The East Carolinian, October 8, 1996







-�"�'

TUEft
October 8,1996
Vol72, No. 14
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
E(
Students say textbooks are useless,3 overpriced
Across The State
BRYSON CITY, N.C. (AP) - A
magistrate from the Cherokee In-
dian Reservation is appealing his
conviction of driving while impaired
stemming from a March citation by
the state Highway Patrol.
Teague Bradley Parker was
found guilty on the charge Thurs-
day in Swain County District Court
He was given a suspended sentence
of 60 days in jail, ordered to pay a
$100 fine and told to surrender his
driver's license and perform 24
hours of community service.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - William
E. Perry, a 25-year agent with the
FBI, has been named the new agent-
in-charge for North Carolina.
Perry, 52, comes to the
bureau's Charlotte office after more
than a year as the ranking deputy
assistant director of the FBI's Crimi-
nal Investigative Division in Wash-
ington.
Across The Country
COLCHESTER, Vt. (AP) -
Marilyn Nichols Kane watched as
crowds of strangers picked through
her former husband's lavish belong-
ings, put up for sale to pay the hun-
dreds of thousands he owes her for
child support
Her former husband, precious
metals consultant Jeffrey Nichols, is
in jail in New York City. He owes an
estimated $640,000 in back child
support and pleaded guilty last
month to a federal charge of leav-
ing a state to avoid the obligation.
CLARKSON, Ky. (AP) - A man
who walked into a rural bank
branch carrying a rifle and wearing
a stocking over his head was shot
to death by the bank's manager,
who then went out and shot out the
tires on the man's car, authorities
said.
Kentucky State Police said the
man held open the bank's front door
and pointed his high-powered 30.06
rifle at the manager, who quickly
drew the .45-caliber handgun from
under a counter and shot him once
in the chest
MIAMI (AP) - Four people on
a small plane that reportedly was
hijacked from Cuba were rescued
after crash-landing in the Gulf of
Mexico off southwest Florida, the
Coast Guard said.
The plane circled a Russian-
flagged freighter, then crashed into
the waters close to it said Lt Cmdr.
Marcus Woodring. a Coast Guard
spokesman. The freighter's crew
rescued the four people aboard.
Around The World
CAPE TOWN, South Africa
(AP) - While insisting its cause was
just, President Nelson Mandela's
African National Congress admitted
today that some of the means used
in the struggle against apartheid
were inexcusable.
The public apology before a
commission investigating human
rights abuses of the apartheid era
came a day after a similar confes-
sion from the National Party, which
oversaw apartheid from 1948 until
reforms began in 1990.
8"
Faculty members
beg to differ
Lisa Daniels
Contributing Writer
Each semester as students
scrounge up money to pay for textbooks
they should ask themselves: Are these
worth the money I'm paying for them?
To many students at ECU the an-
swer seems to be no. Textbooks aren't
worth the stress and frustration that
paying for them causes at the start of
each semester. On top of all of the other
tuition and fees, paying for textbooks
can be an added burden that can leave
many college students financially de-
pleted.
This leaves many students asking
the question, can this class be taught
without a textbook? Do professors un-
load many unnecessary books and
supplements on to an already broke
college student?
After a survey of -�����-
several ECU stu-
dents reactions
seemed to be
mixed
Amanda
MacCreary, a se-
nior social work
major said, "No, I
definitely don't get
my money's worth.
A lot of the time
you don't need the
entire textbook for
a class, it is mainly
used to supple-
ment the lecture �������������i
She also said as she may be able to pass
a class without the textbook, she defi-
nitely wouldn't receive an A in the class.
Many students seemed to share this
"Although
textbooks may be
slightly
overpriced, they
are essential in the
understanding of
some of my
classes
� Jonathon Cummings,
biology major
belief. Out of the 20 students surveyed
by TEC, 70 percent said they felt their
text books were
-���-�-��-� overpriced. Many
agreed that al-
though textbooks
can help in the un-
derstanding of pro-
fessors' lectures,
they are still not
worth the money
that was paid for
them.
Thirty per-
cent felt that text-
books are essen-
tial for the under-
standing of the
class and for fu-
������MHaaw ture reference, and
worth the money that is paid for them.
For biology major Jonathon
See TEXT page 4
TEC Textbook Poll Results
100
70 75
49
felt textbooks
improve grades
Students
felt textbooks
are overpriced
I Faculty
Budget commission
gets view of campus
Officials hope tour will generate
enough funds to finish renovations
Clinton wins first round by 21
Julie Schutz
Contributing Writer
Legislators who toured ECU'S campus had an opportunity to see, first
hand, what buildings need improvements.
On Wed Sept. 25, the Advisory Budget Commission stopped at ECU as
part of a three-day tour through eastern North Carolina. This committee is
responsible for composing the states budget for the next two years.
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs Robert Brown said university offi-
cials have put in a request for $62 million for repairs and renovations to
existing state funded campus buildings.
Brown said this money would go toward repairing air conditioning sys-
tems, electrical problems, brick work, roofing and the steam plants.
"The university is currently receiving $4 million to $5 million a year for
repairs and renovations Brown said.
The Advisory Budget Commission's tour gave university officials the
chance not only to show the committee where tax payers' money had gone
in the past, but what money is needed for future improvements to the uni-
versity.
"In years past the University would show the committee old Joyner
Library in order to plead our case with them Chancellor Richard Eakin
said.
This year, university officials were able to take the Advisory Budget
Commission to the on going $30 million expansion to Joyner Library, so
See BUDGET page 4
Parking During Fall Break
October 17-18, 1996
The following information pertains to perking on campus during Fail
Break, October 17 -18,19:
Freshmen parking permits will be honored on campus in ftadsst park-
ing areas (not in Staff or Private) beginning Wednesday, October 16,1996
at 4:00 p.m. The earlier time for Freshmen permits is to provide the oppor-
tunity for individuals to park and load their vehicles.
30-Mhrate ftajfaf Pmitttf will be available to Freshmen who must
park prior to the 4:00 pjn. time on October 16,1996. These permits may
be obtained at the Residence Halls Community Service Desks beginning
Tuesday, October 15, 1996 at 4:00 pjn. Community Service Desks are
located in Fletcher Hall, Cotten Hall, and Aycock Hall. The permits are
valid in Resident lots and spaces only. They are not honored in staff,
private, handicap, fire zones, no parking, or metered spaces.
Unregistered vehicles may park in student areas beginning Wednes-
day, October 17,1996 at 4:00 p.m. Unregistered vehicles and vehicles with
student permits parking in staff or private lots will be issued a campus
parking citation. Students with unregistered vehicles desiring to utilize
the 30-Minute Loading Permit prior to 400 p.m. on October 16th, must
first obtain a One-Day Parking Permit from Parking and Traffic Services,
jThe fee for a One-Day Parking Permit from Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices. The fee for a One-Day Parking Permit is $2.
All other parking regulations (staff, private, handicap, no parking, ex-
pired meter, etc) will be enforced during Fail Break.
All questions pertaining to parking on campus during Fall Break should
be directed to Parking and Traffic Services, 3284294 or 6963.
19 of poll views
call ClintonDole
debate a tie
Gary Langer
Sunday, Oct. 6,1996
co ABC News
Before any spinmeisters got to
them average Americans who
watched Sunday night's debate
picked Bill Clinton as the winner by
a 21-point margin, and gave him a
very slight bump in support as his
prize.
Fifty percent of viewers thought
Clinton won and 29 percent called
Bob Dole the winner, an ABC News
poll found. Nineteen percent called
it a tie.
Who won?
Clinton 50
Dole 29
tie 19
As is usual in a presidential de-
bate, not many minds were changed.
Clinton went from an 11-point lead
among debate watchers befo�&and
to a 14-point lead among th� same
people after the debate. That'srvery
modest movement, and id did not
come from Dole's hid but fromhe
absent Ross Perot's.
-Among Debate Viewers-
Pre-Debate Post-Debate
Clinton 51 55
Dole 40 41
Perot 5 2
the
This result does not reflect tne
presidential contest among all voters
- only among a random sample of
registered voters who watched, he
debate. That way it tractcs real
change among actual debate viewers.
MOVES: Debates usually rein-
force rather that change opinions,
and that was mainly what happened
Sunday. Among viewers who sup-
ported Clinton before the debate, 82
percent thought he won it, and 95
percent still supported him after it
Among viewers who supported
Dole before the debate, 63 percent
thought he won it, and 94 percent
still supported him after it
LAST TIME: The first debate
in the 1992 presidential election was
unusual because it did have an im-
mediate impact on presidential pref-
erence, more than doubling support
for Perot, from six to 14 percent.
Still, that only pulled Perot form a
distant third place to a little less-dis-
tant third place.
This year Perot was excluded by
the Presidential Commission on De-
bates.
-Among 1992 Debate Viewers
Pre-Debate Post-Debate
Clinton 48 46
Bush 34 31
Perot 6 14
METHODOLOGY: This poll
was conducted by telephone Oct. 6
among a panel of 616 registered vot-
ers who were contacted at random
last week and said they'd by watch-
ing Sunday's debate. The results
have a margin of error of 4.5 percent-
age points. Field work by Chilton
Research Services of Radnor, Pa.
Pories to deliver commencement address
Brings host of
achievements to
podium
Angela Koenlg
StBff Writer
Dr, Walter J. Pories has recently
been named as the speaker for the 1996
fall commencement by Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin.
"He (Dr. Pories) recently retired
from the chairmanship of the depart-
ment of surgery and I thought it an ap-
propriate time to recognize him for his
accomplishments Eakin said.
Pories is the founding chairman of
the department at ECU's School of
Medicine which he began 19 years ago.
He retired from this position in July so
that he could have more time to work
on research and to help with the intro-
duction of managed medical care in east-
em NC.
He also acts as director of the sur-
gical residency program. This program
has become nationally known while un-
der his guidance.
He wrote the curriculum for the
department of surgery's program at
ECU as well as for programs across the
nation. He is also the author of scien-
tific books and articles.
"Dr. Pories not only has been a
major influence on the School of Medi-
cine but also very important to the uni-
versity at large said Dr. Randolph
Chitwood, chairman of the department
of surgery. "He is responsible for devel-
oping the aca-
demic depart-
ment of surgery
in the School of
Medicine, but
more than that he
has brought a
spirit of scholar-
ship, creativity
and service to the
university at
large. Pories
brings humanism
and compassion
to clinical care,
and that is what
he believes in.
Pories is in
fact nationally
known for these �"��"����"��iP
qualities.
"He is one of the reasons I chose
to come to this program. He is vercom-
passionate. He takes pride in knowing
about the personal lives and professional
lives of residents. He is concerned with
their families as well as how many sur-
geries they perform Dr. David Rock,
chief resident of the department of sur-
gery, said.
"Dr. Pories not
only has been a
major influence
on the School of
Medicine but also
very important to
the university at
large
� Dr. Randolph Chitwood,
chairman of the department
of surgery
"He prides himself of the fact that
none of his residents have gotten di-
vorced. Some residency programs boast
that their own high divorce rates mean
their residents work harder Rock said.
Pories will continue to be a faculty
��� member at the School
of Medicine although
he has retired from his
chairmanship. In addi-
tion to his work at the
School of Medicine,
he is a painter of wa-
tercolors.
"He is about as
dose as you can come
to a renaissance man
and by that I mean
that he is a very ac-
complished man in
many ways. Not only
is he an accomplished
surgeon, but he is also
an accomplished art-
ist as well Eakin
'�"�� � said.
Pories will address more than 2,000
graduates and relatives at the com-
mencement ceremony on Dec 7. He has
spoken at several medical school gradu-
ation ceremonies previously and is one
of students' favorite lecturers inside the
classroom.
"They (students) know he's not just
there out of obligation, but because he
wants to be there Rock said.
LIFifefe
Veuide
Guest speaker talks about culture and economicspage
opiNioak,
Political debates on TVpage O
Disappearing football ticketspage I U
'jfoieeadt
Tuesday
Cloudy
High 66
Low 60
Wednesday
Cloudy
High 72
Low 62
t&uv frteact ud
Phone
(newsroom) 328
(advertising) 328
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CISCU.EDU
T7ie East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner






teWfc. .�- -1
Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
University of South Florida welcomes VP debate
After two weeks of negotiation, the Dole and Clinton campaigns
agreed to ax the initial plan to hold the presidential debate in St Peters-
burg and decided to hold the vice-presidential debate there instead. The
St Petersburg debate will now pit Bob Dole's running mate Jack Kemp
against Vice President Al Gore. Ross Perot's running mate Pat Choate
won't participate since the duo was shut out pf the debates last week.
Last year, the Commission on Presidential Debates, the nonparti-
san group that sponsors debates, recommended St Pertersburg as the
site for the second presidential debate and Hartford for the vice presi-
dential debate.
But, those plans were turned upside down when the two campaigns
began hashing out details. The candidates have final say on when and
where the debates are held.
Burglary ends in flood at The University of
Mousouri - Columbia
The MU Fine Arts building sustained substantial damage after van-
dals flooded most of the first floor Sunday morning, said Melvin Platt
director of the music department m
Four to five inches of water collected on the floor of the main
practice hall as vandals broke into the building and turned on faucets in
the two first floor bathrooms.
Vandals also put hand towels in the toilet and over the top of the
drain to prevent it from pouring down the drain.
The main hall stage overturned with three-fourths of it covered in
water. Platt said at least two people were responsible for the damage.
North Carolina Central University rallies to promote voter
empowerment
National, state and local politicians joined N.C. Central University's
dance team, color guard, cheerleaders and marching band Monday in
urging students to make their voices heard and their votes count this
November.
Thousands of students gathered to celebrate Historically Black
Colleges and Universities Day. Speakers tribk the opportunity to liven
the day by giving impassioned speeches, dancing and leading students
in chants. I
The NCCU marching band, the Sound Machine, played up-to-date-
hip-hop music to which the crowd swayed. The band adheres to the
motto "Excellence is No Accident" an idea the speakers and students
turned into the day's theme.
Similar celebrations were held across the country' yesterday in honor
of Historically Black College and University Day.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from various college
newspapers and CPS.
Civil War comes to life at ECU
Food collection at Thursday's
football game
Each person that will be attending this Thursday's nationally tele-
vised ECU-Southern Mississippi Football game is being asked to bring at
least one non-perishable food item to the game.
Special food boxes will be set up at each entrance fo the stadium
and fans are being requested to drop food in those boxes. The food will
be distributed to needy families in Eastern North Carolina that have
been devastated due to Hurricane Fran and Hurricane Bertha.
This is a special project of the East Carolina University Athletic
Department in cooperation with the United Methodist Church's hurri-
cane relief agencies. The support of theentire student body would be
greatly appreciated.
Symposium
focuses on NC's
role in history
Christina Anderson
Contributing Writer
ECU will host the first Civil War
Symposium, on Oct. 11-13. The sym-
posium will focus attention on
North Carolina's role in the Civil
War.
According to Dr. David E. Long,
an assistant professor in the history
department, North Carolina's role
"has traditionally been given second
class citizenship
The symposium will include pre-
sentations from Civil War historians
and writers. The guest speakers are
people who have made a major
splash in contemporary Civil War
scholarship, Long said.
"It's a prestigious group of
people Long said. "I'm excited
about it
The list of speakers include:
Mark Grimsley of Ohio State. Clyde
Wilson of the University of South
Carolina and Chris Fonvielle of
Wilmington and a graduate of ECU.
Not only will the symposium in-
clude speakers, but participants will
also visit some local historical sites.
On Friday, Oct. 11, participants will
tour the Grimesland Plantation,
home of Confederate General Bryan
Grimes. A "pig-pickin" will be held
after the tour and a panel of gradu-
ate students headed by retired ECU
professor, Dr. William Still, will dis-
cuss the Confederate blockade.
A banquet will be held on Oct.
12, along with a roundtable discus-
sion of all the speakers at the sym-
posium. On Sun-
day, Oct. 13,
Mark L. Bradley
of Raleigh will
help lead a tour
of the
Bentonville
Battlefield. A
visit to the C.S.S.
Neuse Exhibit
and Wyse Fork
Battlefield will
also take place
on Sunday.
"North Caro-
lina has been
overlooked or ne-
glected com- ��������������
pared with her neighbors Long
said. "Yet when you look at the part
North Carolina played in the Civil
"North Carolina
has been
overlooked or
neglected
compared with
her neighbors
� Dr. David E. Long,
War, soldiers in North Carolina died
in larger numbers, in greater per-
centages than
-� from any other
state
The sympo-
sium is spon-
sored by the
ECU Division of
Continuing
Studies, the Col-
lege of Arts and
Sciences, and
the Institute for
Historical and
Cultural Re-
search.
Students
should register
��"����"�������� in advance. For
more information about the sympo-
sium, call the Division of Continu-
ing Studies at (919)328-6143.
assistant professor in the
history department
Religious leaders ponder life on Mars
Issue raises some
serious concerns
NEW YORK (AP) - If there is intel-
ligent life on other planets, the first ques-
tion evangelical theologian Tony
Campolo would ask the other beings is:
What can you teach us about God?
"There's a cosmic dimension to sal-
vation. There's a cosmic design said
Campolo, a popular author and preacher
from Eastern College in St Davids, Pa.
"It just may be that Earth is a place where
the most important drama of the salva-
tion story was acted out but the salva-
tion of God extends far beyond the limi-
tations of our minds
Far from being afraid the recent
NASA discovery that life may have ex-
isted on Mars would shake the founda-
tions of their faith, many religious lead-
ers and theologians say the news should
News
Writer's
meeting
Thursday
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be greeted with a sense of humility and
awe at the infinite creative potential of
God.
This is not the 16th century, when
Christian leaders would condemn
Copernicus and later Galileo for teach-
ing that the Earth was not the center of
the universe.
Today, scientific advances - includ-
ing the idea that a potato-sized meteor-
ite which blasted off Mars 15 million years
ago contains several physical and chemi-
cal traces suggestive of life - are more
likely to be greeted as evidence of the
unlimited power of God. religious lead-
ers say.
"We believe a God who is capable
of creating one world is capable of creat-
ing many worlds said Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, former head of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations. "It
does not change our fundamental faith.
It doesn't touch it in the slightest"
While the NASA results are prelimi-
nary - and even then they are only talk-
exican Restaurant
7
ing about tiny, nearly 4 billion-year-old
microbes - they are tantalizing. Promi-
nent religious thinkers are not immune
from the same flights of imagination
about extraterrestrial life that have
gripped so many others for so long.
David Byers, executive director of
the Committee on Science and Human
Values of the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops, said he has been think-
ing about it since he was a boy.
"I remember, when I was about 10
or 12, thinking if I ever ran into an alien,
my first question would be: 'Who's Jesus
and see what they said Byers recalled.
Rabbi James Rudin of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee said the recent
discovery calls for "a little galactic mod-
esty on the part of not only the scientific
community, but also the religious com-
munity. How do we know that we are
the only form of life?"
Few of the theologians interviewed
doubt that if beings with the ability to
think existed on other planets, GoJ
would have relationships with them.
"Whatever is there is God's cre-
ation said the Rev. Robert Russell, a
physicist and United Church of Christ
minister who founded the Center for
Theology and the Natural Sciences in
Berkeley, Calif. "I would imagine God
would be as interested in being in com-
munication, in relation with that form of
life as God is with Earth, with terrestrial
beings
The other side of the issue is how
should human beings react to free, self-
conscious moral agents from another
planet
"Our religious understanding would
impel us to reach out to them in friend-
ship because they are fellow creatures
of God created in his image Schindler
said.
If the alien beings turned out not
to have committed original sin, "to be
unfallen, ain angelic race, then we'd have
See MARS page 3
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 8, 1996
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Welfare: A closer look at the issues
Barbara Vabejda and Judith
Havemann
Washington Post Staff
Writers
Tuesday, October 11996;
Page AOl
co The Washington Post
A far-reaching welfare law that takes
effect today is already playing out in di-
verse and unforeseen ways in states
across the country. In Alaska, officials
are struggling to reconcile the law's pre-
cise definition of the "work" required of
welfare recipients with the lifestyle of
Native Americans in the remote bush,
where the work of subsistence fishing
and hunting is unpaid and episodic
In Colorado, the problem is geogra-
phy: Booming ski areas offer job oppor-
tunities for welfare recipients, but the
nearest affordable housing is 100 miles
away.
In Kentucky, leaders are getting calls
form worried grocery store owners in the
eastern part of the state, where the coal
industry is so crippled that food stamp
and welfare benefits support the local
economy.
As the law took effect 11 states,
including Maryland, had submitted to the
federal government their outlines for
implementing the new policy, while oth-
ers say their plans are months away and
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Rivergate East
Shopping Center
3193 A East 10th St
Phone 758-0204 .
Mon-Fri 7:30 am � 6 p.m
Sat 9:00 a.m. -2pm
A. R. RIGGAN,
OWNER
still face contentious legislative debates.
President Clinton last night approved two
of those plans, Michigan's and
Wisconsin's. Wisconsin's proposal to
require virtually every adult on its wel-
fare rolls to hold down a job was contro-
versial when first submitted, but the pas-
sage of the welfare law two months ago
gave states almost unlimited authority
to design their own programs so long as
they meet the federal law's tough new
mandates.
The states with completed plans will
receive an annual payment from the fed-
eral government effective today, and by
acting quickly these states ensure they
will receive the largest amount possible.
The clock also starts ticking for welfare
recipients ;in those states, marking the
beginning of a five-year lifetime limit on
benefits.
Interviews with dozens of state of-
ficials in recent days make it clear that
the welfare measure, particularly its in-
tricate mandates, is already raising
unique issues in different regions of the
country. And when the success of the
new system begins to be evaluated a year
form now, the result is likely to vary as
dramatically as the economies of New
York City and rural Iowa.
In their effort to meet the law's first
deadline - getting 25 percent of their
caseloads into jobs a year from today �
may states plan to stick with experimen-
tal welfare reform plans they've already
been testing under waivers form the fed-
eral government The law allows them
to continue these programs, but does not
exempt them form complying with new
work requirements and other tough man-
dates.
But in many cases, meeting the law's
work requirements will mean expanding
these programs or adjusting those that
aren't successful. And the trick will be
matching their programs to the precise
language in the new law.
State officials must also figure out
how to track who on their welfare and
food stamp rolls has worked, for how
many hours and how many weeks. In
SeeLAWpage4
JVLUVJKo from page 2
a lot to leam from them Byers said.
He said, "If you run into a race like
those folks from 'Independence Day
you're not going to have much time for
theological reflection
That is the question that fascinates
theologians: If other beings were given
the same capacity for free will, would they
avoid human mistakes?
"Is that capacity to sin, to do true
violence to ourselves, in some sense in-
evitable or is it possible that you can
comiC300
convention
Sunday October 15,1996
9am - 5pm
For more information call
The Nostalgia Newstand
919 Okkmson Ave. � 758-6909
Hamada Inn � 203 W. Greenville Blvd.
have a race of moral free agents who are
truly guileless, who are at peace and
harmony with themselves Russell said.
Campolo sees an ominous develop-
ment in the trend in films away from
portraying aliens as almost Christ-like
figures, such as in the movie "E.T. The
Extra-Terrestrial to their depictions in
the current hit "Independence Day
where beings from another planet try to
destroy the Earth.
He said it reflects a climate of fear
and anxiety in the country, that extends
to our attitudes toward other strangers,
such as Mexican immigrants.
Indulging his own imagination,
Campolo said he could envision a sce-
nario where God - tired of the mess
human beings had created in this world
-would send beings from another planet
to help people learn to love one another.
"We've always looked at ourselves
as people sending out missionaries
Campolo said. "Maybe we need to receive
a few at this point in history
Carroll Daskiell and Students
from the School 01 Music
Friday, October 10, 1996 � MSC Great Room
8:00 PM - 11:00 PM � Mendennall Student Center
AT HKJIT
FREEH!
ALL VARWTWS FUN PACK
Oscar Mayer
Lunchables
selected vuuErms
Kroger
Canned Beans
FRESHBAKED
Hershev
Cookies
1Ct.
�Oaanaaana am wmmwy On �EnamTofmmanr-ftmxluturwlMu
�CxmitwUajnas �aoatmOUownnMrai � OmtoUuflunurajror����
NABISCO
Oreo
Cookies
��.
Flex
Shampoo
15-1HU.
Sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events Committee & ECU School or Music
itjw AM. .VtempHtf QuJttliV - -
kT ��'
To rMrv�;
�t Off lc� at 1 800 SOU AHtS or toe! �t 33a-47�J8
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11
(BROTHER)
Rock-n-Roll With Bagpipes!
REGULAR OR LOW FAT
Armour
Treet
: �-rg ' "��'�� 'Li �iv j�
f





Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
LAW from page 3
western Ohio, where migrant farm labor-
ers receive benefits on and off as they
cpme and go each year, the tracking re-
quirement present a daunting challenge.
; Any change in policy as massive as
the new welfare law is likely to bring
unintended results. This one is very spe-
cific about where states must end up;
what is doesn't specify' is how they should
get there.
"Even within my state, one size
doesn't fit all said Robin Arnold-Will
iims, Utah's director of human services.
She hopes to address the unemploy-
ment in rural Utah with job development
programs that likely would be completely
ineffective in booming Salt Lake City.
1 In Arkansas, state officials are de-
i
yeloping a "menu" of welfare services that
dould be tailored to the have and hove-
not areas of the state.
RUDGET from page
that they could see what the state of
North Carolina had done for the uni-
versity, Eakin said.
After giving the committee a tour
of the new library, university officials
took the commission to Flanagan Hall,
ECU's science and technology build-
ing.
"Flanagan Hall was built in 1939
and renovated in 1970 said Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and
chemistry professor Carolina Ayers.
Du�to budget problems during
these r�novations, the emergency
safety showers were constructed, but
the drains were omitted, Ayers added.
As a result, when the showers are in
use the water leaks down to the first
floor. v
"Th-commission toured the fa-
cility, wtifle lab was in session, so that
they could see how obsolete the fa-
cilities are in terms of teaching mod-
ern science Eakin said. "We were
able to give them a first hand report
on the nature of that facility
According to Eakin, the univer-
sity is planning on constructing a new
science and technology building, and
when it is completed Flanagan Hall
will turn into offices and classrooms.
Dr. Diane Henshaw, director of
Continuing Education, said the
legislature's money has allowed the
division to start a new program this
fall which offers bachelor's degrees to
working adults without them having
to commute to ECU.
The degree program is offered at
Craven Community College, Carteret
Community College and Havelock
Middle School.
"The program is in an area where
educational opportunities are not
widely available to adults Henshaw
said.
However, in order for ECU to re-
ceive any funding from the Advisory
Budget Commission, University offi-
cials have to send a list of priority
needs to the University of North Caro-
lina General Assembly. They deter-
mine which of the 16 University of
North Carolina schools receive fund-
ing for improvements and renovations
to their campus.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
1 EjX. J. from page 1
Cummings, this is true.
I "Although textbooks may be
slightly overpriced, they are essential in
the understanding of some of my
classes. In that respect, they are worth
tta money I pay for them Cummings
skid. "There is no way I could pass the
cjass without the books). They are also
important for future reference
According to a recently released
survey published by the Association of
American Publishers, uiere seems to be
an overall increase in the value in which
college professors and students place
on textbooks in academic work. Accord-
ing to the survey, 55 percent of faculty
ajid 49 percent of students regard text-
books as "very important" in helping
students retain information, study more
efficiently, clarify concepts and provide
future reference.
, The study also revealed that while
75 percent of faculty feel that using text-
books will improve students' grades,
only 51 percent of students share this
view.
"Textbooks are not worth the
money they pay for them if students
don't read them said, Dr. Roger
Rulifson, a biology professor. "A lot of
times they only think of money, not the
value that the textbook may bring to
them in the future
Rulifson added that although it
may vary with each discipline, and some
textbooEs are better than others, text-
books can be "valuable tools especially
in a student's major.
"Vou better read it cover to cover,
and you better hold on to it" Rulifson
said, i
Textbook sales have increased in
the past two years - six percent last
year and 10 percent the year before,
according to Wanda Scarborough, the
ECU Student Store manager.
"Textbook sales have increased
and book buy-backs have increased
Scarborough told TEC. The biggest in-
crease, though, is in the course packs
put together by professors
Some professors may be realizing
that asking for students to buy an en-
tire text for just a few chapters is exces-
sive. This could be why more and more
of these course packs are being put
together to give students a more af-
fordable option.
ECU Student Accounting
Society Meetin
v When:
-Wed. Oct.
�9th - 3:00
Where:
GCB 3006
Why
Guest
H Speaker:
Don Bold
E: �'�
�f
V
�'I '
:


Subs will
be provided!
Come join us!
�,v,vw.v.v.vvv.v.v
� to Mendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF ACTI V I T Y
! 10-eu'U aU te pieces

i3
i3
��

if you miss the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series event,
AlwaysPatsy Cline, on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at 8 p.m.
Student tickets are priced at $12 in advance and can be purchased at
the Central Ticket Office or by calling 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
All tickets at the door will be $25.
Midnight Madness
Nobody spends All Hallows Eve like
Mendenhall Student Center
Dance, Costume & Pumpkin Carving Contests, Midnight Buffet.
THURSDAY, OCT. 31 9 P.M. - 2 A.M.
JOIN THE FAN. CLUB
Start your weekend right with the rock 'n roll 'n bagpipes
of the Australian band BROTHER.
Friday, Oct. 11 at 4 p.m. in the brickyard outside MSC.
:� 4
0
c
trtrn
I
���
8
Mission Impossible (PG-13) Oct. 10-12 at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. Free admission with an ECU I.D.
Man
Get carded
I M
Stop by the Multi-PurpOse Room to get your student I.D. card on
Wednesday, Oct 9 from 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Be sure to bring your activity sticker and driver's license
Cool Pictures
See The Photography ofP.H. Polk on display in the
Mendenhall Gallery upstairs in MSC.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1
Natural Life Special Events & Student Union Films Committee presents:
Drive-In Movie
Now Showing
"Friday

Saturday, October 12 at 9:00 p.m.
in the Chancellor's VIP Parking Lot.
(located on Charles Blvd. between Minges Coliseum and Harrington Field)
Drive up or bring a blanket!
Free Food!
VSDE-
tQggg
� NATURAL
mm
7 C 22 T
RECREATIONAL
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387
or call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
f�5 �!
I ffSMffcHSSai
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Courtesv of
Tuesday October 8
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
AT&T
Pick Up Free Passes at
Mendenhall Info Desk
& ECU Student Store
Presented By
The Student Union - Films
Committee
'UUP��
�LM ��





I. �
Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
&W
Cunttec
Wake up
and smell the
politicians.
State and
national
elections are
important.
Get involved,
get out and
vote.
" Been seeing a bunch of unfamiliar faces on your
television screen lately, telling you that you need them
to "fix things for you and your fellow citizens?" Well,
you might need to listen up.
Those weird-looking guys interrupting your favor-
ite talk shows and sitcoms may be running the coun-
try someday (today, even), and if we, as students don't
know what they stand for, we may be in a world of
trouble.
Tuning in to debates and political summits may
not be your idea of an exciting evening at home, but
the decisions these people make may have a greater
impact on our lives than we think.
Issues like increasing the minimum wage and a
middle class tax break really matter. Even if you don't
have a job or you don't pay taxes, we're sure your
parents do. Think about this no extra funds at home
may mean one less care-package being sent to you,
and even worse, you might have to start paying your
own phone bill.
It's unbelievable, we know, but there actually are
some students who think the only elections that di-
rectly affect them are the ones that happen on cam-
pus. People! Wake up and smell the politicians! State
and national elections are probably the most impor-
tant things in which you could ever become involved.
If you're the guy with the red Chevette bearing a
bumper sticker that reads "DIE, Jesse, DIE" and you've
never taken the initiative to vote before, then guess
what You are part of the problem, man. How do you
think these people keep getting re-elected?
Another excuse we've heard? "I'm only one per-
son. My vote wouldn't make that much of a difference
Haven't you ever heard of a 31 to 30 victory or de-
feat? Not all elections are landslides, and if you and
the three people you spend your time complaining to
will take some action, that's four votes right there.
In other words, if all you do is sit around and com-
plain about the politicians, that's all there ever will be
- reasons to complain. So if you want to make a move
that will redeem your soul for having wasted yet an-
other year without a meaning contribution, do some-
thing that has impact - VOTE
In the infamous words of "Outcast "You need to
get up, get out, and get something (you know the
rest.)
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
An? L Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dillartf Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Andy Farfcas, Staff Illustrator
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
CristJe Farley, Production Assistant
Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
David Bigeiow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crampton, Copy Editor
Carole Meble, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wrlfht, Media Adviser
Janet Resoess, Media Accountant
ib
ill
Serving ths ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for di.�cy or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, ftwenvHIe, NC 27858-4353. For Information, all (919)
328-6366.
If YU jJanel a complaint o
a?MM�-NT WRJTL A LtLTTtR JO
All letters must be:
??typed
� 250 words or less
? include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
StxKtefttubfctitds
JC 87858-4353.
Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
AvsvAt
tvt�r
JS
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ivitoh
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4ftWiX"
Sfc
:�tt$
fob p�i bw
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I
Driving yourself to your grave
. . immmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammtm �� th �fprv rf thpir friends.
I am not here to preach. I am here
to remind everybody about how pre-
cious life is. I know this sounds like
the typical cliche you might find in a
typical article, however it is not 1 want
to remind everybody about the idea
of a designated driver.
You know that person who gets
to hang around their drunk friends
and almost baby-sit them. It may seem
like the worst job in the world, just
think of the alternatives.
If you were not there to drive
your friends home, you may not have
those friends. I am not saying that all
accidents are caused by drunk driv-
ers, what I am saying is that the ma-
jority of them are.
A friend of mine was driving
home from a concert, sober as could
be. She and her friends had the per-
fect evening She had just become a
sister in the sorority she had worked
so hard to join. Everything seemed
perfect After the concert, she and her
friends were on the highway driving
back to her school when she got hit I
do not mean sideswiped or rear ended,
I mean a head on collision. The driver
of the other vehicle apparently had
had way too much to drink, and hav-
ing climbed into the cab of a jacked-
up truck, commenced to navigate his
way down the wrong side of the high-
way.
She did not have any time to re-
act She turned the wheel of her little
Honda, but it was too late. The truck
plowed right into her killing one of
Brian Lewis Bums
Opinion Columnist
her friends immediately. My friend was
lucky enough to live until she arrtjed
at the hospital.
My friend would still be here with
me if that drivers' friends who were
sober had taken his keys or had called
a cab for their friend. There were two
sober men in the cab of that truck
watching their drunk buddy at-the
wheel. I was not the only persoki to
lose in this situation. My friendsipar-
ents will never be able to see their
daughter again. Her friends will never
be able to here her laugh or see her
wonderful smile again.
It is because of this guy ancj his
buddy's that she is no longer with us.
This is why it is so important for
people have a designated driveTt is
not too much to ask for one pfrson
to remain sober for one evening, en-
suring the safety of their friends.
The designated driver program is ,
perhaps one of the best ideas that I
have seen come around in a long time.
My fraternity has a program like this,
every weekend night two people sit
at home and wait for a call from a
brother or a friend who needs a ride.
This goes on all semester long
However you set up your pro-
gram, it is important that you know
who is the designated driver for that
evening. This simple little step could
possib'y save you from having to face
the realization that you may never see
your friends again.
I do not recommend having to go
visit your friends in a hospital or even
worse as I had to do, at the cemetery.
The hard truth is that when someone
who has been drinking gets behind
the wheel of a vehicle, they are self-
ishly taking not only their life into
their hands, but anyone else who hap-
pens to be on the road that night
Please, for your safety and that
of your friends, please be responsible
enough to have a designated driver
available every time you are drinking.
It can really make a difference and I
don't want to have to read about some
poor individual who could have been
saved from disaster by making one
phone call to a friend or a cab.
It is now up to you. If you decide
to go out and drink, then you have to
call someone. Do not get behind that
wheel and take others lives in your
hands!
r
i
i
i
i
i
a or a.
SUBSCRIBE TO
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� m






Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
LIFe
Guest speaks
about culture,
economics
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Play brings Huck,
Tom and Tim
Big River uses
music and effects
to great cuccess
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
The first time I read The Adventures
of Huckleberry Finn, 1 read it only be-
cause I had to, and I complained the
whole time.
I was going through my "why do
we have to read this stupid stuff all the
time" phase in seventh grade. I was de-
termined to hate the novel - and was
quite ashamed of myself when it became
one of my favorites. Since then I've read
Mark Twain's masterpiece about once a
year, and it is still one of my favorite
books.
So when I heard that the ECU Play-
house would be doing Big River this year,
I was pretty excited. It's getting a little
difficult to read for pleasure now. with
all the reading I have to do for class, and
I jumped at the chance to "watch the
play" to get my yearly fix of Huck Finn.
I was not disappointed. I'd never
seen Big River before, but I must admit
that this adaptation is really true to the
book All of my favorite scenes were in-
cluded, and the most important lines are
quoted almost directly from the original
text
I really liked the performance. It was
highly entertaining, which 1 believe is at
the root of all theatre. However, in the
beginning, I had a major problem with
the sound. I could barely hear Jerry Green
(Jim), especially when he sang. The or-
chestra was very loud, which is to be ex-
pected, but I guess Green's microphone
wasn't turned oa This problem was cor-
rected during intermission, but I think
someone should have noticed it much
earlier. After all, this could have been
fixed many times during the first act
when Green was offstage.
I also thought the casting choices
were interesting. Take, for example, Huck
Finn and Tom Sawyer. I might be look-
ing at this from too much of a literary
standpoint but in the novel Tom Saw-
yer is considerably younger than Huck
Finn. In this performance, Matt Stevens
(Tom Sawyer) seemed older than Chad
Brown (Huck Finn). This didn't detract
from my enjoyment of the show by any
means - both Stevens and Brown did
an excellent job. But in the back of my
mind that point kept popping up.
There were several effects through-
out the show that I found extremely suc-
cessful. In the first song, "Do You Want
to Go to Heaven? (which, by the way, is
the one I've found myself humming most
often) a beautiful picture was made by
placing the chorus behind the scrim (the
translucent black screen). I also thought
that the lighting effect that created the
forest was amazing. I felt that it was much
more interesting than if they had tried
to paint some trees on a backdrop.
The absolute best part of this show
See RIVER page 9
Finding problems is easy enough
- the rub is in providing viable solu-
tions.
Dr. Claud Anderson, author of
Black Labor, White Wealth: A Search
for Power and Economic Justice, will
attempt to offer his solutions to Afri-
can-American economic difficulties
tonight when he makes his first trip
to the ECU campus. Anderson will
speak at 7 p.m. in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
The event is sponsored by the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center, the College of Arts
and Sciences, the ECU School of Busi-
ness, the BB&T Center for Leadership
Development and the vice chancellor
of academic affairs. It is free to all stu-
dents, staff, faculty and the general
public.

Anderson
serves as presi-
dent of the Har-
vest Institute, a
think tank based
on solutions pre-
sented in Black
Labor, White
Wealth. The or-
ganization is de-
voted to posi-
tively affecting
the social and
economic reform of black America.
Anderson served as assistant sec-
retary of commerce under former
President Jimmy Carter and as coor-
dinator of education for the state of
Florida. He recently spoke at the
NAACP National Convention in Char-
lotte and at the Essence Music Festi-
Dr. Claud Anderson
val in New Orleans.
Taffy Benson Clayton, director of
the Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center, said she has seen
Anderson speak before, and she be-
lieves he does a
He was extremely
inspiring and very
informed
� Taffy Benson Clayton,
director of the Ledonia
Wright African-American
Cultural Center
commendable job
of relating African-
American eco-
nomic history in
the United States.
"He was ex-
tremely inspiring
and very in-
formed Clayton
said.
Anderson, she
added, showed
"clarity" and "depth" in connecting
events in history and linking them to
the economic problems of African-
Americans today.
"I think this is something worth
sharing in an academic atmosphere
-�� v �
See GUEST page 8
0D1�evieurt,
Cake
Fashion Nugget
Derek T. Hail
Senior Writer
Eli pay full price
Cake. It's about time someone used
this for a band name. If s everybody's
favorite treat on the biggest day of their
year. If s usually taken for granted, but
Cake, oh Cake, what a good time. Al-
though this Cake tastes a little stale in
some spots, the icing is oh so sweet
Combining sounds.that include
guitar, vocals, organ, bass, trumpet, per-
cussion, drums, as well as acoustics, this
cpntet from Sacramento plays with
Aetodies that fit together in weird ways.
"A good song is like a teardrop in
the eye of a prize-winning poodle at a
world class dog show John McCrea, the
band's lead vocalist rhythm guitar player,
anti organist says.
I guess he's talking about the sec-
ond track on this record, called "The
Distance The first single from the
record, the song is currently doing well
on the charts and is definitely a hit The
song starts with a techno beat that
within a lyric, changes shape. Even
thftugh the track goes all over the place,
it keeps its original attitude. It's very in-
See CAKE page 9
buy it used
can't even
humalcna
tape It from a
friend
runaway
John Mellencamp
Mr. Happy Go
Lucky
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
The blue-jean rocker is dead
or at least steadily dying. Maybe
that's wrong to say; maybe they're
just joining the '90s. Either way,
there's a revolution going on some-
where. First Bryan Adams comes
out looking like a bad slacker rip-
off singing "The Only Thing That
Looks Good On You (Is Me) and
now John Mellencamp goes dance
or so everyone wants to think.
However, anyone who gives a
listen to Mellencamp's new album,
Mr. Happy Go Lucky, will realize
that he is simply expanding on the
sound he experimented with on his
past couple of albums, Dance Na-
ked and Human Wheels.
The reason everyone immedi-
ately assumes Mellencamp has gone
techno is the enlistment of Junior
Vasquez as his co-producer. Yes,
this is the same Junior Vasquez that
has frequently worked with Ma-
donna. In fact, she's the one who
recommended him to Mellencamp.
A few years ago, Madonna sug-
gested that Mellencamp let Vasquez
do a dance version of his single
"Love and Happiness He agreed,
and though the two never met on
that project, Mellencamp kept
Vasquez in mind. So, the New York-
based Vasquez went to Indiana for
the recording, and small-town
Mellencamp went to New York for
the mixing.
The result is the best
Mellencamp record in years. While
not another Scarecrow or Uh Huh,
Mr. Happy Go Lucky proves just
as listenable as those huge albums
of the '80s. In fact, Vasquez's in-
fluence is only on five of the 12
songs, and those are mediocre
songs that end up vastly improved
by his helping hand.
The album's opening track,
"Overture is just that - a violin
overture for the album. The first
real song on the album is the dark
and unusual "Jerry a story about
a "slightly" deranged man named
Jerry who gets his kicks yelling at
the man in the moon. The pound-
See HAPPY page 8
There is nothing more useless
than screaming at a waU. It's just
spittle andbricks, bricks and spittle.
However, if you put enough voices
together, that wall might just be
blown over. So join in another fu-
tile attempt to change the status quo
and listen to a "Scream at the WaU
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
I can't stand the smell of struck
matches and the South has a prob-
lem confronting unpleasantries.
What the hell do those two
things have to do with each other,
you may ask Stay with me and I'll
get to the connection in a minute.
We have a big problem with
being two-faced here in the Bible
Belt Every day down here we put
up the facade of being wholesome,
pure, kind, loving, compassionate,
healthy and happy. Yet every day we
get closer and closer to being the
exact opposite.
One of the first images I can
remember of my grandmother in-
volves her creative use of fire and
smoke. Ever since I was a baby (arjd
I'm sure that it was a tradition loijg
before then), my grandmother r4s
struck a match and thrown it in tfle
toilet to cover her more offensive
after-bowel movement smells. Ttjs
practice is a tradition now for mojst
of my family and I can tell you frojn
experience that it does nothing Jo
cover any smell In fact if s wor$e
because it makes the feces smiU
burnt
From now until the end of time,
! will associate the smell of matches
with the smell of dookie and not-
ing will change that fact If a friend
of mine lights up a cigarette, I smfcll
dookie. When I try to light soiie
candles or make a fire in the fije-
place so that my wife and I can have
a romantic evening, I smell dookje.
Until you've been through an exije-
rience like this, and perhaps sortie
of you have, you don't realize how
often that struck match smell'is
around. Believe me, the smell is ev-
erywhere, j
The reason I mention this prac-
tice is because I think if s indicate
of the small ways in which we South-
erners try to cover up our less noble
attributes. I'm not saying that my
grandmother is ignoble I am say-
ing is that she's deluding herself if
she thinks that her stuff don't stink.
And the South does the same
thing. We delude ourselves injto
thinking that everything is peachy
keen and wonderful down here.
Some think that all of our problems
will go away eventually. But if we
don't deal with them they will in fact
get worse. There are still racist mi-
sogynistic, hateful attitudes that are
shared by multitudes of people be-
low the Mason-Dixon line.
Of course, I know that these
same problems exist elsewhere in the
country, too. It's just that they deal
with controversy more openly than
we do. If you don't like someone you
tell them to their face instead of criti-
cizing them behind their back.
See SCREAM page 9
Connells conquer Greenville
Doug McMillan, lead singer of the Connells and former ECU student, flaunted his
Pirate pride during their recent show at the Attic. Always crowd pieasers, the band is
touring in support of their newly released album, Weird Food and Devastation.
Photos by ANN JIV&EN






-
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 8,1996
Flu Season Special!
Listen to Insight every Wednesday from 8-9 for
news that concerns you! This week John Reeves and
John Long talk more about student fees and the SGA.
Call in and be heard at 328-6913!
The Power Hour takes place every weekday in front of
the student store from 12-1. Giveaways, music, and fun!
Big Concert Giveaways return soonBE THERE!
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
Jennifer Phillips
Student Health Service
Flu Season is fast approaching.
The article that follows is intended
to serve as a guide to answer your
most basic questions about the flu
and how to avoid it.
Question: What is the flu and
how common is it?
Answer: It is estimated that be-
tween 25-50 million Americans
come down with the flu every year.
Influenza or "flu" includes any
number of types of fairly common,
highly contagious viral diseases.
Question: How is the flu dif-
ferent from a cold?
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Answer: Generalhlthe symp-
toms of a cold involve s&ffy noses,
sneezing, sore throatslind cough-
ing. The signs and symptoms of in-
fluenza tend to be more severe and
to last longer. The distinguishing
symptoms of the flu include:
� high temperature, (102-104
F) lasting three to four lays
� prominent headache
� general body ache that may
become severe
� fatigue and weakness that
may last two to three w�ks
� extreme exhaustion
� nausea and vomitag
Other symptoms that may be
present are the same as those found
in colds (stuffy noses, sneezing,
sore throats and coughing), and
thus the confusion. Also, complica-
tions such as bronchitis and pneu-
monia may develop from the flu.
Question: How is the flu trans-
mitted?
1
Answer: Unfortunately influ-
enza is highly contagious, particu-
larly in the first three days of the
infection. The virus may be trans-
mitted by coughs, sneezes, laughs
and normal conversation. The usual
incubation period is two days.
Question: How do I avoid get-
ting the flu?
Answer: Some health officials
recommend everyone get annual flu
shots. The Centers for Disease Con-
trol in Atlanta estimate that 70 to
90 percent of healthy young adults
who get flu shots will avoid infec-
tion. It is best to obtain a flu shot
in the fall, before flu season hits.
It takes the body 12 to 20 days to
produce protective antibodies after
obtaining the shot.
Beginning Oct. 15, flu shots
will be available "at cost" to stu-
dents at the Student Health Cen-
ter. Call 328-6317 to schedule an
appointment. Other than a flu shot,
the best strategy for prevention is
to maintain a healthy immune sys-
tem through a balanced diet and
The distinguishing
symptoms of the flu
include:
� high temperature
(102-104 F) lasting
three to four days
� prominent headache
� general body ache
that may become
severe
� fatigue and weakness
that may last two to
three weeks
� extreme exhaustion
� nausea and vomitin
to get enough sleep - both of which
can be challenging goals for college
students.
Question: Who is at the great-
est risk of getting the flu?
Answer: At highest risk for in-
fluenza are those people over age
65; those with serious chronic dis-
eases including: asthma, emphy-
sema, diabetes, kidney disease, HIV
infection, and anemia: and health
care workers.
If you have any questions
about the information above call
the health educator at 328-6794.
Be Frugal And Multiply.
This month copies are just
30 each.
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8
Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
Lecture series makes theory relevant
: r � ciu ,�tk�n.�l,wiv nartmpnts nn camDUS I ho'
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyles Editor
Jane Austen is more popular
now than she has ever been. Her
novels are constantly being trans-
lated into major feature films, and
to great critical and box-office suc-
cess. But Ms. Austen was and is
much more than simply a Hollywood
fad. She is a major literary figure
who still holds a firm place within
the academic circle, and she is to
be the topic of a talk given by James
Thompson, the first speaker for the
1996-97 Theory Colloquium Lecture
series.
Thompson, an English profes-
sor at UNC-Chapel Hill, will read his
paper entitled "How to Do Things
with Austen" this Wednesday, Oct
9, and he is definitely an appropri-
ate voice for Ms. Austen. With a
strong, specialized background in
18th-century literature, Thompson
has authored several books, includ-
ing his most recent Models of Value:
Eighteenth-Century Political
Economy and the Novel (Duke UP,
1996) and Between Self and World:
The Novels of Jane Austen (Penn
State UP, 1988). He is also widely
published in a variety of journals,
such as Philological Quarterly and
Studies in Eighteenth-Century Cul-
ture, w
Getting specialized and accom-
plished academics to read their lat-
est work,is what
the Theory
Colloquwm is
all aboutt Spon-
sored by the En-
glish depart-
ment and the
Dean of Arts
and Sciences,
the Coijoquium
strives to, as its
fliers across
tr
campus say,
"present a
transdisciplinary
group of speak-
ers on current
topics in literary
and cultural
theory and to
foster dialogue
on those topics
According to Jeff Williams, an
English professor who created the
lecture series seven years ago, the
Colloquium is "designed to bring
prominent people in the field of lit-
erary theory, literary criticism or
cultural criticism to campus to
talk about relevant issues in the
wide world of theory
This world of theory is signifi-
cant in today simply because the
world is increas-
ingly opening it-
self up as a
multicultural
realm where dia-
logue is the best
way to under-
stand and resolve
controversial is-
sues. The starting
place for any so-
lution is with
theory. And, as
Williams points
out, "literary
theory, literary
criticism and cul-
tural criticism
have been the
most prominent
and active of the
academic fields within the past 20
years
"It doesn't just represent the
English Department Williams
stresses. "It represents an
interdiscinplanary mix of such pro-
"Although we
don't have piles of
money, due to the
success of the
series, we have
consistent support
from the the
university, as well
as other groups on
campus
� Jeff Williams,
English professor
fessions as English, anthropology
law, philosophy, and more
The Colloquium has enjoyed
great success since its inception, and
it looks towards an increasingly pro-
ductive future. "We started on a
shoe-string budget Williams ex-
plains. "Although we don't have
piles of money, due to the success
of the series, we have consistent
support from the the university, as
well as other groups on campus
The big reason for the
Colloquium's success centers
around the people who come to
speak. So far, such noted academ-
ics as Stanley Fish, Eve Sedgwick
and Jane Tompkins have traveled to
ECU to share their work and ideas.
"These are people who are promi-
nent nationally Williams says, "not
just within their fields but also on
national debates. And we've also had
a number of people from other de-
partments on campus I hope
other fields will participate in the
future
By balancing accomplished vet-
eran academics with people just be-
ginning their professional careers,
Williams hopes to get "young, active
voices" that will help shape the fu-
ture of the academic world.
The lectures generally last
about 30-40 minutes and are then
followed by a question-and-answer
session where open dialogue and
debate can be had. Afterwards, all
are welcome to a reception filled
with beverages and snacks.
Future speakers for this year's
series include Thomas McLaughlin
on Oct. 28 and Bruce Robbins on
Nov. 25. James Thompson will be
Oct. 9 at 4 p.m. in the General Class-
room Building, room 2014.
For further information, con-
tact Jeff Williams at 328-6388.
CjLJbSl from page 6
Clayton said. "This environment is
appropriate for a discussion of improv-
ing the African-American economic
situation, which will strengthen the
African-American community and,
therefore, the greater American com-
munity
Clayton said she hopes
Anderson's audience leaves thinking,�
"What can I do to make the situation;
better?"
"I hope the audience becomes;
enlightened about what the economic!
challenges of the African-American!
community are she explained. "I;
hope they leave with a new attitude;
and commitment to make a difference;
in our community, whether they are;
African-American or any other persua
sion �
Anderson will hold a question
and-answer session following his pre-
sentation.
For more information, call the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center at 328-1680.
HAPPY from page 6
ing front rhythm accompanied by
a dance drum loop in the back-
ground lets "Jerry" start things off
on the right foot.
"Key West Intermezzo (I Saw
You First)" is the next song, as well
as the first single. Mellencamp him-
self has described this song as hav-
ing a dark topic with�a happy sing-
a-long chorus. Nearly everyone can
see a reflection of themselves in
this song. "Key West" is a song
about three people, two guys and
a girl. One guy has the girl, the
other thinks she should be with
him, and this hidden jealousy rules
the song.
"Just Another Day" is the only
Mellencamp song on the album
with that classic Mellencamp
sound. Straight from the older al-
bums, "Day" sounds upbeat with a
"live in the moment" feel. In fact,
apocalyptical "live for today" mes-
sages run throughout the record.
"This May Not Be The End of
the World" is a perfect example of
Mellencamp's apocalyptic message.
The chorus laments "This may not
be the end of the world But you
can see it from here Catchy one-
Hners like this are widespread
throughout the album.
Other attention-getters include
"It's hard to worry about the future
When your past is knocking at
your door and "Her Majesty, the
Queen, is a pretty nice babe Not
your usual idle Mellencamp chatter.
Overall, Mr. Happy Go Lucky
is an excellent collection of eclec-
tic words and rhythms that should
prove to be the best Mellencamp
offering in a long while. One note
to potential buyers, there are two
versions of the album out there for
sale. The retail giant Wal-Mart
seems to have flexed their musical
muscle again without saying a
word.
For years now, bands have been
changing their albums especially
for Wal-Mart. Nirvana changed In
UterMo stay on the good side of
Wal-Mart, but other bands haven't
been so fortunate. The Goo Goo
Dolls had their A Boy Named Goo
album pulled recently. It seems that
the cover photo of a boy with jam
spread over his face resembled a
boy wtth blood on his face to some
customers, and Wal-Mart pulled the
album. Sheryl Crow crossed paths
withthe sensitive dealer when she
made a remark about Wal-Mart sell-
ing guns to children and teenagers.
To sum up, don't waste your time
look g for her new album in Wal-
Mart ither.
So, when Mellencamp prepared
for the release of this album, he de-
cided to walk the safe side of the
road. The album cover, a picture of
Mellencamp and a little girl with
the Devil on one side and Jesus on
the other, has been changed for the
Wal-Mart public. The Devil and
Jesus have been removed from all
Wal-Mart bound copies to ensure
that there are no bad feelings from
the Wal-Mart public. Fortunately,
the music came through unscathed,
and hopefully Mellencamp's blue-
jean rocker image will too.
MANUFACTURER'S COUPON
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GRAINGER
CD Release Party!
Former
Members of
Dillon Fence
Opened for Hootie
Last April
-





Ti " I 'I ' i i -ii. 1��n
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 8,1996
RIV ER from page 6
was, as it should be, the music Even with
the sound problems in the first act the
songs were beautiful. I've already men-
tioned that "Do You Want to Go to
Heaven?" is a favorite of mine, but I don't
think there was a single song I didn't
like. Pap's rendition of "Guv'ment" was
inspired - it made me think of our own
wonderful student government (if you
didn't pay attention to this song, go see
the show again; this is not a compliment
to the SGA). Matt Stevens has a really
good comic presence, and I laughed so
hard through his "Hand for the Hog"
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that I almost didn't notice that horrible
pig Brown used to fake his murder.
Let me stop here and say that I could
have done without that pig. My imagina-
tion is strong enough to picture him kill-
ing the pig and spreading its blood
around the cabin without that pitiful vi-
sual aid. It was entirely too comical, and
while Stevens' song was funny, the cabin
scene has a very serious undertone that
I think was ruined by that prop.
Chad Brown was really terrific as
Huck Fina He had the world-wise inno-
cence of Huck down pat One of the most
important things about Huck's charac-
ter in the novel is that he is almost an
adult but still very child-like because of
his unusual upbringing. Brown handled
these aspects of the character very well.
The relationship between Huck and Jim
was also very well represented by Brown
and Green. I could see the close friend-
ship that existed between the two de-
spite the racial barriers inherent within
their society.
Fire up before the
game with BW-3
Join us at BW-3 for
$ljV wings for
$19.oo all day
Thursday,
October 10th,
8:00pm
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECK
1 14 East Fifth Street � 758 - 9191
Let's Show 'em Our
PIRATE POWER!
Turn Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium Purple for the
ESPN Nationally Televised Game between the
ECU Pirates and the Golden Eagles of Southern
Mississippi!
The ECU Student Stores will help you
DRESS PIRATE by SLASHING prices 20 on the
apparel you need for this NIGHT GAME!
All sweatshirts and other Ions-sleeve shirts
are 20 off, Tuesday, October 8 through
Thursday, October 10.
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All Sweatshirts & Long Sleeve Shirts!
Ronslci t
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tudent Stores
the jest �ooksyour dollars support scholars!
BflB HOWS:
Monday -Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
HA
One of the most hilarious parts of
the show was the performance of the
"Royal Nonesuch Lef s have a hand for
Eryc Whiteley, who murdered
Shakespeare with impressive skill! 1
laughed so hard throughout that entire
speech that I cried. I also saw much more
of Andy Slade than I ever wanted to �
but with hilarious results. I think these
two (Whiteley and Slade) were definite
high points of the show, and their en-
�BP
ergy and wit really started the second
act off with a bang.
"The Crossing" was a very power-
ful scene that was handled very well. The
song was beautiful, and the message was
so strong. Also, I just have to say. that
Tara Kingsberry is awesome. When she
sang "How Blest We Are I could hardly
contain my admiration. What a voice!
Another high point in the show was
Jim Bray's performance of "Arkansas I
know I speak for the entire audience when
I say that he was hilarious. My sentiments
were echoed in the curtain call when Bray
got quite a few whistles and screams.
All in all, I have to say I thoroughly
enjoyed this show. I go to the theater first
and foremost to be entertained, and I was
not disappointed by Big River. The show
closes tonight and I definitely suggest tak-
ing this opportunity to see it if you haven't
already.
VAJKXi from page 6
The band also consists of Greg
Brown (electric guitar, organ), Victor
Damiani (bass), Vincent di Fiore (trum-
pet percussion), and Todd Roper (drums,
percussion). All have made their mark
on this disc You can tell them apart, and
they compliment each other well.
A few songs on this disc did remind
me of something I had heard before,
yet the band makes no mention of where
they swiped the sound from. For ex-
ample, "Friend is a Four Letter Word-
sounds just like Willie Dixon's "House
of the Rising Sun Although there's
something about their creativity that
sparks my interest there's also some-
thing about their thievery that makes
me wanna puke.
On the other hand, there are songs
on this disc that are taken from other
artists and the band gives them credit
for it Isn't that nice? The album includes
covers of "Sad Songs and Waltzes
which was written by Willie Nelson, and
"I Will Survive which was made fa-
mous by disco queen Gloria Gaynor. Not
surprisingly, the band does these songs
justice.
You have to cut down to the essen-
tial roots of a song to make it come to
life, especially when covering a song.
You have to think about what was go-
ing on when the song was written. What
made that person write that? What
makes you want to cover it' And how
are you going to let people know how
you feel about it? In an ironic sort of
way, it's hard work. Being an artist is
all about opening your mind, no limits.
But when you cover a song, in order to
do it justice and out of respect you place
limits on where it can and can't go.
To their credit Cake knows what a
groove is and they don't seem to have
any problems making somebody else's
song come to life.
Listen to this album when you're
out to have a good time. It's a bonus
that adds a little to any situation. Every
song is different and that's beneficial
when you're trying to get your groove
on.
The album is called Fashion Nug-
get. The group is Cake. The eatin's good.
SCREAM from page 6
There's nothing politically correct about
it No censorship, no backstabbing, no
lies. Hatred is above board, and there-
fore easier to deal with. In the South,
you never know who hates you or who
doesn't We're in a state of constant para-
noia.
A friend recently gave me a poster
that outlines this problem well. It lists
the little white lies that a particular North
Carolina senator (yeah, that's right the
famously bigoted one) would have us
believe to be true. I'll list them here for
your convenience. And what the hell, 111
point out their Southern inconsistencies,
too.
1. Family values: The family that
prays together stays together.
Okay, do you mean to tell me that
all those church-going folk who get di-
vorced were really worshipping Satan all
this time. Wow, thanks for clearing that
up. With the divorce rate now up to 60
percent 1 guess Satan's doing a better
job than God. Way to go, Satan.
2. Racism: It's just business as
usual
Yep, that's the South for ya. You
didn't really expect anything to change
after that whole civil rights thi.ig, did
you? The only thing that's changed is
how often those in power lie about their
true feelings.
3. Gun control: Guns don't kill
People kill.
Well if that's true then you don't
mind if 1 give these M 16's to these mon-
keys, do you? I mean, if all we're wor-
ried about is people, then take the guns
away from them and put them in the
hands of the more evolved simian. Guar-
anteed lower death rate.
4. Sex education: No sex is good
sex.
This is a statement from somebody
who has never had sex. Responsible sex
is good sex. Nuff said.
5. Censorship: "Freedom of ex-
pression" is for people who look and
think exactly like him.
I would say something about this,
but I'm not
6. Desegregation: We're flee,
white and 21, as we say in North Caro-
lina - Senator Jesse Helms, as quoted
in the New York Times in 1981.
So by now you've guessed who this
is I'm talking about First of all, I've
never heard anyone in this state say the
above quote besides the man himself.
And secondly, if he's 21, then I'm still a
fetus.
Let's have a reality check here,
people. The Southern mentality is aH
about ducking the issue at hand and
Jesse is a perfect example of this. He
deals with problems by dismissing them
out of hand. Simple one sentence an-
swers will solve them all, he seems to
think. But instead of shirking the re-
sponsibility, we Southerners need to
step up and embrace our difficulties.
They will be that much easier to deal
with and perhaps overcome.
Finally, to my grandmother all
people go to the bathroom and all
people stink, so instead of denying that
try to come to terms with your natural,
God-given odors. If you do, your chil-
dren will thank you And their children,
and their children, and
iu�&wL
The ECU Counseling Center offers life
skills workshops and personal growth groups
at no cost to you.To learn more about any of
the following opportunities, please contact the
Counseling Center by the deadline listed
for the item. Phone 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL STUDENT
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A CAREER
STARTING NEW RELATIONSHIPS
THE CRAZINFSS OF ROMANCE
I IFF AFTER BREAKUP
LEARNED OPTIMISM
PERSONALITYTYPES
Picow iicoitw incurs
COPING WITH LOSS
ANGER MANAGEMENT
BY OfT iS
SEXUAL ASSAULT
ALl BY OC 1
East Carolina University's Literary an$ Arts Magazine
JOIN THE 1997 REBEL STAFF
Be a part of an award-winning publication.
We need dependable and creative people
for editorial assistants, copy editors, illus-
trators and designers. Some positions are
PAID. Interested? Come by and fill out an
application at the Media Board Office on
the second floor of the Student Publications
Building, or call 328-6502.
v-� �
Centrally located on campus, in the Wrisht Building, just off Wright Circle
328-6731http:www.studentstores.ecu.edu
� Purpleville, NC
MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR CALENDAR: , DRESS RIGHT
SIDEWALK SALE HEXT TUESDAY. OCT. IS! DRESS PIRATE.





"TTiPrT nmniii!iiiiiawiir�iw � Tgiran
10
Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
Tickets doing
disappearing act
Women's soccer
splits games
Tracy Laubach
Staff Writer
So, you're all pumped up and
counting down the days until the foot-
ball team goes head on against N.C.
State, right?
Believe it or not, the grand finale
of the season is approaching quickly.
Now is the time to purchase your tick-
ets and make plans to attend what is
guaranteed to be one of the most ex-
citing college football games of the
year.
With more than 28,000 tickets
already claimed, a limited number of
tickets are available, but are expected
to sell quickly. At this time, seating is
available in both the upper and lower
decks for $25 and $38 respectively.
Any tickets that are not sold
within the next few weeks will be sent
back to Charlotte to be sold, and at
that time, will no longer be available
at the $10 student rate.
For all of you Pirate fans who are
planning on purchasing your tickets
the week of the game, not only are
the chances of getting tickets slim,
you will also be denied your student
discount Now is the time to get those
tickets.
The last time the Pirates faced
the Wolfpack was in 1991 in the Peach
Bowl when ECU came back to claim
a 37-34 victory. The last regular sea-
son game between the two schools
was in 1987 when ECU came away
from Raleigh with a 32-14 victory.
However, NCSU
still leads the over-
all series 12-7.
Traditionally,
the glme draws
huge crowds. This
year's game will
be no different.
The game will be
particularly spe-
cial because it rep-
resents a renewal
of rivalry, accord-
ing to Lee Work-
man, assistant ath-
letic director for
ticket sales and
promotions.
"This game
is a step forward
for East Carolina
University Work-
man said. "We will
be able to show
the entire state of
North Carolina what ECU is all about
by making a huge statement about
pride, class and spirit on national tele-
vision
The game, scheduled for Satur-
� mmm
day, Nov. 30th in Charlotte, will be
the first ever college football game to
be held at the Carolina Panthers'
Ericsson Stadium.
The rivalry with the Wolfpack is
one that contin-
ues to grow each
year and it is im-
portant to fill the
stadium with a
lot of purple and
gold to promote
school spirit
"The ECU
NC State game
carries with it
such a rich tradi-
tion of rivalry
Workman said.
"This is a chance
for ECU to shine
and show the
whole state how
terrific our pro-
gram truly is
Tickets are
currently being
sold for the $10
student rate, and
can be purchased
"We will be able to
show the entire
state of North
Carolina what
ECU is all about
by making a huge
statement about
pride, class and
spirit on national
television
� Lee Workman, assistant
athletic director for ticket
sales and promotions
Goin'
Deep
Unitas award nominee
Marcus Crandell picks
his target. Crandell and
the rest of the Pirates
are prepareing to do
battle before a national
television audience,
Thursday night on
ESPN 2 at 8 p.m.
at the Athletic Ticket Office, which is
located directly adjacent to Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium. The office is open
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m
Photos by PATRICK IRELAN
(Above) The Lady Pirates
gather in front of their net
as they map out their next
move. (Right) Junior
Stacie Gause breaks
through the defense on
her way down the field,
Jon Lauterer
Staff Writer
The ECU women's soccer team
split two games this week beating
UNC-Wilmington and losing to Vir-
ginia Tech.
The bittle with the Seahawks
took place on Wednesday at Bunting
Field. The weather conditions were
less than ideal, but the Lady Pirates
seemed right at home on a soggy field.
ECU started the game showing
agile pass control and effective mus-
cling of the ball from their opponents.
The women's team showed a
great deal of determination because
they hadn't won a conference game
up to this point. Now. in front of a
home crowd, the Pirates had their
chance.
As the first half was winding
down, it appeared that the Pirate de-
fense was breaking up. The Seahawks'
goalkeeper was looking impenetrable
as well.
Just a few minutes into the sec-
ond quarter, the Seahawks' goal-
keeper received a fierce kick to the
head. She did not leave the game, and
after a few minutes of composing her-
self, she was ready to begin play again.
Then one of the most well coor-
dinated plays this team has pulled off
this season occurred. Midfielder Mel-
issa Rucker passed to midfielder team
captain Stacie Gauss, who then
crossed the ball from the right of UNC-
W's touchline tc Stacie Schott for a
monster header.
This play left Wilmington dumb-
founded and bewildered, making it.
impossible for them to catch up. Then
came the frustration fouls by the
Seahawks, resulting in a yellow card.
When the final whistle sounded,
ECU were the victors by a score of 1-
0.
"It feels pretty good to get a con-
ference win Head Coach Neil Rob-
erts said. "The girls played hard. They
played really well in the first half.
Credit IUNC Wilmington for hanging
in the game. Keeping the score 0-0 at
half-time
The Sunday game with Virginia
Tech proved to be a tough challenge
for the Pirate team.
The Hokies jumped on the board
early in the game with a goal by
Denise Williams in the fifth minute.
ECU attempted a barrage of shot
attempts on the Hokie goal, but all
came up short. The Hokies shut out
the Pirates 4-0.
All was not lost at the half, but
the Hokies of Virginia were too
pumped up. They scored three times
within ten minutes. The Pirates
couldn't recover from that point on.
"We got beat bad today by a good
Virginia Tech team Roberts said.
"We have to put this one behind us
and get on with it We have a big game
to get ready for on Wednesday night
(Richmond)
ECU's record now stands at 5-5-
1 and 1-2 in the CAA.
The Lady Pirates will square off
with the University of Richmond this
Wednesday for the first time ever. The
match will be in Richmond and will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
Loss suffered in overtime
Pirates fight the
good fight, but
come up short
Jon Lauterer
Staff writer
Photo by CHRIS GAYODSH
The fans were freezing on the
benches this past Friday, but the play-
ers were sweating up a storm in an
intense battle between the ECU men's
soccer team and the visiting Jackson-
ville Dolphins at ECU's Bunting Field.
"It was a strange game Head
Coach Will Wiberg said. "But is
started out well
It appeared to be a good start for
Friday's game when sophomore for-
ward Wyatt Panos assisted to fresh-
man midfielder Robert Hyatt for a
Pirate goal. Panos has been playing
all season with a broken jaw, but the
Swansboro native has still managed
to start every game.
ECU played an intense first half
and it showed going into halftime.
The Pirates concluded the first
half leading the Dolphins 2-1, but Jack-
sonville still had some hat tricks left
for the Pirates in the second half.
Freshman midfielder Brian
Denoo was injured by the Dolphin
goalie at the beginning of the half,
and had to be helped off the field.
The game continued to become
more like football Americana as the
second half got underway. The ECU
bench was livid when senior
midfielder Kevin Johnson was issued
a red card.
Jacksonville took advantage of
the call and scored from a penalty
kick, leaving the score 3-2 still in
ECU's favor.
Soon after, on the 85th minute
of play, the Dolphins tied the score at
3-3, forcing the game into overtime.
Just before the end of regulation,
senior midfielder Darrec Jones was
ejected for foul language, marking the
end of the game for the Pirates.
"We played well on our part
Wiberg said. "Everything just unrav-
eled in the end
When overtime began, so did the
Jacksonville bombardment on the
ECU goal. The Dolphins scored three
goals during overtime, leaving the fi-
nal score at 6-3 Jacksonville.
"We played really competitively
for the first 80 minutes of the match
Wiberg said. "Unfortunately, circum-
stances beyond our control cost us the
game
ECU now goes 1-6 on the year
with conference play slated to begin
later this month.
The Pirates are now preparing for
a big game with the Wolfpack of N.C.
State on Wednesday. The game will
be played at Bunting Field with a 3
p.m. kickoff time.
SRC to open this fall
The ECU volleyball team
was defeated by N.C. State last
week in a make-up match due to
Hurricane Fran.
The Wolfpack swept ECU in
three games, 15-0, 15-7, 15-3.
The Pirates now hold a 5-14 over-
all record.
Freshman Shannon Kaess
led ECU offensively, totalling 11
kills. The defensive leader was
Kari Koenning with 16 digs.
The team will take a few
days off before resuming normal
practice. The Pirates will be on
the road Saturday, Oct. 12
against College of Charleston.
Then on Sunday, Oct 13, the Pi-
rates will take on Wofford Col-
lege. Both matches are set to
begin at 1 p.m.
t
Jason Freeman and Brett
Rowley of ECU advanced to the sec-
ond round of play at the Southern
Collegiate Championships Friday.
iRowley began in a preliminary
rouad match with Anshoomen Aga
of Troy State. After defeating Aga
6-0, 6-1 he advanced to the first
round of the division three flight.
Rowley then defeated Vinicius
Carmo of UT-Chattanooga in a hard
fought three set match 6-3, 4-6, 7-6
(3).
Senior Freeman also advanced
with a 6-1, 64 victory over David
Walker of Sanford in the first round
of the Division four flight.
Roope Kalajo defeated Dennis
Topjc of Georgia State in a hard
fought 7-5, 6-3 match to win his
round. K�,lajo then played fourth
seeded Nic Chisholm.
Four other Pirates won their
opening matches but failed to ad-
vanced to the first round.
Junior Nils Alomar was de-
feated by second seed Patrick
Johannsson 6-1. 6-3 of Kentucky
in the first round of the Division
two flight Alomar had advanced
after winning his preliminary three
set match with South Florida
Silviv Niator 6-2, 5-7, 6-4.
Sophomore Kenny Kirby was
defeated in his first round match
of the division two flight by fifth
seed Joey Pitts of Georgia 64,6-1.
Freshman, Daniel Prevelic was
defeated 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 by Pedro
Pacheco of Central Florida in his
preliminary round match.
Sophomore Derek Slate lost
his match 6-1,6-2 to Souheil SWcil
of South Florida.
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
One of the most exciting things
happening in Rec Services this se-
mester will be the opening of the
Student Recreation Center (SRC).
The SRC is near completion and
will be opening soon this fall. The
SRC will provide over 150,000
square feet of activity space to bet-
ter meet your recreational needs.
If you don't have your own
sports equipment the SRC will pro-
vide a wide variety at the Equipment
Check-Out Center. The check-out
area includes hundreds of items
ranging from basketballs and
racquetballs, to swim goggles and
frisbee discs.
See REC page 11
What to look for in the new
Student Recreation Center-
�sports forum
�weight training and cardiovascular
�center
�aerobic studios
�four pools
�15 mile track
�adventure program center
�indoor climbing wall
�seven racquetball courts
�handball court
�fitness assessment center
�juice bar
�equipment check-out center J





smmmmmmm
smmmammmmmmm
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 8,1996
11
JKJCVj from page 10
The sports forum is made up of
six multipurpose courts. These
courts can accommodate basketball,
volleyball, badminton and special
events. A landbridge separates the
courts and serves as an observation
area.
If you want to get started on a
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
U
P
T
O
w
N
COME JOIN US FOR BREAKFAST AND
RECEIVE A FREE
COURTSIDE CAFE COFFEE CUP
MONDAY � FRIDAY 8:00 -10:30
(Serving Greenville &nce 1950
L
Lurch is served from 10:30 - 5:00, Monday - Friday
757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
The ECU Student Media Board
is seeking two students to
work on special projects
currently under development.
Both projects require immediate help arA should
be completed before the end of the Fall term.
Continuing employment in the department upon
completion of the projects will depend upon the
individual's abilities and availability.
1) NEEDED: A student who is proficient in
developing applications in Filemaker Pro 3.0.
2) NEEDED: A student graphic artist who can
aid in developing several identity items.
For more information, call 328-6009. To apply
come by the Media Board office on the second
floor of the Student Publications Building.
ECU STUDENT MEDIA
We offer the experience of a lifime!Jg
fitness program when the SRC
opens, sign up for a free fitness as-
sessment which will start you on
your path to fitness. The center is
designed to provide computerized
information related to cardiovascu-
lar endurance, muscular strength,
flexibility and body composition.
The office is located on the second
floor.
The weight training and cardio-
vascular fitness center is over
10,000 square feet, with brand new
Cybex equipment, free weights and
the latest in cardiovascular equip-
ment.
There are three separate aero-
bic rooms - two suspended maple
wood floors and one with special-
ized multipurpose carpet. Each of
the multipurpose aerobic studios
measure more than 2,000 square
feet providing various types of ac-
tivities.
This room will help to accom-
modate martial arts and special ac-
tivities. Activities include, aerobics,
dance, martial arts, yoga and other
fitness activities.
For all you swimmers, the nata-
torium gives you the opportunity to
choose from four different pools.
The third pool features a four-lane.
26-yard pool suitable for lap swim-
ming, water polo and water basket-
ball.
The second pool consists of a
four-lane, 19-yard pool area, de-
signed for aqua aerobics, instruc-
tional swim classes and free-play op-
portunities. The leisure pool is made
up of multiple jet swirl activity with
heated water and bench seating. The
outdoor pool is suitable for a re-
freshing dip, water volleyball and
water basketball. Surrounding the
outdoor pool is a large deck with
pool furniture to meet your sunbath-
ing needs.
A suspended track will be avail-
able for runnerswalkers. It has a
suspended one-fifth mile, three lane
track with pace clocks and direc-
tional signs. The track is equipped
with a special surface thatprotects
you from obtaining injuries.
On the far end of the sports fo-
rum is the indoor climbing wall,
which is a massive. 28-foot high struc-
ture with varying routes designed on
a curved reposition panel system.
Climbing shoes and harnesses will be
available to rent for beginners or ad-
vanced climbers.
On the second floor you can
choose from seven regulation rac-
quetball courts and one handball
court.
The SRC offers separate locker
rooms for men, women and one
unisex locker room. The locker rooms
are equipped with showers, lockers,
swimsuit dryers and a free towel ser-
vice. They are all handicap accessible.
Before or after you participate
in an activity, the SRC has a juice
bar so one can grab a healthy snack,
spectate. study and relax. The juice
bar carries an assortment of healthy
foods supplied by Aramark, includ-
ing bagels, soft pretzels, juices and
much more.
For more information call Rec
Services at 328-6387.
?$8
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
.NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758-6909
e�
CHARADES f
Costume Shoppe A
A Division of At Batte, Ltd. m
All the world's a stage and we're here to put you in character. Jt
It's Co$xMcn.em
Pick up tickets for
Southern Miss, game
beginning today at
11:00 a.m.
Party Time
And we have it all for Halloween - For all ages! f
��������-
Look for complete
coverage of Thursday's
nationally televised
game in Thursday's
East Carolinian.
W Jk WEB OCTOBER
M? iV?TH - 12TH
77th Anniversary 1920 -1996 And Still Growing
Owned and operated by the American Legion Posts of Greenville, Farmville & Ayden
(JWSjtfcft-j
vaK
mammm
BUILDINGS
MAIN EXHIBIT BUILDING
Agricultural and Commercial. Eastern Carolina
shows off its regional pride by displaying its
bountiful AGRICULTURE, flourishing INDUSTRY,
quality EDUCATION and SCIENTIFIC and
ENVIRONMENTAL pursuits.
SWINE BUILDING
SWINE & SMALL ANIMALS plus: KIDS PETTING
ZOO!
SHEEP & LAMB BUILDING
Wednesday, October 9, 6:00 PM Pitt County
Lamb Show
Wednesday, October 9, 7:30 PM Flock Show
Saturday, October 12, 10:00 am Open Lamb
Show for ALL of Eastern North Carolina
EXPANDED SHOWING!
CATTLE BUILDING
Eastern North Carolina's finest Cattle, Steers,
Horses and BIG FARM ANIMALS. Plus: Open
Heifer Show, Saturday, October 12, 3:00 PM
18 BUILDING FARM MUSEUM
Finest exhibit of its kind in the South! Building
after building of Pure Nostalgia plus the 500
HP Sawmill Steam Engine. A must see!
0
e
o
9
0
THE 1996 MIDWAY
AMUSEMENTS OF AMERICA America's
largest carnival company (1996 Guinness Book
Of Records) will bring its big Atlantic unit to
Greenville with 35-40 Thrilling Rides, Shows,
Music, Mirth and Memories. As usual, the
BIGGEST Midway East of Raleigh!
0
1996 FREE ATTRACT�
Children of all ages will love the Barnyard located
in the swine building! A wonderful collection of
animals to feed, touch and hold. Small charge for
Pony Rides! Sponsored by Turnage Insurance
Co.
Merry Heart and Co One of the finest Puppet
Shows for kids in the nation today! 3 shows
nightly, Mon-Sat. Independent Midway.
Sponsored by Home Savings Bank of
Greenville.
Wild Heart Entertainment! 2 shows nightly
consisting of Linda Hawley and Country, The
Wild Heart Chicken Show for kids and Wild
Heart Karaoke. Tuesday, Wednesday &
Thursday at the Grandstand.
Demolition Derby in the Grandstand.
Saturday night, 7 PM. The Pitt County Fair
Demolition Derby promises to bring you
action-packed thrills never seen in this area
before!
Lilliana and Her Leopard & Panther Show in
the Big Steel Arena! The wonderful animal show
that thrilled fair goers in 1991 is back by popular
request! independent Midway. Sponsored by
Garris-Evans Lumber Co. of Greenville.
Jamie Garcia's spectacular circus acts including
the chilling Motorcycle "Globe of Death" act
that thrilled our fairgoers in 1995. The "Circo De
Spectacular" returns again! Main Midway.
Sponsored by Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of
Greenville.
The old 1916 CAROUSEL ORGAN will belt
out Midway Music on the Main Midway all night
every night again this year, as well as the
GIANT GERMAN FAIRGROUND ORGAN,
built in Germany in 1895! Independent & Main
Midways. Sponsored by Hooker &
Buchanan Insurance Co.
Thursday ECU Students $2.00 w Student ID
From Campus take 10th St. to Hastings Ford. Take a left and the fair is 1 mile on your left. (
�� �





1
12
Tuesday, October 8,1996
The East Carolinian
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the fall!
Short walk to campus. WoodUtum Apts. - next
to Alpha Omicron Pi house. 3 bedrooms, 2
12 baths, mint condition. 5th Street Square
- Uptown � Above BW3, 3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths, sunken living area. Luxury Apartment
Also available - "The Beauty Salon" � 3 bed-
room apartment If you see it you'll love it!
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
FREE OCTOBER RENT! 1 or 2 roommates.
3 bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse. ECU bus
service, extra nice. $200 rent 13 bills, call
75SQ329.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE four
bedroom apartment at Tar River. $170
month plus 14 utilities. No deposit required.
Call Jamie or Jonathan at 7518024.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 bedroom, 2 bath condo on Breezewood
Drive. Fire place, vaulted ceilings, washer dry-
er hook-up,dUhwasher,AC, baloney, pool, own
bathroom. Great Apartment Great price. Free
cable. Call Nancy at 321-2969.
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 bath townhouse; 3
blocks from campus, wd, dishwasher, pets
o.k pool, very nice, available now, call 931-
0700.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
apartment 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, supermarket and laundro-
mat Rent includes utilities, phone and ca-
bk. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2 BR
apartment; Rent is $16750 per month. Non-
smoker preferred and must like cats! Please
ol 3534994. Thanks.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
AVAILABLE � 1 bedroom apartment Walk-
ing distance to ECU campus. 524 sq. ft Large
walk-in closet washerdryer hookup. Water,
sewer, basic cable. $340.00 per month. No
pets allowed. Call Wooddiff Rentals @ 758-
5005
WANTED: MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
month phone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
ROOMMATE WANTED: CLOSE TO cam-
pus, pets welcome, smokers welcome, spa-
cious living, central heatair. 116 A North
Jarvis Street Call 413-0957 or 551-3242.
roommate wanted to share a two
bed,bath,kitchen and living room fully fur-
nished apartment Low rent and ask for Brian
551-3766.
ROOMMATE WANTED: SHARE LARGE 3
brm25 bath townhouse near Greenville Ath-
letic Club. Very nice with lots of room. $270
month and 12 utilities. Call 355-6457.
DIAMOND BACK RACING MOUNTAIN
bike: Very light aluminum frame, LXXT
components. Manitou adjustable shock, ton
of accessories, all totaling $1400.00. First
$700.00. Call Jason at 551-3844.
LAPTOP COMPUTER $250; MOUNTAIN
bike nevV $200. Pioneer CD Player like new
$200. Electric guitar and amp $?. Answer-
ing machine wphone $40 new. David 754-
2862, leave message.
CARDIOGLIDE. LIKE NEW. $170.00. Ne-
gotiable. Includes users manual. Call Donna
at 7564857.
CAR STEREO: 2 ORION XTR 12" speak
ers for $100 and a Rockford Fosgate Punch
60, cost $360, will sell for $230. All equip-
ment not used more than 6 months.
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE, 303
S. Evans St (Mall) across from Courthouse.
Tue-Wffinurs. 10am4pm 757-2740
FOR SALE FOUR BIG male AKC Rottweil-
er pups. Ready to go 1011. Dam and sin
local. Both with good bloodline and tempera-
ment Call Shawn 931-0993.
ACOUSTIC YAMAHA GUITAR. MODEL
FC-401. $250.00. Call Suzanne 328-8010.
Help
Wanted
For Sale
FOR SALE - portable drafting board $40;
stationary exercise bike with large seat $50;
set TV trays $10. After 5:30 pm 758-5712.
1987 LINCOLN TOWN CAR fully loaded -
dark blue - leather interior, cold AC. Need
the money $800.00. 749-5932 Leave mes-
sage.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT J
WITH PRESENTATION OF THIS!
COUPON
TOt&lc �mmm$m
i
i
i
I and 2 Bedroom Ranfc. Refridgerator.Wuhcr. j
Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units, i
Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER, SEWER, CABLE
ffgmdftmm 0twt�
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
Mmftm "PtvUt-
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, S
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
108 A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday and Sunday, 12-opm
If
Help
Wanted
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crew more. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext.
L53622
COOK AND WAITSTAFF NEEDED at Em
erald City Grill. Must be available at lunch.
Apply in person or call before 11:00 a.m. or
after 2:00 p.m. Stanton Square. Call 758-
3134.
CREDIT REPAIR MANUAL: ESTABLISH
AAA credit Get out of debt Learn how to
improve, repair and increase your credit Free
information. Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope. Opportunities Unlimited, P.O. Box
3891, Greenville.NC,27836.
AMBITIOUS, DEPENDABLE, MARKET-
INGBUSINESS MAJOR needed to prom-
ote and run rental business in Greenville
area. New promotional productgame, nev-
er seen before in NC. Hours are flexible, must
have own transportation, compensation lim-
ited only by skills, dedication, and time. Call
758 - 0240, 5PM to 9 PM.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
m
Sf
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to 525-S45 'hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan. Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, calk (206) 971-
3570 ffct J53626
BROWS IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
week fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
withthe fashionsaccessories you love to
wear. Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure, and
Young Men's. Flexible schedules for the
"early birds" (10am-2pm) or "night owls"
(12pm-9pm or 6pm-9pm) Ail retail posi-
tions include weekends. Merchandisecloth-
ing discount offered. Applications accepted
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 12-5pm,
Brody's, The Plaza and Carolina East Mall.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii; Mexico, Caribbean, etc Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
I AM LOOKING FOR a few good people to
work with me on a part-time or full time
basis to earn some serious money. Call Da-
vid 752-9610.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext
C53627
PART TIME ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE:
Assist with account inquires, billing, and
process credit applicationspayments. 25-29
hours per week. Schedule includes: 12pm
(or lpm) to 6pm plus Saturdays. Schedule
will require eveningSunday hours for holi-
day Shopping season. Additional entry level
office support person needed - Data Entry.
Input merchandise transfersprice changes.
10 Key by touch necessary. Great office
hours: 12:00pm (or lpm) to 6:00pm Mon-
day-Friday. For information call Brody's.
Hulffln Resources Dept The Plaza: 756-
3140.
DAY CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED at The
Children's Learning Tree. Call 752-6593 bet-
weeri6:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m Work around
schedule.
AFTER SCHOOL CAREGIVER NEEDED
for 4 children aged 5 to 10. References and
reliable car with seat belts required. Call 758-
2106 or 758-3077 after 5 pm.
SZECHUAN EXPRESS PLAZA MALL
needs part-time cashier (15-20 hrs)week. No
phone calls please. Apply in person 11-9.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS, WAITRESS
ES, and hostesses at Riverside Seafood &
Steaks, Washington, NC. Experience Re-
quired. Call Cheryl Lee at 946-3830.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Board other bene-
fits. For info, can (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
SPRINC BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLAS'H TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
Services
Offered
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-2X24
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.278 TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
Or. rush $2.00 to. Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Aye, J206-RR. Los Angeles. CA 90025
(faxtypottp & tftntA
Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
�Parties
�Weddings
�Corporate Events
�Special Events
3Ce also rent tables and chairs
tc( tmmtt
752-1988
Terrv Peaden

Travel
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Co Free! Bahamas Cruise S279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399. Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-67&6386
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds of student representatives are already
earning free trips and lots of cash with
America's 1 Spring Break company! Sell
only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun, Baha-
mas, Mazatlan, Jamaica or Florida! Campus
Manager Positions Aiso Available. Call
Now! Take A Break Student Travel (800)
95-BREAK!
WANTED! INDIVIDUALS, STUDENT OR-
GANIZATIONS and Small Groups to Prom-
ote Spring Break Trips. Earn money and free
trips. Cal the nation's leader, Inter-Campus
Programs, http:www.icptcom 1-800-327-
6013
Pk
Greek
Personals
MMP JUST DOESN'T STOP! Whether you
party to "Crease Alanis, and 311 or Jay-Z,
DeLa. and 112. Mobile Music Productions
has you covered. Call Lee at 7584644. Dates
filling fast
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
TWO OPENINGS IN HOME day care. Ages
one year and up. Call 757-1353.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53628
Sports Horoscope - Soap Opera
Wanted
j
FREE T-SHIRTSI000. Credit Card fun-
draisers for fraternities, sororities & groups.
Any campus organization can raise up to
$1000 by earning a whopping $5.00VISA
application. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive FREE T-SHIRT.
attention all students! grants and scholar-
ships available from sponsors! no repay-
ments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$ for
info: 1-800400-0209.
1(1
Point Spreads - Scores�Irivin-
Even financial Markets,
stock quotes
24 hours a day!
1-900-868-2500 Ext 4244
$2.95 per rain.
Must be IByrs.
SenMCf (619-645-8434)
Personals
CHASON RICKS: I WANT you meanest,
cleanest longest Wednesday we danced
and we danced a lot Thursday we'll dance
and we'll dance a lot! K-Dog!
Why wonder about
tomorrow vvhen you
can call for answers
today!
Speak with our
Live 24 hours
1-900-562-4000
Ext.4177
$3 99 per minute
Must be IB yrears
Serv-U (619)645-8434
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD, SILVER, Jewelry-Als Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer ,
tu.plnt Swap Shop
m
L
Greek
Personals
WE HAVE TO HAND it to our sister soror-
ities: Zeta Tau Alpha and Pi Delta. PB's will
never be the same! Thanks to Phi Tau, Phi
Psi, and special thanks to our guests, Tau
Kappa Epsilon for showing us how to break
it down on the dance floor! Love, Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS DELTA ZETA
GIRLS on the volleyball shut-out against Chi
Omega! Ada and Monica did a great job ser-
vin' it up! Good luck in the games ahead!
Love, your sisters
CONGRATULATIONS ON GETTING
INTO the nursing program: Melissa Godwin,
Stephanie Sutton, Lisa Woodlief, Christie
Joyner, and Camille Glenn. Your Alpha Phi
sisters are proud of you and love you
ZETA TAU ALPHA AND Delta Zeta, the
sister sorority social was great! We had a
blast! Can't wait to do it again! Love the sis-
ters and new members of Pi Delta.
TO THE BEST NEW member mom in the
world. Thank you for your hard work and
dedication. It is greatly appreciated. Love the
new members of Delta Zeta.
Announcements
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA, WE enjoyed hav-
ing a social with all of you last Thursday
night. Love, Delta Chi.
CONGRATULATIONS EXTENDED TO
SIGMA Pi for its first win of the season in
the playoffs. Let's try and play the season
next year Larry.
PI DELTA KAPPA PLEDGES, you guys are
doing a great job! Thanks for your awesome
participation at Parents Weekend, sister so-
rority, and especially grab-a-date! Ya'll are
crazy and we love you. Stay awake, there's
more t come, like your bigs! Keep up the
good work. Love, the sisters.
DELTA CHI: THANKS FOR the pre-down-
town at PB's Thursday night We all had a
blast! Let's get together again some time!
Love, Gamma Sig
PI KAPPA PHI - Thanks for the time and
effort put into a successful tail-gate! Our par-
ents enjoyed it. Love, the Zetas.
TOXIC WASTED IS WHAT we got Alpha
Sig house was the spot. Oh yeah the paint
was everywhere. On our clothes, on our face,
but we didn't care. Dives off the stairs and
dips in the pool, this second annual social
was definitely cool! Thursday night's memo-
ries will keep up laughin Thanks Alpha Sig
guys for makin' it happen! Love the sisters
and pledges of Delta Zeta.
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to thank the he-
lios for coming over and hanging out Hope
to do it again.
ZETA'S WAY TO PLAY the game-we're so
glad you came- to see our victory and watch
us go down in history! Good game Alpha Xi
Delta. Love Zeta.
THANK YOU TRACI SORRELL for doing
such a great job with Parents Weekend. It
was a huge success! Love your Alpha Phi
sisters!
PHI PSI: THANKS FOR being our dates
Wednesday night at PB's! B.O.B. and the
gang: Don't worry about being put in B.H.
The Delta Pi's still luv ya! See you soon, of
course. Love you. the notorious sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta.
SIG EP - Thanks for the great time Wednes-
day night Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
THANK YOU ALPHA OMICRON Pi for
coming over and showing our old guys some
rave dances. We had a great time. Especially
Big Joe.
SGA OFFICERS: ALPHA PHI would like
to say thank you for all the hard work you
do for us and every other ECU student We
appreciate you dedication.
TO THE BIG SISTERS of Delta Zeta. With
your crazy clues who was to know that you
were the ones we wanted so. Thank you big
sisters for all you have done. You were defi-
nitely worth the wait. Love your little Delta
Zeta sisters.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS AND Al-
lies for Diversity. Our next meeting will be
Oct 9 in room 221 of Mendenhall Student
Center at 7:30 p.m. We hope to see you all
there.
TUES, OCT. 8 - Big River-Adventures of
Huck FinruProduction of ECU Dept of Thea-
tre Arts and the School of Musk; ticket in-
formation call 328-6829. Messick Theatre,8
pm Toe. Oct. 8 - Guest Recital, "music of
Desenclos. Bonneau and Milhaud Anjan
Shah, saxophone. AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8 pm: Wed, Oct. 9 - Senior Recital, Will
Tynch, saxophone. AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7 pm: Fri, Oct. 11 - Senior Recital, Russell
Tinkham, tuba, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
pm Fri, Oct 11 - Jazz at Night directed by
Carroll V. Dashiell Jr The Great Room, Men-
denhall, 8 pm; Sat, Oct. 12 -Junior Recital,
Erik Harris, euphonium, AJ Fletcher, 4 pm;
Sat, Oct. 12 - Graduate Reciatl, Heather
Struber, basson, AJ Fletcher, 7 pm, Mon,
Oct 14 - Wind Chamber MusicThe Music
of Beethoven and Poulenc" featuring Nathan
Williams, clarient Christine Gustafson, flute,
Christopher Ulffers, bassoon, Petrea War-
neck, oboe, Eileen Cress, horn, Barbara Mc-
Kenzie, piano, AJ Fletcher, 8 pm.
LEARN CLIMBING SKILLS TO help you
explore new heights! Learn all the basic skills
of climbing and belaying at the Recreation-
al Services Climbing Tower on Oct 10 & 14
from 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm at the Climbing Tow-
Announcements
er. Register one business day before each
session in Christenbury 204. For more info
call Rec Services 328-6387.
EVERYONE REMEMBERS THE VIET
NAM Wall. Visit The Wall of ECU October
14 & 15, 9 am - 2 pm in front of The Wright
Place.
RESEARCHING "ACID PARK" LEGEND.
Need your version of "Acid Park" story and
your experiences there. Please call Folklore
Archive: 328726 (Dr. Karer. Baldwin) or
328389 (David Dilts or Amy Spruill)
LEARN MORE ABOUT ADVENTURE
skills with the Outdoor Living Skills Work-
shops. On Oct 15 at 7:00 pm the Adventure
Program is offering a Knot Tying workshop.
Register by Oct 11 in 204 Christenbury. For
more info call Rec Services 328387.
CLIMB TO GREAT HEIGHTS! Recreation-
al Services is offering a Linville Corge Climb
Weekend, Oct 25-27. Breath taking scenery'
is common place in Linville Gorge as you
climb top rope and multipitch. Previous
climbing experience is a must Interested in-
dividuals must register in 204 Christenbury
by Oct 14. For more info call Rec Services
328387.
THEATRESPORTS! THE PEOPLEACT
IMPROVISATIONAL Ensemble will host an
evening of TheatreSports on Saturday. Oct
19 at 8:00 p.m. in the Jaycee park Auditori-
um. TheatreSports is an evening of competi-
tive improvisation performed by two teams
based on audience suggestions. We promise
a night full of laughter and fun! Come join
us! Tickets are $5 at the door. For more info
call 321028.
SHOOT FOR YOUR GOALS! Recreational
Services Intramural Sports Program is hav-
ing a SoccerPreview Registration meeting
Oct 14 at 5:00 pm in MSC 244. For more
info call Rec Services 328387.
GREENVILLE NOW (NATIONAL ORGAN-
IZATION for Women) will meet Wednesday.
Oct 9 at 5:30 p.m. at the Szechuan Garden
Restaurant Program topic "Domestic Vio-
lence Speaker A representative from New
Directions. For information, call 758973
or 756-1811.
TIME TO GET IN shape! Recreational Serv-
ices Lifestyle Enhancement Program is of-
fering a second aerobic .ession. Register for
the Aerobic Session today thru OcL 9 from
8 am - 5 pm in 204 Christenbury. For more
info call Rec Services 328387.
MILAN NEXT MEETING, OCT. 10, 19,
GCB 1010 @ 5:00 pm. An organization based
on preserving the culture of India in Ameri-
ca. Open to all ECU students.
ECU LAW SOCIETY: ALL majors are wel-
come to attend our next meeting on Tues-
day, Oct 8, at 5:15 p.m. in Ragsdale, room
218A. A guest speaker will be present and
refreshments will be served.
The East Carolinian
Advertising Department
is accepting applications
for the position of
Advertizing Repreefitalive
Please come by
The East Carolinian for an application.
Current resume is required.
Cl
College Agent Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good.Atademic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
jeffery H. Mahorwjf
217 Commerce 5t�
(919)355-??
The East
Carolinian
a s s i f i e
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25 add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
Ali Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.
ds
-njj1






Title
The East Carolinian, October 8, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 08, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1165
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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