The East Carolinian, October 3, 1996






THUIJS
October 3,1996
Vol72, No. 13
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
Aycock residents get spider scare
IHlfSJKi
Across The
Country
OWASSO, Ofcla. (AP) - A 4-
year-old girl choked to death on
a pebble she swallowed at a play-
ground. Lindsay P. Johnson and
a friend had been pretending to
bury each other in the gravel,
Undersheriff Jim Hicks said. The
girl's mother tried the Heimlich
maneuver to dislodge the pea-
size stone, but it didn't work.
MIAMI (AP) -At stake for
thousands of legal immigrants
are their federal welfare ben-
efits, which will be cut off un-
der legislation approved by Con-
gress.
The law is expected to push
many to apply to become Ameri-
cans. Petitions for naturaliza-
tion have surged in the past 18
months for several reasons, in-
cluding the debate over welfare
reform and other measures that
take aim at immigrants.
BOSTON (AP) - Widely pre-
scribed hormone pills that com-
bine estrogen and progestin ap-
pear to be just as effective as
straight estrogen in preventing
heart disease after menopause,
a study concludes.
Many women take hormone
supplements to ease the hot
flashes and other symptoms of
the change of life. Some stay on
the pills for many years to re-
duce the risk of heart disease
and broken bones.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Hu-
mans are responsible not only
for depletion of the ozone layer,
a new study concludes, but also
for a cooling trend that scien-
tists have observed in the up-
per atmosphere during the last
few decades.
Since 1979, satellites have
seen temperatures drop about
one degree in an atmospheric
layer roughly 10 miles above
Earth's surface, even as lower
regions of the atmosphere have
warmed.
SEATTLE (AP) - Surpris-
ingly skinny mice created in a
Seattle genetics lab may offer
hints at why some people can
eat all they want and still stay
thin.
Researchers have found
that with a single genetic alter-
ation, they can turn up a natu-
ral metabolic furnace in mice so
the animals burn more fat. Ex-
perts said that people might
eventually be able to control
their weight by doing the same
thing, or by exploiting related
processes.
IRONTON, Ohio (AP) -
Screaming obscenities, the
brain-damaged man accused of
setting a fire that killed nine
people at a fireworks store
pleaded innocent by reason of
insanity.
Defense attorney Richard
Wolfson said the 24-year-old has
the mental capacity of a 12-year-
old and cannot understand the
allegations or the consequences
of his actions. Hall underwent
a lobotomy in 1987 after falling
off a skateboard and hitting his
head.
Rumors may have
created
arachnephobia
Marguerite Benjamin
News Editor
Ashley Settle
Contributing Writer
Before Aycock Hall residents
pack their bags and move off Col-
lege Hill, they should be aware
that the residence hall's so-called
"deadly spider infestation" may not
be as serious a problem as some
have speculated.
Recently, a visitor of Aycock
Hall was hospitalized after being
bitten by a spider on the first floor.
The spider was identified as a
brown recluse, a poisonous spider,
similar to the black widow. Pest
Control sprayed the room immedi-
ately following the incident.
Brown recluse spiders are, as
their name suggests, a reclusive
species found mostly in dark,
wooded areas. These deadly spi-
ders are easily recognizable by
their violin-shaped bodies.
After the first-floor incident,
measures were taken to inform
residents of the problem and to
insure that no one
else was bitten.
Angela Greco,
a freshman resident
of Aycock, said her
resident advisor in-
formed students of
the proper precau-
tions they should
take in order to
avoid being in-
jured by spiders.
Greco said stu-
dents were asked
Chudney Halley, freshman
Nursing
"Yes, on campus but not
downtown it's scary
down there
Anltra Hughes, freshmen
Pre-med
"I don't go downtown
Jay Cochran, freshmen
undecided
"It's kinda rowdy
downtown, but safe on
campus
Yaqoob Mohyuddln,
Junior
AnthropologyPre-med
"With all the robberies
taking place downtown
and on campus. I'm
concerened about my
safety and that of others
as well
by their advisors to wear shoes
when inside the building and avoid
contact with dark places.
After hall advisors warned resi-
dents, several students called the
community service desk reporting
spiders in their rooms.
Other sightings of spiders
have occurred within the last
week. A sighting on the fourth
floor was checked by Pest Control
and they proceeded to spray the
room for safety precautions.
"The spiders that have been
reported recently have all been
small brown house spiders said
Inez Fridley of University Housing
Services. "After each call we have
received reporting a spider, we
have sent someone out to check
and spray the room
According to Aycock resi-
dents, rumors have been spread
that there is a nest of brown re-
cluse spiders in Aycock Hall.
"Maintenance investigated
the dorms and reported no sign
of spider inhabitancy. There has
been no confirmation that there
is a nest of spiders in Aycock
Hall Fridley said.
About the spider
Description: They are brown to tan with a darker "violin" shape on
their backs. Their bodies are about a quarter to a half inch long, and
they have long, slender legs.
Dwellings: They prefer out-of-the-way spots inside homes, especially
in atticks, basements and closets and dresser drawers that aren't opened
very often. Outside, they like piles of rocks and leaves.
The bite: If bitten by a brown recluse, one might feel a little sting,
but usually not any pain. After a few hours, one will start to feel pain
that may range from mild to severe. A rash and then blisters form at the
site of the bite. You may also feel weak and nauseous, start to vomit or
get fever and chilis.
What you can do: Clean the area around the bit with antiseptic,
and place an ice pack over the bite. Get to a doctor as soon as possible,
and take the spider with you so the doctor can be sure it was a brown
recluse.
What a doctor can do: There is no antidote doctors can give to bite
victims; however, a doctor can administer steroid drugs, antibiotics and
antihistamines. A skin graft may be needed to repair the damaged area
of skin around the bite.
To avoid being bitten: Shake out clothes and blankets you have
not worn or used for a while. Be careful aroud areas where you have
seen spiders before. Regularly clean up out-of-the-way places inside the
house, especially areas behind furniture, under beds and inside closets.
Graph Courtesy of wedmaster@KidsHealth.org.
'One card' to simplify
university access
Option ends need
for stickers, stripes
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
Students will soon have the con-
venience of one card to handle all of
their university services. ECU is tak-
ing steps to make university access
easier for students and staff.
A few years ago ECU felt the ne-
cessity to invest in a card access sys-
tem for the university that would
make the carrying of multiple cards
obsolete. ECU administrators created
the One Card Committee.
"We're a subcommittee of the
information resource committee,
which is looking for the existing uses
or needs of a system such as this
said George Harrell, assistant vice
chancellor of business affairs and co-
chairman of the One Card Commit-
tee.
According to Harrell, the school
envisions a card that will encompass
all aspects of life at ECU that involve
a card.
"There are presently seven differ-
ent variations of cards which are used
on campus Harrell said.
The committee is looking at ar-
eas like administration, student activi-
ties and affairs, the athletic associa-
tion and dining services as possible
uses of the new "one card
The new card will not involve
stickers or activity stripes which can
be lost or worn. When a student is
issued their new card an electronic
picture will be automatically taken,
like it is done for state drivers' li-
censes.
See ONE page 4
Renovations require more funds
Latest million
dollar bond not
enough
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
ECU needs more funding for
renovations and repairs around cam-
pus.
The $310 million state improve-
ment bond assisted ECU with the
renovations to the library. George
W. Harrell, Ph.D assistant vice
chancellor for facilities, knows ex-
actly how much the bond helped the
productions.
"What ECU received out of that
was money to build and remodel
Joyner Library Harrell said. "The
total was $30,308,900
Aside from the library, many
other campus areas are slated to be
improved in some way. Harrell said
that a new science and technology
building is ranked high on this list
"The highest priority capital
need for ECU is a new science and
technology building Harrell said.
"This would replace the antiquated
chemistry laboratory currently in
Flanagan, and provide laboratory
space for the School of lindustry and
Technology
Harrell said he is aware that this
kind of advancement does not come
without a price.
"This project is currently esti-
mated to cost $48,997,600 Harrell
said.
Hurricane
Fran did her
part in adding to
the university's
funding needs.
Harrell said that
damage was
done in various
parts of the uni-
versity.
"We had
damage to the
roof ventilation
system on
Minges Coli-
seum and roof
damage on Ward
Sports Medicine
Building and
Belk Allied
Health Build-
ing Harrell
said. "The School of Medicine re-
ceived damage to underpinning on
trailer units
Flooding caused damage at the
School of Nursing trailer with
around 18 inches of water above the
floor. Nine student automobiles
were damaged due to falling trees.
In order to pay for these dam-
"What ECU
received out of
that was money to
build and remodel
Joyner Library.
This project is
currently
estimated to cost
$48,997,600
� George W. Harrell, Ph.D
assistant vice chancellor for
facilities
ages, Harrell said that the univer-
sity is depending primarily on Fed-
eral Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) funds.
"We currently estimate the hur-
ricane damage at approximately
$245,000
Harrell said. "We
have filed a no-
tice of intent to
FEMA to recover
hopefully 75 per-
cent of our loss
Overall, the
funding of the
projects is just as
important as the
projects them-
selves. Harrell
realizes that as
long as the fund-
ing improves,
then so will the
outcome of the
projects.
"The repairs
and renovation
capital funding
that the university received in '96-
97, of $4,968,008, is the largest an-
nual amount for that purpose that
the university has ever received
Harrell said. "The continuation of
this program is exceptionally impor-
tant to the university, if we are to
continue to improve the quality of
the educational facilities at ECU
ugfe
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Thursday
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Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
u
Two Wake Forest students killed by drunken driver
Students at Wake Forest University are pulling together to mourn
the loss of two students who were killed by a repeat offender in a
drunken driving accident two weeks ago. �
Two sophomores, 19 year-old Julie Hansen of Rockville, Md and
19 year-old Maia Witzl of Arlington, Texas, were killed when a drunken
driver plowed into their car.
Thomas Richard Jones of Statesville was charged with one count
of driving while impaired and two counts of second-degree murder,
said Winston-Salem police Sgt Steve Newsome.
University of South Florida serves
alcohol on campus
Students and faculty who want to relax with a glass of wine or a
frozen margarita won't have to leave campus anymore.
Francesco's Italian Restaurant started serving alcohol Aug. 30.
Another restaurant on campus, Rockv's EmDtv Ketf. already serves
beer. Francesco's will be the first to serve liquor.
Owner Reno Agostinis said he believes the addition of alcohol will
add to the casual atmc phere in the restaurant Agostinis said he has
not decided what kind of specials he will offer to customers, but there
will be a happy hour every day from 4 to 7 p.m.
N. C. State's elections go unnoticed by many
Thirty-two Student Senate positions were up for grabs during this
fall's elections but less than half those seats were filled as voter turn-
out numbers plummeted from previous years' low figures.
Elections Board Chair Diane Heibel said 494 students - approxi-
mately 1.8 percent of the student body- voted in this year's fall elec-
tions. Close to three percent of the student population voted in last
year's fall elections.
Murderer comes up for parole at the
University of Tennessee
On Aug. 21,1988, a UT student named Thomas H. Baer was mur-
dered following a party at the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity house.
Jeffery R. Underwood was convicted of second-degree murder and
two counts of aggravated assault and was sentenced to 15 years in
prison. Underwood is up for parole for the sixth time in seven years.
His hearing is scheduled for Oct 9 at 9 a.m. The parents of Baer
and his former fraternity brothers are fighting against Underwood's
parole.
If the Tennessee Board of Paroles doesn't release Underwood on
parole this time, his sentence will eventually expire on Aug. 4, 2002,
said Cayle Barbee, director of the board of operations. If he earns extra
credits for good behavior, his date could be decreased monthly.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from various college
newspapers and CPS.

This month copies are just
3 cents each.
Biotechnology
makes advances
Conference unites
several fields
Jacqueline D. Helium
Senior Writer
By the time most of us now in
college reach retirement age, scien-
tists may have made advances
which will significantly extend the
human life span. That would be one
potential benefit of research being
done in the field of biotechnology.
In recognition of the impor-
tance of this science, a conference
will be held on Oct. 3, called
BioVision 2000. This conference
will bring together not only those
in the biotechnology field itself, but
also those in agriculture, politi-
cians, and university faculty and ad-
ministrators.
Dr. Wendall Allen, director of
biotechnology, will be one of those
going to the conference from ECU.
He detailed the development of bio-
See BIO page 4
East Carolina Playhouse
1996-97 Season7
Roger Miller and William Hauptman's
Tony Award-Winning Hit Musical
BIG RIVER
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
OCTOBER 3, 4, 5, 6 7 AND 8, 1996
RATED: PG
Archibald MacLeish's Pultizer Prize Winning Play
.B.
J
Photo by ANN JIVIDEN
From left to right, Dr. Lee Williams, Dr. Cindy Putnam-Evans,
Dr. A.C. Lamb, Dr. Charles Smith, Dr. Jean-Luc Scemama,
Dr. Edmond Stellwag and Mrs. Ulla Godwin pose before a
biotechnology display.
NOVEMBER 14. 15, 16, 17 18 AND 19, 1996
RATED: PG
An Exhilarating Evening of Dance
East Carolina Dance Theatre's
DANCE 97
FEBRUARY 6, 7, S. 9 10 AND 11, 1997
RATED: PG
Eric Bogosian's Explosive Drama of Anger and Angst
SUBURBIA
FEBRUARY 27. 28, MARCH 1,2. 3 AND 4, 1997
RATED: R
Aristophanes' Classic Comic Battle of the Sexes
LYSISTRATA
APRIL 17, 18, 19, 20V 21 AND 22, 1997
RATED. PG-13
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Or. by mail: fc ' Or. comr liv:
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 3,1996
Siemienska appointed to Rivers Chair
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
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Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
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Sherri Parrish
Contributing Writer
HymnSing 96 !
A Community-wide Celebration
OCTOBER 5 ,1996
I Minges Coliseum 7:00 PM
I
COME AND
JOIN 5000 OF
YOUR FRIENDS
AND
NEIGHBORS IN
PRAISING GOD
IN WORSHIP
AND SONG!
Sing a joyful
noise unto the
Lord!
Let everything
that has breath
praise the
Lord!Hal)elujah!
Psalms
ECU'S Office of International Af-
fairs announced the appointment of
the Thomas W. Rivers Chair for the
spring of '97, following approval by
the UNC Board of Governors.
Dr. Renata Siemienska, an inter-
nationally renowned professor of po-
litical science and women's studies,
was selected for the distinguished
position.
According to Dr. James A. Van
Fleet, assistant to the vice chancellor
of International Affairs and director
of International Affairs, the Rivers
Chair is a visiting professorship
awarded to a prominent international
figure. The purpose of the chair is
to lend an international dimension
to ECU'S campus and curriculum.
"This is a program which helps
bring distinguished academics from
other campuses and other parts of
the world to teach at ECU Van Fleet
said. "It highlights our efforts to be-
come more internationally aware.
The selec-
tion process for
the chair began
with the review
of applications
by the Rivers
Committee, con-
sisting of six
deans within the
university.
Then the
applicants were
ranked accord-
ing to estab-
lished criteria
which included
that the appli-
cant be well-1
published (scho-
lastically) in the field of international
studies and the degree of the appli-
cants' profile in international circles.
The requirements ensure that
the candidates will enhance the aca-
demic standing of ECU.
"We wanted a professor who
would contribute toward the process
"This is a program
which helps bring
distinguished
academics from
other campuses
and other parts of
the world to teach
at ECU
� Dr. James A. Van Fleet, the
River Chair
of our campus internationalism and
teach classes with
a broad appeal
Van Fleet said.
"We also wanted
an individual who
was anxious to in-
teract'with our fac-
ulty and students,
so even if a stu-
dent wasn't able to
take a class with
the professor
they could still
benefit. We want
the professor to
have an impact on
the greatest num-
ber of students
possible
Siemienska, who holds a doctor-
ate in political sociology, will fulfill
these expectations. She has held vis-
iting professorships and lectureships
at numerous universities throughout
Europe and the United States.
In addition, she has taught ex-
tensively at U.S. universities and is
well published in her field.
"Her specialty is women's issues
conferences Van Fleet said. He con-
tinued to say that Siemienska often
addresses the issues of women in poli-
tics, women's rights, and women's
economic status in a global fashion.
Tentative plans for such a con-
ference are in the works for the spring.
According to Jo Allen, special
assistant to the Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences, the tentative
conference will look at the status of
women in a variety of situations and
"the ways women are gaining ground
"We want to take advantage of
Siemienska's knowledge and exper-
tise on women in eastern European
nations Allen said. "We hope the
conference will appeal to faculty, stu-
dents and the community, as well as
scholars throughout the world
Siemienska recently spoke at the
ECU Women's Studies Brown Bag
lunch. The title of her address was
"Women and Politics in Eastern Eu-
rope
Ethics Bowl challenges 20 collegiate teams
Marina Henry
News Writer
Featuring a 1000 voice choir,
congregational singing, and nationally
acclaimed speaker Norm Nelson,
President of The Morning Chapel Hour.
Hard duly at 7 30 AM on 92 5 FM
Admission is FREE! � bring a friend!
Co-sponsored by the Christian Medical Dental Society, Campus Crusade, Promise
Keepers, and Pastors United for Revival of Greenville
ECU students have the oppor-
tunity to compete with other
schools in the fourth annual Eth-
ics Bowl, sponsored by Sears.
"Ethics have to do with the
most basic and fundamental rights
and wrongs of human beings Rob-
ert F. Ladenson, ethics professor at
Illinois Institute and founder of the
Ethics Bowl (TEB) said. "It has to
do with principles and how those
principles react in a person's life
and society as a whole
TEB is a student activity in-
spired by the College Bowl. Its pur-
pose is to increase the conscious-
ness of ethics.
"On one level, all people agree
that ethics are important. But
other things can obscure ethics.
This is a way to bring it back to
the forefront, while also being a
valuable way of teaching ethics
Ladenson said.
TEB consists of 20 teams, each
with three to five players. The stu-
dents are given a description of a
significant problem, such as cheat-
ing, plagiarism, dating, date rape,
abortion and marriage.
The players confer, come to a
conclusion, and the elected speaker
delivers the answer. Unlike the
College Bowl, TEB doesn't have a
definite right or wrong answer.
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A panel of judges rates each
reply on a scale, much like the
Olympic divers are rated. Their in-
dividual scores are combined to
reach the final score. There is no
right or wrong answer. The an-
swers are rated on clarity of re-
sponse, depth, content and focus
Ladenson said.
The team does not have to ac-
cept the final score. They can con-
fer among themselves and an-
nounce their acceptance of the
score or challenge it. If they chal-
lenge it, they are given a chance to
develop and deliver an answer that
is more concise, in-depth and to the
point.
"We prefer to have an element
of discussion and debate, rather
than a cut- and-dry right or wrong
Ladenson said.
The first Ethics Bowl, which oc-
curred in 1993, was not as polished
as this year's will be.
"It was full of really big kinks
Ladenson said. "We hadn't figured
out how to score the game yet. The
judges didn't like it, the players
didn't like it and I ended up being
the sole judge. It was a disaster. I
could see the anger that some of
my calls were making. It was clear
that one person could not judge the
event. We had to change the scor-
ing. But the experience was very
instructive
TEB will take place in Wash-
ington D.C. this spring. The dead-
line for registration is Jan. 17,
1997. The eight colleges that have
applied for TEB are the University
of Montana, Dartmouth, the U.S.
Air Force Academy, DePaul Univer-
sity, Illinois Institute of Technology,
Loyola University, the U.S. Military
Academy and Western Michigan
University.
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MMPIH
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Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
BIO
from page 2
technology and its importance for
TEC .
"Biotechnology developed out
of an understanding that occurred
back in the late 60's and early 70's
that the chemical nature of the
gene was DNA and that all species
were cellular based Allen said. "The
big advance came in the late 70's
when we learned to work with that
chemical material
Once scientists understood the
nature of DNA and how to manipu-
late it, other advances followed.
"It developed into a technology
ONE from page 1
Harrell said the new card will be
fabricated on the spot with the
student's personal bar code for library
services and a magnetic stripe for din-
ing services.
The new card will also include a
new feature found around campus- a
"junk stripe Many students have
found the access of the library copy
cards and vending cards to be effec-
tive, the new card's "junk stripe" will
follow the same concept of being able
to add on money at one's convenience
for vending purposes.
The new card will serve as an ID
card for recreational activities and to
buy athletic event tickets. The card's
proposal also includes use for student
government elections in the future,
which will increase efficiency and cut
down on controversy.
The "one card" is also going to
serve as a key to the proposed elec-
tronic key lockdown system which will
serve as the new security system for
the campus residence halls.
"We are in the final stages of the
project Harrell said. "This was facili-
tated by the university fiber optics
network being in place
The new fiber optics network and
the fact that the new library renova-
tions have been set to be compatible
with the new system are sure signs
of this new system being close to
completion.
"We plan to start re-carding stu-
dents during the spring of '97
Harrell said.
"We will be full stream carding
freshmen and transfer students by fall
of 97
that we call recombinant DNA tech-
nology, which means to put the
DNA together in different ways
Allen said.
Two of the benefits already re-
alized from DNA manipulation are
the products humulin and activase.
Humulin is a type of insulin devel-
oped by taking the insulin gene
from a human and putting it in a
bacteria, which then begins to pro-
duce insulin. That product is
humulin and is used for diabetics.
Activase is a clot-bursting en-
zyme which, if administered soon
enough after a person suffers a
heart attack, prevents damage to
the heart.
These advances and many oth-
ers demonstrate why biotechnology
is so important, and Allen says that
ECU has been at the forefront of
the field for many years.
"ECU got involved in biotech-
nology back in the early 1980's, and
this was a joint development be-
tween the School of Medicine's bio-
technology program, and the Arts
and Science's department of biol-
ogy. The School of Medicine has
Ph.D. and post-doctoral research,
and the College of Arts and Sci-
ences developed an undergraduate
concentration in biotechnology
Allen said.
ECU is also the only state in-
stitution that has a master's level
program in biotechnology, and is re-
sponsible for the founding of two
new companies in the field.
"This university is spinning off
two new Biotechnology companies,
Encelle Inc. and Epigenesis Allen
said.
Allen agreed that the advances
in this field may eventually pose
moral dilemmas for society, and
maybe even change the way our so-
ciety operates. For instance, if the
human life span were to be ex-
tended, as mentioned previously,
the age of retirement would prob-
ably change.
"We do address the potential
for ethical issues to arise, to inform
our students that society will have
to deal with this. Society is a multi-
faceted thing, and society will even-
tually have to work out how it's go-
ing to deal with this information
Allen said.
Society may eventually be
Mv. TU location
lyric;
Thursday
ER.CLAklFAT CLU&
80'S Retro Music
$4 Adm for member unfit 11pm
$1.50
-Bottle Beer?
$1.50 Hiialk
OntySSadm
Jot Members-
'JrrfjW
Frida1
Don Cox Band
Ticket Giveaway to ttggjgt
Saturda1
The AmateUfS Reggae Party!
Ticket Giveaway to WIDESPREAD PANIC
f0nH5adm
fr Members-
Ad v. Tix
S10.00
Tuesdav Oct 8
lit Mh&uU tufa. ZttU Peon epen 7�w
IRONICALLY, THE TIME TO START
SAVING FOR RETIREMENT IS WHEN IT LOOKS
LIKE YOU CAN LEAST AFFORD IT.
Can't afford to save for retirement?
The truth is, you can't afford not to.
Not when you realize that your retirement
can last 20 to 3o years or more. You'll want
to live at least as comfortably then as you
do now. And that takes planning.
Bv starting to save now, you can take
advantage of tax deferral and give your
money time to compound and grow.
Consider this: Set aside just $100 each
month beginning at age 5o and you can
accumulate over $172,109 by the time
vou reach age da. But wait ten years and
vou'll have to budget $219 each month
to reach the same goal.
Even if you're not counting the years to
retirement, you can count on TIAA-CREF
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Over 1.8 million people in education and
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Call today and learn how simple it is
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vour side.
Start planning your future. Call our Enrollment Hotline at 1 800 842-2888.
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.SM
changed in very significant ways be-
cause of advances in biotechnology,
and Allen says that is why it is so
important. The reason that so many
people from outside this field have
been invited is to try to educate a
wider range of people about the
impact of biotechnology.
"The purpose of the confer-
ence is to reaffirm and affirm the
significance of biotechnology to
everybody's life Allen said. "We
now have a technology that is po-
tentially being applied in enough
different situations to virtually im-
pact every aspect of everyone's
life
The Oct. 3 conference will be
held at the Greenville Equestrian
Center on Highway 43. Faculty and
administrators from ECU who will
be attending include Dr. Allen, Dr.
Richard Eakin, Dr. Anton Usala,
and Dr. Paul Phibbs.
Carriage House Apartments
(Across from Athletic Club)
� All Electric
� Two Bedroom Townhouses
� Swimming Pool
� Laundry Room
� ECU Bus Service
� Central Air & Heat
� Near Pitt Plaza
� Free Water
PHONE : 756-3450
(Resident Manager - Apt. 12)
Directions:
Highway 43 South (Charles Street Extension.
14 mile beyond Pitt Plaza on left)
Fitness & Lifestyle Enhancement Programs
Aerobic Session II
Registration
October 1-9
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
in Christenbury 204.
Classes begin October 14.
Mi
N-r-L Monday Night" Registration
Join us for our
Nutrition-Fitness-Lifestyle Enhancement Monday Night Parties!
October 1-11
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
in Christenbury 204.
Class runs October 14-November 18.
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387
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The East Carolinian
I5 Thursday, October 3,1996 The East Carolinian
Is Greenville's
crime rate on
the rise or are
our tax dollars
being spent on
useless police
protection?
Downtown Greenville serves as a mecca for most
ECU students. For countless years, this area of the
Emerald City has been an escape from the toils and
troubles of campus life.
The many restaurants, shops, clubs and bars help
to make life away from home that much more bear-
able. Downtown is ECU's safety blanket. Or rather, it
was.
Recently, downtown has shifted from being a com-
fortable spot where one can relax to a place of unease
and discomfort. It seems that because of downtown's
popularity as an area for hanging out, it has also earned
the attention of some of Greenville's predators.
Of course, this has always been the case.
Any place where people congregate in large num-
bers and are often not in total control of themselves
becomes a place where thieves and violent offenders
see easy pickings. This is a fact of life and cannot be
prevented.
What can be prevented is the number of occur-
rences that happen. And the city of Greenville has be-
come fairly efficient when it comes to crime preven-
tion in the downtown district. Every night, a definite
police presence is visible in the form of officers on
bicycles, in cars and on foot.
This is quite unlike a few years ago, when the down-
town streets often had to be blocked off because of
the enormous numbers of people who flooded Green-
ville during Halloween and other events that were fa-
mous statewide for their ail-out partying action. Al-
though many students moan about the old days and
how much fun they were, the fact is that downtown
has become a much, much safer place.
So why the sudden resurgence in crime downtown?
Has the city of Greenville pulled back on its support
and protection of the student community? Has the uni-
versity police force been negligent in its duties? Or
has there simply been an unforeseeable upswing in
the number of active criminals in our midst?
There are no easy answers.
The real question is with Homecoming and Hallow-
een both fast approaching, and with the temptation to
go downtown and party without abandon an almost
ever-present thought on most students' minds, what
needs to happen to ensure their safety?
Well for one thing, we as students could be more
responsible. There's nothing that says we can't look
out for each other.
Also, we could demand service from the people we
employ to protect us. Both the university and the city-
police benefit from taxes and fees we pay as citizens
and we have a right to have our voices heard on this
matter.
Our concern here at TEC is for the safety of our
readership - the students of East Carolina University.
Until downtown Greenville has reconciled its problems,
we recommend that you watch out for yourselves.
1 tr&h4
�K The East Carolinian
�MJk @ Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
?" Jkp4 Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
�$ m � Matt Hege, Advertising Director
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor � "HI "
aTl. Royter Assistant News Editor Crlstle Farley, Production Assis an
SWr Lifesie Editor Ashley Settk, Production Ass,stant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Blgelow, Cony Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor RNonda Cmmpton, Copy Edrtor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Edrtor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor P��' � Wright Med.aAdv.ser
Andy Fartes, Staff Illustrator '��t ���' Med'a Accountant
ESo
3284366
Election 996
Editor's Note: These two columns are the fourth in a series
of political issues columns that will run through November.
TECs goal is to give the student body information relevant
to the upcoming elections. Today's topic is Ronald Reagan
Larry Freeman Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
m polsfkaf
mqiHfvering, vote
deception, vote
&itt Clinton.
In this Halloween season, it is most appropriate that
Bob Dole is trying to dress up like Ronald Reagan for
that big trick-or-treat party on Nov. 5. Dole thinks be-
ing more like Reagan could give him the victory. I'd say
he's more likely to find a parking spot on ECU's cam-
pus. Folks, Ronald Reagan is not the Jesus on Earth
that the Republicans want you to believe.
Ronald Reagan was the "Great Communicator no
doubt about it There was just something about seeing
his face on TV that made you think the Commies didn't
have a chance. He was a good foreign policy President
He was also dubbed the Teflon President, because noth-
ing damaging stuck to the guy. Well, speaking of dam-
aging things
The perception is Reagan was what saved us in the
80's. Why, he's the only thing that stopped the big-spend-
ing liberals in Congress. Well, the facts show that Reagan
requested more spending from Congress than Congress
authorized Reagan also added 1.4 million bureaucrats.
Furthermore, he even broke his promise for a balanced
budget in 1984, and went on to rack up $2 trillion in
debt
Did Reaganomics work? Harvard Economics Pro-
fessor Benjamin Friedman says, "Tantalizing as it was,
Reagan's claims that lower tax rates would enlarge tax
revenues never had substance Reagan's own budget
director, David Stockman, stated, "The root problem goes
back to the July 1981 frenzy of excessive and impru-
dent tax cutting that shattered the nation's fiscal stabil-
ity To put a nail in the coffin, Reagan is lauded for
creating thousands of jobs during the 80's, but his an-
nual job growth rate was an unspectacular 2.1 percent.
Lyndon Johnson's rate was 3.8 percent, Kennedy's and
Nixon's were 2.3 percent. Even Clinton is kicking
Reagan's bootie with a rate well over 2.5 percent Only
one of the most god-awful Presidents of all time, George
Bush, saved Reagan from last place with a horrible 0.6
percent
Finally, the ReaganBush administrations were
some of the most corrupt in history. The ghastly Sav-
ings and Loan scandal occurred under Bush's watch.
Also. Ronald Reagan sold arms to terrorists, behind
America's back. Besides Bush lying about his involve-
ment in the IranContra affair, a recent article from a
very reputable newspaper (The San Jose Mercury) found
evidence that the CIA sold crack cocaine to drug deal-
ers, and used the profits to sell arms to the Contra rebels.
Authorities found films, manuals and documents show-
ing drug money was used to purchase arms. Mysteri-
ously, all records of the search, seizure and property
"disappeared" from the Sheriff's Department
Let's vote against this type of corruption. Let's vote
against the candidate who voted against the creation of
the Drug Czar (as well as voting against student loans
and clean air). Don't let anyone ever label the Clinton
administration as a corrupt one. I'm much more wor-
ried about our government selling drugs to crooks than
I am about some flimsy little land deal in Arkansas or
some money-grubbing floozy. The evidence shows that
Republicans are the party of corruption and Democrats
are just the ones who can fix it. That's just one more
reason to throw out the old guard of Jesse Helms and
Bob Dole, and bring in the new guard of Harvey Gantt
and Bill Clinton.
This week's column will deal with the ReaganBush
administrations among other things. Reagan took office
in 1981 after defeating Jimmy Carter by a landslide mar-
gin. When Reagan took office the inflation rate was 12
percent and unemployment affected 8 million people. Un-
der Carter, there was actually a point where unemploy-
ment interest rates and inflation were all in the double
digits.
Reagan ran the country in a completely different fash-
ion than did Carter. Reagan made the statement "Govern-
ment is not the solution; it is the problem Employment
dropped and the economy rebounded into Reagan's sec-
ond term. Reagan believed in cutting taxes.
In 1986, Reagan signed into law a sweeping tax re-
form bill. The new iaw lowered the maximum tax rate and
repealed many deductions for business. The bill enjoyed
strong bipartisan support and even dropped many poor
Americans from the tax role entirely.
While Reagan and Bush were trying to put the coun-
try back on track, Bill Clinton was making investments in
the failed Whitewater deal. His wife Hillary was making a
killing at cattle futures. Al Gore, however, was doing some-
thing As a member of the House of Representatives, he
voted against both of Reagan's tax cuts and his budget
cuts.
George Bush was probably one of the best presidents,
in regard to foreign affairs, that the country has ever known.
He followed in the tradition of Reagan in gaining respect
for our military abroad. By bringing to justice Manuel
Noriega and assuring a quick end to the war in the Per-
sian Gulf, Bush proved himself an able leader. Though lib-
erals are quick to point out Bush's mistakes, such a rais-
ing taxes, they leave out a few key points.
For instance, in 1992 Bush vetoed a tax increase that
Al Gore voted for. Al Gore also voted against a line item
veto, a capital gains tax cut and the balanced budget amend-
ment Another shocker was that while Bush was president
in 1989, Al Gore was one of only four senators to vote
against a bill that would require people with the HIV virus
to notify their spouses.
After Clinton won the election in 1992, one of his
first moves was to uphold Bush's policy of returning Hai-
tian refugees. Although he had denounced the policy as
inhumane and promised to reverse it he did not This
proved that his objections were politically motivated and
that Bush's policy was just Bill Clinton also signed a large
tax increase in 1993, contrary to his campaign promises.
Other policies that Clinton had to back away from were
"gays in the military" and his idea of health care reform.
You know what is funny? Even while the Clintons were
debating health care reform, provisions were being made
to protect them from it! Then Majority Leader George
Mitchell introduced a bill that would exempt Congress and
federal employees from the plan. They knew it wouldn't
work and did not want to be a part of it However, they did
not care about you or me or the quality of our health care.
As November nears, Bill Clinton is portraying himself
more and more as a moderate. Given his record though, I
dare say he has not changed. Furthermore. I feel that if he
is re-elected, he will be much more liberal that the country
as a whole wants their President to be.
Let's not give him that chance. Vote against political
maneuvering. Vote against deception. Vote against Bill
Clinton.
"The law is the last result of human
wisdom acting upon human experience
for the benefit of the public
� Samuel Johnson





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Thursday, October 3, 1996
The East Carolinian
LIFe
OCTOBER
Thursday
ECU Ceramics Guild Presents:
The 5th Annual Mug Sale from 8
a.m-6 p.m. at the ECU School of Art
The East Carolina Playhouse pre-
sents: Big River at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre through OcL 8.
Sarafina at 8 p.m. in Hendrix The-
atre through Oct 6.
Breakfast Club at the Attic.
Yolk at Peasant's Cafe.
Thomas Chapin Trio with Gold
Sparkle Band at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Friday
ECU Ceramics Guild Presents:
The 5th Annual Mug Sale from 8
a.m-6 p.m. at the ECU School of Art
and the Percolator Coffeehouse.
Don Cox Band at the Attic
New Brown Hat at Peasant's Cafe.
Big Bump and the Stun Gunz at
Wrong Way Corrigan's.
The Specials with Skinner Box and
Otis Reem at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Saturday
ECU Ceramics Guild Presents:
The 5th Annual Mug Sale from 8
a.m-6 p.m. at the ECU School of Art
and the Percolator Coffeehouse.
Family Fare Series presents: The Vel-
veteen Rabbit at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
The Amateurs with Entrain and
Manute Soul at the Attic.
Tom Taylor at the Cellar.
Wake (formerly Flyin' Mice) at
Peasant's Cafe.
The Thomas Brothers at Wrong Way
Corrigan's.
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Brooks & Dunn with David Lee
Murphy and Jo Dee Messina at Wal-
nut Creek in Raleigh.
Jump Little Children at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
6
Sunday
East Carolina Symphony Or-
chestra at 3 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium.
Monday
New Kingdom with Red Aunts
and The Veldt at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
8
Tuesday
Lecture with Charles Krause,
sculptor, at 7 p.m. in Speight Audi-
torium with a reception to follow in
Burroughs Wellcome Gallery.
"Music of Desenclos, Bonneau, and
Millhaud Anjan Shah, saxophone,
at 8 p.m. in AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Marshall Tucker Band at the Attic.
Wednesday
Comedy Zone with Al Katz at
the Attic.
Junior Brown at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
The Writer's Reading Series was un-
able to host writer Jay Wright on
Tuesday, Oct 1. as was previously
planned. However, he will be resched-
uling his appearance here on cam-
pus for later in the year. Please stay
tuned to TEC for further information
n. .A(, Chris Tucker
Headed to the drive-in tonight?
That's right, the Natural Life Program and the ECU Student Union
Film Committee are co-sponsoring a special showing of Friday, the story
of high times in the hood, starring Ice Cube and Chris Tucker.
The movie is slated to start at dusk (around 7:30 p.m.) in the VIP
parking lot on Charles Street between Ficklen Stadium and Harrington
Field. You can bring your car or just a chair and a blanket For those with
cars, the audio portion of the movie will be broadcast off of a designated
AM wavelength. Oh yeah, there's free popcorn and snowcones, too.
As for the movie, Friday is an appropriate choice for a drive-in movie:
light hilarious and with a little bit of romance thrown in.
Friday centers around Craig (Ice Cube) and Smokey (Tucker) as they
spend a day observing life from Craig's front porch in Compton. They
smoke seemingly mountains of marijuana, experience shakedowns from
the neighborhood bully, Deebo (Tiny "Zeus" Lister, Jr.), and fear for their
lives at the hands of a curly-headed drug dealer, Big Worm (Faizon Love).
Ice Cube wrote the screenplay for the movie along with DJ Pooh,
who plays Red, one of Deebo's favorite targets for theft and pummelings.
Cube is low-key as Craig, recently fired from his job after being sus-
pected of stealing boxes on his day off ("How do you get fired on your day
off?").
Tucker steals the movie in his over-the-top, high-energy portrayal of
Smokey, an aspiring dope dealer with one problem: he smokes all of his
product before he can sell any of it
Friday really has no plot, but the humor hits so quickly you probably
won't notice. Admittedly, the movie sometimes slithers into Jim Carrey
territory with doses of bathroom humor, complete with a flatulent-filled
father & son forum between Craig and his father, played by the immortal
John Witherspoon.
Witherspoon heads a pack of memorable supporting actors includ-
ing Anna Maria Horsford, Bernie Mac, Nia Long, and a dozen other actors
who perfectly pull off an array of eccentric characters. Highlight perfor-
mances include an eternally aroused housewife and her jealous midget
husband (no PC in sight in this movie), as well as Smokey's "Janet Jack-
son" look-a-like would-be-date.
So, tonight take a trip to the drive-in, sit back in your car seat and
see if Craig and Smokey can survive the wrath of Big Worm or if Deebo
ever gets what he deserves.
If that doesn't interest you, there are always the snowcones.
SmteM
reviews legend
H pay full price
buy It used
can't even
humalciut
tape It from a
friend
runaway
Tool
jGnima
Wild Colonials
This Can't Be Life
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
John Davis
Staff Writer
E-Y-EiAtZT?
Big River bridges
cultural differences
Cast learns from
racial tensions that
play exposes
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
One of the hardest things about
being a reporter is reconciling what
people want to read with what people
are willing to say.
I didn't want to write a "fluff
piece for Big River. By fluff I mean
an article that simply says, "Go see
this play. It will be good As a the-
atre major, I want people to go see
the show, of course; but I'm also a
journalist and that means I'm more
than just a commercial.
You can see my dilemma. I
wanted an interesting article that
people would read, but I also wanted
people to go see the play. So, I set
out to interview the cast of Big River,
thinking I would "uncover" some ra-
cial tensions due to the extremely
mature subject matter.
Big River is a musical adaptation
of "Huckleberry Finn a book that
was banned from libraries and schools
across the country for its content
Controversy is the fastest way to sell
out a theater. No publicity is bad pub-
licity.
I felt certain that if I asked the
right questions, I would fjnd all sorts
of juicy tidbits to put in my article. In
speaking with the cast of Big River, I
learned that sometimes you have to
ask the wrong questions to get the
right answers.
When I began interviewing for
this article, I asked if there was any
racial tension among the cast. Be-
cause the play deals with such a seri-
ous topic, I wanted to know how diffi-
cult it is for the cast to get along? The
answer I received amounted to "there
isn't any racial tension in the cast"
That was it Obviously not prize-win-
ning stuff. I
started asking,
"Why not?"
What re-
sulted was close
to two hours of
discussion with
over 20 mem-
bers of the cast
during which I
learned that in-
stead of asking
"Why aren't you
like everyone
else I should
have been ask-
ing, "Why isn't everyone else like
you?"
One cast member, Jamie Lane,
made a great point about the show's
message and his opinion of director
John Shearin's vision of the perfor-
mance. He felt that Shearin's repre-
sentational style highlights the hope
we see evident in Huck and Jim's
friendship. He went on to explain the
difference between presentation and
representation in the case of Big
River.
In a presentational version of this
show, the audience might leave think-
ing, "What a cute show what won-
derful characters what fun In a
representational version, the audience
should leave thinking, "I never real-
ized before how terrible life was for
the slaves how amazing that Huck
befriended Jim despite what society
tried to teach him I learned things
I never knew before
Another point introduced into
the discussion was that racism is a
. learned belief. This
"It's not about
white or black.
Even though that's
part of what the
show's about,
that's not what
we're about"
�Jim Bray,
Big River cast member
is perhaps the
strongest lesson in
Big River. Matt
Stevens, who plays
Tom Sawyer, ex-
plained that Huck
and Tom are
friends with Jim, a
slave, and even
help him escape.
But Huck's "con-
science" bothers
him, because he is
going against what
he has been taught
is right: i.umely, that Jim is a slave
and is not allowed to be free. How-
ever, throughout the play we see slave
children and white children playing
together - a subtle way to show us
that hatred is not a natural instinct
Why would a show with such an
important message engender racial
tension in the first place? Why would
the book and the play be banned? A
lot of criticism is due to the way in
which the book deals with slavery and
the use of the word "nigger
See RIVER page 9
Hare is boy's best friend
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
The Velveteen RabbitwlU open the Family Fare series this coming Saturday, Oct. 5, at 2 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.Tickets will be available in advance at the Mendenhall Ticket Office.
J
Shh! What's that? Could it be?
It's the inner spirit of a band finally
captured on a recording. Let me start
by saying that regardless of what you
listen to, this album is for real.
See TOOL page 10
One of the best side effects of the
growing interest in world music is the
influence it has on American music.
Ever since the Beatles recorded SgL
Pepper's, rock groups have been us-
See WILD page 9
Dale Williamson
Aeeletant Lifestyles Editor
Once upon a time, there was a
stuffed toy rabbit named Velveteen
who craved the love and affection
of Steve, a young boy who desired
acceptance from his older brother.
Because Steve worked so hard to
earn his brother's attention, Velve-
teen found himself neglected. When
Steve is rejected by his brother, he
turns to Velveteen for support and
immediately the two become in-
separable.
But disaster strikes when Steve
becomes deathly ill with the scar-
let fever. Fearing that Steve's toys
may also be contaminated, Steve's
parents decide to burn all of Steve's
belongings, including his toys. As
a result of this perilous situation,
Steve and Velveteen pull together
and are forever changed.
If this sounds like a familiar
story, it should. This tale of a toy
rabbit and his boy is none other
than Margery Williams' classic
children's tale The Velveteen Rab-
bit, and it's
coming to
campus
this Satur-
day as part
of ECU'S
1996-97
Family
Fare Se-
ries.
This
musical
production
will be
brought to
full dra-
matic life
through
the cre-
ative ef-
forts of
Theatreworks
USA, one
of the lead-
ing professional theatre groups in
America for family audiences. Striv-
ing to bring family-oriented enter-
tainment to the forefront,
Theatreworks has set a goal to pro-
vide sophisti-
cated and imagi-
native produc-
tions that are
educational and
thought-provofe
ing, as well as
entertaining.
"Theatreworks
came into being
36 years ago at a
time when there
were no profes-
sional theaters
for children ex-
plains
Theatreworks
representative
Susan Obel. Ac-
cording to Obel,
it all started
when
Theatreworks
founder Jay
Harnick presented a production of
Young Abe Lincoln for school chil-
See RABBIT page 8
�i 3-





8
Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Mug Sale
"Say, that's a mighty
nice mug you got there,
Duchess, and I ain't
talking about the cup
The ECU Ceramics
Guild will be holding
their 5th Annual Mug
Sale from 8 a.m6 p.m.
on Oct. 3 & 4 at the
ECU School of Art and
Oct. 4 & 5 at the Perco-
lator Coffeehouse.
Artwork Courtesy of School of Art
RABBIT
from page 7
dren in an effort to expose them to
professional theater. Harnick took
his show on the road and along the
way acquired some talented writers
who understood and appreciated
his vision. The rest, as the saying
goes, is history. "We did it, there
was a need, and Theatreworks just
grew says Obel.
Since Theatreworks is an orga-
nization that works for the inter-
est of children, stories selected for
productions have to carry qualities
that are not only appropriate for
children but also elements that chil-
dren find appealing and entertain-
ing. "We do many literary adapta-
tions, as well as historical plays,
fairy tales (adapted or updated),
and issue-oriented shows dealing
with such themes as illiteracy or
drugs" Obel notes. "We look for a
story that has interests for younger
children and something that also
has special meaning for them
That fact that Theatreworks
creates family-oriented entertain-
ment was one the main reasons why
Matt Crabtree, who plays Steve in
the play, joined the group.
"Theatreworks is very well known
for children's theater Crabtree
said, "and they have a great repu-
tation. 1 saw it as a wonderful op-
portunity
Crabtree, a N.C. native who got
his start with regional theater before
he moved on to New York, says that
the audience response to The Velve-
teen Rabbit has been wonderful.
"The kids have been verv responsive
to everything we do on stage
Crabtree says. "It's also a very good
show for adults because there's a lot
of humor in it for both children and
adults
Theatreworks hopes that by pre-
senting productions with thematic
stories that are relevant to their lives,
they may not only learn something
about live professional theater but
also themselves. To help make The
Velveteen Rabbit even more relevant
for many children, Theatreworks
added a new element to the story �
that of the relationship between the
Steve and his older brother.
Many local children are set to get
a sneak preview of The Velveteen
Rabbit thanks to an arrangement be-
tween the ECU Family Fare program
and TJ. Maxx, who has agreed to pur-
chase 100 tickets tor the Pitt County
Department of Social Services to dis-
tribute to foster children.
"To hear the kids enjoying them-
selves is rewarding Crabtree stresses.
"Hopefully, we have a positive impact
on them
"There has been an need for live
performing arts for children Obel in-
sists. "We may just excite someone to
seek a career in the arts If nothing
else, Theatreworks will help in allow-
ing a younger audience learn to ap-
preciate the performing arts.
The Velveteen Rabbit will be pre-
sented on Oct. 5 in Wright Auditorium
at 2 p.m. Advance tickets are $8 for
the public. $7 for ECU faculty and
staff, $5 for ECU students and chil-
dren. All tickets at the door are $8.
For further information, contact
the ECU Central Ticket Office at 328-
4788, or call 1-800-ECU-ARTS; for
deafspeech-impaired access, call 328-
4736.
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����i11in fiifiWI nWI
fhe East Carolinian
Thursday, October 3,1996
Wild
from page 7
j
i� musical ideas from other cultures
Jp expand and enhance their own
tongs.
Just as European colonialism
fii-shed new and strange cultural ideas
�n unsuspecting native populations all
in a the world, so now do those cul-
tures get a sweeter revenge with the
"invasion" of their musical forms into
our own popular music.
So, it is somewhat ironic that the
name of this organic rock band is Wild
Colonials, being both a nod to the
acoustic and rustic sound of their
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music, as well as an acknowledgment
of the mish-mash of styles in the band's
music.
The band pulls from a variety of
sources. Some songs, like the album's
opener, "This Misery are pure rock
and roll, while others have a more jazzy
feel to them ("Wake Up Sad) and
more than a few have a Celtic sound
(check out the intro to "Want").
The band is made up of five
friends who began their musical career
by jamming together for the fun of it
The jam sessions drew audiences, and
soon the band found themselves play-
ing clubs. Not long after that they re-
leased their first album, The Fruit of'
Life . Although virtually ignored by
critics and radio, the first record was a
superb effort and was highly under-
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The band has several strong
points, such as the musicians them-
selves. Angela McCluskey's voice is a
sublime instrument capable of cover-
ing jazz, country and even hard rock.
Her voice carries overtones of Natalie
Merchant and Emmylou Harris at
times. Her lyrics are very personal, re-
volving around the loss of a lover and
the time of healing that comes after
such a loss.
Guitarist Shark lays down some
impressive grooves and blends his play-
ing in with the emotive and moving
harmonies provided by fiddle player
Paul Cantelon. Scott Roewe is an or-
chestra, providing the bass as well as
piano, organ, digeridoo, clarinet penny
whistle and saxophone. Behind all of
this is Thaddeus Corea, who plays some
driving percussion, which often times
resembles Celtic marches and reels
more than rock and roll.
The band takes this melting pot
of influences and styles and cooks up
a tasty stew. On "If a real rocker that
starts off with an agonized and angry
Angela wailing, "If you don't love me,
someone will the songs tears into a
full-on, southern rock guitar riff backed
by a bluesy fiddle harmony.
From beginning to end, the album
deals sensitively with the mixed emo-
tions of someone healing after a los-
ing a love. "This Misery" begins the
album optimistically, but immediately
after we are drawn deeper into the
underlying emotions. �
"Spirit" asks the questions we all
want to ask a former lover: "Why do
you love me?" "Were you lying when
you said those things?" Consider the
first verse Hey, I thought it was my
spirit that made you fall in love I
thought it was my love of life that
?hot you from above
"Coy" builds up tension with a
moody percussion arrangement that
builds and climaxes with a soaring
fiddle & guitar harmony in the cho-
rus. Targeting those who rely on am-
biguity and mind games, the song in-
dicts them strongly.
"Wake Up Sad with its vibra-
phone and big band drum sound, fo-
cuses on those who "pick the easy way"
rather than enduring the struggles that
come with a relationship. Angela's
voice is very jazzy, like Lady Day her-
self, tiptoeing around an obviously un-
predictable person. Eventually, she
concludes half regretfully, "So don't tell
me that you love me
The African percussion of "Child-
hood" gives way to a soft tender, but
tentative vocal, as Angela sums up the
apprehensions and fears that have lain
behind the agonized love songs on the
album: "Back to childhood we must go
to pay the price of what we sow
back to being innocent left alone to
conquer it expecting love and com-
pany we get sympathy Paul pleads
the case with a scorching fiddle solo,
which bleeds into a sparse percussion
& tin whisde break, and then to the
final chorus of the album.
Each song is its own adventure,
and had I the space, I could find praise
for every one. Writing about music
tends to be like doing math about a
beautiful sunset Rather than weigh
you down in that way, I will just sug-
gest that you put This Is Not Life on
the top of your shopping list
K.1 V JCJY from page 7
Jerry Green, who plays Jim. ha$
been in Big River before, and he saij
that in the beginning it bothered hinj!
to be called "nigger" on stage.
s
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"I was just frustrated for Jim. and
for what he had to go through said
Green. "I took it too personally. I real-
ized what they had to go through
I'm glad I don't have to The use of
the word 'nigger' opens a lot of
people's eyes. People who use that
word hear it and think. Do I really
sound like that?
Sandra Jones, who plays Alice,
said that a lot of people might not un-
derstand why she accepted the role
of a slave woman. Her opinion, how-
ever, is that this play represents his-
tory. It happened. She feels that the
survival of the black people and the
abolition of slavery represents hope.
If her ancestors could survive that,
nothing is impossible.
One of the reasons the cast of
Big River gets along so well is that
they have open minds about diversity.
The theatre department is comprised
of people from all over the United
States, and from all different back-
grounds. Professionalism demands
that they accept each other's differ-
ences and work well together. But
most importantly, they have genuine
respect for each other, which makes
getting along easy.
"America is too much ME and not
enough EVERYBODY. People don't
have enough respect for themselves
to have respect for anyone else said
cast member Michael Scialabba.
"Just remember that this play is
set about a hundred vears back -
there aren't any slaves now said Jorel
Jones. Jones is an example of the radi-
cal diversity in Big River. At nine, he
is one of the youngest members of the
cast.
"All I can say is just come see the
show. Come see the closeness in the
cast" said Jim Bray, who performs as
both Simon and The Young Fool in the
play. "There's no distance. Everybody's
friends with everybody else. It's not
about white or black. Even though
that's part of what the show's about
that's not what we're about"
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Octo&vtBS, 1996





10
Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
TOOL from page 7
After three and a half years. Tool
is back with an album that could be
called the perfect portfolio for this
band. From the artwork to the tunes,
it's amazing.
The album starts off with a song
called "Stinkfist a tune that's cat-
egorized by a vocal tone unheard of
before. It sounds as if an answering
machine was used to record Maynard
James Keenan's voice.
Keenan is a man who has the
most bizarre stage presence in his-
tory. He's creepy, yet intriguing - a
feat that most couldn't follow
through on. The fact is that people
tend to run away from him but soon
.notice that he's right behind them,
staring at them in the face with eyes
so deep that he could melt a steel
wall to its core.
On a lighter note, the band
seems tc be experimenting more on
this record than the last one. This
band, above all else, is one of the
tightest around. There is so much
energy on this disc. It's hard to be-
lieve if you understand how far out
there these guys are, but the case
proves itself.
When you hear this album, you'll
notice that it tells a story. Maybe not
in any sr. :ific order, but with each
song there's a lesson to be learned,
a state of mind that you can appreci-
ate, and a question unanswered.
For example, listen to the fifth
track on the album, "Forty Six & 2
It's starts off with a bass riff. It in-
hales energy through the keyboards
and exhales through, of course, Mr.
Keenan's push. He keeps referring to
his shadow and his mind. Maybe it's
his mind that serves as his shadow,
or it's his soul that serves as the
shadow to his mind. I wouldn't put
anything past him.
Track number eight is called "In-
termission It's not even a minute
long, and it's probably the most im-
pressive song on the album. It con-
tains a keyboard and only a keyboard.
It's totally unexpected and brought
up just at the right time. You won't
have time understand it because as
soon as it's over, the next track is
already in your head.
Listening to this album puts you
in a untouched zone, a world of your
own. It's hard to listen to a track over
again once the album gets going.
Which brings us to the next piece of
advice.
When listening to this album,
make sure you're in the moment.
Don't jump-ahead in the record or
fall behind what's happening on it.
Listen to the song that's playing, the
one in your head. Take it track by
track, or you might miss something.
And when you think it's over,
keep listening. The last song, "Third
Eye is over 13 minutes long. It's a
song about drugs, claiming that "It's
not a war on drugs, it's a war on per-
sonal freedom It makes sense. The
band feels strongly about the things
they do. You have to give them credit
for never selling out.
Inside this album you will find a
piece of literature that you must read.
It's an artist's view on anesthesia and
how an absent state of mind is free-
dom in itself. I urge you to not simply
read these words as they are written.
Literally, these words are what this
band is about; however, there is so
much more to this passage than meets
the eye and the mind.
"Beliefs are dangerous. Beliefs al-
low the mind to stop functioning. A
non-functioning mind is clinically
dead. Believe in nothing
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m.iiriKfi. � � �"
-i
11
Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Student trainers
work with athletes
Taking the week off
David Councilman
Staff Writer
Tape this, wrap that, ice this down.
You might be wondering what this is all
about These are the words that are heard
every day by ECUs' athletic trainers.
The road to becoming an ECU stu-
dent trainer is a very long and hard-trav-
eled road. There is a lot of time put in
without a whole lot of rewards.
"In order to be successful in this
field the key is time management Dr.
Katie Walsh director of sports medicine
athletic training said. "They are told this
from their freshman year oa We want
them to have fun here at ECU, but they
have to be successful in time manage-
ment Balance is the key
Throughout the semester the "rook-
ies as they are called in this program,
will take classes and work in the field.
They will rotate sports every two weeks.
Throughout the year the program will
lose students. By the end there are eight
to 12 "rookies" left out of 60.
This is a great feat by these students
because they have so many other things
that they could be doing, it just shows
their hard work and dedication.
"In this program the students have
to prove themselves Walsh said.
They have not only proven them-
selves on the field, they have also
proven themselves in the classroom.
There were 26 students who made
the honor roll, and 11 of those made
the Dean's List With the amount of
pressure put on them, that is a
remarkable feat
"These students are
good and driven Walsh
said.
The ultimate goal of the
student trainer is to become cer-
tified trainers. This means they can
work with a professional or col-
lege sports team. Ronnie
Barnes, an alumni of this
program, is now a trainer
for the professional football team the New
York Giants.
Being a student trainer is not a glam-
orous job. They work long hours with
little credit They have to make sure that
an athlete who would normally be told
by a regular physician that he can't play
for six weeks is able to play that day or
weekend. So, they have a lot of pressure
on them. Some of the athletes they are
working with could be making millions
one day, so the trainers have to make
sure that the athletes will be able to per-
form.
"The trainers do everything at an
accelerated rate Dr. Walsh said.
The best student trainers are the
ones never seen, because they are work-
ing so hard on the sidelines. They never
get a break in the action; they are con-
stantly working on injured players.
"The trainers are a great and dy-
namic group; they deserve a lot of
credit Walsh said.
The ECU student trainers help serve
as the backbone to the ECU athletic pro-
gram. They work very hard for little in-
centives; come may work up to 40 hours
a week, and they don't get paid.
So, folks, when you are watching a
sports team at ECU, don't forget that
students just like you are watching over
the athletes.
Practice continues
despite open week
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Fullback Scott Harley and teammates will rest this Saturday in order to prepare for the
next Thursday night's game on ESPN 2 with the Eagles of Southern Mississippi.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Not only will the football team not be on the field this Saturday, but the band and
cheerleaders won't be there either. For now they wiil prepare for next week's game.
Skull and Crossbones
crushes competition
Web site offers
best coverage of
athletics
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
Are you tired of always talking
about ECU athletics and no one ever
listening? Now you can state your
opinions on The Skull and Crossbones
web site on the Internet
The Skull and Crossbones an in-
teractive newsletter available now
on the World Wide Web, allows one
to talk about ECU athletics while at
the same time providing excellent cov-
erage of all ECU sports.
The web site was named the num-
ber one Internet source by The News
and Observer on Tuesday, Sept 17,
1996. Rated second were the Wolf
Chat room of N.C;�tate and the UNC
Chat Arena for Chapel Hill. The pub-
lisher and editor of the Skull and
Crossbones, Coby S. Heath, a 73 ECU
graduate, was elated by the recogni-
tion.
"We have worked diligently to
provide the very best web site to ECU
fans, but this recognition is a tribute
to the passion and pride of ECU sup-
porters Heath said. "They are in-
deed a special people
The Skull and Crossbones offers
a daily news page,
contest page
created with a
talkboard that
has had over
40,000 visitors since May
1, mostly students and
alumni. The web site
tries to offer fans feature
stories and human inter-
est stories that
might get over-
looked by some
other media
"We are in-
medium that is truly one of the great
pioneering frontiers of our modern
society Heath said. "Everyone is try-
ing to find a way to make this me-
dium successful, both financially and
as a media source
Heath encourages students to
visit the web site and to become in-
volved, but cautions that there are
some rules on the talkboard regard-
ing the use of profanity.
outlets,
volved in a
"Profanity is not allowed on our
web site, so if you can't say it on
Sesame Street it probably is not worth
saying Heath said. "I am a firm be-
liever in freedom of expression, but
stifling fan opinion doesn't help our
cause
Heath also has
a book due
out this fall
entitled,
Purple Pride: It's
More Than a Game The
book takes an in-depth
look at the history of Pirate
football and its coaches
from the 70's through the
Logan era. Heath's
main reason for
writ- ing the book was
to find Jir out why Pirate
fans are the way they are
about their passion for Pirate
football.
"I want people of eastern North
Carolina to see where our football
team came from, how it got here and
where it's going Heath said.
You can find the Skull and
Crossbones on the Internet at this
address-http:
www.crossbones.com
Spartans hand
volleyball team loss
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
With no game this
week, players still
hit the field
Amanda Ross
Sport Editor
With a week off, the ECU foot-
ball team will have plenty of time
to concentrate for next week's up-
coming Southern Mississippi game.
On Oct. 10, the Pirates will
play at home on ESPN 2 at 8 p.m.
But don't think Coach Steve Logan
is letting his players take it lightly
this week.
In a typical week the Pirates
practice WedFri play a game on
Saturday and practice on Sunday.
The only day off they receive is
Monday. Logan is sticking to the
same schedule but will give the
team Saturday off. However, the
players aren't practicing with this
in mind.
"We are practicing like we have
a game to get ready for Logan
said. "We are going to give the guys
off on Saturday and get back here
early next week and polish every-
thing for Southern Miss
When Southern Miss hosted
ECU last year, it was a pivotal game
to see which
team would be a
win closer to
competing in
the Liberty
Bowl. ECU
pulled off a last
second upset
and beat the
Eagles 36-34.
The Pirates
know that this
is not a team to
be taken lightly.
Practice,
for the most
part, has re-
mained on the
same level as if
there were an
upcoming game.
"We went full speed today
Logan said after Tuesday's practice.
"Practice was a little less intense
today because we don't have a game
on Saturday, but everyone still
worked really hard
With two tough road trips and
a home game behind them, ECU is
taking this time to rejuvenate.
"We're a little bit of a tired
football team right now Logan
said.
. To some
players, having
the week off is
not a big con-
cern.
"I'd rather
just keep on play-
ing and stay in
the flow split
end Troy Smith
said. "There are a
couple of people
banged up and
this off-week will
help
Quarterback
Marcus Crandell
sees this time as
"We are going to
give the guys off
on Saturday and
get back here early
next week and
polish everything
for Southern
Miss
� Head Coach
Steve Logan
an opportunity to
get ready for a Southern Miss team
that is hungry for revenge.
"We need to prepare mentally
for them Crandell said. "They're
a hard-nose football team. They're
going to come in and hit hard and
we need to be prepared for them
and this is coming at a good time
ECUs women's volleyball team
played host to UNC-Greensboro Mon-
day night, winning only one game out
of a four game match.
The team seemed to get off to a
rough start in the first game, trailing
10-3. They would bounce back and tie
the game at 10-10 and seemed to have
the momentum shifted their way, but
the Spartans rallied back to take a
16-14 win at the end of game one.
The second game started off just
like the first, with the Spartans jump-
ing off to a 9-1 lead early in the game.
The Pirates were not going to go down
without a fight however, and they
battled back to pull within three at
14-11. The team got behind too early
in the game and UNC-G took the sec-
ond game 15-11.
The third game shaped up to be
a better outing for ECU than the per-
vious b"o games. The Pirates jumped
on UNL-C early and were able to hold
onto the lead throughout the game,
something they have not been able to
do lately according to side hitter Sh-
annon Kaess, who also served the
game winning ace to beat the Spar-
tans 15-8.
"We started out pretty slow and
we have had a tendency to do that,
but we're working on it" Kaess said.
"Ijn the third game we had to show
them that we were not going to quit
and we came away with the win
The Pirates eventually lost the
fourth game 15-5 after letting UNC-G
go on a 6-0 run early in the game.
The Lady Pirates did have their bright
spots throughout the game however,
with two freshmen, Julia D'Alo and
Kaess, stepping up their games to a
new level. ECU was also able to gain
support offensively from Kari
Koenning as well as defensive play by
Kristen Woodruff.
The play by Kaess has been one
reason the Pirates have been able to
keep the games close Head Coach Kim
Walker sees the impact that Kaess is
having on the team.
"She's a real solid ball player and
she is carrying the weight for us quite
a bit on the outside position Walker
said. "She's giving us about three
kills a game and that is about the
top five or six in the conference right
now
While Walker is pieased by the
play of Kaess, she also knows that
she doesn't want to use her too much.
"We're using her a little too
much in our offense Walker said.
"She swung at about 60 balls tonight
and when you're playing all around
the court and you're hitting and
jumping at least 60 time including
blocking, it gets a little tough on you
and it can break you down a bit
Kaess also knows the burden of
swinging at too many balls, but she
doesn't mind the actioj.
"It's really exhausting, especially
on the swing hitter Kaess said. "You
pass first, then you have to get up
there and hit, but it's fun
Walker seemed to be a bit
puzzled by Monday nights losses, but
thinks the team is in a good position
for the rest of the season.
"We're playing well we're play-
ing good defense and digging the ball
well, but we are not finding a way to
terminate the ball Walker said. "I
can't ask them to play their systems
any better and I can't ask the setter
to play a better game; it's frustrat-
ing that we are working and playing
as good as we are and still losing
Walker sees the improvement
that her team has made since the be-
ginning of the season and remains
optimistic about the rest of the sea-
son. One spot she knows they will
have to improve on is their hitting,
"Our hitting has been our Achil-
les heel all year, and the game of vol-
leyball is about hitting Walker said.
"We have to find a way to put the
ball on the floor and if we can do
that, I think we will have a good sec-
ond half of the season
NOTE: The ECU volleyball team
did bounce back to beat Hampton
University 15-6, 15-4, 15-9, Tuesday
night ECU is now 5-13 and heads into
a long break. Play begins again Oct
12 as the Pirates will be on the road
against the College of Charleston. The
match is set to begin at 1 p.m.
T
WPMMM





IF
12
Thursday, October 3, 1996
The East Carolinian
Panthers without Biakabutuka
�r
'The challenge
this week is for
our players to pick
up the slack,
because we're
going to be
without a number
of good players
�Coach Dom
Capers
(AP) - Rookie half-back
Tshimanga Biakabutuka, an ex-
pected building block in the Caro-
lina Panthers' developing offense,
is to undergo surgery for a torn
knee ligament and will miss the rest
of the year. ����
"I feel
very, very sad
for him Caro-
lina general
manager Bill
Polian said
Monday, one
day after
Biakabutuka
was injured in
the Panthers'
24-14 loss to
Jacksonville.
"He was hav-
ing a great
rookie season
A mag-
netic reSO- ammmmmmmmmmmmm
nance imaging
test conducted Monday showed a
tear in the anteriorcruciate liga-
ment in Biakabutuka's left knee. He
is to undergo surgery next week, fol-
lowed by eight months of rehabili-
tation, Polian said.
"The prognosis is for a com-
plete recovery Polian said.
To take Biakabutuka's roster
spot, the Panthers reached agree-
ment Monday with Leroy Hoard on
a one year contract Hoard, a six
year NFL veteran, was cut last Tues-
day by Baltimore after rushing for
61 yards on 15 carries. He was en
route to Charlotte on Monday night
and was scheduled to take a physi-
cal on Tuesday.
Hoard could be used as soon
as Sunday's game at Minnesota in
place of Biakabutuka, a former
Michigan star the Panthers took
T with the eighth overall pick in the
! 1996 draft.
Carolina selected Biakabutuka
� with the hopes he could comple-
j ment quarterback Kerry Collins, the
! franchise's first pick.
Biakabutuka, who set Michigan
records last year with 303 rushes for
1,818 yards, missed the Panthers'
training camp because of a 27- day
contract holdout.
After signing a seven year,
$12.7 million con-
tract on Aug. 16,
the 6- foot 215-
pound
Biakabutuka
quickly began pay-
ing dividends,
demonstrating
power and speed
while bringing sta-
bility to the Pan-
thers' running
game. He rushed
for 69, 72, and 69
yards in the Pan-
thers' first three
games - all victo-
ries that helped
Carolina to first
place in the NFC
West.
Without Biakabutuka, the Pan-
thers' rushing duties will fall on
Hoard, who has averaged 4 yards per
carry in the league; fullback Howard
Griffith, limited to mainly blocking
duties with Carolina; Anthony
Johnson and Dino Philyaw, who
have struggled for playing time; and
5-7, 180 pound rookie Winslow
Oliver, who has been used primarily
as a third- down receiver coming out
of the backfield.
Biakabutuka's injury was one of
three significant ones the Panthers
suffered Sunday.
Defensive end Mike Fox. who
led Carolina's linemen in most sta-
tistical categories last year, sprained
his left arch and is to spend 2-3
weeks in a cast, the team said Mon-
day. Fox will likely miss four weeks.
Starting offensive guard Frank
Garcia fractured a bone in his left
foot and will miss about three weeks.
"The challenge this week is for
our players to pick up the slack, be-
cause we're going to be without a
number of good players Coach
Dom Capers said.
The Panthers had better news
regarding Collins, who led them to
a 9-6 record before suffering a
sprained left knee Sept. 8. Collins
will take over the starting reins
again after being relieved by Steve
Beuerlein the past two weeks.
"It's good enough to go out and
it's good enough to take a hit
Collins said. "I think that's kind of
where we're at right now. Is it healed
100 percent? No. It probably won't
be for some time. But it's good
enough to play, basically
Collins played late in the fourth
quarter Sunday after Beuerlein went
down with cramps in his calf muscles.
Collins completed two of six passes
for 42 yards and led the Panthers to
their final touchdown, and he ran for
the two-point conversion.
"I was rusty Collins said.
"When you don't get the reps in prac-
tice and you don't do things for an
extended period of time, it's hard. I
felt like I was still on my reads and
everything , but it was just not as
automatic as it usually is. But that'll
come. That'll come in practice this
week, and hopefully by Sunday ev-
erything should be back to normal
com;c30o
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f" IH nil" .p &?
13
Thursday, October 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Biu.

Travel
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2 BEDROOM, 1 12 bath townhouse: 3
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ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2 BR
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MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
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NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the fall!
Short walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. -
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DIAMOND BACK RACING MOUNTAIN
bike: Very light aluminum frame, LXXT
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PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT FOR dis-
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TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
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OFFICE SUPPORT: PART TIME Accounts
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NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS, WAITRESS-
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PART-TIME DANCE INSTRUCTOR need
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SZECHUAN EXPRESS PLAZA MALL
needs part-time cashier (15-20 hrs)week. No
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FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
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THANK YOU SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon for
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PI LAMBDA PHI WELCOMES our newest
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night oi your lavalier was one of the best
yet Make sure Barn-Bam is in check.
CHI OMEGA SUPPORTS SGA student
body officers. Thanks for all your hard work.
Congrats Sam Lanier and Jessica Ennis for
winning senior class elections.
ATTENTION: ALL SORORITIES AND fra-
ternities! Get ready for the start of Greek
Week. Sunday, October 6 from 12-4 will be
the Alpha Phi rugby tournament Don't for-
get to pick your favorite sorority to win out-
side of the Student Store Thursday and Fri-
day from 10-2!
PHI TAU - Thanks for a great "Gangsta" so-
cial. We Bloods had an awesome time! Love,
your Zeta neighbors.
KAPPA SIGMA - Thanks for showing our
parents a great weekend. Love, Chi Omega
TO ALL PI LAMBDA Phi Brothers, be at
the house tonight or you suck!
TO THE SISTERS OF Alpha Omicron Pi,
just wanted to say thanks for the social
Thursday. We've never had so much fun in
our PJ's. The Brothers of Phi Kappa Psi.
TO THE CAST AND crews of Big River -
Break a leg tonight! Alpha Xi Delta.
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to thank
Sigma and their parents for yet another suc-
cessful Parents' Weekend.
PIKA - WE had a great time last week with
you guys at the predowntown. Let's do it
again soon! Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA � We're looking for-
ward to seeing you tonight! The sisters and
new members of Alpha Xi Delta.
GAMMA SIG: CONGRATULATIONS TO
the pledge class officers! President - Jenny
Love; Vice President - Liz Hodgson: Secre-
tary - Jennifer Foley; Treasurer - Julie Lind-
en Historian - Jennifer Krumbein: Sister Liai-
son - Scarlett Foster. Love, the Sisters.
JILL KAMAREK! THANKS FOR doing
such a great job with Parents' Weekend! Eve-
ryone had a wonderful time! Love, your Zeta
sisters!
PI LAMBDA PHI, BELIEVE it or not we
had a successful tailgate thanks to Lyan for
his hard work. I can just imagine us now,
next Thursday night
TAU KAPPA �EPSILON Thanks for a
great pre-downtown. We had a blast Let's
get together again real soon! Love � Zeta.
DELTA ZETA - We had a great time taiigat-
ing Saturday and look forward to doing it
again, love. Delta Chi
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS: FIND out who
ECU's hottest Greek man is at Alpha Xi Del-
ta's Greek God. See you at The Attic on Sun-
day, October 6 at 9:00 p.m.
KAPPA ALPHA - Thanks for a wonderful
Parents' Weekend. We all had a great time.
The sisters and newmembers of Alpha Xi
Delta.
OUR CREEK SUPER STARS this week are
Alpha Delta Pi Betsy Bullock, Angie Barnes;
Alpha Omicron Pi Teresa Donavan, Alex Ken-
nedy; Alpha Phi Kelly Joice, Laura Benfield;
Alpha Xi Delta Amanda Luther, Amy Graves;
Chi Omega Jen Buckly, Lesley Poley; Delta
Zeta Tina Black, Staci Rodemer; Sigma Ni-
cole Federinko; Zeta Tau Alpha Mandy Jor-
dan, Shelley Branch; Pi Delta Amy McGrath.
GOOD LUCK TO LESLIE Pulley, Lauren
Causey, Jen O'Connor, and Shannon Wallace
in Greek Goddess, show them what you've
got! Love the sisters of Chi Omega
ALPHA PHI - Were looking forward to the
Rugby game on Sunday. Alpha Xi Delta.
BETA OMEGAS - We hope you have a good
weekend. Make the most of it, Love, the sis-
ters of Alpha Xi Delta.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Delta Chi: Tail-
gating with you was so much fun. You are a
great bunch of guys, hope to do something
with you agaia soon. Love, the sisters of Del-
ta Zeta. .
THE 5 SOCIETY OF Pi Lambda Phi Fra-
ternity would like to congratulate Chris Lu-
cas on his graduation from the Wilksboro
School of Engineering. Chop! Choo!
TO ALL OF DELTA Zeta's new little sis-
ters. We hope this week was great We are
looking forward to celebrating tonight with
you, Love your Big Sisters.
THANKS TO DELTA ZETA'S great Plan
ning Board. All of your hard work paid off.
Parents' Weekend was wonderful. You guys
really impressed them! Thanks again, and
keep up the good work! Love, your Sisters.
Announcements
ECU LAW SOCIETY: ALL majors are wel-
come to attend our next meeting on Tues-
day, Oct 8, at 5:15 p.m. in Ragsdale, room
218A. A guest speaker will be present and
refreshments will be served.
GREENVILLE NOW (NATIONAL ORGAN-
IZATION for Women) will meet Wednesday,
Oct 9 at 5:30 p.m. at the Szechuan Garden
Restaurant Program topic: "Domestic Vio-
lence Speaker: A representative from New
Directions. For information, call 756-8973
or 756-1811.
THEATRESPORTS! THE PEOPLEACT
IMPROVISATIONAL Ensemble will host an
evening of TheatreSports on Saturday, Oct
19 at 8:00 p.m. in the Jaycee park Auditori-
um. TheatreSports is an evening of competi-
tive improvisation performed by two teams
based on audience suggestions. We promise
a night full of laughter and fun! Come join
us! Tickets are $5 at the door. For more info
call 321-6028.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS AND Al-
lies for Diversity. Our next meeting will be
Oct 9 in room 221 of Mendenhall Student
Center at 7:30 p.m. We hope to see you all
there.
INTERVIEW SKILLS AND RESUME work
shops. The Career Services staff will pres-
ent the following workshops to help stud-
ents prepare for campus or off-campus in-
terviews for career positions or for intern-
ships and co-op experiences: Resume Writ-
ing - Wed Oct 2 at 3:00 pm or Wed Oct 9
at 4:00 pm. Interviewing Skills - Fri Oct 4
at 3:00 pm or Thur Oct 10 at 2:00 pm. These
workshops will be held in the Career Servic-
es Center, Room 103.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Oct
1 - 8, 1996:
Thurs Oct 3 - Tues Oct 8 - BIG RIV-
ER - ADVENTURES OF HUCK FINN; Pro-
duction of the ECU Dept of Theatre Arts
and the School of Music; For ticket informa-
tion, call 919-3286829; Messick Theatre,
8:00 PM, (Sun, Oct 6, Messick Theatre, 2:00
PM). iun Oct. 6 - East Carolina Chamber
Orchestra, Stephen BlackwekJer, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 3:00 PM Mon Oct 7
- Faculty Recital. Jeffrey Jarvis, tuba, AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 PM Tues Oct. 8
-Guest Recital, "Music of Desend Bonneau
and Milhaud Anjan Shah, saxophone, AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 PM.
RESEARCHING "ACID PARK" LEGEND.
Need your version of "Acid Park" story and
your experiences there. Please call Folklore
Archive: 3284726 (Dr. Karen Baldwin) or
Things Really iove
In the Classifieds!
Advertise with us in
The East Carolinian.
328-2000
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS 5T
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Student Swap Shop
Announcements
3284389 (David Dilts or Amy Spruill)
THE GREENVILLE-RIVER PARK North
Bird Club cordially invites anyone interest-
ed in any aspect of birds and birdwatching
to attend our meetings, which are held at
the Science and Nature center at River Park
North at 2000 Mumford Rd in Greenville at
7:30 p.m. the first Monday of every month.
At the club's meeting for October, on Mon-
day, Oct 7, John and Paula Wright will pres-
ent a slide program on hawks and autumn
hawk migration in North Carolina and Vir-
ginia. The Meeting for November, on Mon-
day, Nov. 4, will include a slide program on
fall and winter water fowl and shore birds of
coastal and eastern NC presented by Joanne
Powell of the NC. Maritime Museum. For
more info contact either Ernest Marshall at
75&0077 or River Park North at 830-4561.
THE ADULT STUDENT ASSOCIATION
will meet on Thursday, Oct 3, 19 at 3:30
PM in room 1010 of GCB. Election of Offic-
ers is to be held. All adult students are invit-
ed to attend. Please contact Wilda Hart at
3286881 for more info.
REGISTRATIONORIENTATION - CA-
REER Services. Students who will gradu-
ate in December, 19 or May, 1997 are en-
couraged to attend a Career Services- pro-
gram to learn about the programs and serv-
ices available to help you in the job search.
The staff will explain procedures for estab-
lishing a credentials files, participating in
campus interviews and registering with the
Career Services office. The meetings will be
held in the Career Services Building on
Tues Oct 1 at 3:00 PM, Mon Oct, 7 at
4:00 PM and Mon Oct, 14 at 3:00 PM.
THE LEDONIA WRIGHT AFRICAN Amer-
ican cultural Center, The Vice Chancellor of
Academic Affairs, the College of Arts and
Sciences, and the BB&T Center for Leader-
ship Development present Dr. Claude Ander-
son, social reform scholar, author of Black
Labor, White Wealth-The Search for Pow-
er and Economic Justice, founder of the
Harvest Institute, former Assistant Secretary
of Commerce and former Florida State Depu-
ty Secretary of Education addressing the
East Carolina University community on the
topic "The Search for Power and Economic
Justice The lecture will be held on Tues-
day, Oct 8, 19 at 7:00 pm in the Great
Room of Mendenhall Student Center on the
' campus of ECU. This lecture is free to all
students, faculty and staff and to the gener-
al public
LOOKING FOR A NEW POSITION
ttolpYM
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
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Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 54
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bacNaste.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 3, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 03, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1164
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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