That is a
problem because fewer staff members
are available in the evening
Another problem with the chem-
istry labs is water flooding. When the
building was renovated in 1972. the
school ran out of money toward the
end of the project. The safety shower
drains were eliminated because they
were viewed as expendable. Now,
when the showers are used, the wa-
ter leaks through to the floor below
causing equipment damage.
"They repair it (the leaks) con-
stantly, but the need for modern fa-
cilities is needed Interim Assistant
Vice Chancellor Dr. Caroline Ayers
said.
According to Ayers, ventilation of
chemical fumes is also a concern.
Because of lack of space, dangerous
chemicals are being stored in hallways.
Chemicals being stored in the lab are
in non-vented cabinets. Without the
modern ventilation systems, the
chemical fumes are emitted into the
labs.
The fume hood systems also mal-
function sporadically-usually during
the evening. This causes an addi-
tional safety problem because main-
tenance men have to reset the sys-
tem from the roof. The poor ventila-
tion systems cause problems with
technology too.
"Since many modern instru-
ments have built-in computers for
data collection, access to computers
for downloading
raw data to facili-
tate data analysis
and manipulation is
needed Ayers
said. "A deficient
laboratory hood
system and inad-
equate climate con-
trol prevent full uti-
lization of comput-
ers in the present
facility
There is a new photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
building on the $i million initiates plans for a new Flanagan
way. However, the building. More money is needed to reach
5 the projected completion date in 2001.
When Dr. Li was asked if he felt
not projected until
2001. Until then state money will
be spent on quick fixes. There has
only been $1 million out of the $50
million in planning money allotted
to the planning of the building.
the building would eventually be
built, he said, in chorus with his stu-
dents, "If we can beat Miami
University connects Charity begins away from home
with future
New wave info presented at
technology fair
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Pi Lambda Phi
goes homeless for
Ronald McDonald
House benefit
Foreign Language software
and use of the Internet for
learning foreign languages.
Teaching Courses On-line: .
The only MSIT in the world.
Computer Graphics in HESC
Virtual Reality: An instruction
tool.
Virtual reality architecture and
urban design; geographical
information system? �
Procurement of
Microcomputer Hardware and
Software.
Music and WEB technology.
Co-Op Resumes on the Web.
cheduled Technology
Presentations
Technology is becom-
ing more and more impor-
tant, if not necessary, in
today's business world.
Next week anyone with
the desire to learn more
about it will be given the
opportunity to attend the
technology fair that is be-
ing held on campus.
Academic Comput-
ing and Microcomputing
Services are sponsoring
the fifth annual East
Carolina University Com-
puting and Technology
Fair. It is scheduled to "be
held Tuesday Oct 29, in
the multi-purpose room,
located in Mendenhall
Student Center. The fair
will start at 10:00 aum. and last until 3:00 p.m. During this time faculty,
staff, students and friends of ECU will be given the opportunity to take
advantage of this chance to receive free knowledge.
Terry Harrison, manager of microcomputing services in the comput-
ing and information system, has a lot of confidence in the upcoming event
and hopes to succeed with the overall purposes.
Harrison said among those purposes is, "to provide the opportunity
for faculty to demonstrate how they are using technology in the class, for
example, how a student can take a whole class without even coming on
campus
Harrison hopes that the fair will bring about a positive change in the
classroom.
"I hope that more faculty will start using more technology in the class-
room Harrison said. "I think students learn more by using this, and not
by someone standing and lecturing
Twenty-six presenters will have individual demonstrations available
for all the attendees. Through these demonstrations people will be able to
learn hands-on about technology. A variety of presentations will be avail-
able from which one can choose their interests. Among these are Microsoft
Exchange, virtual reality, music and Web technology, interactive programs,
teaching on-line, learning through the Internet and resumes on the Web.
Harrison said that the information could help faculty and students
learn more about doing things, like having an available syllabus on-line.
"If a student misses class, he can just pull up the syllabus and find out
what he missed Harrison said "Also, it saves the professor from having
to make about 50 copies
Dr. Michael Schwartz, assistant professor of French and foreign lan-
guage, and French coordinator in the department of foreign language and
literature, will be working with Nancy Mayberry on their presentation. It
will include such things as foreign language software and ways of using the
Internet and Netscape. Also, people will be able to learn about the Internet
phone, where you can use your voice to talk to people all over the world.
This will be Schwartz's third year participating in the fair and he had
nothing but compliments to give to the program.
"It provides a great variety of programs and technology that is being
used on campus Schwartz said
This fair is not to be mistaken as boring. In fact Schwartz says that it
is anything but that
"It is great fun for students to come by and play on these things
Schwartz said. "It is exciting, stimulating and a lot of fun
Jeff Gentry
Contributing Writer
For the three days the members
of the fraternity Pi Lambda Phi will
be living in cardboard boxes, all in
the name of charity.
The second annual Pi Lambda
Phi cardboard village begins on Oc-
tober 22 and runs through midnight
on October 25 to help raise money
for the local Ronald McDonald
House Between 10 and 20 of the
brothers at a time will be staying in
cardboard boxes on the campus mall
across from the Student Health Cen-
ter taking donations. All proceeds
will be donated to the Ronald
McDonald House.
The village, which is a collection
of cardboard boxes that have been
decorated by members of the frater-
nity, was a success last year. "Last
year. Pi Lambda Phi donated nearly
$1500 to the Ronald Mcdonald
House through different projects,
and about $500 of that came from
this one project" said Jeb Brookshire,
public relations intern at The Ronald
McDonald House.
This year the goal is a little
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Two members of the Pi Lambda Phi fraternity set up a
cardboard village on the mall. They plan to sleep in the
boxes overnight in an effort to solicit money for the local
Ronald McDonald House.
higher. "The goal this year is to raise
$1000 with this project alone. Last
year East Carolina restricted the
number of boxes, but they saw how
big it was and gave us an unlimited
number this year said Todd Kelly,
community service chairman for Pi
Lambda Phi.
"We are trying to get this to be
a big Greek project and eventually
involve other on-campus groups to
help unite the campus to support the
Ronald McDonald House,1'
Brookshire added
Pi Lambda Phi has donated over
150 service hours to the house and.
for the past three years, has been
named Most Outstanding RMH Vol-
unteer Group.
"Too often we hear or read nega-
tive comments about the Greek sys-
tem, but the fraternities and sorori-
ties, especially the gentleman of Pi
Lambda Phi, are extremely involved
in helping our community Ronald
McDonald House Public Relations
Coordinator Christy Angle said.
Located near Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital, the Ronald McDonald
House provides the parent's of sick
See HOME page 4
Local area scheduled for facelift
Regional Development
Institute of ECU
awarded for design
Amena Hassan
Staff Writer
The Regional Development In-
stitute of East Carolina University
was recently recognized and
granted an award for its renovation
project of the Evans Street Mall.
The award was presented in
Charleston at the National Associa-
tion of Management and Technical
Assistance Centers' annual fall con-
ference.
NAMTAC, a non-profit organi-
zation which is known for provid-
ing encouragement and enhance-
ment for organizations that grant
technical and economic services to
businesses and communities, se-
lected the project and awarded it
as "Outstanding" in the Economic
Development category. It was cho-
Draw.ng Courtesy of Regional Development
Institute
The Regional Development Institute of ECU received na-
tional recognition for redesigning the Evans Street Mall.
grateful to NAMTAC for recogniz-
ing better opportunities for busi-
nesses to be in a nicer place.
sen from among more than 40
projects in the nation that had ap-
plied within the same category.
"This is an honor and a reflec-
tion of our work and the leadership
of the city said Al Delia, associ-
ate vice chancellor for regional de-
velopment. Delia's role was to over-
see the project and keep it on track.
"Our project has been adopted by
the Uptown Greenville Association
and the city council and we are
Don Edwards, president of the
Uptown Greenville Association,
feels the award is a positive begin-
ning for the whole plan. "It is an
absolutely wonderful happening for
Greenville and we are delighted to
receive the award said Edwards.
See EVANS page 4
?K4tcU
Get stoned at Hendrix this weekendpage I
Columnists duel over abortionpage O
Additions to stadium begin next monthpage I U
Thursday
Partly sunny
0?vtee4Jt
High 70
Low 67
Weekend
Sunny
High 86
Low 74
��&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
-
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
- "S �maa





Thursday, October 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
CRIMEfSENE
October 11
Damage to property - A student reported that someone had dam-
aged the passenger side door of her vehicle while it was parked in the
3rd and Reade Street lot
Breaking and entering of motor vehicle - A student reported that
someone cut the convertible top of her vehicle and stole several items.
Damage to property - A student reported that her vehicle was
damaged while it was parked south of the Irons building.
October 12
Traffic accident - A pedestrian student was struck by a vehicle on
10th St. A non-student (high school student) was standing in a phone
booth that was also struck by a vehicle. No one was injured.
Driving while impaired - A student was arrested for DWI after
being stopped for going the wrong way on a one-way street north of
Jenkins Art
October 13
DWI - A non-student from Cary was arrested for driving without a
license, driving while impaired, obstructing and delaying an officer, pos-
session of marijuana and drug paraphernalia and careless and reckless
driving after drinking and speeding. He was stopped on College Hill
Drive.
October 14
Worthless checks - An officer served a worthless check summons
to a student
October 15
Controlled substance violation - A student was issued a state cita-
tion for possession of drug paraphernalia in his room.
October 16
Domestic dispute - A resident of Jones Hall informed the ECU
Police Department of a domestic dispute that occurred off campus and
provided a description of the person involved.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Short stories address
medical issues
Theater readings
presented at
Medical Schoo
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
The medical school of ECU will
present theater readings of the short
story "He" by Katherine Anne Porter,
as part of an ongoing series in which
readings of short stories are used to
address medical issues.
This series uses the format of a
reading followed by a discussion. Ac-
cording to Dr. Todd Savitt of the de-
partment of medical humanities,
reader's theater is an excellent way to
facilitate open communication between
the performers and the audience.
"We get medical students to be
the readers, so what you get is future
physicians reading to future patients,
and then one of us in the department
moderates a discussion Savitt said.
The short story "He" addresses
the issue of long-term care by telling
the story of a rural Southern family in
which the son is chronically ill. The
difficult questions raised by their di-
lemma are in keeping with the purpose
of the medical reading theater.
"We've done stories on euthana-
sia, or physician-assisted suicide. AIDS,
medical paternalism and women in
medicine Savitt said.
While reader's theater is not a new
development Savitt says that it has not
often been used for the purpose of ini-
tiating medical discussion.
"Reader's theater is pretty well-
known in the theatrical world. Instead
of standing and moving around and
doing regular acting, you sit and do
minimal movement and you read your
part Savitt said.
The idea to use reader's theater
for this particular purpose came from
a lawyer in Chapel Hill named Nancy
King who was a member of the depart-
ment of social medicine.
"Nancy (King) thought 'let's do
this for medicine, and have a discus-
sion with the audience about the mean-
ing of the stories Savitt said.
When this idea first started in the
mid-1980s, three of the four medical
schools in the state participated. The
first reading series was done in 1988.
Since then the other medical schools
have stopped participating, and ECU
is the only one, to Savitt's knowledge,
that currently does medical reader's
theater.
"We're probably the only school
in the country that does this regularly.
We're funded by the dean and we do
these performances every fall and ev-
ery' spring. So we're probably unique
in that sense Savitt said.
Savitt said that the reading series
has involved a lot of work, particularly
Doors Open
7:30 pm
Stage Time
9:00 pm
756-6278
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country &
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FRI & SAT: Silver Bullet
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BULLET
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See MEDICAL page 3
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
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. DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service
iss.
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FRllIASING FOR JANUARY '97
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Oct 31 llenJenUil SttfJenl Center
ECU Students admitted w.th ID. Students may bring one guest. Guest
passes are ava.lable beginning October 28 from Commun.ty Service
Desks from SiOOam-Midn.ght and the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am-
600pm. On October 31, guest passes may be picked up at Community
Service Desks until 9 pm and the Central Ticket Office until 6:00pm . All
events are free.





����MMMMttM"
The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 24, 1996
"74e &et 1l�ie7uMt" h� Gol Beted H
- Free Cable TV
- Free Water and Sewer
- Big Walk in Closets
- Central Air Conditioning
- Central Heat
- Kitchen Appliances
- Nice Carpeting
- 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
- On Site Management
- ECU Bus Service
- Window Blinds
FREEFREEFREEFREE
$SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS $
FREEFREEFREEFREE
1 BEDROOM - $285
2 BEDROOM - $370, $380
2 BEDROOM i"wnhom(s $400
3 BEDROOM - $465
ECONOMICAL
We're giving away FREE HEAT THIS WINTER in our 2 bedroom townhomes
FALL SPECIAL
2 BEDROOM$285
(WE HAVE ONE LEFT)
MINUTES AWAY FROM ECU
OPEN EVERY DAY
EASTBR00K&
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
752-5100
Ijst Annual
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Fall broken
(L-R) ECU students
Jimmy Warren, Scott
Forbes, Greg Maestro,
David White and Bran-
don Waddell proudly
display their 350-
pounds-worth of king
mackerel, caught off
Wrightsville Beach over
Fall Break.
Photo by ROBBIE WOLFE
MEDICAL from
page 2
in finding stories that are suitable for
adaptation, but that it has also been a
positive experience. He said that the
audiences are diverse and the discus-
sions are always educational.
"We're all trying to understand
the meaning of the story. It's just that
we're coming at it from different per-
spectives. And there's a lot of learning
that goes on between the students and
the audience Savitt said.
The reader's theater format seems
to make it much easier for audience
members to discuss delicate medical
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issues. Savitt said. It makes the audi-
ence more comfortable with discussion
and also gives them a common situa-
tion with which to organize discussion.
"It's a text It's much easier for
audiences, or anybody, to have a case
of something than to talk in broad
generalities Savitt said.
The first reading in Greenville will
be on Thursday night, October 24, at
The Greenville Unitarian Universalist
Church, 131 Oakmont Drive. There will
also be a reading on Monday afternoon
in room 2W50 at the Brody Medical
Sciences Building at the School of
Medicine. These are free and open to
the public. For more information, call
the department of medical humanities
at 816-2797.
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Thursday, October 24,1996
The East Carolinian
EVANS from page 1
"I think it is a compliment to the
whole city, as well as the Uptown
Greenville Association that hired
RDI for the project" Edwards, who
has been a catalyst in the execu-
tion of the project, praised the "Buy
a Brick" campaign, which was used
to raise the needed money for reno-
vation costs. "We have received
$161,000 from private donations
which will be matched with tax
dollars, and I feel our members
have been very diligent and have
taken a thoughtful approach in
implementing the plan
The two main architects of the
project, Dr. Abdul-Shakoor Farhadi
and Dr. Bill Towell, tapped into the
theme of the plan, which is to bring
vitality back to the downtown area.
"I interviewed businesses and
people in other successful down-
town areas to fully research the ar-
chitecture said Farhadi. Farhadi,
who is currently working with
Towell on a major plan for an in-
dustrial park in Perquimans
County, designed the bus waiting
area and gazebo that may be built
on the corner of Fourth Street and
Evans Street. By researching
Greenville's existing downtown as
well as other businesses in North
Carolina that are enjoying better
business because of an improved
downtown, Farhadi and Towell re-
alized the key to modernization was
to create a more social atmosphere.
"This award speaks well for the
university and we hope it is going
to increase the visibility for the
downtown area, since it will soon
be a focal point for the whole city
said Towell. "A town without a
downtown loses its identity and
right now you can virtually see
noone out on the streets after dark.
We are opening up the area for
more shoppers and more traffic
movement since what Downtown
needs is more people Towell
stated.
The next challenge according
to Edwards is the implementation
of the plan, which shall begin in the
fall of 1997. The project includes
pedestrian crosswalks, a town
clock, seating areas, two-way traf-
fic before the pedestrian mall and
the overall safety and redecorating
of the area. Also included is the
renovation of both court houses.
"It will take at least nine to 12
months before building begins
since we're fine tuning the plan.
We're beginning to see the positive
implications as we move forward
with it said Edwards.
No news
writers'
meeting today.
Writer should
check
assignment
board.
HOME from page 1
children a place to stay while their
child is recovering in the hospital.
Since it was opened in 1987, the
House has had over 7,000 admis-
sions, representing over 4000 fami-
lies.
Three of the mothers who are
staying at the Ronald McDonald
House here in Greenville came out
to meet some of the brothers of the
fraternity and got a small tour of the
village. Venetta Barnes, Ernestine
Whitaker, and Mechelle Williams all
have premature babies who are still
in the hospital. They have all been
residents at the Ronald McDonald
House here in Greenville for about
two months.
Anyone wishing to contribute
should go to the campus mall any-
time before Friday at midnight.
WZMB-FM 91.3 will be broadcasting
live from7-9 p.m. on Thursday night,
and students are encouraged to come
out
w Bruce Frye
on the Patio
loom
(Weather Permitting)
Try out our
New Menu Items
IE�m@Ib IP�3�3�@ W@(S��e
�floBsESSOa 1?�00(�l@i?8
V:
Si
M0N-SAT 11AM-3AM
SUNDAY 12PM-2AM
2nJ Annual
bialloveen Bash
Thursday, Oct. 31
Drink Specials
Give-way sPrizes
$L
114 E. 5th St.
758-9191
FAX:758-7885
&X-X
ftcftV
Showing all ECU away games
LAMBDA PHI
ptesents
jfamual Cardboard Village
Started Wednesday at noon.
TTntil friday - Midnight -
.11 donations
do to support 'Ronald VicVonald ftouse
Attention all High School quiz bowlers!
Get those buzzer fingers ready for the
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Wednesday, November 6, 1996
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information and Registration
Packet from the Information Desk,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Lots of prizes - cash, t-ahirta, mugs, and morel
For more Information, contact the
Student Union Office, 236 Mendenhall, 328-47 1 5.
��$�,
Sponsored by the
ECU Student Union
Special Events
Committee
ECU will send a team off live College
Bowl players to the Regional
Tournament, February 14-16, 1997,
at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, VA.
" "�





-
���
Thursday, October 24,1996
The East Carolinian
Oufittee
The minimum
wage
increased a
few weeks
ago, but that
still won't help
meet the costs
of attending
college
In a time when the chief executive officers of some of
our leading corporations are making over 200 times the
amount of money that their average employee takes home,
it seems a bit ridiculous for Congress to be haggling over a
mere 90 cents. We wonder why Congress should be the
decision-maker in this process.
When was the last time a senator made minimum wage?
If it was about a decade ago, then he or she would have
been making about 90 cents less than minimum wage is
now. That's right, 90 cents. Ten years ago the minimum
wage was a whopping $3.35. Today it's gone up to unbeliev-
ably high $4.25.
That means that a minimum wage earner working 40
hours per week for 52 weeks would bring in $8,840, before
taxes. No Christmas holiday, no Thanksgiving break and
especially no July 4th off for that lucky stiff. No sir, they
would have to work eight hours a day, five days a week to
garner that fat paycheck. They would be lucky if they could
take a weekend off once a month
Ten years ago that same person would have made $6,698
for the year. But think about the standard of living back
then. Although it was the '80s, when everything seemed to
cost an arm and a leg, it wasn't nearly as much as it is now.
Reagan was in the middle of his second term and prices
were beginning to skyrocket, but the financial crunch didn't
come along until Bush was in office. Seven thousand dol-
lars would have gone much farther at that time then $9,000
goes in 1996.
Now, a bill passed the House of Representatives in May
that would raise the minimum wage another 90 cents over
the next two years to a total of $5.15 per hour. That's
$10,712 a year for our hard-working friend mentioned above.
Not great by any means, but a start.
What does that mean to us, the students of East Caro-
lina University? It affects students from the northeastern
and western part of the state the most according to the
Employment Security Commission of North Carolina. The
legislation raises minimum wage from $4.25 to $5.15 an
hour in two stages. The first stage went into effect on Octo-
ber 1, 1996 with a 50-cent increase. The second stage oc-
curs on September 1, 1997, when there will be an addi-
tional increase of 40 cents per hour.
The Employment Security Commission estimates some
308,000 North Carolina workers will be directly impacted
by the new legislation. They represent just over 16 percent
of the state's hourly work force and about 9 percent of the
overall work force.
If you're paying for college yourself, then you already
know the harsh reality of minimum wage and how far it will
get you. If you're going to school full-time, then more than
likely you only have a part-time job, which also means you're
probably making the minimum.
Needless to say, the minimum wage isn't nearly enough
for most people tr e on in this country. In fact, that 40
hour per week worker might be classified as earning a wage
that is below poverty level.
Yet despite all of these despairing remarks, we should
feel comforted that we live in North Carolina, not only be-
cause the cost of living here is so low in comparison to
many parts of the country. North Carolina has one of the
lowest percentages of hourly workers making at or below
minimum wage in the entire South.
If North Carolina had to come in last at something, we
at The East Carolinian are glad it was that.
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The East Carolinian
Brandon Wadded, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst Prod. Manager
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Cristle Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crampton, Copy Editor
Dill Dillard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
328-6366.
Election 996
Editor's note: These two columns are the fourth in a series
of political issues columns that will run through Nov. 5.
TECs goal is to give the student body information relevant
to the upcoming elections. Today's topic is abortion.
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
The Republican party, that
supposedly wants
government out of our
lives wants government in
the most private, personal
area of all.
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
I cannot think of an issue that engenders more dis-
agreement, more anger, more screaming and yelling. It's
something that most politicians usually try not to touch
with a 10-foot pole. But it's a topic that is on the minds of
many, and it's something that we are going to tackle this
week.
With all of my other liberal articles, I guess you don't
have to be a rocket scientist to guess where I stand on
this issue. I believe that no man or woman has the right
to dictate what another woman can or cannot do with
her body. It's true that most Democrats share my view,
and most Republicans are pro-life.
Let me say one thing. I highly respect the conscien-
tious decision for someone not to have an abortion. I
respect people who do not agree with the procedure, and
1 respect families who feel abortion is wrong. What I do
not respect is individuals on the pro-life side who want to
mandate what a woman can and cannot do with her own
body.
Here's an important distinction to make. I'm not pro-
abortion. I don't know anyone who is. What I am, and
what a majority of Americans are, is pro-choice. That is,
all we want is the ability for women to make the choice
themselves, with their family and their God. If people are
against abortion, then they have every right to decline to
have one. and that's fine.
The Republican party platform states that they sup-
port a constitutional amendment banning all abortions.
That means if a woman is raped, she would not have the
right to terminate that forced pregnancy. If a woman is a
victim of incest, she would not have the right to termi-
nate that pregnancy. If a woman's life was in danger, she
would not have the right to save her life. If a woman's
child were to be severely deformed, she would not have
the right to save that child from a life of torture and pain.
I know that many will disagree with my previous state-
ments, and I welcome that. Our country is built on the
fact that reasonable men and women can disagree. How-
ever, I get really tired of pro-lifers who claim that we who
disagree are Godless, that they have a mandate on moral-
ity. First of all, most of the people who are screaming and
fussing are on the pro-life side. I drove by a pro-life rally
in Raleigh the other day, proudly displaying my Clinton
Gore bumper sticker. Well, besides all of those offensive
"Abortion Kills Children" signs, some of those people gave
me the meanest looks, and one of them gave me the fin-
ger. What kind of morality is that?
I hate to bring this up as well, but sometimes pro-life
arguments are somewhat intellectually lacking. I read the
Reflector the other day, and instead of seeing a letter to
the editor in which the writer expressed his disagreements
with President Clinton on the abortion issue, the writer
called Clinton a "baby killer" and proceeded to deem him
"Willie Scissorhands Feeble words from a feeble mind.
Also, speaking of morals, I haven't heard of pro-choice
people acting violently. What I have heard is of several
doctors who have been killed by pro-life extremists, who
try to use the issue to justify murdering someone. Make
no mistake, there are many good, honest people on the
pro-life side (I know several of them). However, I'm say-
ing there are some real morons on the other side, plain
and simple.
Well, this wasn't the easiest of columns to write, but
remember the point: Disagreement on the issues is fine,
but restricting freedom is the greatest evil of all. In a
perfect world, we would all be pro-choice. There would
not be a minority of people that sought to deny women
of their reproductive freedom. There would be reason-
able people disagreeing on which choice to make, whether
or not to have a first-trimester abortion. But this isn't a
perfect world, and for many days to come, you'll see the
best, and worst, that the pro-life movement has to offer.
When we decided to do these series of columns I
really did not want to do this subject Abortion is a
hard topic to write about The subject is very close to
me and, quite frankly, it is hard not to be reactionary
with this article, but I will try.
In 1987, now Vice President Al Gore wrote a let-
ter to a pro-life constituent stating that he opposed
federal funding for abortion. He said that federal
money should not be used in "what is arguably the
taking of a human life I want to establish this point
in the minds of many people, educated and unedu-
cated alike; abortion is murder. Also, in this adminis-
tration at least, Al Gore recognizes this fact Now as
a society we seem to agree that we should respect
the rights of every group and not force our opinions
on them. How then can members of the Democratic
party support federally funded abortions? This policy
would force many to pay for what they believe is mur-
der.
President Clinton vetoed a bill by the Republican
Congress that would have banned late term abortions.
These are the kinds of abortions in which there are
documented cases of fetuses surviving certain proce-
dures to live productive lives. I say certain procedures
because in many of these barbaric procedures there
is zero chance of survival. Liberals want to dissociate
themselves from the grotesque methods of abortion.
They are more comfortable to speak loftily of choice
and women's rights. Liberals condemn those who try
to shock people into reality using documented clini-
cal facts as Republicans did in Congress.
Liberals want you to have access to any abortion
procedure and even import international methods
such as the new "abortion pill" for added convenience.
Not only do they not care about the large percentage
of Americans who oppose abortion, they also want to
use their money to fund abortions.
What liberals do not want you to hear is that
abortion is a multi-million-dollar-a-year industry in this
country. It would not serve their agenda for Ameri-
cans to know that their stand is based more on cash
than conviction. Abortions are becoming more and
more acts of convenience and this is sad. Although
the rights of women are kept at the forefront of this
debate, what about the rights of the unborn child?
For that matter, what about the rights of the father?
He, under current law, does not even have to be noti-
fied if a woman decides to abort his child. He is not
entitled to even a simple phone call to let him know
her decision.
This is a moral issue pure and simple. Does a
woman have the right to stop a life that lives inside
her body? If so, in what cases? One thing that we all
must agree on is that each successful abortion stops
one child from being born. I wonder which child.
Could it be the boy that would grow up to cure can-
cer through his research? Perhaps the little girl who
would discover a cure for AIDS or become president
It is possible that we could be robbing future society
of its greatest intellectuals and innovators in the name
of choice. We will never know for sure, but each year
with each one of the many thousands of abortions
we prevent yet another child from reaching its full
potential. We could be robbing generations for years
to come.
The law is the last result of
human wisdom acting upon
human experience for the
benefits of the public.
� Samuel Johnson
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Thursday, October 24,1996
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Thursday, October 23,1996
The East Carolinian
L'Fy
Sleepers will leave
you wide awake
English faculty
promote books
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
OCTOBER
24
Saturday
The Rock at 8 p.m. at
Hendrix Theatre. Runs through Sat-
urday.
Lecture featuring Brian Wallis, art his
torian, at 7 p.m. in Speight Audito
rium.
Puego del Alma at the Attic
Doxy's Kitchen with Percy Hill at Peas
ants Cafe.
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble at Stac
cato Cafe.
Versus with Olivia Tremor Control and
leff Mangum at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
25
Friday
Opera Scenes at 8 p.m. in
.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Runs
through Saturday.
uupiter Coyote at the Attic.
Running From Anna at Peasants Cafe.
26
Saturday
International Students Asso
ciation presents International Night
from 6-11 pm in Mendenhall Great
Room.
���������
Chairmen of the Board at the Attic.
Tom Taylor at the Cellar.
�����?������
Jernstock '96 from 3 p.mmidnight
it the Farmers Market Tryon Place
Drive, in Historic Downtown New
Bern. Bands featured include Purple
School Bus, the Bivans Bra's, Down
East Blues Band, Marshall Wayne and
Stephens, Liquor, Brotherhood, and
Maniacal State. Also performing will
be Linda Dunn, Cosmo Jive, Mike
McCulley, Stevie James, and Kavika
the Magician. Tickets are $7. For more
information, call (919) 635-1527.
�������?����
Doxy's Kitchen at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Meeting accomplished writers and
getting them to autograph their work is
always a pleasure, especially if a writer
shares your interests or worldview. Grow-
ing up in small, isolated communities
across the country. I viewed writers as
untouchable spirits. Nobody 1 knew pub-
lished their thoughts. The most accom-
plished writer I could find were those who
showcased their work in the school maga-
zine.
Such does not have to be the case
here at ECU. Our campus is filled with
published authors, and on Oct 30 you
are invited to meet a small sampling of
ECU's best when the English department
hosts a book-signing party and reading
According to Dr. Donald Palumbo,
chair of the English department "Writ-
ing a book involves an incredible amount
of work Certainly, the effort expended
deserves special recognition, and the
achievement is cause for celebration"
This celebration is not only a great
way for the English department to spot-
light some of its faculty, it is also an excel-
lent opportunity for EClJ students to take
advantage of the many resources available
right here on campus. If you're doing re-
search for a paper or if your interested in
a particular topic what better way to fur-
ther your knowledge than going straight
to a professional source?
Even within a specialized group such
as the English department one will find
many talents working in various direc-
tions. This year, six eclectic talents will
share their work
Bradley P. Dean and Ronald W.
Hoag, both experts on Henry David
Thoreau. have collaborated on Thoreau s
Lectures: An Annotated Calendar, which
deals with Thoreau's speaking tours and
his writings. Dean, an adjunct lecturer, was
responsible for unearthing Faith in a
Seed, a lost piece of Thoreau's writing.
Hoag, an associate professor, edits The
Concord Saunterer, a journal specializ-
ing in Thoreau and his work.
Peter Makuck who is the driving
force behind the ECU Poetry Forum, will
feature his latest book of poems, Shore-
lines- A published talent in both poetry
and short fiction, Makuck has much to
offer any aspiring creative writer who de-
sires guidance.
LiUian S.Robinson, whose book Sex
, Class and Culture revolutionized the
feminist movement is a prime source for
anyone interested in women writers or
cultural studies. She recently edited and
compiled the mammoth four-volume col-
lection .AfcxferTi Women Writers. She also
is set to publish her latest work in a book
entitled Canon s Mourn: Dispatcher trom
the Culture Wars.
Charles Sullivan, an English profes-
sor and acting chair of the foreign lan-
guage department is the man to shed fight
on the dark ages His specialty is in Celtic
literature, and hie is a member of the Welsh
academy. Along with The Mabinogi A
Book of Essays, a collection of writings
on the Welsh national epic which Sullivan
edited, Sullivan's work includes research
in science fiction as well as herbal and
magical medicines.
Finally. Gay Witentz, who was named
this year's UNC Board of Governors Dis-
tinguished Professor for Teaching, will
complete the group with a multicultural
spin. Wilentz recently reconstructed a re-
issued edition of AnziaYezierska's Safome
of the Tenements, a chronicle of the Jew-
ish women's immigration to America, by
adding a scholarly and critical introduc-
tion to the text Wilentz is also the author
of Binding Cultures: Black Women Writ-
ers in Africa and the Diaspora.
There you are - some of ECU'S fin-
est ready and willing to share their work.
Hopefully the event will be a success and
inspire other departments to hold similar
functions for their faculty. ECU has marry
fruitful resources to tap mto, and the pro-
fessors and lecturers are a resource that
should not be overlooked. Take the time
to meet and hear our teachers and re-
searchers. They deserve our attention just
as much as we deserve their knowledge.
The book-signing party and reading
will be held Oct 30 from 430630 pm in
the General Classroom Building, room
2136.
Photo Courtesy of Warner Bros.
Kevin Bacon leads the four young boys from Hell's Kitchen down a hallway that will forever
change their lives in what may be the scariest scene in Barry Levinson's new film Sleepers
Jay Myers
Ufeatyle Editor
Forget Brad Pitt Forget Dustin
Hoffman. Forget Jason Patric Forget
Kevin Bacoa Forget Robert De Niro.
The real stars of Sleepers are Jo
seph Perrino, Brad Renfro, Jonathan
Tucker and Geoffrey Wigdor who play
the four young boys who are sent off to
a juvenile prison because of the part
they play in a hragk accident
If s not that the more famous ac-
tors mentioned at the beginning aren't
up to par in the film. In fact De Niro
turns in one of his most kind and nur-
turing performances ever. And Kevin
Bacon makes his slimy scumbucket of
a character wickedly unredeemable.
But the true focus of the film is on
the group of young friends whose lives
are forever changed by the traumatic
events they experience together. The
fact that this part of the film causes so
much emotional pain and agony is a
testament to the strength of the perfor-
mances given by Perrino, Renfro, Tucker
and Wigdor.
By now, almost everyone reading
this has more than likely seen the non-
stop ad campaign that has been run-
ning for this new film from Barry
Levinson. Levinson, who directed such
stellar movies as Rain Man, Diner and
Avalon, and who also serves as execu-
tive producer on the excellent NBC
police drama Homicide, has once again
tackled an ensemble piece with a line-
up of stars that seems overwhelming.
And at times during the film, the
cast does become a bit much to handle.
However, the good points far outweigh
any negative aspects of the film.
Taken from the real life of Lorenzo
Carcaterra, portrayed in the film by Jo-
seph Perrino and Jason Patric Sleep-
ers is a frightening, shocking, heart-
rending film of innocence lost and cold-
blooded revenge.
Beginning in the crime-ridden
streets of the New York neighborhood
Hell's Kitchen, the plot follows the an-
tics of "Shakes" Carcaterra (Joseph
Perrino) and his three friends, Michael
(Brad Renfro), Tommy (Jonathan
Tucker) and John (Geoffrey Wigdor).
Their days consist of going to church
and playing basketball with Father
Bobby Carillo (Robert De Niro), hang-
ing out at a convenience store owned
by Fat Mancho (Frank Medrano) and
running money for local gangster King
Benny (Vittorio Gassman).
When one of their scams goes hor-
ribly wrong and results in the crippling
of an old man, the four friends are taken
out of the neighborhood and remanded
to the custody of the Wilkinson Home
for Boys for the period of one year. Al-
though this is supposed to be a juve-
nile detention center, the guards, one
of whom is the disgustingly smug Sean
Nokes (Kevin Bacon), treat the inmates
as if they were in a real prison.
During their confinement the boys
draw more and more attention from
Nokes and three of his guard buddies,
until at last the unimaginable happens
and the guards take advantage of the
boys. The result of the violation leaves
the boys horribly scarred and their lives
are changed irrevocably.
At this point the movie changes
gears and jumps ahead about 15 years.
Tommy (now Billy Crudup) and John
(now Ron Eldard), who have turned to
a life of crime with the mob, run into
Nokes in a local bar and decide to en-
act their own special revenge upon him.
Once Tommy and John are arrested
for this, Michael (now Brad Pitt), now
an assistant district attorney, schemes
to get them released and to bring down
the Wilkinson Home in the process.
Michael ropes in Lorenzo, Father Bobby
and King Benny to help him. Dustin
Hoffman turns up as the defense attor-
ney for Tommy and John.
Once seen, the first half of the film
is obviously the best Levinson recreates
the Hell's Kitchen of the late '60s with
vivid detail. Not only do we get a strong
sense of who the four boys are, but the
secondary characters also share equal
development We learn of King Benny's
See SLEEP Page 9
27
Sunday
Homecoming Homegrown
concert with the Melanie Sparka
Band, Percy Hill, and Agents of Good
Roots.
Sunday at the Gallery Concert at
p.m. at the Greenville Museum of Art
B02 S. Evans St
gDISevieco
����
������
Solar Circus at Peasant's Cafe.
28
Monday
Chuck D
The Autobiography
of Mistachuck
Chew on This Lecture Se
ries: "Count Dracula" by Dr. James
C. Holte.
Faculty Recital featuring Henry
Doskey, piano, at 8 p.m. in A.J
Fletcher Recital Hall.
29
Tuesday
S. Rudolph Alexander Per
forming Arts Series featuring the
London Chamber Orchestra at 8 p.m
in Wright Auditorium.
John Davis
Staff Writer
�����
70's80's dance party at the Attic
���'�
fXngle Apparho at Peasant's Cafe.
30
Wednesday
English Dept book-signing
and reading party from 4:30-6:30 p.m
at General Classroom Building, room
2136.
����������
Premier Performances of Works by
ECU Composers at 8 p.m. in A.J
Fletcher Recital Hall.
������
� � � �
Comedy Zone featuring Mad Hatter
at the Attic.
Not much other than music typi-
fied as "college" music ever comes to
TEC for review. I suppose the record
companies think that we are too nar-
row minded or too stupid to appreci-
ate much other than MTV buzz clips. I
think we deserve a bit more credit The
student jazz recitals are always stand-
ing room only, which means that some
of us college student types like jazz.
All of this only shows my excite-
ment at running into a rap CD the
other day in the office. So. I picked up
The Autobiography of Mistachuck with
anticipation and eagerly brought it
home to listen to. Memories of old
Public Enemy albums like Fear of a
Black Planet and Apocalypse '91
flashed through my head: 1 found my-
self humming the chorus of "Can't
Truss It" as I walked home.
Unfortunately, Chuck D's first solo
album doesn't pack quite the punch
that those old PE albums had. The
once-ferocious growl of the Rhyme
Animal's saber-sharp wit-filled voice has
been replaced by "Mistachuck who
is still angry and loud but not very con-
vincing. Chuck D's targets are famil-
iar, racism, "crackers" and the Estab-
lishment And he's added some new
ones as well - the record industry and
pretty much any rapper who doesn't
wax political in his fashion.
Where once Chuck D's comments
on society seemed to be both engag-
ing and relevant now they seem and
sound tired, like he knows he's been
spouting them for too long, or perhaps
time has marched on and left him wish-
ing for a war to fight I'm not sure.
All I can really say for certain is
that none of the songs on this album
match the power and musical mastery
administered on Apocalypse '91.
Chuck D seems to have fallen into the
trend of the day, rather than being the
trend-setter he used to be. The beats
on the album leave much to be desired.
Most of them sound just like every
other beat out on the radio waves to-
day, with the exception of the first track
and "Endonesia
The first song on the album,
"Mistachuck is a decent song. The
beat is solid, and Chuck D uses his com
manding voice well to introduce his
new persona, giving himself props and
basically elevating himself as the Na-
tion of Islam's equivalent to "Big
Poppa Of course he doesn't drink or
smoke, and he doesn't spend his money
lavishly, all of which are admirable.
But when one does a good deed,
the purity of it is a hit lackluster after
See CHUCK page 9
WEEKEND ,
Hendrix
The Rock
Student
Spotlight
Nicolas Cage, hot off his Oscar-winning performance in Leaving Las Vegas,
surprised the movie-going public by joining Sean Connery in an action film last
summer. While The Rock may not exactly be an exercise in artistic integrity, it
proved to be a huge box-office success where Cage played the thinking man's hero
and Connery played the brawn.
The Rock is in many ways completely mindless and at the same time an
action flick of a higher caliber. The plot revolves around a renegade group of
marines (headed by the always intense Ed Harris) who take Alcatraz and its
tourists hostage in exchange for a large sum of money from the government If the)
government does not pay up, a few missiles loaded with a deadly virus will be
launched at San Francisco.
The heroes who come in to save the day are, of course, Cage and Connery,
both of whom are forced into the situation despite their reluctance.
After a somewhat dragging first half, filled with a senseless car chase and
some forced efforts at humor, the action picks up when our heroes finally land at
Alcatraz.
Director Michael Bay does much better here with action sequences than he
did in the disappointing Bad Boys and he uses his superb cast to exhilarating
effect In fact the acting is what makes The Rock stand out from the bu'k of
actioners being released these days. A scene featuring a showdown between Ed
Harris and Michael Biehn, who plays an anti-terrorist squadron leader, was one of
last summer's best cinematic moments.
If anything, The Rock illustrated how important a strong cast is in order to
make a movie work.
Chew on this
the BSl English depart-
ment is an internation-
ally recogitzed scholar
of vampire lore and leg-
end. He w� serve up a
lecture entitled "Count
Dracula" at noon In un-
derground MendenhaH
oniWorKiay, Gct28.
pmphoto
Photo by ELIZABETH DUNCAN
Name: Jerry Morris
Dept: Non-traditional
Job: Volunteers almost
all cf his spare time
Joseph Elchehabi
Staff Writer
"I don't do volunteer work
for the rewards said Jerry
Morris, a 42-year-old nontradi-
tional ECU student and father of
four. "I do it because I feel like I
have a debt to pay back. There's
something inside me that says 1
need to do it
What makes Jerry so special,
besides his decision to change
careers at an age when most
people have already comfortably
settled into theirs, is his desire
to give to others who need help
the most. A lot of his volunteer
work centers around organiza-
tions like Camp Rainbow and
Camp Hope, services designed to
help seriously or chronically ill
children suffering from cancer
and sickle-cell anemia.
"I tell the kids in my camp,
'You're special and don't ever
See JERRY page 8
��
l wH





8
Thursday, October 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
JERRY from page 7
forget that. Not only do your par-
ents love you. but God loves you.
and Jerry loves you We don't win
them all; we do lose some, and it's
not just the families who sorrow
It's us too because we've known
these kids. I think in the last five
years I've lost ten. maybe twelve
kids. They're my kids for a week.
but they'll be my kids forever
If Jerry knows about one thing,
it's cancer. In September of 1990
his son Sean, then only nine, was
diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma. Jerry and his wife
watched their child endure three
years of chemical and radiation
therapy at Pitt County Children's
Hospital. All seemed to be going
well, then in '93, after a brief pe-
riod of remission, Sean relapsed,
this time with leukemia. The spread
of his cancer, though, was eventu-
ally stopped.
"We've got to the point now
where we don't say he's cured - you
never say that. But because he's re-
lapsed once we always wonder it
it's going to be Sean again. But you
don't live with that thought of ulti-
mate doom. You live with the be-
lief that he's going to stay well,
and live a full and productive life
In November. Sean will cel-
ebrate his 16th birthday. One das-
he wants to be a minister.
Jerry's home is in Havelock,
but he decided to rent an apartment
close to campus, a decision he made
more out of necessity than conve-
nience while he studies full time.
Though he admits it's hard being
away from his family, he sees them
once a week, and his wife contin-
ues to support him all the way.
"Your job right now she of-
ten tells him, "is being a student
"My biggest strength said
Jerry, "is my wife. She's stood by
me through thick and thin
Even though he could make a
lot more money as an aircraft struc-
ture mechanic, a job he held for 22
years while in the Marine Corps,
Jerry wants to be a P.E. and Social
Studies teacher in high school.
"Success he says, "is not
about the size of your bankroll. It's
the size of your heart
Even with all his studying.
Jerry manages to find the time to
volunteer at least ten hours a week.
"I've become more aware of
others' needs. That's why I volun-
teer a lot. to help in some small way
There's a lot we can do, and it
doesn't take a whole lot of money
or time, just a couple hours a week.
Be part of a community live in
it instead of just existing. You've
got to become involved Jerry
Morris is a man who definitely
walks his talk.
If you would like to find out
how you can become a volunteer,
you may contact Judy Baker at 328-
6432. or visit her office at 201
Christenbury Gym.
6th Annual Gamma Sigma Sigma
PICK-A-PIRATE
Thursday, October 24
8:00 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium
Admission is only $1 or 3 canned
food items, but bring plenty of $$
to bid on the man of your dreams!
LAQteS; &UNQA FZieND,
g�fuq kx� Muer,
SUV M7S
Proceeds Benefit REAL Crisis Center &
New Directions, a shelter for battered women
v
' Tuesday
70's & 80's
Dance Night
only S2 aclm
fur members
Ladies Free
Admission
I ntil 11pm
A Bottle Beer
ATTIC
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Adv. Tix locations
East Coast
music
Skullys
Wash Pub
Attic
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th year in
downtown
Greenville
Checkers
rBURQERS� FRIES �COLAS
F�e$p U 4U
Hours
8amlOpm Sun-Thur
Sam-llpm Fri 5c Sat
Show
Student ID
and recieve
15 off!
8pm to closing.
Not valid with any other discount.
Friday
JUPITER COYOTE
Last Greenville'
appearance
this year!
Saturday
Chairmen of
the Board
Beach Music's 1 Show!
Tuesday 29th
BooteLe. �pLLuu
SHAG
- Styles i
Phone in orders 321-6779
R Mlb " T "B"u"y"0N E" " TFR EESmalF Fr'y"1
DChamP Chicken jwith Purchase of
Burqers I Sandwich, Get; any Sandwich
$.96 ' ONE FREE! ' �A MAU,m
Expires Nov
30th. 1996
i
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rauaoEK- Fties-colas
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Grilled or Fried.
and Medium
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Checkers
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Buy ONE
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Checkers
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Buy Four
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Champs
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$2,qq
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no coupon necessary.
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Free i Milkshakes
Coffee! I half price
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with any purchase.
3pm - 6pm
no coupon necessary. ' no coupon necessary.
������ �n.w.v.v v ��.�.���.�
r�b�o�i4- f�nfc-coiaj I
Checkers
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Checkers
,V.WMi.V.VWV-W





The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 24, 1996
2 e a S 2 2
O JX ft. m C ft-
S � � � S
� � � o "g o
YOUR
could be here
ADVERTISING IN THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CAN GET YOUR MESSAGE OUT AROUND
THE ECU CAMPUS.
For more i
information call 3282000
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St ftftn Hours:
Pittman Building ' 3 ' "UUU J Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC8:00-4:00
CvlxUCviV from page 7
one professes one's righteousness all
over the third verse: "I don't care for
Range Rovers cause to me the
price is too high and I feel 'em get-
ting over Land Cruisers Isuzus or
new shoes man dem notes is heavy
that's why I got a couple of Chevies
Okay, so you're not a big spender. Big
Deal. Why ruin a good beat rolling
out your bank statement for me?
Most of the tracks on the album
approach the level of boring. Or, more
than that, the music is interesting but
Chuck D's vain attempts to experi-
ment fail, and his lyrics lack in
catchiness and content Like the boy
who cried wolf, Chuck D has worn his
particular brand of preaching thin. It's
just not interesting anymore.
The other good track on the al-
bum, "Endonesia is a complaint
about the government sending poor
blacks to fight in Vietnam. The music
is actually well written, and it features
a new MC from North Carolina, Dow
Jones.
Other than those two good
tracks, most of the album is vapid,
empty and vain. The closet Chuck D
even comes to truly expressing his
sentiments about anything in a clear
manner is the hidden track at the end
of track 12 where, in an obnoxiously
distorted voice, Chuck complains
about the music business and how not
enough black musicians get record
contracts. (What music business is he
referring to?)
Anyway, the whole issue of the rap
industry was much better laid out by A
Tribe Called Quest in "Showbusiness
It is very hard for me to take seriously a
political opinion of racism from some-
one who listens to Louis Farrakhan. My
suggestion: find a die-hard PE fan, tape
"Mistachuck" and "Endonesia and
save your money for a used copy of
Apocalypse '91.
, Garry
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
516-A - Hwy 264-A Greenville, NC
MILLIONS
OF AMERICANS DON'T KNOW
THEY HAVE HERPES.
WE
THINK
THEY
SHOULD.
m
c
cU ml (Mix. tyet t&e facte m Ocfo&w 2tk
HERPES THRIVES ON IGNORANCE
GlaxoWellcome
A lournev ot Discovery
CjJLjLJb" from page 7
rise to power in the mob structure. Fat
Mancho spouts philosophical advice on
how to survive in the slumlike neigh-
borhood, and Father Bobby serves as
the boys' shining ray of hope and inspi-
ration.
The sense of wonderment and ide-
alism that the boys maintain in the face
of the adversity is so strong that it be-
comes doubly painful when their spirits
are broken by the Wilkinson guards. The
scenes in the boys' prison are so shock-
ingly arresting in their passion and vio-
lence that the rest of the film is doomed
to pale in comparison.
When the movie changes to the
older actors, the boys' idealistic vision
has been all but lost and this makes the
latter part of the film more difficult to
watch, because the characters seem to
be so changed and so lost
Also, the machinations that Michael
arranges in order to get Tommy and John
off the hook in court proved to be too
difficult to follow for some of the people
I saw the picture with.
On the other hand, Levinson's di-
rection proves once again that he has an
unnaturally good knack for filmmaking.
Which he needed after the bomb he
dropped with the putrid Michael Dou-
glasDemi Moore non-thriller Disclosure.
Although Levinson manages some
innovative camera shots and has a won-
derful sense of pacing, if s too bad that he
couldn't have found some other way in
which to structure the film so that the
climax of the film, the boys' experiences
at Wilkinson, would have come at the end
instead of the middle. However, looking
at the way the film is structured, there
seems to be no alternative that wouldn't
end up destroying the earlier, better part
of the movie.
Ultimately, this point doesn't matter,
though. Because in a film season which
includes such pathetic wastes of celluloid
as The Glimmer Man and Mighty Ducks
3, I'll take Sleepers any day.
DISCOUNTS.
Walk-inj
Tues - rri 9-6 Sat 1-12
18 a
"Official ECU Ring Event"
OW Ja
IRTQ1RVED
roi I PGP JFWELRV
Oct. 21-22 � 9am-4pm
Oct. 23 � 9am-6:15
Oct. 24 � 9am-6:15
Oct. 25 � 9am-4pm
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer" A ri -r � r F" fY
Student Stores 1RTQ1$yjU?
fUJS' WP ' visa ' Special Payment Plans Available
�mnilMMH
'





10
Thursday, October 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
Facelift process to
begin next month
Cheerleaders produce
spirited performances
David Councilman
Staff Writer
Get ready for more construction
on campus. But phase one of this
project is expected to be completed
by next summe-
ECU plans to break ground on
an $18 million stadium expansion
project to Dowdy- Ficklen Stadium
next month. The expansion will in-
clude the addition of 8.000 seats on
the second level on the north side of
the stadium. (The north side is the
where students sit) New restrooms,
concession stands, a double ramp and
an elevator will be added to that side
of Dowdy-Ficklen
This is just the first phase of the
two phase project The cost is esti-
mated around $12.7 million, at no cost
to the student The money will be pro-
vided by the state of North Carolina,
for the first stage of the project
The construction for Dowdy-
Ficklen will be handled by Davidson,
Jones and Beers of Raleigh. The
amount of time they have to finish
this project will run very close to the
beginning of football season.
"Although the time frame is very
tight we still expect this project to
be completed by the summer of 1997
Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs
Richard Brown said.
Photo Courtesy of East Carolinia 96 Pirate Football media guide
The construction will be finished
by the time ECU hosts the Demon
Deacons of Wake Forest University
next season. This will give ECU a
chance to show off the new additions.
The second phase of the stadium
expansion should be completed by the
time we play N.C. State in the year
2000 and UNC in 2003.
The second phase of the stadium
expansion will include 1,500 club
seats and 3,000 end zone seats. The
estimated finishing time for this
project has yet to be determined.
ECU received the money for the
first phse from House Representative
Henry Aldridge. Aldrige has a com-
mitment from the state Speaker of the
House Harold Brubaker for an addi-
tional $3 million in January.
Stadium expansion will help to
bring in bigger name teams, since the
stadium will be able to hold the abun-
dance of fans that big teams bring in,
not to mention the Pirate team that
has packed the stadium the last two
home games.
The ECU football program is on
the rise, and the expansion is just
another step forward. You should get
a good look at Dowdy-Ficklen now,
because next year the place will look
a lot more different.
So, Pirate fans, come out and
take one last long look at every home
game at the old Dowdy-Ficklen, be-
cause next year the place will look
altogether different.
Lacrosse team returns
home for tourney
Mike Danlska
Staff Writer
Fall Break was not a break for the
men's lacrosse team. The players trav-
eled Friday up to Morgantown, West
Virginia and competed in a 12-team
tournament which concluded Sunday.
The team opened up their bid for
a title with an impressive 8-5 victory over
the home team, the Mountaineers. They
then won in a squeaker, 4-3, over a tough
University of Maryland-Baltimore
County team. Attacker Ward Taylor
won the game when he scored with only
40 seconds left
While they started strong, the team
couldn't get it going offensively in the
final two games, losing to defending
national champions Navy and Buffalo,
both by the score of 7-2.
"There was three inches of mud on
the fields Team Vice-President Cullen
McNulty said. "But that is no excuse.
Navy is the defending national champi-
ons, and they were really good. We
played all right against Buffalo, they
were just stronger
Despite the two losses, the team
placed a respectable fourth out of 12
teams.
Some of the standout players on
offense for this past weekend were at-
tackers Brandon McGlaughin, Joe
Camp, Ward Taylor and middie John
Provest
"Our goalie, Brian Trail, played re-
Staying around the area this week-
end? Then cheek out these games
going on this weekend.
Friday, Oct. 25 � ECU Volleyball against
George Mason in Minges Coliseum at 7 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 26-27 � The Lacrosse
team will host a two day tourney featuring six teams
including N.C. State and UNC-Wilmington. Both days
play will begin at 11 a.m. at the intramural fields be-
hind Dowdy-Ficklen.
Saturday, Oct. 26 � ECU Volleyball against Ameri-
can in Minges beginning at 1 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27 � Men's Soccer against Virginia
Military Institute at Bunting Field at
1 p.m.
Admission is free to all students.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Tasha Smith (L) and Jennifer Jones (R) are lifted up by their partners during the football
game. The cheerleaders cheer at all home football games and basketball games.
Tracy Laubach
Staff Writer
ally well throughout the whole tourna-
ment" McNulty said.
Melvin Mitchell, Theron Goodson
and Greg Daisey helped the team cause
and made their presence felt on defense.
"The whole team played well and
strong throughout the tournament"
Team President Less Currithers said.
This upcoming weekend will offer
a change of pace. The team will be host-
ing their own tournament called The
Third Annual ECU Fall Invitational. It
sports a six-team field that will include
N.C. State, University of Maryland. Uni-
versity of Maryland-Baltimore County,
UNCWilmington and Camp Lejeune.
Gameume starts on both Satur-
See TEAM page 11
They are the most spirited stu-
dents on campus.
They can jump, they can flip
and they fly through the air. Their
number one goal is to represent ECU
and to pave the road toward victory
for our teams.
The cheerleaders are divided
into two separate squads: the
purple squad (varsity) and the gold
squad (junior varsity). Members of
the gold squad are out on the field
rooting on the football team at all
home games, along with the
women's basketball team. The
purple squad shows their spirit at
all home and away football games,
as well as at all men's basketball
games.
Coach Paula Korbit, who is new
to the program this year, hopes to
be able to develop credibility for the
program.
"The majority of this year's
squad is made up of new faces
Korbit said. "In being new. we have
the opportunity to grow and learn
together as a team
The cheerleaders practice on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thurs-
days for two hours each day. They
run before they begin practice and
lift weights afterward. Between a
demanding practice schedule and
being on the sidelines at all of the
games, it's easy to see how the squad
members have been able to develop
close friendships and bonds with
their teammates.
"The most rewarding aspect of
being a member of this squad has
been being able to talk to the team
as a family gold captain Billy
Dunlap said. "We all really care
about each other
The male cheerleaders play a
significant role in the overall per-
formance of the squad. Not only are
they able to help the squad success-
fully perform more difficult stunting
combinations and pyramids, they
also have deeper and louder voices
that can reach the crowd easily.
"The feeling you get when you
are out in front of the crowd is ab-
solutely amazing purple member
Chris Feathers said. "You get this
huge emotional rush that just ex-
plodes inside
The cheerleaders and the ECU
Dance Team will be working to-
gether in directing a local high
school cheerleading competition for
their fund-raiser of the year. As with
all of the sports teams, the cheer-
leaders are permitted to participate
in only one fund-raiser each year.
Unlike other sports, ECU cheer-
leaders are not eligible for athletic
scholarships at this time. Gold
squad member Shelley Milam feels
that it is unfair that she and her
See CHEER pagell
An ex-
tremely limited
number of tick-
ets for the Nov.
30 ECU-N.C.
State football
game in Char-
lotte remain on sale
through the Pirates' Athletic
Ticket Office.
Ticket sates have been steady for the 2ame at both schools.
ECU has already sold more than 30,000 seats to the game at Ericsson
Stadium.
Tickets wSl not be available much longer thought the ECU
ticket Office. Once the current supply of tickets is exhausted, fans
will have to purchase tickets through TicketMaster. Currently, the
Pirate Ticket Office has seats available in the ECU section of the
stadium in the both the lower ($38) and upper level ($25).
ECU students can also still purchase tickets. An ECU student
may buy one ticket at a cost of $10 with any additional tickets at
$25 each.
For more information, contact the ECU Athletics Ticket Office
at (919) 3284500.
Congratulations to Senior
Safety Daren Hart for being named
USA Today's National Player-of-the-
Week for his performance against
Miami.
Hart recorded eight tackles, one
interception and one quarterback
sack against the Canes. Hart is third
on the ECU team in total tackles
with 40 for the season so far.
Volleyball team sluggish after road trip
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
Correction box
The men's soccer picture that ran in Tuesday's sport section was mislabeled. The picture
read the player was Chris Padgett The correct name of the player was Wyatt Panos, a sopho-
more forward. We are sorry for any incon fences caused by the mislabeled name.
The ECU women's volleyball team
continues to have pioblems this sea-
son after coming off a treacherous road
trip, but according to Head Coach Kim
Walker, "the team is struggling, but still
fighting
The Lady Pirates began the road
trip with a loss to the College of
Charleston on Oct 12, losing in three
straight games 8-15, 10-15 and 12-15.
The following day the team played at
Wofford College and came away with
the victory 16-14, 15-13, 8-15. 13-15
and 15-11.
Kristen Woodruff, middle-blocker
from Fuquay-Varina, had two excellent
games registering 14 kills, a .519 per-
cent hitting average, 24 digs and seven
blocks. Woodruff also managed to
make no errors in the two games.
After coming off the close win at
Wofford, ECU traveled to NC A&T
hoping to get revenge for an earlier
season loss to the Aggies. The team
lost in four games, 8-15, 15-9, 12-15
and 16-18.
The team continued to slump go-
ing into Colonial Athletic Association
conference play. The Lady Pirates lost
in three games to Virginia Common-
wealth 7-15, 7-15 and 5-15 on Oct 19.
In the team's second conference game
of the season against William and Mary
the next day, things did not get much
better, with the Lady Pirates losing
three straight matches, 1-15, 2-15 and
5-15.
Remaining in a slump can take its
toll on a young team, especially on a
team struggling to find its identity as
the Lady Bucs are.
"Not winning is the biggest
struggle this team is having right now
because we know we were playing bet-
ter volleyball at the beginning of the
year Walker said. "Not winning is
emotionally difficult for everybody-
players. staff, everybody
Kari Koenning, a junior college
transfer from Parkland College this
season, thinks the team is struggling
because of the team's sporadic play.
"We're not playing all that bad,
but we're making mistakes in crucial
parts of the game Koenning said. "It
seems like we play in streaks it's like
we will go on a 5-0 run. but then we
turn around and lose seven points in a
row to the other team
Koenning also points out the team
chemistry seems to not be coming to-
gether like it should
"None oi the players seem to have'
a good game on the same day
Koenning said. "It's like one of us will
have a good game one night but the
rest will play bad; we need that consis-
tency
The lack of chemistry may stem
from the fact that the Lady Pirates are
only playing with seven players on a
12-spot roster.
"We're at seven players and we
don't see six-on-six competition in prac-
tice; therefore, we have to learn to
play six-on-six in the games Walker
said. "My players understand this, but
they are not using it as an excuse
Not having enough players to com-
pete at the level the team needs to
compete at is a problem that Walker
plans to fix.
"I will definitely do a better job
getting the players in here next sea-
son Walker said. "I promised the team
that when they walk in here next fall,
we will have a full squad.
ECU is gearing up for their tough-
est match of the season against George
Mason, but looking forward to coming
back home. George Mason comes into
Minges ranked 22 in the country. This
causes some concern for Walker.
"We just don't match up with
George Mason at all Walker said I
See BALL page 11
m - �
I





The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 24, 1996
11
Harris Teeter�
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Begins Wednesday, October 16,1996
Mt Dew, Diet Ptepsi or
Get'
Pringles
Original
Potato Crisp
12i4 Oz.
Fresh
Eastern
Apples
Cinnamon Toast, Lucky Charms,
Golden Grahams
General Mills Cereal
Harris Teeter
Fruit
Drinks
Meat or Beef
Healthy Choice
Franks
Betty Crocker
Fruit Roll-Ups
vXXJcE�I. from page 10TEAM from page 10
� � Nationa . ading Assoi iation and themural field h
i iation sgameSaturd .
Milaninament
championship
Will finall
'CL's turn 1
petitions.claii
for nation"1 don'i knov
It 1 pel 'allies"Maryland is tou
'We N at Stati s
as much hard wi k as Korbit said. "Buisemi's last yeai
letes � ii irity is almore County � int i- last
� e work just the ga nes to cheer onweekend.
The playc � �
arn So 1 w ca � your supcome out and sup
scholars cheerleaders? It's simplequest tor a victory.
Tlu start a crowd'cheer, gel"We would like for i
spending 1 me up and get loud.come out and support
watch some great la nosa McNulty
' . � Mm " �' ��said.
H S2 Ay .JMtSA-JLlL from page 10
"����� �' ��don't believe that there is anyone in
� ' !L' ����' ��'�� jlthe conference that cat pwith
' -�-1??Mason's size. th
WT I Wwlevel
IsPw C4fc i k" VwllKoenning knows that Gei
1, VC� i Y4s JSoMason is an excellent team.l . �
otBi � - � � � � � Jkthe game still has to he played
Jjne Tobacco 8 GHtggg"We don't need to go into this game scared. Koenning .said

505 South Evans St. -�confidence is a little shaken right now and we know they are ranked, hut we
KJIhave toes the best ol our abili-
413-0900 ��ties
� ' . � . . � ��� �' ' �he I will play George Mason Fri it Minges.
��
Students are admitted free.
lOCt
Remember,
Vfe Have All Of Your School
and Porm Supply Needs-
Notebooks, Pens, Pencils,
And Morel
act.
Fresh Baked L
Hoagie Rolls
Hye
Roller
Sandwich
T
16 Inch
Cheese
8 Piece Box
Fried.
Chicken
Selected Varieties
Carving Board
Lunch Meats
Prices and Offers dood Wednesday, October I6th, Through Tuesday,
October 22, 1996 t Your Greenville Harris Teeter.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Oealers
ft
Stavte today!
Dc�c&uttt catalog clot&iny far cv&mett.
bnnection
Division of U.B.E.
210 EAST STH STREET 758 8612 MONOAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10-6. SUNDAV 1-5
IVANTT0G0T0
CHICOOOOOOOs
f
i x Thurs. Oct. 31st 13th Annual Halloween Fiesta!
p8Ce COSTUME CONTEST face
j $50 Gift j 1 st Place100 Gift Certificate t MM
Downtown Greenville
Mexican Restaxiranl





,1
12
Thursday, October 24,1996 The East Carolinian
Personals
Announcements
CONGRATS SHELLEY PERKINSON ON
your engagement to Jeremy Thompson We
love you � Kerry, Lauren, Beth and Chuck
MR. WIGGLY - Glad you made it back. I lost
$50. Other than that, things are fine with
me. Did they identify that lip fungus? Mr.
Morton.
If
Help
Wanted
3 BEDROOM - Wilson Acres. Take over
lease. Jan - July. Call anytime. 830-9149.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 bedroom apartment $185month plus 1
2 utilities. Very nice and on ECU bus route.
A must see. Call 758-8927.
VERY, VERY QUIET UPSTAIRS furnished
bedrooms for rent in modern home on 17th
� fairway, Brook Valley. Shared bath. Semi-pri-
vate entrance. Limited kitchen privileges.
Central AC. $210 for each bedroom. All util-
ities included except cable TV and your tele-
phone. Available immediately. Semester lease
and $100 deposit No smokers. No under-
graduates accepted except physical therapy
majors. Call (919756-2027.
ROOMMATE WANTED, MALE OR female.
$260 per month and 12 utilities. Fully Fur-
nished, pets negotiable. Call 353-4451.
FEMALE NONSMOKER TO SHARE 3 bed-
room 2 12 bath Townhouse near campus
wit Christian females. Furnished or unfur-
nished bedroom, utilities, washer-dryer in-
cluded. Nice place and area. Call Debbie 328-
6527; 3534178 $300 month.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share 2
BR apartment 6 blocks from campus. $175
month & $150 deposit 12 phoneutilities.
Nonsmoker. Please call, leave mesge,758-
6280
CLOSE TO P.C.C 1 bedroom $280.00; 2
bedroom $330.00 Call 321-7746.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the fall!
Short walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next
to AOPi house, 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths -
mind condition. 5th Street Square - Uptown
- Above BW3,3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sun-
ken living area. Luxury apartment Will rent
for November or December. Also available -
"The Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment
If you see it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 BR apartment overlooking park. Very nice
and on ECU bus route. Only $180.00 a
month plus 12 utilities. Call Laura 758-
8927.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call today! 321-7613. Very affordable.
n
Services
Offered

Greek
Personals
For Sale
BRAND NEW NBA JERSEYS, only $20
each with tags still on! Sizes 44 and 48 of
Shaq, Hardaway and Olajuwan in black or
blue. Please call Peyton at 328-8791.
12 WEEK OLD ROTTWEILER puppy. Fe-
male. AKC Registered. Very well mannered.
Excellent puppy. Must sell. Roommates are
anal! $350.00. She's beautiful. Call 752-8383.
Leave message.
FOR SALE FOUR BIG male AKC Rottweil-
er pups. Ready to go 1011. Dam and sin
local. Both with good bloodline and tempera-
ment Call Shawn 931-0993.
1985 TOYOTA SUPRA, 6 cyl, 5-speed man-
ual trans, runs great $1800. Must see. Call
Justin @ 752-1321.
FOLD-OUT SOFA FOR sale. Good condi-
tion. $100.00 negotiable. Call 355-0552 af-
ter 6 pm.
1991 EAGLE TALON TSIAWD, BlkSil-
ver, leather sunroof, AC, PW, PDL, 6 speak-
er Cass. wEQ. New: Turbo Valves Clutch at
60K, new brakes 896. Runs excellent Great
shape. Wholesale $6300. Call Brian 830-
2190.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural & Doctor recommended. A healthi-
er you through cellular nutrition. 30 Day
money-back guarantee. Call now 756-1188.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHT0URS.COM
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting for 12-16
part-time youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the bas-
ketball skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 7-18, in
basketball fundamentals. Hours are from 3
p.m. to 7 p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from the
end of November to mid-February. Salary
rates start at $4.75hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 830-4550 after 2 pm.
CYPRESS GLEN RETIREMENT HOMES
needs volunteers to assist residents. Flexi-
ble hours, close to campus and good experi-
ence. Please call Kristi Joyner or Lauren Con-
nors at 8300036.
WARREN'S 'HOT DOGS NOW accepting
applications for 3rd shift employees. Very
flexible starting pay $5hour. Call Jan or
Joy at 752-3647.
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for a quality assurance clerk hours 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 pm $6hour; tuition assistance
available after 30 days. Future career oppor-
tunities in operations and management pos-
sible. Applications can be filled out at 104
United Drive (near the aquatics center)
Greenville.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could k? earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
BRODY'S IS GETTING READY for Christ
mas Are you? Enjoy the excitement of
Christmas at Brody's with a part-time posi-
tion. In addition to your salary, you'll re-
ceive a storewide discount that even Santa
would envy. Opportunities available in your
favorite departments like: Young Men's, Ju-
niors and Cosmetics. Flexible hours to ac-
commodate most scheduling needs. Seasonal
Gift Wrap applications also accepted. Apply
with Store Manager, Monday-Wednesday,
Brody's, The Piaza and Carolina East loca-
tions;
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for package handlers to load vans and
trailers for the a.m. shift, hours 3:00 a.m. to
8:00 a.m $6hour; tuition assistance avail-
able after 30 days. Future career opportuni-
ties in operations .and management possi-
ble. Applications can be filled out at 104 Unit-
ed Drive (near the aquatics center),Green-
ville.
INVESTORS AND ENTREPRENEURS
wanted. New company starting with large
potential profits. Minimum investment
$550.00. 100 return plus vacations. Seri-
ous inquiries only. Phone 752-9610
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. Top pay. All
shifts. Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-
7686, Snow Hill.
FOR WOMEN ONLY: INTERESTED in
spicing up your love life? Hostess a sensual
toys party! Call Jenn at 752-5533.
A WAY TO MAKE extraand earn virtual-
ly unlimited long distance telephone calling!
Contact Mike at 328-8837 or leave a mes-
sage
WOULD YOU LIKE MORE hope, health or
freedom? Also help others to have the same.
This has been a big help for me. I'd like to
pass it on. Please Call (919)-757-0622.
Other
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997 MAN
ACEMENT POSITIONS, DYNAMIC COM-
PANY NOW HIRING ENTREPRENEUR-
IAL STUDENTS FOR SUMMER MANAGE-
MENT POSITIONS ACROSS SOUTH-
EAST U.S. FOR INFORMATION OR AN
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION PAINTERS
1-800-393-4521-29.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! SSS cash for college SSS
for info: 1-8004004209.

Travel
AAAA! CANCUN & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air Hotel $399! Prices
increase soon - Save $50! Save150 on food,
drinks free parties! 111 Lowest Price
Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Par
ty Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes all meals,
parties, taxes! Great beaches & nightlife!
Prices increase Soon - Save $50! springbreak-
travel.com 1-8004786386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best hotel & loca-
tion! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Location
$139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $189! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-8006784386
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE earning
free Spring Break trips & money! Sell 8 Trips
& go free! Bahamas Cruise $279, Cancun &
Jamaica $399. Panama City Daytona $119!
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-6386
NOW IS THE TIME to call Leisure Tours
and get free information for spring break
packages to South Padre, Cancun, Jamaica
and Florida. Reps needed travel free and
earn commissions. 800438-8203
DELTA CHI: THANKS FOR the tailgating
party. We had a great time. Let's get togeth-
er again soon! Love, the sisters of Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: CONGRATULA-
TIONS on the win in Mud Football. We know
all your scrapes and bruises were worth it!
Love, your sisters.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: KAPPA pledges
hope all our bigs had a great fall break! We're
having lots of fun this semester! Melanie,
thanks for all of your hard work. We love
the new 'do
THE SISTERS OF EPSILON Sigma Alpha
would like to welcome the lota pledge class:
Michelle Bagby, Laurie Baron, Jennifer
Beard. Sloan Hawley, Amber Hines, Susan
Hoskins, Janet Sharpe. Heather Stull. Love,
the ESA sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GREEKS
of the week: Alpha Omicron Pi - Stephenia
Neal, Amanda McKenney; Alpha Phi - Jackie
Kerby, Erika Rupt; Alpha Zeta Delta - Cathy
Timpleton, Stephanie Cuson; Chi Omega -
Kelly Duben Delta Zeta � Amanda Williams;
Sigma - Catherine Woodall, Mia Dykin: Zeta
Tau Alpha - Jill Kamrack; Pi Delta - Jamie
Finch, Carry Barrett Good job girls!
WE LOVE YOU CAREY Craig, 1996 Roo-
kie of the Year! Great job. Love the sisters
of Chi Omega.
GREAT THINGS HAPPEN IN small groups,
thanx Alpha Sig for the social Wednesday
night! Love the sisters of Chi Omega.
PI LAMBDA PHI ENCOURAGES all greeks
to pledge $50 to the Ronald McDonald
House during Cardboard Village on the Mall.
If the pledge is made the organization's name
will go on a banner for all to see.
CHI OMEGA: WE ARE still looking forward
to getting together with you guys. Hope you
had a great break! Love, Alpha Omicron Pi.
Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Oct
22-28, 19. Wed. Oct. 23, Faculty Red-
taJ, Music of Barbara Kolb. George Crumb,
Stephen Jaffe, Bohuslav Martinu and J.S.
Bach Faculty members Christine Custaf-
son, flute; Mark Ford, percussion; Kelley Mik-
kelsen, cello with guest artists Alisa Cilliam.
piano and Christopher Dean, percussion; AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm. Fri. & SaL.Oct.
25-26, Opera Scenes. Stephen Blackweld-
er, conductor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall. 8 p.m.
Sun. Oct. 27, "Sunday at the Gallery Con-
cert: Guitar Ensemble, Elliot Frank, Direc-
tor, Greenville Museum of Art; 802 S. Elm
St; 2 pm: Junior Recital, David Antkowiak,
horn; AJ Fletcher Recital Hail; 4 p.m. Mon,
Oct 28 Faculty Recital Henry Doskey, pi-
ano; AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
TRY SCUBA FOR THE first time! This is
the perfect underwater test dive for anyone
who is interested in scuba but has never tried
it before. Recreational Services Adventure
Program is offering a Try Scuba Workshop
Nov. 12. Register by Oct 25 in 204 Chris-
tenbury. For more info call Rec Services 328-
6387
AMA SOCIAL: THE AMERICAN Market
ing Association is having its second social
this Thursday at Pantana Bob's. FREE ad-
mission from 9-11 with drink specials. Come
join the AMA. All majors welcome.
AMA COMMUNITY SERVICE: THE Amer
ican Marketing Association will be working
at the Ronald McDonald House this Friday.
Come on out and help them for Christmas.
Sign up on the AMA board, 1st floor, GCB.
All majors welcome.
SENIORS! IT'S TIME TO flash your Pur-
ple Pirate Pass! Get your free Mug with Hugs,
Wednesday, Oct 30,19 in the front of the
Student Stores. Starts at 10 a.m. so get there
early! Purple Pirate Passes will also be given
out Sponsored by the ECU Ambassadors and
the ECU Alumni Association.
CONTRA DANCE! THE OCTOBER Con
tra Dance will be moved to Mattamuskeet
Lodge in Swan Quarter, as part of a clean-
up day, Oct 26, at the lodge. Join us and do
a good deed! Call Samara (752-7824) or
Michael (328-0237).
LEARN TO PLAY RACQUETBALL! The
Lifestyle Enhancement Program is offering
Adult Beginning Racquetball Lessons. In-
terested individuals must register October
23 - November 1,9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. in 204
Christenbury. For more info call Rec Servic-
es 3284387.
INTERVIEW SKILLS AND RESUME work
shops. The Career Services staff will pres-
ent the following workshops to help stud-
ents prepare for campus or off-campus in-
terviews for career positions or for intern-
ships and co-op experiences: Resume Writ-
ing - Thursday, Oct 24 at 5:15 p.m. or Wed-
nesday, Oct 30 at 3 p.m. Interviewing Skills
- Monday, Oct 28 at 2 p.m. or Tuesday. Oct
29 at 3 p.m. These workshops will be held in
the Career Services Center, Room 103.
EVERYONE SHOULD TRY BEACH BACK-
PACKING! Spend a weekend backpacking
at False Cape State Park, VA with the Ad-
venture Program Nov. 1-3. This easy trip will
travel to the water of Back Bay. Interested
individuals must register in 204 Christen-
bury by Oct 25. For more info call Rec Serv-
ices 3286387
THE CITY ATTORNEY SELECTION com-
mittee will meet on Wednesday. Oct 23 at 4
p.m. in the first floor conference room of
the Municipal Building, located at 201 West
Fifth Street The public is invited to attend.
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS - General College stu-
dents should contact their advisers the week
of November 44 to make arrangements for
academic advising for Spring Semester 1997.
Early registration week is set for November
11-15.
rently in progress at UNC campuses, at NC
AHEC Program campuses and AHEC re-
gions across the state. Deadline for submis-
sion of abstracts is NOVEMBER 15, 19.
For more information, please contact Laura
Seufert at the UNC Institute for the Gener-
alist Physician. CB7595. UNC School of
Medicine. Chapel Hill. NC 27599-7595 or call
her at 919966-3456.
YOUNG LIFE: ANYONE INTERESTED in
finding out about Young Life in Pitt Coun-
ty, meeting Sunday, Oct 27,6:00 in GC 1103.
Come check us out! Any questions call 756
2435.
THE JAPAN EXCHANGE AND Teaching
Program offers an excellent opportunity for
U.S. citizens who hold or expect to obtain a
bachelor's degree to patticipate in interna-
tional exchange and foreign language edu-
cation throughout Japan. Application forms
can be obtained from the office of Interna-
tional Affairs. The office of International Af-
fairs will hold a briefing in the international
House. Wednesday, Oct. 30th. at 4:00 p.m.
The JET Program is open to ALL majors.
THE EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
School of Anything Goes Anime is dedicat-
ed to showing high quality anime. Anybody
interested in enjoying anime. we show 3
hours every Tuesday at 7:30, room 14 in Men-
denhall.
LEARN HOW TO COOK gourmet style in
the outdoors! The Outdoor Living Skills
Workshop teaches you how to cook in the
wilderness on Oct 29 from 7:30 p.m. - 8:30
p.m. Register on Oct 28 in Christenbury 204.
For more info call Rec Services 3286387
ONE-ACT PLAY FESTIVAL! PeopleAct
presents an evening of one-act comedies en-
titled "Looking for Love Plays to be per-
formed include: "A Dead Man's Apartment"
by Edward Allen Baker, and "For Whom the
Southern Belle Tolls" by Christopher Du-
rang. PeopleAct is a new community thea-
tre organization in Pitt County.
Show dates & times: Sat, Nov. 2, 8 p.m. at
Ayden Community Center Auditorium; Fri
Nov. IT. 8 p.m. at Farmville Community Arts
Center; Sat, Nov. 16, 8 p.m. at Jaycee Park
Auditorium, Greenville; Sun Nov. 17.8 p.m.
at the Jaycee Park Auditorium, Greenville.
Tickets are $7 general public. $5 PeopleAct
members, and $3.50 students. Available at
the door or by calling 3216028.
ALL FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS and
friends of ECU are invited to attend the ECU
Computer and Technology Fair to be held
Tuesday, Oct 29 from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm in
the Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room. For
more info visit our web site at http:
www.ecu.eduacadfair.htm or call 3286798
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will meet
Thursday, Oct 24 at 5:00 in room 3009 in
GCB. Bill Fleming of Northwestern Mutual
Life Insurance Company will be speaking.
Everyone welcome!
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Abstracts are now
being sought for the Sixth Annual Primary
Care Research Conference, which will be held
on the UNC-CH campus in the William B.
Aycock Family Medicine Building on Satur-
day, March 1, 1997. The conference is de-
signed to promote primary care research cur-
l
lost and
Found
LOST: Set of keys with a green and gold
hiking rope attached to ring. If found please
return to the front desk of The East Caro-
linian. Please help!
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include
Apply within
M-F between 2-4
DID YOU SAYFREE?
YES! When you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartments on West 8th Street, your last month's rent Is FREE! There
are also special rates on third floor apartments for a limited time only
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings
�Corporate Events
�Special Events
We also rent tables and chairs
"Sftteiatty'nf in
M 4Uut
4ptCt( � "
752-1988
Terry Peaden
owner
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 490M�4
Education Fund
Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
�Insurance available
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.2TB TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COD
H 800-3510222
Or. rush $2 00 to: Research Assistance
1132? Idaho Ave 206-RR. Los Angeles. CA 90025
Spring Break '97
Book Now ft Save! Lowest prices to
Florida, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, &
Carnival Cruises.
Now Hiring
Campus Reps!
Endless
Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
Jamaica Cancun Panama City Daytona
Key West South Padre
The East
Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next
Thursday's edition
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
2 full baths
Water and sewer included
Close to campus and downtown
Laundry facilities on site
6 month or 1 year leases
coitus room
Professionally
Managed by
t�
remco
inc.
3551313
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, I. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door ring buzzer
tudent Swap Shop
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 54
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.
-jf
-





Title
The East Carolinian, October 24, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 24, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1169
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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