The East Carolinian, September 19, 1996






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September 19,1996
Vol 72, No. 09
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Student fees pay SGA tuition
Student officials
get books, salary,
tuition
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
In accordance with a bill
passed late in the spring semester
by the Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA), a portion of ECU stu-
dent fees paid the tuition and a
book stipend for members of SGA's
Executive Council for the first time
this semester.
The bill passed the SGA
legisture on April 15, 1996 It was
signed by the previous SGA Presi-
dent, Ian Eastman, and previous
legislative speaker Harry Bray. It
approves funding for the payment
of tuition, fees and books for the
SGA Executive Council members as
well as the payment of up to $200
for books for the SGA attorney gen-
eral, public defender and legislative
speaker.
Current SGA President Angela
Nix, Vice President Eric Rivenbark,
Treasurer Jonathan Phillips and
Secretary Julie Thompson com-
prised the first Executive Council
to receive in-state tuition under the
bill.
"I believe we are the highest
leaders on campus and we deserve
it Nix said. "We
work really
hard
According to
Nix, Eastman
worked on the
bill for two years.
The bill, which
first appeared
before the Ap-
propriations
Committee, was
voted upon by
the SGA legisla-
ture during the
last session of
the spring 1996
semester.
According
to Millie Murphy,
SGA office assis-
tant, there were
no minutes kept
for the meeting when this bill
passed. She added it is not uncom-
mon for there to be no minutes kept
of the last meeting of the semes-
ter.
"It is important that people re-
alize this was passed by last year's
legislature Nix said.
This year's Executive Council
members held other positions in
SGA at the time the bill passed but
none of the four voted on this bill.
Thompson, who
was the chair of
the Appropria-
tions Committee
said her duties
turned into
those of a day
representative
when the bill
was discussed
and voted on.
Nix said she
spends 40 hours
a week fulfilling
her
responsibilities
as SGA presi-
dent. Phillips
said he works 30
hours a week on
the job.
Rivenbark and
Thompson each
said they work between 15 and 20
hours per week.
"Without this bill, you are put-
ting restrictions on the type of stu-
dent who can run for office
Phillips said. "You can't do this job
See SGA page 3
"I believe we are
the highest
leaders on
campus and we
deserve it
� Angela Nix, SGA
President
"I can see how
that would be
controversiaL
� Mark Nippert, student
senate president at
N.C. State University
SGA Legislative
Speaker
ECU dorm room rates reasonable
Susanne S. Oozier
News Writer
East Carolina University ranks
fairly high among University of
North Carolina institutions for
rooms with and without air-condi-
tioning.
Among other UNC Institutions
ECU ranks eighth for rooms with-
out air-conditioning and ranks sixth
for rooms with air-conditioning. For
dorms without air-conditioning, the
room rate is $1,660. The rate for
air-conditioned dorms is $?,000.
Compared to most other UNC
Institutions East Carolina's rates
have not increased within the past
year. Although these rates may
seem high for both air conditioned
and non air-conditioned rooms, the
average rate among the 12 UNC In-
stitutions with air conditioned
dorms is about $1,720.83. The av-
erage rate of the 14 UNC Institu-
tions with air conditioned dorms is
$1,963.50.
Ranking number one for room
rates is UNC-Chapel Hill. The rate
at UNC-CH for non-air-conditioned
dorms is $1,990. This percentage
increased three percent ($60) in the
past year. At UNC-CH, over 50 ?er-
University
UNC-Chapel Hill
N.C. State
ECU
cent of the dorms are
air conditioned.
"This time of
year students really
want air conditioning
but after the fall and
summer it is not nec-
essary said Wayne
Kuncl, UNC-CH direc-
tor of housing.
Mr. Koncl also
said, "The cost of liv-
ing is higher in
Chapel Hill than in
any other part of
North Carolina. Liv-
ing on campus is less
expensive than living
off campus
At UNC-CH each
semester, $9.25 of
non-AC rates goes to
Student Government
fees. $50 of the se-
mester rate goes to
local telephone fees,
which allow students
local telephone ac-
cess within the dorm
rooms. UNC-CH
ranks third for their non-air condi-
tioned dorms.
Ranking number 12 (last) in
room rates is Western Carolina Uni-
versity. For non-air-conditioned
Comparison or room rates at UNC institutions
Semi-private rooms only)
Pembroke State
Non-air-conditioned
room
$1,990
$1,850
$1,660
$1,410
Air-conditioned
room
$2,220
$2,420
$2,000
$1,546
When compared with other universities in the UNC system,
ECU ranked eighth highest for the cost of non-air-
conditioned dorms and sixth highest for dorm rooms with
air conditioning. This chart reflects how ECU compares
with schools with the most and least expensive rates in
each category.
Pitt needs increased
AIDS awareness
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
rooms, the rate is $1,350 a year,
which increased two percent ($3) in
the past year. WCU recently added
air conditioning to one of their
dorms. Per semester for their non-
AC dorms, room rates are $675. For
the air conditioned dorm per semes-
ter it is $710.
See DORM page 5
Career Day opens corporate doors
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
The first major Career Day of the year will be held Tuesday in the General
Classroom Building and will offer an opportunity for 'tudents to drop by and
talk to prospective employers.
While this particular event will focus on companies most likely to appeal to
those interested in business careers, Career Services encourages everyone to
attend for at least a few minutes.
TEC talked to the director of Career Services, Dr. James R. Westmoreland,
and two of the assistant directors, Debra Baker and Margie E. Swartout They
say that this Career Day is only the beginning for students who are interested in
exploring career options.
"The companies that we encourage to come are the people who will be on
campus recruiting throughout the year. We try to use this event as a kind of
kick off activity to get people to realize that there are going to be companies
coming to the campus Westmoreland said.
Westmoreland urged students to know in advance what kind of companies
will be in attendance that may interest them and what kind of questions they
might what to ask.
"Some questions that you might ask would be 'What will your hiring needs
be a year from now, or two years?' or 'What kind of qualifications do you seek?'
It takes people away from saying, 'What do you pay?' That's not a good impres-
sion for students to make Westmoreland said.
Whether students choose to make a point of talking to the representatives
or not, they will definitely be aware of their presence in the General Classroom
Building. Some students may even see these representatives in their classes.
"A lot of these people will be speaking in classes that morning. They're in
the hallways of the first and third floors throughout the morning. That's the
perfect time for people to talk to them about whatever they want to know about
the careers Westmoreland said.
See CAREER page 4
The N.C. Children's AIDS Network (NC CAN) has reported that
the need for pediatric AIDS care in the rural and urban areas in
and around Greenville and Pitt county have become the "hot spot"
for increases in HIVAIDS cases.
In N.C. from 1981 to 1995 there had been 6420 reported cases
of AIDS. Of these cases, 650 are children from infants to age 6.
These numbers represent a small number of the state's population
but they show a desperate need for care.
"We want to bring the issue to the forefront said Mike Hartley,
the state government involvement manager. "The pediatric age group
is not being taken care of
According to Hartley the leading cause of death among women
ages 15 to 40 in Pitt county was AIDS. Thisepidemic is being
spread to the children of NC.
In order for NC. to battle this problem the Greenville Jaycees
along with the NC Jaycees Mission Inn program are working to
bring an HIVAIDS facility to the Greenville area in order to pro-
vide the needed care.
"The facilities' primary mission would be to provide pediatric
care to children, as well as a resource center for education along
with discussions, counseling and transportation for children in need
of HIVAIDS care said Terence Taylor, Greenville JC's president
The facility would serve the entire state as an epicenter of HIV
AIDS care.
"We picked Greenville because of the access to rural low in-
come counties where we are seeing an increase in cases and be-
cause of a need for better education Hartley said.
The state presently uses seven to eight social workers who travel
the state to provide care, counseling, and transportation for chil-
dren and families who live with HIVAIDS.
These services are provided through major grants by the Duke
Endowment, the Hasbro Foundation. Grant money is always in
danger of being cut off or running out. The Jaycees want to see the
care continue.
"We are very fortunate that the children that need this care
are either still with their original parents or have been taken into
foster homes Laura Leatherwood, the NC Jaycee Mission Inn pro-
gram manager said. "We were glad to find out the need for residen-
tial care was not as large of an issue as transportation, respite care
and counseling
According to NC CAN, there are no HIVAIDS children in NC
in residential care. Most are still living with at least a biological
parent or are in foster care.
In 1995 the Mission Inn program was initiated with a HIV
AIDS resident care facility located in St. Louis Missouri. This is
presently the only active care facility in the US.
"NC is the second largest fund-raiser for the program and is
very proactive about HIVAIDS research and care Hartley said.
See HIV page 5
tmu
VtUieU
Family Fare Series provides family funpage j
Oh, what a tangled web we weavepage O
S PO RT Sfce46tg
Pirates prepare for battle with the Gamecockspage 1 C.
'ponecttet
Thursday
Mostly Sunny
High 79
Low 54
Weekend
Sunny
High 80
Low 52
i�ut fo eoc& u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
��





Thursday, September 19,1996
The East Carolinian
CRIMF S'ENE
September 13
Communicating Threat � Residents of a room in Fletcher Hall
reported receiving harassing and threatening telephone calls from an
ex-boyfriend of one of the residents.
Possession of stolen property - A student was issued a state cita-
tion for possession of stolen property.
September 16
AssistRescue - A resident of Aycock Hall was transported to the
hospital by Greenville Rescue after complaining of abdominal pain.
AssistRescue � A student was transported to the hospital by Green-
ville Rescue after she fell at the Croatan.
Larceny � A staff member reported the breaking and entering of a
state owned vehicle parked near the Flanagan building Several tools
were taken from the vehicle.
September 17
AssistRescue � An ECU police officer responded to 10th and
College Hill Drive to assist a Greenville police officer with a student
who had fallen. The student refused to be transported to the hospital
by Greenville Rescue, but was transported by a family member.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
University employees not
in danger of losing jobs
Privitization holds
no threat for ECU
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Department of Energy
seeks graduate students
When UNC system schools were
ordered to study the idea of
privatizing university service jobs
such as housekeeping, many workers
began to worry. If this transaction
did take place, it could put a numer-
ous amount of people out of work.
Not many workers were going to sit
there and let something like that hap-
pen without a fight
Housekeepers and students at
UNC-Chapel Hill gathered together in
a rally against hiring private compa-
nies. They stood on the steps of South
Building, holding firmly to their
rights. Hardy White, assistant direc-
tor of housekeeping understood the
concerns of the people.
"The housekeepers had a rally to
talk about privatization White said.
"There they had a chance to voice
their opinion about the issue
Although many employees are
bothered by the concept of losing their
university employment, White is con-
fident that they have nothing to worry
about
"The university is not consider-
ing privatizing these jobs White said.
"They are just being asked, by a higher
authority, to study this idea
As to the situation concerning
the housekeepers at ECU, Facility Ser-
vices Director D. Crae Clements re-
assures concerned staff members that
the stability of their position is not in
jeopardy.
"Richard Brown has sent memos
to all the workers Clements said.
"ECU has no intentions to do more
than they have already done
Regarding what ECU has already
done, Clements noted that this is
ECU's seventh year contracting, but
that it was nothing that would affect
anyone.
"We do contract workers for jobs
like bug service and elevator repair
Clements said. "To my knowledge,
contracting workers is only done
when needed
Clements said other UNC schools
were studying this prospect and that
it might be a source of good invest-
ment Still, he said he is convinced
that ECU had nothing to worry about
"Privatizing could be a possible
way to save money Clements said.
"Still, no other schools can hold a
candle to what ECU has done
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SeeGRADpagc3
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 19,1996
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
516-A-Hwy 264-A Greenville, NC
GRAD from page 2
mance. recommendations, a state-
ment of career goals, undergradu-
ate G.P.A employment and extra-
curricular activities.
"This is a wonderful opportu-
nity to prepare for an education in
this field. The fellowship serves as
a means of getting a graduate edu-
cation while preparing for a career
in science, engineering and math
Constantin said.
The DOE established ORISE to
undertake national and interna-
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MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LA
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� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service m
752-7529
He L if n.V OlV: 6 dll!
THE ECU STUDENT UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
DAY-STUDENT RESENTATIVE VACANCY FOR THE 1996-1997 TERM
QUALIFICATIONS:
FULL-TIME STUDENT
RESIDES OFF CAMPUS
INDEPENDENT
RESPONSIBILITIES:
SELECTING THE STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
APPROVING COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS
APPROVING THE STUDENT UNION BUDGET
SETTING POLICY FOR THE STUDENT UNION
DEADLINE TO APFLY IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 1996
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE - ROOM 236 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
FOR MORE INFO CALL THE STUDENT UNION AT 328-4715
9�3? o.
tional programs in education,
health, and the environment. Pro-
grams are also offered in database
development and training manage-
ment systems.
ORISE and its programs are
operated by Oak Ridge Associated
Universities ORAU. ECU is a mem-
ber of ORAU.
"This represents an opportu-
nity, not just for students, but fac-
ulty as we'll. ORAU serves as a way
of obtaining more fellowships
Dean of Graduate Studies Dr. Tho-
mas Feldbush said.
There are a high percentage of
graduate students who receive
some form of additional funding.
For an application or additional in-
formation, contact Milton
Constantin at (423) 576-7009, write
to ORISE Fellowship Programs,
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and
Education, Education and Training
Division, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge
Tenn. 37831-0117, or E-mail
GRADFELL@ORAU.GOV.
"My guess is that there are far
more stipends available for gradu-
ate students. Our stipends are low,
but they're better than none Dr.
Feldbush said.
SGA from page 1
and hold another job too. Without
some kind of compensation we ex-
clude too much of the population
Phillips said that in addition to
their official duties, the Executive
Council lobbies for the school on a
state and community level.
"If I'm not in class, I a.n here
(office) or in a meeting Nix said.
All the SGA positions affected
by the bill are also salaried posi-
tions ranging from $400 per month
for the president's salary to $150
per month for the public defender's
salary.
According to Dean of Students
and SGA adviser Dr. Ron Speier,
SGA appropriates $160,000 per
year of student fees to various cam-
pus organizations. Phillips said that
approximately $7,800 per year of
ECU student fees appropriated by
SGA will fund the bill.
Phillips also said ECU collects
approximately $17 million in stu-
dent fees each year.
"It ($7,800) is minuscule when
compared to the total collected
Phillips said.
Nix said there are benefits of
the bill aside from compensating
the Executive Committee.
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"It helps to hold people ac-
countable for their jobs Nix said.
At the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, the SGA
president and treasurer were paid
a stipend for the first time this year.
Aaron Nelson, SGA president at
UNC-CH said their constitution re-
quired the treasurer to be paid a
stipend and up until this year, the
sum paid was one dollar per year.
"I received, for the first time,
$200 per month this year Nelson
said. "Chapel Hill is the anomaly;
many other schools pay a salary to
everyone
Lacy Hawthorne, SGA secre-
tary at UNC-CH, said that paying
for tuition and stipends would not
be beneficial to students at her
school.
"Stipends are students' way of
saying 'You are working for me and
I want to pay you for it not 'You
are going to school for me
Hawthorne said.
At North Carolina State Univer-
sity, SGA executive officials are
compensated in the form of a sal-
ary. According to Mark Nippert, the
student senate president, N.C.
State's president is paid $2,400 per
year from student fees. There are
four other salaried positions which
decline in amount from the presi-
dents yearly salary of $2,400.
"To my knowledge, we have
never considered paying for tu-
ition Nippert said. "I can see how
that would be controversial. The
real measuring stick ought to be
the total amount of compensation
given, whether it's in the form of
salary or tuition
Phillips said other universities'
student government association
policies are difficult to compare to
ECU'S.
"The government approved the
bill and it was almost a unanimous
vote Phillips said.
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THERE WILL BE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221 AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 19, 1996
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DORM from page 1
"WCU does not seem to be con-
cerned with their rates, since air
conditioning is not an important
factor in the mountains said Pat
Wike, WCU room assignments.
The actual room rates among
UNC institutions does not vary
much. These institutions consider
their rates reasonable and beneficial
in cost and savings for the students.
"We hope that people choose to
attend ECU because of the educa-
tional opportunities, not because of
air conditioning or non-air-condi-
tioning in the dorms said Manny
Morow, director of housing for ECU.
Out of the 15 dorms on ECU'S
campus, nine are non-air-condi-
tioned and six are air-conditioned.
"Our goal now is to look at in-
creasing the number of air-condi-
tioned dorms at East Carolina said
Mr. Morrow.
According to a survey of off
campus ECU students who once
lived on-campus, air conditioning or
non-air conditioning was not a fac-
tor in their decision to iive off cam-
pus. Most of their reasons for liv-
ing off campus were to increase pri-
vacy, try something new andor dif-
ferent and to have more living space.
Morow said, "Students love to
live on campus. They say that it is
a great place to live "
According to surveys, students,
and supervisors, students enjoy on
campus living in UNC institutions
because of their increased contact
with other students. Also, students
enjoy the convenient location of
their dorms.
HIV
from page 1
m OlINA 10
T CHINESE QE&TAQMJNT
2516 E. 10th 6t
830-2238 � fax 8304735
Open 7 Days A Week
6unThura. 11:30-9:30
Fri. & SaL 11:30-10:30
Reservations Welcomed!
LUNCH SPECIALS
All lunch specials include fried rice, egg roll, coconut roll or vegetable roll
and your choice of hot & sour, egg drop or wanton soup.
1 Szechuan (Spicy Shrimp$4.95
2 Walnut 6hrimp $4 95
3 (Shrimp & Mixed Greens$4.95
4 Beef with broccoli$4.75
5 Beef & Spring Onion$4.75
6 Hunan Beef$4.75
7 Chicken with Cashewnut$4.50
8 Tai Chien Chicken$4.50
9 Sweet & Sour Chicken$4.50
10 Twice cooked Pork$4.50
11 Pork Egg Too Young$4.50
12 Chicken Lomein$4.50
13 Shrimps Lomein$4.50
14 Sauteed Seasonal Green$4.50
15 Sesame Chicken$4.50
Special Dietary Needs Available Upon Bequest
(No (Salt. No (Sugar. No 6pice. No (Starch. Etc.)
The NC proposal is one of two
presently in the works for the US.
There is another proposal for Grand
Rapids, Michigan.
"We are presently working with
existing N.C. agencies who are al-
ready providing care and treatment
for HIVAIDS patients Leather-
wood said.
The Jaycees' proposal includes
showing financial support, business
support, location and need, cleri-
cal availability and educational
availability.
The Jaycees have already con-
solidated their efforts to include
PittECU medical school, Duke,
Bowman Gray, and Carolinas Medi-
cal centers in Charlotte and Chapel
Hill.
"This is very important to help
the kids who are born with this vi-
rus, and we need the community
to see this need as well Leather-
wood said.
There is also a need to show
community support both financially
and socially.
"Most of the staff will be vol-
unteers, however, we not only need
volunteers, we also need donations
anywhere from money to furniture
to equipment Taylor said. "This
type of volunteering and commu-
nity support is what we need to be
able to show in our proposal
Those interested in volunteer-
ing support to the Jaycees and the
facility project can contact the
Greenville Jaycees at Mission Inn
Project, PO Box 258, Greenville
N.C. 27835.
SGA
fen
w 411Uw
for
Class Officer
Resident Hall Reps
Day Reps
12 Inch
Qaper
Sandwich
Freshly Baked
0QK
Trices and Offer aood Wednesday, September 10 Through. Tuesday;
September 24, 1996 �i �11 dreenville Locations. We Reserve The
Right To Limit Quantities. Vone Sold To Dealer.
All
Candidates Must
File By 5:00
September 12, Room 255
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Mandatory Candidate
Meeting Will Be Held
September 12 at 5:30 in
Room 221 Mendenhall
Student Center.
i
���
-��





-WrfiiTilSWi��"
Thursday, September 19,1996 The East Carolinian
Occitteca
SGA is in
charge of
spending
student fees,
yet their
Executive
Council
doesn't have
to pay student
fees or tuition.
Isn't it ironic?
"Something's rotten in the state of Denmark
When Shakespeare first wrote those words, it is doubt-
ful that he realized how often they would be used to
describe wrongdoing in politics down through the cen-
turies.
Well, once again that phrase has relevance for the
Student Government Association here at ECU.
For those who may not know, the SGA has always
had a checkered past. Last spring, controversy swelled
over an alleged case of election-tampering. Despite pro-
tests against the election, the results were upheld.
Ian Eastman, the former president of the SGA, appar-
ently had one last trick up his sleeve before he left last
May. For the last SGA session, in a clandestine meeting
for which there were no recorded minutes, Eastman pre-
sented a bill that allowed the president, vice-president,
treasurer and secretary to have their tuition paid for, as
well as all of their textbooks. In addition, it allowed the
SGA attorney general, the public defender and the legis-
lative speaker to have their textbook fees covered. All of
this was to be paid with student fees appropriated by the
SGA. That's nearly $8,000 dollars per year, folks.
Needless to say, the bill passed.
Even if TEC had found out about this bill being
passed at the time that it happened (which we didn't),
we would not have been able to report on it until the
summer because the spring semester's paper schedule
was completed. And now that we are reporting on it, we
have been inundated with call after call from parties con-
nected to SGA who would rather we didn't cover this
story.
To put this in perspective, we could find no other
school in the UNC system that offers this kind of com-
pensation for their student governments. In fact, the
schools that we contacted found this to be an unaccept-
able course of action.
In their defense, the SGA Executive Council has
claimed that this bill is part of an equal opportunity
employment agenda. Their logic is that if tuition and text-
book costs are covered by student fees, then anyone can
afford to become a member of the Executive Council.
Our question is then, instead of paying for their tu-
ition and books, why doesn't the university simply pay
them a wage like any other job on campus?
Oh, that's right, they do. On top of now getting their
tuition and books paid for, the members of the Execu-
tive Council also receive a paycheck from ECU that ranges
anywhere from $150 to $400 per month.
What a deal!
Again, in their defense, the SGA Executive Council
claims that, although they were members of the SGA
when this bill was passed, none of them actually voted
on it and therefore Eastman is to blame.
Our response to that is to suggest that if the SGA
feels so strongly about it that they want to blame some-
one else, then perhaps they should reject the bill and
put a stop to these questionable expenditures of student
funds.
�egg
'vF
The East Carolinian
BrMdor. Wit" Editor-in-Chief
Cllaiti Willow, Production Manager
Marguerite B�njmln, Hm� IdifcF Randy Mcr Asst Prod' Mana9er
Amy L. Royster, Assistant Hm UMf Crtstlc Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor S' Production Assistant �
Dale WIUIbbmm Assistant Ufgfyig IfJitW DavM Blgelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Dili Dillard Assistant Sports Editor Caro,c Meh,e Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Pm1 d- Wri�M Media Adviser
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator jMet RPCS Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, Thf Eist Carolinian PUWW� 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian wtko1lftter$ to � edltor'limlted t0 250 words- " � edit'd
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East CtftHrrfeR, rHjHrfttrOns Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
3284366.
Election '96
Editor's note: Tho$� rW@ columns are the second in a i
series of political it$u�$ columns that will run through
November. TECs goal is to give the student body
informatiolevant to th� upcoming elections. Today's topic
is the environment.
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
This week, the environment is our issue. Me tell-
ing you who to vote for based on environmental
records will probably be the biggest waste of paper in
history, but I will still tell you about the record and
make your own informed choice. See, we bleeding-
heart socialist liberal dogs aren't that bad after al
Ladies and gentlemen, the Clinton-Gore adminis-
tration is by far the best environmental administra-
tion since the days of Teddy Roosevelt. You may af-
fectionately call him a tree-hugger, but there has never
been a man in the White House more committed to
the environment than Al Gore and Bill Clinton's en-
vironmental record speaks for itself.
The Clinton-Gore administration has made the air
we breathe truly clean by issuing tough standards in
cutting toxic pollution from chemical plants by 90
percent. President Clinton has toughened EPA en-
forcement, expanded the public's right-to-know about
toxic releases and has required polluters to disclose
information to the public. He has adamantly stood by
the ban on offshore drilling, and has even committed
$1.5 billion over 7 years to the Florida Everglades,
one of the most beautiful environmental shrines on
Earth.
The administration has also cancelled 75 hazard-
ous pesticides (quickly replacing them with safer al-
ternatives). He changed the EPA rules and procedures
toeduce paperwork requirements for businesses by
10 million hours. He even launched the Brownfields
initiative, which gives businesses tax incentives to re-
turn old industrial waste sites to productive use.
Well, this column wouldn't be perfect without
some Republican bashing, right? With all due respect,
Mr. Clinton's opponent does for the environment what
a Twinkie does for a diet. Folks, Bob Dole's environ-
mental record is about as good as SPAM. Trust me, it
ain't good!
The man voted against increased funding for wa-
ter treatment. He voted against a 1987 measure that
would have given $18 billion through 1994 for pollu-
tion prevention, cleanups, etc. Just last year, he wrote
an extreme regulatory bill which would have poisoned
our air, tainted our meat and much more. All at the
whim of big business, which controls Bob Dole.
In one bill, Dole tried to roll back decades of
guaranteed protection for American consumers. The
St. Louis Dispatch even stated Dole's bill "would have
meant serious erosion of protection (72795)
If that doesn't take the cake, had the original
DoleGingrich budget been passed, safe drinking
water funding would have been cut by 45 percent and
toxic dumpenvironmental enforcement provisions by
25 percent. He even voted against the historic Clean
Air Act way back in 1963. Meanwhile, President
Clinton has cleaned up more waste dumps in three
years than Reagan and Bush in 12.
Fellow students, the only thing that has stood
between this anti-environmental extremism and you
is Bill Clinton and Al Gore. Bill Clinton stood behind
the Superfund Law, which makes polluters, not tax-
payers, pay to clean up toxic dumps (which the GOP
wanted to cut by 25 percent).
I thought that Republicans were bad enough
when they tried to slash student loans in 1981 by
$10 billion or when they recently tried to eliminate
the Direct Student Loan program. 1 thought it was
extremist enough for Bob Dole to be one of only 63
U.S. Representatives to vote against the creation of
the student loan program back in 1965. No.
It is the environment that truly shows the differ-
ence between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole. Go on with
your bad self, Bill!
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
How the Democratic
party has one shred
of credibility left the in
environmental debate
escapes me.
OK, you are probably thinking that there is no way
that the Republican party can defend its environmental
policy. Everyone knows that it is the Democratic party
tV at is the green party in the United States. What can a
group of hateful, stubborn, park-closing conservatives do
for the environment? Well, if you share these sentiments,
hold on because you are in for a major reality check.
As usual, the party that has nothing to offer but fear
itself would like us to over look the basic premise of
conservatism, TRUTH! In reality, the Republican party
has a very commendable environmental protection record.
Did you realize that of the 14 prominent environmental
protection acts passed in the 20th century eight of thetn
were passed under Republican administrations? 4
Dwight Eisenhower's administration saw the Atom:
Energy Act of 1954 enacted. It was Ronald Reagartjs
administration under which the Nuclear Waste Policy A?t
of 1982 was implemented. George Bush was in offiife
when the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 became law.
However, the Republican to be most commended
Richard Nixon. Under the administration of Richard
Nixon, America saw the organization of the Environmen-
tal Protection Agency (EPA). It was also during this ad-
ministration that the Endangered Species Act became
law. As if these Republican achievements were not
enough, the Nixon years also brought us the Safe Drink-
ing Water Act, the Noise Control Act, a Marine Protec-
tion Act and the National Environmental Policy Act I
dare say that if Richard Nixon had been a Democrat, he
would have been called "The Father of Modern Envi-
ronmental Policy
How the Democratic party has one shred of credibil-
ity left in the environmental debate escapes me. With
regards to American Policy, one instance stands out to
me. To my knowledge, the only calculated, intentional,
destruction of an environment on a large scale was un-
der a Democratic President and a Democratic-controlled
congress. President John F. Kennedy appointed Robert
McNamara as his secretary of defense in 1961. The turn-
coat, one-time Republican McNamara along with Kennedy,
Johnson and the Democratic-controlled Congress gov-
erned over a dirty little war called Vietnam. Along wif,h
being the country's most unpopular war, it was also an
environmental holocaust
From 1962 tol970, 11.2 million of gallons of Agent
Orange was sprayed over approximately 20 percent of
the forests in South Vietnam. Agent Orange contained
the chemical TCDD- Dixion, which was later proven to
be 100,000 times more potent than Thaiidomide. What
Agent Orange did was destroy enough food for 600,000
people and enough timber to supply Vietnam for 30 years.
Throughout Vietnam, Democratic policy destroyed the
environment and watered the once-fertile fields with the
blood of 57,600 Americans and more than 943,000 Viet-
namese.
Once again it was the Republican party that was the
voice of reason. In 1971, the Nixon administration halted
the use of Agent Orange. Then in 1973, the same admin-
istration ended our military involvement in the war in
Vietnam. Throughout the '80s, we reaped the harvest of
seeds sown by Kennedy and Johnson. Then this party
dares to imply that Republicans do not care about the
environment. It is pathetic, simply pathetic, and I hope
the readers of this article will begin to see the truth be-
hind the environmental debates of today.
So when you cast your ballot in November, decide
on your priorities. Do you want to support the party that
has been a steward of the environment in the 20th cen-
tury?
For sound environmental policies, there is only one
party: the Republican party.
'� ���
��





HHHia�i
7 Thursday, September 19, 1996 The East Carolinian
Spare Time
Life on Tuesday
By Chris Knotts
BIOL 3221
By Rebekah Philips
TUB- CKeAtfcsM MTi
ExzcoVBrReb ISA
Innertube Waltzing
By Nick Holt
Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
VIeD�X' &OT A Quiz
TM� &aK T-ieiOAV, AuD
c,K�. "W� So� 'i
OlfffcKEvJT ftt
TWOUottT I'D
JvAT READ
AUM&.
Primitiv Man
By Karl Trolenberg
Lake Imp USA
Ufa ww, got a- siwieK.
job its Ar nr oei&tai-
eu& sitop iaI rood
Rouso on Duty
By Trevor VanMeter
Deuce
By Starchild
ABSTRACT
art!
MXtNT. )





8
Thursday, September 19, 1996 The East Carolinian
Personals 11 Announcements Announcements
WHETHER IT WAS PUSHING Tammy and
Heather off the stump or helping Mario look
for the lost ring. Macarena musical chairs or
joe's storytelling. Riding the pony or hitting
the blob, it's true humility does bond. Thank
you Eric Withers for making it all happen!
ECU Ambassadors.
WSb.
For Rent
it
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for -
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Help
Wonted
W
Services
Offered
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE four
bedroom house at Fourth and Biltmore. Call
Kevin, Gus, or Doug at 919752-0744.
ONE PERSON TO SHARE two bedroom
apartment Wyndham Court $202.50 depos-
it $202.50 per month, 12 utilities. Avail-
able now. 551-3040.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! "THE
Penthouse" Above BW3. is available for rent
October 1st This is the most desirable apart-
ment in Greenville! Full length windows, sun-
ken living area, over 1400 Square feet 3 bed-
rooms, 2 12 bath. Other units available too!
Including the "Beauty Salon Call Yvonne
at 758-2616.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share 2
bedroom apartment: pay 12 rent (which is
$190month), 12 utilities. Apartment lo-
cated at First Street. 754-2487.
1 ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP Tar River
near campus. Rent $177.50 for your own
.room. Please call 758-7542.
TSaNTEDTmALE GRADUATE STUDENT
. seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
monthphone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR NON-smoking
students - Methodist Student Center. Call
758-2030 for more info.
HOUSE TO SHAREONE ROOM in house
on N. Summit available now. 6 blocks from
class. $225month. Call 758-2294. Partially
fumished,AC,gas heat
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 BR apartment overlooking park. Very nice
and on ECU bus route. Only $180.00 a
month plus 12 utilities. Call Laura 758-
8927.
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO SHARE four
bedroom apartment in Tar River. $170.00
month plus 14 utilities. No deposit required.
Ask for Jonathan or Jamie 754-8024.
SOME NEW, SMALL PETS, highly efficient
one and two bedroom $310.00 and up. 756-
6616.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
For Sale
1 YEAR OLD BALL Python. Beautiful
markings. Comes with 40 gallon tank and
set up $150.00. Call 758-9120.
ALVAREZ ACOUSTIC WITH CASE.
$200.00 OBO 757-0980.
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET be
hind Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche. Paved
lot lighted, numbered spaces, towing en-
forced $288.00 year or $175.00 semester.
Call Mr. Jackson 756-6567.
aTRCONDITIONER 11,000 BTU. Works
great! $130.00 or best offer. Ask for Kent
752-9159.
FOR SALE: HUFFY MOUNTAIN bike
$60.00, New-Trek sport 800 Mountain bike
$225.00. Call Marcia at 328795 during the
day, 752-3074 after 5:00.
FOR SALE SOFABED. GREAT shape. $75
OBO. 757-0980.
'78 SUZUKI GS-1000: Rebuilt carbs.new
K&N filters, tank mural. Runs Great! $875
OBO. Also for sale: Pioneer TS-X200 car ster-
eo speakers,$70 OBO. 757-0346 "Mike
1963 FENDER JAZZMASTER REISSUE
Candy Apple Red. $400.00 OBO, 757-0980
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient willing
to learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are currently taking applications
for part-time telephone collectors willing to
work any hours from 8am until 9pm Mon-
day thru Friday and Saturday morning from
Sam until 12 pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry lev
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc Waitstaff, house-
keepers. SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must Flexi
ble schedules. Apply in person. Denny's, 808
S. Memorial Drive.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crewmore. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext.
L53622
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53627
IAM LOOKING FOR a few goodpeople to
work with me on a part-time or full time
basis to earn some serious money. Call Da-
vid 7529610.
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 355-0210
CAREGTVER NEEDED THAT IS depend-
able and loves children. Hours are Tuesdays
8:30 - 4:30; Wednesday 8:30 - 12:30: Thurs-
day 8:30 - 12:30. References are required.
Please call 355-5067.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, call: (206) 971-
3570 ext J53626
"AMERICAN PIZZA COMPANY NOW hir
ing drivers. Must have car. Immediate work;
great pay. Call 931-011.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE to students who are interest-
ed in becoming PERSONAL CARE ATTEND-
ANTS to students in wheelchairs, READERS,
AND TUTORS. Past experience is desired but
not required. For an application, contact: Of-
fice for Disability Support Services. Brew-
ster A-116 or A-114. Telephone 919 -328-
6799.
COLLEGE ACHIEVERS FRUSTRATED
WITH hourly wages? Company expanding
in Greenville area! Ambitious individuals
wanted for a people oriented career. Busi-
ness and liberal arts majors encouraged to
apply. High commission and bonuses. 321-
7143 PTFT.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Board other bene-
fits. For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K33623
NEED A EARLY MORNING part time job?
RPS Inc. is looking for package handlers to
load vans and unload trailers for the am shift
Hours 3:00 - 8:00 AM. M-F. $6.00hr;tuition
assistance available after 30 days. Applica-
tions can be filled out at 104 United Drive.
In the Greenville Industrial Park; near the
aquatics center.
V�fT
NEW PEOPLE
THE FUN WAY
TODAY
1 -900-990-9333
EXT. 4241
$2.99 PER MIN.
MUST BE 18 YRS.
SERV-U
(619) 645-8434
SCUBA
SPECIAL
MASK, FINS,& SNORKEL
Retail $179.90
ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
Announcements
PITT COUNTY REPUBLICAN HEAD-
QUARTERS would like to announce its
grand opening and Fall rally on Saturday,
Sept 21 from 2-5 pm The Headquarters is
located at 14th Street and Greenville Blvd.
Come out and meet republican officials and
candidates from all over North Carolina. Call
321-1996.
WANT TO BE APART of the royal throne?
Join the fun activities with King and Queen
of the Halls. It has been re-scheduled for
Sept 19,4 pm on College Hill. Come on out
and win the notorious King and Queen
Crowns, or the Crowned Jewels Sceptors. For
more info call Rec Services 328-6387.
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST STUDENTS
who would like to study the Bible with oth-
er SDA students, please contact Cindy at 757-
0930 or Christine at 830-2062.
JUST SHOW UP AND play during the Fris-
bee Golf Singles Tournament Sept 18 & 19,
3 - 6 pm on the Frisbee Golf Course. Fdr
more info call Rec Services 328-6387.
QUICK -N- Easy Vegetarian cooking Open
House. Come by and taste some real easy-to-
fix vegetarian dishes. Free cookbook. Sept
19, 23, & 26. CCB 3010. From 7:00PM-
8:30PM.
READY FOR SOME ADVENTURE? Back-
pack the Shenandoah Mt with Recreational
Services Adventure Program, Sept 27-29. In-
terested individuals must register by Sept.
20 in 204 Christenbury. For more info call
Rec Services 328-6387.
JAPANESE ANIMATION FANS! THE ECU
S.A.G.A. club brings three hours of quality
Japanese Animation to the Greenville area
each Tuesday night! 7:30 - 10:30 PM, Men-
denhall room 14 (downstairs, behind snack
machines). Come check us out
APPLICATION DEADLINES FOR RE-
CREATION and Leisure Studies: Please note
that application deadlines for Fall admission
for students interested in majoring in Re-
creation and Leisure Studies has been set
for October 1. 1996. Intended majors and
interested students should go by the Depart-
mental office and pick up an application for
admission and the criteria review sheet This
effects students interested in either the Ther-
apeutic Recreation degree option or the Lei-
sure Service Management degree option. For
information contact the Department of Re-
creation & Leisure Studies. Minges, Room
174 or call 328-4640.Late applications will
not be accepted.
ATTENTION ALL COMEDIANS, MUSI-
CIANS, bands and singers! East Carolina
University Student Union Special Events
committee presents Mastercard Acts - a tal-
ent show where you may get the chance to
compete for $15,000 You can pick up a reg-
istration form at MSC Information Desk or
contact Keisha Brown at 328-4715.
EXPLORE NEW HEIGHTS! LEARN all the
basic skills of climbing and belaying at the
Recreational Services Climbing Tower on
Sept 23, 26. 30 from 4:00 - 6:00 PM at the
Climbing Tower. Register one business day
before each session in Christenbury 204. For
more info call Rec Services 328-6387.
EXPLORE THE SHORES WITH the Ad-
TV rv�
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
C919) 49�-�4
NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENT HOUSING
FOR ALL AMERICANS
NASBONA (Native American Sister & Brotherhood
of North America) has opened residence lodge 6
near ECU
Private entrances, sweat lodge, spa. Sun tan. Large fenced
back yard for pow wows, drum circle, sports. Security systems.
Lodging $199, $226, $244
752-8533
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53628
NEED.TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
Other
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FR110-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Student Swap Shot
"
venture Program. Travel to Wilmington OcL
5 for a day of kayaking. Anyone who can
swim is welcome. So register in 204 Chris-
tenbury by Sept 20. For more info call Rec
Services 32�6387.
E.C.A.N.S THE EAST CAROLINA Asso-
ciation of Nursing Students will be having a
meeting on Thursday, October 19. All stud-
ents, nursing, pre-nursing or those interest-
ed are invited to attend. The meeting will
be held in the Nursing Bldg. (room TBA)
from 10:15 to 11:15 AM. If you have any
questions, contact Krystal at 830-2765. We
hope to see you there.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE-
PITT COUNTY, will be conducting a Soc-
cer Coaches Training School on Sat Sep-
tember 21st from 9am-4pm for all individu-
als interested in volunteering to coach soc-
cer. We are also looking for volunteer coach-
es in the following sports: basketball skills,
team basketball, swimming, rollerskating,
and bowling. No experience necessary. For
more information please contact Dwain Co-
oper at 830-4551 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
ON MONDAYS AT 7:30 PM and Thursdays
at 2:00 PM. the Newman Catholic Student
Center will hold an inquiry program entitle
"Beauty and Belief an ln-Depth look at C
tholicism This program is an inquiry pre
gram for any student wishing to learn more
about Catholicism. It is also for Catholics
who may want to make their CONFIRMA-
TION or First Communion. For further d&
tails, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at the Cerv
ter, 953 E. 10th Street, 757-1991. ;
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANIZA-
TION will meet on Thursday, SepL 19 at 4:4(J
PM in GCB 1028. All honors students, teach-
ing fellows and students with a 3.4 or abovj
GPA are invited to attend. For more infot-
mation, call Yaqoob at 758-3635. :
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS IS looking for
interested individuals who have two hours a
week to spend with child, age 6 -12. Pick up
application outside Brewster A409. Interest
meeting will be Tuesday, Sept 24, iS pm,
in Brewster B306. Questions, call Jennifer
328-3115. �
SIGMA LAMBDA FRATERNITY RUSH
welcome to all students interested in learn-
ing Sign Language and Deaf Culture. Sept
17th & 19th, 7-9PM. For more info call Ryan
328-3819 (voice) I
AMA SOCIAL: THE AMERICAN Markt-
ing Association is having a social at the ElbjD,
Thursday night Sept 19 from 9-11. Tickets
are available during our meeting on Sept
17. Come join us for FREE drinks while they
last All majors welcome
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE
at the Methodist Student Center. . Casual
dress. Refreshments following the service.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grant and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$
for info: 1-800-400-0209.
tk
Greek
Personals
LOOKING FOR A NEW POSITION
Classifieds Can Help You Pinpoint
Exactly The Right Spot.
it
Help
11 Wanted
Jr"
$ST Services
Offered
J
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old Call today 747-7686.
Snow Hill, NC. ,
THE PARTY CONTINUES! MMP Mobile
Music Productions is back on the road again
to provide ECU with the ultimate DJ. Par-
ty Experience. State of the art sound and
light show, playing the music YOU want to
hear when YOU want to hear it. Celebrat-
ing our 7th year as ECU'S 1 D.J. service.
Ask about our 1.000 watt party van for tail-
gates. Call Lee at 758-4644 for booking.
PHI KAPPA PSI, THANKS so much for Sat-
urday night. Together we went around the
world and the natives did get a little restless
(woah! Those crazy pledges We wouldn't
have had our pref night any other way! You
guys rule! We love you. as always, the sis-
ters and pledges of Pi Delta.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA WILL be hold-
ing Fall Rush. Sept 23-26 in Raw! 105 from
6-7 pm. Epsilon Sigma Alpha is a service
sorority involved in the community and af-
filiated with St. Jude's Childrens Hospital.
Please attend as many nights as possible.
Hope to see you there.
Sigma Lambda Fraternitv Rush Welcome to
all students interested in learning Sign Lan-
guage and Deaf Culture. September 17th &
19th. 7-9 pm. For more info call Ryan 328-
3819 (voice).
Gamma Sigma Sigma: Congratulations to
our '9697 Exec! President - Melissa Hinkle:
Service Vice President - Andra Dornink;
Membership Vice President - Melanie Knox;
Corresponding Secretary - Rhonda
Crumpton. Recording Secretary - Sharon
Langdon; Treasurer - Meredith Manoly; His-
torian - Jennifer Willis; Parliamentarian -
Joy Newcomb; National Representative - Jen
Jones; Chapter Betterment - Alice Murray;
Alumni Liason - Amanda Carver; Social
Chair - Sharon Beaman
The East Carolinian
The East
Carolinian
FallSpring
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5�
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations must be
spelled out - no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reerves the right
to reject any ad forlibel, obsecnity
andor bad taste
DID YOU SAYFREE?
YES! When you sign a one year lease on our newly renovated
apartments on West 8th Street, your first month's rent is FREE! There
are also special rates on third floor apartments for a limned time only
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments CAMPUS P0INTE
2 full baths Professionally
Water and sewer included Managed by
Close to campus and downtown m
Laundry facilities on site ijpp reMst
6 month or 1 year leases lw inc.
: 355-1313

Having trouble
finding where to
drop off
Classifieds and
Announcements?
travel
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money1 Sell
8 Trips & (lo Free! Bahamas Cruise $279.
Cancun & Jamaica $399. Panama City Day-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.cDm I-
800-678-6386
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds of student representatives are already
earning free trips and lots of cash with
America's 1 Spring Break company! Sell
only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun. Baha-
mas, Mazatlan. Jamaica or Florida! Campus
Manager Positions Also Available. Call
Now! Take A Break Student Travel (800)
95-BREAK!
Forms for
Classifieds and
Announcements
can be picked up
in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the
Student
Publication
building.





�-

Thursday, September 19,1996 The East Carolinian
LIF&
SEPTEMBER
� .
19
Thursday
Bike & Blade Rodeo, at 6
p.m. in Minges Parking Lot
�������
�����
Faculty Recital with Kelley
Mikkelson, cello, and Paul Tardif,
piano, at 8 p.m. in A J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall.
��������
�������
Striptease in Hendrix Theatre, at 8
p.m. through Sept 14.
�����
Mike Mesmer "Eyes" at the Attic
Uncle Mingo at Peasant's Cafe.
20
Friday
Thespians of Diversity in-
terest meeting in the underground
of Mendenhall at 6:30 p.m.
' Jazz at Night, at 8 p.m. in the Men-
denhall Great Room.
Headstone Circus with The Backslid-
ers at the Attic.
Kuttphat at Peasant's Cafe.
� ��������������a
The Old Settler, a play by James
Henry Redwood, at the N.C. Mu-
seum of Art
Charlie Hunter Quartet at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
21
Attic,
Saturday
The Nighthawks at the
Rave at Peasant's Cafe and the Elbo
Room.
The Floatplane Notebooks, a play
by Paul Fitzgerald & Jason Moore,
at the N.C. Museum of Art
Everything at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
22
Sunday
The Ernies at the Under-
water Cafe.
23
Monday
Life in General at the Un-
derwater Cafe.
24
Tuesday
Charlie Mars Band at
Peasant's Cafe.
25
Wednesday
ECU Symphonic Wind En-
semble and Concert Band, at 8 p.m.
4 in Wright Auditorium.
Lecture: Linda C. Hults, art histo-
rian, at 7 p.m. in Speight Audito-
rium.
Comedy Zone with Bill Kellor at the
Attic.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an
upcoming event that
you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions
column? If so, please
send us information (a
schedule would be nice)
at
doming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication
Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858
Striptease
The most interesting thing about Striptease is not the fact that
Demi Moore flashes her breasts on the big screen. No, in fact, Demi
looks so bored and dispassionate in her role as down-and-out strip-
per single mother Erin Grant that it becomes easier to forget
she's in the movie than it is to root for her. And the whole plotline
with the strippers at the Eager Beaver club isn't needed for the
film to proceed, anyway (the strip routines are boring to boot).
Even the fact that the plot is taken from a Carl Hiaasen pulp
crime novel doesn't help, although it should considering how in-
triguing and popular Hiaasen's novels are.
Although Burt Reynolds turns in an eccentric performance (one
of his best in years) as the white-haired, addle-brained Senator David
Dilbeck and Robert Patrick (the T-1000 robot from Terminator 2)
is equally good as Erin's bumbling, pill-addicted ex-husband, nei-
ther of these actors is good enough to pull this movie out of medi-
ocrity.
Despite its flaws, however, there is one reason, and one reason
alone, that makes Striptease worth seeing - Ving Rhames.
Rhames is best known for his performances as Marcellus Wallace
in Pulp Fiction and Eriq LaSalle's brother-in-law, Walter, on NBC's
ER. He also appeared in the Tom Cruise action blockbuster Mis-
sion: Impossible.
In Striptease, Rhames steals the show as the Eager Beaver's
animal-loving, over-protective bouncer, Shad. Every scene Rhames
appears in adds another level to the rich characterization of Shad,
whose story is so funny and compelling that you end up wishing
they had centered the film on him.
Student Health now
offers physical therapy
Natalie Rocke
Student Health Service
a
The active lifestyle lead by the
majority of ECU students created a
demand for a Physical Therapy Clinic
at the Student Health Center. A large
variety of academic coursework that
ranges from dance to exercise and
sports science, in addition
to the large number of
participants in
Recreational
Services, sug-
gests just
how active
students
are. There
are a num- w
ber of �di-
verse ways in
which active
students can be- ?
come injured. Stu-
dent Health now offers
services to aid the healing
process necessary for recovery from
such misfortunes.
Starting Sept. 16, physical
therapy will be available at the Stu-
dent Health Center on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from 3 to 5
p.m. Patients requiring therapy must
be referred to the clinic by either a
private practice medical provider or
one that works at the Student Health
Center. A small fee will be charged
for each visit to the Physical Therapy
Clinic. Insurance claims can be filed
by seeing the cashier after each ap-
pointment.
Patients can be referred to the
Physical Therapy Clinic to receive
treatment andor rehabili-
tation for acute inju-
ries, post-operative
procedures, or
chronic condi-
tions. The staff
m will work with
e patients on an
individual ba-
� sis to develop
an effective
treatment plan.
CJ Our physical
therapists are fac-
ulty members associ-
ated with the ECU School
of Allied Health Sciences.
The Physical Therapy Clinic is
an exciting addition to Student
Health. If you have questions about
the Physical Therapy Clinic, please
contact us at 328-6794 and we will
be glad to assist you in your quest
for good health.
Chocolate may mimic
marijuana, doctors say
NEW YORK (AP) - Chocolate contains substances that might
mimic the effects of marijuana, boosting the pleasure you get from
eating the stuff, researchers say.
The ingredients might make the texture, smell and flavor of choco-
late more enjoyable and combine with other ingredients like caffeine
to make a person feel good, researcher Daniele Piomelli speculated.
"We are talking about something much, much, much, much milder
than a high said Piomelli, a researcher at the Neurosciences Insti-
tute of San Diego. He reported the work with colleagues in a recent
issue of the journal Nature.
But a researcher who studies the brain chemistry of marijuana
said chocolate contains such low levels of the ingredients Piomelli
identified that he doubts they have any effect,
Christian Felder of the National Institute of Mental Health esti-
mated that a 130-pound person would have to inject the equivalent
of 25 pounds of chocolate in one sitting to get any marijuana-like
effect.
Piomelli found that chocolate contains anandamide, which is also
produced naturally in the brain and which activates the same target
that marijuana does.
He also found two chocolate ingredients that inhibit the natural
breakdown of anandamide, which could lead to heightened levels of
anandamide in the brain.
Piomelli stressed that his work does not imply that chocolate is
addicting.
Family fun found in
Wright Auditorium
The Magic of Lyn (above), The Velveteen Rabbit
(top right), Dinosaur Mountain (center right),
and Heidi (bottom right) are all events sched-
uled for the new 1996-97 Family Fare Series.
Dale Williamson
Aeeletant Ufentyle Editor
Let's say you are an individual
who is concerned with the lack of
family-oriented entertainment
around the Greenville area. Most
movies out these days are too
graphic for younger audiences,
downtown is filled mostly with bars,
and you can only have so much fun
shopping at the local malls. What
can you do that is fun for both you
and your children?
The solution to your dilemma
is right here at ECU. The Depart-
ment of University Unions proudly
announces the ECU Family Fare Se-
ries, a year-long event that promises
to delight the young and the young
at heart.
This family series offers clean
fun through live productions that
will also prove to be very educa-
tional. According to Marketing Di-
rector Carol Woodruff, these shows
are performed by "professional, na-
tional productions. This is what
these people really do. This is their
livelihood Since the shows are
backed by professional talent, Woo-
druff says that audiences can expect
"full production values -lights,
sounds, costumes, the works
Although the first production
does not start until October, TEC
wants to do its part to support this
worthwhile effort by offering an ad-
vance preview of what is to come
within the next academic year.
The Family Fare Series begins
on Oct. 5 with a musical production
of The Velveteen Rabbit, Margery
Williams' popular story featuring a
stuffed animal who comes to life
through a child's love and devotion.
This story illustrates the power of
childhood innocence by centering
on the relationship between Steve,
a young child who suffers the dan-
gers of scarlet fever, and his stuffed
rabbit. A major conflict arises when
Steve's family, who fears that the
Photos Courtesy of University Unions
scarlet fever has contaminated
Steve's belongings, decides that all
of Steve's toys, including his beloved
rabbit, must be destroyed. The Vel-
veteen Rabbit it an endearing tale
that has become a family favorite.
On Nov. 16, the Family Fare Se-
ries continues with the Magic of
Lyn, a daixling performance filled
with magic and illusion. Lyn is noted
as being one of the few female illu-
sionists in the world, and her high-
energy performance will keep her
audience hypnotised with awe. The
Magic of Lyn, which has been going
strong for over 20 years, will feature
such spectacles as floating objects,
disappearing and reappearing ani-
mals, and a death-defying escape
from 1,800 watts of electricity. You
won't believe your eyes when you
enter the magical world of Lyn.
Crossing over into 1997, on
Feb. 8 you will be invited on a jour-
ney, a Black Journey to be exact
See FAMILY page 11
.mm
e.d. reviews legend
2L: pay full price
Everything
Everything
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
After the release of two studio al-
bums. Labrador and Solid. Everything
gives us exactly what we've always
wanted to hear: an album with style,
pizzazz, and a live sound that is abso-
lutely riveting.
Recorded during two unbelievable
nights at the Bayou in Washington,
D.C the new disc has a quality all its
own. It starts off with a song called
"All's Quiet In an ironic sort of way.
thjs song title seems to be the perfect
buy It used
can't even
hum alone
way to start the album. Maybe the song
refers to how things appeared before
the concert started, but certainly not
when it was going on. Once the show
kicked in, the scene was everything but
quiet.
One of the hardest things to cap-
ture in a live album is the intensity of
the crowd. That's why this album is so
impressive. It's all there. The sound is
not only intense for the live perfor-
mance, it's in the mix as well. The crowd
was balanced, as well as the instru-
ments and voices. Everyone involved
in the production of the album did a
great job.
The sound of this band is promis-
ing. You can listen to these guys and
tell they're headed for bigger things.
The aLum has a groove that can't be
placed with anyone else.
Craig Honeycutt, the band's lead
singer and rhythm guitar plaver. knows
not only where to fill in with his guitar
but also with his impeccable voice. It's
great to hear someone put a falsetto
in the right place. Whether it be in the
background or just part of the main
lyrics, his voice is cool.
Adding to the band's coolness is
Stephen Van Dam. It's hard not to get
up and scream with a band member
like Van Dam chopping away on his
guitar and alto sax. And if you think
that's enough, prepare to overdose. The
band has not only one horn, but three.
Richard Bradley plays tenor sax and
Terence Patrick Wolfe plays trombone.
See PAY page 10
Fiona Apple
Tidal
John Davis
Staff Writer
There are two things that Alanis
Morrisette and Sheryl Crow have in ;
common. One, they are both obviously
female pop musicians. Two, they both
wish they could be Fiona Apple. The.
anger and frustration in life that
Alanis tried so hard to convey on her
Jagged Little Pill album, and the sen-
suality and soulful elements of worn-
See APPLE page 10
V





10
Thursday, September 19,1996
The East Carolinian
JKA.X from page 9
Van Dam and Bradley are always on
opposite sides of the stage and can't
help but challenge each other. You can
imagine the entertainment
No one seems to stick to one in-
strument in this band, though. Try to
swallow that live. Besides the tenor sax,
Bradley also plays the guitar. In addi-
tion to the trombone, Terence Patrick
Wolfe has played keyboards with the
band for the past year and was the
former keyboard player for Full Stop.
Dropping down low on the bass
is David Slankard, a man who is the
undertow of energy that keeps this
band alive. And why wouldn't he since
he stands right next to a drummer who
not only can split time in the most pe-
culiar way, but can sing as well. Nathan
Brown has a lot to do with this band's
intense emotional power. He never
overplays, a rare quality for a drum-
met. His fills are always appropriate,
never overshadowing the basic rhythm.
After you've heard how crazy
these guys are on stage, imagine add-
ing guest musicians to the lineup. Dave
Wannamaker, who has played on stage
with some of the best in the business
(including the Dave Matthews Band
and the Gibb Droll Band), played keys
on this record. Not only was the horn
section challenging one another, the
keys were doing the same.
As if that weren't enough, Gibb
Droll himself made quite an appearance
on the stage, as well. After being re-
viewed as one of the greatest guitar
players in the nation, it's not hard to
hear how he earned that respect from
everyone the night of the show.
Most respect goes out to Craig for
his big finish on the album's last track,
"Essence of the Problem It's a song
that represents the heart of the band
and the man himself. The tune starts
off on common ground with a keyboard
in the mist and a figure to guide the
way. Honeycutt helps the audience
climb to another state of mind, a more
elevated state of mind. And just when
you think it's all over, a note, a yell, a
cry for freedom breaks the silence that
turns the tides of nothingness into Ev-
erything.
AFrLlj from page 9
anhood that Sheryl Crow forced into
her whiny ballads, do not come near
to matching the delicate balance of
sensibilities that Apple has con-
structed on her debut record. Tidal.
Apple's voice is a powerful instru-
ment. She can actually sing, which
puts her ahead of the post-grunge
sandpaper singers (Alanis) or the mis-
erable whiners (Crow). Apple's voice
is well suited to jazz music; she sounds
like a pleasant mixture of Ella
Fitzgerald and Sarah McLachlan.
Some of the highest points of her
album are due to her voice and her
vocal control. A lesser singer, or a
singer without soul in her voice, would
be unable to pull these moves off.
Apple's voice is her strongest point
as one can see on "Slow Milk Honey
in which she sings that phrase and
actually sounds like slow milk honey.
Unfortunately, her voice is also
her weakness, because it promises so
much more than she is willing, or able,
to deliver. There are moments when
a little more jazz sensioility would be
helpful in carrying a meme or emo-
tion, and then there are other mo-
ments when she comes on too strong.
However, this seems to be more of a
problem of youth; Apple has wonder-
ful potential and as long as she can
continue to develop her vocal control,
then she should only improve.
The songwriting and arrange-
ments are strong as well. There is a
nice cohesive variety of styles on this
album, ranging from atmospheric,
angry pop that reminds one of Sam
Phillips, to breathy, soulful jazz bal-
lads that are masterfully arranged,
bringing back memories of Henry
Mancini's talent.
The lyrics include vindictive as-
saults on male do-wrongs, as in the
album's opener, "Sleep to Dream
where Apple lays it on the line: "You
say love is a hell you cannot bear I
say gimme mine back and then go
there for all 1 care
Other songs are sweeter, more
romantic samplings, such as "Pale
September where Apple addresses
sex more delicately and tenderly than
Peter Gabriel, without losing any sen-
suality. "And ail my armour falling
down at my feet and my winter giv-
ing way to warm, as I'm singing him
to sleep
The songs all lean toward rela-
tionships in their theme, but the story
in each song is different, ranging from
the frustration at tiie ambiguity of a
man who refuses to decide whether
to be a lover or a friend
("Shadowboxer") to a first look at a
change of heart ("The Child is Gone").
Tidal is a pleasant album, very
strong and well-written. But it seems
to stray a little too close to monotony
at points (though it never makes it
there). And although it is well done,
it relies too heavily on Apple's vocal
and lyrical talent and doesn't have the
strong musical moments a better al-
bum of this same genre might (such
as Tori Amos' Under The Pink).
Don't get me wrong, the music is
great It's just that with an artist like
Apple, it could be wonderful. While
that frustrates me, the average listener
will thoroughly enjoy Tidal, especially
if heshe happens to be a fan of Sa-
rah McLachlan or Tori Amos. Fiona
Apple has great potential, and I look
forward to seeing where she will go
in the future. For now, Tidal is a pleas-
ant enough appetizer of what will
hopefully be an excellent career.
The Rebuilding of
the Jewish Temple
AND
The End of Our Age
A Slide Presentation on
The Evidence
Mendenhall, Room 242
Thursday, Sept. 19, 7:00pm
Apostolic Campus Ministry
�it,u ns�:
v��t:iIt'7i?'��i 7 t - r �
i Th StueUrrf Unjon and attic off Health Promotion
are Sponsoring a PayTrtpTo 8aTh� inflro Aids Memorial Quilt In , I
V 12 T' � 117 � T1 7 - r " : " � 7 ' �- T ' - T
ftrnfl' , �� . M, m ML 7 � -1 � . WmW '
Well-being
� t � � � w. t � t �
'
- , mm � � � , m , ' - . �
$'?W"
esare foughtwitha
SILVER
1
Doors Open
7:30 pm
Stage Time
x 900pm Two oh Clm
J 756-6278
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night
and Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country &
Western Night
FRI & SAT: Silver Bullet
Exotic Dancers
'Sfcgto'
DON'T
DRINK AND DRIVE'
Call Aladdin Taxi at 850 5466 and
receive $2 off at the door
Located 5 Miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt.(Behind John's Convenient Mart)
Hi! Welcome to
ECU!
STUDENTS
You are invited to a reception
at the Methodist Student
Center to meet Local
Methodist Ministers and the
Campus Minister.
Come to 501 East 5th Street
'(across from the art building)
on Wednesday, September 25,
1996, between 5:30 and
6:30pm.
�Refreshments will be served
Call 758-2030 to let us know
you're interested
"feKi
- f
@
No Hassles.v
, No Waiting
hro Kidding
qwertyU,Opl
� � d ' B b j h I
ay
Introducing
ECU PORT
provided by campusMCh
'
�fzr .J
-r
ijf
Bus leawe, from MSC � 6AM
.� �(� ,J
l. � M
7 j-t"
r seat call:
Office at
ARTS
or locally at 328-4788
m.
- $14.95 MO75 HRS -
- FREE CRUISIN' 1AM-6 AM -
- DIRECT CAMPUS CONNECTION -
- SOFTWARE INCLUDED -
(SOFTWARE AVAILABLE AT THE ECU STUDENT STORE COMPUTER DEPARTMENT)
What Do You Mean You haven't Ordered Yet?
CALL 1 -800-200-4339
Up to 75 hours of local access. One-time sign up fee of $14.95, additional
charges may apply. Contact customer service for complete details.
ampusMCI Internet service provided pursuant to campusMC! program.
� MCI Telecommunications Corporation, 1996.
�.





The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 19, 1996
11
Not Available on E-mail, CD ROM, or
the World Wide Web
North Carolina Dance Theater
Proof that N.C. is
known for more than
hoops and 'bacca
Wednesday, October 2,1996
Wright Auditorium
FAMILY from page 9
This spirited production from Ameri-
can Family Theater (the same group
who brought Tom Sawyer and Pippi
Longsiocking to ECU last season)
uses music from the fifteenth cen-
tury to the present to tell the tale
of the African journey to America.
Beginning with the voyage from an
African village to America, this pro-
duction brings two hundred years
of history to glorious life through
oral traditions and music. Featuring
traditional African chants, gospel,
jazz, blues, rag, and swing. Black
Journey examines the African
American tradition up to the present
day where rock-n-roll and rap have
flourished. Any lover of music will
not want to miss this journey.
March 1, the past comes to life
in a different fashion with Dinosaur
Mountain, also presented by the
award-winning American Family
Theater. Supported by a strong cast
of actors, singers and dancers, Di-
nosaur Mountain is a special-effects
The Department of
(Athletics, Office of
Student Development
is currently hiring full-time ECU
students and graduate students to tutor student-athletes
in all BUSINESS courses as well as in all other subject
areas. Minimum 2.5 GPA required.
Call 3284550.
Tuesday
70's & 80s
Dance Night
only S2 culm,
for members �
�Ladies Free Admission .
Until 11 p.m. PK
$1 Bottle Beer CSr"
xirnc
f $1 Bottle Beer 5
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Adv Tlx locations
East Coast
music
Skulls
Wash Pub
Attic
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th year in
downtown
Greenville
Thursday
The World's Most Powerful Hypnotist
LAST NIGHT, LAST SHOW
Friday
HEADSTONE
CIRCUS
Special Guests:
The Backsliders
Saturday
"The World's Best Bar Band"
East Coast
music
Skully's
Wash Pub
Attic
EDWIN McCAIN
BAND
bonanza where a fourteen-foot-long
robotic dinosaur towers over the au-
dience, flying pterodactyls soar
through the air. and a time machine
carries the audience to a land that
time has forgotten.
The Family Fare Series con-
cludes on April 19 with the ever-lov-
able Heidi. This young orphan's
story is told through a wonderful
musical production, courtesy of
TheatreworksUSA. Heidi is a clas-
sic children's tale that still appeals
to a contemporary audience. Her
story is one that celebrates the tri-
umphant human spirit, an appropri-
ate conclusion for the Family Fare
Series.
Woodruff is very proud and ex-
cited about the series, and she
stresses that this is "part of ECU's
mission to reach out to the larger
community By attracting children
to the arts at an early age, we help
develop audiences for the future
ECU's desire to reach children
is evident through their Art Smart
program, which invites school chil-
dren from all over Eastern N.C. to
watch preview performances of
these productions.
If you are seeking enriching en-
tertainment suitable for the entire
family, then check out the ECU Fam-
ily Fare Series.
For additional information, con-
tact the Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall Student Center, or call 328-
4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. Deaf
Speech-Impaired Access can be
reached by calling 328-4736. Ticket
hours are 8:30 a.m6 p.m. Advanced
ticket prices are $8 for the general
public, $7 for ECU faculty and staff,
and $5 for ECU students and chil-
dren. Tickets purchased at the door
will be $8. All productions will be
performed at Wright Auditorium.
For updates on the series, keep
reading TEC.
ftnwn
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
swers to Tuesday's trivia
questions.
1 Dorothy Lamour was the
woman who traveled all around
the cosmos with funny men
Hope and Crosby in their "Road"
pictures
2. Hepburn and Tracy burned up
the big screen with their (then
unknown) true-life romance in a
total of nine movies.
3. The trials and tribulations of
performing on she Great White
Way were portrayed through the
dancing talents of Charnsse and
Astaire in The Band Wagon.
4 Brar' 3 and Nicholson found
each other in the old west
during the filming of Missouri
Breaks
5. Bogart and Bacall really
learned what it meant To Have t
and Have Not when they fell m
love during the production of the
film.
6. McQueen flew past Garner
and Attenborough on his super-
fast Triumph motorcycle in the
aptly-named film. The Great
Escape
IF YOU'VE GOT WHAT IT TAKES
To Be A Leader In OurCompany,
This Could Be Your Office.
�55
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Not just anyone-can be responsible for territory VE "of you're a leader of Marines. It's a career that's
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of us. But if you're exceptionally smart, tough mr � honor, if you want a career that's a world apart
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M A R I N F OF-F1C1R
For a career that makes a world of difference, see Captain Tingle or Lieutenant Beltran on
September 24th and 25th during Business Career Day. For information concerning
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Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Downtown Greenville (Across from U.B.E.) 757-1666





��MBMMMi � MMM1
12
Thursday, September 19,1996 The East Carolinian
South Carolina
hungry for revenge
Gamecocks seek
redemption for
56-42 loss in '94
DfllDillard
Assistant Sports Editor
Ithas been a year la -off since the
Pirates and the Gamecocks have
matched up in football. The last time
the two schools met on the gridiron
was 1994. It was South Carolina's
homecoming game, and the Pirates
shocked the Gamecocks 56-42 in a
thrilling shoot-out
Things are a little different this go
around. ECU has attracted attention
to the program by back-to-back win-
ning seasons, and the Pirates are no
longer a team to schedule for a home-
coming or parents day game. In fact
officials at USC have moved the game
time from a 1 p.m. start to a 7 p.m.
night game
"They moved that kick off time to
7 p.m for a reason Head Coach Steve
Logan said. "They want every advan-
tage they can get"
USC head man Brad Scott is in
his third year at the helm of this club,
and he has them rolling out of the gate
at 2-0. The Gamecocks opened some
eyes and turned some heads this past
weekend by taking control of the Geor-
gia Bulldogs on national television.
The Gamecocks have been led by
their allusive signal caller Anthony
Wright Wright a native of Vanceboro,
, has put up 460 yards in his first two
ballgames with a 60 percent comple-
tion rate. Along
"They moved that
kick-off time to 7
p.m. for a reason
� Head Coach Steve Logan
with his passing
efficiency,
Wright has been
described by
coaches as one
of the mos. .illu-
sive quarter-
backs in the
Southeastern
Conference (SEC.)
"He is something Logan said.
"Not only can he throw the ball very
well, but it's almost comical seeing
dodge defenders in the pocket He is
the guy
The Bucs will have to stop run-
ning back Duce Staley coming out of
the backfield. Staley, USC's leading
rusher, not only has 365 yards to his
name in rushing, but has also come
out of the backfield for 84 yards in re-
ceiving.
"They have an awfully good run-
ning back that we'll have to watch,
along with a quick quarterback that
we'll have to control Linebacker
Carlos Brown said.
To put up numbers 'ke these of-
fensively, everybody knows you have
to have a defense that can keep the
offense on the field. That they do have.
The USC defense is anchored by
a quick front line led by junior defen-
sive tackle Henry
Taylor. Taylor is the
most experienced of
the defense front,
but the Pirates will
have to keep a
watchful eye on
Maynard Caldwell
who led the Game-
cock defense with
5.5 quarterback sacks last season.
"This unit won't put as much pres-
sure as West Virginia, but these guys
are quick and they recover well Logan
said.
The Gamecocks' defense is for
real, holding both Central Florida and
SEC foe Georgia to 14 points apiece.
With a hostile atmosphere of
85,000 plus fans, and two very evenly
matched teams, this should live up to
the hyped 7 p.m. kick-off in Williams -
Brice. Expect to see another shoot-out
between two matched teams, similar
to the 1994 56-42 Pirate victory.
Former starter takes seat on bench
(.ady Pirate plays
hew role as
i
assistant coach
I
David Councilman
Staff Writer
Basketball season is fast ap-
proaching. The players are running
(ind lifting weights, and the coaches
ire preparing for the upcoming sea-
con.
For the Lady Pirates, there have
een some players lost and some play-
ers gained. The Lady Pirates Head
Poach Anne Donovan has added a
frew coach to her staff, but not such a
hew face to the Lady Pirate basket-
ball team.
I Former player Danielle
Charlesworth has been named an as-
sistant coach for the Lady Pirates.
Charlesworth is a former player for
the Lady Pirates, who finished her ca-
reer just last year and graduated in
May. �
Going from player to coach in a
span of a year will be an adjustment
Charlesworth is going from being a
player who was out on the court mak-
ing things happen, to being a coach
on the sidelines watching the game
unfold.
"I miss playing the game some,
but I love coaching Charlesworth
said.
The system that Charlesworth
played for her last year is still intact
and that should help ease her into her
coaching duties. She knows what was
expected of her and now she can re-
lay that same message back to the new
players.
"Coach Donovan is a lot more
intense Charlesworth said.
She realizes the type of intensity
Donovan expected of her on the court
will be the same for her coaching.
Donovan told her new assistant
that coaching here will be easier in
the fact I have been through the sys-
tem.
Charlesworth realizes what type
of coach Donovan is. She can help the
younger players see what is expected
of them on the court and off.
According to Charlesworth, it
was just too hard to leave Greenville.
"I like the school and the city, it
was a good four years Charlesworth
Although Charlesworth is help-
ing with the basketball team she also
wants to receive her master's degree.
The ironic twist is that the play-
ers that she will be coaching were not
too long ago calling her their team-
mate. This is especially true for the
seniors. They have played most of
their college basketball with
Charlesworth and now they are call-
ing her coach.
SeeB-BALLpagel3
ECU Sports Information
Furman's Dan Falls defeated
Tennessee State's Adrian Adams
on the first playoff hole to cap-
ture the individual title at the Pi-
rate Fail Intercollegiate golf tour-
nament on Tuesday. Furman also
grabbed the team title, edging
runner-up Akron by four strokes
and third place UNC Wilmington
by ten shots.
Adams shot the best'round
of the day with
69, but could not
make par on the
first playoff home.
Falls rolled in his
putt to win the in-
dividual title.
There were four
golfers within two
shots of the lead-
ers. One of those
was ECU'S Robbie
Perry who was
playing as an indi-
vidual. Perry shot
a 72 in Monday's
round and fired a
72 Tuesday, mak-
ing him the top
Pirate finisher. Freshman Stephen
Satterly finished tied for seventh
place after carding a score of one-
over-par.
The Pirates made a run at the
leaders after finishing Monday in
seventh place. They knocked one
shot off Monday's score to finish the
tournament in fifth place, just two
shots behind Charleston Southern
and three behind UNC Wilmington.
"1 was really pleased with
our first performance of the
year Head Coach Kevin Will-
iams said. "We found that we
have some depth which is im-
portant to the success of this
team
The Pirates will be in ac-
tion again at the UTCState
Farm Rail Classic in Chatta-
nooga, Tenn. on Oct. 14 and 15.
Pirate Starting Five (Pars72-72144)
17Stephen Satterly7372
T16Kevin Miller73 7674
T28Richie Creech73
T34Marc Miller7476
T48Shane Robinson7876
145
147
149
150
154
Pirate Starting Five (Pan72-72144)
6
T16
T41
T61
Robbie Perry
Matt Riggs
Scott Campbell
Daniel Griffis
71
77
79
85
143
147
152
159
Who's got it?
Photo by ELIZABETH DUNCAN
The Spleefers (dark jerseys) attempt a pass against their opponents Playboy's Best.
Flag football is now in full-swing after last week's cancelations due to rain.
Players recognized nationally
Hard work and
determination pay
off for key players
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
ECU quarterback Marcus
Crandell and split end Larry Shannon
have been selected to compete for two
national awards at,their respected
positions.
Crandell, a 60" senior from
Robersonville, N.C has been named
as one of 28 candidates for the Johnny
Unitas Golden Arm Award, presented
annually to the nation's top senior
collegiate quarterback. The award is
sponsored by the Kentucky Chapter
of the National Football Foundation
and Hall of Fame, Inc. A select com-
mittee of football experts from across
the country will choose the finalists
and eventually the recipient. Five fi-
nalists will be named for the award
on Oct. 30 with the recipient to be
announced Nov. 27.
Shannon, a 66" junior from
Starke, Fla has also been recognized
as one of 21 national candidates on
the "watch list" for the Biletnikoff
Award. The Biletnikoff award, named
for the former Oakland Raider
standout, honors the best of collegiate
football's receivers. The "watch list"
will be pared to 10 semifinalists in late
October. Semifinals will then be re-
duced to three finalists by early No-
Larry Shannon
vember. with the winner to be an-
nounced in December.
With Crandell and Shannon's
recognitions, they have a chance to
be in the national spotlight and prove
they are the best in their positions.
For Crande'l, being selected is a re-
sult of all the work that he has put
into the program through the years.
"It's an honor to be named for
such a prestigious award Crandell
said. "It's a place that I've fought to
get to and I want to uphold it the best
I can
Crandell admits when he first
started his career here, he wasn't sure
where his place on this team would
be.
"When I came here as a freshman
I didn't really know if I was going to
beat out the other quarterbacks that
were here Crandell said. "I put in
the hard work and took plays home
Marcus Crandell
and learned them through the weeks
and now it's all paying off
For Shannon, the Biletnikoff
award is a chance for him to separate
himself with the elite receivers in the
nation.
"I was very surprised at first but
it will give me the opportunity at the
end of the year to gain some notabil-
ity Shannon said. "It's a great honor
for them to recognize me and if I go
out and keep doing the things that
I'm doing, then at the end of the year
if I got a chance, that would be great"
Being selected to compete for
these awards recognizes Crandell's
and Shannon's ability to create an
offense. An offense that can be explo-
sive and is able to put up the kind of
numbers that are needed to be se-
lected for one of the awards.
See NATIONAL page 14
amecock information for Saturday
Football rivalries can be fierce, but the University of South Carolina still wants ECU fans to enjoy their stay in
Columbia when the Pirates take on the Gamecocks this Saturday in Wifliams-Brice Stadium.
USC's Visitor Center, which serves as Carolina's "Front Door will help ECU fans with travel plans and parking
vnD provide information about USC and Columbia.
"We realize many visitors from other universities aren't familiar with Carolina, our campus or downtown Colum-
bia Derase Wefiman, director of USC's Visitor Center said. "We want them to feel welcome and enjoy their visit"
The Visitor Center is located in the lobby of the Carolina Plaza on Assembly Street the main corridor from
downtown Columbia to WiUiams-Brice Stadium. It is open from 8:30 a.m5 pjn. Monday through Friday and 9-30 Jtm
2 p.m Saturdays.
The center staff will issue Pirate fans a special parking pass that allows visitor convenient access to the Russell
House Student Union and to Carolina's historic Horseshoe, when they can explore McKissick Museum and the South
Carolinian Library.
"We encourage ECU fans to give us a calL" Wellman said. "Well help make their travel plans easier by giving
directions for entering downtown Columbia and the football stadium, as well as information about Columbia hotel and
restaurants.
The Carolina Plaza is at the corner of Pendteton and Assembly streets in downtown Columbia. For more informa-
tion, call the USC Visitor Center at 803-777-0169 or toll free at 1S00-922-9755.
I I QAfL-1 O
Ntes
� 1 3th meeting
between two
schools.
� Gamecocks lead
series 9-13.
� The last time
these two teams
met, in 1994, ECU
handed USC a 56-
42 loss in
Columbia.
� USC is 2-0 after
handing Georgia a
23-14 loss last
Saturday.
41
149
789
292
497
4
First Downs
Total Offensive Team
Total Yardage
Yards Rushing
Yards Passing
Passes Intercepted
4th Down Conversion
Percentage
�"





t �
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 19,1996
13
The Nail Salon, Ztc.
355-1661
Welcome Back,
ECU Students and Staff.
The Salon is conviently located at 3401 South Evans Ext,
just 1 mile south of Target Store
We are full-serviced offering:
Ecu Value Days on Every
Thursday
during the month of
September, AU ECU
Students and Faculty
recieve 10 Off Any
Service with an ECU ID.
(Non Request Stylist and
Technicians Only)
Ask about our GAMEDAY MANI
CURE, only at The Nail Salon, Ztc.
State licensed Manicurist and American owned and operated
Women's Soccer Home Games This Weekend
The women's soccer team
will be action Friday against
Florida State at 4 p.m.
The Lady Pirates will also
face conference foe William
& Mary Sunday at 1 p.m.
B-BAJJL from page 12
. quick'n;easy
Open House
Come and sample some delicious
vegetarian dishes, everything from Baked
Pecan Oatmeal to Mexican Lasagna
and receive your FREE
Cookbook.
When: Thurs Sept. 19th:
Breakfast foods
Mon Sept. 23rd:
Lunch foods
Thurs Sept. 26th:
Dinner foods
Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Where: General Classroom Bldg Room 3010
Make your college
degree pay off.
The Nissan Sentra
Save up to $4,000
Graduates
$1,000
customer rebate"
plus save up to
$2,000
in factory-to-dealer
incentives?
Hurricane Relief
$1,000
customer rebate
and $100 donation
to the American Red Cross
for every vehicle sold
through Sept. 30th.
If'vou've graduated within the last two years or art- �'�� " graduate in me next
six months, you ran save big at your local Nissan Dealer. Graduates of accredited
L'S four-year colleges, two-year colleges, graduate programs and three-year
registered muses are eligible for rebate. So see your local Nissan dealer today.
Ends September 30th.
"The players have not given me
grief yet Charlesworth said.
Although right now the coaches
are not allowed to watch the players
practice, Charlesworth is watching
them while they do their running and
lifting. When it is time for practice to
officially begin her new job will be-
come more important
Charlesworth will work with the
guards. But th?t is not where her
coaching duties will end. Whenever
somebody is hurt or a player can't
practice Charlesworth will fill in and
scrimmage when she is needed. So her
playing days for the Lady Pirates are
not technically over.
Could the Lady Pirates basketball
staff eventually spawn off another
great head coach for the basketball
world? That is a possibility, although
Charlesworth doesn't want to go any-
where soon.
"Eventually down the road
Charlesworth said. "There is so much
moving around
For the Lady Pirates, this upcom-
ing season will be filled with excite-
ment and suspense and should hold
many thrilling times. For
Charlesworth it will mark a new era
in her basketball career.
are you ready
dv to KILL?
BW-3
Buffalo
Stop by BW-3 and pick up
tasting wings before the
Come on down fort
some great
GO
PlZATe$
vs
SOUTH CAROLINA
Saturday, September 21
7:OOpm
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Id. V'
l'KIi IIIH MW UrH I M)M ir t rK sr Is





14
Thursday, September 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
NATIONAL from page 12
Crandell be looking to lead t(J ,ave one 0f the best quarterbacks
the Pirati ird sti ight howl tju, nation as my quarterback, it's
this m of hePirate been a tremendous blessing
en able to For Shannon, Crandell has been
become I a huge raotiva-
time . tion factor.
reer
and ca � i
down
Crandell. t
numb'
just pa
"I �

mysi
out li?
said, i
done too mut.
"I was very
surprised at first,
but it will give me
the opportunity at
the end of the year
to gain some
notability
� Larrv Shannon
itiv between mv
sophomore now, it's just now
people are startin
Crandell has
ifyou pia
sisten pei
'Like I '
people wil
Crandell Si
Shannon certainly has noticed.
He's been at the receiving end of many
of the passes that Crandell has
thrown. He has become the big play
realize it
ys thought that
and are con-
ill take note.
if you're good.
itice regardless
receive
nor. is
speed .
go wit!
Pirate offense. Shan-
� with excellent
'
ers with five
Shannon caught 24
ds. He led all receiv-
hdown catches. This
season Shannon is off to another ex-
cellent star' 12 catches for 163
catch average.
Ik two touchdowns, one of
which v. � � eception against
East Tenm : at To have these
kinds of nun lys a lot about
Shannon's respect for himself and the
team.
"You have to have a good respect
for yourself and 1 believe 1 can be one
of the best in the nation, but it comes
back to the team and the team comes
first Shannon said 'It's been great
Marcus
live for me be-
cause in
to go out
make me better
and I'm going to
make him bet-
ter Shannon
said
Crandell
also sees t h e
positives of hav-
ing a good re-
ceiver like Shan-
non. He also rec-
ognizes the numbers he and Shannon
have been able to put up to position
themselves to win these awards, would
not be possible if it was not tor the
offensive line.
"Our receivers are a big contri-
bution to our offense, but the offen-
sive line also plays a large role
Crandell said. "Our offensive line has
gotten greater and greater through-
out each year that I've been at quar-
terback. It's a combination of me, the
offensive line and the receivers
Crandell said.
While these awards saj i lot
about the talent of these two athletes,
they are both quick to point out that
the award is not their number one
priority - winning and the team are.
I don't even think about it (the
award), some people ask me about it
and 1 listen, but I don't constantly
think about it Crandell said.
Neither playei is allowing these
nominations to overtake their
thoughts.
"When I first heard about the
award i thought about it, hut now it's
the last thing on my mind Shannon
said. "I've just got to worry about
doing my job to help the team win
Both Shannon and Crandell
think that being selected to compete
tor the L'nitas and Biletnikoff awards
should reflect mure on t
just their own individua
ments.
"It shows we !
here and great athi. I
other school S a
to win this awa
award for mi
The national ex
could bring will no: oi
to gain attentioi ' .
This recof il
to gain the respc I
looking for.
"We've been il
have been battling I
and 1 think people an
alize that ECU is a
be mentioned in th
Florida State or anj
teams in the nation " t
Shannon and (
ot Head Coach St,
fleeting on what got th
sitions they are in right
"He's, a friend ai
i i me
and been
rm ad ice when 1 needed
ii � respect
is I :n a tremen-
.� '�" elopment as a
-ne of
n tha � evei
� � i, hi
and how to run
iti :mendous advan-
se awards
� i ail) matter to
nd Shannon What
the season will
. . in , in the
the rest of our
.mmed it up with a
� ree wi rds.
n and one Crandell said.
i one
Red Cross
Blood Drive
Sponsored by
Air Force ROTC
Monday September 23
and
Tuesday September 24
12:00-6:00pm
Mendenhall Student Center
WiMfe
Thursday, September 19
Friday, September 20
Saturday, September 21
DEMI ISDYNAMITE!
Panch Ston�r. PBS fLICKS
'Burt Reynolds
Is A Barrel
Of Laughs!
KSTL TV SALT LAKE Cm
o

�b-

For More information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8 00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students Faculty, and Staff
(one guest alto , th valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
"Demi At Her
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tcn CjrfiDbfll
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information desk in
Mendenhall
Entry deadline - Oct.4
Contest - Wed Oct. 11
8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
1st place - $300
2nd place $200
3rd place - 100
MasterCard
AMEIICAN COUHUF! UlENI SBICK





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The East Carolinian
say, September 19, 1996
15
PRELEASING FOR JANUARY '97
PITT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
919-758-1921
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On Site Management anc Maint
On Site Laundry I
Sand Volleyball Cc
Party Pavill-
On ECU Bus Route .
1ST FULL MO
PRICE WITH TR
OF THIS.
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A professional management team that cares
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
A Home Away From Home
INQUIRY CLASSES - CONFIRMATION CLASSES
FIRST COMMUNION CLASSES - SPIRITUALITY CLASSES
Interested? Come Mondays at 7:30 pm or Thursdays at 2:00 pm.
Place: The Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street
(2 Houses from the Fletcher Music Building)
eWU� 757-tWt
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
WAREHOUSE
SALE
UVe jiidt teceivei a buick had 4 gtcat
(Wkuuj chiim Imm. ycuut dowmte
catahq wwtjjoity!
Wed.Sun. Sept. 18-22
onnechon
Division.of U.B.E.
210 EAST 5TH STREET 758-8612 MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 6. SUNDAY
M Gceenv
We want to give special thanks to
all the locals who voted us the
Best Ail-Around Bar
And To All The Billiards Players
Who Voted Us
Best Place To
Play Pool
$
JS
THE DOWNT
And To All The Ladies
Who Voted Us
The Best
Place To
Meet Men
PARTY GOES ON EVERY NIGHT
SUN
Customer
Appreciation
Night
No Cover
Dollar Night
MON
2 for 1 Pool
$1.75 Hi-Balis
& Beer
"BAR





16
Thursday, September 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
r
Friday. September
20th
Seen In:
gq
Muscle & Fitness
Playcirl Magazine
Vanadu
Entertainment
S
X
anadu
r
Seen On:
Gordon Elliott
Sally Jessy Raphael
Geraldo
Entertainment
jm&du
Entertainment
"The
Proudly Presents
Ultimate Utopia In Male Burlesque"
i
jet i





Title
The East Carolinian, September 19, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 19, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1160
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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