The East Carolinian, September 26, 1996






September 26,1996
Vol72, No. 11
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
20 pases
Across The State
GREENSBORO (AP) - The in-
terim president of the NAACP state
conference has agreed to slow the
pace of change within the fractured
organization, but the decision seems
to have done little to curb infight-
ing.
In recent weeks, Melvin "Skip"
Alston, the state conference acting
president who took the post in May,
has closed the Charlotte headquar-
ters and replaced 13 of the 28 com-
mittee chairmen who serve on the
state's 52-member executive com-
mittee.
ABERDEEN, N.C. (AP) - It has
been 16 years since Shelly Diane
Chalflinch and her 9-year-old daugh-
ter were found dead, stabbed hun-
dreds of times. Sixteen years since
David Junior Brown was sentenced
to die.
As a hearing resumed in
Asheviile in Brown's long appeal
process, relatives of Chalflinch, 26,
and her daughter. 9-year-old Chris-
tine, continued what has become an
agonizing wait.
Across The Country
SPRINGFIELD. Mo. (AP) - The
Walt Disney Co. took another hit
from a Christian group today when
the Assemblies of God said it was
urging its 1.4 million members to
stop buying Disney products or at-
tending its theme parks.
The 250-member panel criti-
cized "Growing Up Gay a book for
teen-agers published by Disney-
owned Hyperion Press, and Disney's
acquisition of Miramax, which then
distributed the movie "Priest a
film about a gay cleric.
TORONTO (AP) - Illicit drug
use in the military has plunged
nearly 90 percent since 1980, thanks
to a get-tough policy and declining
drug use in American society, a
study says.
Cigarette smoking has dropped
by one-third in the same period, the
report says. The rate of heavy drink-
ing showed a smaller drop, which
was attributed to changes in mili-
tary demographics.
Around The World
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP)
- Cambodia's king says only over-
whelming public support would per-
suade him to pardon a Khmer
Rouge guerrilla leader implicated in
the deaths of 2 million Cambodians
during the 1970s who is now nego-
tiating peace with the government.
King Norodom Sihanouk said
in an interview that he believes lead-
ers of the Khmer Rouge regime
should by tried by an international
court for crimes against humanity.
GROZNY, Russia (AP) - Boris
Yeltsin criticized his security chief
for how he handled the Chechnya
crisis, raising doubts about a truce
signed earlier in the breakaway re-
public.
The president also denied wide-
spread reports he needs heart sur-
gery.
Yeltsin's comments came dur-
ing a television interview in his
Kremlin office intended to dispel ru-
mors that his health is failing.
New law cracks down on counterfeiters
Officially Licensed
Merchandise Will:
Display the red and blue
round "Officially Licensed
Collegiate Products" logo.
Depict East Carolina's
logos and marks in a
tasteful manner.
Have a tag that is intact,
not torn or missing.
Bear the name of the
manufacturer somewhere
on the product.
Have the appropriate
Vffl trademark designations
next to a specific name or
design.
I
Pirates
Oft tflC in �at TtramdayJ
wif ��� TEC enrtaed "Stud
What is yot
response to the
rttltled "Student
es pay SGA
� A �'
Phmmhymtofm
Steve Donovan, senior
EnglishHistory major
"I hope the people who
passed this bill run again
at the same level for an
office and are harshly
defeated. There's enough
corruption at the national
level. We don't need it
here at ECU
Lorl Bomberger, senior
Hospitality management
major
Laurie Baron, senior
Interior Design major
"It sucks. Where are their
morals and ethics
Maurie Moody,
graduate student
Business major
"Sounds more than
fair. If I could vote to
have my tuition paid
for, I'd do it
Jeffery Peppard,
graduate student
Business major
"I think they should
concentrate more on
recycling
Officials warn of
illegal athletic
merchandise
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
A state law recently passed against
counterfeiting has now made it much
easier for state and local officials to en-
force counterfeiting laws.
ECU officials plan to use this law to
its fullest extent in preventing the mar-
keting of illegal ECU merchandise. As-
sistant Athletic Director Lee Workman
said that this issue is of particular con-
cern to the athletic department because
so much of the ECU merchandise is ath-
letically related.
"We can find that athletic pro-
grams and their success really drive the
merchandise sales.
As our athletic pro-
gram is growing, and
the exposure is grow-
ing, the marketing
potential is greater,
and there are some
people who might
try to take advan-
tage of that market-
ing potential Work-
man said.
All of ECU'S
merchandise is li-
censed by the Colle-
giate Licensing com-
pany, which also li-
censes many other
colleges and univer-
sities. They will also
be involved in the ef-
fort to make sure
thai only legitimate merchandise is sold.
Until now, the only law against coun-
"If someone is
walking around
with shirts over
their arm, or
selling
merchandise out
of their trunk, it is
most likely
counterfeit andor
unlicensed
� Lee Workman, Assistant
Athletic Director
terfeiting was a
federal one, and
only recently have
the states begun
making their own
laws on this issue.
"There was a
federal law that
applied to it but
North Carolina
did not have a spe-
cific counterfeit
law before this
Workman said.
Workman
also said that
North Carolina
was in fact one of
the first states to
pass this kind of
law. and other
states are now fol-
See LAW page 7
Career Day proves successful
Reactions positive
from companies,
students
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
The first Career Day of the year
took place on Tuesday in the General
Classroom building and elicited a posi-
tive reaction from the companies par
ticipating and those involved in orga-
nizing the event.
There were 66 employers present
an increase from last year's number
of 58 companies. Dr. James
Westmoreland, director of career ser-
vices, said that his department was
happy with the turnout.
"We were so pleased that we had
such a great cross-representation of
different employers Westmoreland
said.
Career Day was an event that had
been in the planning for some time.
The staff at Career
Services say that
they always begin
next year's Career
Day planning as
soon as this year's is
over, hoping to im-
prove on next year's
event even more.
This year's Career
Day was the result
of good participa-
tion from the com-
panies and the hard
work of many
people here.
"We were real
pleased with the stu-
dent involvement
and the faculty in-
volvement. Many employers com-
mented on that" Westmoreland said.
"It was a cooperative effort between
the School of Business Professional
Programs and Career Services
The student involvement in-
cluded those in the Business gradu-
ate school, who phyed host to the
Photo by ANN JMDEN
MBA Graduate hostesses Carolyn Walters
and Stephaniie Russell brief Lee Fields, a
junior accounting major, on the career
opportinities offered through Sprint.
companies. One of those graduate
hosts was Wallace Austin, who is in
the Master's of Business Administra-
tion program.
"(Our job was) to help the em-
ployers get set up, make sure they
See CAREER page 7
Crime Scene:
A universal crowd pleaser
Other schools discuss
crime reports
Marguerite Benjamin
News Editor
about the segment. While some students call and say
the entries are not worthwhile, many others say they
enjoy reading about campus crimes and think they should
be included in every paper.
This week TEC staff members decided to call around
to other universities in the state and country to see if
crime reports had a place in their papers and how well
students lecieved them.
What TEC uncovered is that several other universi-
See CRIME page 6
At least once a week TEC includes a special collec
tion of news briefs entitled "Crime Scene" for students'
reading pleasure.
At times, the editorial staff receives mixed messages
SAMPLE CRIME REPORTS from other universities
The Dally Tar Heel (UNC Chapel Hill)
"Police Roundup"
Saturday, Sept. 7
A resident of Hilton James reported harassing phone calls at 11:37 p.m.
The report named James Bloodworth, 22, a student at UNC-Wilmington, who is also the victim's boyfriend, as the
main suspect.
Reports state that the caller threatened to strike the victim but later called to repeal the threat.
The Dally Beacon (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)
"CrimeLog"
Thursday, Sept. 12
Christopher Thomas Myers, 30, of 1009 Florenza Drive, was arrested at the c-18 lot and charged with indecent
exposure. Tennessee Code Annotated 39-13-511. According to the reports, two women saw Myers masturbating in
the c 25 lot near 11th Street and Cumberland Avenue. He left the scene in his 1997 Ford Contour and went to C-
18. As an officer was approaching the car, he reported saw Myers with his shorts pulled down.
The Maneater (University of Missouri, Columbia)
"Police Blotter-
Tuesday, Sept. 10
Lubin Duque, 22, of 609 taws Hall, was arrested on suspicion of urinating in public near Gannett Hall.
Jeffrey Stanford, 18, of Schurz Hall, was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, driving on the wrong side
of the road and possession of alcohol by a minor.
The exerpts above were taken from the crime report sections of the respective campus newspapers mentioned in the story. The
crimes reported were taken from official police reports and are printed exactly as they were seen in the respective newspapers.
IttOde
Series speaker to explore various themespage 1 1
"Dueling Columnists" on educationpage O
S PO WtUyt4dSUt
Volleyball players close-uppage
19
yvteccut
Thursday
Sunny
High 89
Low 67
Weekend
Sunny
High 87
Low 64
f&w t xetcA u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from loyner





� ���!� ,�iMiBfiiMirm
- �
Thursday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
CRIMFS'ENE
September 18
Possession of marijuana- A student of Fletcher Hali was issued
three state citations for possession of marijuana, drug paraphernalia
and malt beverage under the age of 21. The incident occurred in Fletcher
Hall.September 23
Financial card transaction fraud- A resident of Greene Hall reported
the larceny of her key chain holder that contained her meal card. Three
students were issued state citations and campus appearance tickets after
two of the students were found using the card at the Wright Place. The
other student had used the card on a previous occasion.
Harassing phone calls- A resident of Tyler Hall reported receiving
harassing phone calls in her room.
Larceny- A resident of Fleming Hall reported the larceny of his key
ring and keys from the lock on his door to his room.
September 19
Possession of marijuana- Two men from Virginia were issued state
citations and banned from campus for possession of marijuana and drug
paraphernalia.
Hit and run accident- A faculty member reported that her vehicle,
parked south of Speight, was involved in a hit and run accident A
witness recorded the license plate number of the suspect vehicle. Inves-
tigation is continuing.
Attempted Suicide- Officers responded to a room in Belk Hall where
a student stated he had taken a number of ibuprofen pills. Greenville
Rescue responded and determined that the student was not a danger to
himself or others. He was referred to a counselor. A member of Resi-
dence Life was notified and responded.
September 20
Assault on female- A non-student was arrested for assault on a
female after he was observed choking and pushing a female north of
Garrett Hall.
September 21
Larceny- A student was served an arrest warrant for larceny. The
student was confined at Pitt County Detention Center under a $2,500
bond.
AssistRescue- A non-student fell on the steps at Minges during an
event at Minges. A physician, who was also at the event, suggested he be
taken to the Emergency Department for X-rays.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Graduate students travel rough road
Transitions not
easy second time
around
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Students preparing to undergo
the transition from undergraduate
school to graduate school can ben-
efit from the advice of other gradu-
ate students.
Deanya Lattimore is a graduate
student majoring in Rhetoric and
Composition. She is planning to con-
tinue her education by going for her
Ph.D and then she intends to teach.
Lattimore knows firsthand how the
stress of graduate school differs from
undergraduate school.
"The work load is a lot harder
Lattimore said. "We have about eight
or nine hours of homework a week
An undergraduate's main prob-
lem is usually just the classes, but
that changes later on. Lattimore now
realizes how much is really expected
of a graduate student.
"We are trying to get published,
teach, take classes, we do the busy
work for regular teachers and some
of us are working for our Ph.D
Lattimore said. "It's like we have the
regular workload of a teacher, plus
the load of a student
If students are thinking that it
might be easier if they went some-
where else, don't be so sure.
Lattimore thinks that the faculty is
one thing that makes ECU a little
more bearable.
"Others schools say that you are
graduate students, so they expect
you to be able to do it yourself
Lattimore said. "We have caring in-
structors who are really good about
helping you, and this makes it seem
somewhat easier
For undergraduates preparing to
start graduate school, it can be a
scary situation. Still, as long as stu-
dents understand what is going to
be expected of them, and they are
ready for the challenge, then it all
doesn't seem quite as bad. Jeremy
Jordan, a sophomore major g in
computer science, said he is well
aware of what awaits him.
"I realize that graduate school
is going to be so much more difficult
than it is now Jordan said. "Still, I
know that as long as I keep my pri-
orities in order, that the experience
will only improve my abilities, and not
disprove my capabilities
For those undergraduates still
worried about what is to come.
Lattimore has some suggestions for
students.
First, she suggests getting in the
habit of coming to class. In gradu-
ate school you can't cut; you are ex-
pected to be in class every day. Sec-
ond, Latimore said students should
start using good time management
skills. She added that procrastination
is detrimental to success. Lattimore
also suggested that placing pride u
your presentations was a good idei.
Finally, Lattimore said students;
should start thinking about interests:
in their field. She said students
should not follow a certain path be-
cause they think that is where the
jobs are. Lattimore recommended
doing what one enjoys.
Lattimore reassures that stui
dents will question whether they caji
cope with the stress.
"Some people do have a hard
time dealing with the stress
Lattimore said. "You can go to the.
university counseling center to gef
support and they have people yoti
can talk to
Disney representatives
recruit students
Work offered at resorts, theme park
Angela Koenig
News Writer
For more than a decade, representatives from The Walt Disney World
College Program have recruited ECU students to work at the theme park and
its resorts.
A presentation will be given on Oct. 1 to inform students about available
positions and how working at Walt Disney World can assist in training for
many careers.
"(The presentation will tell students what to expect, the work experi-
ences, housing experiences and business seminars the students must attend
once a week during their stay said Dr. Mary Cauley of the cooperative
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Cur Customers Have
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 26 ,1996
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Bick m
Wake County schools won't be dancing the Macarena
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Local teachers
said they would
not have a
problem with
teaching the
dance
News Editor's Note: TEC re-
ceives the daily and weekly publi-
cations of other college campuses.
The "Pick of the Week" is selected
from a number of these papers as
the most unique, entertaining, in-
formative, etc of all papers re-
ceived during the week. This week's
"pick" comes from The Daily Tar
Heel (UNC-Chapel Hill.) Printed
with permission from the Sept. 10
1996 issue.
Robin Smith
Staff Writer
That famous Spanish dance,
the Macarena which made its way
on to so many American dance
floors this summer will no longer
be taught to students in Wake
County Schools.
After a parent discovered that
her child, a second-grade student
at Davis Drive Elementary School.
Boogie down to the Mkcarena
N' '

Palms down, right arm
out, then left arm out.
Right oakn up.
Left palm up.
i Right hand to left shoulder.
Left hand to right shoulder.
Left hand to beck
of head Right hand
to back of head.
e Left hand to nght hip. fi
Right hand to left hip.
Right hand on tight buttock.
Left hand on left buttock.
-j Shake hips
three times.
8
Hop to the right
and begin again.
Graphic Provided by Philip Malaro, graphics editor
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had learned the Macarena in physi-
cal education class, she complained
to the school.
As a result, the Wake County
school system decided that the
dance would be banned from physi-
cal education classes. Sue King, as-
sistant superintendent for curricu-
lum and instruction, ruled that the
dance and lyrics were inappropri-
ate.
On Monday, administrators
from Davis Drive Elementary re-
fused to comment further on the
issue. The Wake County Board of
Education also said that to com-
ment on this matter right now
would be "frivolous" due to the
seriousness of Hurricane Fran.
The Macarena consists of vari-
ous hand motions, a shake of the
hips, a hop and a turn.
"I would teach it said Andrea
Woodson, a physical education in-
structor at Estes Hill Elementary
School in Chapel Hill.
Recreational dance, including
line, folk and square dancing, is in-
corporated into the curriculum at
Estes Hill El-
ementary. The �
lesson plan for
second graders
focuses on indi-
vidual, rhythmic
dancing an learn-
ing to keep
count.
Woodson
sees the body
movements of
the Macarena as
simply part of
the Spanish cul-
ture.
"When you
learn to dance in
certain cultures, they advise you to
move your hips Woodson said.
"Since this is a multicultural
school, I think it would be appro-
priate
Parents said there were bigger
problems than the dance in schools.
Sue King, assistant
superintendent
for curriculum
and instruction,
ruled that the
dance and lyrics
were
inappropriate.
"Can the child read and write?"
asked Barbara Hoover, Chapel Hill
Parent-Teacher
in i m i Association
member.
Unlike
Davis Drive El-
ementary, cer-
tain groups have
showcased the
Macarena with-
out inciting con-
troversy.
Not only did
the U.S.
women's gym-
nastics team in-
clude the
Macarena in
their routine,
but last spring the dance was
taught to N.C. teachers in a state-
wide workshop.
"Teachers are simply trying to
find things that would interest the
students Minge said. "But you al-
ways run risks
Hoover just laughed. "What's
�next? Square dancing?"
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Thursday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian

f
Successful dance troupe visits ECU
$
NC Dance
Theatre to open
Performing Arts
Series
Susanne S.
Dozier
News Writer
ECU'S '96-97 S.
Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Se-
ries opens with a per-
formance by the
North Carolina Dance
Theatre.
The N.C. Dance
Theatre, founded in
1970, has been noted
for its talented danc-
ers, high energy and
versatile repertoire.
The pieces that will be
performed by the N.C.
Dance Theatre danc-
ers range from full-
length classical bal-
lets to innovative con-
temporary works.
The troupe has
given several success-
ful New York perfor-
mances and two Euro-
pean tours. They have
also appeared at ma-
jor dance festivals
throughout the
United States. Such
festivals include the
Spoleto Festival, the
American Dance Festi-
val and the Aspen
Dance Festival.
Leading the team are Artistic
Director Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux and
Associate Artistic Directors Patricia
McBride and Jerri Kumery. Per-
formers with the N.C. Dance The-
atre include dancers from Texas,
Massachusetts, Maryland, Califor-
nia, Pennsylvania, Argentina and
North Carolina.
On its current tour, the N.C.
Dance Theatre is presenting works
by choreographers George
Balanchine, Alvin Ailey. Agnes de
Mille and its Artistic Director
Emeritus, Salvatore Aiello. The
dancers perform to music by Yianni
Markoupoulous. Carlos Surinach.
Mikhail Glinka and Sergei
Prokofiev.
N.C. Dance Theatre is one of
the South's premier arts organiza-
tions.
�We are really excited about
See DANCE page 6
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 26 , 1996
6I4 tat Adugtw mi. Guacwtte. KC
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Tony Award-Winning Hit Musical
BIG RIVER
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
OCTOBER 3, 4. 5, 6 7 AND 8 1996
RATED. PG
Archibald MacLeish's Pultizer Prize Winning Play
DANCE from page 4
North Carolina Dance Theatre com-
ing to East Carolina University
said Anne Cutler, marketing asso-
ciate with Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter at ECU.
"The Artistic Director of N.C.
Dance Theatre will be conducting
a dance clinic with Pat Pertalion. a
dance instructor at ECU Cutler
said.
N.C. Dance Theatre will per-
form on Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 8 p.m.
The event will be located in Wright
Auditorium at ECU. The show will
last approximately two hours. The
N.C. Dance Theatre performance is
open to a general audience.
Tickets for the performance are
available now at the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center,
East Carolina University. Advance
ticket prices for the public are $25,
$20 for ECU facultystaff, $12 for
studentyouth and $25 at the door.
For more information on N.C.
Dance Theatre and other Perform-
ing Arts Series, contact the Cen-
tral Ticket Office at ECU. 919-328-
4788 or toll free 1-800-ECU-Arts.
For deafspeech-impaired access,
919-328-4736. Call between 8 a.m
6 p.m Monday-Friday.
J.B.
NOVEMBER 14, 15, 16, 17�, 18 AND 19. 1996
RATED. PG
An Exhilarating Evening of Dance
East Carolina Dance Theatre's
DANCE '97
FEBRUARY 6, 7, S, 9. 10 AND 11, 1997
RATED. PG
Eric Bogosian's Explosive Drama of Anger and Angst
SUBURBIA
FEBRUARY 27, 28, MARCH 1, 2, 3 AND 4, 1997
RATED: R
Aristophanes' Classic Comic Battle of the Sexes
LYSI STRATA
APRIL 17. 18. 19, 20. 21 AND 22. 1997
RATED: PG-13
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West addresses race relations at Appalachian
"Race Matters: Focus on Education and Honors" was the
theme of Dr. Cornel West's speech at Appalachian's fall convoca-
tion.
An author, philosopher and a professor of religion and Afro-
American studies at Harvard University, West examined the tur-
bulent history of race relations in America.
N. C. State resolves to keep spring break
. The calendar committee has declared they are dedicated to
maintaining a week-long Spring Break. Last Tuesday, the com-
mittee met to discuss the best way to add seven and a half days to
N. C. State's calendar.
The additions are called for by a mandate requiring all UNC-
system schools to hold class for 150 days per year.
Posters at UNC-CH accuse University administrator of racism
While University officials and housekeepers prepare to meet
in court in two weeks, members of the Coalition of Economic
Justice raised the lawsuit's stakes by putting up eye-catching post-
ers on campus.
One of the two new posters begins with the quotation,
"They're just some niggers and wormy kids from Don Follmer,
former press secretary for N. C. House Speaker Harold Brubakcr.
Follmer was fired in April for demeaning housekeepers and stu-
dents who protested privatizations at a rally at Raleigh's Legisla-
tive Building.
Robin Ellis, a member of the coalition, said the group put up
the signs to draw attention to privatization and the Sept. 23 law-
suit charging racism against black workers by the University.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville. NC
757-0003
Hours:
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SPLASH
OF
COLOR
CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK
SEPTEMBER 30 - OCTOBER 5
TUESDAY OCTOBER 1
"BLACKMAN RISING"
8PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE! FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF
PUBLIC: $5 IN ADVANCE, ALL TICKETS $8 AT THE DOOR
FREE TICKETS MUST BE PICKED UP IN ADVANCE
FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 2
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION
8PM
MENDENHALL GREATROOM
FREE!
c�r0
THURSDAY OCTOBER 3
DRIVE-IN MOVIE: "FRIDAY"
8PM
VIP PARKING LOT, CHARLES BLVD.
FREE! WITH VAUD ECU STUDENT ID
FRIDAY OCTOBER 4
OPENING RECEPTION
THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF P.H.POLK
7PM-8PM
MSC GALLERY
FREE!
SATURDAY OCTOKR5
VIDEO DANCE PARTYL
10PM-24M WmW
MENDENHALL SOCIAL ROOM
FREEl WITH VALID ECU STUDENrTlCfPR GUES
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Cultural Awareness Committee
For More Information Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
or Visit Our Web Page at: www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html

I
r





Thursday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
DISNEY from page 2
education department
In addition, former alumni of the
program will answer students' ques-
tions and tell about their persona!
experiences. Students will be able to
schedule interviews with the represen-
tatives on Oct. 2 as well.
Students will then have to wait
six to eight weeks for notification of
a second telephone interview. Within
two weeks, students will receive their
final employment notification.
There are several positions avail-
able for students, ranging from fast
food workers to tour guides, and po-
sitions are not restricted to certain
majors. There are also opportunities
for students who speak a foreign lan-
guage to work at EuroDisney and
Tokyo-Disney.
"They (Disney officials) increased
the number of students to recruit so
News
Writers:
Call the
news editor
to find out
the time of
the writers'
meeting.
they are not as tight about majors. A
hospitality management major might
want to consider a food and beverage
type position though Cauley said.
Internships are also available but
are coordinated with students' majors.
There are currently two ECU stu-
dents at Walt Disney World this se-
mester ai.d approximately 30 students
worked their last summer.
"It was a wonderful experience. I
worked with cast members who
helped me figure out what I want to
"do with my career said senior Pamela
Miller, a hospitality management ma-
jor.
She worked for guest services at
the Grand Floridian Beach Resort as-
sisting guests during their stay, sell-
ing tickets and making dinner reser-
vations.
While working at Walt Disney
World, students stay in two- or three-
bedroom furnished apartments with
other students.
"It's a wonderful opportunity to
meet other college students from
across the country and to develop
better social skills Miller said. "Stu-
dents should take this opportunity to
see what it's likt They should defi-
nitely go to the prt entation. It's won-
derful working for a wonderful com-
pany. Disneyworld is known all over
the world. People's faces just light up
when you say it and to be a part of
that is great"
The presentation is scheduled for
Oct 1 in the General Classroom Build-
ing, room 1032 at 7 p.m. For further
information students may contact the
cooperative education department.
CRIME from page 1
ties do crime reports on a weekly ba-
sis, and while their methods of com-
piling the reports are similar to our
own, some of our major policies dif-
fer.
In UNC-Chapel Hill's student pub-
lication, The Daily Tar Heel, the crime
report section is called "Police
Roundup
"We get the information for our
'roundup' by going down to the
Chapel Hill Police station and look-
ing through police reports stacked on
a table news writer Heather Jernigan
said.
Similar to the production proce-
dures at TEC, the responsibility of
handling crime reports at The Daily
Tar Heel rests on different individu-
als.
"The same person doesn't handle
it every week Jernigan said. "We ro-
tate
One of the main complaints stu-
dents have had about TECs "Crime
Scene" is that the some of the crimes
reported "aren't really crimes and deal
with things no one really cares about"
There is a reason for that. The infor-
mation comes from actual police re-
ports, and major crimes are not re-
ported everyday.
"We have had that complaint
sometimes, too Jernigan said. "So,
now we try to just report real crimes
and not too much trivial stuff
One of the major differences be-
tween TECs "Crime Scene" and other
schools' crime reports is that other
schools include names of both victims
and perpetrators in their compila-
tions. The Daily Tar Heel , The
Maneater (University of Missouri at
Columbia and The Daily Beacon
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville)
all disclose names.
"We just feel like it's a matter of
public record Maneater Editor-in-
Chief Carmel Snyder said. "We do
have people who call and beg us not
to use their names, but our policy is
no exceptions
Snyder said there have been spe-
cial circumstances under which the
Maneater staff has omitted names, like
in the case of a rape or one special
instance where an international stu-
dent might have been deported if his
name had been used.
"But we usually do include
names, and that's probably why stu-
dents enjoy reading them Snyder
added.
Snyder said the crime report seg-
ment of The Maneater is not one of
her favorites.
"I don't really like doing it
Snyder told TEC. "Years ago one of
our editors did away with the segment
completely, but later someone rein-
stated it Recently we had a situation
during production where we had too
ough
many news stories and not eno
space in the paper, so we cut out (jfte
"Police Blotter" section to make room.
When the paper came out, we
had so many students calling and ask-
ing why we took it out We had ho
idea they liked it that much
2800 E. 10th St
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Mon. -Fri. 9-6
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1964
The Tribute
Parents Weekend
September 27, 1996
8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Advance tickets:
$15 Public
$12 ECU facultystaff
SRA Performing Arts
Series subscribers
$ 7 ECU studentsyouth
All tickets $15 at the door.
Group rates available.
ECU Central Ticket Office, 8:30 a.m6:00 p.m Monday-Friday
919-328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS;
deafspeech-impaired access 919-328-4736
1964The Tribute is not allliuted with or endorsed by Apple Corp. Ltd.
IN STATE RESIDENCY QUESTION?
Peter LMi
Ronfary
ATTORNEY AT LAVtf

HARRINGTON, BRADDY &
ROMARY, L.L&
211-B WEST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
TEL: 919-830-8840
QUICK'NASY
Open House
i
Come and sample some delicious
vegetarian dishes, everything from Baked
Pecan Oatmeal to Mexican Lasagna
and receive your FREE
Cookbook.
When: Thurs Sept. 19th:
Breakfast foods
Mon Sept. 23rd:
Lunch foods
Thurs Sept. 26th:
Dinner foods
Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Where: General Classroom Bldg Room 3010
mm
�Reminder
The ECU Immunization Policy
mandates:
Students will be withdrawn from
classes if immunization information is
not complete before September 27,
1996 (end of the 30 day grace period).
For more information contact the
ECU Student Health Service (328-1093
or 328-6841).
Rs up to YOU






The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 26 , 1996
PRELEASING FOR JANUARY '97
PITT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
919-758-1921
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MS
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On Site Management and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Volleyball Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
1 ST FULL MONTH'S RENT 1. "i
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CAREER from page 1
have everything they need and get
around okay, and to assist them in
making it an easy process for thm to
meet students Austin said.
The companies that TEC talked
to said that the graduate hosts had
been a great help, and had been well
prepared to perform their duties.
"We had an orientation session
last week to let us know which com-
pany we were working with, and we
got in contact with them, so it's been
planned for a while Austin said.
One of the companies repre-
sented at Career Day was Aerotek.
They said they had gotten a positive
response from the event and just
wished they had been placed closer
to the center of the action, rather than
at the end of the hallway. Doug Wise
is a contracts manager with Aerotek.
"We've seen some great candi-
dates already. We don't have a good
position here, but we've seen some
good people so far. There's a great
diversity of people here in this school,
md that's exactly why we're here
Wise said.
Mike Cole, another contracts
manager with Aerotek and an ECU
graduate, agreed that the Career Day
had definitely been worthwhile. He
said that Aerotek had participated in
Career Day before and had always
gotten promising results, but that they
would like to improve on their num-
bers even more.
"We have approximately 2,000
internal employees, and three or four
are from East Carolina. We would like
to get some more people from East
Carolina in the company Cole said.
The number of participants alone
indicates the event seems to have been
well received by the companies and
students alike, but Westmoreland said
that it is only the first step for stu-
dents. Career Services can help them
make the most of their initial contact
with the companies, and the compa-
nies themselves encouraged a follow-
up.
"A lot of the employers stressed
to the students the importance of
being registered with Career Ser-
vices Westmoreland said.
After registering and attending
an orientation. Westmoreland said,
the students are eligible to sign up
for individual interviews with any com-
panies which caught their interest
during Career Day.
"They need to come to Career
Services and attend ar, orientatn
session Westmoreland said.
Career Services is located at 701
E. Fifth St. and will have orientation
sessions on September 26th at 2 p.m.
and the 27th at 3 p.m. There will also
be other orientations scheduled in the
future, and other Career Day events
which will focus on Health and Edu-
cation careers, which will be held in
November and February respectively.
NOW OPEN
Come Tailgate ;With Cls
Saturday Afternoons
A professional management team that cares!
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Join Us At Our
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325 E. Arlington
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LAW from page 1
lowing example. The advantage of the
state law is that it is much easier to en-
force.
'The way the federal law was writ-
ten, it did not give the state and local
agencies what they needed to go in and
enforce the law. The state law is very spe-
cific Workman said.
The enforcement will include not
only the ECU police and officials, but
also the Greenville police.
"The University is an integral part
of the Greenville community and we as
the Greenville Police Department will
make every effort to preserve the integ-
rity of the University by assisting them
in eliminating the sale of counterfeit col-
legiate merchandise and other counter-
feit items that affect the community as a
whole said Blair Carr of the Greenville
Police Department
For consumers, especially at games,
it is important to know that there are
several ways to tell if the merchandise is
legit or not They should look for an offi-
cial products licensed label, a
manufacturer's name and a trademark
designation. In addition to these and
other signs, consumers should also pay
attention to the sellers of the merchan-
dise themselves and where they are sell-
ing.
if someone is walking around with
shirts over their arm. or selling merchan-
dise out of their trunk, it is most likely-
counterfeit andor unlicensed Work-
man said.
There is obviously a financial issue
involved, not only for the school who can
lose profit to counterfeiters, but also
other organizations who legitimately sell
ECU merchandise.
"One part of this also is to protect
the retailers, who are selling licensed
products Workman said.
In addition to the economic aspect
there is also the concern that counter
feiters may not represent the university
in a positive way.
"Counterfeiters may not product
the quality of merchandise that the uni-
versity does, and they might use images
or words that are negative or derogatory.
That's not the image the college wank
to project" Workman said.
Call For Pickup Orders
Enter
TOdfa
Dtfnce
to Win
Contestant Registration
packets available at the
information desk in
Mendenhall
Entry deadline - Oct.4
Contest - Wed Oct. 23
8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
1st place - $300
2nd place - $200
3rd place - tOO
MasterCard





n�� jai
8
Thursday, September 26,1996 The East Carolinian
opmm
Owtfcem
Why is it
taking so long
for North
Carolina tax
payers to get
financial relfef
from Hurricane
Fran?
Experts have described Hurricane Fran as the worst
storm to ever come inland North Carolina since Hurri-
cane Hazel in the early 50s. It has been three weeks
since Greenville and the ECU community felt the first
blow from Hurricane Fran and for most, the effects have
subsided.
For others, the headaches have just begun.
If you've been watching the news, reports of contin-
ued flooding has run rapid throughout the eastern part
of the state. Most towns along the Neuse, Pamlico and
Tar Rivers have been heaviest hit as flood waters from
the upstream Triangle area have flowed to the plains of
Pitt and Lenoir counties. Kinston, along with other cit-
ies close to the rivers, are coping with flooded streets,
busted sewer systems, and the inability of the residents
to return to their homes.
You can't stop there. The Triangle is starting to get
back on its feet after days upon days without power and
Topsail Island has a threat of being condemned. So basi-
cally North Carolina, from the Triangle eastward, was
considered candidate for disaster area status.
The visit of President Clinton to the Tar Heel state
brought the talks of not whether the area needed federal
aid, but rather how much the government can give to
the hurricane victims. Along with Governor Jim Hunt
and Senator Jesse Helms, Clinton has asked Congress to
add another $290 million to supplement the $1.2 billion
that has already been shelled out in the aftermath.
It's about time. We know that this process of clean-
ing up can't be completed overnight; but three weeks
after the worst storm of the century, you would think
the process of finding relief funds shouldn't be a prob-
lem in the most powerful nation on Earth. I think it
shouldn't take our government that long to react, espe-
cially in an election year.
Let's look closer.
True, most of these effects were unforeseen, but when
rivers are overflowing their banks and threats of severe
showers are in the forecast for the same area, you would
think the process of aid would speed up a tad to prevent
hardship.
There's no problem with the amount given to the
stricken areas, but one would have to be concerned with
the priorities of our federal government when it takes
longer to help our citizens than it does for a foreign
country' to receive financial aid from the very citizens
who pay trie taxes that give these countries aid.
v The East Carolinian
i �
torn
0$
&
Brandon Waddcll. Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
��ecytU'J
paper
' V:�-
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead UtoA
e L is the opinion of the Editorial ard. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, wh.cn may be ed t
lo decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be s,gned. Letter should
nSTr? Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville. NC 27854353. For information, hi (919)
328-6366��
Election '96
Editor's note: These two columns are the third in a series of
political issues columns that will run through. November. TEC s
goal is to give the student body information relevant to the
upcoming elections. Today's topic is public education.
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
Thanks to the President,
155,100 students in
North Carolina can
benefit from his
innovative student loan
reforms.
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
In 1995, the Department
of Education stated that
one in two Americans
had a serious reading
deficiency.
education
. Clinton fTfe$l
Let s say you were a big, bad politician and you wanted
to pick an enemy. Would you pick one that was strong? Or
would you pick one that was not as strong, one that could not
respond, one that could not hurt you? The Republicans have
found such a defenseless group to attack: America's students.
Let's look at the facts. Besides Clinton's obvious accom-
plishments (316,00 new jobs and a 42 unemployment rate
in N.C. alone), he has looked out for you. the student Thanks
to the President, 155,100 students in North Carolina can ben-
efit from his innovative student loan reforms.
President Clinton also created the effective Americorps
program, in which over 45,000 volunteers have served their
communities while earning money to go to college. He has
increased the number of Pell Grants for needy students Re-
nublicans tried to slash this too). Even better, the President
made college loans more affordable for 2.8 million students
with his improvements in student loans, including a proposal
that won't let the lenders take more than a certain percentage
out of your post-college paychecks.
Let's see what the Republicans have to offer. How about
our Congressman Walter Jones, Jr.? Instead of serving the
interests of our prestigious university, he has voted with
Speaker Newt Gingrich 95 percent of the time, including 99
percent of the time on the "Contract With America
Folks, that's not a Congressman. That's a puppet!
It's time we elect someone like George Parrott a man
who will look out for ECU, and not the radical right's extrem-
ist agenda.
How about our other friend, N.C. Senate candidate
"Trailer Park Tom" Lamprecht This guy never met a cut in
education he didn't like. Why the nickname?
Pitt County schools are falling apart The walls are peel-
ing, the ceilings are crumbling, the heat is stifling. We had an
opportunity to fix some of these slum-like schools with a multi-
million dollar school bond, but Lamprecht shamelessly orches-
trated its defeat and now, many Pitt County students get their
education in a trailer. Mr. Lamprecht even thinks that a six
percent payraise for our teachers is too much He attacked the
N.C. Senate's efforts to raise teacher salaries. Heck, our teach
ers deserve a 15 percent raise, but it is antieducation people
like Lamprecht that have ideas like taking taxpayer dollars from
public schools and giving them to wealthy private schools.
Let's keep Sen. Ed Warren, a man who has fought tire-
lessly to ensure that ECU gets the funding it deserves. His edu-
cational record is impeccable. As for his opponent's record on
education? Well, just call him Tom Lampshade. The lights are
on, but nobody's home. -5
If protecting education is liberal, then I'm as liberal as they
come.
I will end today by somewhat quoting Hollywood. When it
comes to Republicans and education, it's "lights, cameras, and
NO action
For many, education is the key to the fulfillment of the
American dream. Frederick Douglas, noted African-Ameri-
can Statesman and former slave wrote "That for a man to
deny himself an education is for a man to enslave himself for
without an education no man is free Neither major politi-
cal party would argue that education is unimportant. There
is however a great debate on how to best implement a sound
education.
In 1995, the Department of Education stated that one
in two Americans had a serious reading deficiency. Obvi-
ously something must be done. There is more to the issue ot
education than funding. There are the issues of choice, com-
petition and accountability.
It may sound simpl. Why not let schools compete? One
would assume that the educational community would want
what is best for students. However, in research for this ar-
ticle I found a recent incident that shows a that the educa-
tional establishment is afraid of competition in education.
John Shanahan invented a series of audio tapes designed
to improve reading skills. The program used phonics music
and flash cards to teach reading. The idea of phonics had
been abandoned for whole language methods. Shanahan's
series called "Hooked on Phonics" was manufactured by his
company Gateway Educational products. Shannon would
see his company blossom into a $133 million-a-year industry.
Spectacular for a product that Shanahan developed for his
own son who was basically illiterate after attending public
schools.
What Shanahan did not realize was that he was putting
himself at odds with very powerful interests. One was the
International Reading Association which was founded in 1956
This organization was founded as a response to controversy
surrounding a book called Why Johnny Can't Read. Pub-
lished in 1955 the book called for a return to phonics. An-
other adversary was the National Education Foundation. The
NEA is the largest teachers' union in the country.
In 1992, one of every' five delegates in the Democratic
National Convention was sent by the NEA. Also the NEA
was a driving force behind the organization of the Depart
ment of Education in 1979. Former education secretary Bill
Bennet called it "an act of political cynicism, a payoff to the
union
Shanahan would see his company crushed under the po-
litical hand of the FTC and media The Federal Trade Commis-
sion cited the company with making false advertising claims.
After rewriting this article three times, I finally saw that i
could only touch on this incident I would like to encourage
readers to check out the full story in the April 1996 issue of
Success. Political lobbyists and unions should not be allowed
to dominate educational polices to the detriment of America's
Children! With this kind of governmental and political interest
control dominating the country it is no wonder that people
ScUto
�etten&tt6e
Student leadership deserves compensation
Student fees should not pay SGA tuition
To the Editor,
! On behalf of the entire student
body of apathetic students at East Caro-
lina University, I protest the meeting of
the Student Government Association in
which they voted in a salary, full tuition
payment and books for themselves, paid
(or by our student fees. Student fees
have been spiraling upward for years.
Now these kids have taken up the
jeedy ways of the corrupt adults who
i this rotten capitalist country today
Dy creating a porkbarrel to get them-
selvps on the gravy train.
What right do they have to rob us
blind of our money? One of the rea
sons that this entire country has gone
to hell is because our elected officials
have lost sight of the fact that "a pub-
lic office is a public trust" All they see
in it today is money, greed and power
for themselves, and the retaining of the
right to control, abuse and spend other
people's money. How long can we, the
working class, while we slave our lives
away for low wages, tolerate having this
kind of arbitrary policy shoved down
our throats by the elitists on all levels
of our phony, undeserving govern-
ments? As adults in this world, are we
going to be resigned to endure the
same corrupt leadership that our parts
and forebears endured simply because
no one gave, or gives enough of a damn
to do something about it? Wake up and
get a life!
Richard Becker
Senior
Political Science
To the Editor,
1 am writing in response to some
recent criticism concerning the SGA
executive officers and their tuition and
fees. As a senior, I have seen little par-
ticipation by the overall student body
in organizations on campus. I am only
now realizing how little the average
student does outside of class time.
My admiration of the student lead-
ers on campus increases every day.
These people have been elected by us
to represent our school on the highest
level. The SGA officers have been do-
ing a marvelous job and deserve to be
compensated. The last time I checked,
only two people wanted to be SGA
President Maybe it is only two people
i
who had the initiative to go after the
position.
As a University, we support ath-
letes who prove time and time again
they are above the law. Athletes who
do represent the entire student body
whether they realize it or not We sup-
ply free tuition for their hard efforts in
athletics and have some how sic
pushed aside the true student repre-
sentatives. Have we forgotten what
academics is all about? It has a lot to
do with leadership. Our student gov-
ernment leadership has gone without
compensation for too long.
Another problem is the people
who take time out of their day to orga
nize an opposition to the paying of
these fees. These people are using their
energies in the wrong place. It" flu
would spend their time working for a
better student government rather than
tearing it down, common goals could
be reached. The time consuming work
by these officers should be supported
by free tuition no matter where the
money comes from. These positions
will become more competitive as time
goes by and student government will
rise to the level that exemplifies a top
University. Let us build something
rather than hampering progress. Stu-
dent leaders have my support
Jonathan Huggins
Senior
Nutrition
m JB





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Thursday, September 26,1996 The East Carolinian
Spare Time
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10
Thursday, September 26,1996 The East Carolinian
m Services
r
Offered
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eli-
gible regardless of grades, income, or par-
ent's income. Let us help. Call Student Fi-
nancial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext P53628
MOBILE MUSIC PRODUCTIONS WEE-
KEND! Join MMP every Saturday night at
the 5th Street Brewery and this Sunday
night at the Elbo. (see larger ad this page)
Private dates filling fast Call Lee at 758-
4644 for booking. See you Saturday for the
tailgate party!
SOME NEW, SMALL PETS, highly efficient
one and two bedroom $310.00 and up. 756-
6616.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! "THE Pent
house" Above BW3, is availa' : for rent Oc-
tober 1st This is the most desirable apart-
ment in Greenville! Full length windows, sun-
ken living area, over 1400 Square feet 3 bed-
rooms, 2 12 bath. Other units available too!
Including the "Beauty Salon Call Yvonne
at 758-2616.
ROOMMATE WANTED: SHARE LARGE 3
br2.5 bath townhouse near Greenville Ath-
letic Club. Very nice. Must be neat and re-
sponsible. $290month 12 utilities. Call
551-1863.
HOUSE TO SHAREONE ROOM in house
on N. Summit available now. 6 blocks from
class. $225month. Call 758-2294. Partially
furnishedAC.gas heat
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
FOR -RENT: (SUBLEASE) TWO bedroom
apartment Wyndham Court Deposit required.
$405 rent per month. Very nice. 5 blocks from
campus. Available now. Call Jeff or Jerry at
551-3040.
ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR NON-smoking
students - Methodist Student Center. Call 758-
2030 for more info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
apartment 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, supermarket and laundro-
mat Rent includes utilities, phone and ca-
ble Call 757-1947.
MF ROOMMATE. NICE HOUSE. Walking
distance to campus. Own room, washer and
dryer, and lots of extras. Call 752-8682
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE four
bedroom house at Fourth and Biltmore. Call
Kevin, Gus, or Doug at 919-752-0744.
1 ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP Tar River
near campus. Rent $177.50 for your own
room. Please call 758-7542.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk to cam-
pus. $250mo. plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
8244.
105 E. 1ITH ST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW,
Central AC & Heat Nice Private Back Yard.
Lawncare included, Pets OK! $600. month.
830-9502
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 bedroom, 2 bath condo on Breezewood
Drive. Fire place, vaulted ceilings, washer dry-
er hook-up.dishwasher AC. baloney, pool, own
bathroom. $275 per month, 12 utilities. Call
Nancy at 321-2969.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE PERSON to
share 2 BR2BTH apartment in Parkview
Apt Complex. WD included, clean, nice, be-
gin renting 1st of October. ECU bus stop,
$225month, plus half utilities. Call 754-
2022.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3 BR
house close to campus. Serious student who
wants own room, washer and dryer and lots
of extras please call 752-8682.
WANTED: MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
monthphone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable
UNIVEGA MOUNTAIN BIKE ALUMINUM
703 rock shocks, forest green, new, paid
$850.00, sacrifice, $450.00, call 756-8080.
PEARL JAM TICKETS, OCTOBER 4
Show. Best offer 551-6936.
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 758-8244.
APPLE COMPUTER QUADRA 605. In
eludes moniter, keyboard, and mouse, Sys-
tem 7.1 software. Never been used! $1000
919-637-1782.
SNOW SKIS WITH POLES K2-TRC Select
(190's) with Salomon bindings. Great condi-
tion! $225 OBO, Call 754-2242.
LARGE LOFT WITH FULL-size mattress
and desk underneath. Built by Engineering
student Disassembles easily. $150neg. Call
551-1863.
1992 HONDA PRELUDE SI. Black. Fully
equipped - great condition. Take over pay-
ments plus $500.00. Total payoff - $13,700.
Contact Jose (919)413-0426.
BARENDS. Trek T-system silver barends. L
shape. $10 or best offer. Call Jeremy � 413-
0513.
If
Help
Wanted
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 355-0210
PT SECURITY OFFICER POSITIONS avails
able at Glaxo Wellcome. Pay starts at $6.50.
Must be 21 yrs. old and have a clean criminal
record. Apply Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am -
5 pm Guardsmark. 3219 Landmark Street
Suite 9B, Greenville. EQE.
STUDENTS LOOKING FOR PART time
work wflexible hours? ECU is looking for a
few good Pirates to contact alumni for the
annual fund program. Five dollars per hour -
come by Rawl Annex. Room 5, M-Th after 2
pm for more information.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague. Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Boardother benefits.
For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
PART TIME HELP WANTED week nights
and Saturdays. Come by North American Fi-
berglass Corporation weekdays after 3 pm
and before 5 pm.
I AM LOOKING FOR a few good people to
work with me on a part-time or full time ba-
sis to earn some serious money. Call David
752- 10.
PART TIME TEMP. CAREGFVER needed
at local child care center for after school pro-
gram. MWF 12-6, TTH 2-6. Experience re-
quired. Call 756-8250.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Seasonal
6 full-time employment available. No exp nec-
essary. For info, rail 1-206-971-3550 ext
C53627
PART TIME WAITRESS, Mon-Fri. Golden
China Restaurant 300 S.E. Greenville Blvd
321-6868.
SPEEDY DELIVERY IS NOW hiring smil
ing drivers. Expand with a growing compa-
ny. Drivers must know the Greenville area.
Call today for more information. 355-7585.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc. Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
DID YOU SAYFREE?
YES! Whei you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartaeats on West 8th Street, your first Month's rent is FREE! There
arc also special rates on third floor apartments for a limited time only
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
2 full baths
Water and sewer included
Close to campus and downtown
Laundry facilities on site
6 month or 1 year leases
POME
Managed by
I�
remco
east;
inc.
355-1313
PART-TIME DANCE INSTRUCTOR need
ed for ballet tap, and tumblingacrobatic
classes. Call 753-3626.
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must Flexi
ble schedules. Apply in person. Denny's, 808
S. Memorial Drive
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
RPS INC. IS LOOKING for temporary driv-
ers during their peak season. Must have 1
year commercial driving experience and a
good driving record. Call 1 800-977-7462 for
more information.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crewmore. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext.
L53622
PARTFULL TIME CARPENTERSHOOF
ERS NEEDED. Will work around school
schedule. Call 355-8111, ask for Eva.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient willing
to learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are currently taking applications
for part-time telephone collectors willing to
work any hours from 8am until 9pm Mon-
day thru Friday and Saturday morning from
8am until 12 pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127
OFFICE SUPPORT: PART TIME Accounts
Receivable. Assist with account inquiries, bill-
ing, and process credit applicationspay-
ments. 25-29 hours per week. Schedule in-
cludes: 12 pm (or 1pm) to 6 pm Saturdays.
Schedule will require eveningSunday hours
for holiday shopping season. For informa-
tion call Human Resources: 756-3140.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, call: (206) 971-
3570 ext J53626
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
seek fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
with the fashionsaccessories you love to
wear. Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure, and
Young Men's. Flexible schedules for the "ear-
ly birds" (10am-2pm) or "night owls" (6pm-
9pm). All retail positions include weekends.
Merchandiseclothing discount offered. Ap-
plications accepted Tuesday and Thursday.
l-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza and Carolina East
Mall.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
College Internship Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Seif-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
One in three college agents becomes a full lime associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
Other
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE
at the Methodist Student Center, . Casual
dress. Refreshments following the service.
attention all students! grants and scholar-
ships available from sponsors! no repay-
ments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$ for
info: 1-800400-0209.
FREE T-SHIRT$1000. Credit Card fun-
draisers for fraternities, sororities & groups.
Any campus organization can raise up to
$ 1000 by earning a whopping $5.00 AISA
application. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive FREE T-SHIRT.

Trove
SCUBA
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ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
��c
n.n�-
iJ5? Services
Offered
i
m
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 49-2224
IT'S A
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W E E K E N
SAT. 5sTREET
fi
BREWERY
ABOUT TO BECOME THE NEW SAT. NI6HT HOT SPOT, WITH
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GIVEAWAYS ALL NI6HTCDS AND MIX TAPES!

Greek
Personals
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds of student representatives are already
earning frtt trips and Ibis uf cmJi
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun,
Bahamas. Mazatlan. Jamaica or Florida!
Ziiumui tliutiiiitr .fbiiilHiii iiili
tituiluili.cMNow! Egja g ftani
2lUdt Trout SUP) Dtf.
hli&AXi
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Co Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-67&6386
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUT1CA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12, 1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
tudent Swap Shop
ANNE-MARIE TROY. CONGRATULATIONS
on your pinning. We are so happy for you! Love,
your Alpha Omicron Pi sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: CONGRATULATIONS
to our Greeks of the week: Heather King and
Holly Berg.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: CONGRATULA-
TIONS to the Kappa pledge class! Kim Berg-
stad, Jessica Bond. Melodie Byrd. Kelly Chris-
tenbury, Kathryn Crotts, Brooke Curtis, Sa-
mantha Dassler, Heather Davidoff. Amy Daw-
kins, Christie Devivo, Melissa Dixon, Lindsay
Flythe. Jennifer Foley. Scarlett Foster, Jo Gas-
kill, Kelly Graham, Liz Hodgson, Amber James,
Rachel Jones, Christine Kiesling, Jennifer Krum-
bein, Julie Linder, Jenny Love, Tracy Mason,
Terese Messick. Charity Miller; Jessica Offner,
Hope Pfeil. Samantha Snyder, Christie Swin-
dell. Susan Tart, Mary Van Luven, Lisa Vexler,
Katie Waldman, Beth Wilder and Kristin Wo-
mack. Good luck! Love, the Sisters.
TO THE NEW MEMBERS of Delta Zeta: Fri-
day night's surprise has now unraveled. Just
wait till the moments to come! You have so
much to look forward to and deserve only the
best Love, your sisters.
PIKA WOULD LIKE TO thank Sigma. Alpha
Omicron Pi and Theta Chi for a great time all
day Saturday!
KAPPA SIG, PHI TAU, and Chi Omega: We
really know how to bring cut the band! Can't
wait to do it again. Love, the Alpha Phis.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: WE'RE looking
forward to spending an awesome parents' wee-
kend with you. Love the Alpha Phis.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO JULIE and Zach.
PIKES.
ALPHA XI DELTA - Keep up the winning
-eak. Congratulations on your flag football
- i against Delta Zeta!
ZETA TAU ALPHA AND Delta Zeta. we're re-
ally looking forward to getting together with
you as our sister sororities! Can't wait! Love,
the sisters and pledges of Pi Delta.
THE SISTERS OF DELTA Zeta would like to
extend their gratitude to Faith Noyes, Casey
Smith, and Jenny Sevilla for all their help dur-
ing rush. A special thanks to Stacey Rodemer
for being the best pledge mom!
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE OMEGA
pledge class! Keep up the good work! PIKA
THE BROTHERS OF PI Lambda Phi Fratern-
ity would like to welcome all parents and guests
to parents weekend. Go Pirates!
ALPHA PHI: WAY TO go girls! Let's keep BE
ing some flag football butt Love your sisters.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA Delta Pi hopes eve-
ryone has a great Parents' Weekend.
SIGMA PI: WE ENJOYED hanging out with
the "comfy crowd Looking forward to doing
it again. Love, the Alpha Phis.
THETA CHI: ONCE AGAIN we've proved a
little water can clean up anyone! Thanks for a
great time. Love the water gun queens, The
Alpha Phis.
THE BROTHERS OF PI Lambda Phi Fratern-
ity would like to congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Aar-
on Lowery on their wedding and the birth of
their son. Joshua Neil Lowery.
Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Sept
24 - Oct 1,1996: Wed Sept 25 - Symphonic
Wind Ensemble and Concert Band, Scott
Carter and Christopher Knighten, Conduc-
tors (Wright Auditorium. 8:00 pm free)
Thur Sept 26 - Senior Recital, Brian Jones,
trumpet (AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 pm
free). Sun Sept 29 - Fall Event of The
Friends of the School of Music, sponsored
by the Friends for members and their guests:
For membership information, call 919-328-
6851. Mon Sept 30 - Faculty Recital Mary
Burroughs, horn. John B. O'Brien, piano,
Perry Smith, tenor (AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm, free). For additional information,
call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline at ECU-
4370.
THE PEOPLEACT ONE-ACT Play Festival
is scheduling open auditions for "A Dead
Man's Apartment" by Edward Allam Baker
and "For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls"
by Christopher Durang. No preparation or
Announcements
experience is necessary! Auditions are sched-
uled for Sept 28 & 29, from 3-6PM at Jay-
cee park Auditorium, 2000 Cedar Lane. If
you are interested in being part of the One-
Act Play Festival, we are also looking for
volunteers in costumes, props, stage design,
etc. Please call Deborah Morrison at 321-
6028 to find out more about community
theatre in your area.
HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED about
Greek life? If so, come out and meet the Afri-
can American Greeks on Thursday, Sept. 26
at 7 pm in the Social Room of Mendenhall
Student Center. Bring questions and look
forward to an informative and exciting even-
ing.
THE STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA As-
sociation of Educators (SNCAE) will be hav-
ing a meeting on Wednesday, Oct 2 at 4:30
pm in Speight 308 Alan Bailey will discuss
how you can make and use flannel boards.
Election for Vice ' .esident and Secretary!
Door prizes and refreshments.
PSYCHOLOGY PSI CHI BOOK sale. Texts.
journals, etc. Sept 30 - Oct 4, Rawl 302.
EXPLORE THE WILDERNESS! LEARN
more about adventure skills with the Out-
door Living Skills Workshops. On October
1 at 7:00 PM the Adventure Program is of-
fering an Introduction to River Rescue. Reg-
ister by September 27 in 204 Christenbury.
For more info call Rec Services at 328-6387.
DUE TO HURRICANE FRAN, the applica-
tion deadline for the 1997 Miss Kinston Le-
nior County Scholarship Pageant has been
extended to October 1. The Kinston-Lenior
Co. Scholarship Pageant Association is the
sponsor. Women between the ages of 18-24
(or who will be 18 by the 1997 Miss Ameri-
ca Pageant), who live or go to school within
a 50-mile radius of Kinston may enter. The
pageant will be held Nov. 29 in Kinston. The
winner will receive a $3,000 education schol-
arship: $1,000 cash wardrobe allowance; ex-
pense-paid trip to the 1997 Miss North Car-
olina Pageant and other gifts. For informa-
tion, call Oran K. Perry, executive director,
522-0856; Cathy Wooten, president; 523-
0450; Ken Pittman, chairman, 523-6205
evenings; Joan Turley, 566-4991; or Joy
O'Neal, 527-0633.
PI DELTA SOCIAL SORORITY will be
holding an informal rush, Thursday, Septem-
ber 26th at 7 pm. We'll be meeting in the
main floor TV lounge and having dinner at
Chico's. Dress is casual, bring some money
and a friend. Just come on out and meet the
girls of the only local sorority here at ECU!
For more info, call Ami at 328-3302.
WESLEY FOUNDATION OF GREEN-
VILLE. The Methodist Student Center 758-
2030. Sponsored by the United Methodist
Church, Wesley welcomes persons of all re-
ligious backgrounds and no religious back-
ground. It offers a variety of programs, stu-
dy groups, mission teams, and service pro-
jects. All students and staff invited. Worship
Sunday night 8 pm in the chapel, Wednes-
day Fellowship 7:30 pm
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will meet
Sept 26 at 5:30 in GC 3009. The topic will
be 2nd quarter performance review and light
refreshments will be served. Everyone we
FOHT HENRY'S ARMYNAVY
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iimiiMHiii inrn nil ir n I I
�tvmvKmwt �a
11
Thursday, September 26, 1996 The East Carolinian j
LIFe
E-T-E
on
the
kW
Beatlemania sweeps
Award-winning writer
reads work on campus
S E P T EM B E R
26
Thursday
Thespians of Diversity
meeting, 6 p.m. in GCB 2147
��������
Lecture: Amie Oliver, mixed media
artist, 7 p.m. in Speight Audito-
rium.
�����
� � � � �
Dragonheart in Hendrix Theatre,
at 8 p.m. through Sept. 14.
Edwin McCain at the Attic. Ad-
vance tickets $7.
Doublewide at Peasant's Cafe.
�������
� �
Vertical Horizon at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
27
Friday
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series Parents Week-
end Event: 1964 The Tribute, 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
The F.A.N. Club with yeP! and
Agents of Good Roots performing
live from 4-7 p.m a pep rally from
7-8 p.m. and open recreation from
10 p.m. until closing in Menden-
hall.
Pat McGee at Peasant's Cafe.
Flat Duo Jets with Frydaddies at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
28
Saturday
Cultural Awareness Week
runs through Oct. 4
Cravin' Melon with Hobex at the
Attic.
Funkomatics at Peasant's Cafe.
Edwin McCain at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro.
29
Sunday
Photos of PH. Polk ex-
hibit in Mendenhall Gallery
through Oct 27.
� �
� �������
Scrawl at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
30
Monday
OCTOBER
1
Tuesday
Writer's Reading
Series set to begin
next Tuesday
Dale Williamson
Assistant Ufestyles Editor
The Writers Reading Series is set
to launch this Tuesday, Oct 1 when
the award-win-
ning poetplay-
wrightessayist
Jay Wright brings
his talents to
ECU.
Wright,
whose writing ex-
plores such
themes as the
Afro-American
historical experi-
ence, personal bi-
ography and the
human spiritual
quest, earned a
strong educa-
tional back-
ground through
his years at the
University of Cali-
fornia at Berke-
ley, Union Theo-
logical Seminary in New York, and
Rutgers University.
Within these academic circles,
'Chew on This" lecture se-
ries: " vVhat is the Future of Pales-
tine?' with Yousef Sansour at
noon in Mendenhall Underground.
��������������a
Travel-Adventure Film Series: Leg-
ends of Louisiana, with Sandy
Mortimer at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. A theme din-
ner will be served at 6 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Great Room.
Faculty Recital: Mary Burroughs,
horn, John B. O'Brien, piano, and
Perry Smith, tenor, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Wright found an avenue to explore his
varied interests (everything from the
anthropology of Africa and the Ameri-
cas to Drama to theology), all of which
have affected his creative endeavors.
In fact Wright's eclectic personal
interests and passions are what dis-
tinguishes him as a unique literary
figure. Aside from searching for a de-
fined literary black culture, Wright
assimilates classical European writers,
such as Dante, into African and Na-
tive American
spiritual motifs to
create his own
distinctive vision.
But Wright
doesn't stop with
cultural
thematics. He
strives to make
his poetry carry
the feel, mood,
and rhythm of the
culture on which
he is writing. He
works to make his
poetry musically
represent the Af-
rican American
culture, much like
jazz.
Wright's first
major book, The
Homecoming
Singer (1971), is an exemplary auto
See POET page 18
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Jay Wright
Grab your neru jackets and bring your lonely hearts to see
Auditorium at 8 p.m. this Friday night as part of the celebration
over $100 but is priceless to me) is
on my Christmas listihree times. I
have books written about the Beatles
and books written about people who
write about the Beatles. I can discuss
at length the reasons why John
Lennon's murder was a communist
plot orchestrated by the KGB, and I
can list more facts about the Beatles
than I can about Bill Clinton.
But I never thought I'd have the
chance to see the Beatles perform. I
Calling all Beatles fans, the op-
portunity of a lifetime is here.
I am what could easily be called
a Beatles fanatic. Whenever I get a
little bit of extra money, 1 buy a
Beatles CD. I have the Beatles' An-
thology I and . The video collec-
tion of Anthology (which sells for
Photo courtesy of Student Union
the Faux Fab Four in Wright
for Parents' Weekend at ECU.
saw Paul McCartney a few years ago
on his world tour, but the Beatles
ended their performing days before
I was born. After my birth, they re-
mained in the studio until their
break-up. When John Lennon died, I
was forced to give up my secret
dreams of a reunion.
Now, thanks to the Department
of University Unions, I get to do
See BEATLES page 17
Agents of Good Roots bring good vibes to Pirate fans Friday
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
Photo courtesy of Student Union
The F.A.N. (Friday All-Nighter) Club gets another chance at a fresh start
after being wiped out by Hurricane Fran last time. Agents of Good Roots
(above) and the band yeP! will provide live music for Club members.
Friday nights at ECU won't ever be the
same now that bands have been given the abil-
ity to jam on-campus. The word is that you
don't even have to go downtown to catch a
vibe. Instead, you can just look out your dorm
window tomorrow night. At about 4 p.m two
of Greenville's downtown favorites will be play-
ing in Mendenhall Student Center as part of
The F.A.N. (Friday All-Nighter) Club. The last
F.A.N. Club meeting was cancelled by our good
friend, Hurricane Fran.
If you've ever gone to Peasant's Cafe, you
might have caught a show by the band called
yeP If you have, you remember them. If you
haven't, then go to Mendenhall and you'll
catch a show that will be hard to forget. They
will be taking the stage first, so be sure to
notice how big their vocals are. They're very
tight.
Once you've heard yeP take time to no-
tice where you are and what's going on. Events
like the F.A.N. Club, sponsored by the ECU
Student Union Popular Entertainment Com-
mittee, take charge. They keep people close to
campus on the weekends, keep traffic rolling
through Mendenhall, and keep people at the foot-
ball games on Saturday. Everyone benefits from
this. It's a good thing.
Speaking of the benefits students can receive,
the guests of honor Friday night will be Agents
of Good Roots, who have come straight off a spot
on the recent H.O.R.D.E. tour. After hitting the
stage, the Richmond quartet will blow your mind.
I had a chance to talk to the band's lead
singer and classically trained guitarist, Andrew
Winn. He told me about the tour, jamming with
Blues Traveler, and the road ahead.
"We started playing in Richmond about four
years ago Winn said. I was amazed by his raspy
voice, one that he wasn't exactly born with. An-
drew was involved in a skiing accident a while
ago and it changed his voice forever, which in
turn affected the band's sound.
"As we progress further and further, we have
to keep checking our enthusiasm Winn contin-
ued. "We're touring five nights a week, it's tough,
but it's tight" At least this band doesn't take their
talents for granted.
See FAN page 17
Black Man Rising, at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
� � �
WEEKEND ,
Films
Hendrix
Dragonheart
Travel-Adventure Film Series
Writers Reading Series begins
with poet Jay Wright. Meet the
writer at 3 p.m. in the Greenville
Museum of Art and hear him read
at 7 p.m. in the Willis Building
followed by a reception and book
sale.
��������������a
The Connells at the Attic.
Wednesday
� S. Rudolr1! Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: North Caro-
lina Dance Theatre, at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Comedy Zone with Willie Stratford
at the Attic.
i:
Sean Connery proved that he's larger than life last summer when he
played a dragon? That's right; Connery used his classic voice to bring
the computer-generated Draco to full life in Dragonheart, a box-office dis-
appointment that deserves a second chance.
This fairy tale story involves a bitter knight named Bowen (played by
a gravelly-throated Dennis Quaid) who vows to destroy every dragon in the
land because he believes a dragon heart transformed young prince Einon,
whom Bowen was sworn to protect, into a ruthless tyrant. When Bowen
finally confronts Draco, the two eventually become comrades and the film
turns into the first buddy movie featuring a knight and a dragon.
Despite some rather violent moments, Dragonheart works best if viewed
through a child's eyes. The bulk of the film is filled with more silly mo-
ments than serious ones (a scene in which Bowen is dragged through a
forest by Draco's tail perfectly exemplifies this point). However, these silly
moments ultimately make Dragonheart an innocent escapist piece.
The film's more intriguing elements center around Bowen's struggle
to uphold the duties expected of a knight. Director Rob Cohen, along with
co-writers Patrick Read Johnson and Charles Edward Pogue, do manage to
capture the glory and virtue of knighthood far better than First Knight.
one Connery film that needs to be forgotten.
But the biggest reason to see Dragonheart is the dragon itself. Al-
though Hollywood's use of computer technology is not yet perfected, Draco
is an awe-inspiring wonder to behold, gloriously capturing the beauty and
terror one would expect from a dragon.
Photo courtesy of University Unions
Legends of Louisiana will be shown in Hendrix Theatre at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on
Monday. A theme dinner will be served in the Mendenhall Great Room at 6 p.m.





12
Thursday, September 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
Classical composer finds X-Files addictive
New York (AP) - Mark Snow,
composer of The X-Files, uses his
music to bolster the intrigue, the
mystery of the popular TV show.
He even resorts to trickery now and
then.
"What I like is to keep the au-
dience on edge he says, "by hav-
ing red herrings or false moments
where someone turns around and
the music goes Hanngg' and you
think, 'This is it
"When the real thing hap-
pens he says, he winds down the
music to create "a sense of false
security. It's a good device for keep-
ing the audience's attention
With The X-Files going into its
fourth season this fall. Snow's in-
terest isn't waning one bit.
"Each one is like a mini-movie.
It's not drudge work. It's always in-
teresting and the quality week to
week is so high. It just doesn't get
boring he said.
Add to his list Millennium: a
new one-hour weekly series also
from The X-Files creator Chris
Carter.
Millennium premieres Oct. 25,
taking The X-Files time slot on Fri-
day at 9 p.m while The X-Files
moves to Sunday nights at 9 p.m.
Snow, a graduate of the
Juilliard School who recently
turned 50 and became a grandfa-
ther last month, said the music will
be different for the two shows.
Unlike The X-Files. Snow came
up with the theme for Millennium
on the first try. A violin, he said,
plays a melody of hope, heaven and
"Music is always
there, under their
dialogue, almost
like the third
person in the
hell over dark percussion that
sounds like big Japanese drums.
"The melody is very spiritual
in a funny way. It has the mourn-
ful quality of a mass by Bach or a
Handel oratorio he said.
Millennium focuses on a crime-
fighter who visualizes the crimes
in order to solve
them.
"The pilot
is really out
there Snow
said. "A crazy
guy knocks his
victims out,
sews their eyes
and lips to-
gether, and bur-
ies them alive.
The hero brings
the police to
where they are
buried. They �� �
rescue some It's dark, mysteri-
ous and unsettling to say the least
When composing for The X-
Files, Snow writes music as if it's
actually a character. Especially
when the two FBI agents who in-
vestigate paranormal happenings
that involve homicides, oddball oc-
currences, UFOs and alien visita-
tions are talking.
"Music is always there, under
their dialogue, almost like the third
person in the room Snow said.
"That way, when fantastic things
start popping up all over the place,
there is room for the music. Hav-
ing percussion with no melody and
a low sustained note on bassoon are
both effective as atmospheric mu-
sic
He had to write five themes for
The X-Files before he got it right,
taking suggestions from Carter to
keep it interesting and unexpected.
He said "by luck and a fabu-
lous accident, I had it. within half
an hour.
n
room.
� Mark Snow,
composer for the X-Files
"I put my
hand on the key-
board and heard
these repeats. 1
thought. Boy,
that's really cool.
Let's keep that as
rhythm. Now
what would be
the coolest sound
or instrument
over this?
"I tried sax,
guitar, trumpet,
voice, children's
choir - everything. On one of my
machines, I had a whistle sound. My
wife came in. She's a fantastic whis-
tler. She whistled with it. I sampled
her and combined the two and
that's what it is now
The theme was included in The
X-Files: Songs in the Key of X. a
CD released last spring that also in-
cluded many performers doing
songs inspired by the series. A sec-
ond CD, The Truth and the Light,
which features the show's under-
score, musical motifs and dialogue
by co-stars David Duchovny and
Gillian Anderson, is set for release
in October.
Snow said The X-Files theme
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service
m. 13�B h
A NEW PLAY BY JAMES H. CHAPMYN
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1ST
8PM HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE Tickets For Students, Staff and Faculty.
$5 For The General Public $8 At The Door
Free Tickets Must Be Picked Up In Advance From The
Central Ticket Office In Mendenhall Student Center.
MasterCardand Visa Accepted
A CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK EVENT
For More Information Call The Student Union Hotline Ar 2S-6()()4
is a homage to his mentor. Earl
Hagen, and Hagen's whistling
theme for The Andy Griffith Show.
"He has written a ton of
themes Snow said. "He had this
class, very informal. Payment was
a dozen golf balls; he lived near a
country club. 20 or 25 kids met in
his house. The generosity of the
guy was astounding. He went on
until the last kid was done asking
questions or wanting to hang out
Snow studied oboe at Juilliard
and intended to play in an orches-
tra. But he also played drums and.
in the late '60s, he co-founded the
New York Rock n' Roll Ensemble,
which made five records.
He loved 20th-century classical
composers, listened to soundtracks.
See FILES page 16
BREAK THE
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Steve and Mike's spicy bread crumbs top a secret shrimp stuffing that make these irresistable.





September 26, 1996
Vol. 03, No. 02
East Carolinia University
Greenville, NC
Whether away or home you'll always see the ECU cheerleaders pumping up the crowds. Watch the
endzones after ECU scores and you'll see the cheerleaders doing pushups for every point we score.
Photos by PATRICK IRELAN
Sean Richardson and Larry Shannon take a breather during the
game. The Pirates will be looking for their fourth win of the season.
� . - -
Location - Orlando, 11a.
Enrollment - 28,000
Head Coach. Gene
McDowell
lficknam- (ioiden
Knights
Colors and (ld
Stadium - The Citrus Bowl
Conference- None
lIndependent I
Current Record 1-3
tCV vs VCt 3-C
20
Notes: This is UCF's first
season as a i Mvision I-A
opponent. While ECU
defeated South Carolina
23 week, UCF lost
to the Gamecocks 33-14
two weeks ago.
4 EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
�'�
72ayt&4ticzt&i&
UJ-1
Amanda Ross
TEC Sports Editor
"Pirates grab ninth consecutive
home win
ECU 31
UCF 7
Dill Dillard
TEC Asst. Sports Editor
"The Pirate machine
rolls on
ECU 42
UCF 7
Brian Bailey
WNCT-TV Sportscaster
"Defense gets a shut-
out
ECU 37
UCF 0
Brandon Waddell
TEC Editor-in-Chief
" Momentum carries Pi-
rates through Saturday
ECU 28
UCF 14
Dr. Richard R. Eakin
ECU Chancellor
"The Pirates passing game
comes alive on a dry field
ECU 42
UCF 7
,hE
bE
Brandon Waddell � Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson � Production Manager
Amanda Ross � Editor
Andy Farkas � Staff Illustrator
Get a glimpse
of the UCF's
program, and
about ECU
m record breaker
Inside s�Hae
3
Logan calls all
fans to come
and stay for the
entire game
Updated stats
for ECU and
UCF
VS
Saturday
September 28, l IM
4 p.m.





Thursday, September 26,1996
The End Zone
UCF hopes to steal victory
Brian Paiz
End Zone Writer
What's the cure for a heartbreaking loss on the
road? Weil, if you're ECU it's a big win against a SEC
team on their home field.
The Parent's Weekend contest kirks off at 4 p.m
and brings a Golden Knight team into Greenville hun-
gry for a win. UCF has lost it's past three games in it's
first season as a full member of Division l-A, and ECU
Coach Steve Logan knows that they are ready to come
into Dowdy-Ficklen and knock off the Pirates.
"They are going through a little bit of growing
pains right now Logan said. "But at some point they
are going to rise up and bite somebody big time
The UCF offense is led by sophomore quarter-
back Daunte Culpepper. The Ocala, Fla. native, was
one of the top rated quarterbacks in the nation just
two years back. Florida and Flroida State showed in-
terest but backed ofF when Culpepper had some aca-
demic troubles.
"This young man was the number one quarter-
back in the state of Florida Logan said. "He's good.
If he gets unwound and gets into a rhythm, he can
win a football game single handedly
Culpepper has thrown for over 600 yards this
season thus far. He is the bulk of the UCF offense,
accounting for most of the Golden Knight yards this
season. Culpepper is a very mobile quarterback, al-
most like Anthony Wright who the Pirates faced just
last week. Coach Logan knows his Pirate defense will
have to keep their eye on him.
"When you are 6'4 230 pounds and can run a
4.6 40-yard dash, and throw the ball like he can, he
can go out and win a game on any Saturday Logan
said.
If Logan seems very cautious of this UCF team,
believe him. Just two years ago, ECU had to use a
Tabari Wallce interception late in the game to pre-
serve the victory at home. ECU'S home winning streak
is on the line, and ECU Tight End Scott Richard knows
that Central Florida is going to come into Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium fired up, and Richards feels that the Pirates
are going to have to be up for the challenge.
"When you look at Central Florida, you have to
realize how enthusiastic they are going to play. Some-
times we get into a lull, when we play at home, and I
really hope that changes Richards said.
ECU will be looking to get Scott Harley into the
game early. Harley, who rushed for a school record
291 yards against USC, will be trying to add on to his
performance from last weekend.
"I just try to run the ball hard Harley said. "We
just have to install a plan for UCF, and hopefully we
can go out and play just as well as we did last week
arley rides right past opponent's
r-i �, � :l. i�j.iu �u.ii. i m�m ���! �� � - mmwwmMMaMMaBmmimaaaaaaaimarrwrTrBMMMMMMMBMMMmm'MammWwmmmmmM
Jon Lautcrer
End Zone Writer
Records were meant to be broken. Just ask Scott
Harley.
When this sophomorefullback rushed for 291 yards
against South Carolina last week, he broke a single game
rushing record. In 1993 Junior Smith set the record with
282 yards, but then Harley rushed past that record in
rainy, rifcddy conditions in the 23-7 victory against the
Gamecocks. He also tied the record for most carries in a
game with 41.
But when Harley speaks of his performance, he gives
the credit to his teammates.
"I have to give credit where credit is due - to the
offensive ine, the defense and special teams, because we
couldn't have had the bail to produce the offensive yards
Hariey said.
The win over USC brings the) team's record to 2-1
and leaves Barley's rushing record at 509 yards with two
touchdowns. He is averaging 6.5 yards per carry and
says he just tries to get the ball up the field as best he
can.
"Whatever play they call, I just try to run real hard
and keep the bail north and south Harley said.
Last season Hariey was the team's second leading
rusher with 263 yards on 61 carries. In this season alone,
he almost doubled his yards in just three games.
With his thoughts fixed on the dash with Central
Florida this Saturday, he points out that they can't think
what is going to happen the rest of the season. They must
take it game-by-game.
"We're just trying to win every game possible and
just take it one day at a time Hariey said. "Ailwecan
think about is Central Florida right now, and Ifs hard to
say about the games later on
Being on the road the past two Saturdays has been
tough on the Pirates, but according to ilariey when they
travel they try to think of every stadium as their own.
"Every stadium we play at is ours also Hariey said.
"And if you take the crowd out of it you could have a
good game, so we take those things and try to win every
game
When the Golden Knights roil into town, the game
plan will include trying to contain UCFs Quarterback
Daunte Culpepper.
"(Central Florida's quarterback stands out Hariey
said. "They have a couple of good guys on defense so we
just have to install a plan this week. Hopefully it will
work, and just go out there and piay football like we did
last week
Hariey is no stranger to breaking records. Last sea-
son against Temple he set a freshman rushing record
with 175 yards and 38 carries. He received the chance to
start last season when Jerris McPhail suffered an arm
injury. And with his record last season, he is weil on his
way to rewriting the books.
"I just try to come out here and try to play football
and win games Hariey said.
Photo by PATRICK 1RELAN
Sophomore Scott Harley rushed his way into the ECU record books for his 291-yard
rushing performance against USC. Harley gives most of the credit to his teammates.
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The End Zone
Thursday, September 26,1996
ogan hopes fans will stay for entire game
Fans should get fired
up for all home games
and cheer team on
Amanda Ross
End Zone Editor
When 4 p.m. rolls around this Saturday,
where will you be?
Head Coach Steve Logan hopes you'll be in
the stands. When ECU opened up its season
against ETSU three weeks ago, 25,000 people
filled the stands, but Dowdy-Ficklen holds 35,000.
So where is everybody? It is vital that the stands
be filled for every home game
no matter who the opponent
is.
Logan spoke to his play-
ers about the enthusiasm they
should possess during home
games, but the players brought
up concern of their own.
"I was talking to our play-
ers about playing with emotion
at home Logan said. "What
we have done the past two or three years is play
with a lot of emotion on the road and not quite
so much emotion at home. One of them (players)
said, 'Coach, we need our fans to get fired up
when we come out
The players know how important it is to see
the cheering fans support them.
"Sometimes we get into a lull when we play
at home Tight End Scott Richards said. "I re-
ally hope that changes. It's hard to see the home
"I wish we could
get the fans in
early and have
them stay late"
� Scott Richards, Tight End
team crowd leave you. I wish we could get the
fans in early and have thei stay late
The Pirates will be seeking their ninth con-
secutive home win when the Golden Knights take
to the field. Emotions will be high on both side-
lines.
"When you look at Central Florida, you have
to realize how enthusiastic they are going to play
Richards said.
To get pumped up for this game, Logan gave
his team a special assignment before the start of
the game.
"I really challenged our football team that
this coming Saturday we get into the locker room
pregame, set ourselves cranked up and come out
and play emotional football in
our homestands Logan said.
Richards believes if the
players are excited about the
game then the fans will be
equally pumped up.
"If they (fans) can see the
excitement on the field they can
feel it up in the stands
Richards said.
After two road games, the
players are looking forward to returning to a
crowd that is in their favor.
"If it doesn't rain and we get the stadium
full it will be real nice Noseguard Travis Darden
said. "That long road trip, and the rain wasn't
fun. It's real good to be back home this week
The recent joining of ECU to Conference USA
had a lot to do with the fans. The officials took
into account that the Pirates have an excellent
amount of people traveling to away games, and
that included the two Liberty Bowls.
But for the program to progress further,
fan support is a must. The fans might not Know
it, but they contribute to the success of the
football program.
"We need a full stadium this Saturday
Logan said.
During Logan's press conference he
stressed the importance of letting fans know,
that the players need them to cheer on their
team. Without the fans, the game just isn't the
same.
"On third down when our defense is on the
field, (we need fans) to get up off their seats
and get on their feet Logan said.
Photo by ANN JivlDEN
Lamont Burns acknowledges the crowd
duringthe USC game. Forthe ECU program
to keep moving forward, the support of the
fans is necessary during all home games.
State
Marcus Crandell,
Quarterback
PASSING
TOTAL OFFENSE
G Att. Yards
3 106 563
INT
4
G Plays Yards
3 122 590
i
THE ECU STUDENT UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE 1996-1997 TERM
QUALIFICATIONS:
FULL-TIME STUDENT
RESIDES OFF CAMPUS
INDEPENDENT
RESPONSIBILITIES:
SELECTING THE STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
APPROVING COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS
APPROVING THE STUDENT UNION BUDGET
SETTING POLICY FOR THE STUDENT UNION
DEADLINE TO APPLY IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 1996
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE - ROOM 236 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
FOR MORE INFO CALL THE STUDENT UNION AT 328-4715
12 PRICE
PITCHERS of DRAFT!
Every Monday!
WATCH THE BIG GAME ON OUR 5 T.Vs!
(NFL)
12 PRICE
APPETIZER
SPECIALS
SUN-THURS 'AFTER 9PM
DINE IN ONLY
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RIGHT NOW
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Free Cable TV, Free Water & Sewer, Central Heat Air Conditioning, Walk In
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Thursday, September 26,1996
The End Zone
ECU 25.7 61OFFENSE Average points per gameUCF 17.5
First downs67
600Rushing yards277
200.0Average rushing yards per game69.2
572 190.7Passing yards922
Average passing yards per game230.5
1172 390.7Total offense1199
Average yards per game299.8
ECUDEFENSEUCF
12.7Average points per game28.5
47First downs allowed75
369Rushing yards allowed743
123.0Average rushing yards per game allowed185.8
395Passing yards allowed960
131.7Average passing yards per game allowed240.0
764Opponent total offense1703
254.7Opponent average yards per game425.8
Opponent (Record)Last WeekThis Week at Western Carolina
East Tennessee St. (3-1)Def. VMI, 38-0
West Virginia (4-0)Def. Purdue, 20-6Maryland (Thurs.)
South Carolina (2-1)Lost to East Carolina, 23-7Mississippi State
Central Florida (1-3)Lost to Ball State, 31-10at East Carolina
Southern Miss (3-1)Def. SW Louisiana, 52-27at Louisville Pittsburgh
Miami (Fla.) (3-0)Idle
Arkansas State (1-2)Lost to N. Illinois, 31-30idle
Virginia Tech (3-0)Def. Rutgers, 30-14at Syracuse
Ohio (2-2)Lost to Northwestern, 28-7Idle
Memphis (2-2)Def. Tulane, 17-10Idle
N.C. State (0-2)Lost to Florida State, 51-17at Purdue
LAST TIME VS. EC
83 at Dowdy
into &e final
CULPEPPER'S
NUMBERS
Through only 15 games
in his career, Daunte
Culpepper is already
fifth in career passing ?t
mow courtesy of Central Florida's Media Guide
Daunte Culpepper
passes for
game.
WSKMHOK
UCF. He passed for 208
yards against Ball State
despite being slowed by a weak left ankle which he sprained two weeks ago
at South Carolina. He complete five of six passes for 50 yards and a
touchdown on UCF's opening drive against the Gamecocks. He sprained his
left ankle just before the half and wound up with 210 yards on the game. He
set career mark with 366 yards total offense and 42 pass attempts and tied
his career-high with 307 yards passing and 26 completion's against William
& Mary. His 26 completion's is the fifth-best single-game total in school
history and his total offense performance is tied for fifth-best.
Showtime!
HOMECOMING
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 23 TUESDAY OCTOBER 29I
HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVE ELECTIONS AUTOGRAPH NIGHT
MHHMEJALUEBHEAITH TKE PIA� �U.S:30PH-7-3B�L IMUWMEE Hill fflft AUTOGRAPH MRS (tillNEX U Ut UKDER)SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 2 HBMMNBMP� vRNNVMBHflRBiRBBP PARADE LINEUP EiMsmnenui
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 30FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1HOMECOMING PARADE 10AH-11Mr
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FREE BESSERT Et BEFRESHHEKTSm
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME 2PM SATURDAY
ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY VS. ECU PIRATES
HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE HALF
WINNING OF THE SPIRIT CUP
THE HOMECOMING COMMITTEE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES
FLOAT, BANNER CONTEST, HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS, KING CANDIDATE, AND QUEEN CANDIDATE
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ALL ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 BY 5:00
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
THERE WILL BE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221 AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO RECEIVE A HOMECOMING ORGANIZATION PACKET I ACTIVITIES APPUCATION STOP BY ROOM 210 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER OR CALL 328-4711 'SCHEDULE OF EVENTS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
��
mmmmmmmimmmm





HI 111 l�ll l�T "
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 26 ,1996
17
ktee to buttf Mom. dtopfiittf?
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Aew fewehy haU, tkjitU, dtoed, &
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44vecdeM iep&iateA.
FAN from page 14
He told me that John Popper
of Blues Traveler jammed with
them at one of the H.O.R.D.E. dates
and it was intense. That seems like
an understatement.
Other members of the band in-
clude J.C. Cuhl on sax, Brian Jones
on drums, and Stewart Myers on
bass. Andrew met all of these guys
as the years went by in college at
James Madison University and Vir-
ginia Commonwealth University,
where he received his master's de-
gree in classical guitar. Not only
does this band sound tight, but
they have degrees to back it up.
The best thing about this band
is their ability to improv. They move
from place to place just by glanc-
ing at each other's eyes. They in-
stinctively know where the next
beat will take them.
Not only are they amazing to
listen to, they're also fun. Every-
one seems to "have a good time
when these guys are around.
Just by listening to Andrew talk
to R.V. on WZMB's Roots show you
can tell that the band loves Green-
ville. As a matter of fact he pointed
out on that show that other than
his hometown, of Roanoke, VA,
there was no other place that he
loved to play more.
With that kind of enthusiasm
behind them, they should be able
to rock the crowd at Mendenhall.
So do yourself a favor and.check
them out.
Also, don't forget to stay for
the pep rally afterwards where the
ECU Cheerleaders, the Purple &
Gold Dancers and our own Pirate
mascot will stir up a frothing fan
frenzy. Then go see Dennis Quaid
kick dragon butt in Dragonheart,
playing at Hendrix Theatre. Finally,
all you wacky Pirate fans can bowl
your hearts out during the open
recreation hours from 10 p.m. un-
til closing. Remember, have fun.
BEATLES from page 14
Welcome back ECU
students and faculty
BOWEN
LAUNDROMATS
Bells Fork & Carolina East Center
&
WASH HOUSE
th
111 E. 10th & 514 E. 14
Check out vaulable coupons for
Bowen Cleaners on our home page at
http:www.Bowen Cleaners, com
something I never dreamed pos-
sible. I get to see the Beatles in con-
cert - well, as close to it as we can
get anyway. "1954 The Tribute
the most authentic Beatles tribute
in the world, is coming to ECU for
Parents' Weekend. They may not be
the actual Beatles, but I guarantee
before the night is over they'll have
you believing that John Lennon isn't
dead after all.
"1964 The Tribute" has been
exhaustingly researched so that the
show is accurate down to the small-
est detail. From the haircuts to the
costumes to the sound of the music,
the "faux" Fab Four recreate an ac-
tual Beatles concert with only two
major differences: orte, you can hear
the music, and two, they play the
songs completely.
When the Beatles toured, they
would often play just bits and pieces
of their songs - a kind of montage,
if you will - and left the stage after
about 30 minutes. Not so with
"1964 You'll hear the entire songs,
just as they were recorded on the
albums, and the concert lasts over
an hour and a half.
The band consists of Mark
Benson (John Lennon), Gary Grimes
(Paul McCartney), James Pou (George
Harrison) and Greg George (Ringo
Starr). These four have gone to amaz-
ing lengths to make the show as plau-
sible as it can be. Grimes, who is
right-handed, learned to play guitar
with his left hand so that his
McCartney would be more believable.
Even George's nose bears a striking
resemblance to Starr's famous
honker.
Alistair Taylor, former president
of Apple Records (the Beatle's record-
ing company) remarked after seeing
a performance, "the resemblance was
uncanny, it sent shivers down my
spine. It was just like the boys. Never
have I seen another group go to such
detail
True Beatles fans will not be dis-
appointed with the show's content
The band chooses their setlist from
a repertoire of over 50 Beatles hits,
including: "Can't Buy Me Love
"Eight Days A Week "Ticket To
Ride "HelpI Want To Hold Your
Hand "Twist And Shout "Nowhere
Man and "Yesterday Their goal is
to play the songs the way the Beatles
did without adding anything from
their own style. As Benson said in
an interview with U. Magazine, a
national college newspaper, "When
people come to see our shows,
they're paying to see the Beatles
The way I see it, there are sev-
eral ways to enjoy this show. I intend
to begin the concert with my eyes
closed, transporting myself back to
1964. I'm going to pretend I'm at an
actual Beatles performance, and I'm
going to scream and cry and dance
and maybe even carry a sign that
reads, "I want to have your baby,
Paul Then, once my neighbors have
stopped throwing things at me, I'll
open my eyes and just enjoy the fan-
tasy. Of course this isn't the real
Beatles. But with a little imagination,
no one will ever know.
"1964 The Tribute" will per-
form at ECU on Friday, Sept 24, at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Tick-
ets are on sale at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Ticket prices in advance are $15
for the general public. $12 for ECU
faculty and staff, and $7 for ECU stu-
dents. All tickets at the door are15.
For information call 3284788 or 800-
ECU-ARTS.
mLmmmmvmm!mfflmMeMmMmm�3ffimfflmMBMmfflmMeMmmMm�eMm5S�B.
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18
Thursday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
Veggie storage
made easy
(AP) - It takes more than good
intentions to keep fruit and vegetables
fresh and crisp in your refrigerator. You
must prepare fruits and vegetables cor-
rectly before storing them.
For the best results, these simple
suggestions are offered:
� Refrigerate most vegetables
except potatoes, mature onions, most
winter squash, eggplant and rutabagas.
These vegetables require cool dry stor-
age. Most other vegetables require high-
moisture storage.
� For longest storage life, select
high quality vegetables when shopping.
And quality le.els will not be the same
for all items in a package, so sort veg-
etables as soon as possible. Eliminate
decayed, used, bruised or soft ones im-
mediately.
� Wash and drain leafy veg-
etables, store them in plastic bags or
sealed plastic containers. Storing in
sealed containers retains the moisture
needed to keep leafy vegetables from
wilting. After washing, drain vegetables
thoroughly on paper towels. Too much
.water produces brown spots on leaves
and speeds decay.
� Peppers, cabbage and other
odorous foods should be wrapped or
bagged to avoid transferring odors to
other vegetables. Mushrooms should
always be stored in paper bags, not plas-
tic, for longer life.
� Maintaining the refrigerator
.section between 34�F and 40�F is best
for food storage. Temperature controls
should not be set so low that foods
freeze. Freezing will cause most fruits
and vegetables to tum brown and wilt
� Fresh vegetables should be
stored only for their recommended
"times. When stored too long they
brown, wilt and decay. Decaying food
'builds up water causing other stored
foods to decay.
Upon returning home from shop-
ping, if s tempting to immediately store
perishables in the refrigerator with
every intention of preparing them
properly for storage later. For crisper
salads fight these temptations.
FILES from page 12 POET from page 14
admired Jerry Goldsmith's
atonal, percussion-filled score for
Planet of the Apes and believed he
could combine his diverse musical
tastes to write scores.
"I thought I had a good emo-
tional response to films. I would see
something which would make me
feel a certain way and suggest a cer-
tain kind of music he said.
Snow'? wife, Glynn, sister to ac-
tors Tyne and Tim Daly, encouraged
their move to southern California
20 years ago.
Snow still works for some pro-
ducers he worked for before The X-
Files. Last season, he composed or-
chestral music for the miniseries
Children of the Dust. And he'll
write music for a November
miniseries about the Titanic.
"This is the best time for me,
career-wise Snow said. "The X-
Files is the hippest show out there
now. And the music is getting par-
ticular notice
biographical work that examines
an individual's development as an art-
ist and a spiritual being. Themes ex-
plored within this book include one's
exclusion from mainstream (white) so-
ciety, the failure of religion and religious
rituals within the African American
church, and the frustrations Wright's
poetic persona feels towards the stan-
dard, accepted bohemian black artists
of the time.
Other major publications by
Wright include Soothsayers and Omens
(1976), a collection of poems which
places the poetic persona within a reli-
gious or nistorica context; Dimensions
of History (1976), which is a literary
search for a collective self-understand-
ing; and The Double Invention ofKomo
(1980), which explores the ideological
relations between the contemporary
cosmopolitan and the traditions of Af-
rica and the West
Wright's more recent contributions
to the literary scene include Selected
Poems (1987), Elaine's Book (1988),
and Boleros (1991).
Wright's creative power is still go-
ing strong to ihis day, as evidenced in
his recent honor by the Academy of
American Poets. On September of this
year, the Academy named Wright the
recipient of the 62nd Fellowship of the
Academy of American Poets for his out-
standing poetic accomplishments.
Wright who has won other distinctions
like a grant from the National Endow-
ment for the Arts and an Ingram Merrill
Foundation Award, received $20,000
with the Fellowship, which will allow
him to focus further on his poetic craft
ECU and the Greenville community
are very lucky to have an accomplished
writer such as Jay Wright visiting. Any
writer, aspiring or accomplished, and
any lover of poetry should take advan-
tage of this fortunate opportunity to
hear him speak. Interested persons can
meet the writer at 3 p.m. on Oct 1 in
the Greenville Museum of Art. Mr.
Wright's reading will be at 7 p.m. in the
Willis Building on 300 E. 1st St The
reading will be followed by a reception
and book sale. Both events are free and
open to the general public.
Future writers planned for the
Writers Reading Series include Rafael
Campo on Nov. 18, Margaret Randall
on Dec. 2. Michael Collier on Jan. 27
Allan Gurganus on Feb. 13. and Sue
Standing on March 24.
Stay glued to TEC for further in-
formation.
BUY ONE
GET ONE
Mini-Sundae
coupon expires 101596
Limit 1 per customer
Not Valid with any other purchase
Hank's
Homemade Ice
Cream
316 East
10th Street
within walking
distance
from ECU
758-0000
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LUNCHEON SPECIALS: MON-FRI � SUNDAY BUFFET
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N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th year in
downtown
Greenville
Boom, Boom Boom!
Out Go The Knights!
Before the Pirates
Battle the Central Florida
Knights, Shop the
ECU Student Stores for
a Great Selection of
Game-Going Apparel!
�������
Parent's Weekend & �
Pre-Game Apparel
Sale Going On NOW!
�������
(

r
Ml
� t1' tun
Ronald E
Mecury Recording Artist
Tuesday,Oct. 1
Special Guest
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With Greg Humphries From
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Student Stores
More than just booksyour dollars support scholars!
Store Hours;
Monday -Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
See ECU'S Pure Gold
Dancers perform at
1:00 pm, outside the
Store on Saturday
September M.
fll
the GONNELLS
Doors open at 9pm.
Coming Tuesday Oct. 8: The Marshall Tucker Band'
We're Not Just Having Sales Before Home Games, Check Out
Our "Take it Away Post-Away-Game Points Sales Following
Each Away Game!
Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Building, just off Wright Circle
328-6731http:www.studentstores.ecu.edu
JSSZm Pup,evi�e,NC . �55�
& SIFT ITEM COUPONS! UKWO UlUllt.





19
Thursday, September 26,1996 The East Carolinian
Volleyball player
stands alone
Kristen Woodruff
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
ECU women's volleyball player
Kristen Woodruff is in a class by her-
self.
The 6'0" middle blocker from
Fuquay-Varina is the only senior on
the team, as well as the captain. For
her it means that this is a time she
must step up and become a leader
for the young Lady Pirates. It is a
role that Woodruff is comfortable
with and one she is willing to ex-
cept.
"I hope the team looks to me
as a leader, as a role model, because
1 have been here longer than every-
one else and I have been where they
are Woodruff said. "I am not the
type of person to abuse my role as a
senior, 1 have to be an example, but
1 don't want to be an annoying ex-
ample
Freshman Julia D'Alo appreci-
ates the advice and leadership that
Woodruff can provide.
"I have a ton of respect for
Kristen D'Alo said. "She is the only
senior on the team and I hold a
pretty high regard for her as a
player; she is very supportive
The "96 squad is a young team
with three freshmen, four sopho-
mores and two juniors. The team has
gotten off to a shaky start this sea-
son with a record of 4-10, but that
does not bother Woodruff; she has
been there before.
"This year
has definitely
been the best year
for me Woodruff
said. "We have the
best potential and
the best attitudes
on this year's
team compared to
my previous three
seasons
When Woo-
druff came to ECU
as a freshman, the
volleyball pro-
gram was strug-
gling under then tmmmmmmmmm
Head Coach Martha McCaskill and
finished the season at 11-24. Her
sophomore season did not get much
better under her second head coach
in as many seasons. Gail Guttenberg.
That season the Pirates finished 16-
17. Woodruff pointed out that this
was a very difficult time in her ca-
reer.
"It was a very difficult and dis-
appointing time in my career Woo-
druff said. "When 1 was a freshman
I had the coc -h I was recruited by
and there was a certain amount of
impressing that I had to do because
I was worried about playing
With so many coaching changes
during her career. Woodruff had to
adjust to new techniques .
"To have to adjust to another
coach is very difficult; you have to
learn a new coaching philosophy,
their way of playing, and every coach
has their own special way they want
things done
The most difficult thing that
Woodruff
struggled with
was the differ-
ent styles of hit-
ting that each
coach had.
"One coach
told me to hit
one way and an-
other coach
told me to hit a
different way; it
was hard to get
used to Woo-
druff said.
Woodruff
does not mind
Watch
your
backl
Cori Lawyer (21) takes
it to her opponent in a
match last week. Sun-
day they will travel to
Asheville to compete in
the Puma Classic.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Rugby squad drops game
Team takes tough
road loss to
Virginia Tech
"I hope the team
looks to me as a
leader, as a role
model, because I
have been here
longer than
everyone else and
I have been where
they are
� Kristen Woodruff
Mike Daniska
Staff Writer
all the changes
however, because once Head Coach
Kim Walker took over the program,
things started to change. In
Woodruff's junior season and
Walker's first as coach, the team
managed to finish fourth in the Co-
lonial Athletic Association at 19-18
and had their first winning season
since 1989.
"1 am glad that all the changes
have happened even though it has
See VOLLEY page 20
When the ECU rugby team trav-
eled to Blacksburg. Va. last weekend
they knew they were facing some stiff
competition.
Besides Virginia Tech and ECU,
two other teams, Blacksburg and
Radford, made the trip to compete on
the Hokies home turf. During games
like these, the players go all out on
the field, but usually become good
friends after the game.
According to Team Captain Mike
Myers, the match started out as
friendly but didn't end that way.
"We took a pretty healthy beat-
ing Myers said.
The 45-5 pounding was reflective
of ECU'S overall play against Virginia
Tech.
"Nobody seemed like they wanted
to be out there Myers said. "Vir-
ginia Tech wasn't more skilled than
us; they just played technically better
than us. Lack of experience was par-
ticularly evident in
the wings
However, it
was a player from
the wing position,
team Master-Secre-
tary Kendal Jones,
who had one of
ECUs brighter mo-
ments when he
ripped off a 60-
meter run. mil
Myers also
noted that another reason for the
team's poor play was the lack of play-
ers who couldn't make the game due
to prior engatgments. This year's team
has lost eight starting seniors, and the
25 man squad has yet to completely
gel.
The team will have to start play-
ing up to their abilities soon as tour-
nament time nears. The NCRU state
tournament is fast approaching, the
tournament will take Dlace near the
end of October, around Fall Break in
Raleigh.
The field will include nearly all
the colleges in N.C. In another up-
coming match,
ECU will get a
rematch with
USC, the team
that knocked
ECU out of the
quarterfinals
last semester.
The team
practices every
Tuesday
through Thurs-
day on the fields
"If anyone is
interested, we'd
love for them to
come out
� Todd Ward, Team
President
behind the Allied Health building.
"If anyone is interested, we'd love
for them to come out Team Presi-
dent Todd Ward said
If you are interested in playing,
you can contact Mike Myers at 757-
0346. Team officers are: President
Todd Ward, Vice-President Eric
Kunkel, Treasurer Jeremy Wineger,
Master-Secratary Kendel Jones and
Sergant at Arms John Hannsboro.
ecS&ttfiee
Different club sports offered
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
Be a part of a club that can
make you a champion. The ECU
Club Sport program offers many fun
and challenging team sports. The
clubs are organized by ECU students
with assistance provided by Recre-
ational Services.
Current active clubs include:
Men's "Irate" Ultimate Frisbee Club,
Women's "Helio's" Frisbee Club,
Men's and women's lacrosse, Men's
rugby, underwater hockey, kayaking,
Water Skiing Club, Disc Golf, men's
and women's water polo, men's and
women's volleyball, Goju Shorin Ka-
rate, Tae Kwon Do. Tae Shudo.
Isshinryu and Tai Chi Chaun.
This year's teams have started
the year with a bang. The Water Ski-
ing Club just purchased a brand new
ski boat The boat will be a great ad-
vantage during their first tournament
On Oct 26 and 27. the ECU Men's
Lacrosse team is hosting a tournament
It will be a challenging tournament
between eight different teams. The
Ultimax Frisbee team is also partici-
pating in a tournament on Nov. 23-24.
All home games and tournaments
are played on the Allied Health Sci-
ence fields.
To start their season off, the Men's
Rugby won against Camp Lejeune on
Sept 14. The Frisbee team is also in
full swing. The team lost a hard fought
battle in the quarter finals at Savanah,
Georgia. The Frisbee team still has all
season to show what they are made of,
so don't count them out
For those interested in kayaking,
the Kayaking Club is starting up on
Thursday nights, 7:30-9 p.m. in the
Christenbury Pool. On Oct 2, the
Men's and Women's Water Polo Club
is meeting at 9 p.m. in 102
Christenbury, to kick their season '
off. They are welcoming new play-
ers, so come out and join the team.
After capturing the conference
title last year, the Men's Volleyball
Club is back on track. Come on out
on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in
Christenbury Gym. The Women's
Volleyball Club plays Mondays at
6:30 p.m. in Christenbury Gym.
The Club Sport Program is al-
ways encouraging and accepting new
members to any team. Individuals in-
terested in joining a club program
or starting their own are encouraged
See REC page 20
With hard play like this, the Pi-
rates will look to gain their ninth
consecutive home win. ECU is
coming off a two game road stint
that left them 1-1, and 2-1 over-
all. This week's opponent Central:
Florida will come into Dowdy-
Ficklen gunning to end their three 1
game losing streak. The Golden '
Knights are experiencing their
first season as a Division l-A op- ��
ponent.
Photos by PATRICK IRELAN
���





20
Thursday, September 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
lEg SteMtfote
REC
from page 19
cr
rMnllaixieen (&astixmes
PAKTYMAKERS
Flowers & Balloons
C. 3398-D S. Memorial Dr.
X (Across From Ryan's Steakhouse) 756-8606
FOR ADULT 8c CHILDREN
The Bicycle Post of Greenville is sponsoring an off road race se-
ries, that begins this Sunday. Two other dates have been selected for
the series - Oct 20 and Nov. 10. The series offers a variety of levels
from first timers to juniors to experts. A number a prizes will be awarded
from such sponsors as Airwalk, Trek and Finish Line, to name a few.
There is a fee to register but the earlier you register the less expensive
the cost will be. For more information call the Bicycle Post at 756-
3301 or 757-3616, or stop by the Bicycle Post for an entry' form.
Paper
Products
� Balloons
Novelty &
- Decorations
-Costumes
-Wigs-
-Beards
Gag Makeup - Masks
- Flower
-Hats
Arrangements -Accessories
CREDIT CARDS � SPEOAI. ORDERS
LOOKING FOR A NEW POSITION
Classifieds Can Help You Pinpoint
Exactly The Right Spot.
Check out our Classifieds on page 10.
to contact Rec Services in 204
Christenbury.
Rec Services also offers a wide
variety of facilities for students, faculty,
and staff to work out in. Rec Services
Drop-in Recreation encourages you to
work out play basketball, swim, rent
equipment and climb the Tower.
You can work out in Garrett,
Aycock and Christenbury Weight
Rooms. Rec Services allows you to rent
a variety of equipment from the Equip-
ment Check Out Room.
Choose from basketballs, volley-
balls, soccer balls, tennis racquets and
balls, racquetball racquets and many-
more items. The Equipment Room is
located on the first floor of
Christenbury Gym. across from
Christenbury Weight Room. Also, rent
outdoor equipment from the Adventure
Rental Center (ARC). The ARC rents
many items ranging from tents to ca-
noes. Stop by the ARC located in the
basement of Christenbury Gym.
For Drop-in Recreation Hours, call
the Rec Rap Hotline at 328-6443. For
more information call rec 2532services
at 328-6387, currently located in 204
Christenbury Gym.
Tlirsday, September 26
Willy, September 27
Sitoptay, September 28
Sunday Matinee, September Z9@ 2PM
For More Information, M the
Student Union Hotlne at 328-6004.
U Urns start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are HtB to Students, Faofty, and Staff
(one guest slowed) with vaH ECU D.
No BackpacksBnokbass Mowed to Hendrtx Theatre
VOLLEY from page 19
been tough Woodruff said. "My
first coach was all right: my second
coach was a little better, but Coach
Walker has been great
Woodruff can see the difference
that a good coach can make. In her
second season with Walker, she can
already see the impact that Walker's
guidance is having.
"She definitely knows the game
and I have learned a lot from her
Woodruff said. "She has high expec-
tations for this program and 1 see
her reaching those goals
Not only does Woodruff see the
changes but so do others.
"Coach Walker has a lot of
people supporting her and a lot of
good players coming into the pro-
gram and I believe this program is
on the way up
For Woodruff, she knows what
she has to do in order to add to the
success of the program and the
team. She currently is second in the
CAA in average blocks per game at
1.104, but she does not let that
cloud the big picture - helping the
team win.
"I am glad that 1 am doing so
well, but I would like to do better
with everything else as well Woo-
druff said. "You have to improve ev-
ery year; that is a given, but I want
to improve on becoming a better hit-
ter and passer, as well as a blocker
She knows, however, that her
blocking is what will help the team
the most.
"My first job on the team is as
a blocker and a defensive player
Woodruff said. "I am blocking all
over the net; that is what a blocker
does: block the middle, on the left,
on the right, all over the net
Woodruff also knows she has
other important roles to play on the
team as well.
"My second job is as a hitter
and to hit the ball in all areas of
the net Woodruff said. "I also
have to serve as a decoy and hold
the opposing blockers up in the air
and freeze them in order for some-
one else to go for a kill
Woodruff will be a key to the
success of the Pirates in the CAA
this year. For her, winning the CAA
would be the ultimate goal
achieved thus far.
"We are competitive in the
CAA and we can beat every single
team in the CAA Woodruff said.
"We see ourselves as being able to
win the CAA tournament this year
and go on to the NCAA tourna-
ment
ECU will return home Monday
night to host UNC-Greensboro at 7
p.m. in Minges. The Lady Pirates
will begin CAA play Oct. 19 against
Virginia Commonwealth.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 26, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 26, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1162
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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