The East Carolinian, September 12, 1996






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September 12,1996
Vol 72, No. 07
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Altercation causes waves
Across The State
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) -
About 15 opponents of a pro-
posed jail site picketed the
Cumberland County Courthouse,
but some county commissioners
say the protests are in vain.
The county plans to build a
new 500-bed jail on 72 acres near
the intersection of Camden and
Crystal Springs roads.
Camden Road residents said
they didn't protest the site at an
Aug. 12 public hearing because
they said they didn't know about
the hearing. Residents from four
other proposed sites did attend
and protest.
That night, the commission-
ers voted to start negotiating the
purchase of that land, owned by
Joe Raynor Jr. Buying the prop-
erty would require the board to
take another vote.
CHARLOTTE (AP) -North
Carolina is expected to add
110,000 more elementary and sec-
ondary school students over the
next 10 years, a 9 percent jump,
according to a state-by-state en-
rollment forecast released by the
U.S. Education Department.
Space already so tight in
schools across the state that at
Charlotte's Piney Grove Elemen-
tary School, a teacher once held
class in a closet. Another taught
speech in a hallway - for a while.
The release of the federal re-
port this week came just as sup-
porters of a $1.8 billion bond is-
sue for school construction began
their campaign.
Around The World
CALCUTTA, India (AP) -
Two weeks ago. Mother Teresa
has been hospitalized with a fe-
ver and cardiac problems, but was
in stable condition her doctor
said.
Mother Teresa developed a
fever Tuesday night and was im-
mediately admitted to the Wood-
lands Nursing Home in Calcutta.
She then developed cardiac prob-
lems and was put on artificial res-
pirators, said Asim Bardhan. her
physician.
The fraii Reman Catholic nun
recently turned 86.
Five months ago, she broke
a collar bone at her Missionaries
of Charity headquarters in the
eastern Indian city of Calcutta.
In 1983. she had a heart at-
tack while meeting Pope John
Paul II in Rome. A second heart
attack nearly killed her in 1989.
and she received a pacemaker.
HAMBURG, Germany (AP) -
A German court convicted Ameri-
can Gary Lauck of illegally distrib-
uting neo-Nazi propaganda in Ger-
many and sentenced him to four
years in prison.
After a three-month trial, the
Hamburg state court found Lauck
guilty of inciting racial hatred and
using emblems of illegal organi-
zations.
German prosecutors had
sought a five-year prison term.
Lauck's lawyer had argued for ac-
quittal, saying free speech guar-
antees in the U.S. Constitution
protected his client.
Local rap rivals
attack the station
Jacqueline D. Kellum
SeniorWrtter
The rap group, C.O.D decided to
deliver some mayhem late Sunday night
at WZMB.
C.O.D. was one of two groups who
had been invited into the studio to rap
on the air as part of a contest which the
program, Club 91, had been running.
The DJ that night was Brandon
Yohn. General Manager Jeremy Leftwich
did not arrive until after the incident but
said he was briefed on it later. Leftwich
said that these two groups had partici-
pated in a contest over the phone and
had been invited into the studio to rap
on the air.
"These two groups came in and
apparently didn't like each other, and
they got into an argument on the air.
The orvair DJ cut them off, and got them
out of the studio. Basically, Brandon did
his level best to control the situation the
best he could Leftwich said.
It was only one group, C.O.D who
instigated the trouble. The other group.
Grassroots, actually helped the DJ get
C.O.D. out of the building. Leftwich said
that both groups should not have been
in the studio at the same time.
"There were a total often people in
the two groups. Thats just way too many.
That's asking for trouble Leftwich said.
After being ejected from the build-
ing, C.O.D. went to the construction site inside the station.
at Jovner library
and obtained a
couple of steel bars.
They came back
and beat at the
glass door, which
cracked within the
frame but did not
shatter onto the
floor. They did gain
re�ntrance into the
station.
"They discov-
ered that one of the
doors was open, so
they were able to
get back in. That
was when they mmmammmmm
(C.O.D.) came in and starting fighting shortly.
"These two groups
came in and
apparently didn't
like each other,
and they got into
an argument on
the air
� Jeremy Leftwich, General
Manager of WZMB
That was when the
plant was hurled,
and the fan was
hurled Leftwich
said.
DJ Yohn and
Grassroots man-
aged to get C.O.D.
out of the building
again, and it was
then that Yohn
called his program
manager Brian
Paiz. Leftwich and
the ECU police
were notified, who
along with Student
Patrol members ar-
rived on the scene
"When I got to the station, it was
pretty messed up Paiz said.
Before the police could get there,
one of the C.O.D group members stiH
standing outside the glass doors pulled
a gun, but no one was hurt by the
weapon. The people outside with him
scattered, and those inside went back into
the station.
Leftwich and Paiz both said that
this was not a common occurrence and
that it should not have happened at all.
"This isn't something that happens
a lot Those guys just got out of hand
They give rap a bad name Paiz said
Leftwich said further that there
were certain rules which were ignored
which might have prevented this incident
Sec WZMB page 3
'Roofies Startling new trend
"Date rape drug"
use rampant on
the east coast
Rochelle D. Owsley
News writer
A rape prevention official warns
students of an odorless, tasteless
drug called Rohypnol, which has
contributed to a string of rapes
along the east coast.
According to Tracy Scott, Rape
advocate at the REAL Crisis Center,
students are especially at risk for be-
coming victims at parties because,
alcohol intensifies the drug
Scott said that Rohypnol is com-
monly referred to as a "roofie The
drug is tasteless, odorless and col-
orless. When the victim ingests the
drug, they may feel very relaxed.
After the sedative begins to take ef-
fect, the victim is unable to defend
themselves from sexual assault. Af-
ter several hours of being sedated,
victims experience amnesia and of-
ten do not know that they have been
abused until they find the evidence

in the form of cuts and bruises.
"The victim could be out any-
where from eight to 32 hours de-
pending on the dosage Scott said.
According to Ervin Allcox, spe-
cial agent of Drug Chemistry at the
SB1 in Raleigh,
the illegal drug
costs $5 a pill on
the street.
"It is cur-
rently illegal to
possess roofies
in the United
States, however,
people are smug-
gling it across
the southern
boarders
Allcox said.
Rohypnol
has been spot-
ted in
Wilmington and
is being investi-
gated by law en-
forcement offi- wmmmmmmm�mm
cials.
"In Wilmington, 10 thousand
pills have been distributed. The dis-
tributors had been caught before
anymore were sold Scott said.
Allcox said Rohypnol is cur-
rently most popular in city areas
such as Chicago, Baltimore, and
Washington.
Scott said evidence of
Rohypnol in Wilmington means
that use of the drug is likely to
�� become more fre-
quent in Green-
ville.
"It is impor-
tant to alert all
the students on
campus about
the dangers of
the drug before
it surfaces in
Greenville
Scott said.
Scott said it
is important to
get help in any
sexual abuse
case whether it
involves
Rohypnol or not.
She recommends
�������������� that victims call
the police, go to the hospital and
never change their clothes or
bathe.
For more information on
Rohypnol related assaults, contact
the REAL Crisis Center at 7584357.
In Wilmington,
10 thousand pills
have been
distributed. The
distributors had
been caught
before any more
were sold
� Tracy Scott, Rape
Advocate at the REAL
Crisis Center
U.S. Customs
Seizure of
Rohypnol
Number of Cases
Number of Pills
1990
207
1991
8
771
1992
905
1993
33
8,748
1994
60
28,235
1995
Totals-
81
139,414
1 78.280
This chart shows the growing trend of Rohypnol use
in the U. S. over the past five years as calculated by
the number of related rape cases and the number of
confiscated pills. Officials say these numbers are
expected to increase rapidly in 1996 as the drug gains
popularity, especially among college students.
Two professors awarded
distinguished honors
Shawn White
News Writer
Campus organizations team up
Leaders discuss
minority affairs
A professor from the english depart-
ment and one from the philosophy depart-
ment were recently awarded distinguish-
ing honors at ECU.
Dr. John F. Post a noted philosophy
scholar from Vanderbiit University, was
recently appointed, .as the Whichard Dis-
tinguished Chair of Humanities for the
1996-1997 academic year. Dr. Peter
Makuck from the english department was
named a distinguished professor by ECU'S
College of Arts and Sciences.
Post who will teach in the philosophy
department is the second professor to hold
the Whichard Chair position.
Post specializes in logic rationalism,
metaphysics and in the value of theory.
Post has also written two books and is in the process of writing his third entitled
Sense and Supervennovemberce.
Post who received his doctorate in philosophy at the University of California
at Berkeley, continually speaks at college and international seminars.
He described his recent appointment as a tremendous honor and achievement
"1 am deeply appreciative and look forward to working with hard working and
stimulating colleagues Post said.
Some of Post's other honors include Phi Beta Cappa at Harvard and the N. H.
Grant
The Whichard Chair was established in memory of the late David Julian
Whichard, an editor and publisher of ITie Daily Reflector for 60 years until his
See PROF page 3
Peter Makuck
Jennifer Barnes
Staff Writer
Many organizations are
coming together to plan an up-
coming event at the Ledonia
Wright African-American Cul-
tural Center. "The African-
American State of Affairs at
ECU" is a university-wide pro-
gram that is being headed by
'Emissions. It will be held to-
day in the Great Room of Men-
denhall Student Center from
4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.
This event is expected to be
very useful to ECU in develop-
ing strategies to help further
African-American involvement
in relevant programs. Dr. Brian
Haynes, Assistant Vice Chancel-
lor for Student Life said he
thinks that it will give one some
helpful information.
"This will give us an oppor-
tunity to review and look at
numbers Haynes said.
Taffye Benson-Clayton, Cul-
tural Center director expressed
hopes to reveal the importance
of this meeting to minority stu-
dents.
"We hope to assess how Afri-
can-Americans are faring at ECU
Benson-Clayton said. "This will
help faculty and staff, along with
students
Dr. Haynes and Mrs. Benson-
Clayton will both be speaking at the
event. Some topics that attendees
will be hearing about will be on ad-
missions, recruit- �
ing and retention
issues for Afri-
can-Americans.
Dr. Edwin
Bel! also foresees
this event as be-
ing very benefi-
cial.
"It is hoped
to be useful in
providing infor-
mation in pursuit
of the university
goal to facility diversity Bell said.
The event this evening is free
to the public, but students should
come early because approximately
100 people are expected to be
there, Benson-Clayton said.
The Cultural Center will be
holding another event, "Brother to
Brother on Sept. 18. It will be at
6 p.m. in the Bloxton House.
This is a rap session where
young African-Americans can
participate in intellectually
stimulating conversations with
one another, in a relaxed atmo-
spheie. There they have a
chance to talk with each other
about issues of the day.
Benson-Clayton said she thinks
that this is something that the
males have always done anyway.
"After
events were
over, I no-
ticed that
there was
always a
group of
people that
would stay
and talk
about social
or political
minium imm�� issues
Benson-
Clayton said. "Since they're do-
ing it anyway, they have a
chance to talk about their
choice of topic
Older males will also be
brought in for the conversa-
tions for the purpose of adding
a more mature prospective to
the discussion, Benson-Clayton
added.
"This will give us
an opportunity to
review and look at
numbers
� Dr. Brian Haynes,
Assistant Vice Chancellor
for Student Life
UFfcyfc
?4ide
Travel to a faraway land by filmpage
opiNs miuudut
Columnists duel over welfare reformpage O
5 PO �i&ui4deut
Pirate football heads for the mountainspage I U
Thursday
Sunny
Weekend
Partly cloudy
High 90
Low 72
&
High 89
Low 70
r?W &&cA oi&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Thursday, September 12,1996
The East Carolinian
Air Force cadets
play the field
September 3
Worthless Check - A student was served a criminal summons for a
worthless check.
Larceny - A faculty member reported that her wallet was stolen from her
office in the General Classroom Building.
September 4
Tampering With Computer Equipment � A staff member reported that
someone has been tampering with the computer in her office. A person has
left trash on her desk and her computer is generating error messages.
September 5
Larceny - A student reported her vehicle was broken into while parked
at 4th & Reade. A CD and car stereo face plate was stolen from the vehicle.
Larceny - A student observed two juveniles at the bike rack at Garrett
Hall. One of the juveniles had in his possession a bike the student had stolen
on Sept 4. The juveniles were referred to the juvenile court counselor.
September 6
Resisting Arrest - A non-student was arrested for refusing to identify
himself to a police officer. The officer was attempting to cite him for drinking
in public. The incident occurred at the amphitheater near Fletcher Hall.
September 7
AssistRescue - A student was transported to the hospital from north of
the Recreation Center by Greenville Rescue.
September 9
Warrant for Arrest - A non-student was served three warrants for arrest
for Injury to Personal Property. Injury to Real property, and First Degree
Trespassing.
AssistRescue - A student was treated by rescue and transported to
Student Health for a bee sting.
September 10
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia - A staff member reported that
marijuana residue was found in White Hall.
Assault - A non-student reported that two black males had struck at him
while he was roller skating south of Student Publications.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Scott Hopkins
News Writer
This summer spent at ECU proved to be a demanding and eventful expe-
rience for the cadets of the Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
Detachment 600.
The Cadets spent three to four weeks this summer shadowing commis-
sioned Air Force officers on some of the U.S. most prestigious Air Force bases.
A handful of the cadets experienced the diversity of Air Force travel
while journeying to bases as far east as Germany, as far west as Hawaii and
every point in between.
The cadets experienced some of the Air Forces' well-known jobs such as
pilot training and flight school. Others enjoyed the dynamics of Air Force life
and the jobs and responsibilities which come with it
The program's goal is to offer cadets the possibility to experience the Air
Force and emphasize it as a career choice.
"My summer training was the most incredible and compelling thing I've
done towards my career in the Air Force Cadet Stacey Homolka senior geol-
ogy major, said. "Being stationed in Hawaii, seeing the Air Force work with
the other military branches and working with the people was so exciting
The cadets took part in actual hands-on training such as flying in mili-
tary aircraft, parachute training, administrative duties and other Air Force
occupations.
"I'm following my father and brother by joining the Air Force as a pilot"
4th year Cadet Erik Jorgenson senior biology major, said.
Jorgenson was given a special honor of attending the Air Force Academy's
SOAR program. The programs mission is to give cadets flight training on
wind powered sailplanes. This training gives the cadets preliminary exposure
to the dynamics of flight
"There's a great amount of trust that the officers place on you to be a
part of the training team Jorgenson said. Jorgenson was asked to return to
Cadet Officer training in Florida, to work as a part of the training team which
works with new cadets.
Other cadets spent their summer working in field encampments getting
accustomed to Air Force life. The field program helps to develop military
leadership.
According to Joan Phillips, the administrator to the department of aero-
space studies, the cadets worked on training fundamentals such as Aircraft
and air crew orientation, marksmanship, physical fitness and survival train-
ing.
This summer the AFROTC Cadet Color Guard was invited to per-
form during a special 4th of Jury ceremony which was dedicated to the nine-
teen airmen killed in June in Saudi Arabia.
Cadets enjoy summer experience of a lifetime.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 12, 1996
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K.O.T from page 1
death in 1993.
Byron Coulter, the associate dean
of ECU's College of Arts and Sciences,
described Post's appointment as a tre-
mendous opportunity for ECU.
"Through this endowed chair, we
can maintain our commitment to provid-
ing students a strong liberal arts educa-
tion Coulter said.
In addition to teaching and conduct-
ing seminars on his work. Post plans to
present public lectures. Post's predeces-
sor, Joe Bellamy, of Canton N.Y. was an
English professor from St Lawerence
University, who held the first Whichard
Chair position for two years.
Another professor at ECU to receive
top honors is Dr. Peter Makuck of the
English department was awarded a dis-
tinguishing honor recently.
Makuk, an established professor and
author of seven books, has been named
a distinguished professor by ECU's Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences.
This lifetime honor is given annu-
ally. The honor includes funding for re-
search and presentations. Tne honoree
also receives a cash gift It is one of the
highest honors given at ECU.
Makuck is an acclaimed post and
fiction writer. His poetry was read on
National radio last spring by Garrison
Keillior. He also edits a nationally dis-
tributed journal called "Tar River Po-
etry He also edits the "BYU Studies
He also is a member on the writing corn-
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mittee.
His seven books include "Pilgrims"
and "Sukenlight Ships The book of
poems called "pilgrims has won na
tional literary awards.
Makuck lives in Emerald Isle N.C.
He looks upon his work as a Fulbright
Exchange Professor in France and his
work as a writer at BYU as being two
main factors in achieving this award. One
must have a National and International
diminutive to win the award and it is
known Nationally and Internationally.
Some of Makuck's other honors
include the ZOE Kincaid Brockman
Award (1989) which is awarded annually;
and the Charity Randall Ciatation given
at the International Poetry Forum every
other year in Pittsburgh. He has been
honored for having the best volume of
poems in N.C.
Makuck says that he hopes "to con-
tinue to write and teach and hopes that
poetry will continue to flourish
Makuck also directs the ECU Po-
etry Forum, which is funded by the
English Department and SGA. The pro-
gram has been funded for the last 20
years that Makuck has been the direc-
tor. The forum helps to get world re-
nowned authors and poets to come to
ECU to give talks.
A public lecture is scheduled for
Nov. 11. It will feature Louis Simpson,
who wrote the preface to "Where We
Live which was written by Makuck in
1982.
W JLiiNYD from page 1
altogether.
"What caused all this is the fact that
procedures were not followed. We have
set procedures for having people in the
studio. First of all. the program director
needs to be notified in order to clear it
and that never happened. Management
was not notified of the contest nor about
the band coming down Leftwich said.
Leftwich said that radio employees
involved had been disciplined in this
matter.
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Thursday, September 12,1996
The East Carolinian
PRELEASING FOR JANUARY'97
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HABITS OF
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with Dr. Susan Baile,
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� Six hour Covey Program valued at over $150.00!
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Space is limited so register early! Registration is at the MSC
Central Ticket Office. Student tickets are available for $20.00,
call the MSC at 328-4788. Registration runs Sept. 16-30, 1996.
Valid ECU ID required. This conference is limited to ECU Students
and DSL staff.
(Free to division of Student Life staff as sponsored in part by the DSL Staff
Development Committee.)
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Location: 953 E. 10th St. (Bottom of College Hill at east end of campus)
INQUIRY CLASSES � CONFIRMATION CLASSES
FIRST COMMUNION CLASSES - SPIRITUALITY CLASSES
BEGINS: Thur, Sept. 12 at 2:00pm & Mon, Sept 16 at 7:30pm
Place: The Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street
(2 Houses from the Fletcher Music Building)
"pot "TH-ate Ittl&utuitioH "Pte&ie
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if You've Got What It Takes
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Thursday, September 12,1996 The East Carolinian
TTie East Carolinian
Ou1tet
If the UNC-
System must
add class days,
shorten summer
vacations. Don't
take our
holidays away!
Was your summer break long enough?
We realize you were in no rush to get back to taking exams
and sitting through three-hour labs, but didn't your parents
get on your last nerve? Did you find yourself marking off days
on the calendar, praying that the time would finally come when
someone would let you back in that same dorm you were so
happy to leave in May?
That's a common feeling, especially among freshmen who
have just had their first taste of freedom, only to have to return
home in May and put up with "the folks" for three months. We
may have a solution.
A story in last Thursday's edition of TEC told how ECU is
short eight school days of being up to par, according to a UNO
system wide mandate. To remedy the situation, we will have to
give up some of our state holidays for class time.
Excuse me?
You mean while everyone else is outside basking in the
sun, we will be in an over- (or under-) air-conditioned class-
room learning about how it's possible for a man with green
eyes to marry a woman with blue eyes and still have a child
with brown eyes?
State holidays are in place for a reason. (We may not know
them all, but we trust the people who said so.) If we must be in
class eight more days, then at least make them eight days we
won't really miss. It won't kill us (well, not all of us) to come
back to schoc! a week or so early in August That way we will
have our classwork routine better figured out before the in-
terruption of Labor Day. (It can't be ethical for them to take
away Labor Day.)
We know it will put somewhat of a strain on summer school
students who won't get much of a break. Well, tough. We sug-
gest they take a course in personal adjustment and get over it
(Sorry.)
We might be stepping out on a limb here, but we don't feel
too many students will object to giving up Good Friday. (That's
one of the ones they are thinking about taking away.) How-
ever, it may not be so easy for them to take Martin Luther
King, Jr. Day. (That's another one.)
The bottom line is we don't want to give up any of our
holidays.
Brandon Wadded, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Any L Royster Assistant News Editor Cristle Farley, Production Assistants
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor As" Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Blgelow, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crwnpton, Copy Editor ;
Dffl Dlllard Assistant Sports Editor Carole MeWe, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor P�"l D- Wright, Media Adviser
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator J�net Respess, Media Accountant j
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC z7858-4353. For information, call (919)
3284366.
Election 996
Editor's note: These two columns are the first in a series of political issues columns that
will run through November. TEC's goal is to give the student body information relevant to
the upcoming elections. Today's topic is welfare reform.
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
Steve Higdon
Opinion Columnist
tfo do no n
fyoir
They yvcint to
Tr-cillf ton4 ldrrVe
Aettem t t6e Sdttox,
Hey, all you welfare cheats!
That's right, I'm talking to you. Believe it or not, we
all abuse the welfare system. We are the very welfare
cheats that you always hear those conservatives full of
piss and vinegar talking about Before you get your undies
in a bunch, let me ask you a question.
What's the largest welfare program? Surely, it has
to be all those lazy bums that pick up their welfare checks
(the AFDC program), right? No? Well, it must be food
stamps right? Wrong!
I know you're screaming about those run-down
shacks in Wilson that have Direct-TV dishes and Cadillacs
in front of them, but that ain't it either! The largest wel-
fare program is housing subsidies for first time home buy-
ers. That's right-your hard-earned tax dollars are handed
out to those yuppies that just got that new house, not
Bubba living in the double-wide.
Surely, AFDC or food stamps has got to be at least
second, right? Give 'em the consolation prize, Bob. Wrong
again!
It's the wonderful world of corporate welfare. Thanks
to columnist Joe Jacoby, permit me to list just a few ways
in which our tax dollars are being put to good use. Prof-
itable utilities corporations get a $2 billion a year hand-
out The Advanced Technology Program gives millions of
bucks annually to IBM, Xerox, GE and DuPont (boy, they
really need it).
GE and Westinghouse rob us of $40 million a year to
design "light water reactors although no reactors have
been designed or constructed in over two decades. Farms
collect $10 billion annually, and we give billions a year to
sell mink coats. Jim Beam and Chicken McNuggets over-
seas. Finally, over $85 billion a year is spent in unearned
grants and subsidies.
Now that we know big business is giving us the busi-
ness, let me tell you one example that shows the Repub-
lican attitude towards corporate handouts. Not only did
they kill a bill in the Senate to reform these egrecious
loopholes, listen to this. Our congressman, Walter Jones,
Jr and Newt Gingrich were just two of many Republi-
cans that tried to pass a resolution through the House
who would have allowed a select number of millionaires
and billionaires to renounce their American citizenship
to avoid paying taxes. It makes me sick that some rich
jerk would turn their back on America after making their
fortune in this country.
My final point is that I always hear people spouting
off that "I'm tired of my hard earned money going to
some lazy bum" or, even worse, you have people blaming
welfare mothers for our balanced budget problems.
Folks, AFDC doesn't even take up one percent of
the budget So next time you see some guy on food stamps
buying a steak, stop and think about all the big corpora-
tions that suck down billions of dollars a year. Stop and
think about the housing subsidy program, and yes, stop
and think about the student loan that many of you are
on. Remember, the true welfare cheats may not live in
our slums, but in mansions and yachts across America. I
thank God for welfare, and so should everybody else that
"abuses" the system.
Someone once wrote that "To give a man a fish is to
feed him for a day, to teach a man to fish is to feed him for a
lifetime Embodied in this thought is the basic difference
between the Republican and Democratic perceptions of wel-
fare. Despite constant attacks from the left it is not the Re-
publicans' sole aim in life to cut assistance to the poor.
Quite the contrary; Republicans seek to empower people.
Republicans believe in economic policies that will strengthen
industry thereby allowing more people to work Republicans
champion personal responsibility and accomplishment Also,
the Republican party is committed to better managing en-
titlement programs before they are depleted. Still the oppo-
sition is comfortable blaming Republicans for starving chil-
dren rather than proposing solid tangible reforms.
Democrats do not really care about your personal wel-
fare. They want to be re-elected. They want a type of in-
bridled fabricated hysteria to influence your every decision
making process. Since their party has no substance, t�ey
must make people dependent on their failing economic poli-
cies. Sc what if your policies are ineffective and put an un-
due burden on working Americans they get you elected?
Deception is the strongest arm of the left today. Why
not deal with the real issues at hand? Children are hungry
and for all their hype, the current economic policies of this
country do not work.
According to Social Work Magazine, America is still the
leader in child poverty. Actually, in 1969 at the dawn of
L.BJs great society, 15.6 percent of all children in America
were poor. The most current figures indicate that 21.8 per-
cent of all children in America are poor. So the actual re&l
and tangible benefits of these great wealth redistribution
policies are higher taxes, higher poverty and more debt as a
nation.
Business creates jobs-pure and simple. Knowing this,
one president tried a program which actually paid half the
salary of employees in job training programs. Small Busi-
ness could hire an employee and government would train
them, thereby putting people to work and helping small busi-
ness. Such a program as this used tax dollars to entice busi-
ness to hire new employees and they did just that This pro-
gram was under the administration of F.D.R. right? Perhaps
J.F.K. or L.BJ. was responsible. Okay, Jimmy Carter must
have done it right? No, no, no, and no it was none other
than Ronald Reagan!
These are the kinds of reform that work Most people
on welfare want to work They would much rather have a job
with a decent income and the respect it brings rather than a
meager allowance from Big Brother. However, business can-
not flourish in a taxed-todeath economy. Despite what you
may or may not have heard, if business doesn't survive we
don't survive. Capitalism is the savior of the poor, not govern-
ment
As the election draws closer once again you can see
prominent Democrats adopting more conservative themes.
Governor Jim Hunt's much celebrated crackdown on dead-
beat dads is a good example. Bill Clinton recently signed a
welfare reform bill very similar to what the 104th Congress
wanted all along Both of these reforms were proposed by
the first Republican controlled congress in 40 years. Well, at
least they're getting the idea.
Don't force personal values on society
To the Editor,
I am writing in response to the
article on homosexuality, composed
by a Mr. Donald Wheatley, which ap-
peared in the latest issue of TEC
(Tuesday, September 10.) 1 would re-
ally like to know what ethical prin-
ciples give this man the basis for his
blatantly ignorant views. The method
in which he tries to force his perverse
opinions upon the reader is appall-
ing- I don't believe that it is the re-
sponsibility of any single human be-
ing to determine the correct course
of action for the entire world. By im-
posing his judgment upon the lifestyle
of others, Mr. Wheatley puts himself
above society, places himself as the
supreme authoritative figure in spiri-
tual matters, and takes the role of
translator of the Word of God. In
doing so, he himself commits the sin
of pride, which renowned author
Alexander Pope described as "the
never-ending vice of fools What
could a man like Mr. Wheatley possi-
bly teach us about the cleansing of
our sins when he epitomizes the worst
of them?
In his article Mr. Wheatley made
comments about "Chapel Hell" and
"the queer capitol of NC I must ad-
mit that this is eloquently put-I can
tell these are the words of a true Chris
tian missionary. This man could not
even proofread his own article for
spelling and grammatical errors and
we are supposed to follow him down
the road to "salvation?" I suggest to
Mr. Wheatley that instead of bashing
today's colleges, he should try to ob-
tain an education for himself.
Acceptance is one of the great-
est gifts of mankind. Individual sexual
preferences are not a public matter.
Our job as human beings is not to
condemn the lifestyle of others, but
to try to live our own with purity and
virtue. Instead of slander, Mr.
Wheatley should look inward and
evaluate himself, for he has a lot of
problems. Understanding and an open
mind are the only keys to peace. Re-
member the lesson of the Lord: "This
is my commandment, That ye love one
another, as 1 have loved you (John
15:12)
Spring Helligrath
Aettetei te t6e SdCta
Concessionaires unhappy with new contract
To the Editor,
At the start of the 1995 football
season, we the concessionaires were
granted a fair and equitable commis-
sions contract primarily through the
outstanding efforts of an athletic ad-
ministrator and myself to reach that
agreement. We purchased our 20
drink trays of Pepsi, Coca-Cola and
Mountain Dew from the management
at Ficklen Stadium for $34 per tray
and sold the 20 drinks in each tray
for $40, making $6 per tray sold. Ev-
eryone was happy, even if the weather
was not as good as hoped for.
This year, some turnover of staff
occurred within the ranks of the foot-
ball concessions management. When
we the concessionaires returned to
work on Saturday, September 7th, we
found that the cost of each tray to us
had been raised to $35 per tray, with
the ceiling on the selling price remain-
ing the same at $2 per soda or $40
per tray. Our commission or profit per
tray sold by us is decreased from $6
down to $5 or exactly 20 sic less
than what we received from sales last
year. Such a negative "restructuring
or downsizing of the fair and equitable
contract we had agreed upon last year
reflects a lack of good faith toward
us as drink sellers, whether or not we
sold sodas last year, or were newly
brought in this year to do this job.
The current downsizing of the com-
mission allowed to the soda conces-
sionaires at the football games needs
some realistic and serious rethinking
that can only result in the return to
the contract that was guaranteed to
us in 1995.
Richard F. Becker
Senior
Political Science
-�-





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5 Thursday, Septmber 12,1996 The East Carolinian
By Farkas
Lake Imp USA
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?epU�M: TOEIR FACES HVS
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John Murphy Biol 3221
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Primitiv Man
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Life on Tuesday
F
By Chris Knotts
HI THERE. THE HAWES TUESDAY
WELCOME, TO MY LIFE, fll �
A.YERA&E CAREER COLLE&E STUDENT-
SEEN HERE FOR SEVERAL YEAK KW
I can't remember xw mow why,
RVT I DON'T REALLY THlHK THAT KIHD
0F THIH& MATTERS MUCH. ANyWAY,
DEPICTED IN THIS SMALL , ANIMATED
VU,0fclt AT6 CW ADVENTURES itf LIFE.
PLEASE MEET AHD SAY HELLO ID THE
� following:
MY ONE YEAR
OLD BROTHER,
3ESSE. THU KID
IS fl TRIP. YolSEF,
ttES SCPT OF A
PR0DI6Y. TWO FEET
TALL, AND HE'S AS
SMRsT AS X AM.
AND ,WaL EVEN
THOUGH riEi SO SHORT,
&RLS LIKE HIM MORE
THAN ME.
Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
THIS S
drew, we:ve
BEEN ButpES FOR
aViTE A WHILE.
THE 6L)Y HAS WRE
?fK LUCK TrtAH
ANYSODY t SHOW,
iWCLUDiNfr HIE.
ArtD REALLY
TrtfiYs IMPRESstVE
THIS IS Dflt HE'S
A PRETTY 5F1��TH
GUT. JFTER AU
HE TAKES CARE OF
THE TUITION. AND
THE INSURANCE. AND
PRETTY MUCH ANY
CASH FLOW SITUATION,
H0WEYERT DON'T
"THINK HE REACHES
THAT X DO rr HAVE
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13��Cj�i
Rouso on Duty
By Trevor VanMeter The Raven
By Matthew Childers
Deuce
By Starchild Nine stitches
By Andre' Germain





Thursday, September 12,1996 The East Carolinian
lMrttde
SEPTEMBER
Thursday
12
� Mm The African American State
of Affairs at ECU Organization will
meet from 4:30-6 p.m. in the Men-
denhall Great Room.
Faculty Recital with Christopher
Ulffers. bassoon, and Elizabeth
Norvell Ulffers, piano, at 8 p.m. in
AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
�������?��������
Eddie at Hendrix Theatre, at
through Sept. 14.
�������������?�
2 Skinny J's at the Attic.
����������������
Ominous Seapods at Peasant's
cm.
Manic Street Preachers at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
13
Friday
Down East Pride Festival
with Penn, acoustic guitarist and
vocalist, 9-11 p.m. at the Percola-
tor Coffeehouse.
Pink Floyd light show at the At-
tic
������������?���
Fuego del Alma at Peasant's Cafe.
Cravin' Melon with Debbie Liske
at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Saturday
14
� " Down East Pride Festival
with workshops scheduled from
10 a.mi p.m. in the General Class-
room Building.
� ���������������
Down East Pride Festival outdoor
concert with Commonbond, Fuego
del Alma, two-headed Elvis, Miss
Poochie Pinetops, and the Alan
Arnette Dancers from 12-5 p.m. at
the Greenville Town Common.
� �
� � � � �
Down East Pride Festival jazz con-
cert featuring Melody D. Edwards
at the Percolator Coffeehouse,
9:30-11:30 p.m.
�����
Gibb Droll Band at the Attic.
����������������
Keller Williams at Peasant's Cafe.
Mr. T Experience with Squirt Gun
& Hellbender at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro.
Sunday
15
� � Colouring Lessons at the
Underwater Cafe.
Dirty 3 with Lud at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Monday
16
' Faculty Recital with Louise
Toppin, soprano, and John B.
O'Brien, piano, 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
17
Cafe.
Tuesday
Tanglefoot at Peasant's
Wednesday
I
18
' " Mike Mesmer "Eyes hyp-
notist, at the Attic.
Alanis Morissette at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh.
Man or Astroman? with the Hench-
men at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
SEND US INFO
Do you have an upcoming event that you'd
like listed in our Coming Attractions col-
umn? If so, please send us information la
schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville. NC
- 27858
Thespians seek
diverse talent
Dale Williamson
Aadttant Lifestyle Editor
They resurrected Martin Luther
King, Jr. last semester with their dra-
matic talents. They also enlightened
audiences with a historical play detail-
ing the various roles African-Americans
have played throughout the ages. They
constantly strive to bring cultural aware-
ness to ECU through the dramatic art
form. They are the ECU Thespians of
Diversity, and they are currently look-
ing for new members to join their cause.
Originally named the Black Thes-
pians, the Thespians of Diversity was
founded by Reginald Watson, a lecturer
in the English department. Since
Watson is concerned with cultural is-
sues, he wanted to create an organiza-
tion where minority students could let
their voices be heard, a place where they
could express their individual talents.
Shows put on by the Thespians are
original pieces written by Watson which
incorporate such dramatic forms as
song, dance and poetry. When Watson's
history play, Black Voices From the
Past, was first presented to ECU in 1993,
it included traditional African dance as
well as songs inspired by gospel. By al-
lowing various artistic forms to play a
part within the Thespians, Watson
hopes to attract a wide range of talent
The Thespians, which work in con-
junction with but independently from
the ECU Dramatic Arts program, en-
courage minority students to get in-
volved by giving them the opportunity
to do anything from writing their own
pieces to simply assisting with produc
tions. In other words, you don't have to
be an actor or writer to get involved.
The Thespians have proven to be a
very positive role model for not only
ECU, but also the Greenville commu-
nity at large. Currently, a few Thespian
members (Olyata and Kwame Rigsby,
C J. Rowland and Tonia Joyner) are put-
ting their talents to productive use as
tutorials for D.H. Conley High School
students.
The group has grown in popular-
Professor Reginald Watson
ity, and has recently been officially rec-
ognized by the university. So far, the
Thespians have performed several pro-
ductions both on and off campus. They
performed Black Voices From the Past
at D.H. Conley, the Minority Expo event
and the local Army Reserve Center.
Other notable productions put on
by the group include I've Seen the
Mountain Top But It Don't Look So
Good, which details Martin Luther
King's resurrection in the contemporary
world, and Kwanzaa Story, which was
done in celebration of Kwanzaa.
Despite the strong support that the
Thespians have gotten since their birth,
they need more help in order to keep
going with strength. Many of their
former members have graduated, so the
group is now seeking new talent If you
are an ECU student who has a desire to
write, act or simply be part of a pro-
ductive organization (especially if you
are a minority student), then contact
either Reginald Watson at 3286684 or
Kwame Rigsby at 328-3808.
There will be a meeting for all in-
terested persons either Sept 17 or Sept
20 in Mendenhall Student Center. Con-
tact Mr. Watson for more information.
We live in a country that is more
readily accepting itself as a multicultural
nation, so cultural issues are increas-
ingly important Do your part in bring-
ing cultural awareness to the forefront
Support the ECU Thespians of Diver-
sity. �
Photos Courtesy of University Unions
Legends of Louisiana (above), A Journey in Japan (bottom left), The New South Africa
(bottom center) and Royal Hawaii (bottom right) are the films on schedule for this fall.
Visit faraway lands in Mendenhall
Andy Turner
Staff Wrttor
Seafood gumbo. Steamed
sushi. Pacific Rim chicken kabobs.
Chicken in nut sauce.
Sound good?
These respective staples of
Louisianian, Japanese, Hawaiian and
South African cuisine are only a
small part of what University Unions
and ECU are cooking up for the fall
semester.
ECU will kick off its annual
Travel-Adventure Film and Theme
Dinner series later this month with
plenty of food, culture and insight
into these four popular travel desti-
nations. The series has been a popu-
lar attraction at ECU for more than
20 years.
Each destination will feature
films along with narration from
guest speakers at Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall. Theme dinners will
be served in the Mendenhall Great
Room.
Carol Woodruff. ECU market-
ing director, said ECU hopes to ex-
pand student audiences for the series.
Woodruff added that the series is
a wonderful learning opportunity for
students in various majors including in-
ternational and ethnic studies, foreign
languages, anthropology and history.
"I think it really provides an op-
portunity to broaden their view Woo-
druff explained. "It makes it much more
of a human experience
The series has long been a favorite
of local residents, Woodruff said.
"It is part of our mission to the
region to provide outreach, education
and entertainment to the greater uni-
versity community she said.
Past audience favorites have in-
cluded presentations on Great Britain,
Italy and other popular travel destina-
tions.
Woodruff said a vast industry of
travel filmmakers exist ECU, she added,
attempts to get presenters and films that
provide a different and interesting angle
on a particular destinatioa
There will be four film presenta-
tions this fall and ECU will present five
more travel filmstheme dinners in the
spring.
Legends of Louisiana will be pre-
sented Sept 30 by Sandy Mortimer,
a former news reporter and flight at-
tendant Mortimer promises to prove
that there is more to Louisiana than
New Orleans and its Mardi Gras. From
the northern "Bible Belt" to the
swamps of Cajun country, the film
offers a trip to the land of voodoo
and crawfish.
Sheriryn Mentes will present The
New South Africa on Nov. 4. Mentes
was named 1991 Speaker of the Year
by the Professional Travelogue Pre-
senters' Association. South Africa has
undergone tremendous change over
the last few years. Mentes will present
a country rich in resources and
beauty yet still faced with new chal-
lenges.
A Journey in Japan will take
place Nov. 20. Woody Thomas, along
with his wife Merillan, will present this
Far East experience. The journey
takes viewers across "time and cul-
tures" from ancient Buddhist shrines
to the modern shopping districts of
Tokyo.
The fall semester's last series in-
See FILM page 9
0D TRevtetoa
The Charlie Mars Band
Broken Arrow
,����� �
tape it firm
opao
a friend
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
From the depths of Atlanta comes
the Charlie Mars Band And what a
"band" they are, full of musicians, includ-
ing the man himself, that can carry a
groove from one moment to the next
The band is composed of four mem-
bers: Charlie (of course), Andy Sample
(bass), Andrew Hanmer (drums), and
Scott Osmond (soprano saxophone). As
you can see, the band has the instru-
ments to make it work.
A voice is what they're lacking. Not
in a bad way. Mars has a voice. How-
ever, it's just not right for the music that
he's writing.
Charlie Mars plays acoustic and elec-
tric guitar, acoustic piano, and har-
monica, on top of singing on this record.
Let's face it the man is talented. H s
focused, has a good sound, and is very
young as well. The twenty-year-old musi-
cian is pulling in audiences all the way
down the east coast
The album starts off with a song
called "Maybe His Name Was Jay Maybe
it was, maybe it wasn't If you listen to
the song, you might find out One thing
that you'll find out is that it's groovy. It's
easy to pick up the rhythm if you follow
the guitar.
The guitar, that's it! That's what
makes this band noticeable. Charlie Mars
may not be a first tenor; however, you
can hear the influences of some of the
best guitarists in his solos.
In fact, if you listen closely, you
would swear some of the songs were
someone else's. For instance, track num-
ber eight The song is called "The An-
swer to Everything Well, the answer
came in the form of a Tori Amos piano
riff. And no, fans, the voice didn't match
up. That's okay, though, at least Mars
didn't attempt to hit a high B-flat
Although a few of their tunes could
be misunderstood to be someone else's,
the band doesn't cross the line into
stealing note for note. They don't let it
go offcourse, or suggest that other bands
should take that turn.
The overall sound of this band is
not that bad. It's big, bold and diwrv.
(everything you need for a live per-
formance), and they will probably do well
at Peasant's Cafe when they come to
town on Sept 24.
Broken Arrow is on Dark Horse
Records and are probably as close as your
local record store. If you can't catch 'em
there, catch 'em live on Sept. 24.
D"
� mm
5
i
MIL
IS
Peart Jam
No Code
Jay Myers
Ufwtyle Editor
There used to be a time when I
hated Pearl Jam. When Ten first came
out, I thought it was mindless jock
rock thinly disguised as a Nirvana
clone. They appeared at Lollapalooza
that year as well, and I took advan-
tage of their set to walk around the
park, check out the vendors and catch
a couple of second stage bands.
But then came Vs and my opin-
ion of the band changed. Actually, the
change started before the release of
the second album. Pearl Jam began
to make waves in the press by refus-
ing to make any more music videos,
re'easing Vs. on the "dead" vinyl for-
mat a week before the CD arrived, and
going toe-to-toe with mega-monopoly
Ticketmaster in an effort to guaran-
tee lower ticket prices for their fans.
Because of these choices, I had
newfound respect for the band.
This respect turned to admiration
when Vs. arrived. Pearl Jam had be-
conv a versatile, musically-enriched
powerhouse act with a range that
went from full-on guitar rock to soul-
ful ballads. Even Ten began to sound
a little better, but not great on a re-
peated listening.
Vitalogy came next, and Pearl
Jam proved that they could be weird
and wacky as well. Disregarding their
growing popularity, they followed
Vitalogy by appearing as Neil Young's
backing band on his brilliant
Mirrorball album. All of this made me
more and more of a fan.
So what does all of this informa-
tion have to do with the band's new
album, No Code? Well, No Code is a
step back for Pearl Jam. Whereas Vs.
was a focused album that balanced
itself perfectly between its hard and
soft edges, Vitalogy maintained a
creepy kind of intelligence, and
Mirrorball succeeded as an instrumen-
tal tour de force for Pearl Jam, No
Code is none of these things.
The album tries to combine laid-
back acoustic tunes ("Sometimes" and
"Off He Goes") with hard-edged heavy
ones ("Hail, Hail "Habit"). In be-
tween are squeezed an eerily disqui-
eting track ("I'm Open") and a couple
of songs that sound like Neil Young
("Smile "Red Mosquito"). Does all
of this sound familiar? You bet.
See CODE pgeV
Photo by Elizabeth Duncan
Name: Seo Eo
Dept: School of Art
Job: Ceramics Professor
Joseph Elchehabi
Staff Writer
"A lot of people are ob-
sessed with recording Seo Eo,
ECU's new ceramics professor,
said. "They write journals
tape their favorite shows or live
concerts. The want to remem-
ber, to record
Born in Pusan, a small port
city in southeastern Korea, Eo
has his own special way of re-
cording and sharing his experi-
ences with others. He creates
traditional functional pottery,
interpreting ancient forms from
the seventh century Shilla Dy-
nasty of Korea, and mixes his
love of ceramics with the simple
epicurean delight of good eat-
ing. Not only are his creations
See PROFILE page 8





mursaay, beptember 12,1996
me tast Laroiinian
wmmismowmimiemmmmmmsMSRiBisisiBiaiSim
PROFILE from page
beautiful, but they also serve a pur-
pose.
"When I say functional, 1 mean
practical. But functional or non-
functional, what I'm really inter-
ested in is tH quality of living, and
that involves eating, your intimate
spaces, your surroundings. The fact
that you can use a a work of art
adds to the beauty of the object.
"The thing that intrigues me
the most about traditional pottery
is that the user develops some sort
of special relationship with the ob-
ject. You the artist create your in-
timate dialogue with yourself, the
object and the person using it. That
whole experience becomes what I
cherish about doing functional
work
Although much of Eo's pottery
evokes an Eastern style that is over
one thousand years old, his ceram-
ics are also personal and original.
"Even though I'm interested in tra-
ditional Korean pottery, the forms
that I make are my own interpreta-
tions of them. 1 would never be able
to duplicate what was done thirteen
hundred years ago
Besides Korea, Eo has lived
and studied in such diverse coun-
tries as Bolivia and Japan, but it
wasn't until he started studying for
his Master's degree at Utah State
University that he made his recur-
sive journey to Korean aesthetics.
"I guess you could say he
laughed, "that I rediscovered Korea
in Logan, Utah, of all places
Eo seems to have adjusted well
to his new job and residence, for
which he greatly thanks the faculty
and students.
"I had a very warm reception
from everybody here especially
the faculty members. They have
welcomed me and have been ex-
tremely helpful. I think in a way I
had an advantage starting because
of that. It really counts to have
welcoming people. I'm also im-
pressed by the enthusiasm of the
students and their willingness to
work hard
Eo hasn't had much time to ex-
plore the campus, but he has been
to the library's new addition.
"It's awesome he says. "It's
one of the newest public libraries
that I've seen around As for
Greenville itself, the asymmetrical
layout of the city's streets confuse
him. Slowly but surely he's getting
the hang of things, though.
When asked what motivates
him to create such beautiful works
of art, he simply smiled. "A lot of
reasons why I make stuff like that
is because 1 want to use them

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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 12,1996
r
Thfe Nail Salon, Ztc.
355-1661
Welcome Back,
ECU Students and Staff.
The Salon is conviently located at 3401 SouthJEvans Ext,
just 1 mile south of Target Store. ymJl
I We are full-serviced offering:
ECU Value Day� on Every a � ,
FILM from page 7
stallment is Royal Hawaii: By One Who
Lives There. On Dec 4, Willis Moore
will attempt to take attendees to the
place he has called home for the past
30 years. Moore plans to present some
of Hawaii's lesser known - yet just as
stunning - attractions, along with the
more recognizable sites of Pearl Har-
bor and Wakiki Beach.
ECU students can attend the film
presentations for free with their student
ID. Costs for theme dinners can be de-
ducted from students' declining balance
and meal card plans.
Norwtudents will be required to
pay $4 to attend films and16 for theme
dinners.
Anyone who is interested in attend-
ing a theme dinner must reserve a spot
three working days before the dinner.
Reservations for tables seating as many
as eight are available. The deadline for'
the Sept 30 dinner is Sept 25.
For more information about films
or dinners, call the Central Ticket Of-
fice at (919) 3284788 or 1-800-ECU
ARTS. Deaf or speech impaired persons,
may call (919) 3284736.
Cy 01 Ji from page'
Thursday
during the month of
September, All ECU
Students and Faculty
recieve 10 Off Any
Service with an ECU ID.
(Non Request Stylist and
Technicians Only)
Ask about our GAMEDAY MANICURE,
only at The Nail Salon, Ztc
State licensed Manicurist and American owned ar.d operated.
I � Qeomebucal QidUtif StfUi-
� flewebuf. emA Qift Btudufue
� Manicunei-
fiedicuAei-
Basically, Pearl Jam has done the
best they can to cram all of their dis-
parate tastes onto one album, leaving
a mish-mash of unconnected songs. It's
more like a b-sides collection. That's
not so bad, though I happen to think
that bands often include some of their
best work on b-sides collections (like
Pisces Iscariot by Smashing Pumpkins
or Dead Letter Office by R.E.M.). And
No Code is no different
The song "Present Tense" is one
of the best Pearl Jam compositions I've
ever heard. Beginning with a mellow
litany by Mr. Vedder, sounds are added
slowly (first a simple guitar chung, then
a light drum tinkle, and so on) build-
ing to a thundering climax, after which
the instruments are pulled out one by
one, leaving only the rhythm at the end.
Beautiful.
On the other hand, there are a
couple of misses, too. "Mankind" is a
utterly annoying song which sets my
teeth on edge. Way too commercial in
every aspect, it also features guitarist
Stone Gossard on lead vocals, some-
thing that should never be done again.
Another shot in the dark, "Around the
Bend" sounds unbelievably like a slow-
tempo Hawaiian dirge by everyone's
favorite parrothead, Jimmy Buffett.
Talk about disgusting.
It seems that Pearl Jam can do
wrong. Even their boycott of
Ticketmaster has blown back up in
their faces. Tickets for their small
shows, like the upcoming one in Char-
lotte, reportedly ranged from $1820.
Good luck getting one at that price,
though. Scalpers easily snatched up
most of the tix and are now selling
them for $75-150 apiece. That's defi-
nitely not getting the lowest price to
the fans. Pearl Jam does try hard to do
the right thing, though.
Despite its flaws, No Code is a
pretty good collection of songs. No,
an album, mind you, but a collection t
of songs. Most of these would fit in
nicely with the albums they seem to
be taken from, and adding them into a
mix tape of favorite PJ tracks would
probably not be too bad, either. If
you're a Pearl Jam fan, then I recom-
mend waiting for this one to show up
in the used bins. If you like Pearl Jam
even a little bit, then you should bor-
row it from your friend and tape th
tracks you like.
6tu Nldtdd
TUESDAYS
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night For Female Dancers
Hpm-lam
CASH PRIZE
�CwtMtu �� (� �H t,i nfUw .� ttmu Hot irri� tf Kf�.
THURSDAYS
Country Night
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female Exotic" Dancers.
$ DANCERS WANTED $
c4 xfouch oi CCass
Thursday, September 12
Friday, September 13
Saturday, September 14
r
I
i
i
i
i
ECU
IJMcDomtd's"
I
We do Birthdays. Bachelor Parties. Bridal
Showers, Coiporate Parties, & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
il Dickinson Ave.
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
i (Behind John's Convenient Man) ! �- I BI
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
Showtime!
HOMECOMING 133B
WEDNESDAY 0CT08E123
HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVE ELECTIONS
MMVSHIWJE1IIUMI
HwawuBfm
MM-5WilMlOFM!5IGK
SAM-fifMMEWEffiAlLSWIEHI CEBER
TUESDAY OCTOBER 2S
AUTOGRAPH NIGHT
iK'iPlAZAWW�i:3OTi,
FREE MfTOGMni MGKSff 1CUUREII 1 AMB OKBEH)
BANNER CONTEST JUDGING
USCBRICKY�tt.11:3MH
MONDAY OCTOBER 28
"COUNT DRACUUU�
(CHEW OR W�. MStyMfWSSdlfB. NOBR-I Fll
FRIDAY. I
SKEETER BRANDON &HWY.61
MttUKMIIUM
PIRATEFEST
HSHMMIMMMN
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 2
PARADE LINEUP
tiiwitniw
HOMECOMING PARADE
IMM-lli
THURSDAY, OCTOBERS!
MIDNIGHT MADNESS V
UENDENHALt STUBEfll CENTER 9PM-2AAJ
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME 2PM SATURDAY
ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY VS. ECU PIRATES
HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE HALF
WINNING OF THE SPIRIT CUP
THE HOMECOMING COMMITTEE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES
FLOAT, BANNER CONTEST, HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS. KING CANDIDATE, AND QUEEN CANDIDATE
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ALL ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 BY 5:00
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
THERE WILL BE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221 AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO RECEIVE A HOMECOMING ORGANIZATION PACKET ACTIVITIES APPUCATION STOP Bf ROOM 218 IN THE MENDENHAU. STUDENT CENTER ORCAU. J2M711 �SCHEDULE OF EVENTS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
I
"HP





10
Thursday, September 12,1996 The East Carolinian
Pirates: stand up
against Mountaineers
Brian Paiz
Senior Writer
If you have ever been to
Morgantown, W.VA. on a football Sat-
urday, then you know how fanatic
West Virginia fans are about their
Mountaineers.
On Saturday, through all the
crazy mayhem at -�
WVU, ECU will be
trying to accom-
plish something
that has never
done: beat WVU at
Mountaineer Field.
The game,
scheduled to kick
off at noon in
Morgantown, will mhhhhmi
put two teams try-
ing to prove something on the na-
tional scene. WVU comes into the
game 2-0 after convincing wins over
Pittsburgh and Western Michigan.
So far this season, the Mountain-
eers have found their offensive pres-
ence from freshman tailback Amos
Zereoue. Zereoue is averaging 142
yds. per game, including 10.1 yds. per
carry. The 5T 195 lb. rusher from
Long Island, has touchdown runs of
67 and 69 yards.
Quarterback Chad Johnston will
be trying to improve his performance
against the Pirates. Johnston
struggled in Greenville, helping the
Pirates secure a 23-20 victory in '95.
This season, the senior signal caller
has thrown for 333 yards and three
touchdowns, leading WVU to a 2-0
start
Johnston has used 10 different
Mountaineers in passing situations so
far this season, showing the
Mountaineer's very well-balanced
passing game. Johnston has also
helped WVU find a way to score in
the red zone. The Mountaineers are
8-8 inside the 20-yard line this sea-
-����� son-
"West
Virginia's offense
is totally differ-
ent from
ETSU's ECU
Head Coach
Steve Logan
said. "Their of-
fense is a two-
back set with a
lot of power run-
"West Virginia's
offense is totally
different from
ETSU's
� Coach Steve Logan
ning
The Mountaineer defense is led
by Butkus Award nominee Canute
Curtis. Curtis has three sacks on the
year so far, giving the Amityville, N.Y.
native 21 on his career. A sack against
ECU on Saturday would tie Curtis
with current New Orleans Saint,
Renaldo Turnbull, for the school
record.
The Mountaineer defense has reg-
istered 15 sacks in the first two games,
and has also totaled 25 plays with
negative or no yardage. WVU has only
given up 51 total rushing yards this
season.
"Their defense blitzes a lot and
the team has shown a lot in its first
two games Logan said.
In the WVU secondary, look for
Vann Washington to give ECU quar-
terback Marcus Crandell some prob-
lems. Washington is tied for eighth
on the all-time WVU interception list
Strong safety Charles Emanuel and
short corner Mike Logan are other
standouts on the Mountaineer de-
fense.
ECU looked sluggish at some
points in their opening win over
ETSU. One of the bright spots for the
Pirates was running back Scott
Harley. Hariey rushed for 165 yards,
a touchdown and showed great power
in many of his runs.
Quarterback Marcus Crandell
struggled early, but bounced back in
the second half, passing for 266 yards
and three touchdowns for the game.
On defense, the Pirates will have
their work cut out on Saturday with
the Mountaineers' Zereoue. WVU has
always been known to have a strong
fullback with a very quick tailback
to follow. Last Saturday ECU's de-
fense did not play as well against the
run as defensive coordinator Paul
Jette, would have liked, so look for
ECU's defense to step up in week
two.
Notes ECU vs. WVU
This will be the tenth time the two
schools have met The last time ECU
visited Morgantown was 1992, when
WVU defeated the Pirates 41-28The
game will be televised by WNCT-TV 9
in Greenville and will also be the Big
East Game-of-the-Week. In addition,
the game will be a part of the ESPN
Game Plan pay-per-view series.
Adventurous trips planned
Cathy EMondo
Roc Services
Need a break? The Recreational
Services Adventure Program can provide
you with exciting adventure trips, lei-
surely afternoon canoe rides, climbing,
outdoor living skills and scuba diving.
If you're looking to get away for a
day or a weekend of fun and adventure,
the Adventure Program is right for you.
Get a group of friends together and
do something different on the weekends.
With the adventure trips, you and your
friends can visit Masonboro Island, N.C.
National Park, Va. Wilmington, N.C. West
Virginia, Pilot Mountain, Killington, VT
Southwest Virginia and many more ex-
citing places.
During your trip, you can get the
opportunity to go white water rafting,
hang gliding, horseback riding, backpack-
ing, rock climbing and kayaking.
Registration is on a first come, first
serve basis. Register today for any of
the Adventure Programs exciting trips
in 204 Christenbury. All of the equip-
ment needed will be included in your reg-
istration fee, so bring you and your
friends for a lot of fun and adventure.
If your schedule does not permit
weekend getaways, the Adventure Pro-
gram offers leisurely afternoon canoe
; rides on the Tar River. This trip is a per-
fect study break. The canoe ride is from
�36 p.m. on September 18 and 25. Be
: sure to register the Monday before each
trip.
If you want to learn more about the
great outdoors before you go on a trip
or for your own enjoyment Rec Services
'� Outdoor Living Skills Workshops offers
the perfect opportunity. Sign-up for a
different Outdoor Living Skills Workshop
held every other Tuesday. Learn to live
in the outdoors with:
Date Type of workshop
Sepf. 21 -22 Beach Weekend Getaway
Mansonboro island, N.C.
Sept. 24 Try Scuba
Sept. 27-2 Backpacking Trip
Shenandoah
Oct. 4-6 Whitewater Rafting
New River Gorge, W.V.
Sea Kayaking Day Tri
Caving Weekend
Climbing Competition
with Intromurals
Oct. 16-20 Fall Break Backpacking
Joyce KilmerSlickrock
Oct. 25-27 Unville Gorge Climbing
Nov. 1-3 Backpacking Trip, VA.
Nov. 5 Try Scuba
Nov. 16-17 Pilot Mountain Climbing
Dec 7 Wintergreen Ski
Day Trip
Jan 5-1 1 Christmas Break
Ski Week
Register by
Sept. 13
Register by
Sept. 13
Register by
Sept. 20
Register by
Sept. 16
Register by
,�t. 20
Register by
Sept. 27
Register by
Oct. 10
Register by
Oct. 4
Register
Oct. 14
Register by
Oct. 25
Register I
Oct. 25
Register by
Nov. 8
Register by
Dec. 2
Register by
Nov. 15
Wham, bam!
(Top) Kari Koenning
spikes the ball on her
defenders Tuesday
night. Koenning netted
nine kills for the night.
(L) Shannon Kaess
slices one down the
line. She led the team
with 17 kills.
Photo by PATRICK IRELEN
Home opener a struggle
for volleyball team
Overall record
now stands at
1-5
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
The ECU women's volleyball
team stumbled in their first home
opener, winning one game out of a
four game match, 5-15,15-6,12-15,4-
15.
The Tuesday night match against
N.C. A&T was a struggle for the
young Pirate netters. who went into
the game on a high note after getting
their first win at Hampton University
last week. As far as size, the two teams
matched up pretty much the same.
The team had their troubles right
off the bat with a loss in the first game.
They bounced back in the second
game and were able to secure one win.
The troubles persisted in the last two
games, both which were losses.
The Lady Pirates dug a hole early
on that they could not get out of. N.C.
A&T was able to attack the Pirates
hard from the middle and put up a
lot of points early on. The Aggies
played solid throughout the match in
both their passing and defensive
games.
Jennifer Harris, a junior college
transfer in her first year at ECU, was
able to put the match in perspective.
We played decent, but we just
got down so much in the beginning
that we couldn't catch back up Har-
ris said. "We have to come off strong
from the beginning and stop the other
team from scoring too many points
in a row
ECU did bounce back and secure
the next game.
"The second game we were able
to keep the score close and we didn't
pass up a lot of first balls and we got
a lot of first side outs Harris said.
"Defensively we need to get our block
up stronger and work on some of the
details
This year's squad is young and
they are still getting used to playing
together.
"The team is still adjusting be-
cause we are so young, but I think we
can improve on our mistakes as a team
throughout the year and really take
off next year Harris said.
Harris transferred to ECU via
Parkland College in Champagne, Illi-
nois and hopes to bring valuable ex-
perience to this young Pirate team,
but admits the transition has been
somewhat difficult.
"What makes it so hard when you
transfer is you have to adjust to a new
coach, new system, new area and ev-
erything Harris said.
ECU heads off to Ithaca, N.Y. this
weekend to play in a tournament at
Cornell University, which will be the
beginning of another tough road trip.
They are expected to go head to head
with some good volleyball programs.
Among the teams joining ECU
this weekend will be Lehigh, Wagner.
Morgan State and Cornell. The rest
of the month will not get any easier
for the Lady Pirates as they will play
in one more tournament, as well as
facing off against in-state rivals UNC-
Chapel Hill and Wake Forest.
The team returns home to Minges
Coliseum Sept. 30, to play UNC-
Greensboro at 7 p.m.
Sept 17Wilderness Medicine
OctlIntroduction to River Rescue
Octl5Knot Tying
Oct29One Burner Gourmet
Nov. 12Introduction to Mao & Compass
Nov. 26Holiday Guide to Adventure Gifts.
The workshops are from 7-8:30 p.m.
Register the Friday before each workshop
in 204 Christenbury.
The Adventure Program also offers
an underwater test dive for anyone in-
terested in trying scuba diving for the
first time. Learn all the basics of under-
water breathing and how to use the
equipment in a classroom session. Then
you get a chance to take a your first dive
in the pool.
Try the Scuba Workshop on Sep-
tember 24 or November 5. Register by
September 13 or October 25 respectively
in 204 Christenbury.
Gear up for climbing with Rec Ser-
vices Climbing Skills Workshops. This
workshop covers all the basics of climb-
ing and belaying at the Climbing Tower
(located behind the Allied Health Science
Building) and soon at the Indoor Climb-
ing Wall in the new recreational facility.
Climb from 4-6 p.m. on September 16,
23,26,30 or October 3, 7,10, and 14.
Interested parties must register
one business day before each climbing
workshop.
Organize your own adventure with
the Adventure Rental Center (ARC). The
ARC provides you with the equipment
to camp along a lake or go canoeing on
your own or with some friends.
You can rent from a variety of equip-
ment The ARC rents canoes, tents, tarps,
backpacks, cooksets, climbing shoes, lan-
terns and much more at low cost
Reservations can be made up to two
weeks in advance at the ARC. A valid
ECU ID must be shown to rent equip-
ment Stop by the ARC, located in the
basement of Christenbury Gym and or-
ganize your own weekead getaway.
The Recreational Services Adven-
ture Program will provide you with a
great time. For adventure trip dates and
registration deadlines or more informa-
tion, stop by 204 Christenbury or call
Rec Services at 32&6387.
Ntnes
ECU
V5�
West Virginia
vVv
U�s
� ECU and West
Virginia will
bemeeting for the
10th time.
� The Mountaineers
lead the series 8-1.
� ECU beat West
Virginia iast season
in Greenville 23-20.
� West Virginia is
2-0 so far beating
Pitt 34-0, and
Western Michigan
34-9.
Mountaineer quarterback Chad Johnston's
1995 stats:
GGS 1 ComptAtt.
11-11 j 127248
Yards
ToTCr
IL
ECU vs. West Virginia Flashbacks
v
d
V970
1971
1981
1982
1936
1987
1988
1992
1995
-WVU, 28-f4atECU
-WVU, 44-21 at WV
- WVU, 20-3 at WVU
- WVU, 30-3 at WVU
-WVU, 24-21 at ECU
. WVU, 49-0 at WVU
-WVU, 30-10 at ECU
-WVU, 41-28 at WVU
- ECU, 23-20 at ECU





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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 12,1996
11
IN STATE RESIDENCY QUESTIONS?
Peter IM.
Romary
ATTORNEY AT LAW
HARRINGTON, BRADDY &
ROMARY, L.L.R
211-BWEST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NIC 27834
TEL: 919-830-8840

VISA
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
BOOK SAL E
Thursday, Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m.
(Preview sale for Friends only)
Friday, Sept. 13, 9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 14, 9 a.m6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 15,1-5 p.m.
(Bag Day�$4 per grocery bag of books)
Willis Bldg 1st & Reade Sts.
FREEWAY
I-95 NORTH
BUSINESS H
LOOKING FOR A
ROAD TRIP? HEAD
TO MORGANTOWN,
WEST VIRGINIA TO
SEE THE PIRATES
TAKE ON THE
MOUNTAINEERS.
iyi5ae
tle
csal
(THIS IS JUST ONE
WAY TO GO, SO IF
YOU WANT OTHER
WAYS OR NEED
MORE SPECIFIC
DIRECTIONS LOOK
ON AN ATLAS.)
TAKE 1-95 NORTH
UNTIL YOU HIT THE
OUTERBELT OF
WASHINGTON, D.C.
WHICH WILL PUT
YOU ON
INTERSTATE 495.
TAKE 495 WEST
OUT OF D.C. TO
INTERSTATE 270
NORTH TOWARDS
FREDERICK
MARYLAND. OUT OF
FREDERICK TAKE
70 WEST UNTIL YOU
GET TO
HAGARSTOWN AND
THEN PICK UP
INTERSTATE 68
WEST. THIS
INTERSTATE WILL
CARRY YOU ALL
THE WAY TO
MORGANTOWN.
(YOU'RE ON YOUR
OWN ON FINDING
THE STADIUM.)
Save The People You Call Up To 44.
For long-distance calls. Savings based on a 3-min. AT&T operator-dialed interstate call.
Things Really Move
In the Classiieds!
Advertise
with us in
The East
Carolinian.
828-2000
IHIIITDIlllm.





mm.
12
Thursday, September 12,1996 The East Carolinian
For Rent
J
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOR RENT: TWO APARTMENTS 2 blocks
from ECU campus: 3 bedrooms, i 12 and 2
12 baths, appliances. No pets. Depositrent.
Call 756-5528 or 758-7300.
ONE BEDROOM EFFICIENCY APART-
MENT at Ringgold Towers. Conveniently locat-
ed on ECU's campus. No parking hassles. Call
551-3738 for more information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share 2 BR
apartment 6 blocks from campus. $175month
and $150 deposit 12 phoneutilities, non-
smoker. Please call, leave message. 758-6280.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
ROOMMATE WANTED, M OR F to share 2
BR. 12 utilities, 12 rent WD hook-ups. Con-
venient to everything Call 355-4425.
WANTED: MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
seeking 2 housemates. Walk to class. $200
monthphone. Call Kevin 752-5557.
FORRENT: SINGLE BEDROOM with full
kitchen and Uvingroom newly painted, new car-
pet and vinyl throughout Great location next
to campus, 1 block from downtown. Need some-
one to take over lease until May 97 $325 month.
Includes Cable, Water. Sewer. Call (School) 931
0496. (Home) (910) 475-3506 or call 355-8731.
Ask about Sycamore Hill Apt 10
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW Student Recrea-
tion Center. Rent $225 month at 810 Cotanche
Street Call 752-2615. Bill Williams Real Es-
tate beside Cubbies on Evans Street
NEED STUDENTS TO TAKE over lease Oc-
tober 1.3 12 bedroom and 1 bathroom house
at 201 East 13th Street Rent is $450.00 month-
ly plus deposit Call 72-4462.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE PERSON to
share 3 BR2.5 bath townhouse behind Green-
ville Athletic Club. Very nice. Must be neat and
responsible. $290mo. & 12 utilities. 551-
1863, M or F, start Oct 1.
SONY STEREO 135 WATTSCHAN-
NEL.TWO Sony and two Cerwin Vega speak-
ers,$600. Large entertainment center $150.
Kicker box tow 12: woofers, $150. Alphasonils
amplifier,300 watts,$200. GT mountain
bike,$250. Call Brian 752-1891.
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET behind
Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche. Paved lot light-
ed, numbered spaces, towing enforced $288.00
year or $175.00 semester. Call Mr Jackson 756-
6567.
i YEAR OLD BALL Python. Beautiful mark-
ings. Comes with 40 �lion tank and set up
$150.00. Call 758-9120
1?
Help
Wanted
For Sale
MOUNTAIN BIKE. GPAT CONDITION. One
year old. Perfect for riding to class $100.00.
Call Corey 353-3149.
WATERBED KING SIZE $150, loft with mat
tress and large desk. Disassembles very easily.
$150.551-1863.
MACINTOSH POWERBOOK 150 - $600.00,
Seagull handmade acoustic guitar - $300.00,
Ibanez bass guitar - $200.00. All prices negoti-
able. Call David at 752-7107.
BEAR COMPOUND BOW. RH29-31 draw
length. 65 - 80. Excellent Condition. Quiver,
arrows, camouflage case included. $150.00
OBO. Call 8300722.
MONGOOSE THRESHOLD MOUNTAIN
BIKE. Includes u-Lcck and bar ends. Well main-
tained. Creat condition. $200.00 Call 830-0921.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: LONCBOARD'
good condition, must sell. $225 or best offer.
Call Eric 757-3692.
HOMECAR STEREO PHOENIX GOLD Amp
paid $550, will sell for $200. Kicker Bass Tube
$100. Kenwood Home CD player with remote
$60, JVC dual tape deck $30, AR powered book-
shelf speakers $75, Sansui 10" speakers $80,
bookshelf speakers $25. 757-1723.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn up
to $25-$45hour teaching basic conversation-
al English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea. No
teaching background or Asian languages re-
quired. For info, call: (206) 971-3570 ext J53626
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE to students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS to
students in wheelchairs, READERS. AND TU-
TORS. Past experience is desired but not re-
quired. For an application, contact: Office for
Disability Support Services, Brewster A-116 or
A-114. Telephone 919 -328-6799.
REACH 475,360 EMPLOYERS WITH 1 call!
Utilizing current employer databases, reveal un-
advertised job opportunities. Guaranteed re-
sults 1-800-477-JOBS.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE -
Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching cer-
tificate or European languages required. Inex-
pensive Room & Board other benefits. For
info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
CAREGIVER NEEDED THAT IS dependable
and loves children. Hours are Tuesdays 8:30 -
4:30; Wednesday 8:30 - 12:30; Thursday 8:30 -
12:30. References are required. Please call 355-
5067.
BRODVS AND BRODY'S FOR Men are ac-
cepting applications for Part Time Sales asso-
ciates. We seek lashion forward individuals who
can provide friendly courteous service. Flexi-
ble schedules fcr the "early birds" (10am-2pm)
or "night owls" (6pm-?pm). All retail positions
include weekends. Merchandiseclothing dis-
count offered. Applications accepted Tuesday
arid Thursday, 1-5 pm.Brody's, The Plaza and
Carolina East Mall locations.
PHONE SURVEYORS: FTPT HOURS; per-
manent positions, prestigious location; $6-$ 15
hour, benefitsemployee discounts, paid sick
days, paid holidays and managerial training pro-
gram. 355-0779 or 1-800-7754771.
FULL-TIME OR ALMOST full-time person
needed to help stay-at-home Mom care for three
small children. Prefer upper level or grad stud-
ent with experience with babies. Must be ex-
tremely responsible, dependable and energetic.
Non-srr.oker and references required. Call 355-
9569.
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must Flexible
schedules. Apply in person.
SPRING BREAK '97 - Sell Trips, Earn Cash.
& Go Free. STS is hiring CAMPUS REPS
GROUP ORGANIZERS to promote trips to Can-
cun, Jamaica, and Florida. Call 800-6484849
for information on joining America's � 1 Stud-
ent tour Operator.
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 3550210
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD plavers
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
mud
WAP SHOP
MOORE REALTY
2609 E. 10th St Greenville NC 27858
Available Rentals:
705 4 E. Fifth Street $475.00
2 br. apartment located from across campus. Hardwood floors
throughtout, large rooms, appliances Included. Hot water and heat
included until central heat and air installed.
705 2 E. Fifth Street $350.00
1 br. apartment located across from campus. Hardwood floors
throughout, large rooms, appliances included. Hot water and heat
included untii central heat and air installed.
703 4 Fifth Street $475.00
2 br. apartment located from across campus. Hardwood floors
throughtout, large rooms, appliances included. Hot water and heat
included until central heat and air installed.
402 E.Thirteenth Street $425.00
Q br. house with large bedrooms, 4-5 blocks to campus, hardwood floors
throughout, appliances included, Pet Fee - $100
1st Full Months Rent 12 Price For All Apartments
752-2533
tf
Help
Wanted
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-2224
SCUBA
SPECIAL
MASK, F!NS,& SNORKEL
Retail $179.90
ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
oswo,0
V
Services
Offered
t
CHILD CARE PROVIDER NEEDED for 5
year old, 3:15 - 6:15. Monday-Friday. Own trans-
portation, non-smoker. Immediate opening.
$100weekly. Write "Child Care Provider P.O.
Box 8088, Greenville. NC 27835.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals wish-
ing to gain valuable work experience with a
rapidly growing company, ideal applicam would
be energetic, efficient willing to learn, and have
excellent communication skills. We are current-
ly taking applications for part-time telephone
collectors willing to work any hours from 8am
until 9pm Monday thru Friday and Saturday
morning from 8am until 12 pm. If interested
please contact Brian Franey at 757-2127
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now being
accepted for domestic & international staff!
Flight attendants, ticket agents, reservationists.
ground crew more. Excellent travel benefits!
Call Airline Employment Services for details.
1-206-971-3690 ext L53622
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the Cruise
Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Seasonal & full-
time employment available. No exp necessary.
Fo; info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53627
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-level
& career positions available worldwide (Hawaii.
Mexico, Caribbean, etc. Waitstaff, housekeep-
ers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness counselors, and
more. Call Resort Employment Services 1-206-
971-3600 ext R53624.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710 WWW.SUNS-
PLASHTOURS.COM
BE YOUR OWN BOSS. Great opportunity for
students who want to make money but have a
limited amount of time. Call Matthew at 328-
3579. Leave message.
GYMNASTICS TEACHERS! LOCAL GYM-
NASTICS school is looking for experienced,
motivated instructors who love kids, part time
- good pay. Call Darlene Rose at 321-7264 or
stop by at 1602 Old Firetower Road.
NEED CARETAKER DAYS M-F. Able to lift
patient to wheelchair as well as drive van. Also
need caretaker weekends. Call Deborah Tilley,
830-383 for appointment
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686. Snow
Hill, NC.
REVEAL THE HIDDEN JOB market from a
current 475,360 employer database, to discov-
er unadvertised job opportunities. Guaranteed
results! 1-800477-JOBS.
f Services
m Offered
AL
Greek
Personals
i
Announcements
MEET
NEW PEOPLE
THE FUM WAY
TODAY
1-900-990-9333
EXT. 4241
$2.99 PER IVIIIM.
MUST BE 18 YRS.
SERV-U
(619) 645-8434
TERRY'S TYPING SERVICE. CALL 746-9929
after 2:30 P.M.
Personals
AMBASSADORS, IT IS TIME to get excited!
Retreat is here. Camp Dixie will never be the
same!
Other
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no re-
payments, ever! $$$ cash for college SSS for
info: 1-800-400-0209.
sfc
Travel
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earning
Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell 8 Trips
& Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279. Cancun &
Jamaica $399. Panama City. Daytona $119!
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
FREE TRIPS & CASH! Find out how hun-
dreds of student representatives are already
earning firjM ililli and lutz tf LLZk
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Cancun. Ba-
hamas. Mazatlan. Jamaica or Florida! Cum-
iiij Wnjitiptr Ptizlllt AIsl
AluUulll. Call Now! -fuit A UttltJs
Ztuilitjil Tj-nttl 1300) l�-�Jt�AZi
&
Greek
Personals
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY of-
fers speedy, professional service, campus pick-
up and delivery. Familiar with all formats. Low
Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
THE PARTY CONTINUES! MMP Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is back on the road again to
provide ECU with the ultimate DJ. Party Ex-
perience. State of the art sound and light show,
playing the music YOU want to hear when YOU
want to hear it. Celebrating our 7th year as
ECU'S 1 DJ. service. Ask about our 1,000 watt
party van for tailgates. Call Lee at 7584644
for booking.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholarships
is now available. All Students are eligible re-
gardless of grades, income, or parent's income.
Let us help. Call Student Financial Services: 1-
800-263-6495 ext F53628
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON, "FRAN" has come
and gone! Thank you for cleaning up our lawn.
Love. Alpha Phi.
THANKS DELTA ZETA WE had a fun time
Friday night from the brothers of Delta Chi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO DEREK AT
WOOD, Foster Barker. Chris Farnsworth. Will
Fitzgerald. Gary Milchanoski. and Todd Oak-
ley from the brothers of Delta Chi. good luck
boys.
JEN HUDSON, YOU'RE DOING a great job
with the New Members. Keep up the good work!
Love, your Zeta Sisters!
PANHELLENIC EXEC WOULD LIKE to
thank the Rho Chi's. sororities, and rushees
for a fun and successful Rush. Cood job girls'
TRISICMA SUPPORTS PIRATE footoall! Go
Pirates
LAMBDA CHI - Pref Night was another great
one this year. The tailgating made the day ex-
tra special. Keep up the good tunes Blackwood.
Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
JILL JACKSON - You did a great joh as Rush
Director! You haH work paid off! We love you!
Your Sigma Sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA: WHEN HURRICANE Fran
stormed through the town, all the power lines
came tumbling down. The Alpha Phis and Kap-
pa Sigs, came crawling out from under the
twigs. There was nothing but destruction in
sight yet we were ready to party all night. We
gathered on Tenth Street with all of our new-
est who throughout the night proved they're
the coolest So Saturday came and we gath-
ered again, getting pumped up until the game
began. Through the rain and the shine, we had
an awesome time! Love, the Alpha Phis.
SICMA ALPHA EPSILON. THANKS for help-
ing us clean up after the storm. We really ap-
preciate your hard work The tailgate was a
blast Hope to get together again real soon.
PIKA - WE had a great time celebrating your
BID PARTY Friday night Thanks for the late
night show at Hooray Harry's. Love. Alpha Del-
taPi.
SIG EP - Heaven & Hell was so much fun.
Thanks for a wonderful pref night Love Tri
Sigma.
GINA HERRING � Happy Birthday Big Sis!
Hope it's a blast "Super G" is the best! Love.
your little sister. Taylor.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Delta Chi:From I'm
a little teapot to bottles of champagne. We loved
kickin' it with ya'll island style. We hope ya'll
enjoyed your bid night! Love. Delta Zeta.
PI LAMBDA PHI WELCOMES the lota Pledge
Class: Ashley Bleau. Jason Boyle. Ken Emis,
Ade Galloway. John Jacobs. Scott Layton, Mike
Osborne and Scott Sasser. Good Luck guys
HEIDE ROLAND - You did an awesome job as
Panhelienic Rush Chair We love you! Your Sig-
ma Sisters.
SIGMA NEW MEMBERS - Do you know who
she is yet? Your Big Sisters can't wat for io-
night! Get ready
The rim Industry is
Coming to Greenville
The First Lady President
Now in Pre-Production
Actors, Actresses, Models
Creative Consultants, Production
Assistants and anybody interested in
being involved with motion pictures
and television.
CONGRATS TO THE VERY BEST Pledge
Class of'96: Brooke Anderson. Kelly Black, Hol-
li Bowling, Beth Dudley. Lisa Edwards, Denise
Evans, Anna Creene. Sarah Gregg, Meredith
Griffin. Emily Johnson. Allison Kimnach, Katie
Matish. Katie McLabe. Lynne Modlin. Meredith
Parker. Senya Piraneo. Ashley Rankin. Kristy
Schalles. Valerie Springle, Stacy Suttcn, Alli-
son Tilley. Maya Van Dyken, Anna Walker, Hil-
lary Watson. Jennifer Whitlow and Jamie Wil-
liams. You guys are the best! Love your Sigma
Sisters.
PHI TAU - Thanks for the hot but fun tailgate!
Love. The Sigmas.
PI KAPPA PHI. THANKS for Friday night but
next time let's not get screwed. The nuts and
bolts social was fun. Love, the sisters of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA Chi would like
to thank the Alpha Delta Pi pledges for their
help delivering bids and good luck.
CATHERINE TRUDELL - Thanks for a won
derful RUSH. You did a great job. We love you!
Trudy's 1.
ALPHA PHI: CONGRATULATIONS TO the
Gamma Gamma pledge class officers: President
- Leigh Murphy; Vice President - Jill Wells; Schol-
arship � Erika Everheart; Treasurer - Ellen Bur-
leson: Recording Secretary - Suzzanne Hard-
ee: Social Chair - Koryn Newill; Panhelienic del-
egate - Carmen Land; Panhelienic representa-
tive - Trina Flad; Philanthropy - Jen Mock; His-
torian - Betsy Keville; Scrapbook - Toni Lipari;
Sister's Party - Valerie Snyder: Fundraiser � Jen
Cooper. Good luck, we love you! Love, the Al-
pha Phi's.
PHI KAPPA PSI. THANKS for all the fun on
Saturday. Tailgating was a blast Hope to see
you again soon! Love, the sisters of Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
THANKS PHI TAU FOR keeping us safe from
hurricane Fran. The slippin' slide was quite wet
- like everything else you guys are great! Let's
get together real soon. Love, your friendly Zeta
neighbors.
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA Chi would like
to thank the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi for the
use of their house during rush
CONGRATULATIONS TISH JOHNSON ON
your engagement to Matt! We love you. Love.
your Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW mem-
bers of Zeta Tau Alpha: Kimberly Beecham.
Lindsay Bost Amelia Burney, Melissa Cornwell,
Brandy Cox, Crystal Denny, Melissa Dubois, Joy
Edson, Whitney Farmer. Ashlyn Glendhill, Eliz-
abeth Hamm, Tracy Hibler, Stephanie Hilber-
bran. Mandy Jourdan, Sara Leahy, Lori McMa-
hon. Wendy Melton, Katherine Pappas. Betsey
Roberts. Mary Stallings. Callie Walton.l Sarah
Woley, Beth Zodun. You guys are doing great!
We love the Phi pledge class. Love, your Zeta
Sisters.
SIGMA NU: B.F B.F gotta have a D.F It
was great hangin' out with ya'll Saturday! What
a way to celebrate our first victory! Love. Del-
ta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW mem
bers of Delta Zeta: Ada Martinez, Sabrina Hays.
Samantha Styons. Mariah Cheek. Shannon
Meek. Kelly Pruitt Jennifer Piron, Audra Ken-
nedy. Maggie Lewis. Mandy Johnson, Chasidty
Evangelista, Cennell Brandenburg. Brandy
Nichol. Ya'll are the Best! Love. The sisters of
Delta Zeta.
Announcements
EXSS MAJOR'S CLUB'S NEXT meeting is
Faculty Night: so come out and meet the EXSS
professors on Monday, Sept 16, at 7:30 pm in
the Pirate Club House.
PHI SICMA PI NATIONAL Honor Fraternity
is a coed, honor, service and social fraternity.
If you have 32-96 credit hours and at least 3.3
CPA. come to the smoker on Sept 17th in CCB
1032. Informal attire. Contact Robin at 931-
0196. Come join the oldest fraternity on cam-
pus!
THE PITT ASSOCIATION OF Volunteer Ad-
ministrators and the Pitt Volunteer Action Cen-
ter will host a Volunteer Fair on Saturday. Sept
14 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Plaza Mall.
This is an excellent opportunity to learn about
the diverse volunteer jobs available in our com-
munity. Come join us, and we can help you
discover which volunteer job best suits you to
serve the needs of our community. Take satis-
faction in knowing that you can make a dif-
ference! Bring your children to our activity table
to make a greeting card for a home-bound sen-
ior, a nursing home resident or a child in the
hospital. These cards will be delivered by vol-
unteers on Make A Difference Day in October.
Become a part of our community and help
brighten the day for someone else. Remember.
volunteers make each day brighter!
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will meet
Sept. 12 in GCB 3009. Pizza and drinks will be
served at 4:45 and at 5:00 the meeting will be-
gin. Presentations will be given on Budgeting
Your Money and Second Quarter Performance
review. Everyone welcome!
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANIZA-
TION will meet on Thursday. Sept. 12 at 4:00
pm in GCB 1009. All honor students, teaching
fellows, and students with a 3.4 CPA are invit-
ed to attend. For more information, call Yaqoob
at 758-3635.
CONTRA DANCE! FIRST DANCEMEET-
ING of the year! Short business meeting to elect
new officers. Music starts at 7:30 pm Saturday,
Sept21 at Baptist Student Union. Free! Come
alone or bring a friend. Music by Elderberry
Jam. University Folk and Country Dance Club.
THIS WEEK THE DECISION Sciences Club
will be holding public elections and discussing
club goals. The meeting will be held on Thurs-
day. Sept 12 at 330 in GCB 1030. Refiesh-
ments will be served after the positions are
filled. All ECU students are encouraged to come
and run for officer positions.
JAPANESE ANIMATION FANS! THE ECU
S.A.G.A. Club is dedicated to bringing high qual-
ity animation to the Greenville area! We will be
showing Amme weekly on Tuesday nights from
7:30 - 10:30 in Mendenhall. Room 14 (down-
stairs, behind the snack machines)! Come check
us out!
E.CA.N.S THE EAST CAROLINA Associa-
tion of Nursing Students will be having a meet-
ing on Thursday. October 19 All students, nurs-
ing, pre-nursing or those interested are invited
to attend. The meeting will be held in the Nurs-
ing Bldg. (room TBA) from 10:15 to 11:15 AM.
If you have any questions, contact Krystal at
830-2765. We hope to see you there.
THE EXERCISE AND SPORT Science Motor
and Physical Fitness Competency Test is sched-
uled for Friday. Sept 13 at 10:00 AM in Ming-
es Coliseum (Williams Arena). A passing score
on this test is required of all students prior to
declaring Exercise and Sport Science as a ma-
jor. Any student with a medical condition that
would contraindicate participation in the test-
ing should contact Mike McCammon at 328-
4688. To be exempted from any portion of the
test you must have a physician's excuse. A de-
tailed summary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Lab (Room
371. Sports Medicine Bldg). Your physician's
excuse must specifically state from which items
you are exempt
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION
Sciences and Disorders will be providing the
language and hearing screening for students
who are fulfilling requirements for admission
to Upper Division on September 16. 17. & 18
1996 from 5:0O:00pm each day. These are the
only screening dates during the Fall Semester.
The screening will be conducted in the Belk
Annex (ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) locat-
ed next to the Belk Building (School of Allied
Health Sciences), near the intersection of Cha-
rles Street and the 264 Bypass. NO APPOINT-
MENT IS NEEDED - PLEASE DO NOT CALL
THEIR OFFICE FOR AN APPOINTMENT.
WAITING IS OUTSIDE THE CLINIC WAITING
ROOM. S1CN IS BEGINS AT 4:50pm. Screen-
ings are conducted on a first come, first serve
basis.
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIP -
There is an assistantship available for a gradu-
ate student of Adult Education in the Office of
Adult Student Services, 211 Whiclird, 328-
6882. Please contact us as soon as possible.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY, will be conducting a Soccer Coach-
es Training School on Sat. September 21st
from 9am-4pm for all individuals interested in
volunteering to coach soccer. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball skills, team basketball, swim-
ming, rollerskating. and bowling. No experience
necessary. For more information please con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 8304551 or Dean Foy at
8304541.
THE HISTORY HONOR SOCIETY of Phi Al-
pha Theta will be having its first meeting on
Sept 16. 1996 at 5:00 pm on the first floor D
wing of Brewster. All are welcome to attend.
ONTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 and Mon
day. September 16. the Newman Catholic Stud-
ent Center starts is program entitled: "Beauty
and Belief: An In-Depth Look at Catholicism
This program is an inquiry program for any
student wishing to learn more about Catholi-
cism. It is also for Catholics who may want to
make their CONFIRMATION or First Commun-
ion. The program begins at 2 pm on Thursday
and 7:30 pm on Mondays. For further details,
please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at the Center,953 E.
10th Street757-1991.
COME GET A MASSAGE! Thursday. Sept. 19.
5:30 - 9:30 pm in the Belk Building. Tickets
from PT students or PT department are $3.00
10 minutes in advance; $3.50 at the door.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN SERVING as
a University Marshal for the 1996 Fall com-
mencement may obtain an application from
Room A-16 Minges. Student must be classified
as a junior by the end of Spring semester 19
and have a 3.0 CPA to be eligible. Return com-
pleted application to Carol-Ann Tucker. Advi-
sor. A-16 Minges by September 27. 19. For
more information call 3284661.
CONGREGATION BAYT SHALOM AN-
NOUNCES the following High Holy Days serv-
ices: Friday, Sept 13 8:0 pm - Erev Rosh Hasha-
na. Saturday, Sept. 14 5:00 am Rosh Hashana.
Sunday. Sept 15 9:00 am Rosh Hashana 2nd
Day. Sunday, Sept.22 6:30 pm Kol Nidre and
Monday. Sept 23 9:00 am Yom Kippur Yizkor.
5:30 pm Mincha Ne'ila.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next J7A
Tuesday's edition �1?ixn
4p.m. MONDAY for next V1fM
Thursday's edition ScJ
Rates Jtl
25 words or fewer CSg-
Stuaente$2 A Greek organjzations
Non-students$J must be speHed out. no
Each word over abbreviations. The East
25, add O Carolinian reserves the
For bold, add$ ' right to reject any ad
For ALL CAPS, for libel, obscenity
add$1 andor bad taste.





Title
The East Carolinian, September 12, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 12, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1158
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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