The East Carolinian, October 22, 1996






TUE&
Ocotber 22,1996 ;
Vol72, No. 17 �
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
Best answer to 1 question is December
Across The State
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) -
Gov. Jim Hunt may have no place
to turn if he tries to follow through
with a proposal to speed up
drunken-driving cases by assigning
a corps of emergency judges to re-
duce backlogs.
There aren't enough qualified
people to do the job, said a mem-
ber of a judicial watchdog group
and an aide to the state Supreme
Court's chief justice.
RALEIGH (AP) - A state
medical panel's decision regarding
the use of opium-derived drugs re-
flects growing evidence that those
narcotics rarely become more ad-
dictive for patients than previously
thought
The North Carolina Medical
Board reversed one of its guide-
lines last week for physicians by
endorsing the use of the powerful
narcotics to manage chronic pain.
Across The Country
FLORENCE, Ariz. (AP) - Two
dangerous convicts remained at
large Sunday after a prison break
in which six men cut through three
razor-wire fences at a privately run
penitentiary.
Three of the men who escaped
from the prison Saturday were con-
victed murderers and all were con-
sidered dangerous, authorities
said. Six other inmates unsuccess-
fully tried to escape, authorities
said.
WARWICK, R.I. (AP) - A pim-
ply faced, bespectacled 15-year-old
boy is accused of ride-by sexual
assault, grabbing four women as
he pedaled past them on his bi-
cycle.
The women told police the
boy sped by as they were walking
or jogging and grabbed their
breasts, buttocks or groin, police
CapL Joseph Tavares said.
In each case, police said the
women described their assailant as
white, with acne, wearing wire-
rimmed glasses, a baseball cap and
a backpack.
Around The World
NEW DELHI, India (AP) -
Hospitals dragged extra beds into
already crowded wards as the
death toll in a dengue fever out-
break in New Delhi rose to 220 on
Sunday. The outbreak was begin-
ning to spread to neighboring
states, a news agency reported.
Five additional deaths and
388 more hospital admissions were
reported in New Delhi since Sat-
urday. Press Trust of India news
agency said.
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) -
The Indonesian government today
distanced itself from a local
banker's $200,000 donation to
President Clinton's re-election
campaign, saying the relationship
was a private matter.
Foreign Minister Ali Alatas
said his government regrets "nega-
tive publicity" in the American
media, which he said hints that the
Indonesian government is con-
nected with relations between
Clinton and Indonesian billionaire
James Riady.
Students wonder
about Recreation
Center opening
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
In recent months there has been a
lot of controversy about the role that
student fees and tuition rlay in the ev-
eryday workings of the university. One
of these issues has been the constant
delay in construction of ECU's new rec-
reational center.
The classes of
1996 and beyond
are questioning
whether they will
be able to use the
student recre-
ational center,
whose opening has
been delayed al-
most nine months
due to production
problems.
"There have
been a number of
calls from students
asking if and when
the recreation cen-
ter will be opened
said Nancy Mize,
director of recre-
ational services.
The new stu-
dent recreational
center was set to be finished as of No-
vember of 1995. This project was work-
ing in conjunction with the new library
renovations. The opening time for the
center was pushed back last fall to mid-
spring semester and then to the fall of
19.
"The first general contractor went
bankrupt then we had a series of prob-
lems with material quality and produc-
tion said Mize. "All of this combined
with a difficulty of subcontractors and
small 'punch-list' items, the center's
opening was delayed until November
There is also a rumored increase
in student fees which will be used to
pay for the completion of construction.
According to Dean of Students Ronald
Speier, the student fees increase had
been planned in order to cover many
university funded costs.
"We had planned for a phased in-
crease over a couple of years in order
to pay for building and maintenance
Speier said. "Today you are paying for
construction. When it's operational,
your students fees will help to pay for
upkeep and maintenance
Student fees have been growing
since the class of 1991 graduated. Ac-
cording to Recreational Services, a debt
service fee was established in order to
get bonds for construction. The fee for
this bond was $13 in 1991; the bond
now costs students $96. Students also
pay an activities fee of $100. This is an
increase from $82, which was raised last
year.
"One thing
that students
don't realize is
that a lot of their
fees come right
back to them
through payment
of on-campus
jobs Mize said.
The new rec-
reational center
will employ over
250 students,
most of which are
already employed
by Recreational
Services.
"There is no
state money in-
volved in the con-
struction or main-
tenance of the
center Mize said.
"There is a mis-
"There is a
misconception
that students
alone will cover
the bill for this,
faculty and staff
will also pay an
annual fee of $240
in order to help
upkeep the new
center
� Nancy Mize, director of
recreational services
conception that students alone will
cover the bill for this; faculty and staff
will also pay an annual fee of $240 in
order to help upkeep the new center
ECU is now in the finishing stages
of construction of the center. However,
the center still must have the approval
of the State Department of Construc-
tion.
"The department of construction
is scheduled to look at the center from
the 28th of October to the 30th Mize
said. "Once this is done, and final prob-
lems have been fixed, there will be a
final inspection
Recreational Services foresees an-
other three to four weeks in order to
move in equipment along with a new
climbing wall which will take about two
weeks. However, they feel the best case
scenario for the opening will be the end
of November to early December.
The new, spacious recreation
facility is nearing completion
and has a new completion
date of late November early
December. The facility will
employ over 250 students.
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Revised fall calendar
gains approval
Pirates paint Miami purple
Photo by AMANDA ROSS
Scores of Pirate fans made the journey south to watch the Pirates hand Miami a 31-
6 loss. This is oniy the fourth loss in 74 games for the 'Canes in the Orange Bowl.
Poll responses
saved Fall and
Spring breaks
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
A revised Fall 1997 academic
calendar, which adds nine days to the
current calendar, was approved in an
unanimous vote by the Faculty Sen-
ate last Tuesday.
The decision stems from a man-
date called for over the summer by
UNC-system President C. D. Spangler
which requires all universities in the
system to hold classes for 150 days.
Spangler asked that universities not
cut Labor Day. Good Friday or Mar-
tin Luther King Day
from the calendar.
Spangler also said
reading days may not
count as class days.
John Crammer,
chair of the Calendar
Committee, sought
student, faculty and
staff input through a
poll offering two revi-
sions to the calendar.
According to
Charles Chamberlain.
representative of the
Faculty Chair, the
new calendar reflects
opinions received
through the poll.
"The students, faculty and staff
went hand-iri-hand in what they
wanted Chamberlain said. "Every-
one felt keeping Fall Break, Thanks-
giving and Spring Break was very im-
portant
Chamberlain said students indi-
cated that they preferred keeping
Reading Day as well. Approximately
465 faculty members responded to
the poll and over 500 student re-
sponses were collected.
The calendar committee pre-
sented a revised calendar, which adds
nine days while maintaining holidays.
'The big difference in the calen-
dar is that students will go later in
the fall semester and that there will
be no break between the Spring se-
See FALL page 6
Revised Fall
1997 Calendar
Aug. 19Schedule Changes
Aug. 20Classes begin
Sept. 1Labor Day
Oct. 4-7Fall Break
Nov. 26-30Thanksgiving Break
Dec. 10Classes end
Dec. 11Reading Day
Dec. 12Exams begin
Dec. 13Commencement
Dec. 19Exams end
IdAtde
Finding the best Halloween costumepage C7
River runs through our Editor-in-chiefpage O
'Canes blown away by Piratespage I iL
Tuesday
Sunny
High
Low
70
67
Wednesday
Sunny
High
Low
70
67
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.OtS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner






Tuesday, Ocotber 22,1996
The East Carolinian
Campus accidents go unreported
Anst-Helms posters disappear mysteriously
Posters of Sen. Jesse Helms, R - N. C, surrounded by a black and
white photos, including one of a Ku Klux Klan member, which were plas-
tered around UNC-CH's campus two weeks ago have been mysteriously
torn down.
Quotes from Helms about the Civil Rights Act, the environment and
AIDS appeared among editorial comments on the posters.
No one has claimed responsibility for the posters or for their attempted
removal, though their are several groups on campus who support anti-
Helms politics.
Dancer at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, questions role of
race in dismissal and reinstatement
Freshman Telisha Shaw spent her entire summer dreaming of being
a member of the UT pompon squad.
However, her dreams were halted abruptly when she was kicked off
the team 12 days before the first home football game. She's since been
reinstated to the team, but only as an alternate.
The question as to why she was dismissed in the first place remains
vague.
Shaw said she thinks her skin color had something to do with her
dismissal. The athletic department denies allegations of racism, saying
Shaw had violated team politics. Athletic Director Doug Dickey said people
are dismissed from time to time for violations of team politics. The ath-
letic department declined to explain exactly what those violations were.
Student at Missouri University sexually assaulted
The Columbia Police Department last Monday said an MU student
reported she was sexually assaulted at the Kappa Alpha Fraternity around
three o'clock in the morning Sept 28.
Police said the matter is still under investigation and could not re-
veal details of the case. Mark Vipond, Kappa Alpha Fraternity president
declined to comment to Maneater, MU's student newspaper.
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, screens students for depression
There are times when crying doesn't make the pain go away, when
just a little bit of stress is too much, when everything seems hopeless.
Sometimes these blue periods go on, and thoughts turn even darker.
When such thoughts are prolonged, it is called clinical depression.
According to Janie Pipkin, program director of the Mental Health
Association of Greater Knoxville, one in four women and one in five men
suffer from clinical depression.
UT responded by offering free depression screenings for students.
Self-assessment tests which took 10 minutes to administer were offered to
students.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from various college newspapers and CPS.
Cars, bicycles,
pedestrians
involved
Angela Koenig
Staff Writer
Driving on campus is posing a
problem to ECU students not only
because of parking, but also due to
the number of traffic accidents in-
volving cars, bicycles and pedestri-
ans.
As of Oct. 15, the ECU Police
Department reports that there has
oruy been one reported accident be-
tween a car and a pedestrian out of
105 reported traffic accidents. It is
not known how many unreported ac-
cidents occur on campus.
Freshman Lori Smith was a vic-
tim of an unreported bicycle-car col-
lision. She was struck by a driver who
failed to stop at a stop sign.
Her injuries included a bruise on
her leg approximately the size of a
football, a sprained wrist and a torn
muscle in her leg. Her bike was also
destroyed.
"The person gave me his name
and license number and promised to
pay for my bike. However, the acci-
dent took place within the first few
weeks of school, and he has not
called yet Smith said.
"I didn't feel it was necessary (to
report the incident). I decided to be
nice about it. College kids have no
money and he would have had to pay
for the ticket, fines and my bike
Smith said.
The cost of reporting such acci-
dents may be one reason why driv-
ers are hesitant to report them to in-
surance companies. Hitting a pedes-
trian and causing any amount of
bodily injury carries a penalty of
three points on a driver's insurance.
One point causes an average in-
crease of 25 percent on the cost of
insurance. Three points increases in-
surance rates an average of 60-75 per-
cent. An individual increase depends
on the coverage, type of car of the
insured person and the insurance
company.
If only property damage occurs,
the number of points given is deter-
mined by the amount of damage. Less
than $1000 is one point, between
$1000 to $2000 is two points and
more than $2000 is three points.
Amanda Braddy of Styons Insur-
ance Agency said that most people
do not file claims if only property
damage occurs. If property damage
occurs, there is usually bodily injury.
"Nine out of 10 times the victim
is taken to the hospital to be checked
out and that would be a claim be-
cause we (the insurance company)
wou!d have to cover those medical
bills Braddy said.
"People driving cars on campus
need to be more aware of the stop
signs, speed limits and crosswalks.
After tll, this is a college campus and
there are people walking to campus
and riding bikes to class. With a little
bit more awareness, things like this
(accidents) won't happen Smith
said.
Students warned of scant attempts
Not all financial
aid offers are legit
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Almost everyone who is a col-
lege student has gone through the
process of trying to get scholarships,
financial aid, or other types of
money to pay for their schooling.
The Office of Student Financial Aid
is one of the groups trying to help
these students actually find the fi-
nancial help they need, and avoid
getting scammed out of their money.
There are many scholarship
searches out there that offer help.
Some charge a small fee, some don't.
Some guarantee to get you money,
while others cannot. The hard part
here is not finding help, but deci-
phering between those that really
do help you, and those that only
hurt you.
When a student is trying to de-
cide if the organization will be ben-
eficial to hisher needs, a lot of
them decide to go to ECU's finan-
cial aid office to seek help. Associ-
ate Director Karen Barbee says that
they warn students of suspicious
offers.
"We get a lot of inquiries from
students here Barbee said. "We
tell them to approach with caution
It is important to always re-
search and look out for signs of any
kind of scam. Assistant Director
Maryanne Jenkins says that there
are a few things that may seem OK,
but usually mean trouble.
"You should look out for any
offer that guarantees results
Jenkins said. "Also look out for ones
that require any kind of payment
Some groups make a living
scamming students out of their
money. It is usually those who are
the hardest to catch. Barbee admits
that they usually can't warn you of
them because of their difficulty of
being located.
"For the illegitimate groups, it
is an ongoing process Barbee said.
"They are constantly changing their
names or moving
Barbee said that the legitimate
groups are usually available for re-
search.
"The legitimate groups provide
you with information where you can
go and look Barbee said. "There
are also services on the Web
Barbee and Jenkins both agree
that students need to realize that it
will take a lot of research to find
the trustworthy groups. Jenkins said
that a number of the students look
more for an easier way, and that is
what gets them in trouble.
Despite their efforts, some
people still fall into the traps of
See SCAM page 6
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
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Mon-Fn 7:30 am - 6 p.m
Sat 9:00 a.m. - 2 p.m.
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OWNER
Spring Time
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ITG Travel Centers The piazo Mali
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Listen to Insight every Wednesday from 8-9 for
news that concerns you! This week John Reeves and
John Long talk more about student fees and the SGA.
Call in and be heard at 328-6913!
The Power Hour takes place every weekday in front of
the student store from 12-1. Giveaways, music, and fun!
Big Concert Giveaways return soon.BE THERE!
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
0ct31
Mendennail OttfJent Center
SPONSORED BT:
THE DIVISION OF
STUDENT LIFE,
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COME TO MENDENHALL FOP
A 30 MINUTE EXPERIENCE
THAT LASTS A LIFETIME
�' �" '�





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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 22,1996
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HOMECOMING 1996
CANDIDATES FOR QUEEN
JENNIFER BARNES
Freshman
Rep. of SlayUmstead Hall Council
SlayUmstead Hall Council
Writer for The East Carolinian
Volunteer for church missions
TRACY MAURER
Senior
Rep. of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity
NutritionDietetics
Vice-President of Sigma Sigma
Sigma Sorority
Student Dietetics Association
MARSHA FLEENOR
Senior
Rep. of Adult Student Association
Business Marketing
Adult Student Organization,
American Marketing Association
ELIZABETH HOLLIMAN
Senior
Rep. of Sigma Sigma Sigma
Sorority
English
Homecoming Committee
Social Chair for Sigma Sigma
Sigma
Vote
Wednesday,
Oct 23
Must have
valid student
I.D.
HOLLY BLACK
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority
Health Education
Alpha Xi Delta Membership
Advisor
1996 Fall Rush Chairman
AMANDA ROSS
Junior
Rep. of Student Pirate Club
Communications
Student Pirate Club President
Sports Editor for The East
Carolinian
MARCIE JERNIGAN
Junior
Rep. of Fletcher Hall Council
Biology
Resident Advisor
RA Education and Development
Committee
AMANDA CARVER
Senior
Rep. of Gamma Sigma Sigma
Service Sorority
Elementary Education
Gamma Sigma Sigma Chapter
Betterment Coordinator
JESSICA MIDGETT
Senior
Rep. of Delta Zeta Sorority
Nursing
Delta Zeta Sorority
Volunteer of Operation Sunshine
NATASHA HOWARD
Freshman
Rep. of Tyler Hall Council
Pre-Medicine
Thespian Society
Volunteer of Special Olympics
STEPHANIE HIPPLE
Senior
Rep. of ECU Panhellenic Council
English
President ECU Panhellenic Council
Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority
JULIE THOMPSON
Senior
Rep. of Chi Omega and Sigma
Alpha Epsilon
Community Service
Social Chairman in 1995
Rho Chi Panhellenic
H k
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JENNIFER NOLAN
Senior
Rep. of Chi Omega Sorority
Accounting
Beta Alpha Psi
Pledge Class Treasurer
VOTING
MARCIA JACKSON
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Delta Pi Sorority
Elementary Education
Alpha Delta Pi President
Pride Leader
STACY RIGGS
Freshman
Rep. of Aycock Hall Council
Elementary Education
Aycock Hall Council
Volunteer for Fort Raleigh Historic
Center
COURTNEY ENGLISH
Sophomore
Rep. of B-Giad
Theater
Active Member of B-Glad
Childrens Programs for Theater
Dept.
photo not
available
1. Mendenhall Student Center
Information Booth 8:30-6:00
2. ECU Student Store 8-5
3. Base of College Hill 8-5
4. Belk Allied
Health Building W�i
8-5
IV il
HOMECOMING
DAWN LONG
Senior
Rep. of Criminal JusticeSocial
Work Alliance
Social Work
Criminal JusticeSocial Work
Alliance
East Carolina Friends
BROOKE HUNTER
Senior
Rep. of Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Dance Education
President of Alpha Delta Pi 1996
Volunteer of Ronald McDonald
House
HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996
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Tuesday, Ocotber 22, 1996
The East Carolinian
Student voter
registration way up
Campus politico
group assists
student efforts
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
With the elections coming up
in less than a month, students will
soon be heading for the polls. That
is. if they are registered to vote.
Thanks in no small part to the
combined efforts of the ECU College
Democrats. Students for Gantt, and
volunteers working with past ECU
senior class president Bill Gheen.
more ECU students than ever before
are registered to vote.
Gheen said that the intense
drive to get students registered was
an important endeavor, since so
many of the issues being discussed
in the elections will affect students.
"it's very important that young
people participate in the process. A
lot of the races they can vote on this
November involve issues that have
a very real impact on students and
young people in the community
Gheen said.
Larry Freeman of the College
Democrats agreed with Gheen on
the importance of having students
registered to vote, and said there are
specific issues in this year's election
that make it even more important
for ECU students to be aware of the
issues involved in this year's races.
"We have legislators like Henry
Aldridge that want to cut $50 mil
lion from ECU'S budget Freeman
said.
Although the registration effort
was organized and carried out by
special interest organizations, their
goal was to register everyone, re-
gardless of political affiliation.
"We have
conducted a bi-
partisan registra-
tion process. We
registered Demo-
crats. Republi-
cans, and inde-
pendents. We
want for ECU to
be a progressive
campus when it
comes to voter
registration
Freeman said.
Gheen said
that voter regis-
tration had in-
creased dramati-
polls Gheen said.
People who live on campus will
go to the Elm St. gym to vote, while
those living between 5th St. and Tar
River will go to the Willis Building
on Reading and 1st. If anyone needs
a ride or information, they can call
551-6900.
Both Free-
man and Gheen
stressed that the
success of the
voter registra-
tion effort was
attributable to
all the groups
and volunteers
involved. Free-
man pointed out
that it is often
hard to get vol-
unteers from the
student popula-
tion for this kind
of activity, and
"On election day,
there will be
several mini vans,
called vote vans,
that will be
providing rides to
the polls
� Bill Gheen, past SGA
president
cally this year all over the country,
with nine million new voters regis-
tered. This is due in part to the "mo-
tor voter" legislation which made it
possible for citizens to register when
they renewed their driver's license.
There were also several other
changes in the registration process
that made it easier to register.
In addition to the registration
efforts, these groups have also tried
to make sure that students are in-
formed about where to go on elec-
tion day and that they have a way
to get there.
"On election day, there will be
several mini vans, called vote vans,
that will be providing rides to the
those twho did volunteer put many
long hours into the registration
drive.
"It puts that old stereotype to
bed of students being lazy and apa-
thetic Freeman said.
While the drive to get students
registered seemed to have yielded
positive results, judging by the num-
bers, it remains to be seen if the stu-
dents will now actually vote on elec-
tion day.
"We're hoping to see one of the
largest voter turnouts in ECU his-
tory Gheen said. "We hope that
people will take the time and not
be apathetic, because this is impor-
tant Gheen added.
Drinking causes death
in fraternity fire
Studnets blood-
alcohol level 0.15
DELAWARE, Ohio (API - An
Ohio Wesleyan University student
who died in a fraternity house fire
was drunk and may have been too
confused to find his wUj out, a coro-
ner said Sunday.
Casey Polatsek. 20. of Medina,
died in a fire at the Phi Delta Theta
house early Saturday as the college
about 20 miles north of Columbus
celebrated homecoming.
The cause of death was listed
as smoke inhalation, but his blood-
alcohol level was 0.15 percent and
Correction box
In an article last week
entitled, "Career options
boom in health field the
following information
was omitted: Dr. Eliza-
beth E. Layman is the
chairperson of Health In-
formation Management.
Students interested in
any programs should call
3284426.
things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
probably played a role, said Dela-
ware County Coroner Daniel
Traetow. Mo-
torists in Ohio,
for example,
are considered
intoxicated
with a blood-al-
cohol level of
0.10.
Polatsek
had a small cut
on his forehead
and a bump on
the back of his
head. He may-
have walked or
ran into a door
jam. spun around and landed on the
floor of the bathroom as smoke
"It was nothing
intentional. It was
just an accident,
unfortunately, a
very tragic
accident
� Fire Capt. Larry Milligan
spread, the coroner said.
Heavy, toxic smoke from burn-
ing furniture also
may have kept
Polatsek from es-
caping the fire,
which started in
another student's
room, said Fire
Capt. Larry
Milligan.
'It may be re-
lated to somebody
smoking in the
room or some-
thing like that
Milligan said, it
was nothing inten-
tional. It was just an accident, un-
fortunately, a very tragic accident
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
COME JOIN US FOR BREAKFAST AND
RECEIVE A FREE
COURTSIDE CAFE COFFEE CUP
MONDAY FRIDAY 8:00 10:30
Lunch is served from 10.30 - 5 00. Monday - Friday
lb � 500 Evans Sticd �- 757-1716
tfuebdag
COLLEGE NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials
$
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials
$
Food for Your Brain
ifiQPM
si
Monday, October 28
Count Dracu
Presented by? Dr. ames C. Holte
-AssociateKSor, togltsh)�
.rnich or Grab a $3.99 Special in "Tie Spot'
FREI Drinks and Gourmet Dessert
Presjpted by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
rp-
UN i i1
1 i Mi'
Thursday, October 24
Friday, October 25
Saturday, October 26
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
Thirsty Thursday Free 16oz Drink With Ticket Stub.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
� I I ����'
A SLAM-BANG ACTION
THRILLER!
�ROCK-sauD HMNM rot the
MIEMLin TSEIOCKMHS ��"
�BSI StST�. TMUIDE
ar TK te��-
CONNERY MM HARRIS
cam ebks
RgatwawMnaiu mmjw �' �
THEftAtNtClW
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1 - PIRATEFEST
fSKEETER BRANDON & HVVY.61)
�brs"a
.
R&B Blowout!
W SPECIAL GUEST: MEL MELTON & WICKED MOJOS
SHOW STARTS AT 4:00 PM ON THE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER BRICtO 9D AND IS FREE!
The Student Union Is Always Looking For New Members!
Come by Room 236 To Pick Up An Application.
Presented by the ECU Student Union, For More Information, Cail the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004 or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.eduStudentJJnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html
L
Advertise with
us in The East
Carolinian.
328-2000
1RTQ1RVED
Oct. 21-22 � 9am-4pm
Oct. 23 � 9am-6:15
Oct. 24 � 9am-6:15
Oct. 25 � 9am-4pm
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer" - rTlOCr
Student Stores A R1 Qi ISY tu
10& M� w&T pcvial Pavmeni Plans Available





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 22, 1996
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HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996
HOMECOMING 1996
CANDIDATES FOR KING
SCOTT RESPESS
Freshman
Rep. of CottenFleming Hall
Council
Biology
CottenFleming Hall Council
Intravarsity
BRIAN BAUER
Junior
Rep. of Jones Hall
Exercise and Sport Sciences
Jones Hall Council
Films Committee for the University
Union
STEVE "BATTI'
BATTIFARANO
Senior
Rep. of Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity
Communications
Community Service Chair for Pi
Lambda Phi Fraternity
Microphone Man at ECU Football
Games
SCOTT SUTTON
Senior
Rep. of Kappa Alpha Order
IFC
President of Kappa Alpha Order
Philanthropy Chair
Vote
Wednesday,
Oct23
Must have valid student I.D.
VOTING
1. Mendenhall Student
Center Information Booth
8:30-6:00
2. ECU Student Store 8-5
3. Base of College Hill 8-5
4. Belk Allied Health
Building 8-5
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BRIAN DILDAY
Senior
Rep. of Aycock Hall Council
Exercise andport Science
Residdd Advisor
Hall CtitodHtepresentative
JON ANGLEMEYER
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Delta Pi
Biology
Sigma Phi Epsilon Chaplain
Intramurals
RYAN HENNEDWAYNE GATLIN
SophomoreFreshman
Rep. of Garrett HallTheater Arts
CommunicationsRep. of B-Glad
Resident AdvisorB-Clad
Residence Hall AssociationECU Track Team
JONATHAN HUGGINS
Senior
Rep. of SlayUmstead Hall Council
Nutrition
Vice-President SlayUmstead Hall
Council
Phi Kappa Phi Fraternity
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BRIAN FERRONE
Junior
Rep. of Student Pirate Club
Marketing
Executive Rep. for Student Pirate
Club
American Marketing Association
JOE RAMSEY
Junior
Rep. of Pirate Crew
Exercise and Sport Science
Pirate Crew
EXSS Majors Club
THOMAS PENDERGRASS
Senior
Rep. of Recreation and Leisure
Studies
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Gamma Beta Phi
Golden Key National Honor
Society
WILLIAM BURNETTE
Senior
Rep. of Intrafraternity Council
Political Science
President of IFC
Media Board
LEWIS TERRELL III
Senior
Rep. of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity
Political Science
President of Delta Sigma Phi
Engineered Leadership Chairman
O
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photo not
available
RYAN SMYTHE
Senior
Rep. of Sigma Lambda
Communications
Treasurer of Sigma Lambda
Volunteer of Salvation Army
GEORGE DAVIS
Senior
Rep. of Theta Chi Fraternity
Urban and Regional Planning
Vice-President of Theta Chi
Gamma Theta Epsilon
ERIC RIVENBARK
Senior
Rep. of Chi Omega and Sigma
Aipha Epsilon
Business Finance
Vice-President of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon
SGA Vice-President
CLIFFORD WALL
Senior
Rep. of Psi Chi Honor Society
Psychology
Psi Chi National Honor Society
Sigma Tau Lambda
DWIGHT HENRY
Senior
Rep. of Criminal JusticeSocial
Work Alliance
Social Work
Leadership Team for ECU Football
Team
Volunteer of Greenville Community
Shelter
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photo not
available
v COLIN MCRAE
taritaf
mp. �P�CU Ambassadors
Economics
ECU Ambassadors
Volunteer of American Red Cross
BARRY WHITEHEAD
Graduate Student
Rep. of ECU Chapter of National
Student Speech
Communication Sciences and
Disorders
Social Committee
Health Sciences Golf Classic
Volunteer
MICAH RETZLAFF
Senior
Rep. of ECU Panhellenic Council
Environmental Health
IFC
Pi Kappa Phi
SHANE BARHAM
Junior
Rep. of Fletcher Hall Council
Elementary Education
Resident Advisor
RA Of the Year
RANDY CURRIN
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Omicron Pi
Criminal Justice
Vice-President of Phi Kappa Psi
IFC
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HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996
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�Kli0fMi0Ummmimmmiim
Tuesday, Ocotber 22,1996
The East Carolinian
Labor department protects child workers
tu-(a tv,t rhAA la. 1 .pvi Strauss. Phillies-Van Heusen
WASHINGTON (AP) - American
clothing companies could cut down
on the use of child labor in foreign
plants that supply their products by
better enforcing their own -ules
against such work, a Labor Depart-
ment report says.
The department said today that
American businesses are increasingly
adopting codes of conduct for their
suppliers following a spate of recent
bad publicity over child workers.
The report recommended that all
American retailers, manufacturers and
buyers adopt stronger and more uni-
form standards and strictly enforce
them.
"Private industry now recognizes
that it can take steps to make sure
boys and girls are not robbed of their
childhood Labor Secretary Robert
B. Reich said. But he added, "No code
of conduct is worth the papei it's
printed on without strict enforce-
ment
"Codes of conduct are not a pana-
cea the report said. "Child labor
remains a serious problem - with
hundreds of millions of children work-
ing around the world" in dismal con-
ditions at substandard wages.
The survey found that child la-
bor remains pervasive in small facto-
ries and homes in some countries,
particularly in Asia, but is "not now
prevalent" in the Latin American
countries surveyed.
The department examined the
companies' codes and visited six coun-
tries that make clothing for U.S. firms
- the Dominican Republic, El Salva-
dor, Guatemala, Honduras, India and
the Philippines.
The survey found that 36 of the
45 largest apparel Companies have
adopted standards against child labor.
Only four of the companies, the Gap,
Levi Strauss, Phillips-Van Heusen and
Sears, reported that they had encoun-
tered cases of child labor.
While the companies had distrib-
uted codes of conduct to their suppli-
ers, only 22 of 70 plant managers said
they told their workers about them.
Only 21 had posted the codes in work
areas, the report said.
Concern over child labor has
mounted as imports of apparel have
steadily climbed. The department said
more than half of the $178 billion
worth of garments sold in the United
States in 1995 were imported, com-
pared with 30 per cent in 1980.
funds
WASHINGTON (AP)-The Environ-
mental Protection Agency has spent
more than $1 million since 1993 on train-
ing seminars at ritzy resorts or on sub-
jects unrelated to environment such as
"defensive driving" or speed-reading
courses, according to congressional in-
vestigators.
Posh inns in West Virginia, a beach-
front hotel in Puerto Rico and a moun-
tain resort in Colorado were among ven-
ues chosen for classes and conferences,
Republican investigators with the House
Government Reform and Oversight Com-
mittee reported.
Training sessions included
-Four-day seminars on improving
managers' productivity, held at various
resorts in West Virginia and Maryland.
Cost $20,000 per seminar.
-A $7,000, one-day session at a
beach hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to
train EPA lawyers on preparing for ad-
ministrative hearings.
-A twoday auditors' conference at
a Breckenridge, Colo lodge costing
$4,400.
The committee said it identified $1.4
million in "questionable" EPA training
expenses between 1993 and 1995. The
agency was among the worst offenders
in the committee's investigation of inap-
propriate spending on federal employee
training programs, said committee chair-
man William Clinger, R-Pa.
"What is especially offensive about
EPA's action is that the Clinton adminis-
tration has repeatedly requested in-
creases in EPA's budget while doing noth-
ing to curb this wasteful spending
Clinger charged.
All the training was for employees
who earned more than $50,000 a year, a
committee aide said.
The EPA defended the seminars as
training sessions necessary to boost
worker performances, like those any com-
pany or agency sponsors.
Some classes must be held outside
EPA offices to accommodate large
groups, spokesman David Cohen said,
but the agency keeps costs down by
choosing hotels near employees' offices
and paying less than commercial firms
for outside trainers.
"The EPA takes a very conservative
tack when it comes to training Cohen
said. "It doesn't cost a lot to reserve a
room or stay somewhere close by
The EPA spent $10.8 million on
training for its 17,200 employees, about
1 percent of its overall budget Private
companies typically spend 3 percent to
5 percent of staff costs on training.
- Some seminars had nothing to do
with environmental issues. The agency's
office of solid waste and emergency re-
sponse spent tens of thousands of dol-
lars on Evelyn Wood speed-reading
courses, business writing classes, driving
courses and seminars on resolving con-
flicts among employees.
Cohen said some EPA employees
must read through voluminous files. Im-
proving their reading speed boosts pro-
ductivity, he said.
The $20,000 seminars on produc-
trvity were to teach required management
skills to staffers up for promotion to se-
nior jobs, Cohen said.
Run by an outside firm, the semi-
nars imitate actual executive settings and
have "specific logistical requirements
an EPA training official said. The West
Virginia resort was chosen because it's
close to the agency's Washington head-
quarters.
"These are the kind of things that
can't be put on in a government confer-
ence room. There's not enough room
Cohen said.
SCAM from page 2
these phony organizations, and it's
not just students who do. In fact,
Barbee said that they had a past
incident where a father got caught
up in the fast moving wheels of an
offer, and wound up spending
around $800
Michael Cagle, a sophomore
majoring in computer science, is
fully aware of the dangers involved
when you participate in a search,
but says that it shouldn't cause
students to shy away from the idea.
"Although some scholarship
search services are just out to
make money, there are still a great
number more that really care
about the students and want to
help them Cagle said. "As a stu-
dent, I am grateful to the organi-
zations that work to help us reach
our goals, and I truly believe that
the ones that only try to take ad-
vantage of us will one dav get what
is coming to them
FALL from page 1
mester and the first summer se�-
sion Chamberlain said.
The Fall 1997 semester begin
Aug. 20 with Aug. 19 being late reg-
istration day. There are no classes
Sept. 1, 1997 for Labor Day, Oct. 4-
7 for Fall Break and Nov. 26-30 for
Thanksgiving Holiday.
Classes end Dec. 10,1997 with
a reading day on Dec. 11 Exams b�-
gin on Dec. 12, 1997 and commence-
ment is on Dec. 13, 1997 Exams for
the fall 1997 semester end on Dec.
19.
"It became apparent that threfe
weeks were needed between the Fall
and spring semesters Chamberlain
said. "The university is closed for
one week and we need two addi-
tional weeks for student appeals
The 1998-1999 calendar whidh
will need eight additional days in ol-
der to comply with the 150 day mirfi-
mum requirement has not been re
vised yet.
ENERGY
has arrived.
429 South Evans Street
(On the bustling Evans Street Mall)
561-PIPE
Mdco�� to IdCCO M
6th Annual Gamma Sigma Sigma
PICK-A-PIRATE
Thursday, October 24
8:00 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium
Admission is only $1 or 3 canne
food items, but bring plenty of $$
to bid on the man of your dreams
SttNG KX& WHIET,
SWA W�7H
Proceeds Benefit REAL Crisis Center &

ftjBLISHED.
enter your
ARTWORH
creative wYftmq
.inthe 7: .
Rebel competition
RebeL
East Carolina University's
Literary and Arts Magazine
Work will be taken from
12-5pm THURSDAY k FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24th & 25th
at the Rebel Office,
2nd floor of Student Publications Building
$2 per submission, limit 3 per student
a digital copy must aso be provided for literary entries
For more information or submission guidelines,
call 328-6502 or 328 6009
. L
LOOCinCrOlA
HEW PLACE ZO
LiVE?
Try the classified section in
The East Carolinian!
Please contact our ad representatives
at 33fr�fi
i ���

�81 - jfL- au





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 22, 1996
co HOMECOMING 1996 -HOMECOMING 1996 -HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 BB
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HOMECOMING 1996
CANDIDATES FOR QUEEN
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AMY FITZGERALD
Junior
Rep. of Pirates Crew
Nursing
Pirates Crew
Phi Eta Sigma
CATHERINE SPOSITO
Senior
Rep. of Student Dietetics
Association
Nutrition and Hospitality
Management
VIRGINIA WALSER
Sophomore
Rep. of CottenFleming Hall
Council
Anthropology
CottenFleming Hall Council
Special Olympics Team Leader
HEATHER COX
Senior
Rep. of ECU Ambassadors
Elementary Education
Ambassadors
Emeriti Committee
Vote
Wednesday,
Oct 23
Must have
valid student
I.D.
photo not
available
co

5

AMY SCHROEDER
Senior
Rep. of Lambda Chi Alpha
Marketing
Chi Omega Sorority Pledge
Educator
Volunteer of Battered Women's
Shelter
TASHA MCNEILL
Freshman
Rep. of Jones Hall Council
Accounting
Jones Hall Council Floor Rep.
JOANNA SAWYER
Senior
Rep. of Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity
Computer Science
ECU Karate Club
Ms. Pi Lambda Phi
REBECCA PEREZ
Senior
Rep. of Psi Chi
Psychology
President of Psi Chi
Volunteer of REAL Crisis Center
TRACI HARRISON
Junior
Rep. of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority
Elementary Education
Secretary for Alpha Kappa Alpha
Volunteer of Operation Sunshine
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JULIE LINDER
Senior
Rep. of Recreation and Leisure
Studies
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Historian RCLS Student Society
Lambda Sigma Sigma Pledge
LORRI MURPHY
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority
Sociology
Alpha Omicron Pi Corresponding
Secretary
Panhellenic Delegate
MEG WATSON
Junior
Rep. of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority
Occupational Therapy
Ritual Chairman of Zeta Tau Alpha
Omicron Delta Kappa
PAM MILLER
Senior
Rep. of Alpha Phi
Hospitality Management
Vice-President of New Member
Education
Vice-President of Standards
VOTING
1. Mendenhall Student
Center Information Booth
8:30-6:00
2. ECU Student Store 8-5
3. Base of College Hill 8-5
4. Belk Allied Health
Building 8-5
HOMECOMING
KELLI VALDEZ
Senior
Rep. of Sigma Lambda
Child Development and Family
Relations
Sigma Lambda Intramurals
Coordinator
Volunteer for Special Olympics
JILL JOHNSON
Senior
Rep. of Delta Zeta Sorority
Environmental Health
1995-96 President of Delta Zeta
Sorority
President of Environmental Health
Club
HEIDI BETZ
Graduate Student
Rep. of ECU Student Speech and
Hearing
Speech-Language Pathology
Co-Chair Publicity Committee
Co-Chair Alumni Committee
HOMECOMING 1996 � HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996 HOMECOMING 1996
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8
Tuesday, October 22,1996
The East Carolinian
HJHSfill
OuftVcecfA
Just because
tobacco is
king in eastern
North
Carolina
doesn't mean
that we want
the industry to
have the
freedom to
target
advertisements
toward youths
who are
underage.
President Clinton approved the nation's toughest
crackdown on tobacco directly effecting tobacco farm-
ers in the eastern part of the state. With ECU sitting in
the heart of tobacco country, students whose families
depend on tobacco for their livelihood are undoubtedly
following the situation closely.
While it is important to remember that this univer-
sity lies in the middle of the conflict and has been shaped
by students and educators alike whose families depend
on tobacco, it is not necessarily appropriate to curse
everything that attempts to regulate the industry.
For example, the recent crackdown on tobacco is an
effort to reduce teen smoking by classifying nicotine as
an addictive drug. Now, the Food and Drug Administra-
tion will be able to regulate the advertising and avail-
ability of tobacco products.
Just because tobacco is king in eastern North Caro-
lina doesn't mean that we want the industry to have the
freedom to target advertisements towards youths who
are underage. These new regulations would prevent sell-
ing cigarettes in vending machines. Who can protest
this? There are not beer and liquor vending machines
fromwhich underage buyers can purchase alcohol.
Lawmakers from across the state were furious at the
presidents decision. "The president is declaring war on
76,000 North Carolinians who gain their lr elihood in
one form or another from tobacco Sen. Jesse Helms,
RN.C. said.
Tobacco farmers are worried that this is the first
step in a series of government regulations that may ruin
the industry. Still, comments like Helms' are overstated.
This step in itself is a step towards protecting children
from a life-long addiction whose complications often re-
sult in death.
Underage smoking doesn't have the same taboo as-
sociated with it as underage drinking does. Unfortu-
nately, since nicotine is an addictive substance, and it is
generally more accepted by society than other addictive
drugs, youths easily fail prey.
The new classification of nicotine as an addictive
substance is an encouraging step towards addressing
the seriousness of the problem of underage smoking.
Anything derogatory to the tobacco industry is not
popular in this area. However, neither should anything
be popular in this area that promotes underage smok-
ing.
&etten& t t6e Sdito
Funding for Ficklen wasteful
To the Editor,
According to The Daily Reflec-
tor, $18,000,000 must be raised
through tuition and donations to
build additional horseshoe seating in
Ficklen stadium. At most home foot-
ball games, even against the most
popular teams, none of the seating
in the end sections or the press box
built in the early 1980's is anywhere
near full. At Duke, N.C. State and
other schools, the horseshoe ends of
those stadiums rarely contain more
than a few people who are more con-
cerned with drinking alcoholic bev-
erages than watching the game.
Yet, in Greenville, the ordinary
working low wage workers and the
student classes are expected to foot
the "lion's share" of this kind of con-
struction for the benefit of the
wealthy corporate interests and "big
board sports" media. Already, we,
the students of East Carolina pay a
huge tuition surcharge for the con-
struction of additional seating for
basketball in Minges Coliseum. That
policy was decided upon after all
student programs such as a large
weight -oom were removed from
Minges, - id the entire south end of
campus was devoted to varsity rev-
enue athletics. Under these aggres-
sive new financial policies, a few
wealthy individuals in professional
sports and the corporate interest
benefit at the expense of everybody
else. The "leaders of our society"
will then claim that it is all to our
benefit since we buy the tickets and
sodas and what not, therefore we
enjoy it along with our Pepsi-Cola
and Coca-Cola. Therefore it is not
understood why Richard Becker and
KEO 1925 5;
The East Carolinian
Brandon Wadded, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt liege, Advertising Director
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumpton Copy Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatfey, Electronics Editor
Andy Farhas, Staff Illustrator
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building. ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, all (919)
3284366.
The one that got away
few others bellyache about a few ex-
tra dollars that they, the poor are
asked to shell out forit.
I am aware that the coaches, ad-
ministrators and others are saying,
"We gotta compete with schools like
Wake Forest, then Duke, Chapel Hill,
NC State and Clemson, get into their
league so we can make big bucks.
We gotta build high-dollar facilities
for revenue athletics that are equal
to or better than theirs That's un-
derstandable, and of benefit to the
region, but it is the rich who should
pay the bill, the millionaires, the cor-
porations, Governor Hunt, Jesse
Helms and their wealthy circle of
friends, and surplus revenue in the
state budget.
Richard F. Becker
Senior
Political Science
Stress mine's still 30 to 35
miles off the coast of Wrightsville
Beach. I don't know the nautical co-
ordinates if one wereto search for my
stress but Capt. Robbie Wolfe could
take you to it if you chartered his
boat for the day.
Diametrically opposed to my
dad's advice, I went deep-sea fishing
for the first time over Fall Break with
some friends. The original plan was
attending some job interviews back
home in Hampton, VA over the re-
cent break from classes; but no!
"C'mon, let's go deep-sea fishing
over Fall Break a friend suggested.
I won't lie. He didn't have to twist
my arm.
The stresses and strains of stu-
dent life in Greenville mounts fast -
not just from being a student, but
from also having to hold down addi-
tional jobs to survive.
Ah yes, but before 1 sealed the
lid on my stressbox, I took a good
long look at what I was casting out
to sea to ensure I forgot nothing: 12
hours of classes; behind in school-
work; apply for graduation in May;
find a job for after graduation; cur-
rently having two jobs and not being
able to make ends meet; the disturb-
ing thought that Jesse Helms might
be re-elected; attorney general inves-
Brandon Waddell
Edltor-iihChM
tigating The East Carolinian for li-
bel due to a complaint lodged by a
member of SGA and I bounced two
checks last month. Stressbox-over-
board.
Everything was there, hopefully
on the bottom of the ocean floor. I
hope my stressbox doesn't float to
the surface, wash to shore and hitch-
hike northward to my duplex in
Greenville.
Fall Break's fishing trip was lit-
erally the best time I have ever had
in my life. The therapeutic current
of the Gulf Stream's warm waters
made me feel born again.
The five of us, none whom had
been deep-sea fishing before, left
Greenville at 4 a.m. Thursday morn-
ing headed toward Wrightsville
Beach. Once on board the Whipsaw,
Capt. Wolfe and his mate Greg Hall
slowly steered the boat toward the
ocean. As the boat left the sound, the
clouds appeared to be on fire as the
morning sun shone through them.
The water was like glass and as
smooth as silk.
"Downrigger Wolfe yelled.
"What the hell is a downrigger?"
I asked.
"That wheel on the back of boat
hooked to the fishing line, schoolboy
he answered.
He completely caught me by sur-
prise with this fishtalk, but from the
point he yelled "downrigger the first
time, his lines couldn't stop catching
fish. Our limit in fish was complete
by 12:30 p.m.
Who goes out and catches their
limit that fast?
No one.
None of us even got seasick.
But now it's back to the Green-
ville grind. Mid-terms are coming up.
rent's due next week, paper due in
Correctional Law, paper due in music
and newspapers to produce. Now that
I reflect back on my trip, I should have
tied a cement block around that box.
Clean up after tailgating
To the Editor,
Is it plain laziness or just imma-
ture, ignorant and irresponsible ECU
students! sic Now that hopefully I
have your attention, 1 guess you
want to know what I am talking
about I am referring to the huge
mess of beer cans, beer bottles, KFC
boxes and all of the other trash that
the majority of ECU students seem
to thrw on the ground during their
tailgate parties near the stadium. I
am an avid sports fan and definitely
a huge Pirate fan, but I am totally
embarrassed by the mess my fellow
students leave behind game after
game. We are soon going to be the
leaders of this wonderful country
that we reside in, and we will be the
only ones responsible for our actions.
Your mother will not (and currently
is not) going to be there to clean up
your mess anymore. 1 believe that is
you can bring your supplies to the
game then you also can bring the
remainder of these materials back
home with you. This is our school,
our country and our future and only
you can destroy that! 1 do fell sic
though that I must give some credit
where it is do, so I will. I want to
thank the wonderful staff that ECU
has established to clean up after our
horrendous mess. 1 feel sorry for the
long hours that these men an women
put in to clean up behind a lazy stu-
dent body at ECU. This crew deserves
a raise, an applause and an apology
from the student body.
Jeff Harding
Sophomore
Biology
If yu iJaVl a complaint 0&
CMME-NT WRJTL A LLTTtR JO
TJJL pit?&.
All letters must be:
� typed
�? 250 words or less
� include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
The Bast Carolinian, to the Editor, StudentPut; Wcfcv
ECU, GrecnviHc, NC $7854353,
Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
�- �.
z" 'i"
WMMMMK
"r"��






Tuesday, October 22, 1996
The East Carolinian
Ur&�e
Halloween's freaky
fall fashions found
&D 1�evtecv4
TEC guides you
towards the
costume nirvana
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
A. reviews legend
Tt pay full price
bu it used
jfc can't even
hum alcna
tape It f rcm a
There is nothing more use-
less than screaming at a wall.
It's just spittle and bricks, bricks
and spittle. However, if you put
enough voices together, that wall
might just be blown over. So join
in another futile attempt to
change the status quo and lis-
ten to a "Scream at the Wall
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
As much as I have complained
in this column about the state of
the South and the seemingly un-
changing intolerance and prejudice
that is spouted by many of its in-
habitants (including a few that are
continually elected to public of-
fice), I have to say that there are
moments when change truly hap-
pens.
National focus tends to be put
on those events that cause strife
and agony rather than the more
positive events of peace and for-
giveness that (rarely) can and do
happen. Whereas stories about
gangsters, wife beaters, murders of
children, natural disasters, and
scummy politicians tend to be re-
ported on the front page regularly,
those stories which actually have
relevance to the betterment of our
society are told in a relatively quiet
manner or are only given a cur-
sory glance.
Ten days ago, Vivian Malone
Jones made news that should have
been top headlines on most major
newspapers but was instead rel-
egated to the back pages. Who is
this woman, you may ask?
Well, the whole world knew
her name on June 11, 1963 when
she and James Hood were blocked
from attending the University of
Alabama by then governor George
Wallace. Although Jones (then un-
married) and Hood had the back-
ing of the National Guard and the
governor was under orders from
United States attorney general
Robert F. Kennedy to let them en-
ter the school. Wallace protested
their arrival because they were
black and he believed in segrega-
tion.
Jones and Hood did enter the
University of Alabama that day, and
after enduring two years of verbal
harassment and ostracism, Jones
graduated in 1965.
Wallace has since denounced
his segregationist views and has
publicly apologized to Jones and
Hood for his acts on that day. Now
77 years old, suffering from
Parkinson's disease and wheel-
chair-bound from an assassination
attempt in 1972, Wallace rarely
makes any public appearances.
However, he made exception on
OcL 10 when the foundation he
created gave its first annual cour-
age award to Vivian Malone Jones.
The Lurleen Wallace award
(named for Wallace's first wife) is
to be given to women who have
made major improvements in Ala-
bama and Wallace wanted Jones
to receive the first one in recogni-
tion for her bravery in the face of
adversity. Both Jones and Hood
have forgiven the former governor
and believe that he is a changed
man.
And I do, too. Although the
focus rightly deserves to be on
Jones and Hood for their achieve-
ments, let's take a moment and
consider what Wallace's change of
heart and mind means.
If someone who was so stead-
fast in his belief that races should
be separated that he took a public
stance against the United States
See WALL page 11
With a little more than a week
left, the big day is fast approaching.
The big day being, of course, Hal-
loween. Next Thursday, thousands
will converge on downtown, full of
spirit and spirits. But before you can
join the merry masses, you have a
big decision to make: What are you
going to wear?
The possibilities are endless.
You may, however, value your self-
expression, your creative streak, and
simply, you don't want to be one of
the hundreds dressed as ghosts.
condoms or Crayola crayons. Nor do
you want to go as the popular
sUndby: the drunken college stu-
dent You want something different.
"Where do I go for this land of
costume nirvana?" you ask.
"The hell if I know I say.
1 only claim to provide sugges-
tions to supplement your Halloween
get-up. It is. by no means, a com-
plete or exhaustive list. The possi-
bilities are indeed endless.
With that in mind.
� Charades (inside Carolina
East Mall on South Memorial Drive)
opens every yeai exclusively for the
Halloween season and then it is
gone.
Manager Charlene Schwab said
people are slowly drifting in; how-
ever, she expects to see a rush of
people this week and next week.
"A lot of people wait to the last
minute to decide what they are go-
ing to go as she explained.
So far, the big seller for chil-
dren is the Esmerelda costume from
the popular summer flick The
Hunchback of Notre Dame, Schwab
said.
The adults, she added, are lean-
ing more towards wigs, masks and
makeup instead of complete cos-
tumes.
Schwab said the store gets a lot
of sorority and fraternity member,
and other groups of students, look-
ing for costumes that will match .
certain theme, such as characters
from The Wizard of Oz or other
films or TV shows.
Items of possible interest in-
clude a Pinhead mask(from the fill .
Hellraiser). a knife through the
head, or the good old ninja throw-
ing star wound.
Prices for complete adult cos
tumes range from $22 to $60 and
children's costumes go for $18 to
$35.
� Partymakers Flowers and
Balloons (3398-D South Memori
Drive) caters more to adults and stu-
dents, but has children's costumes
as well.
Owner Rose Hathaway said she
strives to offer a wide selection of
choices for Halloween outfits.
"We try not to order more than
three of one costume she said. "We
have a lot of variety
See HALLOWEEN page 11
The Ocean Blue Phish
See The Ocean Blue Billy Breathes
Carolinas host Farm Aid
John Davis
Staff Writer
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
"This is Oed Ronne the
announcer's voice proclaims at the
start of the disc, and immediately a
string and horn intro begins, sound-
ing as if it were being played from an
old phonograph (that's a record player
for all of you who might be
vocabularily challenged). But it's not
Oed Ronne. it's the Ocean Blue, back
from a three year hiatus.
However, this album. See The
Ocean Blue, features a new. improved
Ocean Blue with a new guitar player
(the aforementioned Oed Ronne).
Unfortunately, the band gained Ronne
and lost Steve Lau. their saxophone
and keyboard player from their first
See BLUE page 11
Phish are finally free and "swim-
ming weightless in the womb as
lead singer Tre Anastasio says in the
first track of their new album Billy
Breathes.
The album starts off with a song
called "Free This song is a bit un-
usual for the band. It ends, as most
of the other tunes on this record,
within the five minute mark. What,
no jam? Fear not. the album is full
of jams, except that now they have
the Steve Lillywhite touchup.
Lillywhite, who produced the Dave
Matthews Band's Crash last sum-
mer, is on the prowl again as he tries
to tackle Phish. something that
See PHISH page 10
( ;
7e Ovte& 7&z�
(fiat rfov&y . . .
Pat Reld
Staff Writer
Saturday, Oct.
12 proved to be a
date that many
music lovers will
remember forever.
Some call it
Farmer-palooza,
some call it the
redneck
Woodstock, but
most call it Farm
Aid. The 11th an-
niversary concert
for the non-profit
organization took
place in Williams-
Brice Stadium in
Columbia, SC and
proved to be much
more eclectic than
in years past.
The Farm Aid
stage has traveled
from Louisiana to
Indiana and has
been graced with
performances by
Garth Brooks,
Guns N' Roses.
Sammy Hagar, and
Willie Nelson, just
Photos Courtesy of Reprise Records
and File Photos
Neil Young (above) and
Hootie and the Blowfish's
frontman Darius Rucker
(right) were just two of the
seemingly endless number
of artists at the 11th annual
Farm Aid concert, held this
year in Columbia, SC.
The Coen brothers go far
Photos Courtesy of Working Title Films
Some films never make it to the Emerald City. Some are too con-
troversial. Some are too small. Whatever the reason, we just never get
to see some mighty good movies on the big screen. When they hit
video, however, they're ours for the taking. This series will look at
some of the films that didn 't make the Greenville cut, the ones that got
away
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The brotherly team of Joel and Ethan Coen is a unique one. They
are both extremely talented and creative filmmakers who have produced
some of the past decade's most unique, eclectic and daring movies.
Blood Simple, the Coen brothers' first feature, breathed fresh life
into the film noir genre. Raising Arizona proved to hilarious effect that
Joel and Ethan could handle comedy. Miller's Crossing stands as one of
the best gangster films ever made. Barton Fink, while not their best
work, still exhibited the originality that has come to be associated with
See FARGO page 10
to name a few. In
fact, Nelson has played every year
to date, which only makes sense
considering he is the president of
Farm Aid.
Farm Aid was started in 1985
by Nelson, John Mellencamp, Neil
Young, and John Conlee. Originally
designed as a one-time event to
raise money to support family farm-
ers, Farm Aid has become an an-
nual event. Every year since has
proven to be a mix of rock, coun-
try and folk, but none have mixed
as well as this year's show.
For those lucky enough to have
press passes, the day started off
with a conference for the media.
Though the interviewing started
out in a jovial spirit, Neil Young
quickly brought attention back to
the purpose of the show.
Young stated that the chemi-
cals which the government insists
farmers use are killing the land and
now organic seems the way to go.
However, in order to be organic,
you must have growth for three
years without chemical use. During
those three years, no support can
be taken from either the organic
sponsors nor the government and
many farmers "lose their ass" as
Young put it. Five hundred farms
are lost every week due to not only
this plight but also the emergence
of "factory farms
Farm Aid helps ease the bur-
den of family farmers with finan-
cial support and crop-sharing.
Money is raised through the ben-
efit concert itself as well as phone
donations and other events
throughout the year.
After the conference, there was
a brief break before Willie Nelson
and a group of Native American
dancers kicked the show off with a
musical blessing. Then newcomers
One Fell Swoop took the stage.
From there the show went to
Marshall Chapman and Robert Earl
Keen for more folkcountry blends.
The first big name to take the stage
was Tim McGraw who was followed
by Grand Ole Opry member John
Conlee. All of the
first set artists
were greeted with
a warm reception
by the few hundred
that showed up in
time for the start
of the day.
The second set
of bands got
people dancing a
bit more with up-
beat sets by Rusted
Root, Jewel, Son
Volt, Deanna
Carter and Steve
Earle. Jewel sur-
prised many with
an energetic per-
formance that far
outshined her de-
but release. Look
for exciting things
from her in the fu-
ture.
Steve Earle also got the crowd
into the show. Having performed at
three previous Farm Aids, he de-
cided to go solo this time and left
his band at home. As his deep voice
weaved its way through his trade-
mark song "Copperhead Road his
instrument went out. Earle plugged
right on and finished the song a
capella. Then, looking down at the
Farm Aid helps ease
the burden of
defective instrument he declared.
"I guess I broke it and launched
right into anothrr song.
Gretchen Peters took the stage
next and had Earle join her for a
duet on his song "I Ain't Ever Sat
isfied After Peters came Hal
Ketchum and then the Texas Tor
nados. The Texas Tornados got the
crowd dancing in aisles and having
a grand time.
By the
time the Texas
Tornados fin-
ished, the sta
dium wa
family farmers with packed an
financial support
and crop-sharing.
Money is raised
through the benefit
concert itself as well
as phone donations
and other events
throughout the
year.
ready to partv.
That chance
came with the
arrival of the
Beach Bovs
on stage
Joined at vari-
ous points by
D o u i
Supernaw.
Willie Nelson
and Ricky in
Shelton (j
to name a
lew I I
Beach Boj
ran through
hit after hit
and had tin
crowd pumped by the end of then
extended set.
This energy carried over tor the
local hosts of the event, Hootii a
the Blowfish. While the crowd
didn't seem as pumped as they were
for the Beach Boys, they wen si
See FARM page 11
���.� ��3





.Kgan. '�-���� iwr.
. � i �� i: .S -
10
Tuesday, Ocotber 22,1996
7?e East Carolinian
FARGO from page 9
the Coen brothers. And The
Hudsucker Proxy illustrated the
Coen brothers' willingness to
dabble with the fantastic and the
magical.
There is no question as to
whether Joel and Ethan have tal-
ent. They are a visionary team
whose work constantly defies the
standard form of filmmaking and
always offers something original
and engaging.
Unfortunately, despite the
praise they receive from critics and
the strong cult following their films
carry, the Coen brothers are not
what one would call a Hollywood
success. Their films rarely, if ever,
have huge openings, and they don't
usually generate much press.
The Coen brothers' most recent
endeavor, Fargo, was one of this
year's most critically praised films.
More than likely, many critics will
list Fargo on their top ten list at
the end of this year. But don't ex-
pect Joel and Ethan's baby to be
nominated for any major awards.
Fargo, staying true to the Coen
sensibility, is not a slice of main-
stream escapism. Fargo is a quirky,
violent, unsettling, and, ironically
enough, funny journey into the
darker territories of human pas-
sions.
Not surprisingly, Fargo did not
cross over into Greenville's theaters
when it was out last spring. We were
too busy showing movies where Kurt
Russell and Steven Seagal save the
world from foreign threats. Well,
Fargo is now on video for grabs and
is a must-see for anyone who tires
of the Hollywood cliche.
Fargo was directed by Joel, pro-
duced by Ethan, and co-written by
both. The concept of the film is
simple and standard enough. A des-
perate man named Jerry
Lundegaard (played to pathetic per-
fection by William H. Macy) is in
great and immediate need of a large
sum of money in order to finalize a
business deal, so he hires a couple
of scumbag crooks (Steve Buscemi
and Peter Stormare) to kidnap his
wife for a large ransom. Once Jerry
collects the ransom from his wife's
wealthy father (Harve Presnell), all
Jerry has to do is split the money
with the crooks and use what's left
over to get his business deal going.
If only it were that simple. A
staple of a Coen brothers' movie is
that everything that can possibly go
wrong does, horribly wrong. Fargo
is no different. It is a downward spi-
ral into meaningless violence and
human error.
But Fargo is also much more
than simply an excursion into the
violent underworld. Much else goes
on through the bizarre interactions
and dialogue between characters,
and some scenes that on the surface
appear to serve no purpose subtly
flesh out the characters and add to
the realism of the entire film.
In many ways, Fargo is the ideal
postmodern film. Characters carry-
on irrelevant conversations, some
characters pop up and disappear for
no visible narrative purpose, and ev-
erything characters do to improve
their station in life ultimately caves
in on itself by the end. At the close
of the film, the heroine, a police
chief named Marge Gunderson (won-
derfully performed by Frances
McDormand) even asks the unan-
swerable question, "What was it all
for?"
Films centering around existen-
tial questions have been done be-
fore, but the ride is what counts, and
riding with the Coen brothers is al-
ways a unique pleasure. The dia-
PHISH from page 9
would seem to be a bit more chal-
lenging in many aspects.
Like the title, Phish seems to
be taking a breather on this record.
The songs are a bit slower. There
are more chord progressions and
identifiable rhythms. Most would
think that working with a different
producer, such as Lillywhite, would
change the sound a bit. Not so. The
songs still say Phish, they're just
carefully packaged.
As the album takes you into a
song called "Waste you'll hear how
much the band is influenced by Pink
Floyd. It sounds a bit like "Nobody
Home song from Pink Floyd's The
Wall, which is truly one of the most
impressive albums of all time. Influ-
ence is good, and before Phish in-
fluence and improv had totally dif-
ferent meanings.
Basically, Phish has set the
norm by using the most random
groupings of thoughts that pervade
in and out of their minds during
their daily lives. Amazingly, it makes
more sense that way because it's
real.
The most impressive "jam" on
the record is a tune called "Cars
Trucks Buses that was apparently
written and influenced by the band's
keyboardist, Page McConnell. There
are no lyrics, and for a few minutes
the tune encompasses you as Phish
take you into their majestic world
once again.
John Fishman, the band's drum-
mer and satirical juggernaut, has
laid back on this album. One of the
world's most innovative drummers
has taken a breather as well. It's far
from disappointing, though.
Fishman is on, and he has presence
on this record, only without the
rough edges. His metronome timing
is unbelievable. The man is a ma-
chine. �
Another impressive tune on this
record is the folk-influenced "Train
Song It starts off and ends simply
and acoustically, while Anastasio
harmonizes with himself on his first
vocal track. Oh, to live in the digi-
tal age.
In "Bliss Anastasio sends a
message to an injured fan. It entails
two acoustic guitars and a bass, only
the bass is written out of tune with
the song. As the acoustics ring out,
the bass grows more in tune again.
Maybe the song is a mere represen-
tation of life itself. The bass is stray
but soon finds its way back home
"Billy Breathes the title track,
is a grabber. It's very melodic and
doesn't change shape very much.
The song represents the album well.
As the album ends with "Prince
Caspian you will begin to appreci-
ate just what the band has done on
this record. Yes. the album is
shorteV Yes, the album is slower.
But the roots of the band are still
there, never lost. Only this time it's
brought to you on a bridge, incor-
porated in a different way. I'm sore
Steve Lillywhite and Phish will look
back on that bridge someday and
cross it again.
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Mixtures� rncni
logue (which features some very dis-
tinctive midwestern accents) cap-
tures a perfect naturalness but also
carries a quirky edge, resulting in a
world that seems familiar yet so bi-
zarre; the complex cast of charac-
ters are all fully fleshed out by a
solid chain of professional perfor-
mances: and, more than anything,
Joel and Ethan's eye for little details
allow Fargo to exceed the bound-
aries of other films like it.
Fargo is possibly the only film
ever made where a very pregnant
woman is the hero who brings jus-
tice to an insane world. In lesser
hands, a big deal would have been
made of the fact that McDormand's
character is pregnant. The Coens
choose not to. She is rregnant be
cause she and her husband are try-
ing to start a family, and that is all
there is to it. Her pregnancy is not
a central issue in the plot.
This may seem like an irrelevant
� � rp . �
Looking for a
roomlmate?
point to address, but after watching
countless paint-by-numbers main-
stream films, I am convinced that
the bulk of major Hollywood writ-
ers not only can't write in a realis
tic manner but also don't have an
original idea in their corporate
skulls.
Joel and Ethan aren't major
players. They are in the same league
with John Sayles, whose recent Lone
Star is another crime drama that re-
ceived great praise. This breed of
filmmakers don't receive much
�press, they don't have huge budgets,
and their films don't break box-of-
fice records. Still, they are product
ing the films that will stand the test
of time and will be remembered af-
ter the blockbusters have played
out.
My hat goes off to Joel and
Ethan and their latest filmic effort
May they never become the next big
thing in Hollywood.
&p a-
The Japan Exchange and Teaching Program 1997
Teach English in junior and senior high schools in Japan
Learn about Japanese culture and people
Gain international experience
Requirements
Have an excellent command of the English language
Obtain a bachelor's degree by June 30,1997
Be a U.S. Citizen
Be willing to relocate to Japan for one year
Contact the Consulate General of Japan,
100 Colony Square Building, Suite 2000,1175 Peachtree, N.E Atlanta, GA 303S1.
Call (404) 892-5067 or 1-800-INFOJET.
Attention all High School quiz bowlers!
Get those buzzer fingers readg for the
rr
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Wednesday, November 6, 1996
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowvl Information and Registration
Packet from the Information Desk,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Lota of prizes - cash, t-shlrts, mugs, and morel
For more information, contact the
Student Union Office, 236 Mendenhall. 32B-47 1 5.
Sponsored by the
ECU Student Union
Special Events
Committee
ECU will send a team of five College
Bowl players to the Regional
Tournament, February 14-16, 1997,
at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, VA.
���� � " '���





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 22,1996
11
WALL from page 9 BLUE from page 9
government can change, then doesn't it
follow that anyone can. Wallace is sym-
bolic of all of the old, conservative, close-
minded, unchanging values that the
South embodies, or so he was. Now
Wallace has changed his tune and is try-
ing his best to embrace those individu-
als whom he once thought were his en-
emies.
Ten days ago, Jones and Wallace met
again for the first time since that hot
summer day in 1963. Thaf s over thirty
years, folks. Change can happen, it just
takes time.
And the change deserves as much
attention as the pain that caused it in
the first place. Although this column isn't
on the first page, I hope that it reaches
an audience that perhaps hadn't heard
the news before. And I hope that it gives
you the same sense of optimism that I
got from it Lets relish these moments
while we can. I guarantee another bad
time is on the way (especially if a certain
intolerant Southern senator gets re-
elected this fall). Peace out
three records.
It has been said (and wisely so)
that when a band loses a member, it
should change its name since the band
is not really the same as before. Think
about the Allman brothers before and
after Duane, or Genesis before and
after Peter Gabriel, or, God help us,
the third lead singer of Van Halen.
I think perhaps in The Ocean
Blue's case, we might make an excep-
tion, however. Even though the
moody, ethereal keyboards and the
catchy melodies of Lau's saxophone
are gone, Ronne blends into the band,
and somehow his guitar manages to
more than fill the gap left by Lau.
Part of this has to with the fact
that David Schelzel is still the vision-
ary of the band, and his strong
songwriting has grown even stronger
without losing the flavor that distin-
guishes him from other pop
songwriters. He is still heavily influ-
enced by the old greats: the Beatles,
the Rolling Stones and the Who Oed
Ronne shares a few of the songwriting
credits, and surprisingly his contribu-
tions sound like classic Ocean Blue.
Musically, the band is exploring
new territory, moving a little farther
from the catchy Brit-pop they're
known for and pulling on influences
from recent American music. There's
a bit more of an edge to some of the
songs, so that Schelzel's happy tunes
now have a twist of lemon in them,
while his sad songs have a touch of
bitterness. The ethereal guitars and
the longing vocals that are trademarks
of The Ocean Blue are still here, just
with a bit of a bite added.
Considering that the band has
undergone a member change, the
music is quite solid, and the band ac-
tually sounds tighter than ever.
There's nothing on this new album
that sounds like their MTV buzz clip
from three years ago, "Sublime but
there are some catchy tunes on the
album, especially the first four tracks.
The record on the whole is very laid
t
"Are you being served?"
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
Ready For A Miracle? Take A Leap of Faith!
Wednesday Night Sanity Break From Campus!
�5:30pm Student Eucharist Campus Minister:
�Supper Provided after service Fr. Tom Cure
�ProgramConversation after supper Home 752-1583 Work 752-3482
�Add new friends to your life St. Paul's Episcopal Church �401
�Bring a friend with you! East 5th Street 752-3482
�Be a part of a faith community
Cross 5th St. in front of Garrett Hall, walk down
Holly St. and you are here
back, posing in a more contemplative
than protesting way.
And, Schelzel does seem to have
a few protests. Unlike his other songs,
which have tended to focus more on
spiritual and philosophical musings,
this album focuses on more emotional
issues, such as bitterness and loss.
But refreshingly, unlike some of the
recent angry bands such as Nirvana
or Smashing Pumpkins (who are good
i their own realm), the Ocean Blue
stays away from despair and all out
anger. Rather, the topics are ap-
proached from a calmer, more British
stance, reserved and thoughtful rather
than brash and attacking.
Interestingly, Schelzel is Ameri-
can. He actually criticizes the whole,
grunge-punk-angst scene in "Bitter"
"Bitter, bitter what's your name?
You see, I see so much of you any-
more You're the same Stuff it all
in and you shout it all out" The lyr-
ics are calmer and more studied, and
at the same time simple. Schelzel has
a sparse word economy, saying only
what he needs. The calm nature of the
album does make it one of those that
has to grow on you. In the heyday of
loud pop music and hip-hop beats,
calmer works like this album tend to
be at a disadvantage. But if given a
few listens. See the Ocean Blue be-
comes a familiar friend that one likes
to have around on rainy days and in
coffee shops.
Overall, See the Ocean Blue is a
strong album with solid songs. It's a
must buy for Ocean Blue fans and a
good album for curious fans looking
to start an Ocean Blue collection.
is now accepting applications for
the position of Resident Service
Representative at the three area
service desks. Preference is
given to residential students. All
applicants must have a clear
judicial record and a minimum
2.2 GPA. Applicants must be
customer service oriented.
Outgoing, friendly with good
organizational and
administrative skills. Apply at any
community service desk.
FARM from page 9
enjoying Hootie to the fullest extent.
Darius Rucker got a little sentimen-
tal as he looked out at the crowd
and saw a group of friends in atten-
dance, "I was thinking, 'Wow, Farm
Aid Then I looked out and realized,
'Wow, home
After Hootie came Farm Aid co-
founder John Mellencamp.
Mellencamp ran through hit after hit
as well and had the crowd dancing
just as much as the Beach Boys, if
not more so. At the end of his set,
he threw a bass drum and a cymbal
to the crowd as momentos.
Neil Young then took the stage
to a lukewarm reception. Due to the
number of acts, Young didn't start
until after midnight, and the crowd
was beginning to fade. However,
Get the Credit You Deserve
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Apply for
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CAROLINA
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1-300-476-4220, Monday
through Friday, 7:00 a.m.
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spirit - call today!
�Must use the card at least once aiumalh or S20.(K) fee is assessed.
Young was as musically sound as
ever. This performance did have
Young saying three words to his
keyboardist I never thought I'd hear
him say, "Turn that down
The evening concluded much
like it started. The crowd had
dwindled to a hundred or so diehard
fans who stuck around until 2 a.m.
to hear Willie Nelson close out the
show. Nelson commented, "Boy y'all
sure are tough The night was cold
and the fans were tired, but Willie
gave them a show to remember.
All in all, Farm Aid XI proved
to be something for everyone. It
seemed that no one left feeling
shortchanged or unsatisfied. Will
Farm Aid ever come this far East
again? We can only hope.
HALLOWEEN frompage9
If you don't see what you want
in the store, Hathaway added, she
will order it for you.
Prices for complete adult cos-
tumes range from $19.99 for the or-
dinary to $199 for a mermaid out-
fit, which Hathaway said is not your
ordinary everyday Halloween cos-
tume.
"We have costumes, and then
we have costumes she explained.
Partymakers has a good selec-
tion of masks, wigs and makeup. For
those planning Halloween fiestas, it
also sells decorations.
The selection of masks includes
everything from Clinton and Dole
to Beavis and Butthead. It for some
reason you are looking for a plastic
beer belly or a big butt, Charades
has that, too.
Hathaway said that so far the
most popular costumes have been
the rigor mortis and grim reaper cos-
tumes.
Costumes do not have to be ex-
pensive. The perfect costume could
possibly already exist in the darkest
corners of your dorm room, apart-
ment or house. For example, several
years back, I saw a guy downtown
dressed as a one-night stand, com-
plete with an actual night stand,
which was covered with beer bottles,
condoms, aspirin and assorted good-
ies. This presumably cheap costume
had its rewards for the guy: he
claimed the outfit had won him sev-
eral hundred dollars that night in
prize money from various costume
contests.
There are numerous other
places around town that can help
facilitate your costume needs at a
reduced rate.
� Goodwill Industries (3109
Landmark St.), Hidden Treasures
Thrift Shop (1012 Dickinson Ave.),
Dapper Dan's (Evans Street Mall
downtown) and the Salvation Army
Thrift Shop (2337 Dickinson Ave.)
all have items that may be what
you're looking for. Old shoes, shirts,
jackets and dresses are all there for
sometimes as low as a few bucks.
After Halloween, if you do not need
these items anymore, you can do-
nate them back.
Of course, there are various
other places to find costumes: Wal-
Mart, K-Mart, Kerr Drugs, Toys R Us,
etc. These stores are substantially
cheaper than the costume stores;
however, do not expect nearly the
level of variety. They probably serve
best as places to stock up on candy
for trick-or-treaters or your own
sweet tooth.
I hope I've helped. All you re-
ally need is a little time and creativ-
ity. Money always comes in handy,
but bundles of cash are not always
necessary. Just remember that the
point is to have fun.
As for me, I'm thinking of go-
ing as a rockabilly star. Think of
Jerry Lee Lewis or Carl Perkins
when they were young. I'm still look-
ing for a good sports jacket, prefer-
ably a hot pink or some other ob-
noxiously bright jacket It does have
to be a solid color, however. I already
have a pair of black and white wing
tips; however, the shoes are about
two sizes too big. But I know I'll
figure something out
1 ycrnric
A
209 E. Sst, Greenville, NC
752-7303
Adv. Tlx location
East Coast Music
Skully's
Wash Pub
Attic
Come by the Bookstore on October 30th to complete
your application and recieve your FREE T-Shirt!
Wed 23
Thur 24
Fri 25
Sat 25
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IWiWlBWITiiii.Wi.iMW ��"����
mm- ����;���






12
Tuesday, October 22,1996
The East Carolinian
Hurricanes sized
SP UKwSL down to depressions
down �&� P MYIfeM
Dill Dillard
Assistant Sports Editor
Domination. That is the
only word you can use to de-
scribe the 31-6 drubbing the
ECU Pirates laid on the 12th
ranked Miami Hurricanes.
Folks, if you've haven't no-
ticed, a drubbing was just
what the doctor ordered for
Steve Logan's 4-2 Pirates.
Not only did this win
seem to put the "fun" back
in the game for the Bucca-
neers, but it also gave ECU
the opportunity to show the
college football world that
this program is certainly for
real. After a heartbreaking
loss to rival Southern Missis-
sippi on ESPN 2, the Pirates
were put in the situation
they're famous for getting
out of having their backs
against the wall and pulling
off the unexpected.
Oddsmakers were put-
ting the Pirates as a 17 point
under dog to the Hurricanes,
who lost only one game to an
unranked opponent in the
friendly confines of the Or-
ange Bowl. The writers at the
Miami Hurricane, the student
paper at the University of Mi-
ami, were predicting a 56-3
Parent's Day win for the
Canes, and felt like they
would have no trouble in do-
ing so.
What I'm getting at is
that nobody, but ECU gave
ECU a chance to win last Sat-
urday night Folks, if the Pi-
rates ever wanted respect,
they certainly didn't hurt
themselves one iota by
trouncing a proven national
power, at their place, on
prime time national televi-
sion. Everybody in the Caro-
linas knew for some time now
about what's happening here
in Greenville, but the rest of
the nation found out Satur-
day night what ECU football
is all about.
Pirate fans, this wasn't a
fluke, like I'm sure most poll-
sters would like to believe.
Most experts said before the
game that ECU would have
to play flawlessly to win down
in Dade County. True, that
was the most put together
game the Pirates played, but
they were also able to over-
come some mistakes which
would have hurt the Pirates
in earlier contests.
Now the other argument
could be that Miami didn't
play well. Out of the ques-
tion. If you look down the
line, mistakes made by Miami
were caused by the frustra-
tion of not being able to stop
an ECU offense that looked
as crisp as ever, or they were
forced by a stingy Pirate de-
fense who didn't give up an-
other point after Miami's
opening drive.
To all the experts, give
credit where credit is due. It
wasn't the weather, it wasn't
the glamour of national tele-
vision. ECU came to play, and
beat an excellent Miami
squad 31-6. No tricks, no gim-
micks. Just a good old fash-
ioned whoopin
Mark my words folks.
Logan said it at the begin-
ning of the season, that ECU
will soon become the hunted
and not the hunter. Pirate
fans, the days of shock when
a top 15 opponent goes down
to the mighty Pirates, will
soon be over. Respect is well
on the way. Just ask the Mi-
ami Hurricanes.
� 11 1 Miami
Records broken
ESPN
in swim meet
Annual Purple
Gold intersquad
meet successful
David Councilman
Staff Wrtter
Fail Break is time for resting and
enjoying a much needed break from
school. The ECU swim team did not
have that option.
Whiie just about everyone else
was at home, the swim team was
practicing and they were holding
their annual PurpleGold meet
which proved that records were
meant to be broken.
The meet is
held annually
and it gets the
team geared up
for the regular
season. This
year the meet
was an over-
whelming suc-
cess. Eleven
new records
were set in this
event
"We swam
fast, absolutely
113-75.
The male side was just as im-
pressive. The male Pirates set four
new records. Two of the four records
were set by newcomers to the Pirate
swim team, one is a junior college
transfer and one was set by a fresh-
man.
The Gold side was not as fortu-
nate as it was on the female side.
The Purple team won the competi-
tion for the first time in four years,
with a close score of 98-97. The
Purple team was led by double win-
ner Matthew Jabs, with wins in the
50 and 100 yard freestyles. The male
Pirates like their counterparts, have
a crop of newcomers who appear to
not let big time college swimming
intimidate them
in the least
The 400
medley team of
Paul Pinther,
Brandon Tilley,
Edward
Garguevich and
Lee Hutchins set
a new 400 med-
ley time. Also,
Patrick
McGonical set
new record time
in the 1000
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
"I am extremely
happy with the
early season times,
the hard work is
paying off
� Head Swimming Coach
Rick Kobe
great" Head Swimming Coach Rick
Kobe said.
On the women's side seven of
the 11 records were set by the
women. Holtie Butler set a new 200
freestyle record, while Krister. Olson
also set anew record in the 200 but-
terfly.
Also setting records were Cindy
Clawson in the 200 individual med-
ley, Melanie Mackwood in the 50
freestyle, Adrian Cross in the 100
freestyle while Amanda Atkinson was
a double winner and set a new record
in the 200 back stroke: Casey Sloan
was also a record setter in the 500
freestyle.
Five of the girls records were re-
corded by freshmen; they seem to be
having no trouble adjusting to the
rigors of college swimming.
With Atkinson's double wins she
helped the Gold side win the
women's competition by a score of
freestyle, while Lee Hutchins set a
new record time in the 500 free style.
Rounding out the record holders is
Junior College All-American Bran-
don Tilley, with a new record in the
200 breast stroke.
These 11 records that fell, should
be an indication of how good our swim
looks to be this season and the dedi-
cation and time they have rontributed.
"I am extremely happy with the
early season times, the hard work is
paying off Kobe said.
This meet gets the team geared
up for the first regular season meet of
the year. With all of the records that
were falling in the Minges Aquatics
Center, the rest of the conference
should be prepared for a fired up ECU
team
The first regular season meet for
the Pirates will be this Saturday, Oct
26, at American University in Wash-
ington, D.C.
It hasn't been
done since 1984.
That was the last
time Miami lost two
consecutive home
games in the Orange
Bowl. But ECU rocked
the 'Canes 31-6, in
front of a national tele-
vision audience on
ESPN, to break that
streak.
The victory marks
the first time ECU has
beaten an opponent
ranked higher than
16th.
The loss sent Mi-
ami down to the 25th
spot while ECU misses
out on the Top 25,
coming in 28th in
Monday's AP Poll.
The defense al-
lowed 361 total yards
for the game, but when
it counted, the ECU de-
fense held off Miami in
the end zone. They
also kept their streak alive as far as
not allowing an opponent to score
in the fourth quarter.
Running Ba.ck Scott Harley
rushed for 134 yards. Harley knew
the 'Canes would be trying to swipe
the ball from him and he was pre-
pared to handle that.
"They were trying to tackle the
football, not me Harley said. "One
guy would try to hold me up and
strip the ball
Harley was stripped twice, re-
sulting in fumbles, but he was also
playing with bruised ribs after a hit
in the first quarter. He still managed
to get into the end zone for the first
ECU touchdown in the first quarter.
Photo by AMANDA ROSS
(L-R) Jason Nichols, Larry Shannon and Mitch Galloway celebrate after
a Nichols caught a touchdown pass in the fourth quarter in the win.
"The first guy just raked the
ball and on the second one I wasn't
holding the ball too tight because
my ribs were hurting so badly
After three interceptions last
week, Quarterback Marcus Crandell
was nearly flawless in getting the
ball to his receivers. Crandell posted
a zero in the interceptions column.
He was 17-27 with 230 yards and
three passing touchdowns.
Coach Steve Logan said the
lack of turnovers helped in the win.
"That's why we wen Logan
said. "Win the turnovers and you'll
win the game
Miami had not seen a player like
Crandell, who threw for passing
touchdowns. Until the game, Miami
had not allowed a passing touch-
down from an opponent until they
allowed three from the Pirates.
Tight End Scott Richards no-
ticed the 'Canes seemed to be look-
ing for answers to a potent ECU of-
fense.
"They were looking to their
coaches to give them some kind of
scheme to stop our offense
Richards said.
Half back Mitch Galloway, who
leads the Pirates in all-time receiv-
ing, was on end of two touchdown
passes from Crandell, once in the
See CANES page 13
PASSING
M.Cronee&
.��-�� -
RUSHING
mi�Ml llliffi�HL
ATT-CMP-INT
I 27-17-0
RECEIVING
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The ECU volleyball team lost its
first conference match on Saturday,
losing to Virginia Commonwealth,
3-0 (7-15, 7-15, 10-15).
The hitting game was once
again a problem for ECU. The Pi-
rates hit 056 versus the Rams .321
percentage. The Rams had 53 kills
against ECU, compared to ECU's 28.
Individually, Shannon Kaess led
the team with eight kills while Kari
Koenning had a team high 10 digs.
On Sunday the team turned
around to face another conference
foe, William & Mary.
The Tribe easily defeated ECU
in three games, 15-1,15-2,15-5. Wil-
liam & Mary served up 15 aces in
the win.
For the Pirates, Kristen
Woodfurr led the team with nine
kills and eight digs.
The Pirates will take on two
conference opponents in Minges
Coliseum next weekend. On Friday,
Oct 25, No. 23 ranked George Ma-
son will take on ECU at 7 p.m. On
Saturday, Oct. 26, the Pirates will
host American. That match is slated
to start at 1 p.m.
The Lady Pirate soccer team
suffered their third straight defeat
in the CAA falling to James Madi-
son, 1-0. ECU's record now falls to
6-8-1 overall and 1-5 in the CAA.
JMU, ranked 20th in the Soccer
America poll now goes to 10-3-2 and
5-0-1 in the CAA.
"I'm proud of the way our team
is playing right now ECU Head
Coach Neil Roberts said. "No one
likes to lose. We are playing to-
gether better than we have re-
cently. It could have gone either
way
ECU challenged the Dukes all
afternoon as the Pirates took seven
shots on goal to JMU's 14. ECU
held the CAA foes scoreless until
the second half when midfielder
Kristi Palmaccio netted a shot in-
side the top of the goalie box that
partially deflected off ECU de-
fender Jill Davis' leg for the 1-0 lead
at the 56:02 mark.
Unfortunately, the Pirates
mustered just three shots on goal
in the second half and were unable
to find and equalizing goal. ECU
freshman goalkeeper Amy Horton
notched six saves over the course
of the game while JMU's Stacey
Bilodeau and Beth Mangi split time
in goal recording one save a piece.
"We've shown we can play with
some teams and scare some teams
Roberts said. "If a team overlooks
us they'd be in big trouble. We're
starting to gain some confidence
as we play together well
The Pirates will wrap up the
1996 season on the road, heading
into the CAA tournament as ECU
travels to Campbell on Oct. 23.
Game time is scheduled for 5 p.m.
The women's tennis team com-
pleted competition on Sunday at
the Wolfpack Challenge.
M.Gaflowoy
J. Nichols
wmBmm
PUNTING
ATT
37
NO.
6
5
2
GAIN LOSS NET
139 5 134
YDS
67
69
47
TD
0
2
1
.� $
YDS
188
AVG
47.0
LONG
15
29
33
LONG
58
See SID page 13
We're
moving
nowl
Chris Padgett, knocks
the ball down the field
against an ODU
defender. The Pirates
are 2-10 overall and 0-
5 in the CAA.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
-





The East Carolinian
� � - � -� - �.
Tuesday, October 22, 1996
13
Practice makes perfect!
SID
from page 12
la singles play. Anne-Birgette
Svae was defeated by Julie Gonzalez
(L'NCG) 6-2. 6-7 (6), 6-0. while Rachel
Cohen won her match by default. In
flight B. Mona Eek lost the match for
seventh place to Helen Wang of the
University of Minnesota (7-6). (6). 64.
Hollyn Gordon also lost the seventh
place match in flight C to Erin Berger
of UNCG. 7-5, 6-3.
Sophomore Gina MacDoanld was
the runner-up in flight D round robin
play. She defeated Kate Watts (UNCG)
64. 6-3 to finish with a 3-1 record.
ECU did not have a doubles team
advance into today's play.
Kerri Hartling and Jamie Mance
finished in the top 10 at the North
Carolina Cross Country Champion-
ships in Charlotte on Saturday, earn-
ing both runners All-State honors.
Harlting finished eight in the
women's race in 18:18. while Mance
took ninth place in the men's race in
25:14
In team competition, the men's
team placed eighth of 13 teams, while
the women were ninth in 12 teams.
"I'm so excited for Kerri Coach
Choo Justice said. 'She ran the best
race of her career. Most of our run-
ners ran their best times of the year.
We keep getting better. We had an
eighth and 28th place finish but our
next runner finished 71st and that's
a huge gap to fill when it comes to
team scoring"
In the men's race, the Pirates ran
strong with eight of their nine run-
ners finishing in 27:00 or less.
"It was a great race for us As-
sistant men's coach Mike Ford said.
"We ran strong through our whole
team. We had a couple of guys sick
this week but runners like Matt Cox
stepped it up a notch and that was
key today
The Virginia Commonwealth
Rams scored two goals in the first half
to open a 2-0 advantage over ECU and
then held off a pesky Pirate attack
late in the game as VCU defeated ECU
2-0 on Sunday in CAA men's soccer
action.
The Rams, now 64-2 overall and
2-3 in the conference, got on the board
early in the game when a Trevor Spen-
cer shot slipped through the fingers
of the ECU goalkeeper. The Rams
scored again in the 32nd minute,
when Spencer scored his second goal
of the game, this one coming on a
penalty kick. The loss drops the Pi-
rates to 2-10 overall and 0-5 in the
conference.
"We made some mistakes and
being a good team, VCU made us pay
for them Coach Will Wiberg said.
"Other than the two mistakes in the
box, I thought the game was very
evenly played. We just dug ourselves
in a hole early on we couldn't get out
of it
The Pirates will return to action
on Wed. Oct. 23 when they host
Charleston Southern at Bunting Field
The women's and men'steams officially opened practiced last Tuesday. Freshman guard
Garrett Blackwelder shoots up, while junior guard Mary Thorn practices her dribble.
Break
on
through
Freshman Karen Blake
is guarded by two Mt.
Olive players. The Lady
Pirates are 6-8-1
overall.
CANES from page 12
second quarter and again for the last
score by ECU in the fourth. Gallo-
way.knew the Pirates couldn't take
any part of the 'Canes' game for
granted.
"We had to take every snap
critical and take care of the ball
Galloway said.
Jason Nichols was on the receiv-
ing end of the third touchdown pass
to start off the fourth quarter.
Nichols had the longest ball with 33
yards and netted 47 yards for the
game.
Chad Holcomb nailed his ca-
reer-long kick with a 52-yard field
goal after missing a 44-yard attempt
earlier in the second quarter.
The Pirates were the 17 point
underdog going into the game, but
the players knew in their hearts that
ti.ey could come away with the vic-
tory.
"We came here excepting to win
the game Galloway said.
For Logan, he doesn't want his
players getting too caught up in the
moment, since they are only halfway
through the season.
Tt's my job not to get too low-
after last week and not to get to high
after this week and that's what I'm
going to do Logan said. "I'm go-
ing to maintain perspective because
no one else will
Galloway agrees.
-We don't want to get over ex-
cited about it, it's just another win
for us
So what do the players hope the
nation will think after the spanking
they handed Miami?
"They're think it's a fluke but it
doesn't matter, because in our hearts
we know we out played them physi-
cally and we beat Miami up and down
the field Richards said. "They had
no answers for our offense and no
way to solve our defense
Galloway says the nation
shouldn't see this as an upset.
"What I would like for the na-
tion to say is that two good teams
played Galloway said. "It shouldn't
be that it's an upset. For them to say
it's an upset is a disgrace to our pro-
gram. They have a great tradition. I
don't want to take anything away
from them, but it was two good teams
and the best team won
The Pirates will have this week
off and won't match up until Nov. 2
when they host Arkansas State for
Homecoming.
But for now the thrill of it all
will still be on the players' minds.
Harley said this is something you
wish for all your life.
"These are things you dream
about when you go to sleep - coming
down here and beating a team that's
ranked





Tuesday, October 22,1996
The East Carolinian
CLAS
iTDm
For Rent
CLOSE TO P.C.C 1 bedroom $280.00; 2
bedroom $330.00 Call 321-7746.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the faH!
Short walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next
to AOPi house. 3 bedrooms. 2 12 baths -
mint condition. 5th Street Square - Uptown
- Above BW3,3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sun-
ken living area. Luxury apartment Will rent
for November or December. Also available -
"The Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment.
If you see it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 BR apartment overlooking park. Very nice
and on ECU bus route. Only $180.00 a
month plus 12 utilities. Call Laura 758-
8927.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share 2
BR apartment 6 blocks from campus. $175
month & $150 deposit 12 phoneutilities.
Non-smoker. Please call, leave message,758-
6280
ROOMMATE WANTED, MALE OR female.
$260 per month and 12 utilities. Fully Fur-
nished. pets negotiable. Call 353-451.
FEMALE NONSMOKER TO SHARE 3 bed-
room 2 12 bath Townhouse near campus
with Christian Females. Furnished or unfur-
nished bedroom: utilities; washer-dryer in-
cluded. Nice place and area. Call Debbie 328-
6527; 3534178 $300 month.
SUB-LEASE IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE.
1 BD, 1 BA furnished. Across from new re-
creation center. Free: cable, water, sanitation.
Inexpensive utilities. $275 and October's rent
included. Call Greg at 75&6214.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!

Travel
SONY STEREO 135 WATTSCHANNEL,
$500. Large entertainment center, $150.
Kicker box two 12" woofers, $150. Alphuso-
nik amplifier, 300 watts, $200. Brian 752-
1891.
ALVAREZ ACOUSTIC GUITAR WITH
case. Brand new, never been used. $275. Call
Brad 7524766.
1985 TOYOTA SUPRA, 6 cyl. 5-speed man-
ual trans, runs great. $1800. Must see. Call
Justin� 752-1321.
FOR SALE FOUR BIG male AKC Rottweil-
er pups. Ready to go 1011. Dam and sin
local. Both with good bloodline and tempera-
ment Call Shawn 931-0993;
- Help
11 wanted
riff
Help
11 wanted
For Sale
1990 NISSAN SENTRA. AC, CC, tape.new
tires, new clutch, blue, 96,000 miles. $2700
OBO. Brian at 752-1891.
1991 EAGLE TALON TSIAWD, BlkSil-
ver, leather sunrooLACPW.PDL, 6 speaker
Cass. wEQ. New:Turbo Valves Clutch at
60K, new brakes 896. Runs excellent Great
shape. Wholesale $6300. Call Brian 830-
2190.
BRAND NEW NBA JERSEYS, only $20
each with tags still on! Sizes 44 and 48 of
Shaq, Hardiway and Olajuwan in black or
blue. Please call Peyton at 3283791.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural Dr. recommended. A healthier you
through cellular nutrition. 30 Day money-
back guarantee. Call now 756-1188.
35 GALLON HEX WMIRRORED back.
Pump, filters, chemicals, etc. $175. 20 Gal-
lon hex wmirrored back and stand. Pump,
filters, chemicals, etc. $200. Over $1000 in-
vested. Call 752-8712.
I AM LOOKING FOR a few good people to
work with me on a part-time or full time
basis to earn some serious money. Call Da-
vid 752-9610.
WILL PAY $40.00 TO have one large item
moved across town on your truck. Call 752-
7228 after 5 pm.
WARREN'S 'HOT DOGS NOW accepting
applications for 3rd shift employees. Very
flexible starting pay $5hour. Call Jan or
Joy at 752-3647.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRIOtS! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting for 12-16
part-time youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the bas-
ketball skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 7-18, in
basketball fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from the
end of November to mid-February. Salary
rates start at $4.75hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 8304550 after 2 pm.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
BRODY'S IS GE1 TING READY for Christ-
mas Are you? Enjoy the excitement of
Christmas at Brody's with a Part Time posi-
tion. In addition to your salary, you'll re-
ceive a storewide discount that even Santa
would envy. Opportunities available in your
favorite departments like: Young Men Ju-
niors, and Cosmetics. Flexible hours to ac-
commodate most scheduling needs. Season-
Gift Wrap applications also accepted. Apply
with Store Manager, Monday-Wednesday,
Brody's, The Plaza and Carolina East loca-
tions.
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for a quality assurance clerk hours 5:30
pm to 8:30 pm $6.00hour; tuition assistance
available after 30 days. Future career oppor-
tunities in operations and management pos-
sible. Applications can be filled out at 104
United Drive (near the aquatics center)
Greenville.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. Top Pay. All
shifts. Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-
7686, Snow Hill, NC. �
WANTED: FEMALE STUDENT WHO is in-
terested in doing inside housework such as
dusting, vacuuming, cleaning bathrooms,
halfday per week - $6.00hour. Call 756-
2496.
CAREGIVER for my fabulous two year son,
one or two days a week. He is bright and
energetic; I would like someone to entertain
and teach him while playing. Daily schedule
from 8 ish to 6 ish, but is flexible. Could
possibly work around a class. Would like ref-
erences. Please call Ruthie at 355-8122.
NEED A PART TIME Job? RPS Inc. is look-
ing for package handlers to load vans and
trailers for the am shift hours 3:00 am to
8:00 am, $6.00houn tuition assistance avail-
able after 30 days. Future career opportuni-
ties in operations and management possi-
ble. Applications can be filled out at 104 Unit-
ed Drive (near the aquatics center),Green-
ville.
NOW IS THE TIME to call Leisure Tours
and get free information for spring break
packages to South Padre, Cancun, Jamaica
and Florida. Reps needed travel free and
earn commissions. 800-838-8203
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips Money! Sell
8 Trips Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
80078386
WANTED! INDIVIDUALS, STUDENT OR-
GANIZATIONS and Small Croups to Prom-
ote Spring Break Trips. Earn money and free
trips. Cal the nation's leader, Inter-Campus
Programs, http:www.icptcom 1-800-327-
6013
AAAA! CANCUN Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air Hotel $399! Prices
Increase Soon - Save $50! Save $150 on
Food, Drinks & Free Parties! 111 Lowest
Price Cuarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-
80078386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Par
ty Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes All Meals,
Parties, Taxes! Great Beaches & Nightlife!
Prices Increase Soon - Save $50! spring-
breaktravel.com 10078386
AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel Lo-
cation! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Loca-
tion $139! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-80078386
Announcements
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.27B T0PKS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Vise IMC or COD
H 800-351-0222
Or 'r $2 00 o Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave . �06-RR. Los Angeles. CA 90025
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments. t
CALL 752-2865
DASfS
Hall
oween
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT WITH
I PRESENTATION OF THIS COUPON
NOT VALID WITH ANY
OTHER SPECIALS
EXPIRES : 130-M
, Choiceo" a TVvCRw a CD p"ayeVwrth
i a one year lease at Wesiey Commons
j North with presentation of this coupon.
i
I
Not valid with any other specials.
Exptras 11-30-96
I ur
I I and 2 Bedroom Range. Refridgerator.Washer.
I Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units.
1 Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER, CABLE
� �?:��
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgera torDishwasher
Washer. Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
s�a�� Wl
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable. 5
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
MANAGEMENT
06 BROWNLEA DRIVE
75�-l�l
I)
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1.30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown,
to back door & ring buzzer
TUDENT SWAP SHOP
drive
�OOK NOW fc SAVE! LOWEST PRICES
TO FLORIDA, JAMAICA. CANCUN,
BAHAMAS. (. CARNIVAL CRUISES.
w NOW HIRING
f;
; CAMPUS REPS!
tWtV ENDLESS
jT- SUMMER TOURS
�� STVMNT TIAVU� 1-800-34"7007
JAMAICA CANCUN PANAMA CITY
DAYTONA KEY WEST 50UTH PADRE
Other
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! SSS cash for college SSS
for taJb: l-80fr4(XM)209.

Personals
y! Services
Offered
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
MMP JUST DOESN'T STOP! Whether you
party to "Grease Alanis, and 311 or Jay-Z,
DeLa, and 112, Mobile Music Productions
has you covered. Call Lee at 7584644. Dates
filling fast See you at the 5th Street Brew-
ery Loft every Saturday night Ladies in
FREE! .
FOB WOMEN ONLY: INTERESTED in
spicing up your love life? Hosting a sensual
toys party! Call Jenn at 752-5533.
WOULD YOU LIKE MORE hope, health or
freedom? Also help others to have the same.
This has been a big help for me. I'd like to
pass it on. Please Call (919)- 757 - 0622.
MR. MORTON - Sorry 1 lost touch. Hope all
is well with you. Respond when you get a
chance. Mr. Wiggly.
can o� lor Wr
tony!
SpMkwtthour
Live 24 hours
1-900-52-4000
&C.4I77
$3.99 par minute
Mtntb IBymr�
Swv-U (619) 645-8434
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 49Q-ZSZ4
jffi GreeiT
" Personals
ECU LAW SOCIETY - Our next meeting on
Tuesday, Oct 22 at 5:15pm in Ragsdale,
Room 218A is open to all majors. Stop by to
hear an interesting guest speaker and order
your t-shirt Refreshments will be served.
CAREER SERVICES ORIENTATION
REGISTRATION. Students who will gradu-
ate in December, 1996 or MaySummer 1997
are invited to attend an Orientation to Ca-
reer Services program to get an overview of
the programs and services available to you
to help you in the job search. The staff will
explain procedures for establishing a creden-
tials file, participating in campus interviews
and registering with the Career Services of-
fice. The meetings will be held in the Career
Services Center, 701 E. Fifth Street on
Wednesday, Oct 23 at 5:15 pm and Thurs-
day, Oct 31 at 2 pm.
READY FOR SOME 3-ON-3 basketball? In-
tramural Sports is having a 3on-3 Basket-
ball Registration meeting for interested in-
dividuals Oct 22 at 5:30 pm in Mendenhall
244. For more info call Rec Services 328-
6387.
AMA COMMUNITY SERVICE: THE Amer-
ican Marketing Association will be working
at the Ronald McDonald House this Friday.
Come on out and help them for Christmas.
Sign up on the AMA board, 1st floor, GCB.
All majors welcome.
LEARN TO PLAY RACQUETBALL! The
Lifestyle Enhancement Program is offering
Adult Beginning Racquetball Lessons. In-
terested individuals must register October
23 - November 1, Rom. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm in
204 Christenbury. For more info call Rec
Services 328-6387.
THIS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, the Decision
Science Society will be having Mr. Jamie Byrd
as speaker. He will be speaking on the Tech-
nology Reinvestment Program at ECU. The
meeting will be held in GCB 1030 at 5:30
pm. Food and refreshments will be served
after the meeting.
LEARN HOW TO COOK gourmet style in
the outdoors! The Outdoor Living Skills
Workshop teaches you how to rook in the
wilderness on Oct 29 from 7:30 pm - 8:30
pm. Register on Oct 28 in Christenbury 204.
For more info call Rec Services 328-6387
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Oct
22-28, 1996. Wed. Oct 23 Faculty Rerf-
talMusic of Barbara Kolb, George Crumb,
Stephen Jaffe, Bohuslav Martinu and J.S.
Bach Faculty members Christine Gustaf-
son,flute, Mark Ford,percussion,Kelley Mik-
kelsen,cello with guest artists Alisa Gilliam,
piano and Christopher Dean, percussion, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm. Fri. & Sat.Oct
25-26 Opera Scenes, Stephen Blackwelder,
conductor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Sun. Oct. 27 "Sunday at the Gallery Con-
certGuitar Ensemble, Elliot Frank, Direc-
tor, Greenville Museum of Art, 802 S. Elm
St, 2 pm: Junior Recital, David Antkowiak,
hom, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 4 pm. Mon,
Oct. 28 Faculty Recital, Henry Doskey, 0-
ano, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm.
ONE-ACT PLAY FESTIVAL! PeopleAct
presents an evening of One-Act comedies en-
titled "Looking for Love Plays to be per-
formed include: "A Dead Mans Apartment"
by Edward Allen Baker, and "For Whom the
Southern Belle Tolls" by Christopher Du-
rang. PeopleAct is a new community thea-
tre organization in Pitt County. Show dates
times: Sat, Nov.2, 8 pm at Ayden Com-
munity Center Auditorium: Fri Nov. 15, 8
pm at Farmville Community Arts Center;
Sat, Nov. 16, 8 pm at Jaycee Park Auditori-
um, Greenville; Sun Nov. 17, 8 pm at the
Jaycee Park Auditorium, Greenville. Tickets
are $7.00 general public, $5.00 PeopleAct
members, and $3.50 students. Available at
the door or by calling 321-6028.
THE EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
School of Anything Goes Anime meets Tues-
days from 7:30 -10:30, room 14, downstairs
in Mendenhall. Now showing Macross Plus,
Ranma 12, DNA2, and other great anime.
TOUCHDOWN! RECREATIONAL SERV-
ICES INTRAMURAL Sports Program is of-
fering Corec Flag Football. The registration
meeting is Oct 22 at 5:00 pm in Menden-
hall 244. Anyone is welcome, so come on
out and make a touchdown. For more info
call Rec Services 326387.
CONTRA DANCE! THE OCTOBER CorT
tra Dance will be moved to Mattamuskeet
Lodge in Swan Quarter, as part of a clean-
up day, Oct 26, at the lodge. Join us and do
a good deed! Call Samara (752-7824) or
Michael (3284237).
SAM IS MEETING ON Oct 22, and will be
having Sandra Blanton as speaker. She is
the current human resource director for
BB&T, and will be discussing what employ-
ers are looking for from college students.
The meeting will be held on Tuesday, in GCB
1028 at 3:30 pm. Food and refreshments will
be served.
AMA SOCIAL: THE AMERICAN Market
ing Association is having its second social
this Thursday at Pantana Bob's. FREE ad-
mission from 9-11 with drink specials. Come
join the AMA. All majors welcome.
INTERVIEW SKILLS AND RESUME work-
shops. The Career Services staff will pres-
ent the following workshops to help stud-
ents prepare for campus or off-campus in-
terviews for career positions or for intern-
ships and co-op experiences: Resume Writ-
ing - Thursday. Oct 24 at 5:15 pm or Wed-
nesday, Oct. 30 at 3 pm. Interviewing Skills
- Monday, Oct 28 at 2 pm or Tuesday, Oct
29 at 3 pm. These workshops will be held in
the Career Services Center, Room 103.
EVERYONE SHOULD TRY BEACH BACK-
PACKING! Spend a weekend backpacking
at False Cape State Park, VA with the Ad-
venture Program in Nov. 1-3. This eas trip
will travel to the water of Back Bay. Inter-
ested individuals must register in 204 Chris-
tenbury by Oct 25. For more info call Rec
Services 328-6387
ALL FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS and
friends of ECU are invited to attend the ECU
Computer and Technology Fair to be held
Tuesday, Oct 29 from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm in
the Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room. For
more info visit our web site at http:
www.ecu.eduacadfair.htm or call 328-6798
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS - General College stu-
dents should contact their advisers the week
of November 4-8 to make arrangements for
academic advising for Spring Semester 1997.
Early registration week is set for November
11-15.
TRY SCUBA FOR THE first time! This is
the perfect underwater test dive for anyone
who is interested in scuba but has never tried
it before. Recreational Services Adventure
Program is offering a Try Scuba Workshop
Nov. 12. Register by Oct 25 in 204 Chris-
tenbury. For more info call Rec Services 328-
6387
THE GREENVILLE CHALLENGE - An Off
Road Bike Race Series" When: Oct 20th
Nov. 10th, 1996. Time: Start time is 10:00
AM. Who: Men & women of all ages, boys &
girls, 12 up. Contact: The Bicycle Post of
Greenville, (919) 756-3301 for more infor-
mation.
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Abstracts are now
being sought for the Sixth Annual Primary
Care Research Conference, which will be held
on the UNC-CH campus in the William B.
Aycock Family Medicine Building on Satur-
day. March 1, 1997. The conference is de-
signed to promote primary care research cur-
rently in progress at UNC campuses, at NC
AHEC Program campuses, and AHEC re-
gions across the state. Deadline for submis-
sion of abstracts is NOVEMBER 15, 19.
For more information, please contact Laura
Seufert at the UNC Institute for the Gener-
alist Physician. CB7595, UNC School of
Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7595 or call
her at 919966-3456.
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings
�Corporate Events
�Special Events
We also rent tables and chairs
aa sss
752-1988
Terry Peaden
owner

Be in a Mcvie
'Back With the Dead"
A comedy atSout the return
of Jerry Garcia.
Dead rock star look alikes
needed:
Jimi, Janis, Jim Morrison,
Marilyn Monroe, etc.
Free photo shoot
going on now!
Get great pictures
for friends &
family.
An 8x10 will be kept
on record for
movie parts.
PIKA WOULD LIKE TO thank Chi Omega
for a wonderful time at Champagne Brunch!
Hope to do it again really soon.
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to thank every-
one involved in Greek Week! It was very suc-
cessful and we had a blast Thanks! We can't
wait for next year!
CONGRATS TO DR. RAY and Dr. Daniels,
Chi Omega's professors of the month. Thank
you for all your great work.
CONGRATS TO KELLY DUCAR! Chi Ome-
ga's Greek of the week!
PI KAPPA ALPHA - Champagne Brunch was
incredible as usual! We can't wait to do it
again next year! Love, the sisters of Chi Ome-
ga,
GREAT JOB PAM GODFREY and Holly
Theiler! Chi Omega's pledges of the week!
CONGRATULATIONS! ANNE ON YOUR
Theta Chi lavalier from Kevin. We are all so
happy for you. Love, your Alpha Phi sisters.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA - We had a great time
tailgating Thursday night death punch and
all! Thanks from Chi Omega.
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS GAMMA week
is October 21-23. Monday Banana Split Par-
ty at 7 pm at Zeta house. Tuesday Skating
Party at Sportsworld at 7 pm. Wednesday
Funnel Party at Mendenhall from 4-6 pm.
Hope to see everyone at these events!
PI DELTA KAPPA GIRLS, are we having
fun yet? Well wait more's to come. We have
a BIG surprise for you and you probably have
a little idea what it is. Either way, we love
you guys!
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include � Education Fund
� Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
� Insurance available
Apply within
M-F between 2-4 p.m.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 22, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 22, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1168
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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