The East Carolinian, October 1, 1996






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October 1,1996
Vol 72, No. 12
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Across The State
T1LLERY, N.C. (AP) - An
Iredell County inmate serving a
10-year prison sentence on a co-
caine conviction was stabbed to
death in a shower stall as a guard
watched.
Dwayne Maurice Caldwell,
23, was stabbed in the chest, back
and right wrist with a homemade
blade Sunday afternoon.
HIGH POINT (AP) - Police
investigated the death of a mo-
torist during a head-on' collision
they believe resulted from drag
racing.
James Gilbert Tilley, 27, of
Archdale, died after his Nissan
collided with a Chevrolet Camaro
Wednesday afternoon on a road
near the Randolph and Davidson
county line, police said.
High Point Police Capt.
Steven Campbell said the
Chevrolet and Ford were side by
side, with the Camaro on the
wrong side of the road.
Across The Country
CARTERVILLE, Mo. (AP) -
A sheet-metal worker with only a
high school education, Joe
Cruzan reluctantly waged a battle
of national proportions to break
new legal ground in the right-to-
die movement
In the end, though, he was
just a father whose heart was bro-
ken beyond repair when a 1983
auto accident left his daughter
Nancy in a persistent vegetative
state. Without publicity, without
a fight in court, in the privacy of
his carport Joe Cruzan exercised
his own right to die.
He hanged himself.
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) -
New images of Jupiter's frozen
moon Europa are giving scien-
tists tantalizing hints that its frac-
tured crust of icy slabs may be
sliding on a layer of slush or even
water - the fundamental ingre-
dient for life.
The new images, taken by
the unmanned Galileo spacecraft
from 96,000 miles away, show its
surface dotted by a series of dark
spots that could be scars of slush-
spewing geysers.
Around The World
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) - A
kidnapped Japanese executive
was found unharmed in an aban-
doned house Monday after a
Mexican policeman delivered a $2
million ransom in a nighttime
rendezvous with gunmen.
The kidnappers remained at
large with the ransom - un-
marked U.S. currency - but in-
vestigators believe they know
who committed the crime, said
Jose Luis Anaya Bautista, attor-
ney general in the district just
south of the border.
BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP)
- It was a crowning achievement
of sorts for former President
Carter.
He received Hungary's Order
of Merit Saturday for fostering bi-
lateral ties and returning St.
Stephen's bejeweled crown, a na-
tional symbol.
Participation low at polls
Voter turnout
lower than past
years
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Many students came out to vote
for their class officers during the
elections that were heid last week.
Unfortunately, the number of voters
and the number running for offices
were both low this year, and while
some of the offices were free from
the stress of competition, others
proved to be quite close.
Adrian Wright, the new fresh-
man president knows just how close
the battle for success can be. After
it was all over with, the freshman
was appreciative of his victory, but
he was disappointed about the lack
of voting participation.
"I'm glad I won, but I wish there
was a better voting turnout" Wright
said. "Hopefully I can do a good
job for the freshman people that did
vote for me
Reid Griffin, SGA elections
chairman, also noticed the amount
of people taking part in the elec-
tions.
"The turnout was really low
Griffin said.
cc
"There were only
383 people who
voted, which is
really below nor-
mal
Griffin real-
ized that there
were some com-
plications that
could have led to
the disappoint-
ing outcome.
"Some of ��iiiitiii
the activity stickers didn't have num-
bers on them, and a lot of the stu-
dents didn't want to go to the
trouble of getting everything right
Griffin said. "Also, there wasn't re-
ally anything to vote on
Despite the problems, the win-
ners were still excited about their
victory. Freshman Vice President
Kristy Schalles said she wants to
do all she can for her fellow class-
mates.
"I look forward to doing my job
and rewarding those who voted for
me with trust, hard work and dedi-
cation Schalles said.
Sophomore Vice President,
James
� Katenschnee,
shares Schaiies's
enthusiasm.
"I'm proud
to represent the
sophomore class
and I'm deter-
mined to do a
great job
Katenschnee
said.
The dorm
and day represen-
There were only
383 people who
voted, which is
really below
normal
� Reid Griffin, SGA
elections chairman
tatives are also proud of their ac-
complishment and ready to make a
difference. Jonathan Huggins, a
dorm representative from Umstead
is one of those people.
"It is an honor to represent one
of the nicest dorms on campus
Huggins said. "I hope that in the
future I can get more support from
the people that I represent so that
we can assure our residence hall will
remain the best"
UNC System president retires
Search for
replacement
begins tomorrow
Amy L Royster
Aaalatant Nawa Editor
The search to find a replacement
for the University of North Carolina
system (UNC-system) president begins
tomorrow at ECU after the current
president announced plans to retire.
After 11 years of service, UNC-
system President C. D. Spangler, Jr
64, announced plans to retire by June
30, 1997.
The search process is scheduled
to begin Wednesday, Oct Z, from 6:30
to 8:30 p.m. in Blue Auditorium in the
Brody Building when the first of a
series of public hearings commences.
The hearing, initiated by the
Leadership Statement Committee is
the first step in the process of find-
ing a replacement for Spangler. There
are seven hearings scheduled for UNC
campuses across the state. Commit-
tee members will be present at each
of the hearings.
According to former State Sena-
tor, and chairperson of the ECU hear-
ingJHeien Marvin, the purpose of the
hearing is to solicit student faculty
and community leaders' comments
concerning the type of person who
should be selected to fill the position.
"What this committee is charged
with doing is finding out what citi-
zens of North Carolina think the ma-
jor characteristics or qualifications of
the UNC president should be Marvin
said. "On the basis of that, the com-
mittee will determine the type of per-
son who should be selected
Marvin said students are welcome
at the hearing as well as faculty and
citizens.
"You (students) are citizens of
North Carolina and you are very much
involved Marvin said. "We would
encourage any student with an idea
to come or write a letter and bring it
to the meeting
The Readership Statement Com-
mittee is composed of members who
hold various positions in both the
UNC-system and the community.
At the same time as the ECU
hearing, a similar one will take place
in Owen Hall Conference Center on
the UNC-Asheville campus. Cameron
Hall Auditorium on UNC-
Wilmington's campus will house an-
other hearing.
On Tuesday, Oct. 15 from 6:30
See UNC page 4
Human Resources changes heads
Dena Parrlsh
Contributing Writer
tt
ECU welcomes a new face,
Stewart A. Mixon, as he joins the staff
of the Human Resources Department
He hopes to soon provide internships
to eligible students.
"By simplifying the human re-
source processes, I
hope to streamline
the services we
offersaid Mixon,
the new Assistant
Vice Chancellor for
human resources.
Mixon, former
assistant director
of the Central Em-
ployment Center at
the University of
Florida, will be re-
sponsible for staff
recruitment and
development clas-
sification and com-
pensation, employee relations, payroll
processing and administration of the
university's benefits program.
"My goal is to examine the rules
and regulations that have already been
developed and terminate those ones
that are timely and restrictive Mixon
said.
Mixon, who started August 1, said
he has been acquainting himself with
administrators and chancellors in or-
der to address their areas of concern.
He is also interested in knowing about
the changes in human resources that
these people desire.
Human resources offers assis-
tance to ECU'S
faculty and staff
members and in-
dividual depart-
ments as well as
to the commu-
nity in providing
job vacancy list-
ings for those
people looking
for work.
"I hope to
soon help stu-
dents by offering
internships to
those qualified
"�����"��"�� students in or-
der to provide them with meaningful
work experience in their field of
study Mixon added.
If Mixon does so, the Human
Resource Department will be able to
impact all areas of the university in
By simplifying
the human
resource
processes, I hope
to streamline the
services we offer
� Stewart A. Mixon,
Assistant Vice Chancellor
for human resources
Stewart A. Mixon
some fashion.
Mixon, who is a native of Florida,
received his undergraduate and gradu-
ate degrees from the University of
Florida. He served the university in
their Human Resources Department
in a variety of personnel service posi-
tions until his move to North Caro-
lina.
Mixon moved to Greenville with
his wife, and his outside interests are
his family and church activities.
Residence hall
safety scrutinized
New electronic card may replace
present system, offer safer alternative
Scott Hopkins
Staff Wrtfr
Being safe on campus always tends to be a paramount concern for
students. From the access to police patrols to residence hall integrity,
everyone has a concern.
Recently an idea was implemented at Appalachian State University
which uses an electronic card reader for students to access the main doors
of the residence halls.
"The system has been up and working for a year and a half and we
haven't had any real incidences yet Brad Reid, director of university hous-
ing at Appalachian State, said.
The system includes an electronic card reader for the main doors and
security alarm systems for all outer doors. The residence hall system also
includes a security desk to assure that the person using the card is actu-
ally the resident; this is done through verification of student ID's.
ECU Housing is presently looking into a similar system to be run off
of the proposed "One Card" system which is to tentatively be started in
the fall of '96.
" We have been considering a system like this and are looking for the
most effective system Manny Amaro, director of housing services said.
Presently ECU's residence halls are protected by a system of locked
doors which are accessed by keys. Residence halls such as Umstead even
have three different levels of locked doors.
The doors are locked 24 hours a day. This system is backed up by a
constant vigil of student and police security patrols.
"The students like the new system and realize that it takes the coop-
erative efforts of the residents to make it work Reid said.
The card reader system at Appalachian State allows for the doors to
be electronically locked between the hours of 9p.m. and 7a.m. where the
staff resident advisors and student security patrols maintain security.
Students need to be aware that leaving doors propped and letting
people in the residence halls who are not residents breaks the integrity of
the security in the halls.
According to Assistant Dean of Students Karen Boyd, there have been
a few incidents this year that constitute looking at a more effective form
of security for the halls.
"A student was assaulted with a fire extinguisher on the first day of
class Boyd said. "Students really need to be aware that propping doors
and letting people follow them through doors who are not residents can
be dangerous
ECU is looking to have the system in place by the spring of '97. This
will follow the implementation of the campus-wide "one card" system.
"This new form of residence hall security system would definitely in-
crease security Amaro said.
4Me
Edwin McCain comes back to the Atticpage O
He-Man saves the daypage O
SPORT&u
Irates: Large and in chargepage
pecmt
Tuesday
Rain
Wednesday
Partly cloudy
"
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High 72
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Km� t� ec& �J
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
crimfQene
September 26
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of a "hip pouch" contain-
ing several personal items from the basketball court at Belk Hall.
Campus political groups gear up
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of a bicycle from Fletcher
Hall.
Damage to Property - An officer reported damage to the bus stop
south of Carol Belk. Two plexiglass panes had been broken by construc-
tion equipment
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of his bicycle from Scott
Hall.
Harassing telephone calls - A student reported receiving harassing
phone calls in her room at Fletcher Hall.
Breaking and Entering a motor vehicle - A student reported the
breaking and entering of her vehicle. A cellular telephone was taken
from the trunk of the vehicle.
Unauthorized use of motor vehicle - A student reported that his
vehicle had been moved from where he had parked it earlier.
AssistRescue - A student was transported to Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital by Greenville Rescue after fainting at Todd Dining Hall.
Armed Robbery � A student reported he was robbed at gunpoint
between Rawl and General Classroom Building.
September 27
AssistRescue -The ECU Police Department assisd the Greenville
Police Department at a vehicle accident involving a pedestrian. The acci-
dent occurred at the intersection of Charles Boulevard and Ficklen Street
Solicitation -A student reported that there were two people selling
perfume on campus. The sales people were located inside Umstead Hall
and banned from campus.
Vehicle Damage � A student noticed minor damage to her vehicle
which appeared to be caused by a car door being opened and hitting the
vehicle.
Larceny � A student reported that his vehicle had been broken into
while it was parked at the Curry Court (Allied Health) lot A CD player
and radar detector were stolen.
Warrant for arrest - A staff member was served an arrest warrant
for disposal of mortgaged property.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from
ECU Police Department records.
College
Democrats,
Republicans raise
awareness
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
The first campus elections have
just ended, national elections are gear-
ing up. The recent excitement of elec-
tion speeches and advertisements are
overwhelming. The consensus is that
this year's elections could be a turn-
ing point in our nation's direction.
TheCollegeDemocrats and Re-
publicans are busy working on cam-
paigns to make sure that all ECU stu-
dents and faculty are aware of the is-
sues and that they are ready for the
elections.
"Our number one goal is to reg-
ister all students and faculty to vote
regardless of their views Larry Free-
man, president of the College Demo-
crats said.
According to theCollege Demo-
crats, a majority of students are reg-
istered to vote in Greenville but less
than 10 percent of ECU's population
is correctly registered to vote or reg-
istered at all. The campus Democrats
and Republicans are working to in-
crease ' hat awareness.
The College Democrats' drive for
voter registration is a campus-wide
effort Within each of the residence
hall lobbies and the lobby of Joyner
Library there have been registration
forms placed, complete with instruc-
tions.
Along with the registration ma-
terial is also a secure box where stu-
dents may leave their registration
forms to be delivered to the Voter
Registration bureau. The deadline for
registration is Oct 10.
In order to register in Greenville
you must be: a U.S. citizen, a resident
of N.C. for 30 days prior to the elec-
tion, 18 years of age by election day,
not registered to vote in any other
county or state and clear of any felony
charges that affect your rights as a
citizen.
"We want to hold lawmakers re-
sponsible for their actions and inform
students about legislators who work
against, instead of for the university
Freeman said.
The College Democrats and Re-
publicans are working hard to create
awareness through other ways besides
registration. Both groups are work-
ing with local and state campaigns to
give student support and to create a
conduit between the students and the
campaigns.
"There is a little known fact of
what we are really about; we exist to
encourage reform Freeman said.
"We are working for the Democrats
to get Congress back
The College Democrats and Re-
publicans are also working to bring
the politicians to the students in or-
der to create mutual awareness be-
tween politicians and the people vot-
ing for them.
"We want to bring in a congress-
man in October, and give the students
and the county of Pitt a chance to
talk about the issuessaid Jessica
Ennis, director of the Pitt County Re
publican Headquarters in Greenville.
Campus political groups are
planning several debates, forums and
speakers for the ECU community to ;
attend. Some are also being planned
for campus.
"We want to do what we can to
bring the views and issues to the stu-
dents as well as let our representa-
tives know what issues concern us
Freeman said. "We want to get rid of
the stereotype that students are laey
and get them involved ZJ,
Both Democrats and Republicans
would like for students to come down
and check out the campaign head-
quarters.
" We have positions for those in-
terested in volunteering; we have cam-
paign literature and stickers for people
to pick up
Anyone interested in participat-
ing in either Democratic or Republi-
can campaigns can contact the respec-
tive headquarters.
Democrats can be reached at 757-
1889. Republicans can be reached at
321-1996.
Employees receive Chancellor's awards
Commendation
given in five
categories
Jacqueline D. Helium
Senior Writer
Several ECU employees, chosen
from five catagories, were recently the
recipients of the first Chancellor's Awards
for Excellence.
Chancellor Richard Eakin hosted a
reception for the five winners of the
award and the other nominees at Men-
denhall on Sept 12th.
"This award was suggested to me
by the Human Resources office. They
thought it would be appropriate to rec-
ognize superior performance by univer-
sity employees, and I agreed with them
Eakin said.
The five categories were: devotion
to duty, innovations, public service, safety
and heroism, and human relations. All
departments on campus were free to
nominate employees they felt were wor-
thy of recognition.
Jasper Barnes, of Housekeeping, re-
ceived the award for devotion to duty,
and was nominated by Rick Karabiac
the academic campus manager with
Housekeeping.
"(Jasper was nominated for) the
hours he puts in at the sports complex,
and the work his crew puts in to get
things ready for sporting events and
cleaning up afterwards Karabiac said.
Two people from the Police Depart-
ment received Chancellor's awards. Di-
rector Teresa Crocker was recognized in
the public service category, and Officer
Johnnie Umphlett for safety and hero-
ism.
"My nomination was for an event
that occurred last year Umphlette said.
"A non-student went to one of the resi-
dent halls with a handgun. He had called
a student he had gone out with a few
times and threatened her. Before he had
the chance to make contact with her, I
arrived and was able to intervene
Crocker was not available to com-
ment on her nomination, but Umphlett
said that she received the award based
on her work in getting the ECU Police
involved in the community and initiat-
ing several innovations in the depart-
ment
The category of human relations
was won by Suzanne Rouse of Central
Printing. Leslie Craigle, the director of
marketing for business services, nomi-
nated Rouse for the award.
"We have a Quest for Excellence
award which is given quarterly. Suzanne
won that award for September '95. Each
person who won in 1995 was nominated
(for the Chancellor's Award) Craigle
said.
The innovations category was won
by Gloria Bradshaw of Academic Library
Services. She is in the Preservation De-
partment in the library.
"I am in charge of repairing the
books in the general collection. 1 also
supervise students and teach them book
repair Bradshaw said.
Bradshaw was nominated by her
supervisor, Elizabeth Smith, who nomi-
nated her because of her willingness M
go beyond the basic job requirements. .
Everyone who was nominated re-
ceived a certificate from the Chancellor.
The winners in each category were also
given an engraved plaque and 16 hours
of vacation time.
Listen to Insight every Wednesday from 8-9 for
news that concerns you! This week John Reeves and
John Long talk more about student fees and the SGA.
Call in and be heard at 328-6913!
The Power Hour takes place every weekday in front of
the student store from 12-1. Giveaways, music, and fun!
Big Concert Giveaways return soon BE THERE!
Q1.3 FM
r East Carolina University
A healing art used in Europe and by the
Royal Family. Learn how you and your
family can benefit from this natural
approach to health. Gain an awareness of
it's effect upon acute or chronic conditions
to include:
Insomnia
Headache .
r
Skin.problems
Digestive problems
Bonny Smith, D.Hom
will present insights about
the value of homeopathy
for these
and other conditions.
Thursday, October 3,
1996 7:00pm
Family Health Medical
3100 Memeorial
Drive
(Across from Parkers)
Greenville, NC
Although admission is free, please call
for reservations.
355-5115
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Lean Cuisine
Lunch Classics9-�.2�.
I ASSORTED VARIETIES
Isnackwell's
I Cookies & Crackers�
'NEW UGHT DUETS OR
Dannon Double
Delights





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 1,1996
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Reading Series brings
acclaimed writers
East Carolina Playhouse
1996-97 Season y
Roger Miller and William Hauptman's
Tony Award-Winning Hit Musical
BIG RIVER
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
OCTOBER 3, 4, 5, 6V 7 AND 8, 1996
RATED. PG
Archibald MacLeish's Pultizer Prize Winning Play
B.
Sophomore Aaron Lewis Jones was killed Sun Sept 29, while riding
a four-wheeler in Warsaw. Due to the gravity and urgency of the situation,
TEC was unable to get more information about the accident before press
time. However, friends and fellow students can contact Jones' aunt, Bar-
bara Jones, at (910)-293-7707 or 1836 Bowden Rd. Warsaw, NC.
Visitation hours will be held today from 7p.m9p.m. at Community
Funeral Home in Warsaw.
Jones' funeral will be held Wed Oct 2. at Friendship United Method-
ist Church.
J
NOVEMBER 14. 15. 16, 17 18 AND 19, 1996
RATED: PG
An Exhilarating Evening of Dance
East Carolina Dance Theatre's
DANCE 97
FEBRUARY 6, 7,8, 9. 10 AND 11, 1997
RATED: PG
Eric Bcgosian's Explosive Drama of Anger and Angst
SUBURBIA
FEBRUARY 27, 28, MARCH 1, 2, 3 AND 4, 1997
RATED: R
Aristophanes' Classic Comic Battle of the Sexes
LYSISTRATA
APRIL 17, 18. 19, 20V 21 AND 22, 1997
RATED: PG-13
On Friday, Sept 27, at approximately 12:45 a.m a male dstudent
was approached by a black male riding a bicycle in the area west of the
Rawl Building. The subject, caring a handgun, requested rhe student's
wallet and took the cash from it The subject left the area heading
west towards the west end of campus.
Anyone with information about these crimes or other crimes
should contact The PittGreenville Crime Stoppers at 758-7777 or
The ECU Police Department at 328-6787. A reward up to $2500 is
available for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of
the person(s) responsible. And remember, you do not have to give
your name.
Multi-sponsored
program begins
this week
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
Editor's Note: Due to unfore-
seen circumstances, Jay Wright will
be unable to participate in the
Writer's Reading Series on Tuesday,
October 1. His programs will be re-
scheduled.
The 1996-97 Writer's Reading
Series set to begin tomorrow will be-
gin a little later. Due to a cancella-
tion, the first reading is now sched-
uled for Nov. 18th.
Julie Fay is the coordinator of the
series and has been instrumental in
bringing writers to Greenville for some
time.
"It started about two years ago. I
had been bringing writers to the area
for a while and wanted to try to bring
as many readers as possible and make
it an actual series Fay said.
Some of the sponsors of this pro-
gram on campus include the English
Department, Ethnic Studies Program,
Women's Studies Program and the
Office of the Vice Chancellor-Re-
search. Off-campus sponsors include,
the Lannan Foundation, the Sheppard
Memorial Library, the Greenville Mu-
seum of Art, Greenville AccuCopy,
Stindt Photographic and the Kinston
Free Press.
"We have two goals for this pro-
gram; one is that the people in this
area learn about these writers, and
the other is that we support writers i
Fay said. "We give a fair amount of
our support to poets, because poets
are supported less than fiction writ-
ers
See READ page 4
Or. In mail:
East Carolina Playhouse
Eat Carolina University
Charge by phone:
v nun' uy initiiiv M ,�.�, i.v.
Or. In mail: . )r- lonu lxy-
East Carolina Playhouse' Q) O QHQ McC.irtnis Theatre
East Carolina University D L0jOtS Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC 27858-4353 1�:�0 �"� il �� l'm
SEASON TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
"Matinee; porturmantcs at 2 (K) p.m : all other dates arc at 8 (K) p.m.
328-6829
Eastern NC's Source for
Maps & Charts � Atlases � jaobfiSiflfEfYJCfi
Recreation, Business or Travel Needs?
We offer a great selection by the bestUSGS Topos
& Aerials � NOSNOAA Aero & Nautical Charts �
Michelin Maps & Guides � Replogle Globes �
Hammond Adases � Rand McNally � DeLormeand
more
563 S. Evans Street at Reade Circle,
Greenville, NC 27834
919-757-2511
Out-Of-Town?
Call toll free 1-800-248-6277
Drug use in the
military declines
TORONTO (AP) - Illicit drug use
in the military has plunged nearly 90
percent since 1980, thanks to a get-
tough policy and declining drug use
in American society, a study says.
Cigarette smoking has dropped
by one-third in the same period, the
report says. The rate of heavy drink-
ing showed a smaller drop, which was
attributed to changes in military de-
mographics.
The report tracked trends from
six worldwide surveys of American
military personnel, each including
about 15,000 to 22,000 participants
who answered confidential question-
naires. The surveys, sponsored by the
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� Check Brake Fluid lew!
SERVICE
AS NEEDED
� lubricate Choliii
� Check 4 Fill Tronsmisn'onTronsoiileFloid
� Check & Fill Differential Fluid
� Check & Fill Power Steering Fluid
� Check & Fill Windshield Washer Fluid
� Check & Fill Battery Water
� InBote fires lo Proper Pressure
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1ST 8PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE Tickets For Students, Staff, and Faculty.
$5 For The General Public
$8 At The Door
Free Tickets Must Be Picked Up In Advance From The
Central Ticket Office In Mendenhall Student Center.
MasterCard and Visa Accepted
For More Informaton Call
1-800-ECU-ARTS or, 328-4788
A CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK EVENT
We Take Customer Service PERSONALLY
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
Only $1 9? "Signature Service"
Not good with any other coupon offer. Cash value of 120th of one cent. Limit one coupon
per person per visit. Good only in Greenville or Jacksonville.
Expires 110696
Defense Department, covered the Air
Force, Army, Navy and Marines. (The
Coast Guard is not part of that de-
partment)
Results were reported Saturday
at the annual meeting of the Amerj
can Psychological Association by Psy-
chologist Robert Bray of the Research
Triangle Institute in Research Tri
angle Park, N.C.
"We found a very dramatic de
dine" in illicit drug use, he said in an
interview before his talk
Survey participants were asked
about drug use within the prior 30
days. When their responses were
weighted to reflect the armed forces
as a whole, they revealed that some
27.6 percent of military personnel
used illicit drugs in 1980.
But the figure fell steadily after
that, to 19 percent in 1982, 8.9 per:
cent in 1985,4.8 percent in 1988,3.4
percent in 1992 and three percent in
1995. The 1995 rate is about one-third
the civilian rate adjusted for differ-
ences in demographic makeup, Bray
said.
The 89 percent decline showed
up about equally in all illicit drugs,
Bray said. There was also an 82 per-
cent drop in illicit drug use within the
12 months prior to the survey.
To explain the trends, Bray cited
an intensified program of urine test-
ing by the military starting in the early
1980s, with a positive finding as
grounds for discharge. "The message
was, DOD was not going to tolerate
drug use Bray said.
Everybody is tested at least an-
nually at random, unannounced times,
said Roger Hartman, a health policy
analyst for the Defense Department.
Expelling drug users is a switch
from prior practice, Hartman said.
"In the past, we had tolerated,
quite frankly, drug users Hartman
said. They were treated and kept in
the military. But in the mid-1980s,
military leaders toughened the policy
and " we simply did not tolerate any
drug use Hartman said.
r
May, October 4
Saturday, October 5
Sunday, October 0
All Dims start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Stall
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
She was their teacher � x,L'?Lrf V-
They were her hope � ' -Hit "�i' L.
L
"Are you being served?"
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Whoopi
Goldberg
Lelcti
Khumali
SARAHNA!
Tlie Sound of Freedom
ggoft.
UOErV,
o Presented by the ECU Student Union, For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004 or Check Out Our Web Sitel
www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
I
Ready For A Miracle? Take A Leap of Faith!
Wednesday Night Sanity Break From Campus!
�5:30pm Student Eucharist Campus Minister:
�Supper Provided after service Fr. Tom Cure
�ProgramConversation after supper Home 752-1583 Work 752-3482
�Add new friends to your life St. Paul's Episcopal Church 401
�Bring a friend with you! East 5th Street 752-3482
�Be a part of a faith community
Cross 5th St. in front of Garrett Hail, walk down
Holly St. and you are here






Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
Lean mice show
Way to end obesity
(AP) - Surprisingly skinny mice
cheated in a Seattle genetics lab may
offer hints at why some people can
eat all they want and still stay thin.
Researchers have found that
with a single genetic alteration, they
dan turn up a natu-
ral metabolic fur-
rjace in mice so the
animals burn more
fet Experts said that
people might eventu-
ally be able to con-
trol their weight by
doing the same
thing, or by exploit-
ing related pro-
cesses.
; Mice with the
mutation have about
6! percent body fat,
compared with
about 15 percent in
their unaltered
brethren. But even
more impressive, the
genetically altered
riice can eat a high-
fit diet without ill effects.
! Even after four months on a diet
with the fat content of a Sausage
McMuffin, mice with the mutation
bjad bulked up to only the normal
rftouse body fat content
; "That's what is the most dra-
matic said pharmacologist G.
Stanley McKnight of the University
qf Washington in Seattle. "When you
put these animals on a diet that's
nore like what Americans typically
ejat they still stay thin
Scientists will have to learn
much more about what's going on in
the thin mice before drugs can be
developed for humans. And because
the field of obesity research is full of
mutated mice, the best drugs may
well come from another line of re-
search.
"These kinds of experiments
ultimately will produce a great deal
of insight about how people regulate
Hieir body fat content said Dr.
Bradford Lowell, an endocrinologist
at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston.
� The University of Washington
researchers produced the skinny
mice by deleting a single gene in the
animals. That deletion altered the
properties of an enzyme, known as
protein kinase A, in the brown fat of
the animals.
"Basically there are two kinds
of fat and white fat is the kind of
storage depot that we all know and
love McKnight explained. "Brown
fat is a much more metabolically ac-
tive and more specialized tissue
Brown fat appears to be involved
in regulating body heat Rather than
serving as a passive energy reposi-
tory, it responds to cold by burning
other sources of energy, including
white fat Past studies have found
that brown fat is more abundant in
hibernating animals, newborn infants
and maybe even adults who have
spent lots of time outdoors in win-
try climes.
The part of the enzyme that the
Seattle researchers altered regulates
the process that brown fat uses to
urn energy into heat Changing the
Structure of the enzyme accelerates
that process, making it consume
more energy, the Seattle researchers
reported in Thursday's issue of the
journal Nature.
That finding might help explain
why some people who maintain sen-
sible diets are overweight while oth-
ers can eat
"These kinds of
experiments
ultimately will
produce a great
deal of insight
about how people
regulate their
body fat content
� Dr. Bradford Lowell, an
endocrinologist at Beth Israel
Hospital in Boston
recklessly and
stay thin.
Research-
ers estimate
that dozens of
genes govern-
ing a number
of A drug that
had the same
effect in hu-
mans as the
genetic alter-
ation does in
mice could
conceivably
help humans
control their
weight Such a
drug probably
won't be nec-
essary, Lowell
said, because an earlier step in the
fat-burning pathway has already-
shown more promise as an interven-
tion point
"It's an incremental advance in
the field Lowell said of the Seattle
research. "There will be further re-
finements of these types of experi-
ments
READ from page 3
Fay said she was particularly
proud to have the Lannan Foundation
as a sponsor, as they are a large orga-
nization on the west coast
"They sponsor literary programs
around the country. We are very for-
tunate to have their support because
most of the programs they support
are very large and well established,
whereas we are a fairly new program
Fay said.
The readings will consist of two
distinct programs. An evening session,
followed by a reception, will concen-
trate more on just a reading of the
author's work. The afternoon session
will provide an opportunity to ask
questions of the writer.
"Each writer will present two pro-
grams. The afternoon program is
called "Meet the Writer" and is held
at the Greenville Museum of Art In
the evening they have a reading at the
Willis Building, on First and Reade
Fay said.
Fay encourages everyone to come
to these events. They are not formal
events, she says, and people can come
as they are. They are free and open to
both the ECU and Greenville commu-
nities.
"People who think they won't
want to come to these things may be
surprised Fay said.
The writers who are invited for
this series are chosen for their appeal
to the community, the quality of their
writing, their desire to meet readers
of their work and the diversity of their
backgrounds. Rafael Campo, and poet
and nonfiction writer, will be coming
on Nov. 18, followed by Margaret
Randall on Dec. 2.
UNO from page 1
p.m. to 8:30 p.m three additional
hearings are scheduled for North
Carolina Central University, UNC
Charlotte and Winston-Salem State
University.
On Friday, Oct 18, Elizabeth City
State University will hold the final
hearing.
The president of the UNC-system
presides over the oldest university in
America, and the 16 campuses which
it encompasses. Over 154,000 stu-
dents attend the various institutions,
all of which offer baccalaureate degree
programs. In addition to baccalaure-
ate programs, the UNC-system offers
two medical schools, one teaching
hospital, two law schools, a veterinary'
school, a school of pharmacy, ten
nursing programs, 15 schools of edu-
cation, three schools of engineering
and a specialized school for perform-
ing artists.
The president is also responsible
for a system which includes the UNC
Center for Public Television and the
NC School of Science and Mathemat-
"The president will set the over-
all direction of the entire university
system Marvin said. "The focal point
of what will happen in North Caro-
lina over the next decade depends on
the type and quality of education of-
I
fered at the universities
Interested parties, unable to at-
tend the hearing may write a letter �
the Leadership Statement CommitteS,
P. 0. Box 2688, Chapel HiU, NC 27516-
2688.
'
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Marvin said the next president
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Phone 756-5244
Hours: 8am-5:30pm Monday-Friday Bam-1:00pm Saturday
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Open Hours:Tues-Sun 10:00am - 7:00pm
� Grocery Items & Fresh Vegetables
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Tofu � Soy Food � Fish � Soy Sauce
� Rice � Sesame Oil � Tea � Candy �
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Natural Life Special Events & Student Union Films Committee presents:
Drive-In Movie:
Now Showing
"Friday"
Thursday, October 3 at 9:00 p.m.
in the Chancellor's VIP Parking Lot.
(located on Charles Blvd. between Minges Coliseum and Harrington Field)
Drive up or bring a blanket!
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For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387
or call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Hjji.i.� jp





r-j -
jaammmmmumsmwmm
Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
-�rfs-i
Ociftlteu
Voice your
concerns I
The UNC-
System is
finding a new
president and
ECU students
can make the
their concerns
known.
The search is on.
UNC-system officials are seeking pulic input to fill the soon-to-be-va-
cant position of president A f m will be held from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30
p.m. Wednesday so a panel can listen to the public in Blue Auditorium in
the Brody Building. So what?
To students pounding across campus everyday, the highest echelons
of administration probably seem extremely distant and unfamiliar. TEC
aims to bring this into perspective. After all, every decision at the top
ultimately trickles towards the bottom. It is our obligation to know who
our leadership officials are and what they are doing.
Considering the large amount of feedback TEC received from stu-
dents who were unhappy with a recent bill passed by our SGA, we suggest
that students take more interest in who our leadership officials are at all
stages. It is our obligation to be informed of who is making policy and
what that policy is.
The UNC president is the chief administrator for all 16 of the univer-
sities in North Carolina. Former state senator and chairperson for the
Greenville hearing Helen Marvin said the next UNC president will effect
students for many years to come.
"The president sets the overall direction of the entire university sys-
tem Marvin said.
Marvin is right This is why students should be aware not only of the
job the UNC president does and who heshe is, but also, that if they
desire, students have the opportunity to provide input to the panel Wednes-
day night
Current UNC-system President, C. D. Spangler, Jr 64, announced
plans to retire after 11 years. Spangler hopes to retire by June 30, 1997.
In the meantime, the Board of Governors has formed a Leadership
Statement Committee to solicit public comment
Spangler is the president of the oldest public university in America,
which encompasses 16 institutions across the state. Over 154, 000 stu-
dents are enrolled in degree programs among the universities.
Pause a moment to consider the influence that the next president
will have on the future of ECU and North Carolina in general.
Should the next president be a former chancellor or businessperson?
What about a Republican or a Democrat? Do we want a baby boomer or
someone from our generation?
Our Student Government Association has appointed a student repre-
sentative to attend the meeting on behalf of the student body. For this
reason, we are not suggesting every student get excited and head for the
hearing.
Knowing who our leadership officials are and what they do is an
important step.
If YOU llANL a complaint �
COmtiX WtZITC A LLTTE-E. JO
All letters must be:
� typed
� 250 words or less
� include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
"If we had no winter, the spring would not
be so pleasant; if we did not sometimes
taste of adversity, prosperity would not be
so welcome
�2lo
BbEl&925 ,

9
The East Carolinian
&
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege. Advertising Director
Marguerite Be.ja.in, News Editor � Miller, As. Prod. Manager
Amy L. Royster, Assiant News Editor Crlstle Farley, Production Assistant
JaMyers, Lifestyle Editor Artley Settle, Production Assiant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Blgelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor -� Crnmpton, Copy Editor
Nil Dillard Assiant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor P�"l �� Wright, Media Adviser
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator '�� Resness, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The leadledttoriaTIeach
�Z the opinion of Z Editoria. Board. The East CaroHnian welcomes letters to the ���� �"� 3��J
for decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must � "
ZSSSZSSi Ed�or, The East CaroHnian. locations Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27854353. For information, all (919)
328-6366.
Masters of the Universe?
When I was about nine or 10,
there was a show entitled He-Man and
the Masters of the Universe. The one
thing that you could always count on
was that no matter what the problem,
He-Man could always count on being
able to call on the powers of the Uni-
verse, harness them and save the day.
Today we live in a remarkable era.
We are able to enjoy luxuries never
before afforded to our ancestors. In
many ways our innovations have made
the world a better place, or has it?
We can first look at the world of
politics. Before true mass media and
the electronic transfer of data, there
wasn't much we knew about politi-
cians other than what local papers
printed of their views on issues or a
speech we were able to witness. To-
day we are abie to have access to ev-
erything about politicians from their
voting records to where they like to
vacation.
In the' 60s, there was big reform
in Canada to protect the Harp seals
from being hunted. The population
has rebounded remarkably; but now,
the population explosion coupled with
the skill of the fishing industry to find
the fish schools has left the�od fish
stocks devastated. Now the Director
of Fish and Game has imposed a mora-
torium on Cod fishing and called for
destruction of 300,000 of the three
million Harp seal population.
In sports, we have the invention
of equipment and supplements that
are designed protect athletes from
injury and allow them to raise the
level of their play. The problem: while
Christopher S. Arline
Opinion Columnist �
We are able
enjoy Juxufi
ai
athletes are bigger, stronger and
faster than ever before, the better
equipment instills them with less fear
of getting injured. They, in turn, put
themselves in a more trivial position.
Their muscles are stronger but their
tendons aren't and they have a
greater potential of attaining more
chronic injuries than before.
Since we are on the subject of
injuries, let's look at medicine. One
hundred years ago, there was almost
no such thing as a medical malprac-
tice suit. As medicine has become
more accomplished, there is a public
sentiment that the work of physicians
be flawless.
The problem: we worry more
than our ancestors about things hap-
pening. We tend to feel that because
of the increases in safety and profi-
ciency, we are no longer apt to find
ourselves in bad situations. Mishaps
encourage improvements and improve-
ments encourage a sometimes overcon-
fident sense of security. ,
This summer I read a book by
Edward Tenner, entitled Why Things
Bite Back: Technology and the R&
venge of Unintended Consequences.
In this book, he offers his own corol-
lary to Murphy's Law. (If there is any-
thing that can possibly go wrong, it
will.) His theory is that sometimes the
only way something can go right is
by first going terribly wrong. This
being the case, he insists improve-
ments in the way things are done are
usually only a result of something
going wrong.
New beach homes built on
Hatteras Island are required to be a
specific distance behind the dunes.
This is a result of the mistakes learned
in Kill Devil Hills, where all the homes
built right up against the dunes are
falling into the ocean.
Perhaps we are better off as a
result of the problems we have cre-
ated. We may have an excessively
close eye on our politicians, but that
increases the chance that they will
make more honest decisions knowr
ing that big brother (the voter) is
watching. -
Doctors scared of facing the
ramifications of a job poorly done will
probably raise the level of diligence
in their work. j
The one thing that we have to!
face is that we are not the Masters,
of the Universe and new problem
will always arise. Things will have to
first go wrong in order for jus to invl
prove. jl
The East Carolinian is looking for a wire
editor. Our wire editor is expected to know
how to use Mac's with Microsoft Word. You
will be pulling stories off the A.P. wire into
word, and searching for interesting articles
for each section. If you are interested appjf
at our offices on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building (across from
Joyner).
4s
i
� Anne Bradstreet
9mm9mmmmmmmmmfmmmmgmmmKSKKmsf9HtKBK
�j �





Tuesday, October 1, 1996
The East Carolinian
LIHe
There is nothing more
useless than screaming at a
wall. It's just spittle and
bricks, bricks and spittle.
However, if you put enough
voices together, that wail
might just be blown over. So
join in another futile at-
tempt to change the status
quo and listen to a "Scream
at the Wall
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyles Editor
We in the Lifestyle section
feel so strongly about the prob-
lem of violence in America that
we felt it deserved more atten-
tion than it was given last week.
So here goes:
The media is filled with
violence. This is the one of
the most overused, hyped, ex-
aggerated statements of the
20th century. Last week, the
Lifestyle editor stated his
opinion on how blaming the
media for the world's prob-
lems is a simplified solution
to a much deeper problem.
This week, I spit out my two
cents.
Movies, television, music,
books, plays, everything artis-
tic reeks with violence, and
many groups focus on popu-
lar culture as the source for
the breakdown of traditional
family values. I only wish it
was that easy. I'd gladly give
up every exciting action se-
quence I have ever witnessed
on any screen for a peaceful
world where murder, rape, tor-
ture, and crime in general are
myths we only hear of in
folktales.
The reality of the situa-
tion is that violence is part of
our world, no matter how
many Quentin Tarantino films
you ban and burn.
But not all popular me-
dia glorifies violence. Sure,
we have the Sylvester
Stallones and the Steven
Seagals out there, but there
are also some very concerned,
conscientious artists working
to address violence as a cul-
tural concern.
Take Tim Robbins for in-
stance. His film Dead Man
Walking dared to honestly ex-
amine a very touchy contem-
porary subject - capital pun-
ishment. His film featured a
scene in which two men rape
a woman and then kill both
the woman and her helpless
boyfriend. Believe me, the
scene was unnerving and un-
pleasant. Dead Man Walking
also showed a scene in which
one of the men responsible
for the horrible rape and mur-
der is executed through lethal
injection. This was another
unnerving and unpleasant
scene.
But I question as to
whether or not the execution
scene would be unnerving for
other Americans.
While Dead Man Walk-
ing is a prime example of a
film that uses violence to ad-
dress a social concern, it is
also a film that is critical of
our society's decision to mur-
der a murderer. But many
Americans believe in the "eye
for an eye" mentality. You
murder someone 1 care for, I'll
See SCREAM page 8
P.H. Polk's photos
bring past to life
Wright Auditorium
will dance all night
Dance Theatre
brings welcome
recognition to NC
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
One of the world's premier
dance companies is coming home.
The S. Rudolph Alexander Perform-
ing Arts Series is bringing the North
Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) to
Wright Auditorium.
NCDT was founded in 1970 at
the North Carolina School of the
Arts and is considered to be at the
forefront of the national dance
scene. In the 27 years since its
founding, it has become renowned
for its magnificent dancers, intensity
and outstanding repertoire ranging
from adaptations of full-length clas-
sical ballets to imaginative and origi-
nal contemporary work.
There have recently been a few
changes in the leadership team be-
See DANCE page 9
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
The nationally recognized NC Dance Theatre will be performing
at ECU in Wright Auditorium on Wednesday, Oct. 2, at 8 p.m.
&ultWHzt 4ouwiete&4, 20ee�
Black Man Rising serves as
centerpiece for cultural events
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
This picture of Theodore and Cornelius Polk, taken in 1936,
is one of 33 photographs exhibited in Mendenhall Gallery.
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
A new photo exhibit at the Men-
denhall Student Center Gallery allows
students and other members of the
ECU community to have the opportu-
nity to experience history.
The pictures of the famed photog-
rapher P.H. Polk recall a history of the
African-American experience in the
Deep South.
The exhibit, part of the events
planned for ECU's Cultural Awareness
week, opens on Friday. Oct. 4 and will
run through Oct 27.
The Student Union
Visual Arts and Cul-
tural Awareness
committees are co-
sponsoring the
event.
I.ynn Caverly,
assistant director of
student activities,
said the Student
Union is very ex-
cited about being
able to feature the
exhibit.
"We thought this would be a good
one to have in conjunction with Cul-
tural Awareness week Caverly said.
Polk, born in Alabama in 18HK. is
perhaps most famous for his photo-
graphs of Lhe prominent scientist
George Washington Carver. Carver was
an associate of Polk's at the Tuskegee
Normal and Industrial Institute, where
Polk served as official school photog-
rapher for more than 40 years. Polk
died in 19K5 jt the age ol w7
The exhibit will
graphs of Polk's associati si ! �
along with I is photographs t fi an-
American rural farm workers and his
portraits of upper middle class black
families.
A total of 33 Polk photographs are
featured.
Polk's artwork is part of the
Southern Art Federation's (SAF) Folk
Arts and Southern Culture Traveling
Exhibits Program. The SAF works in
conjunction with state art agencies in
Alabama. Florida. Georgia. Kentucky,
Louisiana, Mississippi. North Carolina.
South Carolina and Tennessee to pro-
mote the arts in the South.
This is the first time a SAF exhibit
has been featured at ECU.
An opening re-
ception for the Polk
exhibit is slated for
Friday from 7-8
p.m. in the Menden-
hall Gallery.
Caverly said
she is pleased with
this year's planned
events for Cultural
Awareness week,
but she hopes more
minority groups
- will be represented
in the future.
"We would like to expand and in-
clude more in this program each year
she said.
Some groups, such as gays and
lesbians, Hispanics and women are not
being represented. Caverly added.
"We need input from these groups
to he successful she explained. "We
need to know what things we should
bring in to appeal to them
It you would like to get involved
"i ue simply looking for more infer-
about the Polk exhibit and
Cultural Awareness week, please call
the student Union at 3284711.
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
James H. Chapmyn's Black Man Rising, a play based on true events, will be performed in
Hendrix Theatre on Tuesday, Oct. 1, at 8 p.m. as part of a campus cultural celebration.
"We thought this
would be a good
exhibit to have
in conjunction
with Cultural
Awareness week
� I.ynn Caverly, assistant
director tit" student activities
Multiculturalism
finds its place on
campus this week
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyles Editor
Multiculturalism has been dealt
a lot of harsh criticisms lately. Some
people see cultural awareness as a
threat to established hierarchies.
Others believe multicultural atti-
tudes privilege minority groups over
all others, resulting in programs that
unnecessarily focus on and lift up
minority groups. According to this
world view, multiculturalism only
furthers cultural problems by pay-
ing so much attention to one's cul-
tural identity.
In an effort to counter such
negative press, the ECU Student
Union Cultural Awareness commit
tee presents "Splash of Color a cel-
ebration ot Cultural Awareness
Week which will run through Oct.
5. The goal is to prove that
multiculturalism is a positive pro-
gression towards breaking down
cultural barriers and creating an
open environment where individu-
als from various backgrounds can
peacefully celebrate their heritage.
"Splash of Color" is an open
event for all to enjoy, and it is an
event that is
relevant to
ECU now
more than
ever. ECU's
minority
population
is steadily in-
creasing,
and this fall
alone 13
new ini.
tional stu-
dents
2 1 count i les
became part
of our ram-
pus.
E C U
now has stu-
dents from
such countries -i Germany, China.
Sweden Australia, Japan, Austria.
England, Finland, the Netherlands,
Russia, rgentina, Canada Costa
Rica, Curaca , the Dominion Repub-
lic, El Salvador. Korea. No
Spain. Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan.
"Splash of Color" is an assured sign
that ECU welcomes people from any
and all cultures
Events for Cultural A
Week have
already be-
� -
MAN
av,
denha
111 IIP
Chat!
Y ousel
S a n s o u r
lectured on
"The Fu-
ture ol Pal-
� : ��" in
the Men
denhail Un-
ound.
O t h e r
p i a n n e d
event in-
clude an in-
ternational
celebration
on Oct 2 in
the Men
drive-
See RISING page 9





fftV I � �? .
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 1,1996
SW evtecv
Edwin McCain calls Attic home
Our critic gets to
root of things with
popular vocalist -
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
In a recent up-close and per-
sonal interview, I was able to speak
with Edwin McCain about last
year's tour, the band's new drum-
mer, their new album, the time he
took to live a while, and finally, his
return home to the Attic.
"It doesn't seem like a ytar, but
it has been. For the last three
(years) I've been so determined,
forced, and almost compulsively
focused towards this goal that what
I've been failing to do is live a little
bit McCain said.
It seemed as if he were confess-
ing it all. Edwin's been having fun.
He's been living life to its fullest
and is not ashamed of it.
"Playing every night and drink-
ing in bars is great he said. "But
if you don't have the balance of liv-
ing another life and spending time
with people and friends and doing
things that you'd like to do, then
you can't really appreciate how
beautiful music is. because it even-
tually becomes a job
And what a job it has been.
McCain took off from the Attic last
year to do the Letterman show, to
take the band on a great tour with
Bob Weir and the Allman Brothers,
to perform at last year's Barefoot
on the Mall, and cnce again, to re-
turn to the Attic.
"I can't wait to play here again.
It's a great venue. It's definitely in
the top five said McCain as he ea-
gerly awaited the show that
evening.
The band opened up with a
new tune called "Tip of My
Tongue I was very impressed. It's
very melodic and gives Edwin more
room to breathe vocally. Bassist
Scott Bannevich also had room to
show off his outrageous delay tech-
nique. I heard the drummer ask him
in soundcheck, "Does that thing
ever sound like a bass?"
After the first song, with a
quick breath, McCain announced,
"Damn it's good to be back in
Greenville as the band took off
into "Alive the first song on their
debut album Jesters, Dreamers,
and Thieves.
"Alive" allows Craig Shields to
bring out his electric flute and blow
the minds of all that can hear it.
The crowd received the energy well
and took off with the band as the
night proceeded on.
Midway through the concert
the band jammed out a tune called
"America Street It's a song about
Photo Courtesy of Lava Records
One of these happy guys has recently been canned from the
band. If you can't get it in three guesses, throw in the hat.
Friday, October 4
Saturday, October 5
For More Monratton, Cal the
SMent Unton Hottne at 82841004.
Al Urns sort at fcOO PM unless otherwise noted
and are HH to Students, Faculty, and Stan
(one guest snowed) with valid ECU D.
No Backpacks Ttooktags Mowed in Hentfrix Theatre
a street in Charleston, S.C. The
houses are falling down and people
are having a hard time finding an
affordable place to live.
Would you believe that Edwin,
with a little help from his friends,
has started The America Street
Foundation? It's a movement to get
government loans to build afford-
able housing for those who need
it.
Hootie & the Blowfish, The
Gibb Droll Band, Warren Haynes
and McCain himself came together
for the first show about three weeks
ago and raised $200,000. The goal
is to get corporate sponsors
onboard and do about ten shows a
year in support of the cause. With
bands like that, raising money
shouldn't be a problem and, hope-
fully, a few more people will find
comfort in their own homes once
again.
"We're working with Matt
Rollins (the keyboardist for Lyle
Lovett) and Kenny Creenberg in
Nashville. We're also working with
Ed Rolland and Matt Sorletic of
Collective Soul
It seems that the band is turn-
ing it out from all sides these days.
But they aren't happy with every-
thing.
"Hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars get wasted every day in the mu-
sic industry, even just on videos
aione said McCain. "Our last video
got played like twice, and that cost,
us $70,000 to make. I'd rather have
that money go to something bet-
ter
And that's exactly what he is
doing as The America Street Foun
dation gets larger every moment.
But charity work isn't all that's on.
the McCain's mind.
"We're getting deep into the
new record McCain sajd. "I want'
to call it The Return of Stinky
McCain and the Band With No
Shame but everybody's vetoed me
Sec McCAIN page 9
Si-?
f tilt!& MlE:ff & MlEiHB UHRHB !�
r

���
:
to Mendenhall Student Center
w
��
H
8
There aie some parents
who never had to deal with the
subject of marijuana.
nd. unfortunately, they are the parent
families tint only live in tin world ol TV sitcoms
Parents who never hail real worries. But the truth
is. the subject of marijuana has become universal
today. It touches families no matter where the)
take the time to talk to your children about mari-
juana. Anil take the tune to listen You may not
have all the right answers, hut your interest and
caring will mean something u them And that, by
today's standards, may iust make you the perfect
:
m
:
m
��
:
m
Midnight
Madness
Y OUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
Mi
���
s
� ��:
s
til
Nobody spends All Hallows Eve like
Mendenhall Student Center -
DJ Dance, Costume & Pumpkin Carving
Contests, Midnight Buffet.
THURSDAY, OCT. 31 9 P.M. - 2 A.M.
T
Calling ail musically talented andor extremely funny students.
Win $$$$ in the MasterCard Acts College Talent Search.
Contestant registration forms are available from the information desk.
The deadline for entry is FRIDAY, OCT. 4
c
5rm
Friday (R) Oct. 3 at 9 p.m.
Orive-in Movie in the Pirate Club parking lot
Free admission with an ECU I.D.
Get carded
m
:
tit
Stop by the Multi-Purpose Room to get your student I.D. card on
Wednesday, Oct 2 and Friday, Oct. 4 from 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Be sure to bring your activity sticker and driver's license

S
:
K
���,
live, on TV and ofl s a parent in the real work parent. For more inform
ition call l-8(X)29-b686.
Partnership For A Drug-Free North Carolina
Partnership For A Drug-Free America
1-888-7 32-PFNC
TAKE A BREAK
with bowling, billiardstable tennis.video arcade games.
Call 328-4738 for operation hours.
MENDEIHALiSTUDENTCENTER � ffipfoCenterofMSh
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowiing � Billiards � Video Games Oj:
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board kN
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand � Bi
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m. �;
�SI tiff 5 'Blfc't f & Wf .f 15 Klfc-f f 5 MMB
� ��
IS
���"�. ��





8
Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
@D l�eriecx
.d. reviews legend
�Lb pay full mice
ZZTop
Rhythmeen
Pat Reid
StaffWriter
Take three aging rockers, add a
heaping helping of Texas flavor, a touch
of Mississippi blues, and a taste of Mexi-
can spice and you either get indigestion
or the new ZZ Top album Rhythmeen.
Yet another brick in the house that
ZZ built Rhythmeen reflects the char-
acteristics of recent ZZ Top albums such
as Antenna more than the earlier songs
that have permanently embedded them-
selves into classic rock radio. Gone are
the songs like "Tush "La Grange and
"Legs and in their place are songs
more reflective of "My Head's In Mis-
sissippi
Case in point, the title track
"Rhythmeen" comes complete with
smashing guitar riffs, an almost dance-
like drum loop, and the ZZ Top trade-
mark vocal growl. The biggest difference
between current ZZ Top and the older
material is the focus on the rhythm sec-
tion. In days of old the guitar was the
main voice in the song and everything
else was merely back-up. Now the bass
and drums seem to mesh more cohe-
sively with the howl of the guitar.
Before going any further, I must
call attention to the main thing hold-
ing this album back: the songwriting.
The songs on Rhythmeen are like a
sports car with a slow driver. The musi-
cal unit is tight and powerful, but with
songs like "Loaded" (which is about get-
ting that way) and a fair share of songs
buy It used
can't even
hum alenft
about sex and the eternal search for it,
the album lulls greatly when it comes
to singing along. In fact, the older ZZ
Top gets, the harder it is to pick out the
lyrics from just listening. Maybe it's co-
incidence or maybe they know they're
in trouble lyrically and are trying to hide
it You decide.
Excluding the aforementioned
ones, there are some good songs here.
The first single, "What's Up With That"
is receiving substantial airplay and will
probably do a good job of selling the
album to the fans. More laid back and
accessible to diverse musical tastes
than most of the songs on the album,
it's actually reminiscent of their old hit
"Thank You except this version comes
with distorted guitar. �
"Vincent Price Blues" and
"Prettyhead" show the influence of the
blues mentioned earlier. Straight from
the hip blues songs with crunching riffs
and a pounding backbeat, they leave
any listener feeling the power of the
ZZ Top. To put it simply, the guitar
alone shook my floor without even
being cranked up very loud. However,
"Vincent Price Blues" is the better of
the two simply because of its lyrical
taue It from a
friend
runaway
superiority.
The "most different" award for this
album goes to "My Mind Is Gone The
main vibe of the song is unlike any-
thing ZZ Top has ever done. The one
line chorus is weak, but the musical
diversity makes up for it Very experi-
mental for ZZ Top, "My Mind" comes
shining through as a great success.
"She's Just Killing Me" may sound
familiar to radio listeners and movie-
goers. Released earlier in the year, "Kill-
ing Me" was featured in the Quentin
Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez film,
From Dusk Til Dawn. Playing in the
background during a rowdy bar scene,
the song fit the job in the movie per-
fectly. It also helped prepare fans for
the rawer, driving sound ZZ Top has
now adopted.
In fact, the sound is so different
that it seems the men who helped make
Texas-fried blues popular can barely be
recognized as belonging in that genre
now. Mississippi blues meets Califor-
nia hard rock seems a more appropri-
ate description of their sound. If this
is either confusing or interesting, check
out Rhythmeen and you shouldn't be
disappointed.
SCREAM from page 6
murder you. This is how ancient bar-
barian civilizations used to handle
things. And we're conceited enough
to think that we've progressed so
much as human beings?
Capital punishment is once
again a hot topic for news programs
because a man is now imprisoned
for murdering a young girl. Richard
Davis, the killer of young Polly
Klaas, shocked the nation last week
when he implied that Polly's father,
Marc Klaas, was a child molester.
Davis stated that Polly begged him
not to "do her like daddy does
thereby enraging Mr. Klaas and the
nation. Davis had barely uttered
these unbearable words when
Polly's father told Davis to "burn in
hell" and lunged after his daughter's
killer. Mr. Klaas had to be restrained
and escorted out of court.
The truth of Davis' statement
is irrelevant. What is relevant,
though, is how the public will react
to the killer's accusation. My bet is
that by making such a harsh claim
against the murdered girl's father,
Davis has sealed his fate - the ma-
jority of the American public will
want the killer to be executed. He
has it coming.
This is the point of the game
where I get confused. We Americans
constantly complain about how vio-
lent the world has become. We con-
stantly want the world to be a bet-
ter place. If we see murder as an in-
humane act, then how can we jus-
tify murder when it comes to capi-
tal punishment?
Let's not even get into the idea
that someone in Mr. Klaas' position
is not in the right frame of mind to
determine if executing Polly's mur-
derer is the right thing to do. Let's
not even address the fact that ex-
ecuting a convict costs the Ameri-
can taxpayer much more money
than imprisoning and trying to re-
educate that same convict. Let's not
even get into the possibility that
many people who are executed are
totally innocent of the crimes for
which they have been blamed. Let's
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just look at ourselves.
Humans are violent beings. We
always have been. We all have it
within our abilities to kill another
living creature. But what makes us
human (supposedly) is our struggle
to be better than our base nature.
We are violent, but we are also in-
telligent beings who have structured
a society with a moral code � "Thou
shall not kill No one (not the poli-
ticians, not the enforcers of the law,
not the families of the victims) is
above our human moral code. It
seems to be a simple enough ques-
tion: do we as humans have the right
to play God even with someone who
has murdered?
If our society is truly progress-
ing, then let's find an alternative to
capital punishment. There's got to
be a better way to deal with those
who break our laws. If we can't get
beyond our inner desires to kill, then
let's stop being hypocritical about
ourselves and our great society.
When you take away the dazzling
technology, the great architecture,
and the hip sense of fashion, we are
still nothing but uncivilized barbar-
ians.
And once and for all, stop blam-
ing the media. Placing blame on -
something as banal as a movie or a
TV show is a simplified solution that
would only work in a Utopian soci-
ety. We're going to have to work a
little harder than that.
HyrnnSing 96 !
A Community-wide Celebration
OCTOBER 5,1996
I Minges Coliseum 7:00 PMI
I
COME AND
JOIN 5000 OF
YOUR FRIENDS
AND
NEIGHBORS IN
PRAISING GOD
IN WORSHIP
AND SONG!
1
Sing a joyful
noise unto the
Lord!
Let everything
that has breath
praise the
LordlHallehijah!
Psalms
Featuring a 1000 voice choir,
congregational singing, and nationally
acclaimed speaker Norm Nelson,
President of The Morning Chapel Hour.
Heard daily a 7 30 AM on 92 5 FM
Admission is FREE! � bring a friend!
m
Co-sponsored by the Christian Medical Dental Society, Campus Crusade, Promise
Keepers, and Pastors United for Revival of Greenville.
A NEW PLAY BY JAMES H. GHAPMYN
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1ST
8PM HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE Tickets For Students, Staff and Faculty.
$5 For The General Public $8 At The Door
Free Tickets Must Be Picked Up In Advance From The
Central Ticket Office In Mendenhall Student Center.
MasterCard8 and Visa Accepted
A CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK EVENT
For More Information Call The Student Union Hotline At 328-6004
��





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 1,1996
MCCAIN from page 7
on that
It's good to know that he fights
through the pressure and finds only
laughter. Edwin gives the credit of
this new family atmosphere to the
band's new drummer, Dave.
A studio musician from Nash-
ville that has the stamina of record-
ing for 20 hours at a time, "Dave
just glued it all together McCain
said. Dave made them closer as a
'family when bad vibes were getting
started. It's always good to have
someone there to keep your feet on
the ground when your eyes are con-
stantly in the stars.
As the night came to close and
everyone had a good dose of
McCain, he approached the crowd
with "3 A.M It's a song about his
passion to write and play all the
time. No matter what the time is,
it's always there, waiting to be heard.
When I asked him after the At-
tic show to compare this year's crowd
to last year's, he responded quickly,
"Man, I don't think crowds can rock
any harder than they do here. So
judging this is like judging the best
thing in the world. Great is Great
YOLLBd
be here
Advertising in The East Carolinian can
get your message out around the ecu
CAMPUS.
For more information call
!
328-2000
�.
ERIES
in Prophecy
TtkU tie tfwi 2.000 ��fe i
TVvdd Puu a KhxU Zkuutet?
viniiv .S.itui d.iy niih' Oit .ii 7 ISp;
CHURCH AUDITORIUM
261 I I lOtli'Stu-c;
FkEL C Inlfii.
NIGHTLY AT 7 I b PM
I
Saturday, Oct. 5 LIVING BEYOND 2000. How to
thrive in life's toughest times.
Sunday, Oct. 6 COUNTDOWN TO ETERNITY.
Prophecy predicts the coming of a new world. You can be
part of it.
Tuesday, Oct. 8 A WORLD IN TURMOIL Over 20
signs of Christ's second coming have been revealed; there
is one left!
Wednesday, Oct. 9 ANGEL 911: REVELATION'S
ANGELIC CONFLICT. If God is so good, why do so
many innocent people suffer?
Friday, Oct. 11 HOW TO FIND PERSONAL
PEACE. The real answer to guilt, discouragement and low
esteem.
Saturday, Oct. 12 ALIVE AT END TIME: LIVING
TO THE FULLEST. How to break undesirable habits
and transform your past
Sunday. Oct. 13 THE NEW AGE CONSPIRACY:
PSYCHIC PHENOMENON ANDTHE REAL
TRUTH ABOUT THE END TIME. How to keep from
being deceived in the days ahead.
Plus, a continuing series-of
SPLASH
OF
COLOR
CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK
SEPTEMBER 30 - OCTOBER 5
TUESDAY OCTOBER 1
"BLACKMAN RISING"
8PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE! FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY, & STAFF
PUBLIC: $5 IN ADVANCE, ALL TICKETS $8 AT THE DOOR
FREE TICKETS MUST BE PICKED UP IN ADVANCE
FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL.
THURSDAY OCTOBER 3
DRIVE-IN MOVIE: "FRIDAY"
8PM
VIP PARKING LOT, CHARLES BLVD
FREE! WITH VALID ECU STU
UDENT ID
FRIDAY OCTOBER 4
OPENING RECEPTION
THE PHOTOGRAPHS OFP.KPOLK
7PM-8PM fife
MSC GALLERY
FREEI

�'
Studanr Union Culhiro! Awareness Cc
Sponsored by the ECU ttudant Union Culhiro! Awareness Committee
For More Information Call A� Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
or Visit Our Web Page at: www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html
IxlvlJN VI from page 6
day; an exhibit of the photos of P.
H. Polk from 7-8 p.m. in the Men-
denhall Gallery; and a video dance
party in the Mendenhall Social
Room from 10 p.m2 a.m. on Oct.
5.
Another key event for Cultural
Awareness Week is Black Man Ris-
ing, a one-act dramatic presentation
that celebrates the achievements of
the African-American male. The
show, which is described as a
"choreopoem is written by James
H. Chapmyn, an artist whose work
carries a powerful message filled
with hope and pride.
Black Man Rising is, according
to Chapmyn, "a compilation of vi-
gnettes that look inside many of the
triumphs young black men face
daily Chapmyn's stories are all
based in truthful events and hope-
fully will stimulate fruitful discus-
sion afterwards. Any one interested
in conversing with the actors are en-
couraged to stay after the show and
engage in a dialogue.
Dialogue is a key element of
multiculturalism. Advocates of ex-
panding cultural awareness do not
seek to take power away from estab-
lished orders. More than anything,
multiculturalism seeks to open up
a dialogue wherein differing ideolo-
gies can be expressed without fear
of repression, wherein individuals
can take pride in who they are and
what they represent. More than any-
thing, multiculturalism strives to
make the world a better place for
everyone.
Become part of the dialogue
this week. Take part in Cultural
Awareness Week. Black Man Rising
will be shown in Hendrix Theatre
today at 8 p.m. The admission for
the show is $5 per person if bought
in advance, $8 at the door. ECU fac-
ulty and staff can obtain advance
tickets free of charge from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office.
For further information about
any of the events, call J. Marshall at
328-4711.
Do yourself a favor and open
yourself up to these worthwhile
events. Fearing multiculturalism ul-
timately serves nothing. Remember,
we only fear that which we do not
understand.
DANCE from page 6
hind the NCDT. Salvatore Aiello,
who joined NCDT as associate direc-
tor in 1979 and was named artistic
director in 1985, passed on. Aiello's
work with the NCDT was the high-
light of a long and successful career
in dance, which began in 1963 as a
dancer with the Joffrey Ballet. Dur-
ing his illustrious career he worked
with the Harkness Ballet, Canada's
Royal Winnipeg Ballet and John
Neumeier at the Hamburg State Op-
era.
Aiello's successor is Jean-Pierre
Bonnefoux, whose career is no less
impressive. Bonnefoux has danced
with the Paris Opera Ballet, the
Bolshoi Ballet, the Kirov Ballet and
the New York City Ballet. He now
dedicates his enormous skill to di-
recting, choreographing and teach-
ing young dancers.
One of the most impressive
things about Bonnefoux is his work
as a teacher. Often when dance com-
panies perform at ECU, a "master
class" will be held for students in
the dance department. This is an
awesome opportunity for dancers
who want to work with and be no-
ticed by representatives of some of
the world's best dance companies.
This time the dance students are in
for a special treat. Instead of asking
another member of the troupe to
teach this master class, Jean-Pierre
Bonnefoux will teach it himself.
This is the equivalent of having
Sir Laurence Olivier teach an act-
ing class, William Shakespeare teach
a creative writing class, or Bill Gates
teach an introduction to computers
class.
The other members of
Bcnnefoux's artistic team are Asso-
ciate Artistic Directors Patricia
McBride and Jerri Kumery. McBride
is famed as the outstanding Ameri-
can ballerina of our day and is in-
ternationally recognized. Over the
last 30 years, she has participated
in more than 100 performances with
the New York City Ballet.
Kumery performed for nine
years at the New York City Ballet
under the direction of George
Balanchine, Jerome Robbins and Pe-
ter Martins. After Aiello's death, she
served as Acting Artistic Director for
NCDT.
The program for the perfor-
mance at ECU has also undergone
some changes, due to the change in
artistic directors. On the program
as of Aug. 29 are: "Piano Concerto
1 choreographed by Salvatore
Aiello with music by Keith Emerson;
Fantasies, choreographed by John
Clifford with music by Ralph Vaughn
Williams; Escargot, choreographed
by Louis Falco with music by Ralph
MacDonald; and a special perfor-
mance of "Rubies choreographed
by George Balanchine with music by
Igor Stravinsky.
"Piano Concerto 1" is meant
to challenge the versatility and
athleticism of the dancers. It is de-
scribed as "a game of dance styles
- styles learned and interpreted by
all who have studied the discipline
of movement here the stage be-
comes the arena where a game of
dance is played Fantasies tells the
story of two couples and their illu-
sions of love. Escargot has been
described as a "kaleidoscope of in-
terlocking images the dancers
move with sheer abandon to the
jazzy undertones This will be the
first restaging of a Falco work in the
United States since his death in
1993.
"Rubies" is the second act of
the full-length dance showpiece Jew-
els. Balanchine and Stravinsky, con-
sidered geniuses of the 20th cen-
tury, often worked together to turn
out literal masterpieces of dance
theater. Balanchine choreographed
"Rubies" in 1967 for Patricia
McBride and Edward Villella using
a combination of steps from Vaude-
ville, the Cakewalk, the Rhumba and
the Tango. This is bound to be a fast-
paced, interesting highlight to the
evening's entertainment.
The North Carolina Dance The-
atre will be performing at Wright
Auditorium on Wednesday, Oct. 2,
at 8 p.m. Tickets are on sale at
Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office.
Tickets at the door are $25. In ad-
vance, ECU faculty and staff can
purchase a ticket for $20. ECU stu-
dents, check your Clue Book for a
discount coupon letting you pur-
chase your ticket for $5. Otherwise,
tickets for ECU students are $12
in advance
Natural Life Events presents:
Camp Out at the Tower
October 4 at 6:00 p.m.
at the Climbing Tower.
Free Food!
Free Climhino
Free tent rentals!
Call 328-1569 by October 3
to reserve a tent!
� NATURAL"
i
a
Sponsored by Housing and Dining Services
and Recreational Services.
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.
(fiiesclau
COLLEGE NICHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
(ftldag
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
�"�� �� V fMPKHII
HPMH
Mn m





Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
cmw9 t Knights ride
S "HJKJfW home with loss
" Amanda Ross A dT mimamnm
Logan proud of
fan support
Dili DIHard
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU Head Coach Steve
Logan asked and you, the Pi-
rates fans, responded in true
ECU fashion.
After the trouncing of
South Carolina in Columbia,
with 3,000 plus Pirates faith-
f. fully looking on in the pour-
, ing rain, Logan called the fans
out and challenged them to
fill Dowdy-Ficklen for the
match-up against Central
Florida.
Hey, there were no ex-
cuses. It was a sun-drenched
Parents Day with a rolling
ECU squad coming off the big-
gest win of the season thus
far. It had all the ingredients
to be a near sell out, and what
do you know, 34,000-plus
painted the town purple.
"I really credit the fans
with this Logan said. "It was
really good out there
Attendance for the home
opener against East Tennes-
see State was way down from
the norm, due to the effects
of Hurricane Fran. Although
it was a diversion to the strain
of clean-up for about 22,000
Ph-ate fans, the players and
coaching staff were ready to
return home from their road
trip to a filled stadium for
UCF.
The Bucs hit the road for
a tough two-game road trip
with a tight loss at undefeated
West Virginia and a convinc-
ing win at USC. So, after a
hard two weeks of work, you
the fans, gave the Bucs a huge
lift by welcoming them back
with a filled stadium.
Friends, whether you be-
lieve it or not the fans are a
huge part of the program.
True, it's the boys in purple
that go to work on Saturdays,
but if s the 34,000 screaming
fans that keep them going on
those third and shorts.
Folks, we are dealing with
a national program that is do-
ing big things as we speak.
ECU is a team that has a
Unitas Award candidate as the
quarterback, a Biietnikoff
Award candidate as one of the
receivers and a defense which
is now one of the stingiest in
the country. Not to mention,
in the past nine games, no
team has been able to take
one from the Pirates in Green-
ville. Hmm, sounds like a
pretty good way to spend a
Ultimate team
flying high
Photo Courtesy of Tim Duran
Fuller Reeves (stripes) of the Irates launches a long strike
against a Dukt defender. The Irates won this match 11-5.
Mike Daniska
Staff Writer
For the 25 players who make up
ECU'S Ultimate Frisbee team, throw-
ing a Frisbee is serious business
Ultimate, as the players refer to
it has no time limit Three handlers,
two middies and two back throw the
frisbee to each
other, trying to ad-
vance the disc past
the opposition's
goal line. Games
are usually played
to 11 or 15 points
and can last any-
where from one to
two and a half
hours.
Ultimate is
not played in one
season, but rather
"The Columbia
game was one of
the best games we
played
� Tim Duran, Team Vice-
President
See DEAL page 11
two distinctive ones. Right now,
ECU s club team is playing. Club
teams are open to anyone, in or out
of school, which results in a lot of
older players.
So far, the Ultimate team has
played in only one club tournament,
Sept. 21-22 at Savannah, Ga. The
team went 3-1 during the round robin
portion of the tournament Saturday.
Two notable games were a 15-7
thrashing of one of the two Savan-
nah home teams and a 15-14 squeaker
past a team from Columbia, S.C.
"The Columbia game was one of
the best games we played team Vice-
President Tim Duran said. "We were
not expected to win, but we came out
fired up. We had plenty of rookie
subs, so we could run the old men
into the dirt"
The team succumbed Sunday
during the single elimination quarter-
finals, narrowly losing to a team from
Orlando, 15-14.
"Savannah was some really
good club competition for us team
Treasurer Josh Poucher said.
Duran said it was impressive de-
fensive play that kept the team going.
"It was tough defense by Jeff
Plentle and Fuller Reeves that kept
the team alive through out the whole
weekend Duran said.
Upcoming club competition in-
cludes sectionals at Wilmington and
a tournament called Ultimax here at
ECU Nov. 23 and
24. It will be an
open invita-
tional, meaning
all club and col-
lege teams are in-
vited.
"Our club
team is not as ex-
perienced, but
we have more
athleticism.
wmmmmmmmmmmmm We're younger
more hungry
Duran said.
The second season kicks off col-
legiate action, ending with a national
tournament Twice, in 1994 ana 1995,
ECU won national championships in
Ultimate Frisbee.
How does this year's team com-
pare with those in the past, including
the championship teams?
"We have a good chance
Poucher said . "We have some return-
ing veterans and good young talent
But you can't really compare teams
because they are different year to year.
One team might be quicker, one might
play better defense
The team practices every Tues-
day, Thursday and Sunday on the in-
tramural fields behind Ficklen Sta-
dium at 3:30 p.m. Those interested
can contact team captains Josh
Poucher at 757-2702. Tim Duran at
758-3228 or team President. Mike
Wiegund at 830-5436.
"If you like what you see said
Duran, a fast moving and fun sport,
then come on out for the spring sea-
son
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
No rain, a huge crowd
and a win. Football games
just don't get any better than
that.
In front of 34,121 fans
the Pirates eased into a 28-7
win over UCF.
This was the ninth larg-
est crowd to fill Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium and Coach
Steve Logan was thrilled at
the turnout and even a little
surprised.
"Did I hear correctly that
there were 34,000 people at
that football game?" Logan
said. "That's big time right
there. That will push our pro-
gram forward. If we had had
a flat crowd out there, I'd have
been afraid to see what would
have happened, because the crowd
really carried us
ECU (3-1) got off to an early
start and scored quickly with a
Marcus Crandell to Lamont
Chappell 8-yard pass. They would
score again with 2:53 remaining in
the first quarter when Crandell
fired a 25-yard touchdown pass to
Greenvilie native Troy Smith.
The Pirates did not score again
in the first half and the defense
held off any scoring attempts by
the Knights. ECU led at half-time,
14-0.
Smith finished the day with
five receptions for 56 yards and
Chappell recorded two receptions
for 26 yards. Logan was impressed
with the performances of these two
sophomore players.
"Everyday in practice they
flash and Doug (Martin, offensive
coordinator) and I just marvel at
Photo by Chris Gaydosh
Travis Darden (95) puts a hit on a UCF lineman. Darden finished
with four tackles including one for a five yard loss on Saturday.
their ability Logan said. "Those
aren't average athletes out there.
Those guys are big time
One of Crandell's two inter-
cepted passes came in the third
quarter when the Pirates were look-
ing to move ahead 21-0. But
Reginald Doster picked off the pass
and UCF tried to score But Logan
doesn't entirely blame Crandell for
the interception.
"We had a chance to maybe put
the game away early Logan said.
"I put Crandell in a bad situation
with the call down there. I guessed
on a call and put him in a bad situ-
ation. If we had gone up 21-0 I
thought we might have been able
to control the game a little better
The Knights only score of the
game came in the third quarter, two
possessions after Crandell's inter-
ception when Daunte Culpepper's
pass to Mike Huff resulted in a
touchdown.
Two possessions later the
Knights missed a 52-yard field goal
attempt that would have put them
within four points of the Pirates.
ECU scored with less than three
minutes remaining in the third quar-
ter with a Crandell to Larry Shan-
non pass.
The Pirates went into the
fourth quarter with a 21-7 lead. But
last year when these teams met.
UCF scored 11 unanswered points
to pull within three points. The Pi-
rates were going to make sure the
Knights didn't have a repeat perfor-
mance this year.
The final score of the game
came when J.J. McQueen caught a
1-yard touchdown pass from
Crandell to end the scoring drive,
giving ECU a 28-7 win. The Pirates
See PIRATES page 11
26
207
265
472
14-150
8-303
37.9
35:46
7-17
4-29
first Downs
yards rushing
YARDS PASSING
TOTAL YARDS
PENALTIES: NUMBER-YARDS
PUNTS-YARDS
AVERAGE PER PUNT
POSSESSION TIME
THIRD-DOWN CONVERSIONS
SACKS BY: NUMBER-YARDS
15
48
244
292
9-65
7-319
45.6
24:14
3-13
0-0
Carlos Brown (LB)
B.J. Crane (LB)
Marvin Burke (LB)
Forrest Poster (DB)
Kelvin Suggs (CB)
9
5
4
4
4
Day at the beach?
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The 1996 ECU women's soccer team tangled with
Appalachia State University in the UNC- Asheville Puma
Classic on Saturday at the Greenwood Field as both
teams fought in miserable weather conditions, tying 1-
1.
ECU'S junior midfielder Sheila Best (Cary, NO
opened the scoring in the first half for the Pirates, who
have been unable to score in five games, connecting in
just the twenty-fifth minute.
"We came out a little tenative ECU Head Coach
Neil Roberts saidWe played okay, but it was the type
of game that if we were going to win we needed to put
the other team away early, especially before the rains
came
Following the intermission, rain soaked the area,
making the field conditions unbearable and. as a result,
canceling the second game between the host UNC-
Asheville and Georgia Southern.
"It was a good game Roberts said. "It was good
that we scored and played well
ECU and Appalachia State exchanged goals after
ASU's Allison Osborne answered with a goal in the thrty-
first minute of play.
The Pirates registered six shots on goal to the Moun-
taineers five. ECU'S Amy Horton (Raleigh, NC) did not
register a save while ASU's Kelley Guinn picked up three.
Sunday was a lot brighter for the Pirates as they
shut out the Eagles of Georgia Southern in day two of
the UNC-Asheville Puma Classic Tournament 2-0.
"This is a great win for us after a disappointing
result against Appalachian State Roberts said. "Our
team played well and kept the pressure on GSU often
The Pirates and the Lady Eagles were scoreless go-
ing into the second half when the GSU defense suc-
cumbed to the flurry of Pirate shots on goal. Inevitably,
the Pirates scored in the 66th minute on junior
midfielder Stacie Cause's (Jacksonville, NC) free kick
from the outside the top of the goalie box.
See SID page 11
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
(Top) Fans enjoy the game by playing a
little ball themselves. (Left) Former ECU
star, now Miami Dolphin, Jerris McPhail,
entertains the media during Saturday's
game.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
-





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 1,1996
11
THE
THE NEW ALBUM
VTEIJID FOOD 6 DEVASMTJl
v
ATTIC
I presents
ike GONNELLS
vjiJD from page 10
Thirteen minutes later, freshman
forward Trisha Roop (New Fairfield,
Conn.) sealed the ECU victory with a
shot inside the goalie box at the eight-
yard mark.
"Stacie's Cause goal was big
and Trisha Roop's goal gave us the
insurance Roberts said. "I'm pleased
to come back home after a tie and a
win
ECU'S goalkeepers, Amy Horton
and Cara Morgridge (Burke, Va.), com-
bined for eight saves in the contest.
GSU's Mary Perry notched six saves
on the day.
Due to the inclement weather
conditions in Asheville, the second
game between UNC-Asheville will not
be rescheduled. With the unfortunate
weather conditions and time con-
straints, there were neither post-tour-
nament honors nor a team champion.
The Pirates will return home to
host two games this week. They will
host UNC-Wilmington on Wednesday
October 2 at 4 p.m. and then host Vir-
ginia Tech at the end of the week on
Sunday October 6 at 4 p.m.
The ECU volleyball team lost its
seventh consecutive match Saturday to
Wake Forest (2-15,15-11,4-15,10,15).
WFU took advantage of the five
errors committed by the Pirates in the
first game to defeat them 15-2. How-
ever, ECU rebounded in the long, hard-
fought second game, defending 53
WFU attacks to win 15-11. In the third,
the Pirates had a 4-2 advantage before
the Deacs reeled off 13 points to take
the game 15-4. Then in the fourth, the
two teams battled evenly until WFU
pulled ahead 15-10.
'it's the best we've played since
Cornell Head Coach Kim Walker said.
"They played hard and that's all we can
ask
For the Pirates, freshman Shan-
non Kaess had 11 kills and seven digs,
while teammate Jennifer Harris contrib-
uted 10 kills and a team-high five
blocks.
ECU will play tonight at 6 p.m.
againsl Hampton University.
The ECU men's and women's
cross country teams traveled to sepa-
rate meets on Saturday, with the Lady
Pirates finishing fourth at the Virginia
Tech Invitational in Blacksburg, Va.
and the men's team taking ninth place
at the Greensboro Invitational.
The Lady Pirates were led by
sophomore Kerri Hartling vs ninth
place finish (18:23) while junior Karen
Reinhard finished 13th in 18:33
"We are still missing Suzanne i
(Bellamy) Women's Coach Charles
Justice said about the 1995 CAA;
Rookie-of-the-year "Kerri and Karen j
have run good for three straight weeks
but they need some help. We've got to
get someone to step up up if we're !
going to be competitive. Lack of depth '
is hurting us
ECU's men's team competed at
the Greensboro Invitational where they
finished ninth of 14 teams. . �
"We held out our top five runners
for 8K race for training purposes. It
was a good preparation for next week's
meet at Wake Forest and it gave our
other runners an opportunity to run
and be scorers for us Coach Mike
Ford said.
In the 8K Division competition,
sophomore Jeremy Coleman led the
Pirates, finishing 25th in 27:46. In the
5K competition, sophomore Jamie
Mance was ECU's top finisher, taking
sixth in 16:06.
"It was a good meet for Jeremy
(Coleman) Ford said. "He's getting
back on track to his freshman year
form. In the 5K, Jamie Mance, who has
been our top finisher in the first two
meets, continued to run good
ECU's women's team will be off
next weekend while the men's team will
travel to the Wake Forest Invitational.
DEAL from page 10
Saturday afternoon to me.
ECU fans have often been de-
scribed as the best fans on earth
and you certainly showed it Satur-
day.
"I think we have the best fans
in the NCAA senior Defensive
Back Darren Hart said. "I just can't
say enough about our fans
With a hostile home crowd and
a solid football program anything
is possible. Just ask Nebraska and
Arizona 3i.ate.
So Pirate fans, take a week off
and get ready to rumble again when
those Golden Eagles of Southern
Miss come into town for the Thurs-
day night Oct. 10 ESPN match-up.
PIRATES from page 10
are now 4-0 against UCF. The
Knights drop their overall record
to 1-4.
UCF had trouble all day getting
their offense in rhythm. With three
intercepted passes and 292 total
yards, the Knights couldn't pull off
the victory.
"I give them credit Logan
said. "They played hard and didn't
quit
Cornerback Kelvin Suggs knew
this wouldn't be an easy win.
"We knew we were going to
have to play our hardest Suggs
said. "We just wanted to come out
and give it our all and that's what
we did
The Pirate defense had another
good showing with four quarter-
back sacks and only allowed UCF
to rush for 48 yards.
"Our defense kept taking the
ball away Logan said.
ECU recorded 14 penalties for
150 yards while UCF received nine
for 65 yards. Coming into the game
ECU had 20 penalties for 157 yards
for the season.
"We were on a mission it
seemed like Logan said.
"Everytime I turned around, we
were holding somebody
Senior Safety Darren Hart be-
lieves the high number of penalties
was the result of an incident that
happened in 1993. That was the year
a UCF player took a late cheap-shot
to Crandell that resulted in a bro-
ken leg. Hart says the seniors always
have that game on their mind.
"The guys came out real
pumped up Hart said. "This is our
last time we can play against them
Senior Linebacker Marvin
Burke, who recorded his first inter-
ception, says the team is pleased
with the win.
"We're real happy with this
win Buike said. "We didn't play as
good as we know how to play, we
gave up too many penalties, too
many personal fouls. We played bad
ECU football but luckily they aren't
a better team
The Pirates will have this week
to recover fully and take a little
breather before the Oct 10 match-
up with Southern Miss.
"We're a little bit of a tired foot-
ball team right now Logan said.
"And it's good we have a little bit of
a break
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Determined by: The East Carolina Sports Dept.
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� 2 Touchdowns
,TO- IUII





12
Tuesday, October 1,1996
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
&
Greek
Personals
Announcements! Announcements!
�3bl
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for-
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
IT?
Help
Wanted
N
Services
Offered
Services for details.
L53622
1-206-971-3690 ext.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE IN the fall!
Short walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. -
next to Alpha Omicron Pi house. 3 bedrooms,
2 12 baths, mint condition. 5th Street
Square - Uptown - Above BW3, 3 bedrooms,
2 12 baths, sunken living area. Luxury Apar-
tment Also available - "The Beauty Salon"
- 3 bedroom apartment If you see it you'll
love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3 BR
house close to campus. Serious student who
wants own room, washer and dryer and lots
of extras please call 752-8682.
ONE BEDROOM ON CAMPUS. Available
now. $350 call 754-2902 or 328-6556.
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE two
bedroom house. $262.50 plus utilities. Non-
drinkernon-smoker. Quiet neighborhood
just 5 miles from campus. Must like animals.
Call 758-7409. Must see.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk to cam-
pus. $250mo. plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
8244.
WANTED: MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
monthphone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
ROOMMATE WANTED: SHARE LARGE
3 br2.5 bath townhouse near Greenville
Athletic Club. Very nice. Must be neat and
responsible. $290month 12 utilities. Call
551-1863.
MF ROOMMATE. NICE HOUSE. Walking
distance to campus. Own room, washer and
dryer, and lots of extras. Call 752-8682
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
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of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
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105 E. 11TH ST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW,
Central AC & Heat Nice Private Back Yard.
Lawncare included, Pets OK! $600 'month.
830-9502
For Sale
SONY STEREO 135 WATTSCHANNEL,
Sony and CerwinVega Speakers, $600. Large
entertainment center, $150. Kicker box two
12" woofers, $150. Alphusonik amplifier 300
watts, $200. "Brian" 752-1891.
SPRUCE UP YOUR PAD! Beige area rug,
12 x 12, good condition 7560449.
'95 CANNONDALE R300 WITH clipless pe-
tals $625 or best offer, contact Rod at 830-
9436.
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 758-8244.
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE, 303
S. Evans St (Mall) across from Courthouse.
Tue-Wed-Thurs. 10am-4pm 757-2740
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext
C53627
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
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3570 ext J53626
SOCCER OFFICIALS NEEDED FOR Pitt
County Community Schools Soccer Pro-
gram. Certification not required but soccer
knowledge and a good attitude is. Call 353-
4416, leave message.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
$ 1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
RPS INC. IS LOOKING for temporary driv-
ers during their peak season. Must have 1
year commercial driving experience and a
good driving record. Call 1800-977-7462 for
more information.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
seek fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
with the fashionsaccessories you love to
wear: Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure, and
Young Men's. Flexible schedules for the "ear-
ly birds" (10 am-2pm) or "night owls" (12pm-
9pm or 6pm-9pm). All retail positions in-
clude weekends. Merchandiseclothing dis-
count offered. Applicaitons accepted Mon-
day, Tuesday and Wednesday, 1-5 PM, 3rr
dy's, The Plaza and Carolina East Mall.
I AM LOOKING FOR a few good people to
work with me on a part-time or full time
basis to earn some serious money. Call Da-
vid 752-9610.
NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS, WAITRESS-
ES, and hostesses at Riverside Seafood &
Steaks, Washington, NC. Experience Re-
quired. Call Cheryl Lee at 946-3830.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
STOCK PERSON WANTED. MUST be Re-
liable, Neat Outgoing, And Drug Free. Du-
ties Include Warehouse Maintenance, Deliv-
ery, Merchandise Transfer, Unloading Incom-
ing Merchandise. Ability to Drive a "Box"
Delivery Truck Required. Must Have A Clean
Criminal Record, Clean Driving Record, And
Valid Driver's License. Heavy Lifting. Must
be Able to Work Weekends. Some Flexibili-
ty Around Classroom Hours. Apply in per-
son Wednesday, Oct 2, 10 am - 6 pm and
Thursday, Oct 3, 10 am - 6 pm.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
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PI KAPPA PHI: THANKS for an awesome
Bid nite! We had a blast! Let's get together
again real soon! Love, Zeta.
ALPHA XI DELTA - Congratulations on
your volleyball game win against Chi Ome-
ga! You're doing great Love, your sisters!
TO MICAH EARNEST RETZLAFF, I will
get you back for your prank. The Theta class
of Phi Kappa Psi rules killa! Revenge, The
Notorious B.O.B.
WE WOULD LIKE TO wish for a great week
t our sister sorority - Sigma Sigma Sigma -
Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
GAMMA SIG, THE LUAU Social was a blast
Thanks for a great night Love, Alpha Sig.
PHI KAPPA PSI. WE had fun getting down
in our 'jamas The PJ social was great!
Thanks so much! Love, the sisters of Aipha
Omicron Pi.
WE HOPE EVERYONE HAD a great time
at PB's for Zeta's Grab-a-Date! Robyn - Con-
gratulations on another outstanding job '
making this yet another memorable special
event' Love, your Zeta sisters and New mem-
bers;
DELTA SIG. THANKS FOR the great 70s
social. We had a blast Let's get together
again soon! Love, the sisters of Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
WANT THE BEST BANDS to play your par-
ty! Purple Schoolbus, Agents of Good Roots,
Knocked Down Smilin Ominous Seapods,
yeP! & dozens more. Call LEEWAY Produc-
tions. 753-8566.
SINCERE, STRAIGHT, WHITE, MALE,
American with 25 years teaching and secur-
ity experience on national and international
level, will exchange expertise for apartment
or large room and bath. Tutor all subject
levels 1-14 including college research.
Worked with retarded men one year licensed
paramedic 5 years in L.A. State private pro-
tection license. Lived in area 10 years. Ref-
erences and background check available.
Alcohol and drug free. Drivers license will
travel. House broken and clean. Will house
sit for long termMail: Tutor, 2462
Stantonsburg Rd 194, Greenville, NC
27834
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263495 ext F53628
TWO OPENINGS IN HOME day care. Ages
one year and up. Call 757-1353.
PRICE WITH PRESENTATION !
OF THIS COUPON
I and 2 Bedroom Range. Refridgerator, Washer, j
Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility. Sandfelleyball Court. Located 5 j
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER, CABLE
TOtptd&zm CuU
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located S Blocks from Campus
JStmfttm 'PtvtA
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, 5
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
108 A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday and Sunday, l2-6pm
m
Travel
ATTENTION STUDENTS REGISTERED
WITH Career Services! Several organiza-
tions who will conduct campus interviews
have changed their recruiting dates since the
JOB GUIDE was mailed to you. These are
Wachovia Bank, Syntel, Inc Olde Discount
Corp Target Stores, Hughes Supply, Inc
Keane, Inc. and Enterprise Rent-a-Car. Sev-
eral others have been added to the campus
interview schedule - American Buildings,
Pulte Homes, State Farm Insurance. Please
come by Career Services to check out these
changesadditions since the deadline for
resumes may be different than that published
in the JOB GUIDE.
THE GREENVILLE-RIVER PARK North
Bird Club cordially invites anyone interest-
ed in any aspect of birds and birdwatching
to attend our meetings, which are held at
the Science and Nature center at River Park
North at 2000 Mumford Rd in Greenville at
7:30 p.m. the first Monday of every month.
At the club's meeting for October, on Mon-
day, Oct 7, John and Paula Wright will pres-
ent a slide program en hawks and autumn
hawk migration in North Carolina and Vir-
ginia. The Meeting for November, on Mon-
day, Nov. 4, will include a slide program on
all and winter water fowl and shore birds of
coastal and eastern NC presented by Joanne
Powell of the N.C. Maritime Museum. For
more info contact either Ernest Marshall at
75&0077 or River Park North at 8304561.
THE STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA As-
sociation of Educators (SNCAE) will be hav-
ing a meeting on Wednesday, Oct 2 at 4:30
pm in Speight 308 Alan Bailey will discuss
how you can make and use flannel boards.
Election for Vice-President and Secretary!
Door prizes and refreshments.
INTERVIEW SKILLS AND RESUME work
shops. The Career Services staff will pres-
ent the following workshops to help stud-
ents prepare for campus or off-campus in-
terviews for career positions or for intern-
ships and co-op experiences: Resume Writ-
ing - Wed Oct 2 at 3:00 pm or Wed Oct 9
at 4:00 pm. Interviewing Skills � Fri Oct 4
at 3:00 pm or Thur Oct 10 at 2:00 pm. These
workshops will be held in the Career Servic-
es Center, Room 103.
DUE TO HURRICANE FRAN, the applica-
tion deadline for the 1997 Miss Kinston Le-
nior County Scholarship Pageant has been
extended to October 1. The Kinston-Lenior
Co. Scholarship Pageant Association is the
sponsor. Women between the ages of 18-24
(or who will be 18 by the 1997 Miss Ameri-
ca Pageant), who live or go to school within
a 50-mile radius of Kinston may enter. The
pageant will be held Nov. 29 in Kinston. The
winner will receive a $3,000 education schol-
arship; $1,000 cash wardrobe allowance; ex-
pense-paid trip to the 1997 Miss North Car-
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earning
Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell 8
Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279, Can-
cun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDaytona
$119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-
6386
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds ol student representatives are already
earning free trips and lots of cash with
America's 1 Spring Break company! Sell
only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun, Baha-
mas, Mazatlan, Jamaica or Florida! Campus
Manager Positions Also Available. Call Now!
Take A Break Student Travel (800) 95
BREAK!
WANTED! INDIVIDUALS, STUDENT OR-
GANIZATIONS and Small Groups to Prom-
ote Spring Break Trips. Earn money and free
trips. Cal the nation's leader, Inter-Campus
Programs, http:www.icptcom 1-800-327-
6013
olina Pageant and other gifts. For informa-
tion, call Oran K. Perry, executive director,
522-0856; Cathy Wooten, president; 523-
0450; Ken Pittman, chairman, 523-6205
evenings; Joan Turley, 566-4991; or Joy
O'Neal, 527-0633.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Oct
1 - 8, 1996:
Thurs Oct. 3 - Tues Oct 8 - BIG RIV-
ER - ADVENTURES OF HUCK FINN; Pro-
duction of the ECU Dept of Theatre Arts
and the School of Music; For ticket informa-
tion, call 919-328-6829; Messick Theatre,
8:00 PM, (Sun, Oct 6, Messick Theatre, 2:00
PM). Sun Oct 6 - East Carolina Chamber
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 3:00 PM Mon Oct 7
- Faculty Recital, Jeffrey Jarvis, tuba, AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 PM Tues Oct. 8
- Guest Recital, "Music of Desencl Bonneau
and Milhaud Anjan Shah, saxophone, AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 PM.
THE ADULT STUDENT ASSOCIATION
will meet on Thursday, Oct 3, 19 at 3:30
PM in room 1010 of GCB. Election of Offic-
ers is to be held. All adult students are invit-
ed to attend. Please contact Wilda Hart at
328-6881 for more info.
THE LEDONIA WRIGHT AFRICAN Amer-
ican cultural Center, The Vice Chancellor of
Academic Affairs, the College of Arts and
Sciences, and the BB&T Center for Leader-
ship Development present Dr. Claude Ander-
son, social reform scholar, author of Black
Labor, White Wealth - The Search for Pow-
er and Economic Justice, founder of the
Harvest Institute, former Assistant Secretary
of Commerce and former Florida State Depu-
ty Secretary of Education addressing the
East Carolina University community on the
topic "The Search for Power and Economic
Justice The lecture will be held on Tues-
day, Oct 8, 1996 at 7:00 pm in the Creat
Room of Mendenhall Student Center on the
campus of ECU. This lecture is free to all
students, faculty and staff and to the gener-
al public.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS WILL
have a meeting in the Underground in Men-
denhall, Wednesday, Oct 2. Any questions
call Cristie @ 355-6474. E-mail: ugfar-
ley@ECUVM. or David Sturm @ 3530808.
REGISTRATIONORIENTATION - CA-
REER Services. Students who will gradu-
ate in December, 1996 or May, 1997 are en-
couraged to attend a Career Services pro-
gram to learn about the programs and serv-
ices avilable to help you in the job search.
The staff will explain procedures for estab-
lishing a credentials files, participating in
campus interviews and registering with the
Career Services office. The meetings will be
held in the Career Services Building on
Tues Oct 1 at 3:00 PM, Mon Oct, 7 at
4:00 PM and Mon Oct, 14 at 3:00 PM.
Residential facility needs mature individual to work some weekends:
Friday (5pm) through Sunday (8pm). Active work hours S-Bpm Friday.
8-1, 3-8 on Saturday and Sunday. On call by pager 8pm-8am Friday and
Saturday.Will need to fill in for evening manager by working 5-8pm
week nights occasionally. Required to spend Friday and Saturday nights
on-site in very comfortable bedroom (with cable TV). Some holiday
work will be required.
Candidates should be excellent in dealing with people; be tactful and compassionate, vet able to be
firm and take charge when necessary Successful candidate will have administrative responsiblities and
must be able to work independently, giving close attention to detail.
Relief Manager
Part-time Position
Weekends and
Evenings
Immediate openings. No phone
calls, please. Send resume and letter
of interest by Oct. 7th to:
Relief Manager Position
Ronald McDonald House
549 Moye Blvd.
Greenville. NC 27834
NEW
THE FUN WAY
TODAY
1 -900-990-9333
EXT. 4241
$2.99 PER MIIM.
MUST BE 18 YRS.
SERV-U
(619) 645-8434
Ak
Greek
Personals
M
Greek
Personals
i
m Help
1 wanted
J
SZECHUAN EXPRESS PLAZA MALL
needs part-time cashier (15-20 hrs)week. No
phone calls please. Apply in person 11-9.
PART-TIME DANCE INSTRUCTOR need-
ed for ballet, tap, and tumblingacrobatic
classes. Call 753-3626.
OFFICE SUPPORT: PART TIME Accounts
Receivable. Assist with account inquiries, bill-
ing and process credit applicationspay-
ments. 25-29 hours per week. Schedule in-
cludes: 12 pm (or 1 pm) to 6 pm plus Satur-
days. Schedule will require eveningSunday
hours for holiday shopping season. For in-
formation call Brady's, Human Resources
Dept The Plaza.756-3140.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Board other bene-
fits. For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT FOR dis-
able male student; mornings, evenings, wee-
kends. No experience necessary but helpful.
Must have own transportation. 758-9098,
leave name and number.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING � Entry lev
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico. Caribbean, etc. Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
OUTGOING AND MONEY MOTIVATED?
Apply today for local merchant phone pro-
motion. $5 - $8 per hour. Afternoon and even-
ing hours available. Apply 5 pm to 7 pm,
223 West Tenth Street (Wilcar Executive
Center) Suite 107.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crewmore. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
LAMBDA CHI: SORRY THE party was so
late, but I'm sure it was worth the wait
Thank you guys for helping us out so our
big sisters would no longer pout We had
fun and hope you did too. Can't wait until
another social with you! Love, Alpha Phi
ALPHA XI DELTA, THANKS for the pre-
downtown Thursday night Let's do it again
soon. Love. Alpha Sig.
THETA CHI THANKS FOR showing our
new members a good time for their Pref!
Hope you guys had as much fun as we did!
Love, Zeta.
Other
ATTENTION ALL STYDENTS! grant and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! SSS cash for college SSS
for info: 1-800-400-0209.
SAM YARD SALE SATURDAY, Oct 5, 6
AM, Parker's Barbecue Parking lot, Memo-
rial Drive. Donated items can be brought to
GCB 3015 by noon Friday. Support the Man-
agement Society and find wonderful stuff
all in one day! Rain or Shine. All donations
are tax deductible.
HALLIE L. CONGRATULATIONS ON get
ting a 4.0 iast spring. Good job! Love, your
Alpha Omicron Pi sisters.
HEY, ALPHA DELTA PI, Thanks for a great
time on Tuesday night! Hope to do it again
really soon! Pi Kappa Alpha.
ALPHA XI DELTA FLAG football team - con-
gratulations on your win against Alpha Omi-
cron Pi. We are proud of you and good luck
in playoffs! The sisters and new members!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI - Thanks for the pre-
downtown Thursday night. We had a blast
Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA PHI: CONGRATULATIONS
GAMMA Gammas. Your big sisters love you
very much. Big sis hunt was well worth the
wait Love, the sisters of Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA SERVICE Fraternity
would like to welcome their Fall '96 pledge
class: G.W. Barker, Amy Elliott Jen Glace,
Ashley Henry, Amy Miller, Sarah Riddle,
Chris Short Katie Smith, Guy Tran, Aryn
Williams, Jessica Wilson. Congrats and hold
on -the fun's just begun.
ALPHA OMICRON PI THANKS to all those
who participated in Alpha Omicron Pride
Day! And Congrats on the win in volleyball!
Keep it up.
ALPHA DELTA PI THANKS for the wake
up call. Next time we will have coffee and
doughnuts waiting for you girls. Love, Al-
pha Sigma Phi.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Student Swap Shot
Looking for a
place to stay
next year?
Find one in our
classifieds.
Northwestern
MulxiaJUfe-
College Internship Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.
-pj'
��B�W�"
1� J





Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 01, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1163
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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