The East Carolinian, September 5, 1996







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September 5,1996
Vol 72, No. 05
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
ECU welcomes Conference USA
ECU football
enters new era,
new conference
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The wait is over, now it's time for
a celebration
After months of talks and plan-
ning, Conference USA Commis-
sioner Michael Slive, officially told
the media that ECU's football pro-
dram u now a mpmher of Confer-
ence USA .
"On behalf of the presidents of
Conference USA it is my pleasure
to announce that beginning with
the 1997 season, East Carolina Uni-
versity will be a football member
of Conference USA Slive said.
"This long awaited affiliation is the
result of a lot of people both at the
conference level and here at East
Carolina University
The deal was a collaboration of
many officials at all levels.
"I think it's appropriate to call
attention to at least two people,
without whose effort, this never
would have taken place and that's
Chancellor Eakin and Athletic Di-
rector Mike Hamrick Slive said.
On hand to answer questions
were Eakin, Hamrick and football
Head Coach Steve Logan. All
seemed pleased and relieved that
this day had finally come.
"It is a great day to be a Pi-
rate Eakin said. "It is also a great
day to be a member of Conference
USA and to be affiliated with all
the institutions of the conference.
We are joining, indeed, a wonder-
ful collection of universities
Tribute can also be paid to the
players and coaches who have es-
calated this football program to an-
other level.
"I want to pay tribute to our
coach, Steve Logan, and his play-
ers who have represented this uni-
versity so beautifully Eakin said.
"You know, athletics is in some re-
spect a part of our university that
can do us great ill or be a real
source of pride and I want to say,
under the leadership of the athlet-
ics program and Steve Logan and
all the other coaches, we have a
program that indeed does instill
pride
Without the Liberty Bowl ap-
pearances, the announcement today
might have never happened.
"I'd be remiss if I didn't men-
tion Steve Logan and the outstand-
See USA page 11
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Conference USA Commissioner Michael Slive welcomes ECU into the new conference Wednesday morning. Chancellor
Richard Eakin and Head Football Coach Steve Logan listen to the long-awaited announcement.
Officials prepare New classes move off-campus
for kick-off
Brandon Waddeli
Editor-in-Chief
Joe Horst
Contributing writer
The team's preparation is over; the administration's has only be-
gun.
The football team has been getting ready for its first game since
the Liberty Bowl victory last season. This Saturday the eyes of North
Carolina will be sharply focused on Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium as ECU'S
"football team takes on the East Tennessee State Buccaneers at 4
p.m. Aside from the obvious scouting by competing universities, other
concerned parties will also be watching the game.
"Student Government is thrilled to have later football games and
"hopes that stdents enjoy themselves, but not at the cost of jeopar-
dizing the university's image Angie Nix, SGA president said.
Members of SGA are not the only ones concerned about
Saturday's game.
"Make a commitment to come to the game but if we want a
nationally ranked program, we have to show we're worth it We've
gone a long time without any problems and we don't need to start
See KICK page 4
Satellite sites offer
degree programs
Stephanie Waters
News writer
Soon students will be complet-
ing degrees without stepping foot
on campus.
Through a partnership with
Craven and Carteret community col-
leges, ECU now offers three bach-
elor degree programs, which are
available off-campus. These degrees
include middle grades education,
industrial technology, and informa-
tion processing administrative ser-
vices.
Classes are offered on evenings
and Saturdays and follow the same
academic calender as those offered
on-campus. Admission requires the
completion of general college re-
quirements or its equivalent of a two
year associate degree that is usually
obtained through a community col-
lege. Classes are held at Craven and
Carteret commu-
nity colleges and "
at Havelock
Middle School.
When de-
ciding where the
program should
be held, an infor-
mational survey,
which was con-
ducted in nu-
merous loca-
tions, revealed
that the areas
surrounding
Morehead and
New Bern gener-
ated the most i
interest. The
programs offered at Havelock Middle
School serve the military population
"I've set a goal to
earn a degree from
ECU. This has
allowed me to do
something I've
wanted to do for a
longtime
� Michael Hudson
at Cherry Point.
"I've set a goal to earn a degree
from ECU. This has allowed me to
do something I've wanted to do for
a long time
Michael Hudson
said. "I think it's
handled very,
very well. It's
something we ve
needed for a long
time
The off-campus
program is aimed
at the non-tradi-
tional student.
These are people
who hold down
40 hour a week
jobs and also
manage a family
�minunmi i n in at home. The stu-
dents do not have
the time or the means to commute
to Greenville everyday for regular
scheduled classes.
Hudson is currently working to-
wards a degree on middle grades edu-
cation at Carteret Community Col-
lege. Mr. Hudson has had cancer for
two years now, which makes travel-
ing on an everyday basis diffficult.
The use of computer technology such
as the Internet allows students, like
Hudson, to pull down lessons in the
event that they are unable to attend
classes.
Expansion may occur if the gen-
eral public generates enough inter-
est If this happens, the decision will
then be left to ECU administration.
Full-time staffing may pose a consid-
erable problem iti the future.
Dr. Paul F. Fendt is associate di-
rector of continuing education and
feels that this problem can be corn-
batted with use of the Internet.
"For faculty to cover their on-cam-
pus and off-campus duties is a real
challenge Fendt said.
Photo Courtesy of CNN Storm
Center
As of Wednesday, Hurricane Fran
was a category 3 with winds near
115 mph and is expected to inten-
sify to a category 4 which carries
winds of 130 mph to 155 mph.
What does It mean?
flffffil.ETiHLiWil hurricane may
threaten within 36 hours.
5J2S SSSEI hurricane
expected to strike within 24
hours.
Hurricane Fran Update
Hurricane Fran may affect Pitt County as early as this morning. Gale- force
winds may be felt in our area by 11 a.m. today with up to 10 inches of rain
being possible. Flooding is likely given the significant amount of rainfall
over the past few days.
During the event Hurricane Fran does threaten Pitt County please follow
these simple steps:
Do
� Stay calm and listen to the radio and TV for weather updates and
information concerning university closings and class schedules.
� Check WZMB for university relate updates.
� Keep car fueled.
� Plan possible escape routes.
� Store drinking water
� Store all valuables well above floor level if located in basements or
other areas susceptible.
� Leave low-lying areas
� Turn off electricity, gas; unplug electronic equipment
� Board windows or protect with shutter or tape
Don't
� Call emergency numbers (911, Police, etc.) for general information.
� Panic or go outside during the storm.
� Work with electrical equipment during the storm.
All information is as of press time Wednesday.
"Do's and Do Nots" provided by Tom Pohlman of the Office of Enviromental Health
and Safety and CNN Storm Center.
Need for financial aid increases
Report shows
more students in
need of assistance
Angela Koenig
News Writer
Each year the number of stu-
dents seeking financial aid increases
due to the rising cost of a college
education.
The North Carolina Association
of Colleges and Universities (NCACU)
published its annual report "Financ-
ing Student Access to Higher Edu-
cation" at the beginning of August
which states that although North
Carolinians benefit from a college
education, the federal government is
not likely to increase its level of sup-
port.
The effect of this is students will
have to take a more active role in
funding their education. The office
of Student Financial Aid encourages
students to ask questions and seek
help in applying for financial aid in-
cluding scholarships.
Director Rose Mary Stelma said.
"That's what we're here for, it's our
job. and it's what we're supposed to
do
The financial aid office is also
developing information sheets which
will answer questions concerning as-
sistance. In addition to this, students
who have questions can access their
office via e-mail at
faques@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu.
The Student Financial Aid office
estimates that an in-state student
who lives on campus will pay $7956
this year for tuition and fees, etc.
With more than 40 percent of ECU
students receiving financial aid, a
decrease in federal assistance will
lower the number of students able
to continue their education beyond
high school.
Of the $47.8 million in aid re-
ceived by ECU, $24.7 million is in
the form of federal loans including
Parent and Stafford loans. More than
3000 students receive Pell Grants,
which are given only to those stu-
dents who exhibit significant finan-
cial need.
The NCACU's report states that
it is necessary for the NC government
to increase need-based grant funding.
This will benefit society by lowering
poverty, unemployment rates, crime
and need for public assistance.
Although NC had the third larg-
est increase in grant aid to under-
graduates between 1990 and 1995,
Georgia increased their aid by al-
most four times and Virginia by
more than twice NC's rate.
"We encourage students to ap-
ply early (for financial aid). In Au-
gust we have 150 to 175 students
to apply during registration week be-
cause they get their bills that day
and decide to apply that day Ms.
Stelma said.
Ms. Stelma warns students to
be weary of companies offering
scholarships lists for a fee. The same
information may be obtained on the
internet through the Financial Aid
office. Their homepage links to
FastWEB which lists scholarships,
grants and loans.
MttfU
Purple and gold rocks out with the F.A.N. Clubpage D
Smoke rises all the way to the White Housepage O
All the way to the End Zonepage 1 0
Pec4d
Thursday
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Weekend
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??W t teetcAtc
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
� -�





2
Thursday, September 5,1996
The East Carolinian
Computer misuse on rise
Associate Dean
reminds students
of proper conduct
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
Students who enjoy playing with
the computers in any of the numer-
ous labs around campus are aware of
the many services and features that
the computers have to offer. Some
students are now using the Internet
to plagiarize or cheat on their school-
work, which is a cause of concern to
professors and administration.
Karen Boyd, the assocaiate dean
of students expressed her concern
over the increasing trend toward com-
puter misuse, which is beginning to
be prosecuted in some college judi-
cial systems. Just last semester at UNC
Chapel Hill a student was caught us-
ing an on-line service to cheat in a
class and went to the campus honor
court
There have been cases involving
computer misuse at ECU. although
not necessarily plagiarism.
"I've been here two years, and
I've been having cases like this from
day one Boyd said.
Boyd says it is important that stu-
dents realize that anything done on
the computer, especially the e-mail, is
subject to retrieval and is considered
legitimate documentation.
"Anything you type on e-mail has
the potential to be brought back up.
It may not be able to be retrieved in
it's entirety, but in partiality it can be
Boyd said.
This is an especially relevant con-
cern for students who use the com-
puter here on campus, where that
material is considered the property of
the school.
"It is considered legal documen-
tation, and it is the right of the com-
puter owner to have it Students need
to realize that It is the universicy's
resources Boyd said.
Web sites such as "Evil House of
Cheat" and "School Sucks" have made
it easier than ever for students to use
the Internet to invent new ways to
cheat These sites offer student term
papers just waiting I o be downloaded.
Boyd said that so far there have not
been any plagiarism cases at ECU, but
there have been other cases of un-
ethical computer use.
There are ways you could haze
or harass over the computer. We have
had a harassment violation Boyd
said. "We've had students who have
posted stories of things that happened
that are not true
The harassment case was adjudi-
cated, and there was a hearing held,
but Boyd could not comment further.
So far. there has not been any
change in campus policy or the judi-
cial system because the current poli-
cies are considered adequate for any
action that needs to be taken.
"We have not written a special
code for this, because everything in
the handbook covers, in general, stu-
dent behavior Boyd said.
Students need to be aware of all
the dangers and pitfalls of using e-
mail, the Internet and especially us-
ing the Net as a source for schoolwork.
While some information taken off the
Internet is considered research, some
of it is just plain cheating.
MAP STORE
Pair of players charged
Two football players cited
Jennifer Barnes
Student Health warns of STDs
Health educators talk to students
about the risks of unsafe sex
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Jennifer Barnes
NewnWrtter
Two members of the ECU football team are facing criminal charges.
An officer with the Greenville Police Department located and picked
up one of t�.e athletes at 500 S. Greene St
Marcus Crfcndeil, BCU's qu&terback, was arrested on Sept 3, 1996
and charged with a misdemeanor on one count of simple assault Donald
Yohn filed the complaint which will require Crandell to appear in court for
trial on October 9,1996.
Crandell was placed in custody with an unsecured bond of $200.00
Ernest Tmnm, 21 another member of the football team was charged
with second degree trespassing on Jury 17.
According to a statement released by Norm ReUry, sports information
director, he is aware of CrandeiTs charges and has looked into the details.
"We are confident it will be resolved in due time Rally said. "We feel
it is not appopriate to take any action at this point based upon the facts we
know
A concern of ECU students is the risk of contracting a sexually transmitted
disease.
Heather O. Zophy, health education coordinator at the Student Health Center,
said that communication is the key to decided what is the best form of protection
for sexually active couples.
"Two people should communicate with each other before they become in-
volved in any physical engagements Zophy said. "Discuss all the what ifs of a
sexual relationship
It is recommended that both partners be tested for STDs before starting in a
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�,





"ilil-mnri-fiMi-r imn
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 5, 1996
The Rebuilding of
the Jewish Temple
AND
The End of Our Age
A Slide Presentation on
The Evidence
Mendenhall, Room 242
7:30 pm Thursday, Septembers
Apostolic CampusMinistry
(First of a Series Gh, Propriety) :
Lecturer discusses managed care
Professorauthor
brings insight to
medical school
Susanne S. Dozier
News Writer
On Tuesday, September 3,
1996, in the Brody Medical Sci-
ences Building, Dr. E. Haavi
Morreim discussed the future of
managed care.
Morreim is a professor of hu-
man values and ethics at the Uni-
versity of Tennessee College of
Medicine. Her lecture was part of a
Perspectives series, sponsored by
the ECU Medical School's depart-
ment of Medical Humanities and
the Bioethics Center.
Morreim has been noted for
her numerous publications on bio-
ethics and health policy. Recently.
she published her
new book, Balanc
ing Act: The New
Medical Ethics of
Medicine's Sew
Economics.
Morreim said,
"I think we are go-
ing to see some ter-
rific changes in the
next few years of
managed care
Morreim dis-
cussed current
trends involving the
advantages of per-
sonal choice and the disadvantages
of bureaucracy and inflation in
managed care situations. She also
noted that "clutzy" economic man-
agement resulted in negative, im-
personal doctor-patient relation-
ships.
"the individual
gets to keep some
or all of what's left
in the pot (money)
at the end of the
year
� Dr. Morreim, professor
from the University of
Tennesse
Morreim rec-
ognized de-
fined money
c o n t r i b u -
tions to man-
aged care,
such as block
grants, capi-
tation and
defined
grants.
These contri-
butions act
as functions
������ of transfer-
ring economic risk. Also, vouch-
ers for health care are provided by
certain businesses across the
United States. Such grants and
vouchers can mean savings tor hos-
pitals, insurance companies and
patients.
On Management Services Orgar
nizations (MSO's). which also re-
turn spending, Morreim said, "the
individual gets to keep some or all
of what's left in the pot (money) at
the end of the year
In conclusion to her lecture.
Morreim stated that health care
benefits are usually held by employ-
ers. Eighty-four percent of employ
ers who offer r-uch health care usu-
ally offer one choice of health care.
This one choice encourages employ
ees to use their employers' speci-
fied plan.
For more information on the
Perspectives series or other lec-
tures at the ECU Medical School,
contact the department of Medical-
Humanities at 816-2797.
3 it2�wt
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday, September 5
Friday, September 6
Saturday, September 7
lE"r uA
Paint Ficklen-Dowdy purple with ECU athletic sportswear from
Downtown Greenville 758-2616 Open 9-6 on home game Saturdays
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted 1
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff.
One guest allowed with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
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STOP SHOP features one of Greenville's
widest variety & largest supplies of ice-cold
kegs and STOP SHOP also has all the
setups: Ice, cups & munchies, too!
Before the Swashbuckling
Season Opener of the ECU
Pirates vs. the Buccaneers,
Shop the ECU Student
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Selection of ECU Apparel
and a Great Variety of
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and Other Specials!
ECU's Party People
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STOP SHOP!
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752-6366
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Student Stores
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Store Hours;
Monday -Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Comer of 5th and Reticle Streets in Downtown Greenville
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we honor 328-6731http�www.studentstores.ecu.edu t
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� .





�W HHMHm
Thursday, September 5, 1996
The East Carolinian
KICK from page 1
now Layton Getsinger, associate
vice chancellor of bu iness affairs
said. "The last thing we need to do
is disrupt the game
The police presence around
Dowdy-Ficklen has always been ap-
parent, but the ECU police officers
are also gearing up for Saturday's
game. "It's number of officers ba-
sically the same as last year
Teressa Crocker, ECU police chief
said. "The home games haven't
had any major problems in the
stands in two years.
"There is a zero tolerance for
alcohol inside the stadium. Those
found with alcohol will be ejected
from the stadium, given a state ci-
tation and campus appearance
ticket Crocker said.
Tailgating stands as a time-
honored tradition at ECU. The lots
at the Allied Health building and
Harrington Field are the only
places where tailgating activities
will be allowed.
ECU uniformed and plain-
clothes officers, along with Alcohol
Law Enforcement (A.L.E.) agents,
will be patrolling the tailgating ar-
eas enforcing alcohol laws. Stu-
dents and alumni should remember
that there are no kegs, glass con-
tainers or pig cookers allowed in
these areas during tailgating. Beer
and unfortified wine, such as wine
coolers and table wine, are the only
alcoholic beverages allowed during
tailgating.
The tailgating fields will close
and remaining people will be asked
to leave the area at the start of the
game. In order to enter the sta-
dium, students must have a valid
ECU I.D. when showing their stu-
dent tickets at the gate. Gates 5 and
6 are designated as student gates
for this weekend's game.
USA Today currently has the
ECU program ranked number 31
and several other national publica-
tions rank the Pirates in the top
25. With the increased media atten-
tion focused on Greenville. ECU'S
administration is taking every pre-
caution to ensure the safety and
well-being of all who attend
Saturday's game.
S 1 l) from page 2
new relationship. Zophy advises not to
look at a person to decide if he has an
STD or not
��STDs do not discriminate against
age. race, status or sex Zophy said.
"One out of every four college students
estimated to be infected by an STD
Zophy said students should not wait
until they start showing signs of an in-
fection before acting on it It could be
days, weeks, months, or even years be-
fore a person shows signs to some STDs.
In fact with diseases such as chlamydia
and gonorrhea 80 of women and 20
of men will not show any symptoms.
N.C. leads the nation in gonorrhea
cases. Zophy recommends that if students
are going to be sexually active they
should use some type of contraceptive.
"Laytex condoms are one of the
more effective ways to protect yourself
Zophy said. "To get the best protection
from a condom one should make sure to
put it on, use it and take it off properly
Also, make sure you store it in a
cool place and use it before its expira-
tion date. As well as watch for any rips
or tears. Condoms can be bought at the
Student Health Center at 15 for S2.00.
They are also sold at student stores, resi-
dence halls and local pharmacies at vari-
ous prices.
Zophy knows that even if you use
the best contraceptives available that
abstinence is the only real protection.
"Before one becomes sexually ac-
tive find out about your partner's past"
Zophy said. "Testing is very important
before starting a new relationship
People under 25 account for two-
thirds of the new STD infections in the
U.S. each year. Students can receive an
STD test at the ECU Student Health
Center at a reduced cost The prioe
range from $5430.00.
If you have any questions or want
more information concerning STDs. then
contact Heather Zophy. health education
coordinator, at Student Health Services.
328-6794.
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Stereo and Cassette
Sponsored by the Division of Student Life
Wednesday. September 11, 1996
10:30 a.irt - 1:00 p.m.
Wright Circle Student Plaza
i







Thursday, September 5, 1996 The East Carolinian
4
Owilieci
President Clinton approved the nation's toughest crack-
down on tobacco directly affecting farmers in the eastern
part of North Carolina. With ECU sitting in the heart of
tobacco country, students whose families depend on to-
bacco money for their livelihood are undoubtedly follow-
ing the situation closely.
While it is important to remember that this university
lies in the middle of the conflict and has been shaped by
students and educators alike whose families depend on
tobacco, it is not necessarily appropriate to curse every-
thing that attempts to regulate the industry.
For example, the recent crackdown on tobacco is an
effort to reduce teen smoking by classifying nicotine as
an addictive drug. Now the Food and Drug Administra-
tion (FDA) will be able to regulate the advertising and
availability of tobacco products.
Just because tobacco is king in eastern North Carolina
doesn't mean that we want the industry to have the free-
dom to target advertisements towards youths. Tnese new
regulations would prevent selling cigarettes in vending
machines. Who can protest this? There are no beer and
liquor vending machines which underage buyers can pur-
chase alcohol from.
Lawmakers from across the state were furious at the
President's decision.
"The president is declaring war on 76,000 North Caro-
linians who gain their livelihood in one form or another
from tobacco Sen. Jesse Helms, RN.C. said.
Tobacco farmers are worried that this is the first step
in a series of government regulations that may ruin the
industry. Still, comments like Helms' are overstated. This
step in itself is a step towards protecting children from a
life long addiction whose complications often result in
death.
Underage smoking doesn't have the same taboo asso-
ciated with it as underage drinking does. Unfortunately,
since nicotine is an addictive substance, and it is generally
more accepted by society than other addictive drugs,
youths easily fall prey.
The new classification of nicotine as an addictive sub-
stance is an encouraging step towards addressing the seri-
ousness of the problem of underage smoking.
Anything derogatory to the tobacco industry is not
popular in this area. However, neither should anything be
popular in this area that promotes underage smoking.
Tobacco
supporters are
furious with the
recent
reclassification
of nicotine as
an addictive
substance.
Even though
we're in the
heart of
tobaccoland,
should we
really be upset
with the
changes in
store?
Support the enviroment in '96
Having trouble finding an issue
that you feel is important in election
'96? If so, the reason is this year has
been full of smoke screen politics,
cloUded issues and orchestrated con-
ventions. Unfortunately, very little
attention is being given to the envi-
ronment when, ironically, so much is
at stake. If the republicans gain con-
trol of the White r.ouse, they will start
an all out war on the environment
starting with: oil drilling in the Arc-
tic National Refuge, development of
Utah's wilderness, weakening the
Endangered Species Act and the
Enviromental Protection Agency
(plans that failed in the 104th Con-
gress). Sound crazy? Well, if elected,
Bob Dole, who incidentally, was given
the rating of zero by the League of
Conservation Voters, will help rewrite
25 years of promising environmental
policy so that he can help his wealthy
friends from big business and ndus-
Matt Downs
Opinion Columnist
try profit from weaker EPA regula-
tions. Friends, who have provided lit-
erally millions of dollars to the Repub-
lican party and would expect a little
in return.
Thus far. Bob Dole and his fel-
low Republicans have already tried to
repeal key provisions to the Clean Air
Act and have successfully attached a
clause into the budget reform bill that
has ultimately led to the destruction
of many of our old growth forests and
dozens of ecosystems where timber
harvesting was previously restricted.
Not suprising from a man who sums
up his environmental devotion by re-
porting that if elected he would "have
common-sense environmental policies
not policies that put thousands and
thousands of people out of work
Loggers must really love this guy!
Fortunately, Bill Clinton offers
more favorable environmental policies
than his opposition. Clinton, who has
fought hard against the Republicans'
"war on the environment" has pro-
claimed that "when it comes to pro-
tecting the environment, we can't turn
back Don't help the Republicans
destroy 25 years of vital environmen-
tal policy. Vote Bill Clinton.
"Human felicity is produced not so
much by great pieces of good
fortune that seldom happen, as by
little advantages that occur every
day

$o,
mm
m
The East Carolinian
�3T
ifc5P
Brandon Wadded, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor David Bigelow Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Rhonda Crnmpton, Copy Editor
Dili Dillard Assistant Sports Editor Deanya LatUmore, Copy Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building. ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
her tott tote W
tta Jtw m �n U4fM
u'r t W8p rfyVroft
rriCr.8 K
Dole sells his soul
In this rosiest of election years
for the Democrats, the Radical Right
is frantically trying to indict President
Clinton in the court of public opin-
ion. What I hear over and over again,
just like a broken record is this char-
acter issue. Well, I'd like to throw a
new album on the turntable; how
about the lack of character exhibited
by Bob Dole?
First Bill Clinton is being unfairly
attacked for the drug problems we
have today. It's true that youth drug
use has skyrocketed, but can we re-
ally blame the president? Clinton has
increased funding for drug prevention
and rehabilitation, so to blame Clinton
for this is like blaming Governor Hunt
for those darn potholes on U.S. 264.
He is doing everything humanly pos-
sible to counteract this trend, but Bob
Dole still has the g to use this is-
sue as a political football. Well, Mr.
Dole, watch out for the fumble.
Dole is also shamelessly attack-
ing the Clinton White House for be-
ing a house of drug abuse horrors.
Besides the fact that these ridiculous
allegations have no evidence or sub-
stance behind them, it's outrageous
for him to talk about drug abuse. As
the Senate Republican leader in 1992,
Dole defended a republican nominee
to the Treasury that had used cocaine
as well as marijuana. All you smok-
ers know that Bob Dole is sympathetic
to your cause (he equated smoking
with drinking milk), but now. cocaine
junkies and crack users can take so-
lace in knowing that Senator Dole
stands behind you. My point is, if you
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
Dob is ah
shamelessly
attcrckfog the
ClintonWhite
Housi for being
a house of drug
abase horrors.
are going to defend coke users, then
don't engage in cheap political drug
attacks on a White House that has
spent billions of dollars in trying to
end this problem.
Secondly, let's talk about this
supply-side economic crap that Mr.
Dole is trying to pass off on us like
Grandmother's fruitcake. What am I
talking about? Well, Mr. Dole wants
a tax cut to the tune of over $500
billion. Sounds great, but how can
anyone with the IQ of a salad bar (or
hopefully higher) actually buy that he
can simultaneously balance the bud-
get, cut over half a trillion dollars in
taxes, and not cut social security and
medicare. 1 got news for you, Bob.
There is no way in hell your program
could be paid for, not even with the
most liberal estimates of economic
growth. 1 know my Economics pro-
fessors are probably losing it right
about now, but the god-awful disas-
ter that Ronald Reagan created is in
danger of coming back again.
Yes, things were good in the 80's,
but that was because his policies of
short-term gains really screwed up our
country in the long run For one
thing, under Reagan's tutelage, we
had the largest disparity of income in
our history. Am I biased? Probably,
but conservative author Kevin Phillips
and former Reagan budget director
David Stockman aren't, and they
agree with my general premise: That
Reaganomics was an unfortunate
sham.
Listen, I know President Clinton
has his problems, but all these things
that are being thrown against him
(Whitewater, the FBI files, etc) are
unsubstantiated, unproven and likely
untrue. There isn't one scintilla of evi-
dence that directly implicates the Presi-
dent or the First Lady in Whitewater.
Don't forget that Gennifer Flowers and
Paula Jones were paid by the Republi-
can party to come forward with their
stories. I think that most of us can see
through all the fog and the mist and
come to a basic conclusion: Like any-
one, President Clinton isn't perfect but
he isn't the monster the Republicans
want you to think he is. It is my hope
that you all decide your candidate on
the issues, and not some crap in the
Enquirer. Since President Clinton de-
livered on his promises to reform wel-
fare, to give us more jobs (10 million
more), to cut the deficit in half, and to
not let the Republicans touch student
loans, I know whe I'm voting for. Do
you?
If YOU LlANL A
COMPLAINT ?R
CMMNT WR.ITL A
LLTTLE. 10 Ti-JE.
LDITtfG
� Benjamin Franklin
All letters must be:
�� typed
� 250 words or less
include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them
The East Carolinian, to the Editor, Student Pubs, bids
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353.






Thursday, September 5,1996 The East Carolinian
Mtyte
Pirates rock-n-roll all
night at Mendenhall
WEEKEND,
Films
Hendrisc
SEPTEMBER
Thursday
Faculty Recital: Jeffery
Jarvis, tuba, 8 p.m. in A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Hendrix Theatre presents Twister
at 8 p.m. through Sept 7.
Disco Inferno at the Attic.
Doxy's Kitchen at Peasant's Cafe.
22nd Annual Collard Festival fea-
turing the Supergrit Band and the
Fantastic Shakers Band, 6 p.m.
through Sept. 7 in Downtown
Ayden.
Friday
" The F.A.N. Club: 5th An-
nual Saber SlashSun SplashOr-
ange Crush Concert, 4 p.mmid-
night in Mendenhall.
The Back Doors at the Attic.
Blue Rags at Peasant's Cafe.
���������?������
Band of Oz in concert followed by
the film Apollo 13,5-8 p.m. at the
N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.
Fuego del Alma at the 42nd Street
Oyster Bar in Raleigh.
������
������
Independent Music Festival with
Tractor Hips, Sharkquest, Brother
Monk, Joby's Opinion, Regatta 69,
Plutopia and Whiskeytown at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Saturday
" Purple Schoolbus at the
Attic.
Unsound at Peasant's Cafe.
��������??������
The Return of The Mothership,
The 20th Anniversary Reunion of
George Clinton & the P-Funk All-
Stars featuring Parliament,
Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie
Worrell and the The Brides of
Funkenstein at Walnut Creek in
Raleigh.
�����??���������
Lenny Marcus Trio featuring Chip
McNeill, and Squirrel Nut Zippers
and the North Carolina Jazz Rep-
ertory Orchestra at the N.C. Mu-
seum of Art in Raleigh.
Fue�o del Alma at the Festival del
Pueblo in Chapel Hill.
Doxy's Kitchen with Acoustic
Workshop at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
8
Sunday
Mickey Mills and Steel at
the Underwater Cafe.
House of Blues Barnburner Tour
with Joe Cocker, Buddy Guy, The
Fabulous Thunderbirds, and The
Radiators at Walnut Creek in Ra-
leigh.
Monday
W Carbon Leaf at the Un-
derwater Cafe.
??�?������???�?�
The Wallflowers with Maypole at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
10
Tuesday
H
Hipbone at Peasant's
Cafe.
Sebadoh with Those Bastard Souls
and Elliott Smith at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro.
Wednesday
11
� � Comedy Zone featuring
Michael Reed at the Attic.
����?����������
Joe Louis Walker & Boss Talkers
at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Twister
Those of you who didn't want to fork out cash to see Twister, one
of this summer's biggest cinematic blockbusters, will get one last chance
to see this roller-coaster film on the big screen, and it wont cost you
one red cent Hendrix Theatre, ECU's premier movie theater, will have
free showings of Twister Thursday-Saturday at 8 p.m making this the
best movie deal around.
While a film centering on a couple of love-torn tornado chasers
may result in a lame script with cliched characters, it also results in
some breathless action sequences filled with state-of-the-art special ef-
fects.
Director Jan DeBont who managed to make Keanu Reeves some-
what exciting in Speed, makes the most of his special effects team and
creates an intensely fun brain-candy film that must be seen on the big
screen. Trust me, Twister will not be nearly as impressive once it's
released on video.
Fans of the hit TV show Mad About You will get an extra joyful
kick watching Helen Hunt (who gives the film's most likable perfor-
mance) face down one killer tornado after another.
So, if you have any desire to give Twister a chance, hop on down
to Mendenhall Student Center sometime between Thursday and Satur-
day. Twister should prove to be a great film to watch with a theater full
of rowdy Pirates.
gZ TRevtecoa
Starting at 4 p.m Skeeter Brandon & Highway 61 will be playing all your favorite blues and
R&B tunes during the F.A.N. (Friday All-Nighter) Club meeting in Mendenhall Student Center.
n '

1 � '
' WW.i
t!f '?y �� r J? X

Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Frog Legs
Midnight Radio
Ween
12 Golden Country
Greats
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
Do the words "pep rally in-
spire memories of chewing-gum-
stained bleachers, cheesy cheers,
and testosterone-spewing motiva-
tional speeches from sweaty high-
school principals?
Rah. Rah. Please God, no.
After tomorrow, hopefully,
"pep rally" will deliver more pleas-
ant images.
The newly created F.A.N. (Fri-
day All-Nighter) Club will make its
premiere at Mendenhall Student
Center beginning at 4 p.m. with per-
formances by two blues-based
bands: the Wicked Mojo Brothers,
and Skeeter Brandon and Highway
61.
A pep rally, featuring the ECU
Cheerleaders, the Purple and Gold
dancers, and the Pirate mascot, will
be held from 7 to 8 p.m. Following
the pep rally, the film Twister will
premiere at Hendrix Theatre. From
10 p.m. until the student center
closes, free billiards, table tennis
and bowling will be available.
The F.A.N. Club, sponsored by
the ECU Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee, will be
held for each home football game
excluding homecoming.
J. Marshall, assistant director
of student activities, said the idea
for the FAN Club was developed by
Angela Bouman of the recreational
services department.
Marshall, and others involved
with Mendenhall and University
Unions, were looking for a way to
sponsor a pre-game event at the stu-
dent center. They were excited by
Bouman's proposal.
"The F.A.N. Club seemed like
an opportunity for us to help pro-
mote Mendenhall Student Center
Marshall said. "We want to bring
more students and traffic in Men-
denhall
Over the summer, the concept
of the F.A.N. Club expanded,
Marshall explained. The Athletic
Department and Pirate Club, as
well as the Student Pirate Club,
were contacted to see if they would
lend their support to the idea.
"We decided to hold it the
night before the game to get as
many people as possible to attend
this thing he added.
Marshall said other state
schools such as N.C. State and
UNC-Chapel Hill already have pep
rallies.
He also realizes that some
people perceive pep rallies to be
See FAN page 7
Frog Legs It's the perfect name
for thif band. They're skinny, ugly,
and make me turn green. Their mu-
sic is humorous, yet silly, and that's
the problem. It's too sarcastic. The
band really doesn't seem to give a
damn, and it makes me wonder
whether to love them or hate them.
Unfortunately for them, this is
not love at first sight. The band seems
too childish. Listening to their album,
Midnight Radio, is like hearing a five-
year-old jam out a Phish tune. It just
doesn't work.
The disc starts out with people
making the most ungodly noises I've
ever heard. How can you get into a
groove where there are people cluck-
ing like chickens?
And there's net too much to say
about the originality of each of the
songs on the album, either. You could
say that all of them are different; how-
ever, they all seem to have one thing
in common - they all sound like ass!
There are some positive things
about the band, however. Wrenn Mag-
num, the lead vocalist, has a good
vocal range that streaks from Presley
to Prince. If he were in a serious
band, people would see him for the
singer that he is. Other band mem-
bers include Morgan Huff (drums).
Tom IUmensee (electric and classical
guitar), and Turtle (bass). How cute.
Let's all get together and come up
with pet names, why don't we?
But let's not butter things up.
The band isn't exactly an emotion-
ally honest band. Frog Legs try too
hard to be comical on the album. It
will definitely make you laugh; the
problem is whether or not it's inten-
tional. This band is basically the
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
When Ween wants to be weird,
they can be weird. In fact, they're
almost the definition of the word.
They've done songs about spinal
meningitis, spaghetti western
themes, and happy tunes about little
daisies. It's even rumored that they
are the angry young guys behind the
pseudo-metallic punk rap out-
fit, the Moistboys. So if Ween wants
to dc something different musically,
where do they go? (
Nashville.
That's right, for their newest al-
bum, 12 Golden Country Greats, the
Ween brothers, Gene and Dean, de-
scended on the capitol of country
music for inspiration and motiva-
tion. Not only have they employed
such notable Nashville session mu-
sicians as Pete Wade (guitar, dobro,
6-string bass), Russ Hicks (pedal
steel), and Charlie McCoy (bass, har-
monica, percussion, vibes, organ,
trumpet, tenor banjo, tuba) to help
them capture that certain twang for
this release, they also roped in the
quintessential country vocal group,
The Jordanaires, as back-up singers.
This sounds like the makings of
a phenomenal cowpoke album,
doesn't it? Well, it is and it isn't.
Ween just ain't normal, folks. From
the outset, it's easy to tell that some-
thing just isn't right. For one thing,
12 Golden Country Greats only con-
tains ten tracks. Song titles are also
a dead giveaway, since they run the
gamut from the strikingly normal
"I'm Holding You" and "Pretty Girl"
to the hilariously strange 'Help Me
Scrape the Mucus Off My Brain" and
Student Health Service: You've
Sot questions; We've got answers!
See FROG page 7
See WEEN page 8
Jennifer Phillips
Student Health Service
When students come to col-
lege, they often find themselves
responsible for things which
were previously of little concern.
Health care is a common ex-
ample. College students sud-
denly find themselves asking
questions about where to go
when feeling sick, experiencing
injury, or for other medical
needs. This column is designed
to address some common ques-
tions concerning the ECU Stu-
dent Health Service (SHS).
Question: I've heard all
sorts of stories about the qual-
ity of care at the SHS. Do stu-
dents find the care there satis-
factory?
Answer: Yes, ECU students
are generally satisfied with the
quality of care received from the
SHS. In a recent survey, ECU
students were asked "What was
your overall degree of satisfac-
tion with your recent SHS visit?"
Most students reported either
"good" (46 percent) or "excel-
lent" (44 percent) in reference
to the quality of care received.
It is interesting to note that SHS
conducts an ongoing quality as-
surance survey. Phone inter-
views are completed to assess,
monitor and continually improve
the services offered to students.
Students are also strongly en-
couraged to complete comment
cards that are available at SHS.
Question: If 1 am sick and 1
decide to come to the SHS, will
I have to pay to see a health care
provider?
Answer: Currently en-
rolled ECU students will
not be charged for an
office visit to see a
health care provider
at the SHS. A stu-
dent health fee is
part of the tuition
bill which covers m
the costs to see
health care provid-
ers at the SHS for
the semester. For ser-
vices such as gynecologi-
cal exams, medications, x- �
ray, lab and others, there are
small fees. As part of the educa-
tional process, it is important that
students become health care con-
sumers and compare prices between
the SHS and other offices and clin-
ics. Paying a lesser amount for medi-
cal services does not mean the stu-
dent is receiving less quality of care.
Question: I am a female student.
Why is it when I come to the SHS
for a sore throat, they ask me if I
am pregnant?
Answer: This question may frus-
trate students, particularly if a stu-
dent feels assumptions are being
made about their personal sexual be-
havior. Asking female patients if
they are pregnant is a standard medi-
cal question that health care provid-
ers must ask. Pregnancy is a medi-
cal condition that affects treatment
options and care, particularly any
medications that might be pre-
scribed. The intended purpose of
this question is for medical reasons,
not to judge a student's sexual be-
havior.
n u
Question:
What are the qualifications of
the medical staff at the SHS?
Answer: The members of
the medical staff come from di-
verse backgrounds and educa-
tion. SHS currently employs
physicians, psychologists, family
nurse practitioners, physician
assistants, registered nurses,
registered pharmacists, certified
lab and x-ray staff.
Question: What if I am sick
on the weekends? Where should
I go?
Answer: Many ECU stu-
dents are not aware of the fact
that the SHS is open both Sat-
urday and Sunday from 9 a.m.
until noon. Hours of operation
Monday through Friday are from
8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Question: What other ser-
vices does the SHS offer?
Answer: SHS offers a wide
See HEALTH page 8
L
WR





IMMMMHMItMW � ���.� � � -�vfm - ��
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 5, 1996
PIRATE.
�jaaua
PIRATE
Be in. your $eat at Halftime
shaken, not stirred to catch
Special �gent VeeVee's
FAN from page 6
"corny" or "outdated He is opti-
mistic, however, that the F.A.N. Club
will go over well.
Marshall said he has been par-
ticularly impressed with the atti-
tudes of ECU alumni.
"I have never seen the level of
pride at other campuses that 1 have
seen on this campus he said. "I
hope the students will pick up on
some of these things
Overall, Marshall explained,
there are three goals of the F.A.N.
Club.
"We want to get people to know
what kinds of programs Mendenhall
has to offer he said. "Second, we
want to make the student center the
focal point of the campus: if they
want to find out what's going on on-
campus, this is the place to be.
"We also want to work with the
athletic department to develop a
strong foundation for supporting
the athletic teams and. specifically,
football
Marshall said he is excited by
the musical groups slated to perform
as part of the F.A.N. Club. The
bands, he said, are all similar to the
types of bands that would play down-
town.
Skeeter Brandon and Highway
61, based out of Chapel Hill, are this
week's featured performer. The band
plays both covers and original blues
and R&B.
Brandon is a former gospel
singer and keyboardist with Clarence
Carter. Critics describe his voice as
a "soulful roar The Charlotte Ob-
server said Brandon has the kind of
voice other performers "dream" of
having and would "pay money for
Other bands scheduled to per-
form as part of the F.A.N. Club: Sept.
27 - Yep! (rock) and Agents of Good
Roots (roots rock), Oct. 11 - Brother
(Australian bag-pipe rock band).
Nov. 15 - Offcenter (rock) and Re-
gatta 69 (ska).
The F.A.N. Club is free to all ECU
faculty, staff and students. For addi-
tional information call (919) 328-
4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
ISMriBlBlBldlzlg!E!E!iaE!Ig!E!Blg
llBIBlBIBiaiaagJBlBnaaiBIBIBIBIBMBE I
Welcome back ECU
students and faculty
BOWEN
LAUNDROMATS
Bells Fork & Carolina East Center
&
WASH HOUSE
111 E. 10th & 514 E. 14th
Check out vaulable coupons for
Bowen Cleaners on our home page at
http:www.Bowen Cleaners, com
r KVJ VJ from page 6
Rodney Dangerfield of roots rock.
They can't get no respect, but they
don't really deserve any.
The problem with comical
bands is that they fizzle out very
quickly. Sure it's amusing for a
while, but how funny is the same
stand-up act day after day? It falls
into the "same song and dance"
foutine. When people hear some-
llliBililllimt?
i
thing they like, they want to hear
it again. But it really lets people
down when they don't find the
same level of intensity in the mu-
sic that they heard the first time.
Maybe they will like it the second
time they hear it. How- about the
third, though'
Midnight Radio is not a bad
title for the album. It probably has
something to do with the time
frame, since it's the only time of
day that you can hear them - when
you're asleep. Consider it a bless-
ing from your local radio stations
if they really play it at midnight.
The band is on tour and are ap-
pearing at the Underwater Cafe on
Sept. 27. Check them out, if you're
up for a night of "What tha?"
KICK OFF YOUR SHOES AND SLIP ON YOUR SOCKS AT THE
1ST ANNUAL "TWISTER OFF" SPONSORED BY ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE ON SEPTEMBER 5 AT 6:00 P.M.
IN GREAT ROOM 3 OF MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
DOOR PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN AWAY COME OUT AND JOIN THE FUN
STUDENT UNION OPEN HOUSE FOLLOWING
RUSH
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
National Co-Ed Service Fraternity
Informational Meetings:
Tuesday, September 10
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
1st Floor
8pm
Wednesday, September 11
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
1st Floor
8pm
Leadership, Friendship, and Service
Winner of the 1996 Governor's Volunteer Award
5?w mone ittfrniHatiott, fdeate catl&Ante 'ZfaatutQ at $30-5265
for
Class Officer
Resident Hall Reps
Day Reps
All
Candidates Must
File By 5:00
September 12, Room 255
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Mandatory Candidate
Meeting Will Be Held
September 12 at 5:30 in
Room 221 Mendenhall
Student Center.





8
Thursday, September 5, 1996
The East Carolinian
WEEN from page 6
"Piss Up a Rope
Speaking of "Piss Up a Rope
this has got to be one of the best
tracks Ween has ever done. It starts
off like the typical "somebody shot
my dog" kind of complaint. "My
dinner's on fire as she watches T
And if you've ever wondereB what
it's like to be me She takes all my
money and leaves me no smokes
Yells at my buddies and insults my
folks I'm breaking my back doin'
the best 1 can , She's got time for
the dog and none for her man You
get the idea.
The lyrics quickly shift gears.
however, and the tune takes on the
punkish humor that is a Ween trade-
mark: "And I'm) no dope, but 1 can i
cope So hit the fucking road and
piss up a rope You ride my ass
like a horse and a saddle Now
you're up shits creek with a turd
for a paddle and so on. all the while
maintaining that pickin' and
grinnin' sound which is so indica-
tive of Nashville.
With every album they have re-
leased. Ween has continued to
stretch the bounds of the alterna-
tive label tudt the music industry
so easily slat.s on them. 12 Golden
Country Greats is no exception,
and they have proven that no mat-
ter what you may think of Ween,
they are. and always will be. differ-
ent.
For you rough-and-tumble TNN
and CMT fans. Ween may come as
an unwanted surprise. For the die-
hard Ween fans among the throng,
12 Golden Country Greats may also
serve as an eye-opener. Yet if your
mind is open and you don't mind
having your expectations sur-
passed, then do yourself a favor and
let Ween drop-kick you through the
goal post of life.
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Mil MR f�J
'�;
HEALTH from page 6
variety of services including lab and
x-ray services, physical therapy, an
allergy clinic, a pharmacy, gyneco-
logical services, health education,
an urgent care clinic, and a student
health insurance plan. Mental
hearth services are provided by psy-
chologists and psychiatrists. A self-
care clinic is available during regu-
lar SHS hours. Students may pur-
chase certain popular over-the-
counter medications at a reduced
cost. Beginning this month. SHS
will offer physical therapy services.
A new building for SHS is also in
the planning phase. Also, students
interested in providing input on the
services at SHS are invited to join
the Student Health Advisory Com-
mittee (SHAC).
The Student Health Service
encourages students to become
educated health care consumers.
If you have further questions con-
cerning SHS, please call the
Health Education department at
328-6794.
students!
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The Department of
(Athletics, Office of
Student Development
is currently hiring full-time ECU
students and graduate students to tutor student-athletics
in ASIP, CHEM, MATH Stats, and EMST as well as in all
other subject areas. Minimum 2.5 6PA required.
Call 3284550.
WANTED FOR '96
PIRATE FOOTBALL
If interested, contact coach Paula Corbett
328-4510
W
Buy an IBM PC 340 or
350 desktop computer
and an IBM Multimedia
Kit. And you'll get a CD
software package that includes Windows 95,
Lotus SmartSuite. Netscape Navigator. World
Book Multimedia Encyclopedia and the Infopedia
collection of essential reference software.
Buy a ThinkPad and you'll get Windows 95 and
Lotus SmartSuite. You can also take advantage
of special student, faculty and staff financing.
Just call 1-800-4 IBM-LOAN for information.
Hurry, visit your campus computer store today.
After all, no one looks .�.� � �
good in a checkered 5 l� "ZIZZ
apron. SS255 S T ZZ
amma cSiqma Jblqrna
I n f o rma I Rush
September 9 , 10, 11
8-9:30 pin in the Mendenhall Underground
T
Come find out what seruice and friendship is all about!
For more information call Melanie Know at 551-8578
�.rporatiof Windows is a 'egiste'ed uadem ol M
ce mate ot othw 11996 i8M Corp All ngnts reserved
VARIITY MAiCOT TRYOLTS
When: Se
Where: Scales Field House Lobby
Final Tryout: September 8 at 12:00
For more information, contact coach
Paula Corbett 328-4510
I

4; 1T1TJC
2 5 YEARS' Greenville? NC
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Wed 18th and Thurs 19th I

.1
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The World's Most Powerful Hypnotist
TWO BIG NIGHTS, TWO BIG SHOWS
m





10
Thursday, September 5, 1996 The East
OSS
USONS
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
sex: SEX: sex:
Niiw that I have your at-
tention. I'll tell you what I
really want to talk about -
you the ECU fan.
As you know, ECU'S
first home football game is
Saturday in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium beginning at 4 p.m.
1 know all of you are going
to make it to the game and
stay throughout the entire
game. Right? Of course.
Fan support is vita! to
any football program and it
is the fans that even helped
bring about the new confer-
ence affiliation. Whether
you know it or not. the fans
play a huge role in a
school's football program.
1 said it last year and I'll
say it again - stay for the
entire game. A typical foot-
ball game only lasts a few
hours and the is the least
you can do is stay from start
to finish. It doesn't matter
if we are winning by 20
points or losing by 20
points. Either way. the fans
should be there to show
their support.
The football team and
coaches are out at practice
everyday for hours and all
you have to do is take time
out on a Saturday afternoon
to show them that you sup-
port the hard work they
have put into practice.
Football games are the
best part about the fall. You
tailgate before the game
and then head to your seats
to watch your Pirates from
start to finish.
Now 1 know some of
you are saying. "Well,
Amanda, sometimes it rains
and we don't want to get
wet All right 1 understand.
But before a game you can
watch the weather forecast
and if there is even a remote
chance of rain, take a pon-
cho. But no umbrellas, they
don't allow them inside the
stadium.
Ponchos are inexpen-
sive and they keep the wa-
ter off of you. The players
and coaches still have to be
out there and they all can't
wear ponchos. I think it's
sort of fun to watch a game
in the rain, it adds to the
excitement. The football
game gets more challenging
for both sides and that is
n fan support is needed
most.
I'm no preacher, but
1 m preaching now. Stay for
tame - the entire game.
i 5 ; have the students
stands only half full in the
middle of the third qu
� let's ha
pressure
�� � clock reads 00 00 in the
- :i you just
tell them, Amanda said
stay
We onl) '
gani
miss them. I mea
� tu some of the away
Spirited make-
over planned
I oreenv
ille tc

Tracy Laubach
CONFERENCE
tJSjflk

� - . is busine
unity, incli d .
i Ip promote ECU spint. These shuts
ilso being sold at UBE
� nv-hich wen
-� efited not onh,
� also tile scholarship
fund that has been establis
ity through Pitt County. For each shut
. . sold one dollar I
il is to get ever)
. . irple and dressing purple "
Surles said.
� " onl iCt.i
nted by the Pitt
es Ci rate Club. There is a
possibility that a $2 million goll
ul ' it a hole in one will be organized
all this spring.
Until then. Surles urges people
wear their purple, come on out to
5, and show your spirit.
I'll tell
you
once!
Coach Steve Logan talks
to the press about ECU'S
acceptance into Confer-
ence USA for football.
Conference play is slated
to begin in 1997.
Photo fiv PATRICK IRELAM
Pep rally planned
night before first game
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Stand up and get loud
urday is the opening
ball game of ti-
To kick ofl the season. Mei
hall Student Center along witl
Marching Pirates. ECU cheei
and dance team, will he holding .
rally to boost spirit.
Jay Marshall, i
dent activities, has put tog
evening that will includi
pep rally.
"This particular Fr I
immediately followii
music concert
Student Pirate (
ganize a pep rally.
This is the
Marshal sees this a
way to invi � enl
hall rr arama
start.
-

Stand
talli
Chancellor Eakin
speaks about his ex-
citement for ECU to be
affiliated with Confer-
ence USA. Eakin
played a big part in
helping ECU become a
member.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
pponent's Schedules
Austin Peay State at Arkansas State
Miami
vVest Virginia
Ohio at Hawaii
Central Florida at South Carolina
Gear NX. State
Virginia Ted on
omphis
f-
ama





� �
��,���
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 5, 1996
11
Natural Life Events presents:
9th plnniial
JCing Queen of thejialls
It's time to determine who is the fairest of them halls!
ate: September 5, 1996
Time: 4:00 p.m.
(place: Collegejiill
Come be part of the fun, games, and prizes!
USA
from page 1
ing job that he has done Hamrick
said. "If we hadn't been to the Lib-
erty Bowl the last two years, I don't
know if we would be standing here
today. He has put our football pro-
gram on the map, we're nationally
recognized and the quality players
he has and quality staff he has. I
want to thank them
The determination of all in-
volved helped to bring Conference
USA to Greenville.
"If you have perseverance, it is
the grandest quality and that is the
quality that is here at East Caro-
lina University Logan said. "I am
so humbled and gratified to be a
part of this happening today be-
cause I am starting my eighth year
here and I've seen incredible
changes in eight years and I sus-
pect in the next eight that there
could be even more wonderful
things to happen
What this means for ECU, is
the opportunity to play for a con-
ference championship. That is
something ECU has not been able
to do since 1976, when they were
affiliated with the Southern Con-
ference. Since then, ECU has been
an independent team in Division I
play.
"We're going to make this a
good conference, we're going to
make it a great conference
Hamrick said. "We're going to do
everything we can every year to win
this conference
The national exposure ECU
will receive will increase when they
play next season, since Conference
USA's games are televised on na-
tional television. Just last week two
Conference USA teams played on
national television and won, iden-
tifying the conference as a competi-
tor who can hang tough with any
team.
"As you know, we had two
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Campus Z-Station features:
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Desktop Systems include Microsoft� Natural� Keyboard
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games on last week, Tulane and
Cincinnati, Memphis and Miami, �
and I am absolutely amazed at the
exposure, recognition and the ac
knowledgment we have received as !
a result of that national exposure
Slive said.
Anyone that has followed EQJ
football knows that these confer
ence talks have been taking place
for some time now. One factor that
helped to finalize the talks was the
support of the fans. If the Pirates j
didn't have the fan following thj;
have had to away games, especially
the two Liberty Bowl games, thin j
this might not have been made pos- j
sible.
"The fans have played such an 1
incredibly important role in the de-1
velopment of this program and the
emergence of this program as a na
tionally competitive football team
Slive said.
Eakin agrees.
"I would really make a huge-
mistake today, if I didn't pay trib
ute to the fans that fill that stadium
week after week � who travel with �
us week after week Eakin said.
"Those who have stood by us
through the times when 3-8 sea-(
sons didn't seem as if they would 1
ever go away
That is also the sentiment ex
pressed by Hamrick who pays hom-t
age to the fans.
"I can stand here before youj
today and tell you this would have!
not happened without the East)
Carolina fans Hamrick said. "The!
commissioner and I met for about!
six hours in Memphis and if we had
only had about two or three thou
sand Pirate fans this past year for;
that Liberty Bowl, that meeting;
probably would have lasted about
an hour I
ECU will join the conference as!
a football member only. AH the
other varsity sports at ECU are af;
filiated with the Colonial Athletic;
Association, and Slive does not
anticipate ECU's other varsity,
sports joining Conference USA. !
"We have had no discussions)
and I certainly don't anticipate
any Slive said.
When play begins next season
ECU will match up against Cincin;
nati, Houston, Louisville, Memphis,
Southern Miss and Tulane. The win;
ner of the conference championship
will earn an automatic berth to the
Liberty Bowl. But that is nothing
new for the Pirates who have trav-
eled to Memphis the past two years
to compete - losing in 1994 to Illi
nois and winning last season
against Stanford.
As far as Conference USA ex-
tending to more teams, Slive said
it is possible but will not happen
anytime soon.
"We're now seven with the ad-
dition of East Carolina and I can
assure you that expansion will con-
tinue over the next several year$
and my hope is that we will not limit
ourselves to seven Slive said. !
So now, ECU can breathe a
little easier with its new affiliation.
It's what officials have been work-
ing for and now the hard work has
paid off. Conference USA will help
to boost our football to the top. j
"The Pirates have established
themselves as a Top 25 contender
and the best is yet to come and that
best of what is yet to come is going
to come with Conference USA.t
Slive said. "If anyone has any
doubts just look at their bowl
records, look at who they play and
look at last year's win in the Lib-
erty Bowl over Stanford
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education@zds.com
Things Really Move
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12
Thursday, September 5,1996 The East Carolinian
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
- He'P
11 Wanted
n?
Help
11 Wanted
SZECHUAN EXPRESS � PLAZA MALL
needs cashier Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11-4
and some night hours (15-20 hoursweek)
no phone calls please, apply in person 11
�9.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. Credit Card fun-
draisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can
raise up to $1000 by earning a whopping
$5.00VISA application. Call 1-800-932-
0528 ext. 65. Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT.
Attention ail students! grants and schol-
arships available from sponsors! no re-
payments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$
for info: 1-800-400-0209.
Other I Announcements Announcements
APARTMENT FOR RENT STARTING
the month of September. 1.5 blocks from
campus pius basketball court and pool.
Call 754-2948 and ask for Ross.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and
utilities 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very
Affordable.
APARTMENT FOR RENT 12 block
from campus. 1 BR1 Bath. $305month
with utilities included. No high bills and
no pets. Single occupancy only! For more
information call 757-9387.
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW Student Re
creation Center. Rent $225 month at 810
Cotanche Street. Call 752-2615. Bill Wil-
liams Real Estate beside Cubbies on Evans
Street
IN SEARCH OF HONEST, easy going,
female roommate(s) to apartment hunt
ASAP! Non-smokers preferred. Have all
furnishings Call Amy at 407-1552
TWO FOR RENT. ONE house and one
townhouse. Three bedroom, large kitch-
ens, central air, on bus route. $650.00
each. Call 754-2708 Leave message. Pool,
Dishwasher, etc
FOR RENT: SINGLE BEDROOM with
full kitchen and livingroom newly paint-
ed, new carpet and vinyl throughout Great
location next to campus, 1 block from
downtown. Need someone to take over
lease until May 97 $325 month. Includes
Cable, Water, Sewer. Call (School) 931-
0496. (Home) (910) 475-3506 or call 355-
8731. Ask about Sycamore Hill Apt 10
FOR RENT: TWO APARTMENTS 2
blocks from ECU campus: 3 bedrooms, 1
12 and 2 12 baths, appliances. No pets.
Depositrent Call 756-5528 or 758-7300.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP
to share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk
to campus. $250mo. plus i2 utilities.
Call 758-8244.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-
7613. Very Affordable!
ROOMMATE WANTED $250 PER
month 353-4451 leave message
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW!
To share 3 bedroom apartment Rent $180
plus utilities, right beside campus. Call
355-9526.
JSarth Friendlqr
Seeking people with
environmental awareness
and a need for excellent
part time income potential
Flexible hours, good
feeling. Call Ms. Collins:
321-6250
For Safe
CARS FOR SALE. WE can finance.
Choose from various styles, makes, such
as 88 BMW, 89 Chevy Blazer, etc "Cars-
R-Us" 355-3620
FOR SALE BLACK OVERSTUFFED
COUCH AND CHAIR STAIN RESISTANT
AND VERY COMFORTABLE. PERFECT
FOR COLLEGE APARTMENT $200.00
OBO, CALL 355-0930.
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET
behind Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche.
Paved lot lighted, numbered spaces, tow-
ing enforced $288.00 year or $175.00 se-
mester
FOR SALE: APPLE 636CD computer,
keyboard and monitor. $700.00 Queen size
mattress, box spring and frame $150.00.
Call Jason at 752-7107.
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 7583244.
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE, $300.00. Good
condition,350 pounds of weight; small
dorm sized fridge for sale $50.00, good
condition. Call 756-5309. Ask for Jeff.
STUDENT DESK $50, GIRL'S 12 speed
bike $60,FulIQueen size blonde head-
board with matching nightstand $50, 13
inch color TV $65. Call 758-9831.
COMPUTER DESK NEW, PERFECT
condition, $20.00. Call 931-0688 and leave
message.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry
level & career positions available world-
wide (Hawaii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc. Wait-
staff, housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders,
fitness counselors, and more. Call Resort
Employment Services 1-206-971-3600 ext
R53624. .
SPRING BREAK '97 - Sell Trips, Earn
Cash, & Go Free. STS is hiring CAMPUS
REPSGROUP ORGANIZERS to promote
trips to Cancun, Jamaica, and Florida. Call
800-6484849 for information on joining
America's 1 Student tour Operator.
AIRLINE JOBS � Applications are now
being accepted for domestic & internation-
al staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents,
reservationists, ground crew more. Ex-
cellent travel benefits! Call Airline Employ-
ment Services for details. 1-206-971-3690
ext L53622
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING
our circulars. For info call 202-393-7723.
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must Flexi
ble schedules. Apply in person.
GYMNASTICS TEACHERS! LOCAL
GYMNASTICS school is looking for ex-
perienced, motivated instructors who love
kids, part time - good pay. call darlene rose
at 321-7264 or stop by at 1602 Old Fire-
tower Road.
PHONE SURVEYORS: FTPT HOURS;
permanent positions, prestigious location;
$6-$15hour, benefitsemployee dis-
counts, paid sick days, paid holidays and
managerial training program. 3554779 or
1-800-7754)771.
SALES ASSOCIATES, full & part time.
Manager Trainees. When you join Zales,
the nation's largest retail jeweler, you'll
find a company committed to your growth.
Our structured training program, policy
of promotions from within, and exception-
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ise in the exciting jewelry industry. If you
have an enthusiastic attitude we will train,
no experience is necessary. Please apply
in person at Zales in the Carolina East
Mall.EOE. Zales Jewelers, The Dia-
mond Store
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL
SUNSPLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
FALL SOCCER COACHES: THE Green-
ville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the fall girls and boys
soccer programs. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-16, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00pm until
7:00pm with some night and weekend
coaching This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid-November. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James at 8304567
or Michael Daly at 8304550
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXI-
BLE HOURS, full or part-time available.
Top pay with benefits package. Call today
355-0210
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - PLAZA MALL
NEEDS cashier Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11-
4 and some night hours (15-20 hours
week). No phone calls please, apply in per-
son 11 - 9.
WANTED: PART-TIME WAREHOUSE
and delivery. License required. Apply in
person at Larry's Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th
Street Greenville, NC
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient, will-
ing to learn, and have excellent communi-
cation skills. We are currently taking ap-
plications for part-time telephone collec-
tors willing to work any hours from 8am
until 9pm Monday thru Friday and Satur-
day morning from 8am until 12 pm. If in-
terested please contact Brian Franey at
757-2127
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. AH shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the
world while earning an excellent income
in the Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry.
Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No exp necessary. For info, call 1-
206-971-3550 ext C53627
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Boardother benefits. For info, call (206)
971-3680 ext K53623
tk
Greek
Personals
DID YOU MISS FALL formal rush? Do
you still want to be Greek? Never fear, it's
not too late! Pi Delta, ECU'S only local
sorority will be holding its own fall rush
September 9 - 12 in Mendenhall. Come
out for four days of games, fun and ex-
citement For rides and info call 328-3751.
Announcements
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS IS starting
its tenth consecutive year and is looking
for dedicated and caring people to spend
quality time with a deserving young child
in our community. We require you to have
a GPA of 2.3 and 2 extra hours a week.
For more info call Dan Davidian,355-8823.
Applications can be picked up at BA401.
Officers only: We will meet in BD301 on
Thursday, Sept 5 at 5:00.
THE VOLUNTEER GUARDIAN AD Li-
tem Program is looking for advocates for
abused, neglected and dependent child-
ren. Volunteers are trained, then appoint-
ed with an attorney to represent the child's
best interest in juvenile court hearings.
The program works with other agencies
in locating and developing resources that
would benefit the child and their family.
Volunteers can assist by speaking out for
Children's rights to grow up in a safe and
caring environment For more information,
contact Catherine Darby, Guardian ad Li-
tem District Administrator, PO Box 1391,
Greenville, NC 27835 or call (919) 830-
6217. Training classes for new volunteers
will begin September 26.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE
PITT COUNTY, will be conducting a Soc-
cer Coaches Training School on Sat, Sep-
tember 21st from 9am4pm for all individ-
uals interested in volunteering to coach
soccer. We are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: basket-
ball skills, team basketball, swimming, rol-
lerskating, and bowling. No experience
necessary. For more information please
contact Dwain Cooper at 8304551 or
Dean Foy at 8304541.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA NATIONAL Coed
Service Fraternity received a Governor's
Outstanding Service Award on Wednes-
day, August 28,19 at Rose High School.
Governor Jim Hunt presented the service
award to over 200 individuals and organ-
izations in eastern North Carolina Alpha
Phi Omega was nominated for the award
by the American Cancer Society for their
volunteer work at the Relay for Life Wal-
kathon last April. For more information
on joining Alpha Phi Omega, there will
be an information booth in front of the
Wright Place on Sept 9,10,&11,1996.
EXPLORE NEW HEIGHTS! LEARN all
the basic skills of climbing and belaying
at the Rtcreational Services Climbing Tow-
er on September 5 from 4:00 p.m. - 6:00
p.m. at the Climbing Tower. Register oa
September 4 in Christenbury 204. For
more information call Recreational Serv-
ices at 3284387.
ADULT STUDENTS: FOR THE latest in
formation of interest to adult students at
ECU check out the new listserv ADULTS-
TU. You can subscribe by sending the fol-
lowing e-mail message "subscribe LIS-
TSERV@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU or come
to the Adult Student Services Office in
211 Whichard.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANI-
ZATION will meet on Thursday, Septem-
ber 12 in GCB1009 at 4:00 PM. All honor
students,teaching fellows and students
with a 3.4 GPA are invited to attend. For
more information, call Yaqoob at 758-
3635.
THE HISTORY HONOR Society of Phi
Alpha Theta will be having a meeting on
Sept 6,1996 on the first floor, D wing of
Brewster. All members and interested per-
sons should plan to attend. Time is 5:00.
WANT TO BECOME AN aerobics instruc-
tor and make money? Register for the Aer-
obic Instructor Training Class September
3 -13 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. in 204 Christen-
bury Gym. For more information call Re-
creational Services at 3284387.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 496-2224
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR
AEOROBIC INSTRUCTOR
COORDINATOR
Pitt County Memorial is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness
Department. Persons will contract to
teach on a part time basis. Also
seeking a qualified canditate to coor-
dinate aerobic classes. Interested
candidates should call for more
information between 8am-4:30pm at
(919) 816-6501.
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
EOEAA
f
Services
Offered
Part Time Help Wanted
16-20 hours a week.
Weekends a must.
apply in person.
Boularatd JSagel
327 Arlington Blvd.
WANTED: STARVING ARTIST
GRAPHIC DESIGNER to create logo for
business. Call 321-1634. Wanted: starving
photographer with equipment for unique
long term opportunity call 321-1634.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT -
Earn up to $25-$45hour teaching basic
conversational English in Japan, Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For info, call:
(206) 971-3570 ext. J53626
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All Students are
eligible regardless of grades, income, or
parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263495 ext
F53628
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
MATURE, DEPENDABLE STUDENT
TO care for children all ages. Non-smoker,
have own transportation, and good refer-
ences. Available MWF 12 - 6:30; TTH af-
ternoons. Also weekends. Call 328-3618.
TERRTS TYPING SERVICE. CALL 746-
9929 after 2:30 P.M.
DO YOU LIKE TO hear good music at
Parties? Then call DJ Dave to book your
next party at 758-5711. DJ Dave is a pro-
fessional DJ with top of the line equip-
ment If you want a wide variety of music
at you next party, then DJ Dave is your
man. Call DJ Dave for more info, at 758-
5711
Personals
t
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
tudent Swap shop
EASYGOING MUSICIAN - TYPE seek
ing partner to share healing massages.
Also seeking Fun-Loving ladies to share
music & sunshine. Write now: DT, POB
8663, Greenville, 27835. Photos helpful.
HEY MOUNTAIN BIKERS! LOOKING
for somebody to ride with in Greenville.
10-30 miles per week. On road or off.
Please call 551-6754. Ask for Karl.
Do you
have some
things you
need to get
rid of?
Advertising
in our
classifieds
can help.
328-2000
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include � Education Fund
�Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
� Insurance available
Apply within
M-F be4Aeen 2-4 p.m.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY tor next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
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Students$2
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Each word over
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For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.





��MMHMMMMMMi
(ft-
I XWWfaj
September 5, 1996
Vol. 03, No. 01
East Carolinia University
Greenville, NC
4 pages
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY S
Ware Sports Medicine SoilOiftg � OreeCviIic. North Carolina 2"S58"0? � Phone SI? ?26-450
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Dear ECU Srjdcns:
First, welcome to campus! It is good to have you irack it. Greenville Second, le; me say this there
are no better Badeocs in ihc country tc support their football team on Saturday artemoons than ECU
students You are loud, enthusiastic, and piay a key role in our home winning streak
This Saturday is our first home �ame lor 1996. Tradition is a big pan of any successful progrx-r.
Over the previous few years sortie traditions have beer; established at ECL First DownPirates the
team entrance with everyone on their feet, and cannon Wast after each score. .And, the loojstanir.g
"Hey. Hey. ECYou Look So Oood To Me" cheer at the end of ball games has been around for
years.
Beyond continuing the things mentioned above, 'Jiere are four important trungs I encourage you to
do in ! 996.1) line up and cheer the tearr. buses wheu ihey come through the parkinglets 7 i2 hours
before the game; 1) be in your seats 50 minutes before the game and support your football team in
the stands until the final horn sounds; 3) be on your feet making noise for a smoke filled terar.
entrance; and 4) on tliird down plays for the opposing "earn. �iand up and make as much noise as
possible.
This is your team and your school. Take pride in the purple and go!d, fiii the stands, display good
sportsmanship to our visitors and be responsible in your actions before, during and after the games.
Give your team the best opportunity to win with a spirited home field advantage I wjS guarantee you
this: if you fill up the stands early and make noise to the final horn, we �ill give it everything v.e have
on the field to make you proud!
The Spirit of the East is Growing Strong! Gel Loud and Be Proud'
Sincere
o
Steve Logan
Head Football Coach
ECU Pirates
VuUe,
�-iTolS-nJiC-foV'
-rTf :�mo M-V-mCTf. Aier, Dlcy
Photo Courtesy ofECUSiD
(Above) Senior Marcus Crandett, enters his final season as quarterback. The 1995 defending Liberty
Bowl Champions kick off their 1996 campaign this Saturday at 4 p.m. against East Tennessee State
"patacU
"Location. - Johnston City,
Tenn.
1iTvn?!lm?nt -11,715
"Head Coach. - Mike Cavan
$f tcktxam- Buccaneers
Colors - Navy Blue and Old
Gold
Stadium - Mini Dome
Conference- Southern
Conference
Current "Record 1-0
tCV v tvesn
ECU leads 5-4-1
1984 ECU 24
ETSU 6
Ifotes: ETSU is 0-5
versus IA teams in the
last four years. The last
and only time ETSU
defeated a IA opponent
was in'87, with a 29-14
victory over N.C. State.
ECU ready for spotlight
lPwyaa4t6cifon&
Brandon Waddell � Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson � Production Manager
Amanda Ross � Co-Editor
Brian Paiz � Co-Editor
Andy Farkas � Staff Illustrator
ETSU gives
Pirates its first
challenge
Brian Paiz
End Zone Co-Editor
Don't tell ECU Head Football Coach
Steve Logan that Saturday's matchup with
East Tennessee State is just a season
warm-up. After all, his team knows not to
ever overlook anyone.
The Pirates have been in ETSU's
shoes before: the underdog team trying
to knock off the bigger opponent.
Saturday's 4 p.m. kickoff at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium is sort of a David vs.
Goliath matchup.
ECU is the Buccaneer's only Division
I opponent on their 1996 schedule, and
ETSU would just love to come into Green-
viHe and leave with a major upset. ECU
players have been forewarned that they
better be ready to play on Saturday.
"ETSU is just another team that we
are trying to get past sophomore nose
guard Travis Darden said. "Until you men-
tioned it, I had forgot that they were a
Division l-AA team. We are trying to win
one game at a time
ECU is also ready to face someone
else other than their teammates. Senior
free safety David Hart can't wait until
Saturday.
"We've been ready for the past two
weeks, and we just can't wait to get out
there on Saturday and play the game
Hart said.
ETSU got their season kicked off last
Thursday as the Buccaneers defeated Lib-
erty 24-20 in Johnson City. A key player
in that game was senior quarterback Greg
Ryan. Ryan connected on 22 of 34 passes
for 229 yds and a touchdown. Ryan has
broken every major passing record at
ETSU, including passing yards with 6,010.
Ryan's favorite targets seem to be
sophomore wide receiver Marcus
Satterfield, and junior B J. .Adigun.
Satterfield caught seven passes for 65
yards and two touchdowns against Liberty.
Satterfield and Ryan know each other very
well.
The two have been playing football
together since they were both members
of the midget league football programs in
Greenback, Tenn. Adigun, a pre-season All-
Southern Conference cl.oicc, had seven
catches for 96 yards against Liberty.
On defense, ETSU is led by senior
defensive end James Russell. Russell was
named pre-season All-Americar by the
Sporting News. The St. Augustine, Fla.
Native holds the Buccaneers career records
for tackles for a loss with 47 and sacks
with 22.5.
A major concern for ECU going into
the season opener was who would fill the
void on defense left when Dwight Henry
was lost for the season at right cornerback
with an ACL injury to his knee. His re-
placement looks to be red-shirt freshmen
Forrest Foster.
The Clemson, S.C. native had been
battling junior Tabari Wallace for the job.
Elsewhere on defense, junior Matt
Semenza has earned a start at outside
linebacker. Semenza will be sharing time
with senior B.J. Crane.
On offense, the only question going
into Saturday's game is how would the
running game respond with the loss of
Jerris McPhaii. McPhail rushed for 943
yards last season and is now showcasing
his talents on Sundays as a member of
the Miami Dolphins.
Coach Logan and his staff gave the
nod to sophomore Scott Harley. Harley is
no stranger to the ECU offense. Last sea-
son, the Neptune, N.J. native filled in for
an injured McPhail in the Temple game
and rushed for 175 yards, an ECU fresh-
man record. Quarterback Marcus Crandell
will be starting his final season in Green-
ville, and Crandell, who has broken almost
every major passing record at ECU, has a
lot of respect for this Buccaneer defense.
"Their secondary is tough Crandell
said. "They play soft coverage, and they
mix it up a lot
Look for the Pirates not to underesti-
mate the Buccaneers on Saturday. ECU
knows that they are still trying to gain
national respect, and a let down on Sat-
urday would be a major blow to a team
that is trying to prove something each and
every football game.
If the Pirates need any incentive on
Saturday, they need just to look back to
1987 when an ETSU team came to the
state of North Carolina and clobbered NC
State 29-14.
Amanda Ross
TEC Sports Editor
"Pirates prove why they should
be ranked in the top 25
ECU 31
ETSU 7
Brian Paiz
WZMB Sports Director
" Woo-ha, Pirates keep
Bucs in check pjj 42
ETSU 10
Brian Bailey
WNCT- TV Sportscaster
" Pirates, don't overlook
Bucs
ECU 34
ETSU 7
Brandon Waddell �"��&
TEC Editor-in-Chief
" My Dad's coming to
Greenville only to see hfs
alma mater (ETSU) get
smoked ECU 34
ETSU 3
Dr. Richard R. Eakin
ECU Chancellor
" East Carolina takes care of
business
ECU 31
ETSU 10
pac� 2
Last go around
for senior
quarterback
Marcus
Crandell
;cs3
Scott Richards
defines tight
end position
4
Lamont Burns
returns as most
improved
offensive
player
VS. ETSU
FjM 1 mnrrf Suite University
Saturday
September J� 199C
4 ii.iii-





Thursday, Sqptember 5,1)996
The End Zone
Final season for Crandell
Amanda Ross
End Zone Co-Editor
tit,
He has been praised as one of the
best quarterbacks in the country. ESPN's
Lee Corso dubbed him his "Superpick
Quarterback" for the year. Who is he? You
know exactly who he is. Marcus Crandell.
Going into this season, Crandell
knows that the expectations are high for
the defending Liberty Bowl champs.
"This year there is a lot more anxiety
that has been built up from last year's
season Crandell said. "We want to have
a better outcome as far as the record is
concerned
A better outcome for the players
would be to go undefeated. A light home
schedule should provide easy wins at
Dcwdy-Fkklen Stadium, while a tough
road schedule could give the Pirates some
trouble.
"Games that we are for sure that we
can win, we have to make those wins as
good as possible, and try to prepare for
the next game Crandell said.
Crandell, who has surpassed two of
Jeff Blake's records (the Cincinnati
Bengal's starting QB) with 5,463 career
passing yards and 6,026 yards for total
offense needs just two more TD's to also
go ahead of Blake's career TD passes.
But as this first team QB for the 1995
All-Independent team knows, records can
be a huge motivation in a performance.
However, Crandell admits that once he hits
the field, those records are the furthest
thing from his mind.
"It doesn't enter my mindCrandell
said. "It's a motivating factor but I don't
think about it and when I broke records
last year I didn't even know that I had
broken them until after the came when
people told me
Because of the strong performances
Crandell has displayed the past two sea-
sons, he has been recognized as one of
the top quarterbacks in the country. For
example, in Football News he was listed
as one of five players nationally in a group
labeled "Players Worth price of Admis-
sion In other publications, Crandell h�
been recognized as one of the elite in the
QB position, but he still thinks he has to
show how good he really is.
"In the eyes of some people they
don't see me as that good and I still have
something to prove
This ECU team which is typically a
passing team will have to look to run the
ball more this season, and Crandell real-
izes that a lot of the ground yardage will
depend on him just as much as it will on
his running backs.
"We have to establish a running game
regardless, whether it be 90 percent pass-
ing and 10 percent running or 50-50
Crandell said. "We have to establish a run-
ning game to keep our passing game up
As with every player, obstacles are
met - and usually overcome. Crandell said
he didn't have just one hurdle to jump
over; he had two.
"When I first jjot here, being a
redshirt freshman and having to be thrown
into a system that is so hard to learn and
get it down pat to where I have it right
now Crandell said.
The second came just six quarters into
his career, in 1993, when a Central Florida
player took a cheap shot that resulted in
Crandell suffering a broken leg.
"I wondered if I would get back to
100 percent, where I was going to be able
' to play again
Much of the talk surrounding ECU
football has been the lack of respect from
the pollsters. The discrepancy In ratings
with different polls showed that really
nobody took a close look at the incred-
ible season the Pirates produced.
The AP Poll, which is regarded as
football's most prestigious poll, ranked the
� Pirates only 26th. That's right. They were
,the only 9-3 team with a bowl victory not
to make it into the top 25. It's a ghost
���'� i.
File Photo
Crandell will finish this season as ECU'S all-time leader in career
passing yardage, career offense and career touchdown passes.
that the players are playing against, but
it's not something that is the most impor-
tant thing going into this season.
"I worry, but I don't worry about it,
because I know in my mind and my heart,
and I think I speak for a lot of guys on
the team that we're better than a lot of
the teams they picked before us Crandell
said. "All we have to do is just keep striv-
ing for the achievement and set our levels
of standard a little higher than last year
So what's next for Crandell after the
season? The answer is obvious, the pros.
But he isn't looking too far down the
road just yet. He knows he must concen-
trate on leading his team to victory and
focusing on his final season with the Pi-
rates.
"I hope to keep pursing a football
career Crandell said. "I pray every night
that I will get to that point - it's a
dream
East Carolina University � Recreational Services � Lifestyle Enhancement Program
lerobics Instructor Training Program
The Aerobics Instructor Training Program (A.I.T.Pis a two day, intensive development seminar for aerobics
instructors, trainees, and fitness enthusiasts. This I I hour workshop will focus on topics essential to the
group exercise instructor including: basic exercise science, principles of training a.id their practical
applications, choreography development, movement evaluation, and the standards and guidelines for
group exercise instructors as established by the Aerobics and Iitness Association of America
Practical elements include rhythm, cueing, and exercise leadership.
Registration for the A IT P is September 3-13 in Chrislenbury 204.
Seating is limited so register early.
The cost is S45 for ECU students, faculty, and stall
The cost for the general public is SI25.
The course will be taught by Recreational Service's Aerobics Coordinator.
CPR certification is recommended, but not required.
Program DatesTimesLocation
Friday. September 20. 6:00 p.mMM) p.m. in 102 Christenbury dym.
Saturday. September 21, 9:00 a.m5:00 p.m. in 102 Chrislenbury Gym. A "lite" lunch will be provided.
All participants should he prepared to exercise hoth days.
,lclult Beginner Tennis lessons
September 10-October 3
Classes meet Tues.Thurs. evenings
8:00 p.m9:30 p.m.
Meet at Minges Tennis Courts.
Skills to be covered include:
� Forehand
� Backhand
� Serve
� Rules & Scoring
� Singles & Doubles play
Register today through September 9 in 2(14 Christenbury.
Cost is $20 for students & $30 for nonstudents.
Please bring water.
For more information ontaci Recreational Servu c oi 328-6387.
Saves on calling cards, too!
Just dial 1-800-COLLECT and use any local calling card,
urn
It's Fast. It's Easy. It Saves.
For long-distance calls. Savings vs. interstate 1-800-CALL-ATT basic card rates.
mmm





I-
The End Zone
Thursday, September 5,1996
Richards proves versatile
Dill Dillard
End Zone Writer
In the complex offensive mind of
Steve Logan, his well oiled machine calis
for a strong receiving corps. In a short
passing game like ECU'S, a strong tight
end mtist accompany speedy wide outs
in order to be successful. None better to
fill this spot than senior tight end Scott
Richards.
With a short passing game, a great
number of patterns are in the middle of
the defensive secondary, and a big tar-
get is needed to complete some passes
in a sea of linebackers. Richards, at S'5"
260 pounds, is one of the bigger tight
ends in division one football, and has
become a huge threat in Logan's offense
in the past two seasons.
"We are very comfortable with our
tight end situation with Scott Richards
Logan said. "I feel we have one of the
most underrated tight ends in the coun-
try.
He might be underrated, but his stats
are not. Last season, the rumbling tight
end gathered 33 passes for 341, yards
which placed him fourth among Pirate
receivers.
"I've worked hard to improve the
past two years, and I look forward to
improving again this season Richards
said.
Richards impressed coaches and fans
alike the past two campaigns starting in
every game lest season, including the
southern Miss contest where he caught
four passes for 62 yards and two touch-
downs in the victory over the Golden
Eagles. Now when you talk to Pirate fans
about Richards, the first thing out of their
mouths is reliable. From his 93-yard gutsy
performance at the Carrier Dome at Syra-
cuse to being the leading receiver in the
Liberty Bowl victory, when the Pirates
needed a big reception big number 90
would some how show up on the play.
Richards, recruited out of high school as
a quarterback, has a valuable ability of
reading defenses as well as being able
to anticipate QB Marcus Crandell's next
move.
"I'm a former quarterback, so read-
ing defenses is something I've been able
to do Richards said. "Also, it helps me
understand what Marc wants me to do
and where he wants me to be on certain
plays
Richards has proven to be versatile
and reliable as a receiving tight end,
blocking tight end, or even a blocking
full back in short yardage situations.
"What ever it takes to win, I'm will-
ing to do my part to help the team out in
anyway I can Richards said.
Being a team player, the biggest as-
piration for Richards this season is to
earn the respect of poll voters who
shunned the Bucs last seasons.
"Last year was great, but it's over
Richards said. "We've gotten to the bowl,
we've won a bowl, now we've need to
bring the program to another level and
be recognized as a national class pro-
gram
It's old news to Pirate fans when it
comes to being shunned by the Associ-
ated Press poll, but last season hurt a
touch more after winning nine games as
weil as snagging the Liberty Bowl title
from Stanford in the Bucs' second
straight appearance in Memphis.
"For them to rank us 26 was disap-
pointing, especially to me, because we
knew after all the hard work we deserved
a better ranking than 26 Richards said.
"This year it's our goal to do like coach
(Logan) says and just win the next game,
prove that East Carolina football deserves
to be in the top twenty five
The drive for the top twenty five will
no doubt be steered by many, including
Richards. This quest will begin next week
at home for the Pirates, much to the avail
of Richards, a senior majoring in Indus-
trial Technology.
"It's a big
boost for me as well
as the team to start
out the season at
home, seeing that
the past two years
we've started out
on the road
Richards said.
With an excit-
ing senior season
ahead, September 7
won't get here soon
enough for
Richards.
"I'm ready to
try to get my senior
season started and
get to work
Richards said.
"Practice has been
going well, but it
gets old seeing the
same faces across
the line from you,
day in and day out.
So, a lot of frustra-
tion will be let out
on Saturday against
ETSU. We're just
ready to play
Nl
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Richards is no stranger to the tight end position
Last season he caught 33 passes for 341 yds.
IN �TATE RESIDENCY QUESTIONS?
Peter IM.
Ronfary
ATTORNEY AT LAW
HARRINGTON, BRADDY &
ROMARY, L.L.P.
211-B WEST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
TEL: 919-830-8840
VISA
Showtime!
HOMECOMING
Wednesday October 23
HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVE ELECTIONS
MNHKIUlBIUin
MKflMlBEtil
MHMORMiHB
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UH4MMUftHHIALL SIWEMT CENIER
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 30
BANNER CONTEST JUDGING
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MONDAY OCTOBER 28
"COUNT DRACULA��
�CHEW OH THIS). MSQ-UNBEflGRQUNO. IfOQN-1PM
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TUESDAY OCTOBER 29
AUTOGRAPH NIGHT
THE PlAMMttLB.30?H-7 3OTI.
fREt AyTOGRAPH B0QK5a 4CtUVPAilEH : AMD UNDER!
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31
MIDNIGHT MADNESS V
MENDEMHALL STUDbMT CEMTER SPH-2AM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1
PIRATEFEST
MSC BRICKYARD 6 33PU-8PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
PARADE LINEUP
ELM 3TH��1 STH 8AM
HOMECOMING PARADE
mm
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME 2PM SATURDAY
ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY VS. ECU PIRATES
HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE HALF
WINNING OF THE SPIRIT CUP
THE HOMECOMING COMMITTEE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES
FLOAT, BANNER CONTEST, HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS, KING CANDIDATE, AND OUEEN CANDIDATE
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ALL ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 BY 5:00
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210 IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
THERE WILL BE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221 AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO RECEIVE A HOMECOMING ORGANIZATION PACKET ACTIVITIES APPLICATION STOP BY ROOM 210 IN THE MENDENHAU STUDENT CENTER OR CAU 328-4711 -SCHEDULE OF EVENTS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
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Thursday, September 5,1996
The End Zone
Burns turns up the heat for '96
Brian Paiz
End Zone Co�dttor
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrm
M there was ever anyone on the ECU
football team that symbolizes the word
player, it would be senior Lamont Bums.
As a freshman writer for The East Caro-
linian back in 1993,1 had a chance to
interview Lamont for the first time. I
have seen Lamont not only mature as a
player, but also as a person.
Lamont Bums has definitely had his ups
and downs as a Pirate. Bums was recruitc1
by former ECU head coach Bill Lewis in 1992
out of Page High School in Greensboro. As
a high school senior he recorded 55 tack-
les, and recovered seven fumbles. Although
ECU had a coaching change, Bums still de-
cided that ECU was the place for him to
continue his football career. The times have
been rocky at some points, but Bums said
he has never regretted his choice to come
to Greenville.
"I would not chanqe any decisions that
I have made at ECU Burns said. "The things
that have happened to me here has made
me a stronger person today
After red-shirting in 1992, and receiv-
ing the Outstanding Defensive Scout Team
Award, Burns played in all 11 games at de-
fensive end during the dismal 2-9 season in
1993. However, things changed in the spring
of 1994. The coaching staff decided to move
Bums to tight end, a position he really never
got comfortable with. When fall drills began
in 1994, Burns moved to offensive guard
where he saw limited time in four games.
Then there came 1995. Bums started
to improve at offensive guard and by season's
start, had earned himself a starting posi-
tion at offensive guard, and by season's end
was named the most improved offensive
player He also had a Liberty Bowl champi-
onship to add to his career achievements.
Through all the position changes, and
the difficulties he went through, Bums cred-
its Coach Steve Logan for helping him
through the situation.
"Coach Logan has always been real to
me Bums said. "I wasn't performing up
to his potential on defense, so he made a
change. Every position change I made, Coach
Logan was very supportive
The next step for Burns could be pro
football, and he is receiving national atten-
tion. Several college football magazines have
listed him as a top offensive linemen, but
Bums knows that if pro football doesn't work
out he is ready for his future.
"It's just time to wait and see what hap-
pens Bums said, who has already gradu-
ated with a BA degree in Communications,
"i have already graduated, so I am ready for
anything
One thing Burns is ready for is the '96
season. Bums and the Pirates still feel that
they are not getting the national respect that
they should, and the Associated Press Poll
Last season added salt to the wound. The
AP poll snubbed ECU out of the top 25, by
placing them at number 26.
"It bothered a lot of people Burns
said. "We think we deserved to be in the
top 25
ECU opens this Saturday against East
Tennessee State, a team that some people
think the Pirates might overlook. But Bums
and his fellow teammates know better.
"At first I was worried that we might
overlook them Bums said. "But we have a
lot of seniors on this team and we know
that people have overlooked us before, and
were not going to let that happen on Satur-
day
One thing he is proud of is the fact that
he has been part of a program that has risen
into the national spotlight in recent years.
"I feel that I have been part of the
piece of the puzzle to make ECU'S football
program more visible on the national
scene
The final regular season piece to his
puzzle will end on November 30 in Char-
lotte against the N.C. State Wolfpack, a
team that Pirate fans have been waiting to
see ECU play for a long time.
"I came in after the Peach Bowl game,
and everybody has been waiting for this
one for a long time since Burns said. "It's
going to be a bam burner
Burns however will take one game at
a time.
"This is my last go around. I want to
play every game to it's fullest
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
After earning a starting position
at offensive guard, Burns was
last season's most improved
offesive player on the team.
ECU Rins Event
Saturday, September 7th
9am-2pm
A KKA RVEfi $25 Deposit A RTCMiB
V COLLEGE jEWtXBY
Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
p �� � Special Payment Plans Available
Monday � MONDAY NIGHT MADNESS -1.75 HtBals and Domestic
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
NO COVER
Tuesday - BAR CRAWL - NO COVER Dollar Domestics
Wet T-Shirt Contest "foesday, September 10th
Many Prizes-No Cover
Thursday - BLOCK PARTY � NO COVER Before 10pm1.00
Domestics, Hi-Balls, Kami's
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
$1.50 Hi-balls
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
$ 1.75 HiBals and Domestic
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
Friday - WEEKEND PARTY-NO
COVER LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LIQUOR & BEER SPECIAL
Saturday - LIVELY - REAL LIVELY
GREAT BAR SPECIALS
Sunday - CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION NIGHT -
NO COVER
$1 DOMESTICS, KAMI'S
' $1.50 HI-BALLS
$2.00 SHOTS AND SHOOTERS

�- � �' mfViiLMmtrm'mm'mmmmmmi � iim nm� �!��� m a
PT1 . ��� � "





Title
The East Carolinian, September 5, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 05, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1156
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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