The East Carolinian, September 24, 1996






September 24,1996
Vol 72, No. 10
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
Students assaulted, robbed downtown
Across The State
GRI I (AP) -State
I i sentative Larry
i tteville will not re-
59 n on ontract to pro-
North Caro-
niversity that
id awarded him
: ract will go
ised company.
irthur Leaston,
chasing officer.
-terns from in-
. rmation from A&T
when the bids were initially re-
view �
-�- S. N.C (AP) - Four
� � rs accused
� d ath of a
� : .mman w;
bees to call
s James J.
imberland, Md
. kicked, hit.
put. � - ed to the
i ison police Lt.
Across The Country
Two attackers
escaped, police
have few leads
Jacqueline D. Keilum
Senior Writer
Two ECU students were assaulted
and robbed just behind the Subway on
5th St on Monday, Sept. 16. The stu-
dents, who requested that they remain
anonvmous for safety reasons, both re-
stitches at the hospital
The two students, both males, were
going toward the hack entrance to Sub-
way when they were accosted by two
men.
"Two gu ached us and
asked us tot money We thought they
were just bums looking for a handout
and said no. we didn't haw any n
This third guy came out of nowhere,
and hit my friend in the head
gun. We threw down our walk ts imme-
diately one of the victims said
up their walli econd victim was
also r. in the head with the gun.
We had multiple wounds to
heads : - We both had stitches
They got us both in the left back side ol
the hea
The victims said that the fact they
ith hit in exactly the same place.
and the fact that both of them experi-
enced some memory loss ol the event,
made them think that these men had
bel i The assailants defi-
nitely si nedl ; w what they were
JA( �AP) - Inves-
don't ; cargo Vhite House : there
lg a tup
.today.
ceived blows to the head that required After the victims had already gr
Special helpers require
special treatment
Canines assist
students daily,
deserve respect



1
partial memory loss, hut thi
issing diffi
dent, and so were abl
blanks 1 ther
Although both victr
surrendered then mi
ceived blows to thi
then proceeded to hea' '���
theii fists. A:See ATTACK page 4
) tar sug-
� it
Id report-
- A w
Kevorkian's
r chronic fa-
cetting
tssisted-
aid to-
is 42-
gistered
Mass, died
" � 35th
I
Around The World
a king
act and
lat
i month
d tour
Primary care week
raises awareness
Jacqueline D. Keilum
Senior Writer
Caution: do not pet the dogs.
At least not if the dog is wearing a
harness and Is obviously being used by
a visually-impaired individual as a see
ing-eye dog.
Nancy Badger, who is visually-im-
paired, recently began work at the Coun-
seling Center. When she arrived to be-
gin her job. her dog Heidi came with
her. Badger wanted for the campus popu-
lation to know that a dog such as Heidi
needs to be treated differently than most
dogs seen on campus, who are pets.
Badger says she understands that
Heidi is a beautiful dog and it is natural
tor people to want to pet her and talk to
her. but such actions keen the dog from
doing her job.
"When (Heidi) has her harness on,
that means that she's at work, and she
shouldn't be distracted by other people.
Otherwise, what will happen is she'll lose
her training, and she won't pay atten-
tion to her surroundings. It's a safety is-
sue, not only for me. but for her as well
Badger said.
Another hazard for herself and her
dog. Badger pointed out are the dogs
who run loose on campus, with or with-
out their owner around.
"A loose dog will go up to a work-
ing dog. get in that dog's path, follow
the dog. and create all sorts of problems.
Heidi has actually been attacked by a
loose dog Badger said.
If the campus community is made
Photo By CHRIS GAYDOSH
Heidi (above) is one of the seeing-eye dogs providing assistance
to students on campus.
aware
are around a Seen
it will make thing
self and ne-
on camp
� says.
activi
dger says si some mis-
See HELP page 3
Series of
information
sessions planned"

Angela Koenigwill '
News Writer'
ECU'S School of Medicine is
celebrating Primary k this
week to educate students and the
public about primary care.
"We're trying to educati.
selves about the future of health
care said Shelton Hager. third
medical student.as prim
In 1994. a national commiti
of medical students introduced Pri-Ugh
mary Care I av.the
"The dav was launched hv stu-nai on i
dents who want to
care awareness to studi
public said Jeannme M. Hi
the office of Medical Cei
and Information.In ad
Because this year s date
1(). conflicts with examsfree bloi
dents. ECU'S celebration hasthe publ
changed to Sept. 23-27.
"We decided not to put oiMed
and second year students, throughpate in
that Hager said.ivities con
The students worked in con
junction with other Schoo
Mi
cine programs to establish a sei ies
of information sessions about pri-
mary care in North Carolina i
events are specialized for the
cal students and may not be infor-
mative to the public, but all an
to the public.
The sessions focus n the
theme "Students (
Their Future and Their Comm
ville Communit
Clink.
cal care to

Series offers ageless entertainment
Shows designed
to appeal to all
generations
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
From toys coming to life to one little
girl's fight to be with her grandfather.
the 96-97 Family Fare Series at ECU is
designed to be full of enjoyment and
entertainment tot all ages
For the tnird year in a row the I te
partment of University Unions will be
sponsoring a series of five shows to be
held on various Saturday afternoons in
the Wright Auditorium. Each wili begin
at 2 p.m. and will last approximately one
to one-and a-half-hours.
The efforts, made to join the stu-
dents and their families through fun are
being noticed and appreciated by stu
dents. Terese Messick a sopl
ingin communications, recognizes
the good tl at
out ot pi
this
i think it is great

Union is
families together to
spend quality time
The Vel eteei
Rabbitt.
the group of
Thi atr .v.irks I'SA
productions will be
performed i n
Rob M ill be
playing the part
Velveteen Rabbit, a
stinted annual that is brought to lift
Diplomat to speak on
foreign service careers
Marina Henry
News Writer
Photo C
The Velveteen Rabbit will be shown as
part of the Family Fare Series this fall.
This show wili is scheduled for Oct. 15.
York
. nizeu '
different act
iety ol
� said. "T: i brought
ou will stil
SeeMRlbSpaj;e4
lit
retired I
el .
According to
Hill all haw
inviting Whiti
" Yi
walk Van Fl� i I
IFfcyc
Vntdc
V& recast
Expressions brings home the goldpage O
Monogamy is under-rated in the 90spage O
I If 1 fkejjfetp
FrpsHman named CAA player-of-the-weekpage Zj
�!& ?& TtStcA UJ
Tuesday
Sunny Bono
High 70
I ow 67
Wednesday
Raining canned hams
High 70
I on 67
v w
Phone
I newsroom I 328 fr36t�
(advertising) 328-2000
1
$28 -6558
I v
l 1 i :
Studenl





.
Tuesday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
Greenville concerned
about depression
DISCOVER A
LITTLE CORNER OF
u
Stephanie Waters
NewsWrtter
NC State student government president's role questioned
Acting Senator Keith Crawford of the NC State Student Senate
proposed at a recent meeting that members of the Student Govern-
ment should be banned from also having a position on the Student
Media Authority. He said that the distinction between government
and media had been infringed upon by Student Government members
including President Robert Zimmer.
Crrawford said the president could use his seat on the SMA to
blackmail the media by voting to cut media budgets or by threatening
to vote for a media head candidate that favors his agenda.
UNC-Ch student selected top 10 college woman
Lindsay Rae Mclntiyre, UNC-Chapel Hill's student body vice presi-
dent, was named one of Glamour magazine's top ten college women.
Mclntyre, a senior from Victoria, British Columbia, found out about
the magazine contest last year and decided to give it a shot.
To apply she submitted three letters of recommendation, a list of
her extracurricular activites and an essay about her most meaningful
leadership experience. Mclntyre began teaching herself sign language
when she was 15.
University of Tennessee recognized as activist school
Mother Jones, a San Francisco-based investigative magazine,
named the University of Tennessee (UT) as one of the country's top
20 activist schools over the past 20 years in the SeptemberOctober
edition.
UT students have been noted for battling the nearby Watts Bar
nuclear power plant and its parent the Tennessee Valley Authority.
Organizations on campus such as the NAACP, Amnesty Interna-
tional and Habitat for Humanity are some groups who take active
roles on campus.
Mother Jones named UT as an activist campus after poling 20
activist organizations and asking them which schools have pioneered
social action and consistently generated students committed to public
affairs issues.
Appalachian Sate University gets a bad grade
Appalachian State University fell from eighth to 14th place in
U.S. News and World Reports annual survey of Universities and Col-
leges.
Appalachian's score dropped from 87.1 percent to this year's score
of 75.1 percent The office of admissions is in the process of preparing
a report analyzing the rankings to be presented to the Deans Council.
Although Appalachian's overall rating went down, its academic
reputation rating improved, which accounts for 25 percent of the overall
grade.
Mental health professionals are par-
ticipating in National Depression Screen-
ing Week by offering information and
free screenings to local residents.
"This lets people know that depres-
sion is an illness with real treatment If
they get help, 80 percent get better said
Gail Home, executive director of the
Mental Health Association in Pitt County.
Twenty-five percent of all people
experience depression during their life-
time. Common symptoms of depression
include feelings of hopelessness, worth-
lessness, restlessness, changes in sleep
and appetite, energy loss and thoughts
of death. This condition affects the body
as well as the mind.
"Depression, along with any men-
tal illness is viewed in one of two ways.
People may think that the depressed
person can get over it or that its in their
mind This is not true, because depres-
sion is a real illness with real treatments.
Another is just die common stigmas that
surround a mental condition in general
Home said.
Treatment involves psychotherapy
along with medications like prozac and
elavile. If not treated, sufferers of depres-
sion may experience problems at work
or school They may have poor personal
hygiene, sleeping and eating disorders
and in extreme cases, they may commit
suicide.
"I think if s important for people to
know what to look for so they can see it
coming before it gets much worse said
Dr. Thomas Maple, a counselor at the
ECU Student Counseling Center.
Being away from home and among
the population of a large university may
make college students experience feel-
ings of loneliness, which is one of the
major contributors to depression.
"If s really hard not having your
friends or family around Sometimes, you
just sit in your room and think about
things all by yourself freshman biology
major Christina Trucks said.
ECU was involved in National De-
pression Screening Week last year, but
this fall the Pitt County division of the
on the corner of Evans and Third Street
n a cafe setting, we serve (teedat
from 8:00 a.m. through 10:30 a.m. and
tucA from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Ask mmout our Frequent Diner Curd.
Call ahead & we'll have your favorites ready to go
757-i7l6 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
See GREEN page 3
Film series designed to
broaden horizons
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
Thanks to a new travel documen-
tary series, students receive the ben-
efits of travel without spending a for-
tune or booking any reservations.
The ECU department of Univer-
sity Unions is working with Campus
Dining Services and a group of talented
travel documentary film makers in or-
der to bring to ECU a series of travel
documentaries which will expose stu-
dents to many different locales around
the world.
"We bring these documentaries
together to give their creators the abil-
ity to market their productions and to
give the public a taste of the world
around them said Anne Cutler, mar-
Make your college
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If you've graduated within the last two years or are going to graduate in the next
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keting associate for the student union.
The documentaries will be shown
at Hendrix Theater where film-goers
can view the natural and human won-
ders of cultures and countries through-
out the world
"This is just like the performing
arts series Cutler said.
The film adventure series is much
more than just a movie documentary,
it is a true exposure to the culture of
the place visited. The public gets to
actually sample authentic dishes from
the region presented in the film docu-
mentary.
The series will begin on Sept 30
Sec FILM page 3
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THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open MonSat.
9:30 a.m9 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
Tel: 7566200
r
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STANTON SQUARE
Stantonsburg Road
Open MonFri.
10 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6p.m.
Tel: 7570076
CHARLES BOULEVARD
SHOPPES
Charles & 10th Street
Open MonFri.
9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6 p.m.
Tel: 8305536
HoirCut
$900 Offi
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i5 to Mendenhall Student Center
O YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
Doll Over Beethoven,
"1964 The Tribute" is Almost Here!
The 1 Beatles show is coming to Wright Auditorium during Parents
Weekend, Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. Student tickets are $7 in advance at the
Central Ticket Office ($15 at the door)
o
trern!
:
Dragonhearf (PG-13) September 26-28 in Hendrix Theatre
Special matinee on Sept. 29 at 2 p.m.
Free admission with an ECU I.D.
6jet caf?e?
:
m
:
Stop by the Multi-Purpose Room to get your student I.D. card on
Sept. 25 & Sept. 27 from 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Be sure to bring your activity sticker and driver's license
ATTENTION
STUDENT LEADERS
There will be a meeting for all Student Leaders
Wednesday Sept. 25 from 4:30 -5:30 p.m. in Great Room 3
1 Ke 7 Habits ol Highly LJiective I eople
Registration for a special seminar - The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People - will be held Sept. 16-30 at the Central Ticket Office.
The registration fee of $20 includes a book and the evening meal. The
seminar will take place Oct. 3 from 2 until 8 p.m. in the Great Room.
mi
3
m
3
3
m
5
m
3
� �-
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� � Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand � w
, s HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.ml 1 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. ����:
55tf? m-IIZt Mi :� M? mt:l 15 MlfciS MIlS





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 24,1996
Hi! Welcome to
ECU!
STUDENTS
You are invited to a reception
at the Methodist Student
Center to meet Local
Methodist Ministers and the
Campus Minister.
Come to 501 East 5th Street
.(across from the art building)
on Wednesday, September 25,
1996, between 5:30 and
6:30pm.
'Refreshments will be served
Call 758-2030 to let us know
you're interested
2 BEDROOM
1050 SQUARE FEET
3 BEDROOM
I 350 SQUARE FEET
LOCATION: 5
BLOCKS FROM
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY.
WITH BUS SERVICE
AVAILABLE
$400 SECURITY DEPOSIT
2 BEDROOM
$500 SECURITY DEPOSIT
3 BEDROOM
' PETS ARE ALLOWED
WITH A FEE
� OLYMPIC SIZE SWIMMING
POOL.TENNIS COURTS, AND
BASKETBALL COURT
� ALL UNITS HAVE WALK-IN CLOSETS
FROST FREE REFRIGERATORS. SELF CLEANING EDROOM
OVENS.
DISHWASHER. CEILING FANS AND DRAPERIES , 500 SECURITY DEPOSI
� WATER. SEWER AND BASIC CA3LE ARE INCLUDED IN THE RENT 3 BEDROOM
�ADDITIONAL SECURITY UGH TING AND DEADBOLTS.
� 24 HOUR ON- SITE MANAGEMENT ' .
� 24.HOUR EMERGENCY MAINTENANC E � '
�WASHER DRYER CONNECTIONS AJlr A�-Ar A r-� �-4-r-v-k irt-c I -A
� on site laundry facilities Wilson Acres Apartments, Ltd.
� ENERGY EFFICIENCY '752-0277
P.O. Box 772
I860 E. 1st St.
Greenville, N.G. 27835-0772
0.tll-x from page 1
understandings in the past with people
who seem to feel that making a dog work
is a form of animal abuse. She even has
had SPCA (Society for the Protection
and Care of Animals) officials come to
her house to investigate charges of ani-
mal abuse, although that incident was
quickly resolved when the officials real-
ized that Heidi was a seeing-eye dog.
"People sometimes think that it's
cruel that we make the dogs work like
this. But these dogs absolutely love this
work. When I have to leave (Heidi) at
home, she hates it She wants to be with
me all the time Badger said.
Badger also pointed out that being
able to be with their owners all the time
is one of the perks of a seeingeye dog's
life, as well as being able to go almost
anywhere.
"She's been places that other dogs
won't ever get to go. She's been in res-
taurants, and on beaches that other dogs
don't get to go on. She's been clear to
Alaska and back. Other dogs don't get
to do that Badger said.
While a seeingeye dog might have
all sorts of experiences that the average
dog wouldn't, the average, day-to-day
activities are those where they perform
their services.
"A lot of people wonder Can dogs
read traffic lights, or what exactly can
they do? She goes on my commands.
She can't read traffic signs. But what she
will do, is if I tell her to go across the
street and she sees that there is a car
coming and if s not going to stop, she
won't take me. She'll get in my way so I
can't cross the street" Badger said.
Getting a dog is not for everyone,
Badger said, and is a personal decisioa
Some people who are visually impaired
do not want the responsibility of a dog,
and prefer to work with a cane. But Bad-
ger says it was a wonderful choice for
her.
"I can get places quicker and a lot
more effectively. I like a dog because, for
me it's better. I've gone a lot more places
with her than I would have gone with a
cane, and I feel more confident" Badger
said.
Badger has had Heidi for five years,
and says she will keep the dog until she
dies, even when Heidi is no longer able
to work.
"I will get a new working dog, but I
will have Heidi as long as she's alive.
People do it different ways. Some people
hold on to their dog, and they'll get a
new working dog. Their dog will become
a pet And that gets kind of sticky, be-
cause both dogs have to feel valued
Badger said.
And these dogs are useful far more
so than the average dog that lives as a
pet They provide a valuable service to
their owners, who benefit from the com-
panionship and help of man's best friend.
So students should keep all of these
things in mind when they see a working
dog. Badger says. Do not try to treat these
dogs as pets, or interfere in any way with
their duties, which are serious business
to both the dogs and their owners.
�PEEDIG TICKETS DVVI, DRUG OFFENSES
Peter.M.
Romory
ATTORNEY AT LAW
ltems& Prices Good Thru Sept 28,1996
Wed.25lThuis.26
Copyright 1996 � The Kroger Co. Items
& Prices Good in Greenville. We
reserve the right to inn t quantities.
None sold to dealers.
od &. Drug
Always (rood. Always Fresh
COBBLESTONE MILL
ASSORTED VARIETIES
English Muffins
orBpgelsmm
VIRGINIA GROWN
Red or Golden
Delicious Apples
HARRINGTON, BRADDY &
ROMARY, L.L.P.
211-B WEST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
MEMBER, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
CRIMINAL DEFENSE LAWYERS
TEL: 919-830-8840
GREEN from page 2
Mental Health Association is turning its
focus on the elderly population by tar-
geting surrounding aging centers. Stu-
dents, who feel they are experiencing or
may be at risk for depression, are encour-
aged to visit the Student Counseling
Center, which is located at 316 Wright
Building, or call the Pitt County Mental
Health Association at (919) 752-7448.
FILM from page 2
with the Legends of Louisiana series.
This film is produced and narrated by
Sandi Mortimer. The film will visit
many places never seen by many would-
be tourists who visit the state.
The theme dinner will feature such
dishes as seafood gumbo, chicken
etoufee, red beans and rice and other
specialties.
"The film series is really big on
college campuses Cutler said. "We re-
ally want to draw in more student par-
ticipation
There are going to be four pro-
ductions during the fall and five other
productions in the spring.
"This series covers locales such as
South Africa, Hawaii and Japan; all
showing parts of the country that
many visitors never see Cutler said.
According to Cutler, many of the
producers of the films are presenting
to ECU documentaries that they spend
years of travel and work producing.
"We've had an excellent public
response and hope to make 96-97 the
best year for this series Cutler said.
Students get a special break with
this series. Student tickets are free for
the movie series and tickets to the
"theme" dinner are only $12. Season
tickets to the nine film series for the
public are $30 and $25 for ECU em-
ployees and group purchasers. Theme
dinner packages are $117 per person
for all nine dinners or $70 for any five.
Single tickets are $4 each for the
film and $16 for the buffet
To buy tickets contact the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center or call 328-4788.
QUICK'IVEASY
Open House
Buy One
Get One
Come and sample some delicious
vegetarian dishes, everything from Baked
Pecan Oatmeal to Mexican Lasagna
and receive your FREE
Cookbook.
13.7&CZ COCA COMETS, 140Z HONEY
NUT TOASTED OS OR
Kroger
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AU. VARIETIES
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A?
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ALL VARIETIES ONCOR
Chicken
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KROGER
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l-fb.Pkg.
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KROGER
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�IN THE DEUPASTRY SHOPPE
�GREATFOR DINNER-ORLANDO
Classic
Garlic Bra
Bm,
When: Thurs Sept. 19th: .
Breakfast foods
Mon Sept. 23rd:
Lunch foods
Thurs Sept. 26th:
Dinner foods
Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Where: Genera! Classroom Bldg Room 3010
-A
OISSTRUCTINq
YOUR, FUTURE? ft)
BUILD YOUR RESUME
Come learn how you can build your resume with The Walt Disney World College Program. You'll be able to earn college
recognition or credit while gaining the experience or a lifetime! This is a unique opportunity to enhance your resume with
the Disney name.
Representatives will be on campus to answer all your questions concerning the Walt Disney World College Program.
Interviewing: All Majors! Positions available throughout theme parks and resorts: Attrac-
tions. Food & Beverage. Merchandise. LiCeguarding. and many others! Ask the Disney
Representative about special opportunities for students fluent in Portuguese.
Presentation Date; Oct. 1, 1996
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: General Classroom Building, Room 1032
For More Information Contact; Mary Cauley.
(919) 757-6979
Also visit us at Orlando Sentinel Online on AOL using keyword "Disney Jobs" or
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NMMMMMM
Tuesday, September 24, 1996
The East Carolinian
A.R. lAKjMK from page 1
said they looked to see which way they
were headed. But when the man with
the gun looked back and saw them
watching, he started to head for them
again and that was when the two vic-
tims retreated into Subway.
Once inside, the victims said, the
Subway workers immediately gave them
medical assistance and called an ambu-
lance.
"The people in the Subway really
helped us out a lot the victims said.
The victims were taken to the hos-
pital where they received stitches and
were kept under observation. One was
released within a few hours, at approxi-
mately 3 a.m. The other was disoriented
for several hours after the attack and
did not get released until 5 p.m. the
next day.
The victims said that they lost ap-
proximately $60 to $70 dollars alto-
gether, but that their primary concern
was losing all of their documentation,
such as student ID's, Social Security
cards, driver's licenses and their ATM
and credit cards.
"Do you have any idea how hard it
is to get a check cashed in this town
without any ID?" one of the victims
asked.
The victims pointed out to TEC
that they both (the victims) are fairly-
large men-one is 6T' and the other
6'2and that they were in a well-lit
parking lot next to a busy street It was
also fairly early in the evening, relatively
speaking, since 11:30 p.m. is early com-
pared to the 2 a.m. quitting time most
people adhere to when they are down-
town. Given the circumstances, neither
of these students expected to be the
victim of an attack that night
"We've taiked a lot about it and
we've never given a second thought
about it about walking around down-
town late at night" one of the victims
� said.
The victims said that neither of
them had been drinking that night nor
under the influence of any drugs what-
soever. They said they wanted to stress
that fact since a policeman called them
the day after the attack and asked what
kind of alcohol or drugs were being
used. He didn't ask if there were drugs
involved, the victims said, but seemed
. to assume that there were and only
asked what kind.
The victims said they were initially
unsure about being interviewed about
the incident but decided to do it in the
hopes that others would read their ac-
count of the attack and exercise cau-
tion when out at night
"If whoever sees this paper and
reads this story thinks twice about go-
ing downtown next time, then telling
our story is for the best" the victims
said.
They urged others to always stay
with friends and not to be out late, es-
pecially if they're drinking.
"The situation is crazy. It's every-
where, it's in Greenville, and you have
- to be careful. And until it happens to
you, or someone you care about you
don't think about it"
JJblvlrl5 from page 1
Lyn will feature a big-box illusionist
Then, an African-American musical nar-
rative, Black Journey, will be the attrac-
tion on February 8. It will be followed
by Dinosaur Mountain, a Family The-
atre production that will be shown March
1. The series will be concluded on Apr.
19 by a theatrical version of the Swiss
classic "Heidi
Tickets can be bought at the door,
but that might not always be your best
idea. Cutler said that the tickets are going
at a steady rate.
"Velveteen has almost sold out al-
ready Cutler said. "Typically the audi-
ence fills the house
Tickets are available at the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center and you can also charge your
orders to major credit cards through mail
or by calling 3284788 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS. Tickets can be bought individu-
ally or by the season. Cutler said that
families might be interested in the fam-
ily pass.
"Families are being offered a family
pass for $75 Cutler said. "This would
give them five tickets to each show
Individual ticket orices are $8 for
the public $7 for faculty and staff, $5
for ECU students and youth and $8 at
the door for everyone. The seasonal tick-
ets are $25 for public $20 for faculty
and staff and15 for students and youth.
As the series nears its start Cutler
joins in with eager hopes for the year.
, "We are really excited about the
events coming to the campus this sea-
son Cutler said. "We look forward to
another successful year
inn
i ji
in.
on
int
For all you non-math
majors, this is
a really good deal.
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Tuesday, Septemeber 24,1996 The East Carolinian
&c8�efif
4
Oun1tew
Was the
launch on
Iraq a
necessary
action to
preserve
democracy or
a calculated
election-year
stunt ?
On Sept 3, the United States launched a missile attack against
Saddam Hussein and Iraq in an effort to combat Hussein's aggres-
sion on the Kurdish areas in what is supposed to be a United
Nations "safe haven" in northern Iraq. Once again, might makes
right and alien threat is suppressed through the power of Ameri-
can technology. Hooray.
George Bush did the same thing back when he was president,
and he received much praise for displaying some backbone and
putting those darn Iraqis in their place. Hooray.
We at TEC are not idiots. We acknowledge that national threats
are a reality. We know that war is a reality. We know that some-
times nations are left with no option but to retaliate and fight
those forces that threaten national security.
We also know how to read between the lines. Think back to
Mr. Bush. Think back to how the election year was approaching
Think back to how many voters viewed Mr. Bush as a "wimp a
president with no backbone. What better way to show that you are
not a wimp, to prove that you are a strong, tough leader than to
walk right up to your enemy and slap him in the face. Cross this
line and you'll get burned. That's what many Americans want in a
leader.
Guess what? Another election year is approaching. Is this a
coincidence or is President Clinton copying Mr. Bush? Many crit-
ics of Mr. Clinton have also centered him out as a wimpy leader, an
idealistic flower child. Clinton needs the polls on his side. He needs
to prove that he is a leader we can depend on when it comes to
hostile threats. What can one do?
Mr. Clinton and his staff are justifying their decision to attack
by boasting about international security concerns. "Our objectives
in Iraq are limited but our interests are clear Mr. Clinton states.
"To demonstrate once again that reckless acts have consequences,
to reduce Saddam's ability to strike out again at his neighbors, to
increase America's ability to prevent future acts of violence and
aggression
Even Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole had voiced
his support for such a daring display of strength. "America and its
allies and friends around the world can no longer tolerate Saddam's
repeated attempts to erode the restraints that have been placed
on his regime, and to violently reassert his authority Dole said.
When you wipe away all of the political, flag-waving rhetoric,
what is left? We at TEC see this military aggression as just another
political move to boost the polls. It was once stated that nothing
helps the economy like a good, old-fashioned war; the same can be
said for the presidential stats. We, as Americans, like to feel secure,
and we want a leader who will guarantee that security. We don't
want a wimp.
Another famous quote stated that wars do not make one great
The same can be said when talking about the wimptough leader
analogy.
So, before you salute our leaders for taking action against a
national threat take a moment and ask the all-important question,
"Why did they do this now?"
Sdtto
The East Carolinian
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor �� Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Amy L Royster, Assistant News Editor Crtotie Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumptoa, Copy Editor
Dill Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor P�"l �� Wright, Media Adviser
Andy Farhas, Staff Illustrator J�"�t Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial hi each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For Information, all (919)
328-6366.
Monogamy is a fossil
By design, humans possess the
ability to reason. It is what separates
us from the rest of the animal king-
dom. Baboons can do the sex gigolo
with a thousand other babe-boons.
It is not in their nature to bother with
sexual ethics.
Well, I am not an ape or mon-
key.
I have known a hundred guys
who were great friends, but I could
never stomach their treatment of
women. We'd go downtown on a Fri-
day or Saturday night and I felt like
I was in a jungle. Primates jumping
up and down on one another with
somekind of erotic fervor. Me; I al-
ways end up standing precariously in
a corner, wishing God would start
evolution over. Hey, where is love?
Am I endangered here? Don't tell
me that conquering as much flesh
as is possible is some sort of pursuit
of love.
Anthony Slade
Opinion Columnist
Bravol You've
just added
another pathetic
chapter to the
book of human
futility.
The value of a monogamous re-
lationship is at an all-time low. Mo-
nogamy does not entail one sex part-
ner per night. It is a commitment to
your significant other. That means
if your lucky enough to find that spe-
cial someone, you don't lie, cheat or
sneak. I swear on my grandmother
Sylvia's grave, that if you delegate
that powerful sexual energy toward
someone you love, the heart will
flourish.
People seem to treat sex like it's
something you get away with. "Oh,
yeah, I nailed this chick last night,
and I didn't even give up my real
name Bravo! You've just added
another pathetic chapter to the book
of human futility.
Look, I guess I'm getting too old
to deal with people who blow-off the
fragility of the human condition. Is
love not what we're searching for?
Maybe the 90s are just some sort of
surreal forum for sex dominance. Of
course, as usual I'm ranting, but it
doesn't really matter.
Humans hate one thing more
that listening changing
Co eat a banana.
&etten& t t6e Setito
Why are student fees putting SGA through school?
Vote for Victims' Rights
To the Editor,
This past session, 1 submitted
Senate Bill 6 which is known as the
"Victims Rights Bill This bill is a
Constitutional amendment that must
be approved by the voters of North
Carolina on November 5.1 would like
for your readers to be aware of this
initiative and what it means for our
state.
If a majority of the voters sup-
port my bill in the General Elections
on November 5, the victims of crime
will have the following rights: 1. To
be informed of and be present at
court proceedings of the accused; 2.
To be heard at sentencing and other
times; 3. To receive restitution; 4. To
be given relevant information about
the system; 5. To be notified about
the disposition of the case and the
sentence of the accused; 6. To be
notified of changes in the status of
the convict; and 7. To confer with
the prosecution.
Eighteen other states have
added these rights to their Constitu-
tion and I feel that it is time that we
do the same. I have submitted this
bill and fought for its passage in the
General Assembly, but the job is not
done until every voter is aware of
what my bill will do to improve the
rights of victims in North Carolina.
We should be tougher on criminals,
and more supportive of victims. If our
system is more supportive of victims,
our communities will be less inviting
to criminals. 1 ask that you please
support Senate Bill 6 on the ballot
this November. Please vote for
Victim's Rights.
Ed Warren
N.C. State Senator
Ninth Senate District
To the Editor,
I am writing in response to the
article in Thursday's TEC "Student
Fees Pay for SGA Tuition
Student government is a campus
organization that very few students
know or even care about So, why is
it that these fellow students believe
that they are the "highest campus
leaders?" The truth is that these so-
callei leaders" have little effect on
the everyday common student
Why is it that these people have
the ability to pass a bill allowing their
leaders to use my money for their tu-
ition and books? Maybe the Interfra-
ternity (IFC) and Panheliinic councils
should pay their leaders' tuition with
student fees? In fact why shouldn't all
students receive free tuition? The fact
is that had the students known about
this bill before it was passed, there
would have been a major debate be-
tween the East Carolina University
students and our leaders. It seems as
if the SGA is a secret society that only
comes public with legislation that tells
students their student fees are pay-
ing for other students to receive an
education.
Proven by last year's election, the
SGA is at best controversial. Maybe it
is about time we investigate this or-
ganization and reveal where our
money is really going. As a student
who does pay tuition here at school,
it disgusts me to know that my money
is also paying for other students to
receive an education.
The way to solve this problem is
to allow the entire student body to
vote whether or not SGA officials
should receive free tuition in addition
to free books and a monthly check. I
guarantee at the end of that vote all
student government officers would be
receiving a paycheck every week for
the number of hours they really
worked times $5, as do most student
employees. If they were the "highest
campus leaders" they claim they are,
they would be paying their own way
and putting money back into the uni-
versity-where it should be going!
G. W. Rocchio
Senior
Biology
Support same-sex marriages
To the Editor,
I wanted to thank you first for
your presentation of the understand-
able differences of opinion relating to
the issue of same-sex marriage. I felt
though, that a stronger case needed
to be made in favor of such marriages.
The big argument against same-
sex marriages stems from the idea that
marriages are simply the union of a
man and woman for the purpose of
having children. This idea is flawed
without even considering same-sex
unions. When a couple applies for a
marriage license, they may have to
have a blood test, but do not have to
take a fertility test. Nor are couples
without plans to have children or too
old to have children denied marriage
licenses on those grounds.
A marriage is a commitment be-
tween two adults who love one an-
other and want to commit their lives
to living together as a couple. They
may or may not have children, either
of their own as a coupl, of one from
previous relationship or by artificial
insemination, or of neither through
adoption.
The whole idea of a "Defense of
Marriage Act" is preposterous and sim-
ply an election-year ploy to try and
make Bill Clinton alienate gay and
lesbian voters. Elizabeth Birch, direc-
tor of the Human Rights Campaign
best showed the hypocrisy of one of
the original sponsors of the bill, Rep.
Barr (R-GA), when she asked him
which of his three marriages he was
trying to defend. Similarly, one could
ask which of Bob Dole or Newt
Gingrich's marriages they wished to
defend.
The only thing that marriage
needs to be defended from is people
who take their marriage vows lightly,
leading to break-up and divorce.
Maybe Congress is simply afriad that
if allowed, same-sex couples might
actually show them up and just get
the marriage thing right
Rich Elkins
Graduate Student
Geography
Correction
Due to the change in scheduling lor FaH break we will have a paper
on Oct. 10 and not on Oct. 17.
We improperly used the adjective "clandestine" in our Editorial on
Sept. 19. According to Webster's College Dictionaryclandestine
means "held or done in secrecy or surrepetitioushr; for ����'
clandestine meetings The SGA meeting on April 15, 1996 was not i
clandestine meeting as our Editorial states. The meeting was -
conducted in a public forum; however, no minutes of the meeting
were recorded�
"The truth that makes men free is for the most
part the truth which men prefer not to hear
� Herbert Sebastian Agar, writer, 1942





Tuesday, September 24, 1996 The East Carolinian
LIFe
Project 2000 projects
to freshmen's future
ECU minority
magazine wins
the gold medal
ECU founds new
tradition for next
century's students
There is nothing more use-
less than screaming at a wall. It's
just spittle and bricks, bricks and
spittle. However, if you put
enough voices together, that wall
might just be blown over. So join
in another futile atlemnt to
change the status quo and listen
to a "Scream at the Wall
Jay Myers
Ufestyie Editor
BANG! POW! SMACK!
CRASH! SLAM! BOF! OOF!
Those were the sounds of my
youthful introduction to TV violence
on reruns of the ultra-campy, almost
cartoonish Batman show. Con-
stantly beseiged by lackeys sporting
goofy nicknames and matching out-
fits, Batman (Adam West) and Robin
(Burt Ward) punched and kicked
their way through an endless mass
of bad guy flesh.
And it didn't stop there. James
West (Robert Conrad) and Artemus
Gordon (Ross Martin) regularly used
human bodies to destroy furniture
on The Wild, Wild West while, over
at the Paramount lot James T. Kirk
(William Shatner) of Star Trek fame
put a hurtin' on just about every'
non-human that thrust his chin out
towards him.
For the younger kiddies of our
generation (hell, I must admit 1 loved
'em, too), Warner Brothers dished
out cartoons of Bugs Bunny beat-
ing the crap out of Elmer Fudd and
Wile E. Coyote serving as indestruc-
tible fodder for his own evil machi-
nations against the always chipper
and moralistically unchallenged
Road Runner.
"So what? you may ask.
Well, our generation has been
characterized as an ultra-violent un-
caring, unfeeling bunch of wackos
who would rather take injections of
heroin in our eyes and rape our
grandfathers than try to make the
world a better place. .And many of
those who characterize us this way
would blame violence in the media
(entertainment and otherwise) for
this.
Come on, how can anyone be-
lieve a concept like this? Let's lump
everybody in their 2()'s together and
say that Daffy Duck made them kill,
kill, kill. It's ridiculous.
Why am I on this soapbox? Rap
artist Tupac Shakur recently died
because of his involvement in a
drive-by shooting and his detractors
have been less than pleasant in stat-
ing why they feel he died. Bob Dole,
in his run for the presidency, has
recently spoken out about the lack
of family values in such films as
Natural Bom Killers and Pulp Fic-
tion.
Both of these things have
brought the topic of violence up to
a simmering heat in the frying pan
that is my brain. In order to put my
thoughts in perspective, let me
tackle each one of these aforemen-
tioned topics in turn.
First of all. Tupac was admit-
tedly, from day one, a gangsta. No
mincing words here, he lived life
hard and fast and many criticize him
for it Yet the blame for his death
lies not with the popularity he en-
joyed as a rap artist Yes. the record
industry does promote heavily th se
rappers who have a street legitimacy
they can maintain, but. they are not
the source for this problem, either.
No, the real problem lies with
society and our inability to provide
a way out for people who are
trapped because of their economic
status. Because they are angry and
they have no political voice, they
have to find some kind of voice
See VIOLENCE page 8
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Attention all freshmen: do not
read this article.
Now for everyone else:
Do you remember the months
before you first came to ECU or the
day your parents reluctantly dropped
you off at your residence hall? What
was it your mom said about being
proud of you? Don't get into too much
trouble, your dad warned.
What did they say? Can you re-
member?
University Housing Services
hopes a new project captures those
parental aspirations, warnings and
predictions forever for this year's (and
future) freshmen.
Project 2000, similar to a time
capsule, allowed parents to write let-
ters to their children and simply state
their thoughts about sending their
son or daughter away to school. The
letters were then sealed in envelopes
and addressed to the students' per-
manent homes.
In a separate envelope, parents
mailed the letters to University Hous-
ing Services, who will keep the let-
ters in a safe until May of the year
2000, the projected graduation date
for this year's freshman class. At that
time. Housing Services will mail the
letters back to the students.
Manny Amaro, director of Univer-
sity Housing Services, said he hopes
the project, developed by Carolyn
Miller, associate director for Resident's
Life, will become a tradition at ECU.
"We see a
need at ECU to
build on some tra-
ditions Amaro
said. "We truly are
a wonderful south-
ern university.
When you think of
southern universi-
ties, you think of
traditions
ECU is only
one of a few univer-
sities that have
projects similar to Project 2000, ac-
cording to Amaro.
The project has been a success
so far. considering Housing Services
has received more than 1.100 letters.
'We had to get a larger safe
Amaro admitted. "Obviously, the par-
ents really like this
The letters were supposed to be
a surprise to the students. However,
Amaro thinks some students may al-
ready know.
"We have had students come
(with the letters) and say, 'Yeah, my
mom said to give this to you he ex-
plained.
Amaro said Housing Services
even received a request from an aunt
who wanted to be included in the
project. Her niece, an incoming fresh-
"We are a nice
community that I
haven't seen on
(other) college

campuses
�Manny Amaro, director of
University Housing Services
men. was the first in the family to have
the opportunity to go to college. The
aunt, who has Alzheimer's, was afraid
she may not still be alive when her
niece graduates.
Of course we will accept that
letter Amaro said.
Amaro sin-
cerely believes
there is some-
thing "special"
at ECU.
"We are a
nice community
that I haven't
seen on (other)
college cam-
puses he
added.
Amaro said
Housing Ser-
vices is considering other projects to
help build traditions at ECU
One project will help dormitory
residents to get to know the men and
women their residence halls are
named after.
"We had residence halls named
after women before we recognized
that whole concept Amaro said. "We
had strong women leaders before
women's suffrage
Another project would allow resi-
dents to name their particular floor
after a house and develop a commu-
nity contract where residents insti-
tuted their own rules, Amaro ex-
plained.
"It would be. 'I live in such and
such House instead of. I live on the
third floor
f
�7ft
wee Kevtetv
movie reviews legend
r-? Dav full price
see a matinee
rent it en vicler
-n
see It fer free
run away
Willis stands proud as Last Man
Photo Courtesy of Expressions
Expressions has won yet another top honor for its continuing
excellence.We at TEC wish to extend our congratulations.
Dale Williamson
Assistant Ufestyie Editor
Expressions recently received
the highest magazine rating pos-
sible, earning the distinction of
being a gold medalist in the Colum-
bia Scholastic Press Association
(CSPA), making Expressions a
highly reputable publication that
deserves to be read.
Expressions seeks those stu-
dents whose voice might not be heard
otherwise said General Manager
Michelle Terry. We also want to ad-
dress those issues and concerns that
might be overlooked by other main-
stream publica-
tions. Although
Expressions fo-
cuses on minority
issues, our maga-
zine points out
issues that can be
of interest to ev-
eryone
In order to
be evaluated,
the CSPA deter-
mined the essen-
tial qualities
needed to create a successful maga-
zine. These qualities where divided
into categories by which each maga-
zine was judged.
The first hurdle for Expres-
sions was the magazine's concept,
which included such elements as
the magazine's goat, and concepts.
the cover, the title page, and the
overall readability of the publica-
tion. Out of a total of 150 points.
Expressions earned a whopping
145 points. The judge loved the
premise of the magazine as well as
"the strong spirit that emanates
from its pages The judge added
that "it is not often that student
publications combine so many cre-
ative impulses (poetry, essays, fea
tures. et ! ii a coherent whole
with ai � purpose and phi-
losophy maintained throughout
each issue
Next, the magazine's content
(which includes short fiction, po-
etry, non-fiction, interviews and
photography) was judged. Expres-
sions earned an extremely impres-
sive 461 points out of a possible
500. When commenting on the
magazine's fiction, the judge
stated. T do think that many of the
pieces use dialogue particularly ef-
fectively, and I believe that they all
touch on very compelling overall
themes which appeal to the
publication's target audience
The third section of judging fo-
cused on the publication's design,
which pulled in
293 points out of
300. Criteria
here included
such questions
as "Does the
magazine have
an overall visual
appeal?" and
"Have contempo-
rary graphic-
techniques been
used in a func-
tioned and at-
The judge stated
that it was a pleasure "to see that
Expressions is working with such
an impressive budget and that the
contributors! are striving to bring
a real look' to the publication
Finally, the creativity of Ex-
pressions was judged. ECU'S maga-
zine earned an astounding 48 out
of 50 points. The judge's final com-
ment stated. "I think your magazine
has real style and flair - it feels
very professional in its presenta-
tiort "
If you want to let your voice
he heard, contact Michelle Terry at
328-6927 or come by the Media Board
office in the Student Publications
Building.
The next issue will be available
on Oct. 30, so pick it up.
"Expressions seeks
those students
whose voice might
not be heard
otherwise
� Michelle Terry,
Expressions General Manager
Photo Courtesy of New Line Pictures
Give Bruce Willis one gun and he thinks he's invincible, give him two and he thinks he's a
god. In Willis' latest outing, Last Man Standing, our critic finds himself a willing disciple.
tractive way?
Bruce brings back
mythic hero with
brains and bullets
Dale Williamson
Assistant Ufestyie Editor
When Bruce Willis first played
tough guy in Die Hard his career took a
drastic turn from light comedy to hard-
edged action. In an attempt to become
the next big action star, Willis made sev-
eral shootem-up films that, unfortu-
nately, labeled him as a half-baked actor
of mindless trash. As a result Willis' ca-
reer took a dive.
Wising up to this fact. Willis has
recently tried to revamp his career by
revising his role as tough guy. Both lilp
Fiction and 12 Monkeys featured Willis
as the taut hero, but unlike other Willis
actioners (such as Striking Distance)
these films were backed with solid sto-
ries and creative talent. These films gave
Willis the boost he needed to restruc-
ture his heroic image.
Willis' newest film. Last Man Stand-
ing, continues on the path that Ihilp
Fiction and 12 Monkeys paved by cast
ing our hero within a mythic context that
poetically plays off archetypes and clas-
sic motifs. While every other critic in this
country is discounting ImsI Man Stand-
ing as a needlessly violent cliche, this
film proves to be a action piece filled with
top cinematic talent, a mythic atmo-
sphere, and an engaging moral ambigu-
ity.
Wntei directoi Waltei Hill bases
IlsI Man Stamina on Akira Kurosawa's
Japanese masterpiece Yojimbo (which
was also redone as the Sergio Ieone
Clint Eastwood western. A Fistful of
Dollars). The tale involves a lone figure
appearing in a wasting town ruled by
two warring gangs. Seeing an opportu-
nity to make a financial gain, this lone
figure plays both sides of evil by work-
ing for both gangs and manipulating
them against one another.
This mythic tale requires a setting
and time that creates a sense of distance
and separation from our sense of reality.
Trying to recreate this story within a
contemporary metropolis would not
carry the same sense of awe and isola-
tion. There we, Hill wisely places his lone
figure (Willis as the ambiguous John
Smith, a nice play off "the man with no
name" mystique) in the far reaches of
the Texas wasteland during the prohibi-
tion era. Kurosawa used samurais. Sergio
I eone used cowboys, Hill uses gangsters.
See LAST page 8





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 24,1996
Rose Nails
Free Gold Charms
Airbrush with any
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TJ Maxx Showing Center
(Next to Dress Barn)
Telephone: (919) 321-6112
Full Set $25.00
Fill-in $15.00
Hours: Mon-Sat 9-8
Sun 1-6
Appointments Available
Walk-ins Welcome
Go to class on TV this fall
(AP) � The classroom is the center-
piece offtve new shows this fall� there's
wannabe entertainers who turn to teach-
ing to pay the bills, an ex-Marine who
teaches inner-city kids, and a working-
class widow who goes to an Ivy League
college.
"Yeah, can you do something about
that asked Dennis Rinsler, executive
producer of IJPN's Nick Freno: Licensed
Teacher.
Veteran TV producer Don Reo,
whose show Pearl is among the group,
had a simple explanation for the glut of
educationally-themed shows.
"Everybody copies what I do Reo
said. "They just watch me and whatever
I'm doing, everybody else tries to jump
on the bandwagoa That's the only plau-
sible explanation I can come up with
Kidding aside, one can take a look
at recent big-screen successes that fo-
cused on teachers -Mr. Holland's Opus
with Richard Dreyfuss and Michelle
Pfeiffer's Dangerous Minds � and put
two and two together. Dangerous Minds
itself is coming to the small screen in
the form of a dramatic series on ABC.
"It's not so much everyone is imi-
tating Mr. Holland's Opus so much as I
think the movie maybe reminded every-
body that this is sort of a time-honored
genre that really had been getting short
shrift of late on television said Peter
Noah, executive producer of the teacher
sitcom Mr. Rhodes.
Reo, whose Pearl stars Rhea
Perlman as a widow who is accepted to
a Yale-like university, said television of-
ten borrows from the movies.
Of the new shows this fall, three are
similar in that they revolve around fish-
out-of-water teachers and all three fea-
ture actors who have been stand-up com-
ics at one time or another.
NBC's Mr. Rhodes stars Tom
Rhodes as a long-haired, jeans-wearing,
down-on-his-luck novelist who turns to
teaching at a private prep school.
The WB Network's Nick Freno:
Licensed Teacher stars Mitch Mullany
as a wanna-be actor who becomes a sub-
stitute teacher at an urban middle school.
Steve Harvey stars in the WB
Network's The Steve Harvey Show as
an ex-musician who reluctantly takes a
job teaching music at an inner-city high
school when his royalty checks stop com-
ing.
When pitched ideas for a series,
Rhodes said he "got so many bad, cheesy
horrible ideas thrown at me By the
time the teacher idea came around, I was
thrilled. I thought 'Yeah, I could actu-
ally picture myself doing that
Which of the three teachers gets
an "A"? None of the above.
That honor goes to Malcolm
McDowell in Pearl. Known more for
E YOU A :
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movies than television, the British actor
is delightfully crafty as an arrogant hu-
manities professor who gives the street-
wise Pearl a run for her money.
For drama fans, Dangerous Minds
stars Annie Potts, who's known more for
her comedic roles such as Designing
Women. Yet Potts makes a fine substi-
tute playing Louanne Johnson, a former
Marine who teaches street-tough stu-
dents.
"Our show is really trying to deal
with real issues that confront these kids
said Dangerous Minds executive pro-
ducer Andrew Schneider. "We have hu-
mor in it but we're trying to deal with
something in a serious way, to really delve
in a deeper way, perhaps more than a
sitcom would
Probably true, although the creators
and executive producers behind Nick
Freno: Licensed Teacher were teachers
in tough New York City schools for ten
years and are sure to inject a dose of
reality into their show, as well.
"The show's about what happened
to us when we started teaching said
Rinsler. "We had just gotten out of col-
lege and we related more to the kids than
the authority figures. So when the prin-
cipal came in the room and said 'whaf s
going on in here?' we would jump like
the rest of the kids. We weren't used to
being in charge
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8
Tuesday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
' 1
VIOLENCE from page 6
VL
somewhere. That voice is justifiably one
fufl of anger and violence at tl Jt injustice
which oppresses them. And more often
than not those who criticize that voice
do so from an elevated economic posi-
tion. In fact, the ones criticizing are usu-
ally the ones causing the problem.
Next Bob Dole doesn't know a good
movie from a hole in his head. He re-
cently stated that True Lies was a better
film than Natural Born Killers because
it extolled family values.
. Later, an interviewer told him that
more people were killed oivscreen in True
Lies than in Natural Born Killers and
asked him how he thought this was a
good example of a family film. Dole ad-
mitted that he had not seen either film,
that the speech had been written for him.
Again, the problem lies more with the
uninformed critic rather than the more
informed victim of said criticism.
These two incidents serve as per-
fect examples of the misconceptions the
generations before ours have about their
roles in our current state.
Our generation is messed up. I'd
be the first to admit that But so is the
one before it and the one before it etc
The problem isn't TV or movies or books.
It is much more complex than that
People are the problem, as they al-
ways have been and always will be.
Instead of worrying about why
we're shooting each other's brains out
watch a movie about it or listen to an
album about it Listen to the voices that
are really speaking about the problem
and tell the old farts to shut up.
rq
R I N C I 1' 1 1 S : of S ()l N n K I - T I R 1. M 1 N T I NJ
LAST from page 6
Much of the film's criticism centers
around the violence and sexism of the
characters. While the characters ae vio-
lent and they use women for their own
distasteful purposes, violence and sexism
are not the film's central elements. In
reality, gangster organizations were not'
known for humanitarian efforts, and
political correctness had not yet dawned
in the '20s.
One of the major strengths of this
film's story is its sense of manipulation
and moral ambiguity. Smith is not the
classic hero in the traditional sense; he
is, however, the classic film noir figure.
He is a man running away (from what
we are never sure). He is a man who hides
in a whiskey bottle (which also serves as
a sense of empowerment for him). He is
a man who manipulates situations to
work for him. Hill pays homage to film
noir to the point that he even has our
hero's tired, beaten voice aarrate the tale.
While Last Man Standing looks to
the past for its inspiration, it doesn't get
stuck in the past Hill is a talented mod-
ern director who knows his craft Like
the heroes in other contemporary mythic
films (such as John Woo's The Killer and
Robert Rodriguez's Desperado), Smith
is an unstoppable walking arsenal. Give
this hero not one but two guns and any-
thing is possible.
Technically, Last Man Standing is
topnotch stuff. Cinematographer Lloyd
Ahern creates a dusty, golden wasteland
riddled with blood and fire; Ry Cooper's
soundtrack recalls the disorienting feel
of the spaghetti westerns of the late '60s;
and Hill's transitions from scene to scene
and sequence to sequence clearly illus-
trate his visual expertise.
Christopher Walken is an extra bo-
nus as the scarred, raspyvoiced gangster
named Hickey. I don't care how tired the
critics are of Walken playing the killer
psychotic he is a cinematic treasure who
wears his roles with the elegance of roy-
alty.
Last Man Standing is not for ev-
eryone, admittedly. It is extremely vio-
lent there are few (if any) admirable char-
acters, and one has to comprehend the
story's subtext in order to fully appreci-
ate the film's moral thematics. However,
for those of you who enjoy action with a
disturbing edge, Last Man Standing is a
sure bet
Bruce Willis has taken some harsh
blows from critics in the past and appar-
ently Last Man Standing isn't going to
be an exception-1 have to stray from the
majority on this one, though. Willis' re-
cent work (with the exception of Die
Hard With a Vengeance) has been ad-
mirable, and if his latest is an indication
as to the type of roks he'll be choosing
in the future, then I'm sure his films will
stand the test of time and leave the crit-
ics in the dust
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�&10m'
9 Tuesday, September 24, 1996 The East Carolinian
Women's soccer drops
two home matches
Pirates weather
Gamecocks
Scott Harley
rushes for school
record, 291 yards
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
It was just another typical foot-
ball Saturday for the Pirates.
When ECU headed down to Co-
lumbia to match-up with South
Carolina, little did they know that
history would be made.
It was the 13th meeting be-
tween the two schools with the
Gamecocks holding a 9-3 lead in the
series. But after a 23-7 victory,
USC's series lead was cut down to
9-4.
The weather favored the Pirates
throughout the game. No it wasn't
a clear, cool night; it was rainy and
muddy. Why would that favor the
Pirates, you ask? Thanks to Hurri-
cane Fran, the Pirates were used to
practicing in the rain and it was ob-
vious that South Carolina was not
With the aerial assault shut
down due to the weather, the run-
ning game had to pick up the slack.
And it did in a huge way.
Sophomore Fullback Scott
Harley rushed for 291 yards, which
is a school record for most rushing
yards in a game. The original mark
was set by Junior Smith in 1993 with
282 yards. Harley tied another
record set by Butch Colson in 1969,
for most carries in a game - 41.
Harley credits his success to his
teammates who helped to create the
openings he needed to get down the
field.
"I just come out here and try
to play football and win games
Harley said. "AH I do is follow my
linemen and my linemen were giv-
ing me good blocks. The defense
played well and special teams played
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
ECU soccer goalie Cara Morgridge recorded 15 saves in Sunday's loss to William & Mary.
The Lady Pirates dropped another game on Friday losing to Florida State, 1-0.
Jon Lauterer
Staff Writer
Last weekend was a very event-
ful time for the ECU Women's Soccer
team.
Two home games on Bunting
Field only one day apart and one be-
ing a conference game, were enough
to make the ECU team feel the pres-
sure of expectation.
The first game of the weekend
took place on Friday afternoon. ECU
faced off with an equally skillful team,
Florida State. The Seminoles were
definitely ready to play tough.
The game had advanced only 10
minutes into the first half when fresh-
man player Shana Woodward received
an injury to her right leg. The injury
resulted in Woodward having to sit
out the game.
The Pirates kept the momentum
strong and steady for the first 20 min-
utes, resulting in a great deal of play
at the Seminole goal. But not many
shot attempts were made by ECU.
At about the 20 minute mark, the
Seminole offense surged forward and
gave the Pirates a good seesaw battle
for the rest of the half.
Ten minutes before the half, the
Seminoles made a great number of
shot attempts on Pirate territory
which finally resulted in a Florida
State goal.
A big blow to the ECU offense
came just before the half when this
season's leading scorer. Karen Blake,
was injured by a kick to the left shin
Blake was carried off of the field and
iced up for the rest of the game.
The second half was a struggle
at mid-field. Both sides couldn't get a
good look at the other's goal and the
goalkeepers pulled saves until the end.
Due to the aggressive play, a
Seminole was issued a red card in the
second half.
The closest the Pirates came to
tying the Seminoles was when Kelly
Karras fired a penalty kick that
bounced off of the top of the goal post
When the final whistle blew and
the dust cleared, the Florida State
Seminoles were the victors by the
score of 1-0.
The Lady Pirates had only one
day to prepare for their second con-
ference game of the season. Their first
conference match up wasa loss on
Wednesday to Old Dominion at Nor-
folk, Va. So the William & Mary match
on Sunday was very important for
standings and team morale.
"We knew coming in that Will-
iam & Mary was going to be very skill-
ful and aggressive, and they were
ECU Head Coach Neil Roberts said.
See BALL page 11
Cross country runs with the "Pack"
Zina Briley
Staff Writer
The men's and women's cross
country teams traveled to Raleigh
over the weekend to compete in the
Wolfpack Invitational.
ECU came away with a fourth-
place finish from the men and a
sixth-place finish by the women.
North Carolina State
University's men's and women's
cross country teams captured both
tities this weekend at their
Wolfpack Invitational. This comes
as no surprise, as both teams are
ranked 10th in the country.
For the Pirates, who came
close to beating one of their rivals,
UNC-Wilmington, this meet was one
to be proud of. Never before, in the
history of ECU men's cross coun-
try have nine runners run this fast.
"The men are excited about
this season and are very dedicated
to cause Coach Mike Ford said.
The Pirate, as a team, are, on
average, over a minute faster, rewrit-
ing the top ten of all time in just this
season-
Jamie Mance who finished first
at last weekend's ECUOverton
Cross Country Invitational at Lake
Kristi. was one of the top finishers
for ECU on Saturday. He is one of
the Pirates rewriting history. Mance
finished 11th with a time of 24:S5,
which is a minute faster than last
week's time.
Other top finishers were Jus-
tin England, finishing 16th with a
time of 25:16. and Andrew Worth,
who placed 18th with a time of
25:47.
See PACK page 11
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING
Scott Harley
Marcus Crandell
Raymond Mabry
PASSING
Marcus Crandell
RECEIVING
Larry Shannon
Mitchell Galloway
Lamont Chappell
Alphonso Collins
CAR
41
2
4
QQMP
5
REC
2
1
1
1
YDS
291
12
9
ATT
20
ID
1
0
0
YDS INT
75 0
ID
2
YDS
25
43
5
2
ID
1
0
0
1
ECU
20
4-14
383
308
75
5-20-0
5-43.6
3-16
1-0
29:14
use
NETYARDS
NETYARDS
PUNT
PENALTIES.
FUMBLES-U
TIME OF POS
Scott Harley
Harley was named the USA
Today Player-of-the-Week
for his performance.
well. We just all came together as a
team
Coach Steve Logan was pleased
with the effort his entire
team gave.
"This is a good
three-way win Logan
said.
Marcus Crandell
completed just five
passes for the game, but
knew once the rain
started his role would be
different
"Once it started to
rain I thought we were
going to run the ball
down their throats
Crandell said.
And run the ball
they did. ECU racked up
308 yards rushing and
only 75 yards passing.
Before the game be-
gan, the sky dropped
some precipitation to
make things more diffi-
cult. But that would
prove not to be an ob-
stacle for the Pirates.
"You can dedicate
this game to Hurricane whatever-it-
was that came through here Logan
said.
The initial crowd of over 79,000
people dwindled down after half-
time. This was an advantage since
USC did not have the crowd roar-
ing in their favor.
Buck Collins, who recorded his
first touchdown for the Pirates,
hopes the team will get more recog-
nition now.
"All we want is a little respect
Collins said. "They couldn't stop our
running so we just kept on going. I
thought it was going to be closer
See ECU page 11
Volleyball player recognized in CAA
Photo by ECU SID
Justin England (31) and Brian Beil (25) helped the men's
cross country team to a fourth place finish in Raleigh.
Freshman Julia
D'Alo named
player of the week
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
A freshman volleyball player is
turning heads in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association.
Julia D'Alo was named the CAA
volleyball player-of-the-week during
the week of Sept 16.
D'Alo, a freshmen from Pitts-
burgh, Pa. garners the award after
having a phenomenal week. She led
ECU to three straight wins to cap-
ture the Cornell Invitational tourna-
ment title and the Most Valuable
Player honors.
"Julia has simply been the most
consistent player on the team Head
Coach Kim Walker said. "Her physi-
cal and mental effort in each match
and at practice has been outstand-
ing
This past week , D'Alo recorded
13 kills. 144 assists and 33 digs, in-
cluding a career high 49 assists
against Cornell in the tournament's
championship match. She currently
posts a .333 hitting percentage and
has served 19 aces and registered 90
digs.
For D'Alo, the award is some-
thing she knew little about.
"I'm just a freshman and I did
not even know that such an award
was available D'Alo said. "It's a nice
honor and I am very excited about
it"
The tournament win at Cornell
was the first tournament the Lady
Pirates have won this season. They
managed to beat Wagner 3-0, Mor-
gan State 3-1 and Cornell 3-2 in the
finals. For D'Alo the win not only
shines on her abilities as a player,
but alsoon the
team.
"We took a
big step at
Cornell in im-
proving as a
team D'Alo
said. "We really
competed well
and we took the
play at people
when we had to,
something we
have struggled
with earlier this
season
"We have a
lot of good talent
"We really
competed well and
we took the play at
people when we
had to, something
we have struggled
with earlier this
season
� Julia D'Alo, freshman
from Pittsburgh, PA
nation at the amateur level. She cred-
its her experience in junior Olympic
club volleyball as what has brought
her up to the level of play that is
expected in Division 1-A volleyball.
"High school volleyball is on a
much lower level than Division 1-A
but the club volleyball matches I have
played in are pretty much on the
same level D'Alo said. "I have
played in some
club matches that
are at a lot higher
level than some of
the matches that
I have played in
here, but then
there are some
that are as bad as
high school
D'Alo needs
that kind of expe-
rience to fit into
the Pirates young
program. The po-
sition she plays on
the court - setter
is one that carries
on this team and we are good enough
to win when we all play together
D'Alo said. "At Cornell we put it all
on the line and we were able to come
away with the win
D'Alo is no stranger to putting
it all on the line. She comes from a
very strong high school program,
where she was selected to the All-
State Team her senior season in the
state of Pennsylvania. She also played
on a national club volleyball team
that finished in the t�Jp 20 in the
with it a lot of responsibility and is
key to the Pirates success.
"The setter is like the core of
the team, fhe nucleus D'Alo said.
"It could be a real scary position for
a freshmen coming into a new pro-
gram, but I'm not like that
She compares her position to
that of a football position.
"Playing the setter position is
like being the quarterback on the
See FRESHMAN page 10
� "
plHIIWI �'�' M�"i





IKr- � Bliilfciigi
10
Tuesday, September 24,1996
The East Carolinian
FRESHMAN from page 9
football team - you're the center of
everything and you run the offense
D'Alo said. "I am very comfortable
in playing this role, I love my posi-
tion and I would not change it for
the world
One of the reasons that D'Alo
has become so comfortable at setter
1 the trust and support of coach
Walker. D'Alo credits Walker with
her development as a player as well
as one of the key reasons for choos-
ing ECU in the first place.
- "I chose ECU not only because
of the program and academics, but
also because Coach Walker was very
serious when she said she wanted to
turn this program around D'Alo
said. "I have been coached by a lot
of different coaches and what I like
about her coaching style is she al-
lows me to make my own decisions
on the court. She trusts me and we
work together very well. I have a ton
of respect for her
D'Alo believes that the women's
volleyball program will become a con-
tender in the CAA, if not this sea-
son, then next She has a good sense
of where the team stands and where
it is headed in the future.
"I believe we can win a confer-
ence championship D'Alo said. "I
don't know how far down the road
that is, but we are a young team and
we are already having some success.
We are 4-6 and we have beat some
good teams, but we have lost to some
good teams we could have beaten as
well
To win a conference title, team-
work will be the key.
"If we keep working together I
think we will win the conference
eventually D'Alo said.
ECU lost to UNC-Chapel Hill af-
ter the Cornell win in three games
by the score of 9-15, 3-15 and 7-15.
The team also played in one
other tournament this past weekend
at Campbell University. The team's
two wins came against UNC-Asheville
(1-3) and Mercer (1-3). They also re-
corded losses to James Madison (0-
3) and Campbell (0-3).
ECU will play UNC-Greensboro
at 7 p.m. Sept 30 at Minges. Students
are admitted free.
Band marches toward NFL half-times
David Councilman
StaffWritar
What student organization is at
ail the home football games, in the
stands and on the field playing their
hearts out? Yes, it is the football
team and the cheerleaders, but that
list also includes the ECU Marching
Band.
In the past it seems as if the
band never gets the recognition they
deserve. Until now.
' The Marching Pirates, under the
direction of Chris Knighten, now
have gotten the recognition they
have been looking for. They have
been asked to perform at a Washing-
ton Redskins game as well as perform
at a Carolina Panthers game. The
band was selected after they sent in
videotapes to the Redskins and Pan-
thers entertainment directors. They
got the news that they would be per-
forming at these games this summer.
"The students are very intelli-
gent and work very hard, they enjoy
providing entertainment Knighten
said.
A lot of the band success can be
attributed to Knighten. Before he
came to ECU the band's enrollment
was only about
140 people, now
the enrollment is
200 members.
That is an in-
crease of 40 per-
cent
"We have a
very aggressive
recruiting cam-
paign Knighten
said.
The band
practices three
days a week,
Monday,
Wednesday and mmmmmmmmmmm
Friday from 4-6
p.m. The members start off with
stretching, marching fundamentals,
30 minutes of just playing music and
then the rest of the time they are
putting the show together, which is
very complex. They also have work
to memorize, which is sort of like
arrhe students are
ery intelligent
and work very
hard, they enjoy
providing

entertainment.
� Chris Knighten, director
of The Marching Pirates
their homework. For all the hard
work the band puts in, there are not
many rewards.
"There is only one hour of credit
for the marching
band Knighten
said.
The march-
ing band is not
only for music
majors. There are
a diverse group of
majors who play
for the band.
"We target
non-music majors
as well, 50 per-
cent of the band
are not music ma-
jors Knighten
said.
The band re-
cruits by sending out letters, they
also work with high school bands. A
majority of the high school band di-
rectors in the east are ECU alumni.
The band does not perform in pa-
See BAND page 11
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Budweiser
AtU
"Super Ho's"
Flag Footbali
Rusher
Chris is a former Track and Field sprinter who
has appeared in two National tourneys. He was
the most valuable Player in both 1994 and 1995
at the Southern Atlantic Flag Football Invitational
in Wilmington. He combines astounding
quickness and the ability to change direction
instantly with superior hand speed and flag
pulling abilities to dominate a game. The "Super
Ho's" have won their first two games 26-0 and
54-0 in their attempt to defend their All-Campus
title that they have won in four of the last five
years.
Athlete of the week is determined by Rec Services and the
Sports department of The East Carolinian
3 Games
3 Touchdowns
2 2 point conversions
The Nail Salon, Ztc.
355-1661
Welcome Back,
ECU Students and Staff.
�The Salon is conviently located at 3401 South Evans Ext,
I just 1 mile south of Target Store
. We are full-serviced offering:
Ecu Value Days on Every
Thursday
during the month of
September, All ECU
Students and Faculty
recieve 10 Off Any
Service with an ECU ID.
(Non Request Stylist and
Technicians Only)
Ask about our GAMEDAY MANI-
CURE, only at The Nail Salon, Ztc.
State licensed Manicurist and American owned and operated.
You're young,
inexperienced and cion't
even have a degree.
We think you're ready
to be a leader.
East Carolina Playhouse
1996-97 Season
Roger Miller and William Hauptman's
Tony Award-Winning Hit Musical
BIG RIVER
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
OCTOBER 3,4,5, 6 7 AND 8 1996
RATED: PG
Archibald MacLeish's Pultizer Prize Winning Play
J.B.
NOVEMBER 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 AND 19, 1996
RATED: PG
An Exhilarating Evening of Dance
East Carolina Dance Theatre's
DANCE 97
FEBRUARY 6, 7,8, 9. 10 AND 11, 1997
RATED: PG
Eric Bogosian's Explosive Drama of Anger and Angst
SUBURBIA
FEBRUARY 27, 28, MARCH 1, 2 3 AND 4, 1997
RATED: R
Aristophanes' Classic Comic Battle of the Sexes
LYSISTRATA
APRIL 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 AND 22, 1997
RATED: PG-13
When you get involved with Do Something, you'll be helping to build your
community. You can get involved in existing programs, or start your own with
a Do Something Grant. For more information, go to the Internet community
festival, http:www.webstock96.com and basically, do something good.
Charge by phone:
Or, by mail: - ' Or. come by:
Easl Carolina Playhouse S.AQOQ McGinnis Theatre
East Carolina I niversity J �0V0�J Monday - Friday
Gi-eemille. NC 27858-4353 10:00 am until 4:00 pm
SEASON TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
"Matinee performances al 2 00 p m all other dales .dre at 8 00 p.m
Or. come by:
McGinuK Theatre
Monday - Friday
VISA
Visa supports Do Something.
evmuSA me i
�� � �
http:www.vjsfi.com





�'���
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 24, 1996
11
Catch the "Pirate Insider WZMB's half-hour pre-game show
before each Pirate football game. Join WZMB Sports Director Brian
Paiz at 3:30 p.m. before Saturday's game against University of
Central Florida.
We're throwing away the format and the playlist every Friday from
1 until 6 p.m. It's the WZMB "Friday Request Fest. You say it -
We play it! Call in at 328-6913 to take part in ZoMBie Radio's
Friday Request Fest.
Ql .3 FM
East Carolina University
:t
(Jueidag
COLLEGE NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
THE BAiH CLUB
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
(AGENTS OF GOOD ROOTS)
Jazzy, Feel-Good Alternative!
W SPECIAL GUEST: yeP!
SHOW STARTS AT 4:00 PM ON THE MENOENHALL
STUDENT CENTER BRICKYARD AND IS FREE!
AGENTS
GOOD ROOTS
SPLASH
OF
COLOR
CUlTURAt A WARINESS WIEK
HPTOMMR 30 - OCTOMt S
MONDAY, SOTMMKR 30
LECTURE: YOUSEF SANSOUR
THE FUTURE OF PALESTINE
NOON !PM
MENDiNHAlL UNDERGROUND
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1
'BLACK MAN RISING"
8PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION
8PM
MENDENHALL GREATROOM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3
DRIVE-IN MOVIE: "FRIDAY"
8PM
VIP PARKING LOT, CHARLES BLVD.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4
OPENING RECEPTION
THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF P H POLK
7PM-8PM
MSC GALLERY
SATURDAY
VIDEO DANCE PARTY?
10PM-2AM
MENDENHALL SOCIAL ROOM
Thursday, September 26
Friday, September 27
Saturday, September 28
Sunday Matinee, September 29 @ 2PM
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU O.
No Backpacks Bookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
HEART
BALL from page 9 ECU from page 11 PAC1V from page 9
The game kicked off on a sour
note with a Tribe goal on the fourth
minute.
"Early goals do not help. In the
game of soccer, you don't score that
many in the first place and when you
get down one-nothing four minutes
into the match, it gets tough Rob-
erts said.
The early Tribe goal prompted an
ECU defensive scramble against a re-
lentless Tribe offense. ECU Goal-
keeper Cara Morgridge had her hands
full with 15 saves throughout the
game. The Tribe did a very consistent
job of keeping the ball in Pirate terri-
tory for the remainder of the first half.
The second half was a hard one
for the clearly-frustrated Pirates. The
second Tribe goal that slipped out of
Morgridge's hands in the 59th minute
was a devastating blow to the Pirates.
With only three minutes remain-
ing, the nail was driven by the Tribe
when they scored the last goal of the
game.
The final score- William & Mary
3, ECU 0.
"The girls hung tough, they came
back Roberts said. "They came back
and battled in the second half
The Lady Pirates will have two dif-
ficult games in the UNCAsheville Puma
Classic Tournament scheduled for next
weekend. ECU will take on Appalachian
State and Georgia Southern.
than it was
The question remains: Does
South Carolina respect ECU now?
"Most definitely not Ron
Suddith said. "They don't respect us.
When we were doing stretching,
they were talking about East Caro-
lina who? So obviously they don't
respect us. But they know deep
down inside that we're a better
team
Lamont Burns sees the series
doing more of a balancing act. with
ECU racking up more victories.
"The series is starting to bal-
ance out Burns said. "They still
don't respect us. Once they start
respecting East Carolina and the
program, it won't be the way it's
been the last four or five games. It
will be a more competitive series
when they realize we're just as good
a team as they are or better
Going into the game, there was
no doubt that the Pirates were
pumped up for the battle.
it's pretty tough coming down
here, but we played out hearts out
and come out with the victory
Crandell said.
Harley felt the same way.
"We were down after the West
Virginia loss but we knew we could
come down here and give these guys
a fight Harley said.
The Pirates will head into prac-
tice for this Saturday's home match-
up against Central Florida. Kick off
is set for 4 p.m.
Central Book (
OVER 3000 MAGAZINE TITLES
COMPLETE LINE OF PAPERBACKS & HARDBACK BOOKS
NEWSPAPERS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY
COMICS & TRADING CARDS
SPECIAL ORDERS AT NO ADDTTIONAL COST
7524747 M
We are located at the intersection of 14th & Charles
(Harris Teeter Shopping Center)
I
0
"Every aspect is in a positive
direction Ford said.
N.C State's Pat Joyce won the
event with a time of 24:15.
On the women's side, Kerri
Hartling finished strong for the
Lady Pirates, placing 17th with a
time of 19:35. Karen Reinhard kept
up the intensity, using her "don't
give up" mentality placing 18th
behind Hartling. Her time 19:36
and Dava Rhodes was 21st at 21:10.
The goal for the Lady Pirates
is to get their times down and over-
take their biggest rival the
Seahawks. Jackie Coscia took first
for the Wolfpack with the time ctf
18:26.
The next meet for the men will
be this weekend at Greensboro at
the Greensboro Invitational. As for
the Lady Pirates, they head to
Blacksburg, Va. to compete in the
Virginia Tech Invitational.
mmm�m�m�ama�mm�mmm�mmmat
BAND from page 10
rades, but they did put on a great
show at the Liberty Bowl Parade.
Also the Marching Pirates perform
twice a year at high school march-
ing band competitions, which is a
great recruiting tool. They perform
in front of 2,000 to 5,000 students
at these competitions. This does not
include all the people that they per-
form in front of in a year.
"The band performs in front of
400,000 people a year Knighten
said.
They also travel to one away
game in football and they go to Bowl
games if the football team makes it
in. The band also has 30 people per-
form for basketball games and they
travel to the CAA tournament in
Richmond. Part of the group will
perform at the Virginia Tech game,
but the whole band will perform at
the long awaited clash between Pi-
rates and N.C. State. You know - the
other team.
So the next time you watch an
NFL game look for your Marching
Pirates during the halftime show.
You never know where they might
pop up next
Class Officer
Resident Hall Reps
Day Reps
THE STUDENT UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
APPLY AT THE STUDENT UNION OFFICE IN ROOM 236
DEADLINE DATE FOR APPLICATIONS IS SEPTEMBER 27
Presented by the ECU Student Union
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.edu5fr tdentUnlonTHEHOMEPAGE.h!ml
All
Candidates Must
File By 5:00
September 12, Room 255
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Mandatory Candidate
Meeting Will Be Held
September 12 at 5:30 in
Room 221 Mendenhall
Student Center.





t0
Tuesday, September 24,1996 The East Carolinian
SSIFIEDS
For Rent
j
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FIRST FULL MONTH'S RENT 12,
PRICE WITH PRESENTATION i
OF THIS COUPON
I and 2 Bedroom Range, Refridgeracor.Washer. I
Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court Located 5 j
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER, SEWER, CABLE
2 BEDROOMS
StoveRefrtdgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located S Blocks from Campus
1 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, 5
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
I08ABROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday and Sunday. 12-6pm
iff
For Sale
ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR NON-smoking
students � Methodist Student Center. Call
758-2030 for more info.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share 2
bedroom apartment: pay 12 rent (which is
$190month), 12 utilities. Apartment lo-
cated at First Street. 754-2487.
MF ROOMMATE. NICE HOUSE. Walking
distance to campus. Own room, washer and
dryer, and lots of extras. Call 752-8682
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. PRI-
VATE bedroom and bath, two bedroom mo-
bile home in Greystone Mobile Home Park.
S350.00 per month includes utilities.pow-
er.cable.water.phone.washer.dryer use also.
Call 756-9635 ask for Shana.
FOR RENT: (SUBLEASE) TWO bedroom
apartment Wyndham Court. Deposit re-
quired. $405 rent per month. Very nice. 5
blocks from campus. Available now. Call Jeff
or Jerry at 551-3040.
HOUSE TO SHAREONE ROOM in house
on N. Summit available now. 6 blocks from
class. $225month. Call 758-2294. Partially
furnished.ACgas heat
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! "THE
Penthouse" Above BW3. is available for rent
October 1st This is the most desirable apart-
ment in Greenville! Full length windows, sun-
ken living area, over 1400 Square feet 3 bed-
rooms. 2 12 bath. Other units available too!
Including the "Beauty Salon Call Yvonne
at 758-2616.
WANTED: MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
month phone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
ROOMMATE WANTED: SHARE LARGE
3 br2.5 bath townhouse near Greenville
Athletic Club. Very nice. Must be neat and
responsible. $290month 12 utilities. Call
551-1863.
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO SHARE four
bedroom apartment in Tar River. $170.00
month plus 14 utilities. No deposit required.
Ask for Jonathan or Jamie 754-8024.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3 BR
house close to campus. Serious student who
wants own room, washer and dryer and lots
of extras please call 752-8682.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE PERSON to
share 2 BR2BTH apartment in Parkview
Apt Complex. WD included, clean, nice, be-
gin renting 1st of October. ECU bus stop.
$225month, plus half utilities. Call 754-
2022.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. Washer, Dryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
1 ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP Tar River
near campus. Rent $177.50 for your own
room. Please call 758-7542.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE four
bedroom house at Fourth and Biltmore. Call
Kevin. Gus. or Doug at 919-752-0744.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk to cam-
pus. $250mo. plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
8244.
ALVAREZ ACOUSTIC WITH CASE.
-$200.00 OBO 7570980.
UN1VEGA MOUNTAIN BIKE ALUMINUM
703 rock shocks, forest green, new, paid
$850.00, sacrifice, $450.00, call 756-8080.
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE, 303
S. Evans St (Mall) across from Courthouse.
Tue-Wed-Thurs. 10am-4pm 757-2740
1963 FENDER JAZZMASTER REISSUE
Candy Apple Red. $400.00 OBO, 757-0980.
SNOW SKIS WITH POLES K2-TRC Select
(190's) with Salomon bindings. Great condi-
tion! $225 OBO, Call 754-2242.
LARGE LOFT WITH FULL-size mattress
and desk underneath. Built by Engineering
student Disassembles easily.150neg. Call
551-1863.
FOR SALE SOFABED. GREAT shape. $75
OBO. 757-0980.
APPLE COMPUTER QUADRA 605. In
eludes moniter, keyboard, and mouse. Sys-
tem 7.1 software. Never been used! $1000
919-637-1782.
'78 SUZUKI GS-1000: Rebuilt carbs.new
K&N filters, tank mural. Runs Great! $875
OBO. Also for sale: Pioneer TS-X200 car ster-
eo speakers,$70 OBO. 757-0346 Mike
HOME GROWN COMPILATION CD avail-
able at CD ' 'ley. Featuring: Purple School-
bus, Agents of Good Roots, Gibb Droll, Ju-
piter Coyote, Keller & many more. HOME
GROWN 2 coming soon!
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 758-8244.
9m Services
Offered
ym
m
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
Announcements
Help
Wanted
SM 1S"T
flSri
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING � Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext
C53627
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill. NC.
BABYSITTER WANTED: RESPONSIBLE
PERSON for babysitting or infant. Child de-
velopment or education major preferred. In
university area. Please call 758-3591.
I AM LOOKING FOR a few good people to
work with me on a part-time or full time
basis to earn some serious money. Call Da-
vid 752-9610.
PART TIME WAITRESS, Mon-Fri, Golden
China Restaurant. 300 S.E. Greenville Blvd
321-6868.
STUDENTS LOOKING FOR PART time
work wflexible hours? ECU is looking for a
few good Pirates to contacf'alumni for the
annual fund program. Five dollars per hour
-come by Rawl Annex, Room 5, M-Th after 2
pm for more information.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE to students who are interest-
ed in becoming PERSONAL CARE ATTEND
ANTS to students in wheelchairs, READERS,
.AND TUTORS. Past experience is desired but
not required. For an application, contact: Of-
fice for Disability Support Services, Brew-
ster A-116 or A-114. Telephone 919 -328-
6799.
CAREGD7ER NEEDED THAT IS depend-
able and loves children. Hours are Tuesdays
8:30 - 4:30; Wednesday 8:30 - 12:30; Thurs-
day 8:30 - 12:30. References are required.
Please call 355-5067.
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must. Flexi-
ble schedules. Apply in person. Denny's, 808
S. Memorial Drive.
AMERICAN PIZZA COMPANY NOW hir-
ing drivers. Must have car. Immediate work;
great pay. Call 931-0411.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
PART TIME TEMP. CAREGIVER needed
at local child care center for after school pro-
gram. MWF 12-6, TTH 2-6. Experience re-
quired. Call 756-8250.
Orr he. suffUK l: fAK I TIME Accounts
Receivable. Assist with account inquiries, bill-
ing, and process credit applicationspay-
ments. 25-29 hours per week. Schedule in-
cludes: 12 pm (or 1pm) to 6 pm Saturdays.
Schedule will require eveningSunday hours
for holiday shopping season. For informa-
tion call Human Resources: 756-3140.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for Part Time Sales associates. We
seek fashion forward individuals who can
provide friendly courteous service. Work
with the fashionsaccessories you love to
wear. Juniors, Cosmetics, Fuller Figure, and
Young Men's. Flexible schedules for the "ear-
ly birds" (10am-2pm) or "night owls" (6pm-
9pm). All retail positions include weekends.
Merchandiseclothing discount offered. Ap-
plications accepted Tuesday and Thursday,
l-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza and Carolina East
Mall.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crew more. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext.
L53622
PARTFULL TIME CARPENTERSROOF-
ERS NEEDED. Will work around school
schedule. Call 355-8111, ask for Eva.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRiCES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-600-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
PART TIME POSITIONS: LAW firm has
openings for a mailroommessenger 2:00 -
6:00 p.m. 5 daysweek; 2 CDROM opera-
tors (scanning files onto optical disc's) 8:00
� 2:00 p.m. 5 daysweek or 5:00 -10:00 p.m.
4 daysweek; and 1 word processing special-
ist (60 wpmWord Perfect). Ideal for infor-
mation processing student 3:30 -10:00 p.m.
or full-time 3:30 - Midnight Applications from
receptionist Ward and Smith, P.A 120 West
Fire Tower Road.
SPEEDY DELIVERY IS NOW hiring smil-
ing drivers. Expand with a growing compa-
ny. Drivers must know the Greenville area.
Call today for more information. 355-7585.
RPS INC. IS LOOKING for temporary driv
ers during their peak season. Must have 1
year commercial driving experience and a
good driving record. Call 1 800-977-7462 for
more information.
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 355-0210
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, call: (206) 971-
3570 ext J53626
PART TIME HELP WANTED week nights
and Saturdays. Come by North American Fi-
berglass Corporation weekdays after 3 pm
and before 5 pm.
HELP WANTED - ServersHostesses need-
ed. Must have previous experience and be
willing to work a couple lunches a week. Call
355-1111 between 2 -5 PM. A Matter of Taste.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc. Waitstaff, house-
keepers. SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
PT SECURITY OFFICER POSITIONS
available at Glaxo Wellcome. Pay starts at
$6.50. Must be 21 yrs. old and have a clean
criminal record. Apply Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 9 am - 5 pm Guardsmark, 3219 Land-
mark Street Suite 9B, Greenville. EOE.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient, willing
to learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are currently taking applications
for part-time telephone collectors willing to
work any hours from 8am until 9pm Mon-
day thru Friday and Saturday morning from
Sam until 12 pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Board other bene-
fits. For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext. K53623
MEET
NEW PEOPLE
THE FUN WAY
TODAY
1 -900-990-9333
EXT. 4241
$2.99 PER IVIIN.
MUST BE 18 YRS.
SERV-U
(619) 645-8434
Other
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12, 1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
THESE ARE THE WORDS of opportuni-
ty. There is only about 5 of the people in
the United States who have what I want.
These are the leaders that have moved out
of the flock and became eagles. If you don't
ever step out of the pack, you will always
be part of it. If you want to be understood
by the 5 you will be misunderstood, at
times, by the 95. I am part of the fellow-
ship of the 5. The die has been cast, I
have stepped out of the comfort zone, the
decision has been made. I won't look back,
let up, slow down, or back away. My past is
forgiven, my present is focused, my future
is secure. I'm finished and done with low
living, sidewalking, small planning, faith-
less dreams, tainted vision, mundane talk-
ing, cheap excuses, and dwarf goals. I no
longer have the need for eminence, posi-
tion, promotion,promises, or popularity. I
don't have to be first, I don't have to be
right, I don't have to be recognized,
praised, regarded, or rewarded. I live by
faith, learn by submitting, labor by love,
lead by example. My dream is developed,
my destination definite, desire determined,
discipline dedicated, devotion distinct. My
pace is set, my pace is fast, my road is nar-
row, my way is tough, my companions
strong, my counselors reliable, my purpose
pure, and my mission clear. I can not be
bought, compromised.detoured, lured away,
turned back, diluted, delayed or denied. I
will not flinch at the face of sacrifice, hes-
itate in the presence of the advisory, nego-
tiate at the table of the enemy, ponder at
the pool of popularity, or meander in the
maze of mediocrity. I won't give up, shut
up, let up until I've stayed up, stored up,
paid up, and stood up for the prices and
cause of freedom. I must fight when oth-
ers faint, go when others won't, give until
I drop, teach till I know, and work until
the task is finished and when I lay exhaust-
ed on the playing field of dreamers, the
Britt Diamond Club won't have a problem
recognizing me as one of their own. Come
join us. For more information call 353-
0634.
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE at
the Methodist Student Center Casual dress.
Refreshments following the service.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no re-
payments, ever! SSS cash for college SSS
for info: 1-800-400-0209.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Kappa Sigma:
Thanks for the pre-downtown at H.Hs. Jean-
nie Garth says thanks to the participants,
even the short haired guys who had to leave
the game' Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON - Thanks for
helping us clean up after Hurricane Fran!
Alpha Xi Delta.
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank Sig-
ma Alpha Epsilon for cleaning our year af-
ter Fran!
THANKS TO KAPPA SIGMA from chi Ome-
ga for showing our new little sisters a great
time!
THANK YOU PI KAPPA Alpha for the tail-
gate. Love the sisters of Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA - Even though Fran blew
strong on Pref night, we partied all night
long. As if it weren't enough, we came back
to crawl your halls. We had a blast! Alpha Xi
Delta.
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank Sta-
cee Diener and Laura Partin for doing such
a great job this weekend on the pledge re-
treat!
ALPHA SIG, THANKS FOR the great luau
social on Thursday night! We had lots of fun.
Love, Gamma Sig.
KAPPA SIGMA � We enjoyed the cheese
with our WHINE! We're looking forward to
next time. Alpha Xi Delta.
DEAR PI DELTA SISTERS, on behalf of
the pledges, thanks for the great Rush. "Ar-
ound the World was a blast Phi Psi's can't
wait to see you more. It's been great so far
and 1 can't wait for the future when 1 can
call you all MY sisters, especially my big. I
know now that I belong a Pi Delta and there
are only good times, together, left to come.
Love. Rachael.
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to thank Alpha
Phi for coming over, especially on such short
notice. We all had a great time and we hope
.o do it again. Thanks again.
BETA OMEGAS OF ALPHA Xi Delta: Af-
ter looking high and looking low, you found
the clues that let you know. BigLil' sis week
was lots of fun, but just wait because there's
more to come! We love you. your BIG SIS-
TERS!
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank Sig
ma Phi Epsilon for the hurricane party! Let's
do it again.
ALPHA OMICRON PI. THANKS for the
great time at the 70's social Thursday. We
look forward to doing it again. The Broth-
ers of Delta Sigma Phi.
ON WINNING YOUR 1st volleyball game
against Alpha Omicron Pi! Keep up the good
work. Alpha Xi Delta.
CHI OMEGA LOVES THEIR new little sis-
ters and we are looking forward to all the
great times ahead!
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON PROUDLY
WELCOMES THE EPSILON PLEDGE
CLASS: ANDY ASBELL, STEVE BAR-
HAM, ANDY BATES, BRYAN BRADDY,
CHRIS CAPPUCCI, ANDY CRAWFORD,
CHRIS CURRIN, ROB FANNON, ERIC
HANSON, SCOTT HOBBS, NATHAN
LLOYD, TED MILLER, BRANDON MOYE,
TJ SAWYER, MIKE STROUD, AND WILL
WILSON. CONGRATULATIONS MEN
AND GET READY FOR THE TIME OF
YOUR LIFE. THE E'S.
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank Pa-
tricia Anderson for being such a wonderful
role model and outstanding teacher of the
month!
Greek
Personals
$f Services
" Offered
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
C�19) 49Q-���4
THE PARTY CONTINUES! MMP Mobile
Music Productions is back on the road again
to provide ECU with the ultimate DJ. Party
Experience. State of the art sound and light
show, playing the music YOU want to hear
when YOU want to hear it. Celebrating cur
7th year as ECU's 1 D.J. service. Ask about
our 1,000 watt party van for tailgates. Call
Lee at 7584644 for booking.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53628
r
Relief Manager
Part-time Position
Weekends and
Evenings
Residential facility needs mature individual to work some weekends:
iFriday (5pm) through Sunday (Bpm).Active work hours 5-8pm Friday.
8-1.3-8 on Saturday and Sunday. On call by pager 8pm-8am Friday and
Saturday. Will need to fill in for evening manager by working 5-8pm
week nights occasionally Required to spend Friday and Saturday nights
onsite in very comfortable bedroom (with cable TV). Some holiday
'work will be required.
Candidates should be excellent in dealing with people; be tactful and compassionate, yet able to be
firm and take charge when necessary Successful candidate will have administrative responsiblities and
mut be able to work independently, giving close attention to detail.
Immediate openings. No phone
calls, please- Send resume and letter
of interest by Oct. 7th trv
Relief Manager Position
Ronald McDonald House
549 Moye Blvd.
Greenville. NC 27834
each Tuesday night! 7:30 - 10:30 PM. Men-
denhall room 14 (downstairs, behind snack
machines). Come check us out
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST WEDNESDAY
Night Bible study Mendenhall Room 14,7:30
PM. Free food, fun, and fellowship. For more
info call Amy at 752-1492 , Peyton at 321-
2712 or Jennifer at 752-8395.
WESLEY FOUNDATION OF GREEN-
VILLE. The Methodist Student Center 758-
2030. Sponsored by the United Methodist
Church, Wesley welcomes persons of all re-
ligious backgrounds and no religious back-
ground. It offers a variety of programs, stu-
dy groups, mission teams, and service pro-
jects. All students and staff invited. Worship
Sunday night 8 pm in the chapel, Wednes-
day Fellowship 7:30 pm
HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED about
Greek life? If so, come out and meet the Afri-
can American Greeks on Thursday, Sept 26.
at 7 pm in the Social Room of Mendenhall
Student Center. Bring questions and look
forward to an informative and exciting even-
ing
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA'S FIRST meet-
ing is today, September 24 at 5:30 PM in
Mendenhall Student Center's Great Room.
We will discuss up-coming events and pro-
jects. All nomination forms are due at this
time. All ODK members arc encouraged to
attend.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC Events for Sept
24 - Oct 1.1996: Wed Sept 25 - Symphonic
Wind Ensemble and Concert Band, Scott
Carter and Christopher Knighten. Conduc-
tors (Wright Auditorium. 8:00 pm free)
Thur Sept 26 - Senior Recital. Brian Jones,
trumpet (A J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 pm
f-ee). Sun Sept. 29 - Fall Event of The
Friends of the School of Music, sponsored
by the Friends for members and their guests:
For membership information, call 919-328-
6851. Mon Sept 30 - Faculty Recital, Mary
Burroughs, horn, John B. O'Brien, piano,
Perry Smith, tenor (A J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm. free). For additional information,
call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline at ECU-
4370.
ATTENTION ALL COMEDIANS, MUSI-
CIANS, bands and singers! East Carolina
University Student Union Special Events
committee presents Mastercard Acts - a tal-
ent show where you may get the chance to
compete for $15,000. You can pick up a reg-
istration form at MSC Information Desk or
contact Keisha Brown at 328-4715.
PSYCHOLOGY PSI CHI BOOK sale. Texts,
journals, etc. Sept 30 � Oct 4, Rawl 302.
APPLICATION DEADLINES FOR RE-
CREATION and Leisure Studies: Please note
that application deadlines for Fall admission
for students interested in majoring in Re-
creation and Leisure Studies has been set
for October 1, 1996. Intended majors and
interested students should go by the Depart-
mental office and pick up an application for
admission and the criteria review sheet This
effects students interested in either the Ther-
apeutic Recreation degree option or the Lei-
sure Service Management degree option. For
information contact the Department of Re-
creation & Leisure Studies, Minges, Room
174 or call 328-4640.Late applications will
not be accepted.
BGLAD (BISEXUALS, GAYS, Lesbians &
Allies for Diversity) will have its next meet-
ing Wednesday, September 25th at 7:30 pm
in Room 221 Mendenhall. Meetings will con-
tinue every two weeks through the end of
the semester, so mark your calendars! Con-
tact Rich Elkins, 931-0160. B-CLAD
!
Travel
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GREEKS
of the week Alpha Delta Pi - Carlyn Lupton,
Cameron Ward : Alpha Omicron Pi - Holly
Burg, Heather King; Alpha Phi � Wendy Hill.
Mell Swartz: Alpha Xi Delta - Kate Jones.
Michelle Matthews; Chi Omega - Stacee Darn-
er, Laura Parton; Delta Zeta - Monica Setz-
er, Torri Forbes; Sigma - Alishia Page, Anna
Shapley; Zeta Tau Alpha - Audra Lathum,
Catheryn Singleterry. Keep up the good
work!
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to welcome its
new pledges, Creighton Barrett. Joe Main.
Walker Miller and Joe Sayblack.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE BETA
Omega Pledge class of Alpha Xi Delta: Kris-
ty Holmes. Jordan Simmons. Catherine San-
ders, Karen Dushner, April Billings, Amy
atemoerg, Carolina uuaraeni, sara nuagins,
Lindsay Wilder, Langhorn Sydnor. Emily
Ische, Shelley Bissette, Molly Parrish. Holly
McDonald.Stephanie Bronson, Sarah Sim-
mons, Catherine Lutz, Michelle Kimsey,
Casey Stone, Peyton Moore, Kim Shaffer. Ali-
cia Marblo, Kerri Augustine Holly Bucha-
nan, and Holly Honaker.You're the best! Love
the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA XI DELTA!
What a great way to start the flag football
season with the 12-0 win against Chi Ome-
ga! We're proud of you. the sisters and new
members.
CONGRATS TO NEW PLEDGE officers of
Chi Omega: Jaime Hand - President Gillian
Rafferty - Vice President Melissa Falco - Sec-
retary Patricia Epling - Treasurer. Kelly Kauff
- Community Service. Mary Denning - Per-
sonnel, Melissa Williams - song. Pam God-
frey - spirit Darlene Frock - Special Events,
Nicole Pappa � Intramural, Eydie and Patri-
cia Hill - Social, Courtney Edgerton - Histor-
ian. Jennifer McKagan - Alumnae. Good luck
girls!
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds of student representatives are already
earning free trip and lots of cash with
America's 1 Spring Break company! Sell
only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun. Baha-
mas, Mazatlan. Jamaica or Florida! Campus
Manager Positions Also Available. Call Now!
Take A Break Student Travel (800) 95-
BREAK!
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertising in our
classifieds gets results
Call Jeremy Lee @
328-2000
Announcements
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS IS looking for
interested individuals who have two hours
a week to spend with child, age 6 - 12. Pick
up application outside Brewster A409. In-
terest meeting will be Tuesday. Sept 24,4-6
pm, in Brewster B306. Questions, call Jen-
nifer 328-3115.
EXPLORE THE WILDERNESS! LEARN
more about adventure skills with the Out-
door Living Skills Workshops. On October
1 at 7:00 PM the Adventure Program is of-
fering an Introduction to River Rescue. Reg-
ister by September 27 in 204 Christenbury.
For more info call Rec Services at 328-6387.
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will meet
Sept 26 at 5:30 in GC 3009. The topic will
be 2nd quarter performance review and light
refreshments will be served. Everyone wel-
come!
THE PEOPLEACT ONE-ACT Play Festival
is scheduling open auditions for "A Dead
Man's Apartment" by Edward Allam Baker
and "For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls"
by Christopher Durang. No preparation or
experience is necessary! Auditions are sched-
uled for Sept 28 & 29. from 3-6PM at Jay-
cee park Auditorium, 2000 Cedar Lane. If
you are interested in being part of the One-
Act Play Festival, we are also looking for
volunteers in costumes, props, stage design,
etc. Please call Deborah Morrison at 321-
6028 to find out more about community the-
atre in your area.
JAPANESE ANIMATION FANS! THE KCT
S.A.G.A. club brings three hours of quality
Japanese Animation to the Greenville area
Forms for
Classifieds
and
Announcements
can be picked up in
Mendenhall and
dropped off in the
Student Publication
building.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Grepk organizations must be
spelled out - no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reerves the right
to reject any ad forlibel, obscenity
andor bad tasteV
�MB!





Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1161
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58646
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