The East Carolinian, September 3, 1996






TUESU
September 3,1996
Vol 72, No. 04
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Upgrading fire safety will cost millions
Across The State
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP)
- A Spring Hope man charged
with second-degree murder fol-
lowing an accident that killed
an Onslow County man had
been convicted seven times of
driving while impaired.
Five of those convictions
have come in the last 10 years,
Assistant District Attorney Troy
Peters told an Onslow County
judge last week during a first
court appearance for 37-year-
old Chauncey Marshburn.
Marhsburn's bond was set
at $126,000 in a court hearing
Wednesday.
FORT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) -
A Fort Bragg soldier charged
with espionage had an interest
in China and visited the coun-
try, but he was not a spy, his
stepmother said.
The Pentagon on Wednes-
day confirmed that charges
have been filed against Eric
Jenott. Jenott was charged with
espionage, damaging military
property, larceny and breaking
into government computer sys-
tems, according to Army docu-
ments.
Other than confirming that
charges have been filed against
Jenott, the Pentagon was not
saying very much about Jenott's
arrest.
Across The
Country
BRIDGEPORT, Conn. (AP)
- A witchcraft-practicing school
bus driver was convicted
Wednesday of statutory rape for
seducing a 14-year-old boy who
said she cast a spell on him and
forced him to lick her blood.
As Patavino was led to her
car after the verdict, one of her
friends punched a newspaper
photographer repeatedly on the
steps of the courthouse.
Patavino faces up to 115
years in prison at her sentenc-
ing Oct. 11, although sentences
in such cases are usually signifi-
cantly shorter. Her attorney, Jo-
seph Mirskv, said he would ap-
peal.
The boy was a middle
school student in Trumbull
when he met Patavino, then a
26-year-old bus driver with
purple streaks in her black hair.
Around the World
CAPE TOWN, South Africa
(AP) - South African police sub-
poenaed the notes of local and
international journalists Tues-
day in a search for information
on vigilante violence in Cape
Town's ganglands.
A spokesman for the Cape
Times newspaper said two po-
licemen arrived in the office
with a subpoena for editor
Moegsien Williams. He was
seeking legal advice on how to
respond to the order to bring
any an 1 all material on the re-
cent mob slaying of a suspected
drug dealer, including notes
and film, to the attorney gen-
eral next week.
Chapel Hill fire
still causing alarm
Chris Loga
News Writer
To officials of the UNC system
fire safety has become a big issue
among the individual schools and
administration.
The subject became an issue
after a fire erupted at the Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity house at
the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. The fire began in the
early morning last Mothers Day and
sent a wake up call to students and
faculty. Since there were no sprin-
klers in the house, the administra-
tion has elevated fire safety to the
top of its priorities list.
Fraternity houses in North
Carolina are just part of the prob-
lem. According to a recent study of
state colleges, most are in need of
a sprinkler upgrade.
The study has shown that the
cost of the needed construction will
be $55 million at minimum. This
cost would include adding sprin-
klers in dorms at 16 campuses in
North Carolina.
State officials have also re-
ported the release of funds to start
the individual projects at certain
schools.
According to Manny Amaro di-
rector of Housing Services, a re-
ported $524,500 in funds that was
supposed to start construction at
ECL' has yet to be seen.
"At this time we have not re-
ceived, nor do we expect to see anv
of that money Amaro said.
According to Amaro, it would
take a projected $14 37 million to
complete the project over a period
of 10 years.
"This project will take so long
because each building has to be
shut down for the entire
processAmaro said.
While the totals are high, some
of the headache could have been
alleviated. Amaro said that during
the renovation to Slay and Umstead
Halls, there was a conflict between
the university's intentions and
state regulations.
"The university wanted to up-
grade (buildings) then, but the ex-
tra construction would have ex-
ceeded the sate building code
Amaro said.
Amaro expressed the need for
changes to the code, which limits
and regulates what construction
can be done to an existing build-
ing. Without these changes, no con-
struction can start.
This means that even though
the state may have good intentions,
the actual construction may not
start for years.
The delay on construction
could be detrimental for students
at other schools since some have
not evaluated the problem of fire
safety yet.
Since the Chapel Hill fire, the
only results have been studies on
safety in individual schools.
Dining services applauded
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Students frequent the healthy food, salad and pasta section in Mendenhall Dining Hall.
Selections of this type helped to win the NACUFS award in July.
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Senior Writer
ECU food services won recogni-
tion for their Nutrition Month and
Something From Home programs
When they attended a conference of
the National Association of College
and University Food (NACUFS) in July.
The organization holds a confer-
ence each year in a different location
and keeps members up to date on the
industry.
"This organization promotes the
improvement of college food services
around the country. ECU is a mem-
ber and we send representatives each
year said David Bailey, who is the
district marketing manager.
The conference includes the
showing of new products, information
sessions and other activities in addi-
tion to the competitions in different
categories.
"There are general interest ses-
sions that everyone attends about the
industry. There are also smaller spe-
cial interest sessions that have to do
with catering, marketing, menu devel-
opment and so forth Bailey said.
ECU's Nutrition Month program,
developed and managed by Campus
Nutrition Manager Laura Hartung.
won first place for the "Most Creative
Nutrition Month Promotion by a
NACUFS Institution
"They judge it on your creativ-
ity, your use of heart-healthy menus,
and how much involvement you had
throughout the university Hartung
said.
The NACUFS
Food and Nutri-
tion Committee
judged the pro-
grams based on
portfolios submit-
ted by the en-
trants. This was
the first year that
ECU had entered
the nutrition con-
test. Hartung says
that she is just be-
ginning her third
year as the nutri-
tion manager and
hopes to continue
educating the campus population
about healthy eating.
"People think that healthy eating
is just eating vegetables and salads,
and I'm trying to dispel that myth
Hartung said, and added that a sur-
vey she did last spring indicated some
disordered eating habits among stu-
dents.
As reward for her program's first
place finish. Hartung won airfare and
registration to this year's conference
and was invited to come back next
year.
The "Something From Home"
program was entered in the cash
sales special event category. It won
in its large school
division first,
then won the
grand prize for
all divisions in
the category.
"Something
From Home" is a
care package pro-
gram which be-
gan in fall 1993
and enables par-
ents to send gifts
to students for
their birthday or
other special oc-
casions. The pro-
giam o!ters
cakes, cookies, pizzas, gift bags and
balloons for parents to choose from
when ordering.
"Something From Home" won its
category based on the program as it
was last year. Bailey says that there is
a new feature being added this year.
railed "Monthly Love
"We put together a whole
See DINE page 3
People hink that
healthy eating is
just eating
vegetables and
salads, and I'm
trying to dispel
that myth
� Laura Hartung, campus
nutrition manager
Estimated costs of residence hall fire
safety systems
Residence Hall
Project cost
Jarvis
Greene
Clement
Cotten
Fleming
Fletcher
Garrett
Aycock
Jones
Belk
Scott
Slay
Umsteari
$248,970
$648,510
$700,363
$418,864
$739,218
$877,460
$334,329
$2,620,835
$562,826
$946,724
$1,112,330
$3,274,062
$1,123,012
$295,236
$429,703
These figures include projected totals for
sprinklers, service requirements, asbestos $14 332 443-Total
removal, alarm replacements, smoke detec-
tors.
College campuses
goldmines for
Students urged to guard against theft
Scott Hopkins
News Writer
As students return to school, the ECU Police Deptartment offers recom-
mendations that students can take to protect themselves and their personal
possessions
A recent study done by the Chronicle of Higher Education reports theft
to be the top concern on college campuses.
"The public puts a lo! on the police for protection from crime, we ask that
they(students) take just a minute to lock their rooms and possessions so they
can deter a crime instead of report one said Patrolperson Sara Harris.
Harris said everyone has to deal with theft and burglary. However, on a
college campus, security of students, self and their belongings should always be
paramount on the student's mind.
Students tend to take their security and safety for granted by leaving room
or car doors unlocked, giving their keys to friends or just leaving articles of
value lying around in public places.
Last year at ECU, there were 339 reported cases of larceny(petty theft) on
See THEFT page 4
Child development lab
claims third award
Marina Henry
News Writer
ECU'S Child Development Laboratory received an accreditation from the
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) this past
July.
This is the second time ECL' has received this three year accreditation.
The NAEYC is one of the nation's oldest and largest organizations of early
childhood professionals. Only five percent of early childhood programs nation-
wide have received accreditation from them.
Dr. Helen Grove, Dean of the School of Human Environmental Sciences,
said the accreditation was important to parents and educators alike.
"This accreditation assures the parents and the educators that the pro-
gram is of high quality and gives the children what they need the mostGrove
said.
The lab provides a preschool environment for 52 children, ranging in age
from two to five, of the communitv. staff, and students. The youngsters are
exposed to new ideas and ways of doing things, stimulating and rich experi-
ences which help each individual grow in his or her own way. The goal of the
program is to increase the child's curiosity, confidence, their eagerness to learn,
and to help the child feel good about them self.
"We have talented and committed faculty and staff who are dedicated to
working with each other, the children and the parents to achieve a common
goal Grove said. "Our program works closely with parents. They are the true
judges thai our staff is doing their job. Our parents are highly supportive, and
our program is as good as it is because of the support or our parents
See CHILD page 4
Uffcyfe
Art students play with heavy metalpage t)
To park or not to parkpage 3
SPORTJw
Soccer teams kick grasspage 9
Tuesday
Rainy
High 87
Low 67
Wednesday
Rainy
High 86
low 65
NcW

rfW fo ezc& ci&
Phone
(newsroom) 328-6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
It Hi K ITVM.CIS.EC I .1 -m
The Fast Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





ii i m "
Tuesday, September 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Support offered to students with MS
UNC-CH official calls insurance plan 'misleading
Graduate and Professional Student Federation President Katherine
Kraft cautioned students this week to be aware of possible problems
regarding a new health insurance policy.
The policy, mailed to students through the U.S. Postal Service, is
underwritten by the Mid-West National Life Insurance Company of Ten-
nessee and offered through the American College Students Association.
Kraft said Tuesday she had never heard of the American College
Students Association, nor had Association of Student Governments Presi-
dent John Dervin.
Kraft said she was concerned the policy's claims would lead stu-
dents unfamiliar with insurance regulations to make erroneous assump-
tions about the policy.
Kraft has sent a letter to the N.C. State Department of Insurance,
requesting advice on several legal questions she thought the policy
brought up. u
For example, Kraft questioned the policy's claims that poucy hold-
ers could pay their premiums by credit card.
Med students urged to link spirituality with clinical care
Medical students at Wake Forest University are being encouraged
to include a dose of spirituality with their healing powers when they
treat a patient
The medical school in Winston-Salem was one of six in the country
to receive a $10,000 John Templeton Foundation grant Tuesday to be
Lsed to teach medical students how to incorporate spirituality into clini-
cal care.
The grants were presented in Washington by the National Institute
for Healthcare Research.
The foundation was established in 1987 by Templeton, an interna-
tional investment manager, to encourage the link between the sciences
and religion.
Students who set fire visit frat house at UNC-CH, burn center
Five middle school students who set a fire at a vacant school are
learning how lucky they were to escape.
They visited the scene of a fatal fraternity house fire and a hospital
that treats bum victims.
"Luckily, we didn't need a funeral home, although we very easily
could have one of the boys wrote in an essay after visiting the Phi
Gamma Delta house at UNOCH. The house was the site of a fire which
killed five students on Mother's Day.
In May, a Durham judge ordered the five middle school students
convicted of setting the Hope Valley School fire to serve part of their
100 court-ordered community service hours at the North Carolina Jay-
cees Burn Center at UNC Hospitals and then report to her about their
experiences.
Wake Forest student who died in TWA crash
A young Wake Forest University student died aboard TWA Flight
800. 300 people gathered at the Florence Baptist Temple on Jury 27 to
remember Matthew Alexander, 20 who was killed in the explosion off
Long Island, N.Y.
Alexander was headed to Dijon, France to serve in a short-term
ministry with members of Youth With a Mission of Greater- Europe be-
fore joining the university's overseas study program.
Alexander had a French translation of the Bible with him on the
plane when he died.
Corralled by Amy L Royster. Taken from various college newspapers and
CPS.
Group discusses
challenges, finds
solutions
Susanne S. Dozier
News Writer
Thanks to the Eastern North
Carolina Chapter of the National
Multiple Sclerosis Society there is a
support group available for ECU stu-
dents suffering from multiple sclero-
sis.
"But You Look So Well" is the
name of the support group in which
Students are welcome to
participateThis program will focus
on individuals with multiple sclero-
sis and the everyday challenges they
face.
Individuals with MS are encour-
aged to attend. This group aims to
increase self-esteem for MS victims
and provide them with positive sup-
port
"We are excited that we are able
to offer this group. We hope to meet
the needs of the people in Green-
ville said Kaye Gooch. Director of
Multiple Sclerosis Society Chapter
Services.
In September 1973, Congress
passed Section 504 of the Rehabili-
tation Act. This act states no handi-
capped person can be "excluded from
participation in. be denied benefits
of, or be subjected to discrimination
under any program or activity receiv-
ing federal financial assistance
Consistent with Section 504, the
policy of East Carolina University is
that no qualified individual with a dis-
ability may be discriminated against
on the basis of his or her disability.
ECU encourages academically
qualified students to seek admission
to the university. ECU offers special
services to the disabled through the
school's Disability Support Services,
located in Brewster building A-llv
The center seeks to meet individual
needs by coordinating and implement-
ing programs, services, and activities.
This group is scheduled for six
consecutive Tuesday evenings begin-
ning August 27. and concluding Oc-
tober 1,19. The meetings will take
place from 6p.m. to 7:30p.m fees are
$10.
There are many other groups and
programs available throughout Pitt
County that may offer support to the
disabled individual. For more informa-
tion, contact Director of Disability Ser-
vices C.C. Rowe at Brewster A-116 or
328-6799.
Campus wins im
Construction and
renovation worthy
of recognition
Jennifer Barnes
News Writer
While the con-
struction work
covering most of
ECU'S campus
may have caused
some inconve-
nience, it proved
to be beneficial by
bringing the uni-
versity national
recognition.
ECU is one in
over 2400 educa-
tional institutions
that have come to-
gether to form a
national organiza-
tion known as
CASE (Council for
Advancement and
Support of Educa-
tion).
Malcolm Woodall, associate
vice chancellor for institutional ad-
vancement, said CASE is a highly
productive establishment.
"Their purpose is to support
fund-raising in higher education by
recognizing the schools that
showed the most continous im-
provement in a three-year period
Woodall said.
- "The members
are catego-
rized as two-
year, four-year,
public and pri-
vate groups
The cho-
sen institu-
tions then re-
ceived the
Circle of Excel-
lence Award.
Less than
three percent
of participat-
ing schools ac-
tually have this
honor and
ECU proved it-
self by beating
"Having a major
capitol campaign
helped energize
businesses,
friends and
alumni and made
them want to
volunteer
� Malcolm Woodall,
associate vice chancellor
; for institutional
advancement,
the odds.
While approaching the close of
1995, ECU brought the Shared Vi-
sions Campaign to a successful end.
Woodall was very proud of the fund
raiser's successes.
"The beginning goal was to
raise $50 million in capitol funds
to create new buildings, renovate
the university library and provide
scholarships for students in various
schools Woodall said. "Before it
was over, this university-wide effort
had produced $65 million dollars
When asked about the tremen-
dous success of the campaign,
Woodall, said it was all the result
of teamwork.
"Having a major capitol cam-
paign helped energize businesses,
friends and alumni, and made them
want to volunteer Woodall said,
"The entire deans, administration,
undergraduates, corporations, and
foundation worked together to
achieve a goal that no one thought
was possible. Everyone worked
very hard and has the satisfaction
of achieving such a goal
The annual CASE assembly was
held in San Francisco on July 8 to
honor the recipients of the Circle
of Excellence award in front of a
selected group during an evening
gathering.
Over 1000 attendees watched
as Peter Buchanan presented the
award to Woodall. who received it
on behalf of the ECU institutions.
ECU STUDENT
ACCOUNTING SCO!
1TY
"MEET THE OFFICERS"
Stop by and join us for donuts!
Wed. Sept 4-7 7:30-9:00AM
in the Lobby of GC
Mandatory j
Mews writers
meeting
4:30 p.m.
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�.�.B
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 3,1996
r-
i
i
i
i
i
L.
20 Off Suggested Retail on
Any One Item.
expires October 31,199
Do you have some
things you need to get
rid of?
Advertising in our
classifieds can help.
The East Carolinian
328-2000
ECU
HILLEL
Let's gather and meet our
fellow Jewish classmates.
Organizationalsocial
meeting to eat pizza
and plan for the
upcoming holidays.
Mendenhall 8C,D,E
6:OOpm
Wednesday, September
4th.
Debbie: 75Z-
8607 for more
info
o?M
TO MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
Video Games
FOOD
Student
Union
Movies, - - ,
Transit IfljO. UG$KSQA
BOWLING
ABLE. Newspapers
Central Ticket Office
Meeting Rooms
"?? Greeks
ART Gallery
Computer lab
and more
Billiards
BOLL OVER BEETHOVEN,
"1964THE TRIBUTE IS ALMOST HERE
Tit I &tATLL6 && 16 C0W&; 10 WRJIJT AUDITORIUM,
PA�LNtT6 vttJdLMp. slptlm&lr. 27 at &ooph
5TUDLhiT T10dLT6 67 N ADVaMX AT TUt CLNlTKAL VOCSLJ CfftiL
(4 15 AT Tit POOR.)
NOW SHOWING!
TWI6TLE. PC13). 6EPTLM&U2. 3-J UtrJPRJX TitATCE.
FJ2��. APMj56k?N' VfTlJ E-CU V.
GET INFORMED
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TAklL A &ZUXL VlTLl &tf VUI &LUARD5. TA&UL TOWSi AMP VlPLtf AR-
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CALL 328-4738 FOR. 0PERAT10N i-k?UE.6.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER Ywir Onter of Activity"
HOURS: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m lp.m Fri. 8a.m12am Sai. 12p.m12a.m Sun. lp.mllp.m.
New Joyner Library
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Jennifer Winstead, ajunior majoring in psychology, copies chapters for class in the
new reserve reading room on Joyner Library's first floor.
Joyner Library Hours
Fall Semester 1996
(or call 328-4285)
Building Hours
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Computer Lab
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
8 a.ml a.m.
8 a.m6 p.m.
10 a.m6 p.m.
1 pml a.m.
8 a.mlO p.m.
8 a.m5 p.m
1 p.m5 p.m.
2 p.mlO p.m.
Government Documents
MonThurs. 8 a.mlO p.m.
Fri. 8 a.m5 p.m.
Sat noon5 p.m.
Sun. 6 p.mlO p.m.
InterLibrary Services
Mon-Fri. 8 a.m5 p.m.
MediaTeaching Resources
MonThurs. 8 a.mlO p.m.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
8 a.m5 p.m.
noon-5 p.m.
1 p.mlO p.m.
North Carolina Collection
MonThurs. 8 a.mlO p.m.
Fri.
Sat
Sun.
8 a.m6 p.m.
noon4 p.m.
6 p.mlO p.m.
PeriodicalsMicroforms
MonThurs. 8 a.mlO p.m.
Fri. 8 a.m6 p.m.
Sat 10 a.m6 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.mlO p.m.
Reference
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
8 a.mlO p.m.
8 a.m6 p.m.
10 a.m6 p.m.
1 p.mlO p.m.
Special Collections
MonThurs. 8 a.m5 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m2 p.m.
Music Library Hours
Fail Semester 1996
(or call 326250
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
8 a.mlO p.m.
8 a.m5 p.m.
noon-5 p.m.
2 p.m10 p.m.
VIA VAI
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DINE from page 1
semester's worth of gifts, where for
one price parents can have something-
sent to their son or daughter once a
month Bailey said.
Bailey said they hope to have
good results with the "Monthly Love"
program, and continue to do well in
whatever NACUFS competitions they
enter in the future. He said that the
success at this year's competition was
especially noteworthy considering
that most NACUFS members are self
operating, whereas ECU's Dining Ser-
vices are contracted through
ARAMARK, which is beginning its
seventh year at ECU.
If Youve Got What It Takes
To Be A Leader In Our Company,
This Could Be Your Off ice.
Few people will ever set foot in an office
like this. But then, few people have what it takes to be
a Marine Officer. Officer Candidates School (OCS) is
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internships phone 1-800-722-6715.





Tuesday, September 3, 1996
The East Carolinian
XHJbr 1 from page 1
campus. This number is down almost
20 cases since 1994. Unfortunately, it
is still the one problem the police must
deal with the most
"Many of these incidents are from
residents simply not taking the time
to lock a door when going down the
hall Harris said.
There are many different choices
a student can make in order to deter
or dampen the effects of theft Insur-
ance is one of them.
Insurance may not stop the prob-
lem of theft, but if one's possessions
are properly identified and fully cov-
ered within the policy, it may lessen
the effects of the loss.
Students who live on campus need
to check with their parents'
homeowner's insurance policy to make
sure articles such as TV's, VCR's, and
computers are all covered by these
policies.
For students who live off campus,
independent insurance policies or rent-
ers insurance policies protect yourself
and your possessions.
According to ECU police, many
insurance companies require a photo
and engraved identification of all ar-
ticles that fall under their policies.
To help with this, the ECU police
department has implemented Opera-
tion ID.
"This program has been imple-
mented in order to protect the students
and help the police in tracking and
recovery of the articles Harris said.
The program allows students to
bring articles to the ECU police, who
will engrave the articles with the
student's license number and state.
The police will also catalog the items
by value and brand name.
Engraving allows police to iden-
tify stolen articles once they have been
found on the street and makes it pos-
sible to locate the owner.
CH ' JLU from page 1
The accreditation said the pro-
gram is meeting the child's full educa-
tional, intellectual, social, emotional
and physical needs. The staff and fac-
ulty meets the highest standards set
for birth through kindergarten educa-
tion.
ECU has the only birth through
kindergarten teacher certification pro-
gram that has been approved by both
the National Council for Accreditation
in Teacher Education (NCATE) and
by the State Department of Student
Instruction.
"We strive to have the best teacher
education program and this accredita-
tion says that we are on the right
track Grove said. "I feel an enormous
sense of pride in our teachers who
work so hard with the children and
parents. This accreditation is very im-
portant and I am pleased that ECU has
received it for the second time
Possible Damage To Property - A student reported that he struck
a car door in the parking space next to his on August 17, 1996. The
victim told the student he would file a report. As of August 26, 1996 at
10:39 a.m no report was filed.
Damage to Property - A faculty member reported at 11:24 a.m.
that her vehicle was scratched while parked at Fletcher Music Building.
Harassing Phone Call - A faculty member reported at 11:24 a.m.
that she had been receiving several harassing telephone calls.
Possession of Stolen Property - A staff member was issued a state
citation for being in possession of a stolen mail file which was sent to
ECUV.M 1 system printer.
August 27
AssistRescue - A staff member reported another staff member
was having difficulty breathing in Greene Hall. Greenville Rescue re-
sponded and the staff member refused transportation to the hospital.
She was taken home by a friend.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of her purse from one of
the ECU transit buses.
Solicitation - A non-student was banned from campus for selling
magazines on the sixth floor of Fletcher Hall.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
A
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A'
T
a 7
s





t
,
Tuesday, September 3,1996 7fte �ast Carolinian
m
:m
m
Parking
problems are
not a new
issue. But is
ECU putting its
money into
projects which
suit the best
interests of all
students?
Complaining about parking at ECU has almost become a
cliche. Anyone who owns a car and has tried to park on or
around campus understands the problem. There are simply
not enough parking spaces to accommodate the increasing
population of ECU.
Admittedly, the university has tried its best to handle the
situation. Freshmen will temporarily be allowed to park in a
former shuttle parking area located at the corner of Charles
Boulevard and Ficklen Drive. Also, the university has suppos-
edly bought the block of land around the former Sub Station
II. This property became available when the formerly popular
student hang-out went out of business several months ago.
And let's not forget the fact that the university provides
free busing for its students so they can at least get to class.
Now, whether or not you qualify for busing privileges depends
on where you live. If you live too far from campus, you're
simply out of luck.
But the transit system is not a total solution even for those
who take advantage of it Apparently, parking is such a prob-
lem that more and more people are taking the bus, thereby
causing some serious crowding problems. One TEC employee
reports that overcrowding on ECU'S buses is so bad that stu-
dents are forced to sit on the steps leading out of the bus. Not
only is this form of seating very dangerous, but it also violates
some major traffic regulations. If a student were to be injured
because he or she was not provided safe seating on a campus
bus, ECU would have to find some cash in its seemingly empty
pocket
There really is no reason for parking to be this bad. We at
TEC acknowledge the budget cuts that this state has been
suffering, but we don't exactly accept this as an excuse for the
major parking problems ECU's population has been endur-
ing.
This campus needs many things. The restructured library
is a welcome gift We are a university, and we need a strong
library. The new recreation center, however, is something that
could have been trimmed a bit. If money is such an issue, then
take some of the money budgeted for the recreation center
and put it to sensible, effective use. Build a parking deck,
pave new lots, expand existing parking spaces, buy more buses,
do something.
We at TEC don't expect miracles. We understand how lim-
ited funds can constrain what one can do. Still, when you
break it down, ECU is a business, and any good business needs
to keep its customers happy. So, as cliched as the problem
may have become, parking is still a very real issue. And a?
paying customers, the student population demands better ser-
vice.

B-
4,etten& fa t6e Sdita
Does Sen. Aldridge really represent us?
jfe The East Carolinian
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dlllard, Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial 3oard. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27854353. For information, all (919)
32M366. . ,
Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
David Bigelow. Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
No holiday resources
The hard work that has been in-
volved with the beautification of our
campus is to be appreciated. The
lovely dome in the middle of the mall
gives a particular mystique to our
university. The labor involved with
doing-up the Wright Place has been
needed for quite some time. 1 don't
mind that my tax dollars, tuition and
university fees go toward these
projects. However, for me to continue
paying my fees to help out, I need to
be able to stay in school, right?
So, if you'll just follow me for a
second, I'll make it clear where I'm
going.
In order to help out around cam-
pus, my fees have to be paid. Check.
Therefore, I must maintain a cer-
tain level of academic prowess so that
I am allowed to continue paying those
fees for campus beautification. Check.
Hence, if Joyner Library Is not
open from Saturday through Monday.
I have no resources to initiate qual-
ity, go-gettum studying. Check.
Labor Day break is a brief relax-
ation period where you can take in
everything that has happened in the
frst two weeks of the fall semester.
Except that in those first two weeks a
great deal of work has accumulated.
We are lucky enough to offer
graduate programs in areas like phys-
Anthony Slade
Opinion Columnist
rngmmmmm
and ihos
diligent,
determined cats
practically live in
tfte library.
ics and English at ECU and those dili-
gent, determined cats practically live
in the library. The fine resource ma-
terial that our new-look library of-
fers are like an IV full of an excellent
academic saline solution. Cut that off
for a three-day period and your GPA
could result in an early semester
flatline.
Now I'm not going to pretend to
know all the reasons that our univer-
sity officials had for closing the library
Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Which
is more important-the library staff
having a few extra days off or the stu-
dent body being a few days ahead in.
their work?
Nobody asked me.
Nor do I recall a last minute cam
pus vote last spring when we voted-
on this issue. I do know that this uni
versity is a public institution, thus, it
is compiled of a joyous number of
public service representatives. More
over, a public institution needs one'
very vital thing to maintain its suc-
cess the public, and that just so-
happens to be me. '
If I'm going to continue my edu-
cation at this university, I'm going to'
need a little help. That means that you
could take a 12 cent out of every
student's tuition and fees to pay a
couple of people to work at Joyner1
over a few breaks (Christmas with-
standing). Now I'm sure that this is
sue can be turned into a quagmire of
confusing and entangling university
policy. That's what happens when
there is not an answer. 1
Yet, I'm willing to keep an open'
mind about this situation. So, if any:
top university officials are reading this,
column right now, give me a call and
schedule a meeting with me. You can
get my number from the university
directory. If you can't reach me at�
home, maybe you can catch me at'
the library. Check minus.
THflr
PtAIHS
� To the Editor:
� After reading your article today
regarding the new budget for ECU, I
wjpited to remind TEC and the stu-
dents and faculty of ECU that it is
time to look closely at our budget
anfl who is responsible for it. Yes, the
underpaid teachers of North Carolina
wijj get a 4.5 cost of living raise.
Thf Republican legislature originally
suggested 3 and the Democratic
Senate suggested 6. The result was
a compromise. I suggest that TEC
contact Senator Ed Warren for de-
tails. He is the State Senator for the
students and faculty of East Carolina
University and he advocated this
raise. Our State House Representa-
tive is Henry Aldridge. TEC should
assure that its readers know the facts
about this man. After all, he was the
only elected official quoted in your
article.
Henry Aldridge is known nation-
ally for his extremist comments such
as "Women who are raped don't
get pregnant He faces Charles
Ward, a Democrat, in the November
5 elections. Henry Aldridge has voted
to cut ECU'S and the entire UNC
budget both years he has been in
power. He also suggested that the
university should abridge the free-
dom of the press to stop TEC from
printing safe sex ads. Henry Aldridge
tried to eliminate 62 facultystaff
positions from ECU last spring as
well. As for Aldridge's 3 million for
the stadium: the entire amount of 6
million has already been promised by
Senator Ed Warren and the President
Pro Tern of the Senate Marc Basnight
in the spring. TEC has a responsibil-
ity to accurately inform the students
of these facts, to encourage them to
register to vote, and to vote for a
better ECU. 1 hope that other stu-
dents will act to keep Ed Warren in
the Senate and to take Henry
Aldridge out of office before he
causes any more damage.
Lucy Goodwin
Senior
Biology
"I know it's just a job
journalists have to do, but
sometimes I wish they
wouldn't

� Princess Diana, British royal, 1981
If Yc?U llANL A COMPLAINT 0R. CtfMME-NT
WR.ITC A LLTTLR. JO TUt LPITR
All letters must be:
�?typed
� 250 words or less
� include name, major, year and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
The fast Carolinian, to the Editor, Student Pubs, bids
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!








wtmmimmmmmmimmmmimmmimmmmmm
. - � �� �
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Tuesday, September 3, 1996
The East Carolinian
Mendenhall hosts
iron-clad exhibit
Reunion Iron '96
brings together
Baltic students
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Chad Davis is an iron man.
The senior art major has dis-
covered the spiritual side of steel.
Davis is exhibiting his works of art,
which are made from or include
cast iron as a primary material, as
part of Reunion Iron '96. Other
ECU faculty and students are also
included in the presentation, which
is sponsored by the ECU Student
Visual Arts Committee.
The exhibition, currently on
display in the Mendenhall Gallery,
will continue through Sept. 20. All
of the a' twork featured comes from
participants in the ECU School of
Art Baltic Iron Symposium. For the
past two summers, students in the
symposium traveled to the Baltic
countries of Europe to take part in
a fc�ign study studio course.
Davis took part in both sum-
mer symposiums. He described his
experiences as "spiritual" and "edu-
cational
"It was a very friendly experi-
ence Davis said. "It greatly af-
fected me as an artist
Davis admitted to having a
long-time appreciation of visual art
"This has turned out as a way
for me to express that he added.
"The whole experience provides an
opportunity for everyone to really
evolve
Professors Carl Billingsley, the
sculpture area coordinator, and
Hanna Jubran conducted iron-cast-
ing workshops, along with gradu-
ate assistants, during their trips to
Tallinn Art University in Tallinn,
Estonia.
Before the 1995 trip,
Billingsley and his students built a
furnace to be used for casting iron.
He instructed students on how to
make iron molds. The studio work-
shops allowed students to be teach-
ers.
"The best way to learn some-
thing is to have to teach it he ex-
See IRON page 8
SeuutTZeviec
Moon makes Matthews moody
Photo Courtesy of RCA
Dave Matthews (second from right) and his band played to a packed house that was struck
with moonlight madness last Friday night at the Walnut Creek Amphitheatre in Raleigh.
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
The night was perfect. The moon was a radiant or-
ange. The stage was set, and the sound was balanced.
The Dave Matthews Band was at Walnut Creek Aug.30.
As the night started, my friends and 1 gathered
ground our VIP table. We took a look around, had a few
drinks, and before we knew it the lights were off and
Dave was on.
And, boy, was he on. It was the most relaxed set I've
tver seen him play, especially to such a huge audience.
The band opened up with the fifth track on their new
album, Crash, a song called "41 It let everyone get
into the groove without wasting too much energy. By
the time the song was over, the crowd was captivated.
Dave then chose "Lie in our Graves This got the crowd
off their feet and into the air. dancing and laughing.
After a few more songs, I decided to take a stroll
through the crowd up to the top of the hill. Once there,
I noticed the most amazing thing. It wasn't the music. It
wasn't the vibe that could be felt, almost like a physical
presence, in the crowd.
No, it was the atmosphere. The moon was offset.
See DAVE page 8
These ECU School of Art students enjoyed visiting the
Baltic countries of Europe as part of the Baltic Iron
Symposiums that were held during the last two summers.
The works that they created upon their return to Greenville
can be seen in Mendenhall Gallery through Sept. 20.
(?D &eotceA6
The Jerky Boys
The Jerky Boys 3
y
tape it f i iii
OPPIO
a friend
JQ.
J2
I
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
Okay, after two successful CDs and
a feature film, has anybody not heard of
the Jerky Boys? Just in case you haven't
these two guys (Johnny Brennan and
Kamal) make a living off of prank calls.
Basically, they call businesses and give
whoever answers the phone a really hard
time. Well, they're back with their third
CD, appropriately titled The Jerky Boys
3, and they're still the same old Jerky
Boys.
After the fame and notoriety that
came to them from their first two CDs,
the Jerky Boys found they had an un-
foreseen problem with their chosen pro-
fession - some people recognized their
voices. So in an effort to put a new spin
on things foi this record, they placed clas-
sified ads in local newspapers and pulled
their pranks on the neople calling them.
One such ad was for lawn equip-
ment. They apparently advertised a
chainsaw. a lawnmower, and a log-split-
ter for sale. The calls they got asking for
these items make up about six or seven
of the tracks on the CD.
The first one has the caller asking
where he can see the items for sale. The
answer he repeatedly gets from "Sol a
recurring voice used by the Jerky Boys,
is thai he can see the items in any hard-
ware store. Then when the guy asks
where "Sol's" items art, "Sol" replies, "In
my attic The guy takes one last chance
and asks where his attic is located, to
which "Sol" says, "At the top of my house
near the roof Another caller asks if he
can come get or see the items and is
promptly told. "Ummm no. Thank you
One of the outgoing calls is to a
party balloon supplier. "Frank Kizzo
another of the Jerky Boys' stock charac-
ters, asks for big balloons, "enough to
float my 11-year-old around the room
After explaining that they're planning to
use his son as sort of a pihata, "Frank"
even states that he'll probably take a
couple whacks at him, too. The scary
thing is that the salesman says that 200
balloons would probably do the trick and
goes right on with the sale.
Then, the Jerky Boys team up on
one call. While one Jerky calls a televi-
sion store about his television needing
repair, the other talks in the background
like a repairman. When the salesman says
not to touch anything on the back of the
television, the caller yells to the repair-
man, "He said to touch the back Then
all that is heard is a sound like an elec-
tric shock and screaming from the back-
ground. The caller then blames the sales-
man for the accident
Basically, The Jerky Boys never grew
out of their prank-calling phase of life
and are now rich because of it They are
funny, if this form of humor is your type
of thing. However. I really don't see pay-
ing full price for a CI) of prank calls. If
you feel like you have to have it buy it
used. Otherwise, just find a friend who
has it and is willing to share the fun.
IttwAie ctAlectA
Not-so Very Brady Sequels Hawaiian humor wipes out
rentiteit
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Mocking the '70s is the hip
'90s thing to do, but for some rea-
son, the '90s generation is obses-
sively fascinated with the popular
culture of the '70s. Clothing fash-
ions are now '70s throwbacks; many
current "hot" musicians are water-
downed versions of the 70's music
scene (face it, Alanis Morissette
wishes she had the anger of Janis
Joplin); and Hollywood is con-
stantly transforming popular '70s
TV shows into feature films. Such
is the case with The Brady Bunch.
Unlike many, I'm fond of the
70s, and I'm probably the only per-
son who actually believes The
Brady Bunch Movie to be a bril-
liant cinematic achievement. The
Brady Bunch Movie magically cap-
tured the goofy, cornball fun of the
original show and blended the
show's bellbottomed innocence
with a biting, satiric '90s mental-
ity. The film proved to be more than
a lame remake of the show; it was
a film about cultural identity, cul-
tural shifts and generational gaps.
But most of all, it was fun and hi-
larious, especially for anyone famil-
iar with The Brady Bunch.
Since The Brady Bunch Movie
m
succeeded so wildly, it was only a
matter of time before the sequel
knocked on our theater doors. Now
I'm not of the popular belief that
all sequels are worthless or need-
less. Many great sequels have been
made. However. A Very Brady Se-
quel is not one of them.
The main problem with making
a sequel to Th" Brady Bunch Movie
is the simple fact that there is re-
ally nothing fresh to present. The
first film already satirized the
Bradys and their world view. Going
on that trip again only proves to
be blandly repetitive.
Still. A Very Brady Sequel does
have its moments for die-hard fans.
We Brady junkies get to play voy-
eur as C.reg and Marcia struggle
See BRADY page 7
Photo Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
Those wacky Bradys and their ever-present maid Alice take
a Hawaiian vacant n in their new movie, A Very Brady Sequel.
There is nothing more
useless than screaming at a
wall. It's just spittle and
bricks, bricks and spittle.
However, if you put enough
voices together, that wall
might just be blown over. So
join in another futile attempt
to change the status quo and
listen to a "Scream at the
Wall
Jay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Last week, 1 spent my time
in this space complaining about
being considered an "old guy"
at the ripe age of 28. Even
though I balk at the label, one
thing I have as an "old guy"
around here is experience. I've
been through that freshman
year (hell, I've been through
that senior year, too). Better
yet, I went through it ten years
ago. And now I'm here to spread
some wise words on your brain
like peanut butter on a nice,
thick slice of oat bread. I hope
some of them will stick.
First of all, decide for your-
self whether you really want to
be here for college. I don't mean
the fun parts of college like
staying up all night, partying,
drinking, having lots of sex,
skipping classes, spending
money on stuff you don't really
need, eating whatever you want
- basically all the stuff your par-
ents wouldn't let you do at
home. If that's what college was
all about, then everybody would
want to be here.
I'm not harping on that as-
pect of college life, either. I went
through my own extended pe-
riod of debauchery and baccha-
nalia many years ago and loved
every minute of it.
Well, almost every minute.
When 1 awoke from my stupor,
I found that I had really screwed
myself on that other all-impor-
tant piece of college life, my
education. You see, I had taken
so much time out for my own
social life that I ended up flunk-
ing several courses in a row and
was almost expelled from the
university I attended.
Yet I was having so much
fun that 1 didn't really care. So
what if some stuffy professor
thought I was doing substan-
dard work. I knew the value of
See SCREAM page 7





�HMHH
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 3, 1996
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For more
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Greenville, NC
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Adv. Tix locations
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KIvALIl from page 6
with their lustful attraction for one
another; we once again get to peer
into Jan's obsessive psychoses; and
we get a trippy reference to the '70s
cartoon show based on the Brady
kids.
Unfortunately, inspired mo-
ments such as these are not enough
to keep this Brady adventure from
getting lost in its own gags. The
script tries too hard to have a sa-
tiric edge. Whereas the original
film had a natural, punchy comic
timing, this film meanders from one
forced joke to another. How many
sexuai innuendoes can an audience
take before they simply get bored
with the joke?
Worse yet, the plot to this se-
quel is lame and misleading. All of
the ads for the film push the Ha-
waii angle. Ail the fans of the show
fondly remember the two-part Ha-
waii adventure the original Bradys
tackled. It's a wonderfully cheesy
story that could have easily been
transformed into a feature film. In-
stead of pulling from their original
source, the scriptwriters (there are
too many of them to name) and di-
rector Arlene Sanford try to be cre-
ative and conjure up this ridiculous
plot involving a man masquerading
as Mrs. Brady's first husband just
so he can steal an extremeiy valu-
able horse sculpture which the
Bradys own. This husband plot
takes up over half of the film's time,
and we don't even get to Hawaii
until it's almost over.
The movie does get a huge
push from its perfect cast, however.
The entire Brady cast fit their roles
to perfection (especially Gary Cole
as Mr. Brady). Watching these ac-
tors bounce around in their happy,
little Brady world is a joy. Too bad
the writers couldn't create a world
more suitable for the Brady men-
tality.
A Very Brady Sequel is only for
those of us who respect those ide-
als which the Bradys represented
and those of us who take pride in
being Brady geeks. But even true
Brady fans may not want to rush
out to see their favorite TV family.
The sequel does not carry the fresh-
ness of the first film, nor does it
carry the unique appeal of the
show. Those of you who don't care
about the Bradys but found the
first film to be fun, skip out on this
ride. Those of you who are true
Brady fans, save some cash and rent
the film when it's on video. Finally,
for those of you who think you're
too cool for the Bradys, I draw en-
ergy from my mystical disco ball,
pray to the great rock god, Davy
Jon�s, and mock your "hip" sense
of what is cool.
How to get the
best results from
your dryer
Here are a few basic rules re-
garding the proper use of your
dryer.
First, sort dryer loads so that
they contain similar weight fabrics;
towels with towels, jeans with simi-
lar fabrics, and lightweight synthet-
ics and permanent press items to-
gether.
Separate lint producers (tow-
els) from lint catchers (permanent
press); separate dark colors from
light And leave items plenty of
room to tumble freely.
For best results, mix large and
small items. By themselves, large
items m& tend to ball and roll, while
small items may "ride" without tum-
bling. However, do not mix heavy-
weight fabrics with lightweight
ones.
Make sure that any stains were
removed during the wash cycle.
Follow these suggestions and
you will automatically prolong the
useful life of your wardrobe as well
as your pride in its appearance.
L
SGIVE.AM. from page 6
my education and I could pick up
the knowledge I wanted from classes
without having to prove my worth
on some stupid test. I carried this
punk attitude for most of my fresh-
man and sophomore years.
Somewhere along the way, I ma-
tured. I'm not sure when it was ex-
actly, but from what I remember, I
took a class that truly captured my
imagination and my attention. I
wanted to prove to the teacher that
I was just as interested in the sub-
ject as he was. So I worked really
hard and made an A. That came as
a shock to me. I could make A's in
college.
Yet the grades on my transcript
made me look like a moron. I knew
I wasn't, but anyone else who looked
at that sheet of paper could only see
my mistakes. I set a goal of improv-
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ing my record so that it would re-
flect the real me, not the slacker that �
I was. I wanted to prove it to my-
self.
The problem didn't dawn on me
at first Slowly I began to realize that,
the hole I had dug for myself dur-
ing my first year and a half was too '
deep for me to crawl my way out of.
Not knowing what to do, I took
the advice of a friend and switched
schools, hoping that my GPA would
be erased in the process. Although
my record at the new university
where I spent my senior year was
pretty good, my former failures still
haunted me. They have now become
a permanent part of my history on
paper. Nothing can change that.
That hard, cold fact brings me
back to my original piece of advice
� decide for yourself whether you
really want to be here for college.
The education part of it, that is. If
you're just here to party and have a
good time, then do yourself a favor
and take a year or two off to get it
out of your system. I wish I had.
There is no written rule that
says that you have to attend college
directly after you leave high school,
no matter what your parents or
friends might tell you. Your parents
and your friends won't have to live
with your record for the rest of their
lives, you will.
If you're not ready to accept the
responsibility of making the best
you can of your college education,
then get the hell out. You'll be bet-
ter off in the long run.
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It's time to determine who is the fairest of them halls!
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ime: 4:00 p.m.
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Come be part of the fun, games, and prizes!
Lots of 25th
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For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.
Rain date: September 12 at 4:00 p.m. on College Hill.
I NATURAL I
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8
Tuesday, September 3,1996
The East Carolinian
DAVE from page 6
dangling in the sky as if it were
placed there just for this evening. The
band must have thought so, too, be-
cause they placed a picture of the
moon on the widescrt ns around the
area. Witnessing such a spectacle
almost made me want to give up my
ViP pass and watch the show from
tbi lawn.
As I went back to my seat, I took
the sidewalk around the crowd. The
sot�g "Tripping Billies" screamed out
so loudly that it could be heard for
miles, and I was once again in awe of
what was happening. As 1 walked be-
tween the floor of the amphitheater
and the grass of the hill, spinning
dancers surrounded me on all sides.
The energy took me away. How free
ttoe people were at this show. Every-
one was having a great time with no
worries.
�x By the time 1 returned to my
seat, the band again had my full at-
tention. They continued to pull out
the most unbelievable jams. As you
can guess, most of the night was
unprov. One song after another, the
band was tighter than ever. Boyd
Tinsley, a supreme violinist took the
place by storm, especially during the
old Remember Two Things tune 'Re-
cently He must have played a 20-
jninute solo.
The drummer, Carter Beauford,
was spell-binding as usual. This man
is never off beat He's one of the
greatest I've ever heard. Although
there wasn't a standard drum solo
for Beauford, it appeared that he had
one in every song because of his in-
i
IRON from page 6
plained.
! Billingsley added that the
workshops went well despite lan-
guage difficulties with the foreign
; students.
During this past summer's
month-long trip, participants made
; stops in Finland, Thailand and St.
! Petersburg, Russia.
Billingsley said he believed stu-
! dents got more out of the trip by
! going to the Baltic states than they
1 would have from going to such es-
; tablished centers of artisitic study
as Paris and Rome.
"These (Baltic countries) are
! countries undergoing tremendous
transitions from being Soviet
! states he said. "They are faced
with the challenge of being a free-
; market economy
Baltic artists also face chal-
; lenges when trying to find quality
! art materials, Billingsley added.
Billingsley said students are
made aware of the struggles artists
encounter when trying to survive
; under a totalitarian regime.
"Through the attitudes and at-
mosphere, they kind of get a feel
of what it is like he said.
As part of the symposium, stu-
dents were required to prepare a
I final exam summarizing their expe-
riences on the trip.
Billingsley said students came
away with a new understanding of
the Cold War and what it is like to
S& an artist without freedom.
? "They also came away with the
knowledge that they helped do
�something to help their Estonian
friends he added. "They had a will-
ingness to help them make the tran-
sition
Nineteen artists, all ECU stu-
dents and faculty, have works fea-
tured in Reunion Iron '96. The
works were all crafted at EG The
pieces completed during the sum-
mer symposiums remain in Europe.
Billingsley said he hopes
� people who view the exhibition will
be able to feel the emotion that
went into the pieces.
"When they look at it. I hope
they can see that there is some-
thing special about all of this he
explained. "I hope they see a rich
range of inventiveness, ideas and
interests, from playful to complex
Another Baltic symposium is
planned for this summer.
Reunion Iron '96 is this school
year's first presentation by the ECU
Student Visual Arts Committee.
Several more presentations are
planned for this semester and the
spring. In October, a photography
exhibit by PH. Polk will be pre-
sented. The committee also spon-
sors the annual illumnia student art
competition. The awards for the
competition amount to more than
$1,000 in prize money for student
artists.
For more information about
Reunion Iron '96 or the Visual Arts
.Committee, call 328-4715.
tensity. As a matter of fact the man
next to me couldn't help but ask,
"Does he ever quit?" Not a chance.
The night was coming to a close.
and Dave came out to hum a few bars
himself. He played a little ditty, and
then bassist Stefan Lessard came out
to join him. Dave streaked into Bob
Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower
and we heard the most melodic,
power-driven bass solo that the 21-
year-old has shown us thus far.
I've never seen Stefan take
charge in such as forceful manner.
Watching these guys grow as musi-
cians is one of the best things about
this band. Everyone feels like they're
a part of it.
The most impressive thing 1 saw
all night was the way the band con-
trolled the momentum of the crowd.
It started off smooth. Midway
through the show, everyone in the
house was dancing. By the end of the
night, it was pure pandemonium. I'm
surprised Dave could hear what he
was saying.
After the smoke had cleared and
the roadies had taken to the stage, I
glanced around at the crowd, a crowd
that surpassed the one at the
H.O.R.D.E. festival which had taken
place just a couple of days before. I
was impressed with the diverse group
of people assembled there, all of
whom were blown away by the Dave
Matthews Band, including myself.
The night was perfect.
Anemia can cause
short attention
span
Recent studies have found
that eating healthy is not only good
for the body, it's good for the brain.
The studies, conducted as part
fPw the Nutrition Collaborative Research
Support Program on Nutrition and Function in Egypt,
Kenya and Mexico and by scientists in the United States, found that
childhood anemia can limit an individual's attention span. Iron defi-
ciency impairs cognitive development which can result in weak short-
term memory and low standardized test scores.
Meeting the naed for iron is important for all ages, but especially
for children and young adults.
Poor food choices can contribute to deficiencies of iron and pos-
sible deficits in cognitive function.
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Tuesday, September 3, 1996
The East Carolinian
The August edition
of SPORTSFORUM
had a two page
article on the
National
Championship
race. The
following is taken
from that article:
While most of
those who vote
in polls would
find it difficult
to break
tradition and
vote for any
team that has
not been a
college football
power for the
past 20 years,
two lesser
known squads
� ECU and San
Diego St. both
have the talent
to finish
undefeated
and propel
themselves into
the national
championship
picture. Here
are 25 teams and
their odds at the
national title �
Colorado 5-1
Tenn. 6-1
Nebraska 7-1
Florida 8-1
East Carolina 10-1
Florida State 10-1
Notre Dame 12-1
Southern Cal 12-1
Arizona St. 15-1
Texas 15-1
San Diego st. 20-1
Iowa 20-1
Sycracuse 25-1
Ohio State 25-1
Auburn 30-1
Miami, Fla. 30-1
LSU 35-1
Michigan 40-1
Kansas 50-1
Penn State 75-1
Oregon 100-1
Kansas State 150-1
Virginia Tech 200-1
Virginia 250-1
Alabama 250-1
Staying healthy
key for success
Injuries are down
but still prove
costly
David Councilman
Staff Writer
The ECU football tvam is in full
swing coming off their 1995 Lib-
erty Bowl Championship, but as
with any team injuries can change
things in a
heartbeat.
ECU knows
about injuries
all too well. The
injury bug has
bit Cornerback
Dwight Henry
this season,
who suffered a
torn ACL in
practice. Unfor-
tunately, this is
knee injury.
Although Henry did not sus-
tain the injury during a contact
drill, injuries like this have caused
coaches to disallow tackling to the
ground. Coches just cannot afford
to lose players.
Players are allowed to hit, but
they cannot tackle the players to
the ground. The players wrap up
each other, it is referred to as "stay-
ing up The defense pursues, there
is a collision, but everybody stays
up. Skill positions such as the quar-
terback are not allowed to be
touched by the defense in practice.
ECU can not afford to lose Ail-
American quarterback candidate
Marcus Crandell in some freak ac-
cident in practice.
This "stay up" rule helps the
players with their tackling tech-
nique. Even though the players are
not knocking each other to the
ground, the practices are still just
as grueling and demanding.
"Practice is just as intense as
if they were in full pads" Head
Coach Steve Logan said. Although
the players are not knocking each
other to the ground during prac-
tices, they are
Conditioning is a
huge factor in
injuries
� Mike Hanley, ECU
trainer
a season ending
ready to hit some-
body by game
day.
"Players are
hungry to hit by
Saturday Logan
said.
The way the
practices are
structured the
players are get-
ting in more conditioning.
"Conditioning is a huge factor
in injuries" ECU trainer Mike
Hanley said.
The main injuries according to
Hanley occur to the knee, ankle,
shoulder and muscle ligaments
Conditioning cuts down on these
types of injuries.
More importantly the players
enjoy the type of practices Logan
uses. They come out to practice in
helmets, shoulder pads, shorts and
thigh pads.
According to Logan this makes
See HEALTH page 11
Men's soccer
kicks up victory
Teamwork proves
key to home
opener
Jon Lauterter
Staff Writer
Hurricane Edouard may have
missed the coast, but there was still a
storm at Bunting Field.
The ECU's men's soccer team had
it out with Virginia Tech Sunday in
front of ail impressive turn out of stu-
dents and locals, or storm trackers if
you will. And in the end the storm
brought a 2-1 victory to the Pirates.
Despite the hot, 90-degree
weather, ECU was more than ready
to hang tough with Virginia Tech.
Tech came out looking very strong
both defensively and offensively, mak-
ing it look a little hopeless during the
opening minutes.
The Hokies started by making
many attempts at scoring, but their
effort was thwarted by one of ECU's
key players, goalkeeper Jay Davis.
Davis led the league in saves last
year.with 131.
On the 26th minute, Wyatt Panos
headed an assist to Rodney Jones, who
out ran the Tech defenders to
score ECU's first goal of
the season.
The Hokies
responded by ap-
plying more
physical pres-
sure to the
ECU offense.
ECU responded
by fouling to the
point of being is-
sued a yellow
card. This woke up
the young team
and the referee
made sure they
got the mes
Women's soccer team
scorches Barton
Lady
Pirates open
season with
victory
Jon Lauterer
Staff Writer
Barton College won't forget the
hurting they received by the highly
versatile ECU Women's Soccer Team
Saturday afternoon.
The Lady Pirates came out of the
locker room ready to let everyone
know they meant business and at the
end of the day the 7-1 score showed
they had practiced hard in the off sea-
son. They started off the first half by
almost exclusively keeping the ball
near Barton's defending goal.
Four shot attempts where made
in short intervals by the ECU offense,
before Stacey Schott powered one in
on the 16th minute of play.
Barton's defense was exceptional
during the first moments of
the game, but their spirit
seemed to be broken after the
second goal was scored by
Stacie Cause on a penalty kick.
ECU's defense was espe-
cially held strong by Dana
Durbin and Kelly Karras who
were not afraid to get physical
with Barton's offensive and
mid-field players. They pro-
vided the team with a large
number of steals and down-
field possessions.
Barton's first half goal
keeper was well acquainted
sage.
Ten minutes before the half, se-
nior Chris Padgett blasted a 30-yard
rocket to bring the score to 2-0, ECU's
favor.
At the half, ECU knew their mis-
sion was to hold fast and hang tough
against the Tech offense. This would
be the time the Hokies would be ex-
pected to pull out their big guns to
put some points on the board.
At the beginning of second half
play, Virginia didn't seem to pump up
their offense as much as their defense.
A great deal of mid-field play was the
story for the second half. But when
the ball went anywhere, it was usu-
ally to Virginia's defending goal. But
their goal box defense was almost im-
penetrable.
On the 89th minute of play, the
Hokies made a not-so-graceful play
that resulted in their only goal of the
game.
ECU's Davis had a spectacular
game, with 15 saves - all of which
were executed with the flare of an all-
conference player.
"This was a great win for the pro-
gram Head Coach Will Wiberg said.
"I knew it was going to be a close
game and it was very evenly played.
Both teams had the upper hand at
different times, but we didn't break
Coach Wiberg used the
freshman bench to his ad-
vantage.
"We played three
freshman and a sopho-
more the majority of
the game in the
back Wiberg said.
"A lot of credit goes
to our defensive
unit. Davis had a
great game
The next chal-
lenge facing ECU is
the Citadel. This
home game will
be Friday, SepL
6, at 4 p.m.
with the ground by halftime. This was
a direct result of a late first half as-
sault led by Karen Blake and Karras,
who both scored.
With a halftime score of 3-0, in
favor of ECU. Barton needed to
change their game plan. Barton Head
Coach Scott Ginn started off by
switching goal keepers and subbing
his bench.
But they couldn't beat the major
advantage ECU had over the Barton
squad. The ECU squad has a very deep
bench overflowing with talent and
Head Coach Neil Roberts knew how
to use it
The women came out ready for
more intense action in the second half
and it showed with the way they
played, ready to attack the goal.
Karras christened the new goal with
a powerful kick to the upper right
corner, upping ECU's lead to 4-0.
Then the game briefly took an
unfortunate turn when a Barton pen-
alty kick turned into their first point.
This didn't discourage the ECU squad
and they showed it when Blake drove
the field to make her second goal of
the day.
Barton's second half goal keeper
did a bit better than the other, but
ECU was too pumped up and ready
to score.
Jennifer Reiley "nade an explosive
play when she slide-kicked the ball
after it had been unsuccessfully recov-
ered by the Barton goalie.
In yet another unbelievable play,
Blake ran a half-field sprint to score
her third, and final goal for the day.
leaving the final score. ECU 7 �
Barton 1.
After the game, Roberts said he
was very impressed with this team.
"They have come out and set a
president Roberts said. "I am also
very pleased with the reserves. The
intensity level didn't drop when the
reserves where sent in, in fact it actu-
ally increased
The next home match up will be
with Radford next Sunday, SepL 8 at
noon.
ScorerTeamTimeAssist(s)
Stacey SchottECU16:21Jennifer Reiley
Stacie GauseECU24:15(penalty kick)
Karen BiakeECU31:32
Kelly KarrasECU34:04Shelia Best
Amy MorrisBC56:03(penalty kick)
Karen BlakeECU59:24jVgh ri
Jennifer ReileyECU61:28�oft
Karen BlekeECU71:41x1
Relaxing but not for long
File Photo
(L - R) Jason Nichols, Marcus Crandell and Larry Shannon take a break during the
Tulsa victory last season. The team is gearing up for the season opener Saturdayz.
New rule changes outcome
Overtime rule now
used in college
football games
Dill Dillard
Assistant Sports Editor
Rules, rules and more rules. It
seems like every time you turn
around, college football changes the
rules in some form or fashion. Well
folks, they've done it again, but this
time it's a change most everybody
likes.
The officials of the NCAA ad-
justed their football rule book to fit
an overtime rule for Division I foot-
ball play.
As everybody knows, the ugliest
three letter word in a sports fans vo-
cabulary is tie. The new rule change
will insure that there will be a win-
ner if there is a tie at the end of regu-
lation which pleases most college
football fans. This rule nixes compro-
mising situations such as at the end
of the season. Two teams vying for a
bowl trip, winner goes bowling, loser
stays at home, and both teams New
Year's are ruined due to a tie. Oh no,
say good-bye to that.
No doubt about it, there will be
a serious love affair between the new
OT rule and the fans, not to mention
the television networks. Despite this
match made in football heaven, the
making or breaking of the new rule
will depend on the feelings of the
masters of the X's and O's.
Fans will love the fact that they
will fill a stadium and will be guar-
anteed that their will be a winner
when they leave. The coaches on the
other hand, have mixed emotions
about the new change. One may
think that it
would change
the mentality
of most
coaches to a
more conser-
vative ap-
proach to-
wards the end
of the game,
but for others
it doesn't
change a
thing.
"We'll ap-
proach the
end of the
game just like
we always have Head Coach Steve
Logan said. "If we're on the three
with a chance to end it, I'll be
doggone if I'm going to move it back
out to the 20 (yard line) in overtime,
we're going to go for the win
For those who are unfamiliar
with the overtime rule, it is totally
different from pro football's sudden
death over time where the team that
strikes first wins. The rule itself al-
lows both teams to answer back from
the other's score and whoever is
ahead at the end of the overtime pe-
riod wins the ballgame.
"I feel the rule is more fair than
the pro sudden death rule Logan
said, "I mean, whoever wins the toss
has a huge advantage and has the
opportunity to end it on the first
Each team will have
equal time of possession.
It will not be a
sudden death
playoff like in
professional
football.
drive of the period
Will this change the complexion
of ECU footbal'? With Logan's coach-
ing style, that's doubtful, but it'll
make a few games this season a bit
more interesting to watch.
"I'm sorry, I'd rather win it or
lose it and get the headache over
with, but it should be an interesting
year with the new rule Logan said.





10
Tuesday, September 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Crowning of best to take place
,?Cathy Biondo
'Zfiec Services
Be a part of the ECU history
�and become royalty with the 1996
JKing and Queen of the Halls.
The festivities take place this
jThursday, September 5 from 4-6
r,3.m. on College Hill. This event is
Composed of a variety of fun and
�xciting activities and the famous
crowns and scepter.
King and Queen of the Halls is
a battle between every residence
hall to become King, Queen or
Crown Jewels of the halls. King and
Queen of the Halls started in 1988
when it was called King and Queen
of the Hill.
When word got out of how
much fun it was, Central and West
Campus wanted to participate. In
1989, every residence hall received
the opportunity to battle it out to
become King or Queen in, "King
and Queen of the Halls Ironically,
in 1989 when the title changed and
every residence hall competed, only
one hall on College Hill become roy-
alty.
Garrett Hall was the first King
and Belk Hall won Queen of the
halls. For six consecutive years
Garrett's reign continued until last
year when Scott Hall dethroned
Garrett and became King of the
halls.
Winner's among the women's
residence halls vary from year to
year. In the past, it has been a close
battle between Belk, Fleming,
Greene and Tyler. In the coed halls,
the halls who won Crowned Jewels
were Fleming in 1992 and 1993,
Jones in 1994 and Aycock last year
in 1995.
To determine the best resi-
dence hall of them all, this year's
scoring is as follows:
�The first scoring criteria is
the percentage of residents in at-
tendance from each residence hall.
The men's, women's and coed resi-
dence hall which have the highest
percentage of participants as deter-
mined by sign-up sheets at the ac-
tivity site (based on a percentage
of residents in their respective
halls) will receive points based on
their ranking8 0 0 f i r s t,
700second place, 600third place,
500fourth place, 400fifth place,
300sixth place, etc)
�The second criteria is the
number of points accumulated per
residence hall. Points will be
awarded to each participant when
they successfully complete each
gameactivity. The residence hall
in each category which collect the
most points will be awarded the cor-
responding point values800-first
place, 700second place, etc)
�The third criteria is a tug of
war. The top two men's and
women's residence halls who have
the highest scores will compete in
Pick up football tickets!
Football ticket pick-up will begin today
at the Ticket Off ice behind Ficklen
Stadium. Be sure to bring your student LD.
d.
o n
IT'J
coniNQ
Check out the
middle section of
The East Carolinian
on Thursday, Sept 5
It will provide
complete pre-game
coverage of the 1996
home football
games
(full or mixed heritage)
chra�SfcMlk'I
rtvlllwIH
Brotherhood of North America
has opened a residencg Lodge near ECU!
Private entrance, smeat lodge, large private backgard
for Pom-QIoms. Mang amenities.
Inexpensive.
Purple Cloud 75Z-&533
ETSU
t, 1 mrti.ce St lie University
the price
Will Change
your course
RIGGAN
SHOE REPAIR
fmmmtb � 24 tytevu
Oux Sfu:itltif U Sole &
Men's and Women's shoes for
sale $5 to $35.
Rivergate East
Shopping Center
3193 A East lOtil St.
Phone 758-0204 �s.
Mon-Fn 7:30 a.m � 6 p.m
Sat 9:00 a.m. - 2 p.m.
A. R. RIGGAN,
OWNER
If you love golf but don't have a
tremendous amount of extra cash
to spend on playing, try us!
September Special: Mon-Fri, $15 includes
cart, greens fees for 18 holes of golf.
For public golf and ECU, we're doing our
best to change your course.
Mae To Grtftan
lilDDM
"Griffon's Great 18"
919-524-5485
Gnftoo crvtoo
2.2 m.
rtaan Tio

Morvrt
TavtOf
1-800-830-4822
meVDEL! �'&� Pizza
Quality Pizza, Subs 8c Sandwiches
Introducing PIZZA
79UAe DELI & Pizza
Opening special
LARGE PIZZA WITH THREE (3) TOPPINGS
$6.99
Tel:830-6686
810 E. 10th St. i
next to Darryl's
2ftle'i-DELI'& Pizza
Opening special
, 2 LARGE PIZZAS WITH ONE TOPPING ,
$1 7 QQ i
? ��' 810 E. 10th St.
' Tel:830-6686 next to Darryl's
I
l����i
Free Delivery 830-6686
�Mce i DELI & Pizza
LARGE SANDWICH CHIPS G DRINK
$2.99
Not good with any other offer.
Expires 10-31-96
355-8883 � The Plaza Mall 'Food Court
I
I
I
810 E. 10th St
next to Darryl's
a tug-of-war. The winner will re-
ceive 800 points and the second
place team will get 700 points.
The top four co-ed halls will be ran-
domly matched into a tug of
war competition. Each winner will
get 800 and each runner up will
receive 700 points. In addition, the
winning tug-of-war teamswill re-
ceive T-shirts and the runner-up
will bet squeeze bottles.
There will be a King, Queen,
and two Crowned Jewels this year.
The big excitement this year is to
see if Scott will remain at the
throne and who will claim the
Queen and Crowned Jewels titles.
Come out and join the fun Thurs-
day beginning at 4 p.m. on Col-
lege Hill. This activity is sponsored
by Rec Services and Campus Hous-
ing and Dining. For more informa-
tion, call rec services at 328-6387.
Good Neighbor service
makes State Farm unique
my policyholders swear by it
year after year. J9
1
Bill McDonald
2710 E. 10th St.
Phone � 752-6680
STATI FA�M
IKSUIANC!
CALL ME.
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington. Illinois
Like a good neighbor. State Farm is there.
tf
"Are you being served?"
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
Ready For A Miracle? Take A Leap of Faith!
Wednesday Night Sanity Break From Campus!
5:30pm Student Eucharist
�Supper Provided after service
ProgramConversation after supper
Add new friends to your life
Bring a friend with you!
Be a part of a faith community
fe�
Campus Minister:
Fr. Tom Cure
Home 752-1583 Work 752-3482
St. Paul's Episcopal Church �401
East 5th Street 752-3482
Cross 5th St. in front of Garrett Hall, walk down
Holly St. and you are here
Seniors!
Get
Carded!
The first 500 seniors
to flash their Purple
Pirate Pass will
receive a special deck
of playing cards!
Grand Prize Drawing:
Alumni Signet Jewelry
Wednesday, September 4, 1996
Student Stores
9:00 a.m-until they're gone!
Sponsored by ECU Ambassadors and the ECU Alumni Association
mutKmmmm





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, September 3, 1996
11
10 Minute
Brief
STUDENT.
DISCOUNTS
Walk-inj
Tuej-fri 9-6 Sat
After to losing to Towson State and Kent State on the first day of
competition, the ECU women's volleyball team were hoping to turn things
around. It just didn't happen for the Pirates this weekend.
Sunday's first match pitted ECL" against West Virginia. West Vir-
ginia defeated ECU (9-15. 10-15. 8-15). Freshman Julia D'Alc led
the team with 15 assists while junior outside hitter Kari Koenning added
15 digs for the team.
In the final match of the tournament. ECU was defeated by Xavier
(15-10. 15-8. 15-131. Led by all-tournament pick. Shannon Kaess. the Pi-
rates tried to rally in the third game but were unsuccessful. Kaess. a
freshman, led the team with 16 kills and 12 digs.
After a slow 0-4 start, the Pirates travel to Hampton. Va. to take on
Hampton University on tomorrow at 6 p.m.
2020 Savings
i
20
Eye
"off
i
with student ID only
Expires 93096
r20"OFFni
i i
Complete Pair of Eyeglasses)
I (Frame & Lenses) �
with student ID onlv �
Expires 93096 "
r20 "j
OFF
Complete Contact
Lens Package
(Eye Exam, Fitting
and Contact Lens)
with student ID only
Expires 93096 "
Photo Courtesy of ECU ISD
Sophomore Kristin Warner returns a serve during a match
last season. The Lady Pirates will return home Sept. 10.

No other discounts apply.
OnOMCTWC
�YECAR�C�KT�RPA
See the Quality. See the Value.
(919) 756-4204
(j()l SE Greenville Blvd.
fOnemilk NC 27S5S
Dfc David 1- Filuerald. Optometrist
Gary M. Harris. l.DO
Vlun Tue Wed Kri, f);nn-ttm: Th )ain 7pin: Sal 9am 2pin
1EHK3�Nti
Bq?RE5
��Mil
HEALTH
VISA
from page 9
practice more tolerable. This type
of practice also allows the player
to learn the game a"d not kill each
other at the same time. The play-
ers learn the mental side of the
game, not just the physical.
Although some schools have
higher injury rates than others, in-
juries here at ECU have decreased
since Logan implemented the "stay
up" rule.
"Coach Logan used common
sense, he wasn't afraid to go against
the common tradition Hanley
said.
The amount of practice time
and game time missed due to inju-
ries have decreased by almost half.
Logan recognizes that football is
more fun to play than to practice.
"Football is brutal to prac-
tice Logan said.
With all that is at stake in col-
lege football today a coach cannot
afford to lose a player in practice.
Coaches need their best players on
the field on Saturdays. This is no
different for the ECU football team
Logan called his type of prac-
tices a "slam dunk success
jM
uj
�&

Route 1 Box 1S4
W.nterville Nf 28S90
M.inkn Oau-nport
75b-MIS
nyvt44 4'
The "As You Like It"
Specialty Shoppe
Custom & Manufactured jewelry
Creative Custom Framing � Painting
Signs � Woodworking � Carving
Engraving Collectibles � Refinishing
Repairs � Remodling
not "banking.
from
free
ou've got bet
th your :
I jj
Visa Che
-s to do at nght than wrestle
int, the College Account
you. We make it easy, with
ard
�-ee ran5actions
it card is also
Wachovia's toll-free telephone banking lines are just
a phone cal
-thing
way. You can get your balance or find
i1 � a check cleared with our auto-
mated Phone Access" service. Or call
� 0-WACHOVIA (I-800-922-4684)
to reach a real Wachovia banker any-
. � hours a cay. Plus, you may
tlify foi special student overdraft
�� � edit card and savings
At this point in
shouldn't something be?)
t's yours until you graduate.
4CHOVIA
AMERICA' S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Jiffy Lube, your car receives the
finest, most complete, preventive
maintenance possible, performed by
a highly-trained team of specialists.
Drive into Jiffy Lube and drive out in
minutes knowing your car is ready for
that long road trip
SERVICE
INCLUDES
� CKonge oil will premium b'Ond
(up to 5 qh 1
� l�!toll NewOI fihei
� CKf-l WrFihe
� CKeck Wiper Blade
� Vacua� Interior Floors
� Wo.K Enteric 'A m
� .4 Brain �� Id le�l
AS NEEDED
� Wbr'CO CKoil'
. he I S FiHTw � � -
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. . Fill
. c I Fill Bat i
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We Take Customer Service PERSONALLY
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
Only $"1 9? "Signature Service"
Mot good with nny other coupon
per person per visit Good only in Greenv
Expires 10 I





12
Tuesday, September 3,1996 The East Carolinian
N
f Services
Offered
Announcements I I Announcements
Part lime Help Wanted
16-20 hours a week.
Weekends a must,
apply in person.
327 Arlington Blvd.
�iipr.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Wanted
ForRenf FH I iff Help
Wanted
FOR RENT: TWO APARTMENTS 2 blocks
from ECU campus: 3 bedrooms, 112 and 2
12 baths, appliances. No pets. Depositrent
Call 756-5528 or 758-7300.
FOR RENT: SINGLE BEDROOM with full
kitchen and livingroom newly painted, new
carpet and vinyl throughout Great location
next to campus, 1 block from downtown.
Need someone to take over lease until May
97 $325 month. Includes Cable, Water, Sew-
er. Call (School) 931-0496. (Home) (910) 475-
3506 or call 355-8731. Ask about Sycamore
Hill Apt 10
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE house
on river 5 miles from campus. $65.00 a week.
$100.00 deposit Possible trade work for rent
Everything included except phone. Call 830-
1787.
APARTMEN t FOR RENT 12 block from
campus. 1 BR1 Bath. $305month with
utilities included. No high bills and no pets.
Single occupancy only! For more informa-
tion call 757-9387.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT IN coun-
try. 10 miles from campus. $300.00 per
month. Call 746-9130.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2 BR
apartment; Rent is $167.50 per month. Non-
smoker preferred and must like cats! Please
call 353-0994. Thanks.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk to cam-
pus. $250mo. plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
8244.
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW Student Recrea-
tion Center. Rent $225 month at 810 Co-
tanche Street Call 752-2615. Bill Williams
Real Estate beside Cubbies on Evans Street
ROOMMATE WANTED $250 PER month
353-4451 leave message
TWO FOR RENT. ONE house and one
townhouse. Three bedroom, large kitchens,
central air, on bus route. $650.00 each. Call
754-2708 Leave message. Pool, Dishwasher,
etc
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW! To
share 3 bedroom apartment Rent $180 plus
utilities, right beside campus. Call 355-9526.
115 E. 13TH ST. 5BD2 Bath, WD Hook-
up, Stove, Frig, Central Heat Big Rooms,
Lots of Parking. Lawncare included, Pets OK!
$750month. 830-9502
105 E. 11TH ST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW,
Central AC & Heat Nice Private Back Yard.
Lawncare included, Pets OK! $600month.
830-9502
IN SEARCH OF HONEST, easy going, fe-
male roommate(s) to apartment hunt ASAP!
Non-smokers preferred. Have all furnishings
Call Amy at 407-1552
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include � Education Fund
� Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
� Insurance available
Apply within
M-F between 2-4 p.m.
Ear th Fr iendlqr
Seeking people with
environmental awareness
and a need for excellent
part time income potential
Flexible hours, good
feeling. Call Ms. Collins:
321-6250
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED. 6 a.m. - 11
a.m. M-F.12-20 hrswk. $5.00hr. Removing
organs at a pork processing center and trans-
porting to our facility. $5.00hr. call 355-
4405, ask for Marilyn.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient willing
to learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are currently taking applications
for part-time telephone collectors willing to
work any hours from 8am until 9pm Mon-
day thru Friday and Saturday morning from
8am until 12 pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext
C53627
PART-TIME LAB ASSISTANT needed. 12-
20 hourswk. $5.00hr.General lab main-
tenance, solution preparation, etc. call 355-
4405, ask for Marilyn.
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT
STUDENT needed for after school care of
two children. Monday - Friday 12 PM - 6 PM.
Must have ownlransportation, referrals, non-
smoker. Call Tina after 6:30 PM 321-1313.
SPRING BREAK '97 � Sell Trips, Earn Cash,
& Go Free. STS is hiring CAMPUS REPS
GROUP ORGANIZERS to promote trips to
Cancun, Jamaica, and Florida. Call 800-648-
4849 for information on joining America's
1 Student tour Operator.
GYMNASTICS TEACHERS! LOCAL GYM-
NASTICS school is looking for experienced,
motivated instructors who love kids, part
time - good pay. call darlene rose at 321-
7264 or stop by at 1602 Old Firetower Road.
For Sale
for sale black overstuffed couch and chair
stain resistant and very comfortable. Perfect
for college apartment $200.00 OBo, call 355-
0930.
STUDENT DESK S50, GIRL'S 12 speed
bike $60,Fu!lQueen size blonde headboard
with matching nightstand $50, 13 inch col-
or TV $65.
CARS FOR SALE. WE can finance. Choose
from various styles, makes, such as 88 BMW,
89 Chevy Blazer, etc. "Cars-R-Us" 355-3620
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 7583244.
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE, 303
S. Evans St (Mall) across from Courthouse.
Tue-Wed-Thurs. 10am-4pm 757-2740
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE, $300.00. Good
condition,350 pounds of weight; small dorm
sized fridge for sale $50.00, good condition.
Call 756-5309. Ask for Jeff.
FOR SALE: TWO SOLID wood chairs with
vinyl cushions. Perfect for the family room.
$25.00. Cal) 551-6754.
TWIN BED S40.0O.WATERBED FRAME
$25.00;Desk $10.00; 4 chairs $2.00 each. Call
Jim 756-7769.
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET be
hind Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche. Paved
lot lighted, numbered spaces, towing en-
forced $288.00 year or $175.00 semester.
MONGOOSE THRESHOLD MOUNTAIN
BIKE. Includes u-Lock and bar ends. Well
maintained. Great condition. $200.00 Call
8300931.
FALL SOCCER COACHES: THE Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer coach-
es for the fall girls and boys soccer programs.
Applicants must possess some knowledge of
the soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 5-16, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid-November. Salary rates start
at $4.25 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James at 830-4567 or Michael
Daly at 8304550
CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR INFANT Mon,
Tues, andor Thurs 8:30am - 12:30pm; also
for preschooler Tues. 2-5pm. Prefer non-
smoker with own transportation 752-9243
KIND PATIENT AND LOVING sitter want-
ed Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday to care
for two boys, ages 2 years and 4 years. Must
enjoy playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crew more. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext
L53622
ALL SHIFTS. WEEKENDS A must Flexi-
ble schedules. Apply in person.
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 3554210
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - PLAZA MALL
NEEDS cashier Tuesdays, Thursdays, 114
and some night hours (15-20 hoursweek).
No phone calls please, apply in person 11 -
9;
Now Hiring Playmate. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
WANTED: STARVING ARTISTGRAPH-
IC DESIGNER to create logo for business.
Call 321-1634. Wanted: starving photogra-
pher with equipment for unique long term
opportunity call 321-1634.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room & Boardother bene-
fits. For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
PHONE SURVEYORS: FTPT HOURS;
permanent positions, prestigious location;
$6-$15hour, benefitsemployee discounts,
paid sick days, paid holidays and manageri-
al training program. 3554779 or 1-800-775-
0771.
DEPENDABLE, MOTIVATED, AND MA-
TURE babysitter needed for 2 12 and 5
year old boys on Mondays (8:30 a.m. - 5:30
p.m.), Wednesdays and Fridays (12:30 p.m. -
5:30 p.m.). Experience preferred. Referenc-
es required. 7563262.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, call: (206) 971-
3570 ext J53626
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53628
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF The Wall with
Bubba Rocks DJ Services. CountryRock
Top 40Dance. $200 for 3 hours of Pure Jam-
min! Call 3211144
DO YOU LIKE TO hear good music at Par-
ties? Then call DJ Dave to book your next
party at 758-5711. DJ Dave is a professional
DJ with top of the line equipment If you
want a wide variety of music at you next
party, then DJ Dave is your man. Call DJ
Dave for more info, at 758-5711
TERRY'S TYPING SERVICE. CALL 746-
9929 after 2:30 P.M.
MATURE, DEPENDABLE STUDENT TO
care for children all ages. Non-smoker, have
own transportation, and good references.
Available MWF 12 - 6:30; TTH afternoons.
Also weekends. Call 328-3618.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
Personals
HEY MOUNTAIN BIKERS! LOOKING for
somebody to ride with in Greenville. 10 - 30
miles per week. On road or off. Please call
551-6754. Ask for Karl.
m� lost and
Found
j
LOST: COLD CHARM BRACELET. Re-
ward.pleasecain$30-6839.
a
Greek
Personals
Guardian ad Litem District Administrator,
PO Box 1391, Greenville, NC 27835 or call
(919) 830-6217. Training classes for new vol-
unteers will begin September 26.
THE HISTORY HONOR SOCIETY of Phi
Alpha Theta will be having a cookout on
Sept 3, 1996 in front of Christenbury Gym.
Members are welcome and those interested
are welcome. Time is 5:00 In case of rain
the cookout will be held on the first floor, D
wing in Brewster.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS WILL
have a meeting Wednesday, Sept 4 at 7:00
PM (downstairs in Mendenhall) in the Un-
derground Room. We will have a speaker
for the Hayes campaign. New and old mem-
bers welcome. Questions call Cristie,355-
6474 or David,353-0808.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS IS starting its
tenth consecutive year and is looking for ded-
icated and caring people to spend quality
time with a deserving young child in our
community. We require you to have a GPA
of 2.3 and 2 extra hours a week. For more
info call Dan Davidian.355-8823. Applica-
tions can be picked up at BA401. Officers
only: We will meet in BD301 on Thursday,
Sept 5 at 5:00.
PERSPECTIVES, A NOON TIME Lecture
Series. Tuesday, September 3, 12:30 - 1:30
p.m. at Brody 2W-50. The Decline and Fall
of Managed Care as We Know it: Sooner
Than You Think by Haavi Morreim, Ph.D.
Call for more information 816-2797.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA NATIONAL Coed
Service Fraternity received a Governor's Out-
standing Service Award on Wednesday, Au-
gust 28, 1996 at Rose High School. Gover-
nor Jim Hunt presented the service award
to over 200 individuals and organizations in
eastern North Carolina. Alpha Phi Omega
was nominated for the award by the Ameri-
can Cancer Society for their volunteer work
at the Relay for Life Walkathon last April.
For more information on joining Alpha Phi
Omega, there will be an information booth
in front of the Wright Place on Sept.
9,1011,1996.
ECU AMBASSADORS, THE OFFICIAL
student representatives of the university are
currently having a membership drive. If you
are a full-time student with a 2.5 cumulative
GPA and have some time to give to the Uni-
versity, stop by the Student Stores for an
application this week or call Marsha at 830-
8861 for more information. Become a Proud
Pirate. Join the Ambassadors.
GET YOUR BUNS IN gear? The Lifestyle
Enhancement Program is offering Burgers,
Buns, and Thighs. This class will teach how
to get fit Register from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. in
Christenbury 204 September 3 through Sep-
tember 9 For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3284387.
WANTED. PART-TIME WAREHOUSE and
delivery. License required. Apply in person
at Larry's Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC
Other
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR
AEOROBIC INSTRUCTOR
COORDINATOR
Pitt County Memorial is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness
Department. Persons will contract to
teach on a part time basis. Also
seeking a qualified canditate to coor-
dinate aerobic classes. Interested
candidates should call for more
.nformation between 8am-4:30pm at
(919) 816-6501.
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
EOEAA
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - PLAZA MALL
needs cashier Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11-4
and some night hours (15-20 hoursweek)
no phone calls please, apply in person 11 -
a
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800-426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
attention all students! grants and scholar-
ships available from sponsors! no repay-
ments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$ for
info: 1-8004004209.
Alpha Phi: Congratulations to our new mem-
bers: Natalie Baer, Ellen Burleson, Katrina
Flad, Christie Joyner, Betsy Kevilie, Lauren
Lester, Toni Lipari, Carmen Land, Jami
Northam, Jennifer Snyder, Jill Wells, Heath-
er Ferguson, Jennifer Mock. Erika Everheart,
Mayra Duran, Tracey Jones, Leigh Murphy,
Jen Cooper, Valerie Snyder, Heather Good-
ing, Koryn Newill, Suzanne Hardee, Karen
Lee, Kim Lewis, Melissa Langham, Laura
Rouge. We are so happy to have you and
look forward to many great times! Love the
Alpha Phis! '
ALPHA PHI: JULIE SMITH, you are the
best Rush Director ever! Your work may be
done but your accomplishments will remain
forever. We love you. Love your sisters.
DID YOU MfsS FALL formal rush? Do you
still want to be Greek? Never fear, it's not
too late! Pi Delta, ECU'S only local sorority
will be holding its own fall rush September
9 -12 in Mendenhall. Come out for four days
of games, fun and excitement For rides and
info call 328-3751.
PI DELTA SISTERS: THANKS for all your
hard work on rush! It will all pay off in the
end. Just remember, the best is yet to come!
Also I'd like to extend an extra special thanks
to our Rho Chi's. You guys are awesome!
Everyone let's get ready for a great semes-
ter. I love you guys! From your very stressed
but very pleased president
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE BEST
pledge class of '96: Christina Alexander.An-
gie Barnes, Mindi Carter, Chrissy Dukict
Amy Garner, Candace Cray, Emily Green, Mel-
issa Home, Stacy Hughes, Suzi Jones, Mel-
issa Kling, Allison Lewis, Carolyn Lewis, Em-
ily Marco, Betsy Merricks, Nikki Mills, Meg-
an Packard, Mary Margaret Porterfield, Am-
ber Reed, Jayme Reeves, Kelly Rhodes, Mary
Rogers, Jennifer Sangor, Shannon Schmidt
Greta Sutton, and Paige Williams. Love, your
Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
THE HISTORY HONOR Society of Phi Al-
pha Theta will be having a meeting on Sept
6, 1996 on the first floor, D wing of Brew-
ster. All members and interested persons
should plan to attend. Time is 5:00.
EXPLORE NEW HEIGHTS! LEARN all the
basic skills of climbing and belaying at the
Recreational Services Climbing Tower on
September 5 from 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. at
the Climbing Tower. Register on September
4 in Christenbury 204. For more informa-
tion call Recreational Services at 3284387.
FREE JUNK MAIL TERMINATOR kit Pu
an end to unwanted junk mail! Order you;
free "Junk Mail Terminator Kit" from th�
Pitt Co. Clean Sweep. Call Joy Hudson a
8304391 to request the kit containing 1J
postcards that can be mailed to clearing
houses to remove your address from mastei
mailing lists. Be a junk mail terminator!
Reduce! Reuse! Recycle!
WANT TO BECOME ROYALTY? Partici-
pate in King and Queen of the Halls and
rule the halls. Come to College Hill at 4:00
p.m. on September 5 for fun, games and priz-
es. For more information call Recreational
Services at 3284387.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE-
PITT COUNTY, will be conducting a Soc-
cer Coaches Training School on Sat, Sep-
tember 21st from 9am4pm for all individu-
als interested in volunteering to coach soc-
cer. We are also looking for volunteer coach-
es in the following sports: basketball skills,
team basketball, swimming, rollerskating,
and bowling. No experience r pessary. For
more information please contact Dwain Co-
oper at 8304551 or Dean Foy at 8304541.
WANT TO BECOME AN aerobics instruc-
tor and make money? Register for the Aero-
bic Instructor Training Class September 3 -
13 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. in 204 Christenbury
Gym. For more information call Recreation-
al Services at 3284387.
RIDE THE RIVER! RECREATIONAL Serv-
ices Adventure Program is canoeing the Tar
River on September 4. Come out and enjoy
a leisurely afternoon on the Tar River. Be
sure to register by September 3 in Christen-
bury 204. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3284387.
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: ABSTRACTS are
now being sought for the Sixth Annual Prim-
ary Care Research Conference, which will
be held on the UNC-CH campus in the Wil-
liam B. Aycock Family Medicine Building on
Saturday, March 1, 1997. The conference is
designed to promote primary care research
currently in progress at UNC campuses, at
NC AHEC Program campuses, and AHEC
regions across the state. Deadline for sub-
mission of abstracts is November 1, 19.
For more information, please contact Laura
Seufert at the UNC Anastasia for the Gener-
alist Physician, CB7595,UNC School of
Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7595 or call
her at 919966-3456.
PITT COUNTY CHAPTER OF American
Diabetes Association presents "Cutting
Through the Red Tape of Insurance, Medi-
care, and Medicaid" on September 9, 1996.
All programs will be held in the Gaskin-Les-
lie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial Hospi-
tal at 7:00 p.m. There is no cost for atten-
dance. Everyone is invited. For more infor-
mation call 816-5136 from 8:00 a.m. - 4:00
p.m. Mon - Fri. or call 1-800482-9692
WANT TO SHOOT SOME hoops? Intramu-
ral Sports is offering an outdoor 3-on-3 bas-
ketball tournament The registration dead-
line is September 5 at 5:00 p.m. in Christen-
bury 204. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3284387.
ADULT STUDENTS: FOR THE latest in-
formation of interest to adult students at
ECU check out the new listserv ADULTS-
TU. You can subscribe by sending the fol-
lowing e-mail message "subscribe LIS-
TSERV@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU or come to
the Adult Student Services Office in 211
Whichard.
Announcements
THE VOLUNTEER GUARDIAN AD Litem
Program is looking for advocates for abused,
neglected and dependent children. Volun-
teers are trained, then appointed with an
attorney to represent the child's best inter-
est in juvenile court hearings. The program
works with other agencies in locating and
developing resources that would benefit the
child and their family. Volunteers can assist
by speaking out for Children's rights to grow
up in a safe and caring environment For
more information, contact Catherine Darby,
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 54
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
em
LOOKING FOR
A JOB?
Become an Ad-Rep for
The East Carolinian!
Contact Janet at
328-6009.
College Agent Programl
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience tor their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (9! 9) 355-7700
All Greek
organizations must be
spelled out - no
abbreviations. The
East Carolinian
reserves the right to
reject any ad for libel,
obscenity andor bad
taste.
v





Title
The East Carolinian, September 3, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 03, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1155
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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