The East Carolinian, August 29, 1996






.
THIIflS
August 29,1996
Vol 72, No. 03
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
Across The State
GREENSBORO (AP) -
Greensboro police have charged a
former Baptist minister with at-
tempting to murder his three chil-
dren by carbon monoxide poison-
ing.
Police say William Richard
Gartlan. 44. confessed to attempt-
ing to poison himself and his chil-
dren by leaving his Ford Granada
running in his basement garage
early Monday morning.
Gartlan was charged with
three counts of attempted first-de-
gree murder. He was under a sui-
cide watch at the Guilford County
Detention Center, where he is be-
ing held with no bond.
The three children have been
placed in protective foster care.
RALEIGH (AP) -GovenorJim
Hunt Democrat or Republican?
One in five voters interviewed
for a recent survey said that Hunt
- who has been North Carolina's
governor for 12 years - is a Re-
publican.
(For the record, he's really a
Democrat.)
The statewide poll conducted
last week by the conservative John
Locke Foundation in Raleigh also
found that fewer than half of the
voters interviewed, or 47 percent,
knew that Republicans control the
state House. Only a third knew that
Democrats control the state Sen-
ate.
Across The Country
WASHINGTON (AP) - Tues-
day President Clinton put his sig-
nature on a historic overhaul of
America's welfare system. He prom-
ised the legislation will "recreate
the nation's social bargain with the
poor" by compelling welfare recipi-
ents to go to work.
In his third public White
House ceremony this week, Clinton
signed into law a new state-run
network of aid, ending six decades
of guaranteed federal cash assis-
tance to the poor.
WASHINGTON (AP) - A
single-seat Marine Corps FA-18
Hornet has crashed in the Atlan-
tic Ocean off the coastline shared
by Maryland and Delaware, au-
thorities said Tuesday.
The attack jet was based at
Andrews Air Force Base in subur-
ban Maryland as part of a Marine
Corps Reserve unit, said Gunnery
Sgt. Don Hooper.
The precise location of the
crash was unclear. The Marines
said it was off the Delaware coast
Around The World
MEXICO CITY (AP) - Weak-
ened by a trip across the Yucatan
Peninsula, Tropical Storm Dolly
rapidly gained new strength Tues-
day as it rolled across the Gulf of
Mexico toward northeastern
Mexico.
Dolly was expected to reach
hurricane status before landfall,
the U.S. national Hurricane Cen-
ter said. Maximum sustained winds
were near 60 mph at 11 a.m. EDT
A hurricane watch was posted
from La Pesca, 155 miles below the
Texas border, south to Veracruz.
HIV testing coming soon
Debate rises over
anonymous
testing
Amy L Royster
Assistant News Editor
Testing for the virus that causes
AIDS is coming to campus soon among
a whirl of controversy over the legality
of anonymous testing.
The North Carolina State Appeals
Court ruled this summer that courts
cannot oversee state agencies and their
rules.
The commission on Health Services
applauds this ruling after fighting to re-
place anonymous testing for HIV with
confidential testing. ACT-UP Triangle, an
AIDS group that supports anonymous
testing is currently appealing this
summer's decision.
Patients tested anonymously are
referred to by number alone. Confiden-
tial testing means disclosing patient's
names, addresses and telephone numbers
in records regarded as confidential infor-
mation between the physician and pa-
tient
Tammy Garrett, a nursing supervi-
sor at the Pitt County Health Depart-
ment said that until the appeals process
is complete, patients can opt for anony-
mous or confidential testing. Currently,
the Health Department is the only place
ECU students can be tested for the virus
that causes AIDS.
"Until the appeal goes through
there will be no changes, we will still of-
fer both anonymous and confidential
testing Garrett said.
Heather Zophy, Health Educator for
the Student Health Center said that HIV
testing will be available to students
through the Student Health Center soon
but details have not been worked out
yet
"We have been talking to the Pitt
County Health Department about offer-
ing the service for a while now Zophy
See TEST page 3
Freshman drop-out rate
changes orientation
Pirates
on the
Street
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
10 pases
Do you think the
courts should do
away with
anonymous HIV
testing?
College freshmen
get better
welcome
Chris Loga
News Writer
As the school year gets started, the
freshman class will have many choices
to make, including whether or not to stay
in school.
Fortunately, more freshman stu-
dents at ECU and in North Carolina are
deciding to stay in college. The national
picture is a different one altogether.
In North Carolina, the numbers
have remained fairly consistent over the
years with the latest totals at 19.3 per-
cent
According to a study in 1989, iden-
tifying the problems of freshman has
been an important task for local and
government education officials. Accord-
ing to recent national figures, a fresh-
man class with 500 can expect about 135
to drop out or transfer before their
sophomore year. For a class size of 2,000,
538 will not return.
Since the national level is so high,
officials in North Carolina have begun
to make changes in the way freshmen
are received.
Attrition Rates at Four-Year College & Universities
Percent of students who do not return for sophomore year
Public Privati
1983
19B5
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
28.6
28.8
29.5
29J
29.6
29.3
28.6
28 3
28.4
2A. I
28.3
28.6
29.0
22.8
23.4
24.0
24.3
23.8
23.6
23.8
23.8
23.8
24.0
24.fi
2S.I
25.0
�From American Ct&tge Ttattm
All
24.5
24.9
25.6
25.fi
25.5
25.3
25.2
25.1
25.9
26.2
26.9
ECU has followed suit to help the
new students get adjusted to college life.
At ECU the freshman class consisted of
2,360 students in 1994 with 77.3 per-
cent returning for a sophomore year. At
UNC-CH however, a freshman class of
3.486 had 92.7 percent returning.
As for students at ECU, many fresh-
men leave for different reasons.
"Some don't have priorities and
this is their first time from home se-
nior Kirsten Rukenbrod said. "They lose
track of what has to be done
"I knew some people who just get
carried away, they can't handle the pres-
sure of class, money, and being away
from home. It can cause a tremendous
amount of stress and they need to get
it out somehow junior Catie Gallo-
way said.
According to the College Press Ser-
vice, many colleges have taken the facts
seriously. Many schools have tried to
make the orientation session a more
worthwhile experience for freshmea
Whether it occurs in the summer
or before classes start officials use the
orientation time to pitch the strengths
of the school and ensure the bonds
between school and student is made.
Free
parking!
Kurt Markley. senior
Major: Anthropology
"No. It takes away the
privacy, and people can be
limited because of the fact
that it's oublic. It could end
up like the Scarlet Letter
Quinton Manley, senior
Major: Information
Processing
"I don't think they should.
The person's privacy
plus they just test for HIV.
We don't want to label
them before they have full-
blown AIDS. If they tell
everyone, it's like wearing a
hat to single them out. It's
not everybody's business
Stephanie Newcomb,
sophomore
Major: Communications
Disorders, Speech
Therapy)
"Yes. You should treat
everyone like they are HIV
positive and just be
educated. Anybody could
have it, and it's your own
personal business
Caroline Alligood,
freshman
Major: undecided
"No. It's your own personal
business. If you want
anybody to know, it's your
business to tell
Facilities Services
Worker David Anderson
puts new bike racks in
place set in concrete
outside Joyner. These
may be some of the
most hassle-free
parking spaces on
campus. Bikers don't
even have to put
quarters in meters.
ECU Undercover:
Officers patroling in street clothes
Joe Horst, ECU Police Department
Contributing Writer
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Parking Situation Update:
in th. fCOIh t0 ?ll GTZ- direCt�r �f Parking and Traffic Services' laments have been made to remedy the overcrowding
Ch r e nh;FX ' FreHhm6n " " l� � the � � SKEZSK
sssjai-jartsrequired over the ��on Fourth�be J-ReL:
alreadnXd"6 fr6Sman SCh�0' �f A"ied " Sh�U'd be fi"ished b Fa� B�k- �"� ' complete and has
"As soon as the second phase is completed, that should solve our parking problem as far as freshmen are concerned Certz
I
ECU Police will be out in full force this semester in the Reade Street lots,
using plain-clothes officers to protect property and to enforce alcohol laws,
state laws and city codes.
These parking lots. located on Reade Street from Fifth Street to First Street
have shown in the past to be high traffic areas during the weekend. Out-of-town
visitors and students alike use these parking lots while they visit the downtown
area.
Fn order to more effectively protect this outlying campus area, the police
department has increased uniform patrol in the area and added plain-clothes
officers in these lots.
ECL' Police Chief Teresa Crocker said the department hopes to deter crimi-
nal activity with the added manpower in the parking lots.
"We hope by placing officers in the lots, we can prevent some of the prob-
lems we have had in the past Crocker said. "We want to be able to provide
security to those in those lots and to enforce alcohol laws
Uniformed officers will continue their routine patrol of the vehicles in the
lots, while the plain-clothes officers will focus more on alcohol and city code
violations, such as urinating in public and public consumption.
Plain-clothes officers will also be enforcing a "zero-tolerance" policy, giving
state citations to any and all individuals found in violation of these laws and
codes.
"Alcohol is a problem on our campus, and the police are taking steps to
ensure alcohol laws are enforced and .students are provided a safe environment
Crocker said.
"Most of our assaults and property crimes are a result of alcohol. As a
result, students become victims. Students need to be aware of alcohol laws and
See UNDERCOVER page 3
HcV! K Showtimepage 5
Man from Krypton saves Democrats paqe 4
Women's soccer ready to rollpage 8
Thursday
Rainy
Weekend
Partly cloudy
High 87
Low 67
VW

High 90
Low 70
f?W to- ec� oc&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





'�r-mmmmmm
Thursday, August 29,1996
The East Carolinian
hatting
hancellor
About the recent tuition and fee increase
Resident tuition increased $34 per year or 4 percent this year. Fees
increased $45 per year or 5.4 percent. These increases were held to the
lowest possible levels consistent with inflationary and programmatic costs.
The State of North Carolina continues to have remarkably low tuition costs
at its public institutions, this is the result of strong state support.
About the new 150 class days policy
The University of North Carolina board of Governors has adopted a
policy which requires each of the constituent universities to achieve by
1997-98 as a minimum of 150 class days each academic year. ECU has a
total of 143 class days in 1996-97. The University Calendar Committe will
be charged with the responsibility of recommending a new calendar for
1997-98 that meets the 150-day minimum requirement.
Old Austin Cupola and other construction
The replica of the cupola from the original Austin Building is nearing
completion. It is an important symbol of our past and provides a tangible
connection with the beginnings of the university.
The renovation ot Joyner Library continues to move forward. The addi-
tion is open and, from all reports from students and faculty, is being well-
received.
The Student Recreation Center will open during the Fall semester. It
should exceed all expectations.
About our chances at a parking deck
The Board of Trustees and the administration have considered for sev-
eral years the possibility of a parking deck on central campus. All parking
facilities, including decks, must be financed by parking fees.
Parking fees would have to be increased to an extraordinarily high
levei to finance a single parking deck. The university has opted instead to
create parking lots on the perimeter of the campus and provide timely
access to the central campus via the student bus system.
Concerning changes to the SGA election process
I have long held that the responsibility for student government, includ-
ing the student elections process, is placed with the students. I believe that
any changes in the elections process should be initiated by the Student
Government Association.
On the first day of class, between 4:25 p.m. and 4:44 p.m a female
student was assaulted in her dorm room in White Hall.The victim was
sitting in her room studying with her back to the open door when an
unknown person struck her causing injuries. It is believed that the sus-
pect then left the building by using the southeast stairs near the back
corner of the building towards Greene Hall and Ringgold Towers.
August 23
On Friday, between 1:45 and 2:30 a.m a female non-student was
assaulted by unknown persons in the area of Slay and Umstead Halls.
The victim was walking through campus when she was assaulted with
an unkown sharp object.
Anyone with information about either of these crimes should con-
tact The PittGreenville Crime Stoppers at 758-7777 or The ECU
Police Department at 328-6787. Rewards are available for informa-
tion leading to the arrest of the person (s) responsible. You do not
have to give your name.
SS
Correction
The hours advertised in the Clue Book and Student Stores' aca-
demic year planning calendar are incorrect as they were printed before
the store schedule was chanced to accomodate requests for earlier
morning hours and Friday evening hours.
The ECU Student Stores' regular fall semester hours will be as
follows:
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
9:00 a.m. to 3 rm.
CLOSED
University enrollment
keeps growing
Scott Hopkins
News Writer
Have you ever tried to visualize
ECU as a large liberal arts school? Well,
the answers to your prayers may hap-
pen slowly over the next 10 years.
In the July 31 issue of the News and
Observer and in the Aug. 1 issue of the
Daily Reflector it is estimated that en-
rollment in universities across the state
will increase by 40,000 students over
the next decade. This increase is ex-
pected to effect most if not all of the
16 University of North Carolina system
schools.
ECU has committed to recent
projects such as the renovating of Slay
Umstead residence halls, the new addi-
tion to the library, and the new student
Recreation Center.
Administrators of ECU, as well as
other UNC schools, have been asked to
make plans to accommodate expected
enrollment increases.
Timothy Sanford, director of insti-
tutional research at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill said in
an interview with the Daily Reflector
that the legislature was trying to decide
the future of the universities.
"We're trying to do our best to look
ahead at the crystal ball and figure out
where Carolina wants to go Sanford
said.
According to Robert Thompson,
there are several factors of enrollment
increases that will need to be addressed
in the future.
"At present we are looking at two
possible scenarios Thompson said.
"The first is what percentage can the
school handle with the minimal amount
of growth, using the facilities we have.
The second is considering more fund-
ing for classrooms and facilities become
available
Presently, ECU's estimates for
growth are anywhere between 1 with-
out new funding for classrooms or aca-
demics buildings and 2.5 with more
funding. ECU presently has many ad-
ditions already in work, like the new
Science and Technology building which
will house Chemistry, Biology and other
science related studies.
The university is also looking f(
ward to many planned renovations to
residence halls over the next few years
which will allow for an influx of students.
However, the increase in students will
not weigh heavily on the housing situa-
tion, since the greater number of stu-
dents will mean an increase in income
for housing development
"We are also looking into other pro-
grams like distance learning, television
and Internet classes, but these are still
in their infancy Thompson said.
The present head count at ECU is
17,000 students. This figure is expected
to increase from 19,000 to 22.000 stu-
dents in the next decade. Fortunately,
the instructor to student ratio is going
to stay steady at 16:1.
UNDERCOVER
university policy
Students should also be aware
that violations of these laws could also
be a violation of the ECU Honor Code.
Students may be held accountable to
the Dean of Students office if they are
issued a Campus Appearance Ticket
(C.A.T.). One of these tickets requires
the student to meet with the dean re-
garding the incident and possibly at-
tend educational classes or tasks, per-
form community service andor pay a
fine.
has opened a residency Lodge near ECU!
Private entrances, smeat lodge, large private backgard
for Poui-UIomj. Mang amenities.
Inexpensive.
Purple Cload 752-8533
IN �TATE RESIDENCY QUESTION
Peter j.M.
Romary
ATTORNEY AT LAW
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Overtoil's
Over WaterOver Land NEVER OVER PRICED
LABOR DAY CLEARANCE
& SIDEWALK SALE
ENTIRE STOCK OF
KAHALA APPAREL
MENS OFFSHORE
SHIRTS AND SHORTS
35 OFF
REG. 34.95 TO 49.95
SELECT STOCK OF
MENS SWIMWEAR
95
REG. 19.95
TO 34.95
SELECT STOCK OF
WOMENS
SWIMWEAR
one & two 0 frr
PIECE STYLES 570 UPF
50
TO
SELECT STOCK OF
MENS & WOMENS
SUMMER APPAREL
50
TO
70 OFF
$
9
SELECT STOCK OF
SUMMER T SHIRTS
MENS St WOMENS STYLES
$coo
5
REG. 14.95
TO 19.95
from page 1
Karen BoyJ. associate dean of stu-
dents, said C.A.Ts provide an alterna-
tive means when officers deal with stu-
dents.
"Students have behavioral respon-
sibilities to the university and the com-
munity Boyd said. "If a student vio-
lates university policies, he or she needs
to be prepared to learn from that expe-
rience through the disciplinary process.
Also, if a student violates community
standards, he or she will be held ac-
countable through the court system
MENS &
WOMENS
TANK
TOPS
AS LOW AS
RUSSELL
ATHLETIC
SCOO
" The Mark of a Pro.
PLAYMAKER1 A 95
BASKETBALL
UMBRO OLYMPIC
S095 SOCCER BALL
SIZES 4 & 5
REG. 16.95 AVAILABLE
9
5
MENS & WOMENS
ATHLETIC SHORTS
AS LOW AS
$
10
00
SELECT
STOCK OF
BASEBALL BATS
FROM EASTON,
& LOUISVILLE
SLUGGER
50
OFF
SELECT STYLES
SOCCER SHIN
GUARDS
scoo
5
SELECT STOCK OF 50 O
MENS & WOMENS TO
TENNIS SHOES 7$
OFF
(SIDEWALK ONLY)
SELECT STOCK OF
BASEBALL
GLOVES
FROM
RAWLINGS,
FRANKLIN,
WILSON
50
OFF
SELECT
STOCK OF
COLLEGE
& PRO
TEAM HATS
scoo
5
REG 12 95
TO 17 95
DISCONTINUED
CLEARANCE
SKIS &
KNEEBOARDS
SOME AS LOW AS
$-7095
79!
LIMITED QUANTITIES
AVAILABLE
R
RUSSELL
ATHLETIC
$
14
MENS
PIQUE
POLOS
95
SEVERAL COLORS TO
CHOOSE FROM
AND 1
BASKETBALL
VERBACE APPAREL
T-SHIRTS, MESH SHORTS,
POLO SHIRTS, & JACKETS
30
WIDE OEE
SELECTION l �
TO CHOOSE FROM
PIICISION IN-IINI SKATIS
H-3 HOCKEY SKATE
Reg $15995
$
119
95
F-3 SPORT SKATE
89
95
T-6 FITNESS
SPEED SKATE
F 40 FORCE
MULTIPLIER
J13995
Reg. $149.95
SXFRONTSIDE
STREET SKATE
$19995
179
95
Reg 219 95
Save up to 60 off selected closeout
styles of BAUER fitness d hockey skates
Reg �jL
1239 95 Mm
HARRINGTON, BRADDY &
ROMARY, L.LP.
211-B WEST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
TEL: 919-830-8840
SALE ENDS LABOR DAY
OMrt'il I I
nvMify v
mwf
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
919-355-5783
STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday 9AM to 8PM
LABOR DAY HOURS 9-2
Bee
Advertise
with Us.
Call 328 2000
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
953 E, 10th St. (Bottom of College Hill at east end of campus)
8th Annual Back to School
OPEN HOUSE & PIG PICKIN
When: Fri Aug. 30, 1995, 4:00pm-7:00pm
'pot 'TfCate. yttasittuztcatt, "Pteatie.
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
ARE NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES AND
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
FOR THE 1996-1997 TERM
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Apprtn ing Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Polie for the Student Union
Full time Student
Resides off Campus
Independent
4TV
Deadline to apply: FRIDAY Sept. 6
Applicalions-can be picked.up at the Student
Union Office - Room 236 Mendenhall
For More Information,
Contact Student Union 328-4715





The East Carolinian
Thursday, Ausust 29, 1996
66Good Neighbor service
makes Stale Farm unique
my policyholders swear by it
year after year. 99
Recent grad lands hot (dog) job
Says weiner work
is
"b
uns o
fun"
Bill McDonald
2710 E. 10th St.
Phone � 752-6680
Jacqueline D.
Senior Writer
Kellum
STATt FAIM
INSUIANCI
CALL ME.
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington. Illinois
Like a good neighbor. State Farm is there.�
Rodney Kidd graduated from ECU
in May of 1995 with degrees in commu-
nications and geography. Several months
later, he landed a job driving a giant hot
dog which utilized both degrees.
Kidd is one of 30 recent graduates
from across the country who are finish-
ing up a three month internship with
the Oscar Meyer company.
"They hire kids out of college to
drive the Weinermobile and be spokes-
persons for the company Kidd said.
He applied to the company and
while waiting to hear back from them
worked a summer at Disney World, where
he had worked previously during a se-
�oS� Pitchers
All Day & All Night
y1 il � i ii
Dnri
ALL PURPLE
APPAREL
NOW 25 OFF
PurpU- Sale 'uifo throughl) 7 �o No othei piomotional discounts
ino betaken in lomuiictioh with this sale
SHOW YOUR PIRATE POWER
THIS SEASON, LETS TURN
DOWDY FICKLEN STADIUM
INTO A SEA OF PURPLE.
More than just books your dollars support scholars!
Open Monday � Friday: 730 am - 7:00 prri & Saturday; 9:00 am - 3:00 pm358-6731
Wright BuildingPurpleville, NC
mester off from ECU, and did some trav-
eling.
Although the Oscar Meyer company
recruits actively for this program on col-
lege campuses, they do not come to ECU.
Kidd says he had to be persistent when
he applied to the company, as he had
not been interviewed face to face like
most of the other applicants.
After sending in a resume and call-
ing back several times, Kidd made an
impression and eventually was hired for
the internship which has been highly
regarded for some time.
"Rolling Stones rated it in the top
10 for internships approximately two
years ago Kidd said.
The interns pursue various rejects
during their three months, which might
include doing store calls, parades or prize
patrol.
"This summer, one of our promo-
tions was a talent search Kidd said.
This initial phase of the talent search
involved getting children ages four to 12
to perform and taping them, then send-
ing the tape to a talent agent in Holly-
wood.
The talent search led Kidd and his
two partners over a significant portion
of the United States. Kidd said they went
to nties in Wisconsin. Maine, New Jer-
sey, New York, Massachusetts and Penn-
sylvania.
Kidd said that all the interns went
through a two week training session
before going on the road. They were
taught skills in media, driving and crisis
management
Kidd said there were many events
during their travels which would remain
memorable. While in New York, he saw-
several plays, including "When Pigs Fly
during the intermission of which he met
actress Whoopi Goldberg in the lobby.
There were also the occasional protests
from vegetarians who objected to a gi-
ant hot dog making its appearance in
their community.
Although Kidd admits it may sound
a bit strange at first to think of driving a
hot dog as a job, he feels he has gained
valuable experience, as well as having fun.
"The experience of driving across
the country has been great. Everyone
wants to see the Weinermobile. every-
one waves to you, it's like being in a
parade every day Kidd said.
Due to the fact that Oscar Meyer
does not promote their internship
much in North Carolina, Kidd is the
only intern ever to come from this
state. But Kidd says he is trying to
convince the company to recruit at
ECU next year. So don't be surprised
if you see a giant hot dog roll on to
campus in the spring.
TEST from i
ipage 1
said. "It is our hope that by the fall se-
mester of next year if not by this spring
semester, students will be able to have
testing done here
The Student Health Center hoped
to contract the Pitt County Health De-
partment to test students on campus.
Zophy said due to staffing problems, this
type of arrangement was not possible.
Instead, the Student Health Center plans
ELTORO
Barber & Style
Men's Hair Styling
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon. -Fit 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say PIRATES &
Get Hair Cut for
$7 Everytime
$7.00
Haircut
South Greenville's
Neighborhood
Restaurant and
Gathering Place
Game Day or Any
Day
X
11 MEMurphy'c
BAB & GRILLE w
Sunday Brunch 11:30 - 2:00 PM
Featuring Grilled Entrees & Sandwiches
Also Salads, Appetizers and
Freshly Created Soups
� Quaint, Relaxed Atmosphere
� Full Service Bar
1914 Turnbury Dr.
(919) 355 -7956
Please inquire about catering
"Experience the Excitement"
of ECU away games and other sporting events
on our TV's
to become an auxiliary center for the Pitt
County Health Department
The Student Health Center will pro-
vide pre-test counseling, testing and post-
test counseling. Zophy said these types
of counseling are required by law. When
testing is available, counselors will inform
students of the current status of anony-
mous testing and explain student's op
tions.
Other schools in the state such as
N. C. State University offer HIV testing
on campus.
"At State, testing was offered once
or twice a week Zophy said. "Now it is
offered on a daily basis
In a previous issue of The East Caro-
linian, Christian Godwin, HIV coordi-
nator and counselor at The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill said that
they have offered HIV testing through
Student Health Services since 1989.
Testing services have been available
for the past three years at the University
of North Carolina at Greensboro. The
University of North Carolina at Asheville's
testing program was initiated one year
ago.
Zophy said that there is already a
heavy demand for testing among ECU
students.
"I anticipate a large percent of stu-
dents wanting to be tested Zophy said
"We already refer a lot of students to the
Pitt County Health Department"
Zophy said that if anonymous test-
ing is eliminated, it will effect students
who receive testing on campus.
"Students could still get tested, but
they could not be tested anonymously
Zophy said. Everything at the center is
confidential already. Medical information
is kept between the doctor and the pa-
tient"
Zophy said that there is a lot of con-
troversy over anonymous versus confi-
dential testing.
"Much of the controversy with con-
fidential testing arises from a possibility
that insurers could drop patients who's
medical records indicate they are fre-
quently tested for HIV Zophy said.
m
$3.95 LUNCH
SPECIALS!
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THIRSTDAY
BLOODY MARYS $2.25
SANGRIAS $1.50
12 PRICE PITCHERS OF
DRAFT
MUGS OF DRAFT .950
LIME MARGARITAS $2.50
MEXICAN IMPORTS $1.50
TEQUILA SUNRISE $2.25
12 PRICE
APPETIZERS
SUN-THURS AFTER 9PM � DINE IN ONLY
NO FIESTA COULD BE BETTER THAN CHICO'S!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 757-1666 ALL ABC PERMITS
rtf?-�itw� �






Thursday, Ausust 29,1996
The East Carolinian
I
OuxtteouL
It's that time of year again. That's right, with the
dawning of a new fall semester comes heavier traffic flow
with parents and students doing that last minute shop-
ping. The college town of Greenville along with the local
merchants welcome the student body with open arms;
but they're not the only folks happy to see the young-
sters donning the purple and gold.
Oh no.
The most noticeable traffic flow lies around the Green-
ville Blvd. area where you find super stores. They're glad
to hear the school bell ring because the Wal Marts and
the Targets of Greenville depend on the students for busi-
ness as well as employment.
It was no accident that retail powers like Wal Mart
and Target chose Greenville to plop a store in the middle
of town. Everybody knows that the average college stu-
dent has little or no money, so when say a student has
the burning desire to buy the George Strait CD he she
wants or the toilet paper they desperately need of course
they'll seek out the lowest prices possible. With the tre-
mendous size of these corporations, they have the abil-
ity to buy in bulk and give the lowest prices for quality
items. Sounds great, right. Wal Mart's happy, the stu-
dents are happy, but the local small businesses may not
enjoy the big boys coming in and shaking things up.
The small local stores of Greenville, who were here
long before Wal Mart became a household name, can't
buy in bulk, therefore they must raise prices to actually
make a profit. It doesn't take a business major to see
that the ability to sell a product for three dollars less
than a local competitor could weed out competition in a
hurry. Now don't look at Wal Mart as an evil empire,
they're not out to get anybody, they're just doing things
the American way.
Yes, many small businesses have and will suffer from
these super stores' ability to have such a wide selection
along with low prices simply because of their size. De-
spite the fact that these superstores have just about any-
thing, including hair styling salons, they may not have
what everybody wants. This is where the small businesses
thrive on. It is nearly impossible for Wal Mart to have
everything the smaller stores have just because of their
buying methods. So, the small business will probably not
die due to a Wal Mart, Target or T.J. Maxx. Plus the
economy of Greenville is not any poorer from the arrival
of these ware house stores.
These super corporations provides jobs for many of
the students and townspeople alike. Sure, it's a frighten-
ing thing that one or two names can change the com-
plexion of a whole town, but we at TEC believe it's the
American way in progress. It's just too bad family-owned
businesses that have been in this town for years have to
suffer.
Mega-huge-
superstores
offer students
the lowest
prices on
everything from
pliers to toilet
brushes. But
should these
superstores run
family-owned
businesses out
of business
with their
power buying
techniques?
Is Jones a common man?
To the Editor:
Walter Jones, Jr. is running for
re-election to the United States Con-
gress. Mr. Jones claims he is running
as a friend of the common man. Mr.
. Jones wants the good people of the
Third District to believe he has had
their best interests at heart while he
has been in Washington. Mr. Jones
would have us all believe he is work-
ing for the industrious in the commu-
nity and the students here at ECU.
Common people cannot afford to
send their children to college when
student loans are cut Mr. Jones is a
wealthy man who voted to cut student
loan and financial aid programs when
he voted for 99 of the Republican
Contract on America. Mr. Jones is not
being the friend of the common man
that he claims to be when he is deny-
ing poor and middle class students a
chance at a higher education. Finan-
cial aid is the only means by which
many ECU students can afford to at-
tend school. Mr. Jones over the last
two years has aligned himself with
men such as House Speaker Newt
Gengrich and fellow freshman Repub-
lican Fred Heineman. Gingrich has
made millions off of book deals and
Heineman last year stated that his
salary of one hundred thirty thousand
dollars put him in the lower middle
class. Mr. Jones and his aristocratic
friends are out of touch with middle
class America. They do not seems to
understand what it takes for common
people to make ends meet
The only way to preserve student
loans is to vote Mr. Jones and his
wealthy Republican friends out of of-
fice in November. Common people in
the Third District must vote no to
Mr. Jones and his anti-student and
anti-middle class policies. Walter
Jones, Jr. needs to come home in
November.
Matthew A. Stuart
Senior
Political Science
Warren supports ECU
To the Editor:
I would like to respond to TEC's
article regarding the new budget Sen.
Ed Warren was not mentioned in your
article, so please include this letter in
you next edition so that your readers
will know of his strong record of com-
mitment to ECU. This year Sen. Ed
Warren acquired 1 million dollars for
the planning of a new Science and
Technology building for our campus.
He also made arrangements to acquire
6 million next Spring for the Ficklen
Stadium Expansion Project It was our
Senator, Ed Warren, that supported
a Senate probision to provide the eq-
uity funding discussed in the TEC
article. These funds are designed to
bring ECU's funding up to the level it
should be.
Last year Sen. Warren worked to
arrange an agreement between ECU,
UNC, and NCSU to play football in
Greenville. UNC and NCSU had re-
fused to play us for several years prior
to that. Sen. Warren also obtained
approximately 12.5 million dollars for
the Life Science Bldg. at the ECU
Medical School. Senator Warren also
submitted a bill for the bond issue that
brought us our new library and the
funds to purchase property that will
allow ECU to have more space to grow.
We need to be aware of what leg-
�a I92i

The East Carolinian
Brandon Waddcll, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dillard Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor
Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Crlstle Farley, Production Assistant
Ashley Settle, Production Assistant
Deanya LatrJmore, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Ail letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
3284366.
Superman saves Chicago
With the republicans coming of
a rip-roaring party, the presidential
race became more of a contest or
so it seemed. Then came the Demo-
cratic convention in Chicago this past
week. I flipped on the tube and there
was Christopher Reeves starting
things off with an endearing speech.
I thought to myself, " It really is all
over now The ability of the demo-
cratic party to initiate sentiment in
the past four years was continued with
Reeve's presence.
When Dole was nominated by the
republican party, it seemed cut and
dry that no sensible American would
shun Clinton. Dole represents the old-
school, monarchical, you-don't-need-
to-know-for-your-own-good politics
that got us into trouble in the late
1960's. However, with the republican
convention, came the appearance of
a looser, off-the-cuff type of neo-repub-
lican. This made me slightly nervous,
because a hip republican is a contra-
diction of terms. Nonetheless, it made
the democrats wonder, "Now, what
can we do to fix this vote-altering
leak?" Answer: Call up Superman!
Christ, if he can't fix it, we're in deep
doo-doo.
The move to have Reeves, the
fallen Superman, who has risen to
even higher levels since his accident,
was a flare of true genius. Though I
Anthony Slade
Opinion Columnist
Answer: Call
up Superman!
If he cant fix it,
we're in deep
doo-doo.
give the American public more credit
on most occasions, I would have to
say that just seeing this valiant man
was a strong move on the old psyche.
As involved citizens, we try to listen
to the actual politics of our chosen
leaders, but in this case, the demo-
crats played on the heart strings.
Reeves discussed no actual political
premises, but rather reminisced over
the days of a similarly crippled man
named FDR.
Well, batten down the hatches!
There are two names associated with
democratic greatness in the 20th cen-
tury, FDR and JFK. Just utter those
names and people can transpose those
ideals onto Clinton. Not necessarily
because be represents the same poli-
tics, but he does have the same ethic.
So, as prepped by Stephanopolus as
he may have been, Reeves was inspi-
rational all the same. Now, the re-
publicans might say that this was a
cheap trick, but at least we weren't
the ones selling missiles to the Irani-
, ans, so there.
A lack of sentimentality has been
what the republicans have so long
been without The democrats have
always appealed to the zest and zeal
of American life, which is really what
we all want not some reflective starch-
ball who wishes he had the civil war
back.
Reeves' presence just punctuated
that sense of fervor we all have to be
allowed another four years of progress
in a truly democratic Capitol Hill. I
do support Clinton and so does the
man from Krypton, a guy who was
rarely wrong.
Silly, but true.
This election is not about the
banter of bill principles, it is about
commitment to a cause that we
started in 1992. You have to give any
quality president two terms nowadays.
Besides, with Reeves playing Super-
man for the democrats, that must
make Bob Dole the Lex Luther of the
republicans.
Think about that. .
1

E
Editor
islators such as Sen. Ed Warren have
done to promote our University. This
election year will decide what happens
on ECU's campus. We cannot afford
to be apathetic or misinformed. Please
join me on Nov. 5 to support Sen. Ed
Warren as our Senator in Raleigh.
Claudette Peale
Junior
Nutrition
Editor's note: "New budget may
mean pay raises" was the final article
in a series concerning the UNC sys-
tem budget. Sen. Warren was inter-
viewed several times over the summer
for his comments on how the budget
effects ECU.
COMPLAINT tfR. C0MMC.NT
A LLTTE-R. TO jUL LPITR
All letters must be:
�� typed
�� 250 words or less
�?include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bldg. (2nd floor)
across from Joyner Library or mail them.
The East Carolinian, to the Editor, Student Pubs bids.
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
Let us know what you think. Your voice can be heard!
"The man who makes no mistakes
does not usually make anything
� Edward John Phelps





Thursday, Ausust 29, 1996 The East Carolinian
Greenville cinema
found lacking
Hendrix Theatre
takes top honors
from TEC critic
aie Williamson
ienior Writer
Greenville may not be the best
lace to see the best movies, but it at
jast offers more than one choice for
h evening of cinema. Those of you new
� the Greenville area may either be
eiighted or appalled, depending on
;here you're from, to hear that the Pi-
ate city has five movie theaters, total-
lg twelve screens.
Rumor has it that all of Greenville's
heaters (save one, which I will get to
iter) are owned by the same person. If
his is the case, it explains a lot All of
ur theaters belong to the Carmike
hain, and they are all homes for the
lolly wood blockbusters. None of these
heaters (with very rare exceptions)
how foreign or independent features,
nd they each share problems that can
e easily solved with a little effort
Admittedly. Greenville is not Ra-
leigh, Charlotte, or even Chapel Hill, so
it will not have as many theaters as those
shining cities. It also means that
Greenville's theaters (for the most part)
will not be as nice as the theaters in
more thriving communities.
But Greenville is not simply a hole
in the ground. The city has boasting
rights to a major state university filled
with significant scholars, many success-
ful local and national businesses, and a
steadily increasing population that
shows no sign of slowing down. If Green-
ville as a city and a community is pro-
gressing, then why shouldn't
Greenville's night life? As it stands now,
Greenville cinema, despite its twelve
screens, is not all it could be simply be-
cause the theaters do not live up to their
potential.
I know that one's notion of "night
life" does not necessarily mean going
to the movies, but movies are still very
much a popular .American pastime (just
look at how much money Hollywood
has made this summer alone). Green-
ville citizens, like the rest of America,
love going to the movies. Unfortunately,
the movie experience in Greenville is
not always that pleasant. Since I've
wasted enough page space complaining
about Greenville's cinematic choices. 1
now tui n my critical eye to the theaters
themselves.
Let's start with The Carolina East
Cinema, the "classiest" theater in town.
The Carolina East has the distinction
of being the only Greenville theater with
four screens. The screens themselves
aren't much to brag about (none of the
local screens are). Compared to the sig-
nificantly larger and wider screens in
such cities as Raleigh, the local screens
appear to be more like big television
monitors than actual widescreen cin-
ema. Still. Carolina East offers the more
pleasant viewing experience.
The main advantage Carolina East
has is its lobby, which is spacious and
conveniently constructed. Once inside
the theater, one has easy access to the
individual theaters, located in four sec-
tioned-off corners of the lobby. Section-
ing off the theaters is essential because
it allows traffic leaving one showing to
exit without crashing into those wait-
ing to get in. The other local theaters
have a big problem with traffic flow sim-
ply because the theaters and the lobby
are not arranged in a rational manner.
See CINEMA page 7
6 cv "1
7�e Otted- 76� tyat s4cv&y . . .
Lost Children offers french-fried Sci-Fi
Dale Williamson
Senor Writer
French cinema is quite different
than American cinema, and City of
Lost Children perfectly illustrates this
point. This French film, which has re-
cently been released on video, takes a
fairly standard science fiction plot and
transforms it into something different,
something unique, something un-
American.
I'm not trying to sound like I'm
trashing America. However, 1 am (at
least partially) trashing American cin-
ema. If the overall plot for City of Lost
Children had its conception in Holly-
wood, the resulting film would star
Arnold Schwarzenegger and it would
be more action and less cerebral. While
the French may love American mov-
ies, they sure don't make them like we
do.
City of Lost Children is a futuris-
tic film that revolves around several
disparate plots which all come together
by the conclusion. Explaining how the
plots work together would give too
much away and require too much bor-
ing summary. Instead, let me quickly
summarize individual scenarios.
Plot 1: A hulking, muttering,
sideshow muscleman (played by Ron
Perlman) searches for his kid brother,
who has been kidnapped by a futuris-
tic organization known as the Cyclops.
Plot 2: Perlman's search teams
him up with Judith Vettet, a rebellious
child who seems to be developing a
subtle romantic interest in Perlman.
Plot 3: Vettet, along with several
other orphaned children, are forced to
steal anything they can get their hands
on for a pair of evil Siamese twins.
Plot 4: On a remote laboratory
in the middle of the ocean, a brilliant
scientist tries to discover a method
which will allow him to dream.
Plot 5: On the same remote labo-
ratory, five identical clones struggle
with their individual identities and each
other
Plot 6: On the bottom of the
ucean, a reclusive man collects junk in
"lis submarine until some unknown
brce drives him to the remote iabora-
ory.
On paper. City of Lost Children
lay appear to be cluttered and unto
jsed. Admittedly, it does have quite a
w characters to deal with, but then
ain. so does Independence Day and
)body's complaining about that.
Independence Day is a prime ex-
Books lost and
books found
Staff Reports
Photo Courtesy of TriStar Pictures
This man with the lightbulb head is a scientist who cannot
dream.just one of the citizens of The City of Lost Children.
So you're new in town, and despite the school's rep, you actually came
to ECU to learn something. Maybe-you even want to do some reading out-
side your regular class work. Maybe you're wondering, considering the pro-
liferation of bars and fast food joints near campus, where a person of an
intellectual bent could go to find some books.
There's always the Student Stores, of course, but that's easy to find.
Anyway, their selection of non-course books is a bit limited.
No, if you're looking for actual, honest-to-God book stores, you've got
to get off campus and into the wilds of Greenville. To help the incoming
ECU student pick his way through the literary wilderness of his new Emer-
ald City home, we here at The East Carolinian have composed the follow-
ing book store guide.
Waldenbooks: Our first book store is the most well-known in town, but
it's also the farthest from campus. Located at Carolina East Mall.
Waldenbooks offers the usual variety of main-
stream reading selections in all the usual genres. �
It's fine if you're into Stephen King or John
Grisham. but those with more intellectual or off-
beat interests may want to look elsewhere. In
other words, it's no better or worse than any
other Waldenbooks you've even been in. Blah.
Michael's Bookshop: Located at the Plaza mall,
this locally-owned store offers a good selection of
mainstream titles. More than a mere Waldenbooks
clone, however. Michael's also caters to a slightly
more intellectual crowd. You can get all the John
Grisham you want here, but if you're into
Shakespeare, politics, science, history or even
entertainment, Michael's has that too. You can
find some real gems among the crap here, if you
look hard enough. And if you're a book lover, dig-
See BOOKS page 7
Various Artists
Bordello Of Blood
Sublime
Sublime
tape it f ri in
Q��0
a friend
m
A
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
ample of how Hollywood differs from
French cinema. Whereas Indepen-
dence Day consciously focuses its ef-
forts on action and obvious character
development. City of Lost Children
sacrifices action for mood and subtle
character development. The relation-
ship between Perlman and Vettet. for
example, is never quite dear. Sexual
tension is hinted but never fully ex-
plored. Subtle actions, such as Perlman
massaging Vettet's tired feet, thrust the
film forward.
Ironically, the film's director. Jean-
Pierre Jeunet. has been signed on to
direct Alien 4. which stands to be a big
Hollywood picture in Summer of '97.
While action has been important for the
Alien films, rumor has it that Jeunet
got the job more for the visual style he
displays in City of Lost ('hildren, which
is the most expensive French film made
to date. American audiences (who are
accustomed to special effects on a grand
scale) may not be utterly enthralled with
Children's special effects, but Jeunet's
camera still works wonders for his dark,
futuristic world. Jeunet visually does for
his cluttered, junky, watery wasteland
what Ridley Scott did for his entropic
landscape in Made Runner.
City of Lost Children is very much
a visual film the must have looked gor-
geous on the big screen. Unfortunately,
the video release limits Jeunet's vision
to the aspect-ratio of one's television
set Hopefully, a letter-boxed version will
be out soon.
I will warn all fans of traditional
science fiction that City of Lost Chil-
dren does not follow tradition. It paces
itself methodically, much of the tilm is
filled with silence, and the climatic end-
ing is anti-climactic at least by Holly-
wood standards. However, it vou're will-
ing to get a taste of what the French
have to otter then City of Lost Chil-
dren is a must-see.
What do you get when you take
a handful of mediocre '70s bands,
a few '80s metal bands, and just a
touch of new stuff? A so .ndtrack
full of one-hit wonders with no-
where to go. And that's the recipe
for the soundtrack of the new Tales
From the Crypt movie. Bordello of
Blood.
Somewhere in the planning of
Bordello of Blood, somebody had
a good idea for a soundtrack that
went horribly awry. That led to an
album containing bands like An-
thrax. Free and Cinderella - that's
right. Cinderella. Unfortunately, in
this wide range of bands, there are
only two new songs. Anthrax has
the honor of being one of the lucky-
bands with the title track, "Bor-
dello of Blood "Bordello" is a
slight change from the band's usual
speed metal stylings. While still
heavy and driving, it contains more
harmonizing than your average
Anthrax (vocally and musically),
and it is a bit more musically com-
plex.
However, the same cannot be
said for the other new tune.
Kerbdog's "This Is Not A Love
Song In fact, about the only nice
thing to be said for this track is that
it's there. A one line song, it sounds
more like a garage band warming
up than an actual fully-produced
studio recording.
After Kerbdog comes '70s time.
Frees "All Right Now" kicks off the
retro movement of the album in
jamming style. A guitar rock an-
them, you have to wonder if this
was reallv added for the movie or
just to help sell the soundtrack to
classic rock fans. Either way, those
same classic rock fans can also feast
upon Thin Lizzy's "Jailbreak And
See BLOOD page 7
When Brad Nowell first started
listening to and playing music, he
couldn't decide exactly what to play
because the music moved him in so
many ways. He was influenced
heavily by rap, funk, ska and punk.
Driven by a desire that burned
brightly, the man himself could only
extinguish the flame. Well, that
flame burned out a couple of weeks
ago. and we lost a good musician.
But. we also received his best work
to date.
Sublime. Nowell and his band's
newly released, self-titled CD. hit
stores late this summer. With their
major-label sound, 17 new tracks,
and a sonic diversity like you
wouldn't believe, the album appears
to be their best to date. Which is
good, considering Nowell's untimely
death has probably, and unfortu-
nately, ended the band's short ca-
reer.
The album starts off with a se-
rious groove. From one note on the
keyboard, "Garden Grove" is born.
Once the song gets moving, it
changes its shape into the form of
reggae improvisation. Nowell can ac-
commodate. His voice just belongs.
The album itself shifts from one
source of energy to another. And yet
the band remains tight, each of them
knowing when to add their own par-
ticular accent. Nowell's musical part-
ners-in-crime, Bud (drums) and Eric
(bass) (both of whom appear to have
no last names), compliment each
other very well. Nowell couldn't
have asked for a better band. Each
member has his own time to solo.
Sure, a vocalist like Nowell is more
likely to get noticed than the next
guy. but for the most part the band
has a strong common aura, unbreak-
See SUBLIME page 6
AUGUST
29
Thursday
Faculty Recital with
Sharon Munden and John B.
O'Brien at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Reunion Iron '96 sculpture exhi-
bition in Mendenhall Gallery
through Sept. 20.
Everything with The Drag at the
Attic.
Pitt Boss at Peasant's Cafe.
Mickey Mills and Steel at Under-
water Cafe.
The Tragically Hip with Clarissa
at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Dwight Yoakam with David Ball
at Salem Civic Center in Salem,
VA.
30
� v Cone Head Buddha at
Peasant's Cafe.
Frog Legs at Underwater Cafe.
���.��
Fuego del Alma at Berkley Cafe
in Raleigh.
Dave Matthews Band with Corey
Harris at Walnut Creek in Ra-
leigh.
����������?����
Knocked Down Smilin' CD Re-
lease Party at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro.
H.O.R.D.E. Festival with Blues
Traveler, Lenny Kravitz, Rusted
Root, 311, Son Volt, Taj Mahal,
Agents of Good Roots, and
Cycomotogoat at Virginia Beach
Ampitheatre.
������������?�
31
Saturday
James Taylor at Walnut
Creek in Raleigh.
SEPTEMBER
1
Sunday
ACDC with the
Wildhearts at Walnut Creek in
Raleigh.
Monday
� 22nd Annual Collard
Festival featuring The Supergrit
Band & The Fantastic Shakers
Band, amusement rides, parades
and a collard eating contest 6
p.m. nightly in downtown Ayden
through Sept 7.
Tuesday
Acoustic Workshop at
Peasant's Cafe.
� a ?�� -�
Butter with Skeleton Key at the
Cats Cradle in Carrboro.
� The Comedy Zone with
ventriloquist Peter Hefty at the
Attic.
Moon Boot Lover at Peasant's
Cafe.
������
Throwing Muses at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
House of Blues Tour with Joe
Cocker, Buddy Guy. The Fabu-
lous Thunderbirds. and the Ra-
diators at Virginia Beach
Ampitheatre.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like
listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so,
. please send us informa-
tion (a schedule would be
nice) at:
It's Showtime
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University-
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858






Thursday, August 29, 1996
The East Carolinian
i
oa� IRetttecti
wmmmoKmomm
vv-v1
Rushdie teaches art of storytelling
�-���-�" -it
John Davis
SMI Writer
Imagine you had written a
wildly imaginative and clever piece
of fiction that explored the path-
ways of the human heart and the
reasons behind morality and also,
as"a side issue, happened to imply
that Mohammed was a bit deceived
when he came up with the Muslim
faitfa. Imagine you named it The
Satanic Verses. Now, imagine that
some meanies in the Middle East
deeded that they didn't like your
masterpiece and put a rather hand-
some price on your head - "wanted,
dead
' "With all of that ringing in your
ears, what would you do? Well, if
ySU' were Salman Rushdie (and I
suppose that if all of the above were
true of you, you would be Salman
Rushdie, or a very desperate copy-
cat), you would write an even more
liniij i mull more imaginative novel
tftrrt stretches the boundaries of
MM fiction and explores the art
of'fiction as its theme. And you
wMd call it Haroun and the Sea
&Stories.
i-Without giving away too much,
the novel is basically a children's
bedtime story, but written for
aBtts. The main character,
Haroun, is a child, the son of a fa-
mous and respected storyteller
wWSe wife and gift of telling sto-
ries" have both left him. As one
might expect, the conflict in the
story develops around the desire of
soWand father to get both lost trea-
sures back.
'�If the story seems rather plain
and cliched from that explanation,
kSe'p in mind that there are very
few"unique plots in the world, and
tfitgift of telling good stories re-
rteStjuite a bit on how the story is
ted7 Rushdie is a master story-
tell. Being from India, he pulls
qSffe a bit of influence from Indian
mythology and makes allusions to
IffdTan cinema and art . But
Rttstidie writes in English because
he has lived in England for a good
portion of his life,
so he has a wealth-
of allusions to
western culture
and art. He
doesn't just stick
to "high art' ei-
ther. Shakespeare,
Star Wars, the
Beatles, the En-
glish and Indian
alphabets, the fan-
tasy stories of
Ursula LeGuin
and C.S. Lewis,
the Arabian
Nights, the game
of chess, and piles
of other sources
all fivv into this
(forgive me) sea of
stories.
Rushdie is a
poetic writer. He
possesses an
amazing ability to
make words jump
through hoops
that you just
didn't know were
there and to twist
the universe just
enough to pull the
reader into his playful and insight-
ful imagination. He is a comic
writer, poking fun at nearlv every-
thing, even himself and the reader.
As he takes the reader through this
story about the art of telling sto-
ries, he weaves a joyous and yet in-
trospective adventure thai is both
compelling and softly prophetic in
nature.
Rushdie's characters are well-
developed, possessing more liveli-
hood in the short 200 pages of this
novel than any character in a 500-
plus-page John Grisham novel could
ever have. Rushdie uses words and
situations economically, making ev-
ery phrase, every plot development
exist as both frivolous and indis-
pensable.
Most of all, Haroun and the
Sea of Stories is a thrilling ride
through the imagination of one of
the 20th century's most talented
RUSHDIE
"Alto tK�we. tewlw.
. ojnwttil and jtMW-
Mth re-fed ,�k1 ptrMWrre
H ARPU
'ferws
i i.
Photo Courtesy of Granta Books
Although published in 1991, Rushdie
manages to capitalize on current nostalgic
trends like Star Wars and the Beatles.
writers. This novel is exhilarating
fun for all ages, and it contains a
joy and freshness that most of the
books written these days seem to
lack.
Experience
Elegance & Fine
Chinese Cuisine
7 Jafi A l4JeeJz
SUBLIME from page 5
able. The best thing about Sublime
as a band is that no one is trying to
be out in front.
7 The best thing about Sublime's
rnuaic is that it's so unpredictable.
They go from one extreme to the
ngxt It seems that their point is for
their listeners not to become too re-
laxed. You should always be aware
of what could be coming up next.
One minute, you're listening to a
tune so relaxing that your eyelids
are all you see. The next minute, a
thrashing punk tune is bursting out
so loud and so aggressively that
you'll be left wondering if you had
the disc changer on shuffle.
If you look the word "sublime"
up in the dictionary, you'll find that �
the definitions all revolve around
one central concept - elevation. It
makes perfect sense. It's how you
feel when you listen to their music.
The album is very spiritual in many
aspects; however. Sublime are not
exactly saints. Nor are they devil
advocates, for that matter.
Whatever the case may be, the
CD sounds great. It's about an hour
long and full of surprises. As for
Brad, it's good to know that the an-
swer isn't "What might have been
for Sublime. Instead, the answer is
in the music, where he'll always be.
CHINESE QESTAUQANT
Lunch Special:
Sesame Chicken Including Egg
Rolls, Fried Rice and Soup -
$4.50
2516 East 10th Street
Greenville. HC 27658
530-2238 Fax 830-1735
Sun-Thun
11:30am 9:30pm
Fri-Sat
ll:30am - 10:30pm
Welcome back ECU
students and faculty
BOWEN
LAUNDROMATS
Bells Fork & Carolina East Center
&
WASH HOUSE
111 E. 10th & 514 E. 14th
i V tt
5 YEARS
2 5DRAFT
EVERY NIGHT
Check out vaulable coupons for
Bowen Cleaners on our home page at
http:www.Bowen Cleaners, com
E, 5sL
Greenville, NC
752-7303
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
Adv Tix locations
East Coast
music
Quicksilver
Wash Pub
Attic
now in its
25th year in
downti
Greenville
EVERYTHING
Live music and personal appearance at
Blockbuster Music I -6 p.m.
Lots of prizes and ticket give-aways!
W?
A '
K Drafts
t V
D0N7
7WOUQHh
1109 Charles Blvd.
Open 10am - Midnight Everyda
Phone-758-4251
- FetKfy. - kf&- 'fi DV$ W
�pejt Kvju: �-fOiv wW
"
9
"t'v
m
without IBM
Computers
y can Iea4
to Disco
House
i 900

PC 350
See campus
computer store
for details.
Buy an IBM PC 340 or
350 desktop computer
and an IBM Multimedia
Kit. And you'll get a CD
software package that includes Windows 95.
Lotus SmartSuite. Netscape Navigator. World
Book Multimedia Encyclopedia and the Intopedia
collection of essential reference software.
Clean up win.
of the hottest
1 80Q-4IBM-L0AN
f student, faculty
ami staff financing.
y
Buy a ThinkPad and you'll get Windows 95 and
Lotus SmartSuite. You can also take a
of special student, faculty and
Just call 1-800-4 IBM-LOAN tor information.
Hurry, visit your campus computer store todav.
After all. no one looks ��� � �
apron. :��' '
, : � vwe names mr, He Mftmarte or �rwt �rkS 01 Othere i '1996W





The East Carolinian
Thursday, Ausust 29, 1996
BLOOD from page 5
The only place for scrumptous quality
authentic Greek food, speciality Pizza,
Sandwiches, and the best Subs in this part
of the World!
m
We introduce others copy.
706 S. Evans St, (919) 752-3753;
752-0326
FAX 758-8811
We Deliver
Try our new outstanding Eggplant entrees
to increase variety in vegetarian items.
Open: Sundays; 4pm-9pm
Mondays & Tuesdays; I lam-9pm
Wednesday-Saturday; 1I am-10pm
Freshmen Receive 10 Discount witli Mid ID
(Offer not valid for specials or deliveries)
if that's not enough. theY can try
the pop metal stylings of Sweet's
closet classic "Ballroom Blitz I'm
not really sure why this is such a
good soundtrack song, but Tia
Carrere also did a version of it for
the soundtrack to Wayne's World a
few years back.
Redd Kross adds to the mix with
a super-fast version of Kiss's
"Deuce "Deuce" starts out sound-
ing a little awkward due to the speed
and then sounds really bad when the
vocals start. Instead of the deep Kiss
vocals of the original, the singer has
a much higher pitch that makes the
song hard to listen to and, in short,
annoying.
Anybody remember the Scorpi-
ons? Those of you nodding right
now might remember a little song
of theirs called "Still Loving You
Apparently, Bordello Of Blood
needed a love song, or else the
soundtrack producer was having a
moment. Either way, the Scorpions
came to the call with this melodic
piece.
From the Scorpions, it's right
back to the 70s with Humble Pie's
"30 Days in the Hole Then we im-
mediately bounce back again to the
early '90s with, yes folks. Cinderella.
One of the many hair metal bands of
the late '80searly '90s, Cinderella
seems to be getting most of their
work from soundtracks now. They
were on the Wayne'? World
soundtrack as well, with a song called
"Hot And Bothered Unfortunately
for them, though, the Bordello of
Blood producers didn't want a new
song this time around and instead
recycled an album track of theirs
from 1990. "Love's Got Me Doing
Time" isn't a bad song, as long as
you can forget who it is performing.
Finally, bringing up the rear is
IS J O Jv5) from page 5
The Herd (featuring Peter Frampton)
on "From The Underworjgf
Frampton Comes Alive it's notHft
fact. I'm not sure what it is. Old is
the best word I can think of to de-
scribe it. In fact, the song is frrjrn
1967. and believe me, it sounds tike
it. This is one you have to check but
for yourself.
So, what do I think of the
soundtrack overall? If someone gjves
it to you, say thanks and see what
you think. If c friend gets it, record
the songs you like and laugh at the
other ones. Otherwise, you're not
really missing out on much.
ii ��
ging through the shelves should be a
joy in and of itself.
Central Book and News: Located
at the Harris Teeter shopping center
on 14th Street Central Book and News
is essentially a big newsstand. Their
selection of books is kind of smail, but
their magazine selection is another
matter entirely. They have magazines
of every conceivable stripe here, truly
something for everyone. But above and
beyond their normal variety. Central
Book and News also has a dizzying
array of pornography. It's the biggest
and most obscene collection of printed
depravity in town; even if porn offends
you, this place ;s a must-see.
Booktrader: Greenville's oldest
used book store, located on the cor-
ner of Charles and 14th streets, has a
wide variety of secondhand books on
sale for 50 percent off cover price. Like
most used book places, they will take
your used books for store credit, mak-
ing this a good place for starving stu-
dents to check out The selection is
mostly mainstream best-seller stuff, but
occasional gems surface here too.
Bookworm: Another used book
shop, Bookworm has the coolest name
of any store in town. Located on Green-
ville Boulevard near Wal-Mart, the
Bookworm's selection, policies and
prices are similar to those of
Booktrader. If you can't find it at one
place, check the other one.
Nostalgia Newsstand: Greenville's
longest-lived comic book shop, Nostal-
gia once shared their Dickinson Avenue
building space with Booktrader. Now,
however, the place is filled with com-
ics and nothing but. This store is kind
of dingy and rundown, but that has
nothing to do with the quality of the
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service
s 752-7529
merchandise. Their large back-issue
stock is messily arranged, but a lot of
great comics are tucked away in there,
many at cover price. Nostalgia also of-
fers a wide variety of alternative and
underground comics: if it's in print
they probably carry it.
Heroes Are Here Too: Located in
downtown Greenville (between all the
bars). Heroes is a typical mainstream
comic's shop. They sell mostly super
hero comics, so don't go in expecting
to pick up anything too bizarre. The
staff here is more friendly than the
usual surly comics shop herd, however,
and the owner will bend over back-
wards to help out regular customers.
It's also easy walking distance from
campus, which makes it a favorite
among ECU'S comics collecting set
Book Potato: Eccentric. That's the
word I can best use to describe this
place, located on 10th Street across
from campus. Book Potato sells a
mixed bag of comic book back-issues,
vintage science fiction and assorted
other books of any type the owner
finds interesting. The atmosphere is a
bit intense.
Barnes & Noble: Greenville's book
selection continues to grow with tbe
addition of this giant chain. Barnes
Noble will not only feature a very large
selection of books, but also a small cafe
where one can drink espresso and read.
And there you have it: Greenville's
purveyors of the printed word. Diligent
readers can find a lot of interesting
stuff if they know where to look. So
now that you do get looking, i n
CINEMA from page 5
The other key to the success of
Carolina East is the fact that the snack
bar is smartly located in the center of
the lobby, as opposed to the rear. This
not only allows lines to form around the
snack bar without bothering those who
simply want to skip food and see the
movie, it also allows the employees to
serve as many customers as possible as
qjickly as possible, thereby making the
wait for food short
But the Carolina East is not per-
fect and like the Carolina East the other
theaters also suffer problems. The Buc-
caneer, which tends to have wider
screens than the Carolina East has its
snack bar in the center of the lobby,
but the lobby still leaves much to be
desired because it isn't built to hold a
large, sell-out crowd.
The Park, Greenville's only $1.50
theater, handles itself nicely. Since the
Park only has one screen, there isn't
much of a problem with traffic flow.
While the theater itself isn't great the
Park, for its price, is pretty satisfying.
The main complaint with the Park cen-
ters around the movies it typically de-
cides to show, but I won't deal with that
issue now.
The worst of the bunch is without
a doubt the Plaza. Not only is this the
MCX
ater butt ugly (who exactly designed the
curtains hanging on the walls?), it is also
illogically constructed. The lobby is too
small for a three-screen theater, thereby
causing serious crowding problems; the
snack bar is located in the rear of the
lobby, thereby causing more crowding
problems: and the individual theaters
are awkwardly situated down narrow
halls, thereby causing even more crowd-
ing problems. Oh, by the way. the
screens and the projectors here equate
poor cinema. When I finally saw
Schindler's List at the Plaza, I distinctly
heard the projector cranking the reel
around. The Plaza almost makes a movie
trip to Raleigh worth the effort
There is one final option open only
to ECU students and faculty and their
friends: Hendrix Theatre, located in
Mendenhall, the one theater not mo-
nopolized by the same man. This, in
many ways, is Greenville's best cinematic
choice. Its screen is large and does main-
tain the aspect-ratio of widescreen cin-
ema. The seating area is spacious, al-
lowing for a rather large sell-out crowd,
which can get rowdy at times, depend-
ing on what movie is showing.
Hendrix has several advantages
over the other local theaters. For start-
ers, all films can be seen for free, which
makes Hendrix the best choice for your
buck. Also. Hendrix. unlike the Carmk�
chain, will once in a while slip in higher,
quality film selections. For example,
Hendrix is the only theater in town.that
dared to show The Cook, The Thief, His
Wife, and Her Lover, a delightfully
risque import f
The only drawbacks to Menden-
hall center around its no-snack policy
and its sound system, which is barejy-
stereo. But this is a problem all Green-
ville theaters suffer. Don't expect a T$X
sound system at any local screening U
you want to really experience the feel,
and sounds of big films like Twister,
then you're going to have to drivejp
Raleigh or Chapel Hill. You're nogfjri,
ingtofind it here.
In summary. Greenville's movie the-
aters range from pretty good to pathetic
While 1 feel Greenville is ready for and.
deserves better quality in its local-fliS-
aters, 1 don't see it happening any time
soon.
Still. Greenville cinema could be a'
lot worse. While we'll never see fllrhs
like Trainspotting at a local art h6use,
at least we can feel secure that the big'
hits like Independence Day and Mis-
sion: Impossible will always have a
home here.
fcJ9A�
!� 'l "
���

am.
I
well Give you 10 weeks.
Ten weeks may not seem like much time to prove you're capable of being a
leader But if you're tough, smart and determined, ten weeks and a lot of
hard work could make you an Officer of Marines And Officer Candidates
School (OCS) is where you'll get the chance to prove you've got what it takes
to lead a life full of excitement, full of challenge, full of honor Anyone can say
they've got what it takes to be a leader, we'll give you ten weeks to prove it
Marines
TWfimt 7Sr fnmd. Jhr Hrnim.
If you think you can handle this crash course in
management contact Captain Tingle or
Lieutenant Beltran at 1-800-722-6715.
����"��"��(���





�MMMWMMMl
8
Thursday, August 29,1996
The East Carolinian
Women's soccer ready
for competition
First game of the
'96 season this
Saturday
Volleyball takes to court
Jon Lauterer
Staff writer
iTeam hopes to
finish higher this
season
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
ECU women's volleyball is set to
take care of some unfinished busi-
ness from the '95 season, picking up
where they left off under second year
Head Coach Kim Walker.
The Lady Pirates are coming off
their first winning season in seven
years. They finished a strong fourth
ih regular season conference play last
year, while stepping out early in the
first round of the CAA tournament.
This year's team is a young one
and is yet to find its identity. They
return only five players from last year,
while at the same time adding five
�ew faces to the squad this fall. Two
$ the five incoming freshman, Julie
O'Allo and Shannon Kaess, gained
experience on the national level last
year by qualifying for the U.S. Jun-
ior Olympic National Volleyball tour-
nament in San Diego, CA. last sea-
son.
The Lady Bucs have no real
$tand out on the team.
"All of them are pretty even and
compete real well Walker said. "The
team is made up of some nice volley-
ball players and athletes in the pro-
gram that are doing things both of-
fensively and defensively that could
not be done before
The ECU
women's volley-
ball team is not
only tough on
the court but in
the classroom as
well.
"The team
had the second
highest G.P.A. of
all varsity sports
.st semester
Walker said.
"Over a 3.0 average as a team
The Lady Pirates are going to
need those smarts, along with a solid
offense and defense to handle the
pressures of a very demanding sched-
ule, both inside the conference and
out.
The conference is expected to be
strong with George Mason ranked in
the pre-season top 30 and winning
the CAA conference title the past five
seasons.
"American has a strong team as
always with a lot of international
players Walker said. " William &
Mary will also be very strong because
of being one of the more established
teams in the CAA
The team's non-conference sched-
ule does not look any less challeng-
ing with ACC clashes with N.C. State,
North Carolina and Wake Forest.
Along with the
"The team had the
second highest
G.P.A.ofall
varsity sports last
semester
� Coach Kim Walker
regularly sched-
uled teams, ECU
will be competing
against, they will
also play in five in-
vitational tourna-
ments this season,
beginning with a
season opener at
Towson State.
Walker knows
the ins and outs of
volleyball and will help this team grow
into a contender in the CAA.
"This is most important, because
the CAA tournament carries with it
an automatic bid into the NCAA tour-
nament" Walker said.
The NCAA tournament is a tour-
nament the Pirates have never seen
action in before.
The Lady Pirates will open up the
season on the road in various tourna-
ments but will return for their home
opener on September 10 against N.C.
A&T at 7 p.m. All home matches will
be played in Williams Arena and ad-
mission is free.
players travel across globe
basketball players
travel to Europe
for workouts
M
M
Dill Dillard
Assistant Sports Editor
;� Football is upon us once again,
btiit as every college athlete knows by
r(bw, every sport is year round - in-
cluding basketball.
That's right It may be a little
early to talk about hoops for most
people, but for a number of Division I
players from the east coast including
ECU'S Jonathan Kerner and Alico
rjunk, that is all they can think about.
During the later part of the sum-
mer break, a select number of basket-
ball players from the east took their
show overseas in Europe for summer
workouts. These two players worked
�out, as well as played six games in
Jthree different countries.
"It was a new experience, but it's
Jnot an uncommon thing for players
to go overseas for these workouts,
Kerner said.
The trips for these athletes gives
them a chance to see how the style of
play is overseas compared to the style
here in the U.S. It gives the redshirt
players an opportunity to get back
into the groove of their game before
the season starts.
"Playing over there is lOtally dif-
ferent from over here Kerner said.
"It is a lot more physical here in the
states, but the competition is still
stiff
Kerner, a 6-11 senior, considered
going to a similar camp in Brazil with
senior Tim Basham prior to his jun-
ior year to sharpen his skills, but de-
cided to attend this year instead. Due
to NCAA transfer rules, Kerner as did
Dunk, had to sit out a year to become
eligible for Division I play. True, sit-
ting out a year gives them the chance
to adjust to the academic life but this
is also a year without game experi-
ence. So, the logical solution calls for
any kind of game experience they can
acquire.
"These workouts are good for
guys who have redshirted and have
sat out a year, because they give the
guys an opportunity to compete at a
pretty high level before the season
even starts Kerner said. "For guys
like Alico it gets them back into the
feel of an organized basketball game,
and for guys like me it just sharpens
my skills even more
The two Bucs along with the
other CAA and Big East players,
played six games against European
competition and came out 3-3 at the
end of the summer. Not to mention
they came out of it with a whole dif-
ferent outlook on the game.
"It was good to get back to orga-
nized ball Dunk said. "I had to get
use to playing by the rules with the
hand check rule, and just getting back
to playing against players who play
everyday
With the addition of this experi-
ence for these two Pirates, along with
the recruiting year second year Head
Coach Joe Dooley had, Pirate fans
should look forward to an exciting
winter to go along with an exciting
fall.
Soccer season is sneaking up on
everybody, except for the ECU
Women's Soccer Team. This team is
ready to face even the toughest of
competitors throughout this fall sea-
son.
Fortunately for the team they
will have lots of home field advan-
tage as 10 of the 20 scheduled games
are going to be held in the newly
formed soccer complex inside
Bunting Track. With an abundance
of old and new talent this team
should fare well this season.
ECU has recruited 18 freshman
from all over the country as well as
North Carolina. There are players
from New York and Indiana all the
way down to Florida. This is ihe re-
sult of an effort put forth by the ECU
Sports Department to expand the
number of athletes in all sports,
whether they be revenue making or
not.
Many of ECU'S non-revenue
sports have been overlooked due to
the strong concentration of football
recruiting. This year many of the
coaches from all sporting teams are
getting some valuable talent to work
with.
With only a small amount of re-
turning players, and a few transfer
students, Head Coach Neil Roberts
has a challenging season in front of
him. Returning for his second sea-
son as head coach. Roberts is very
confident about this team, which has
a large majority of freshman.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SiD
Senior, Barrie Gottschalk (left) takes the ball down the field
against her competitor during a match last season.
"Some of these freshman have
played at a higher level in high
school Roberts said. "So I feel very
good about this team
Roberts is especially confident
about the goalkeepers and defensive
lineup. All three of this year's goal-
keepers are freshman players, but
Roberts doesn't seem to think of this
as a problem. Instead, he is exited
about this abundance of new talent
that will become stronger as the sea-
son progresses.
Another factor of this year's
team is the trio of transfers that will
play an important role in leading this
team. This trio consists of: Sheila
Best, Stacie Cause and Kristen Thor.
Cause and Thor will be the team cap-
tains for this season.
The Lady Pirates will open up
their season this Saturday here at the
soccer complex against Barton Col-
lege at noon.
10 Minute Brief
The '96 Pirate football team wili be without a crucial player this
season. Cornerback Dwight Henry tore the anterior cruciate liga-
ment (ACL) and the medial meniscus in his left knee last week in
practice. It was a non-contact injury that occurred when Henry turned
his body and his lower leg stayed planted, thus causing the tear.
Although it is a season ending injury, it will not end Henry's career
here at ECU. The senior has one redshirt year left and could opt to
return for the '97 season if he wishes. With Henry out, junior Tabari
Wallace and freshman Forrest Foster will vie for the corner job. As a
member of ECU'S 4x400 relay track team, Henry brought a lot of
speed to the field. Last season he had 58 tackles and six pass deflec-
tions.
Dwight Henry
ECU'S
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The ECU men's soccer team
�scored four times in the first half,
Jen route to posting a 10-1 victory
ftver North Carolina Wesleyan on
Huesday, during the first scrimmage
"of the season.
"I am very pleased with our
"team's effort today ECU Heads
Coach Will Wiberg said. "It is a sur-
prise to score 10 goals, but we
Jworked really hard in the preseason
;and it paid off today. Our fitness
on this game for us. We were hus-
ttling and winning loose balls. The
.guys did a really nice job today
Freshman Sean Hawley started
�the scoring frenzy when he headed
�a Chris Padgett crossing pass into
;the upper right corner of the goal
Jin the 18th minute. Sophomore
IWyatt Panos added an unassisted
igoal one minute later from 17 yards
iout. The first half scoring contin-
ued when Robert Hyatt scored
"back-to-back goals at the 32:00
�mark and again at the 34:00 mark.
� N.C. Wesleyan got on the board
3n the 41st minute on a penalty kick
3y senior Joey Bowman to close the
JPirate lead to 4-1. However, ECU
continued to drive down the field
ind moved the score to 6-1 on goals

m
��
�����inli'iniiiiwiiMMwiiiaiimmnij�iMiiii �'��!� wmmmmMm
by sophomore Josh Sklar and se-
nior Darrec Jones. Padgett added
a goal on a pen-
alty kick in the
66th minute and
freshman A.J.
Gray scored at the
69:00 mark.
The Pirate at-
tack continued
with two more
goals in the
game's final min-
utes on goals by
freshman Brian
Taylor at the
83:00 mark and
freshman Rodney
Jones in the 89th
minute.
ECU'S de-
fense was also a
key point in this
game. The Bat-
tling Bishops
were held to just
shots on goal as
the Pirates fired 26 shots.
The Pirates will play their sec-
ond scrimmage today against
Greensboro College at 5 p.m. here
at ECU. The Pirates will open its
�HHMI T
season Sunday at home against Vir-
ginia Tech at 3 p.m. The game will
be played on
the soccer field
behind Minges.
ECU split
end Larry Sh-
annon has been
named as one
of the 21 candi-
dates nation-
ally for the
19 9 6
Biletnikoff
Award.
Presented
by the Tallahas-
see Quarter-
back Founda-
tion, Inc the
Biletnikoff
Award is pre-
sented annually
to college
football's top
receiver. The
21-candidate "Watch List" of nomi-
nees were chosen by the selection
committee and will be pared down
to 10 semifinals in late October.
The semifinalists will be reduced to
"It is a surprise to
score 10 goals, but
we worked really
hard in the
preseason and it
paid off today.
Our fitness won
this game for us.
We were hustling
and winning
loose balls
� Coach Will Wiberg
three finalists in early November
and the winner will be announced
in December on ESPN's College
Football Awards Show.
Shannon, a 6-6,205-pound jun-
ior for the Pirates, has been a start-
ing receiver each of his first two
seasons and is slated to start again
when ECU opens up the 1996 sea-
son on Sept. 7 at home against East
Tennessee State. Shannon, a native
of Stake, Fla has caught 41 passes
the past two seasons, including 24
as a sophomore in 1995. Most im-
pressively, of his 41 receptions. 11
have been for touchdowns.
The Biletnikoff Award is named
for Fred Biletnikoff, the fourth-lead-
ing all-time receiver in NFL history
who played 14 seasons with the Oak-
land Raiders. Biletnikoff partici-
pated in two Super Bowls and was
named MVP in one of those appear-
ances. He earned Ail-American hon-
ors during his outstanding colle-
giate careefat Florida State Univer-
sity. Biletnikoff is currently receiv-
ers coach for the Oakland Raiders.
The selection committee is
made up of national media, former
professional receivers and previous
Biletnikoff Award recipients.
ecSewiceA
David Gaskins
Rec Services
The Department of Recreational Services is sponsoring the
"Back to the Blacktop" Outdoor 3-on-3 basketball tournament to
be held beginning of the week during September 9 on the courts
next to Belk Hall.
The deadline for entry will be Thursday, September 5 at 5 p.m.
Registration will be conducted in 204 Christenbury Gym weekdays
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Rosters must contain the following information in order to be
accepted: 1) Team name and division of play selected, 2) Addresses
and phone numbers for at least two team representatives, 3) First
and last names and social security numbers for all players listed, 4)
A minimum of three players on the roster, 5) Team availability, 6) A
completed "Participation Contract: signed and dated by the team
captain.
Poole play times are available on Tuesday. September 10 ana
Wednesday, September 11. Sign-ups for poole play will be conducted
on a first-come, first-serve basis. Each poole can accommodate a
limited number of teams.
Competition will be provided in men's gold (competitive), men's
purple (recreational), and women's divisions. The top 50 percent of
teams from each poole will qualify for a single elimination playoff
tournament which will begin the week of September 16.
Games will be 15 minutes in length, with a running clock, or to
31 points, whichever comes first Each team will play a minimum of
three games in poole play.
The style of play is extremely wide-open and offense oriented
with emphasis upon the three-point shot and driving to the basket.
In addition to the outdoor tourney, Rec Services will once again
offer the Schick SuperHoops 3-on-3 basketball program in October.
This indoor program is a campus event that is sponsored along
See REC page 9
J
-f





-�l��-�,�,
� �iTn hi iiiii,niifri�MW�
The East Carolinian
Thursday, Ausust 29,1996
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
VISA
Sale Begins Wednesday, August 28,1996
Mountain Dew,
Diet Pepsi
or Pepsi
2 Liter
Men's
soccer
vs.
Virginia
Tech.
3 p.m.
All Natural
Hunter
Ice Cream
2 SB
uRVnVr!Cft9
Frito-Lay
"Variety
SEPTEMBER HOME SCHEDULE
SUN.
1
8
Women's
soccer
vs.
Radford
noon
MOW
2
9
TUES.
a
10
Volleyball vs.
NCA&T
7 p.m.
WED.
4
11
Women's
soccer
vs.
Liberty
4 p.m.
Till US.
REC
from page 8
l2gaL
92S osb.
with Schick razors on approxi-
mately 600 college campuses na-
tionwide and culminates with local
winners advancing to one of 16 re-
gional tourneys. ECU has hosted
the Atlantic Regional for the past
three years and has also had the
women's championship team for all
three of these tourneys.
At press time, it was uncertain
as to whether "Kappa Alpha last
year's outdoor 3-on-3 champion
would return to defend their title.
However, where there is basketball,
Vu "The Blacktop Bomber" Donie
can be expected to be leading one
of the top teams.
For further information, please
contact David Gaskins at Rec Ser-
vices at 328-6387.
-
Sports
writers'

Smueker's
t
SCO.
SIMMCM�
Peter Pan
Peanut
Butter
69
17.615 Oz.
;s Choice
ECU Lacrosse
Organizational Meeting
t2Pk.l20
Cans
6 oz. Bag
Lays Potato
Chips
ST �COB
Who: Anyone interested in
playing lacrosse.
When: Thursday, August 29
9:00pm-10:00pm
Where: Christenbury Gym Room 102
Last Spring:
Undefeated North Carolina
Champions
and National Quarterfinalist with an
Overall Record of 15-3!
For more information contact either Brian
at 830-2180 or les at 758-0977.
meeting
Thnrsday
��
5 p.m.
Remember,
We Have All Of Your School
and Dorm Supply Needs-
Notebooks, Fens, Pencils, 6
Cleaning Products .�.����
And More!
-v A
The Best DeliBakery Around
Do you have some
things you need to
get rid of?
Advertising in our
classifieds can help.
Call Jonathan Keith �
328-2000
8" Double Crust
Apple Pie
Ea
ple
I
Single Layer
Chocolate
Swirl Cake
9
Ea.
3
Gift Certificates
Available
georges
hair designs
-Full Service Unisex Salon
�Tanning
-Skin and Nail Care
-Walk-ins Welcome
-European Trained Stylists
-Latest In Facial fir Body Wax
-Professional Hair Products
Buffalo Wings
Hot 8r Spicy,
Terryakior
BBO
16 Inch Prepared
Ftepperoni Pizza
99
Ea.
Avroid the wait-
call ahead for
faster service
Prices and Offers Good Wfednesday, August 28 Through Tuesday, September 3,1996 At AJl Mecklenburg County
Harris Teeters. Vfe Reserve The Right To Lifnrt Quantities. None Sold To Dealers.
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open MonSat.
9:30 a.m9 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
Tel: 756�6200
CHARLES BOULEVARD
SHOPPES
Charles & 10th Street
Open MonFri.
9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6 p.m.
Tel
HoifCut
s2�bff
Expires
September SO, 1996 JiaJjp
8305536
STANTON
SQUARE
Stantonsburg Road
Open MonFri.
10 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6p.m.
Tel: 7570076
Farms or Tanning flockooe
s50(b
ff
Expires
September 30,1996






10
Thursday, Ausust 29, 1996
The East Carolinian
t?
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WALK TO CLASS! AVOID parking hassles!
Available September 1st 4 Bedroom, 2 12
Bath, 1 block from campus. Safe off-street
parking, central air, WD hookup. No Pets.
Non-smoking females. After 5 758-7515
ROOMMATE NEEDED SERIOUS STUD-
ENT or Professional to share contemporary
apartment Rent $270 plus utilities. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath. Call 353-1027
FOR RENT: TWO APARTMENTS 2 blocks
from ECU campus: 3 bedrooms, 112 and 2
12 baths, appliances. No pets. Depositrent
Call 756-5528 or 758-7300.
ROOMMATE WANTED $250 PER month
3534451 leave message
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 3 bed
room duplex. $177.50 per month. No rent
fee in August! Friendly neighborhood, 4
blocks from campus. Call 758-0607. Securi-
ty deposit $17750 needed. No lease require-
ment
105E. 11THST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW,
Central AC - Heat Nice Private Back Yard.
Lawncare included, Pets OKi $600month.
830-9502
ROOMMATES WANTED. NICE HOUSE
close to campus. Male or Female. Smokers
pets welcome. AC, WD. Dep. $220, Rent
$200-240.413-0957
RENT BEFORE AUGUST 31, get last 10
days September free - 1 & 2 bedroom's in
Summerfield, Brasswood, Riverbluff, and
Williamsbuig. Call Potomac Properties 752-
9722.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share 2 bedroom apartment at Tar Riv-
er. Own bedroom and privacy! Only $250.00
month. Call 752-2262. No deposit required!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NONSMOKER
DRUGFREE mature. 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex
Heritage Village WD $250mc. Referenc-
es required. 355-2944
FOR RENT: SINGLE BEDROOM with full
kitchen and livingroom newly painted, new
carpet and vinyl throughout Great location
next to campus, 1 block from downtown.
Need someone to take over lease until May
97 $325 month. Includes Cable, Water, Sew-
er. Call (School) 931-0496. (Home) (910) 475-
3506 or call 3553731. Ask about Sycamore
HiH Apt 10
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW! To
share 3 bedroom apartment Rent $180 plus
utilities, right beside campus. Call 355-9526.
MALE OR FEMALE NEEDED to share rent
for 2bdrm townhouse in Village Green. Free
heat cable, WS, low utilities. Kind pref. Call
Jim 757-9625
1203" FORBES ST. 1BD 1 Bath WD
Hookup, Remodeled Kitchen & Bath. Big
Rooms, Nice Yard, Pets OK, Lawncare includ-
ed! $300month 830-9502
MALE OR FEMALE NEEDED to rent one
room in three bedroom house. Three blocks
from campus. $200 per month. Call Abby
830-1842
WANT TO LIVE OFF campus this year? I
need a roommate, male or female, smokers
OK, to take over half of the lease. Call for
info. Lori 752-0009.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOMMATE
needed ASAP! Great condo, 2 bdrm, 2 12
baths, pool, cable included. Rent $250.00.
Please call Debbie at 758-0308
115 E. 13TH ST. 5BD2 Bath, WD Hook-
up, Stove, Frig, Central Heat Big Rooms,
Lots of Parking Lawncare included. Pets OK!
$750month. 830-9502
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE new
apartment near ECU. Walk-in closet and pri-
vate bath. Rent $240.00. Available now. Call
754-2050. Please leave message
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3 BLOCKS from
campus, $200 a month and 12 utilities. Own
room in 2 bedroom duplex. Serious student
preferred. Call Jamie at 758-5140.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Cail Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
TWO FOR RENT. ONE house and one
townhouse. Three bedroom, large kitchens,
central air, on bus route. $650.00 each. Call
754-2708 Leave message. Pool, Dishwasher,
etc
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT IN coun-
try. 10 miles from campus. $300.00 per
month. Call 746-9130.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE house
on river 5 miles from campus. $65.00 a week.
$100.00 deposit Possible trade work for rent
Everything included except phone. Call 830-
1787.
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW Student Recrea-
tion Center. Rent $225 month at 810 Co-
tanche Street Call 752-2615. Bill Williams
Real Estate beside Cubbies on Evans Street
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
1205 FORBES ST. 3BD 1 Bath, WD
Hookup, Remodeled Kitchen Bath, Cen-
tral AC Heat Nice yard. Pets OK. Lawn-
care included! $500month 830-95112
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. Walk to cam-
pus. $250mo. plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
8244
IN SEARCH OF HONEST, easy going, fe-
male roommate(s) to apartment hunt ASAP!
Non-smokers preferred. Have all furnishings
Call Amy at 407-1552
11 Wanted
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 49�-��4
For Sale
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR $50, Stud
ent Desk $50, Girls 12 speed Bike $60. Full
Queen size Blonde Headboard with match-
ing nightstand $50, 13 inch color TV $65
Call 758-0101
MOUNTAIN BIKE 970 TREK. Great con-
dition. $350.00 Firm. Call 522-7696. Ask for
Keith.
M600 CANNONDALE GOOD CONDITION
$300, Harmon-KARDON Tape Deck - $125
OBO BSM Amp- Equalizer $100 752-9850
FOR SALE. DORM REFRIGERATOR.
$50 negotiable. Call 7583244.
FOR SALE: TWO SOLID wood chairs with
vinyl cushions. Perfect for the family room.
$25.00. Call 551-6754.
DORM FRIDGES, ONE KNEE high $35.00,
one waist high $55.00. Call 931-0093
PARKING SPACES FOR RENT. Less than
one minute walk to Student Store. $30 per
month. Spaces are limited! 830-8891.
FOR SALE: QUEEN SIZE bed. $250.00.
Call Jason at 752-7107
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE, $300.00. Good
condition,350 pounds of weight; small dorm
sized fridge for sale $50.00, good condition.
Call 756-5309. Ask for Jeff.
CARS FOR SALE. WE can finance. Choose
from various styles, makes, such as 88 BMW.
89 Chevy Blazer, etc. "Cars-R-Us" 355-3620
MICHELIN ALL SEASON RADIAL tires
(2). P18575R14 apprcx. 8000 mi. Call 757-
8704
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET be-
hind Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche. Paved
lot lighted, numbered spaces, towing en-
forced $288.00 tear or $175.00 semester.
If
. Help
1 wanted
Earth Friendlqr
Seeking people with
environmental awareness
and a need for excellent
part time income potential
Flexible hours, good
feeling. Call Ms. Collins:
321-6250
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 355-0210
MAP SALES: PART TIME work including
Saturdays with The Map Store. Knowledge
of mapsgeography helpful. See Joe or Sta-
cy, 563 S. Evans Street @ Reade Circle, 757-
2511.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No exp
necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53627
A NEW START! DEGREE not required.
Growing telecommunications company needs
enthusiastic, aggressive self motivators. Per-
sonal freedom and a chance to motivate oth-
ers come with job. Flexible hours, part or
full time. Make money without losing your
personal freedom. Call now 752-8090. Inde-
pendent rep. Excel Telecommunications.
AFTERSCHOOL SITTER NEEDED FOR
two eleven year-old girls (sixth graders at
St Peter's Catholic School). They are good,
motivated students and well-mannered, in-
dependent children. 2:4SS:15pm Mon-Fri
(but there is flexibility when it is needed by
you). Very little driving involved, but must
have your own car for school pick-up and
when needed. Good Pay and Comfortable
Home Situation. Experience in childcare pre-
ferred and references required. Please call
757-1378 (there is an answer machine if you
need to leave a message with your name and
number and best time to contact).
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - PLAZA MALL
NEEDS cashier Tuesdays. Thursdays. 11-4
and some night hours (15-20 hoursweek).
No phone calls please, apply in person 11 -
9. ,
PART TIME POSITION: FILE Clerk posi-
tion available in local Greenville office. Ap-
proximately 15-20 hours per week. Willing
to work around class schedule. Send resume
to Administrative Manager. 1428-2, Avers-
boro Road, Garner, NC 27529.
LAW OFFICE ASSISTANTS. MORNING
position and afternoon position. Answer tel-
ephone, photocopy, filing, light typing. No
smoking. Starting salary negotiable depend-
ing on experience. Room for growth and sal-
ary increase. Downtown location. FAX re-
sume to 919752-1016.
EARN CASH WEEKLY for local civic or-
ganization. must have good phone voice.
Earn up to $14.50 per hour evening hours
5:45- 9:00 PM MF. Call John 10:00 am - 5:00
PM. 752-3014.
BRODY'S WELCOMES YOU BACK TO
SCHOOL! As eastern North Carolina's lead-
ing fashion retailer for women and men, Bro-
dy's offers all students the opportunity for
10-29 hours per week, flexible scheduling
around class schedule, and a clothing dis-
count to start off your year with a great fall
wardrobe! Applications for sales positions are
accepted Tuesdays. lpm-5prn, Brady's, The
Plaza or Carolina East Mall.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED. 6 a.m. - 11
a.m. M-F.12-20 hrswk. $5.00, Tir. Removing
organs at a pork processing center and trans-
porting to our facility. $5.00hr. call 355-
4405. ask for Marilyn.
- Help
11 Wanted
DEPENDABLE, MOTIVATED, AND MA
TURE babysitter needed for 2 12 and 5
year old boys on Mondays (8:30 a.m. - 5:30
p.m.). Wednesdays and Fridays (12:30 p.m. -
5:30 p.m.). Experience preferred. Referenc-
es required. 756-8262.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals
wishing to gain valuable work experience
with a rapidly growing company. Ideal ap-
plicant would be energetic, efficient, willing
to learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are currently taking applications
for part-time telephone collectors willing to
work any hours from 8am until 9pm Mon-
day thru Friday and Saturday morning from
8am until 12 pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127
SPRING BREAK '97 � Sell Trips, Earn Cash,
Go Free. STS is hiring CAMPUS REPS
GROUP ORGANIZERS to promote trips to
Cancun, Jamaica, and Florida. Call 800-648-
4849 for information on joining America's
1 Student tour Operator.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crewmore. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext.
L53622
PART-TIME LAB ASSISTANT needed. 12
20 hourswk. $5.00hr.General lab main-
tenance, solution preparation, etc. call 355-
4405, ask for Marilyn.
FALL SOCCER COACHES: THE Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer coach-
es for the fall girls and boys soccer programs.
Applicants must possess some knowledge of
the soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 5-16. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid-November. Salary rates start
at $4.25 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James at 8304567 or Michael
Daly at 8304550
4
Greek
Personals
PI LAMBDA PHI. AFTER all the summers
hard work, it's to come back strong! Be it
known the brothers always have support.
Good Luck on Rush. Continue to make us
proud. The 5 Society of Pi Lambda Phi Fra-
ternity.
PHI SIGMA PI: WELCOME Back! Hope
everybody made it to the meeting August
26th. Good luck and have a great semester!
f
Services
Offered
Announcements
INTERESTED IN BEING ON a volleyball
team? Intramural Sports is having a volley-
ball registration meeting on September 3 at
5:00 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center 244
Come out and join a team! For more infor-
mation call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE
PITT COUNTY, will be conducting a Soc-
cer Coaches Training School on Sat Sep-
tember 21st from 9am-4pm for all individu-
als interested in volunteering to coach soc-
cer. We are also looking for volunteer coach-
es in the following sports: basketball skills,
U basketball, swimming, rollerskating,
anU Lowling. No experience necessary. For
more information please contact Dwain Co-
oper at 8304551 or Dean Foy at 8304541.
FREE ADVENTURE! LEARN MORE about
the great outdoors with Outdoor Living
Skills Workshop. On September 3, Recrea-
tional Services Adventure Program is Explor-
ing Eastern North Carolina. The registration
deadline is August 30. For more information
call Recreational Services at 328-6387,
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY: 1ST meet-
ing of the year is Aug. 29th, Thursday in
Brewster 305C. We will be discussing issues
for the semester and fundraisers. All are we
come to join!
PITT COUNTY CHAPTER OF American
Diabetes Association presents "Cutting
Through the Red Tape of Insurance, Medi-
care, and Medicaid on September 9, 1996.
All programs will be held in the Gaskin-Les-
lie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial Hospi-
tal at 7:00 p.m. There is no cost for atten-
dance. Everyone is invited. For more infor-
mation call 816-5136 from 8:00 a.m. - 4:00
p.m. Mon - Fri. or call 1-800-682-9692.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All Students are eligi-
ble regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Financial
Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53628
ZAP YOUR FAT! EXPERIENCE more en-
ergy, lose weight and inches. All natural.
Doctor recommended. 30 dayBack Guar-
antee. Call 7580997.
DO YOU LIKE TO HEAR GOOD MUSIC
AT PARTIES? Then call DJ Dave to book
your next party at 758-5711. DJ Dave is a
professional DJ with top of the line equip-
ment. If you want a wide variety of music at
you next party, then DJ Dave is your man.
Call DJ Dave for more info, at 758-5711
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF The Wall with
Bubba Rocks DJ Services. CountryRock
Top 40Dance. $200 for 3 hours of Pure Jam-
min! Call 321-1144
NEED MONEY? WANT TO know how to
make money everytime someone else uses
their phone? Call Kevin 752-1955.
Other
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc Waitstaff, house-
keepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness coun-
selors, and more. Call Resort Employment
Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53624.
BOWEN CLEANERS IS NOW accepting ap-
plications at its Bells Fork location for morn-
ing customer service representatives. Hours
will be 7:00am til 2:00pm or 8:00am til
5:00pm.
KIND PATIENT AND LOVING sitter want
ed Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday iO care
for two boys, ages 2 years and 4 years. Must
enjoy playing with and reading to children.
Please call 357238
MATTRESS PLUS INC. IS expanding and
looking for mofivated, well rounded individ-
uals who possess a desire to work in a retail
environment. Some duties include deliver-
ing, assembling, and sales. Must possess
strong attitudes towards customer service.
Part and full-time positions available. Apply
in person 606 E. Arlington Blvd. No Phone
Calls Please!
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAIJTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRJ 10-12, 1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
LU:4h3tovK1
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. Alt shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
GYMNASTICS TEACHERS! LOCAL GYM-
NASTICS school is looking for experienced,
motivated instructors who love kids, part
time - good pay. cail darlene rose at 321-
7264 or stop by at 1602 Old Firetower Road.
CHILDCARE NEEDED FCR INFANT Mon.
Tues. andor Thurs 8:30am - 12:30pm; also
for preschooler Tues. 2-5pm. Prefer non-
smoker with own transportation 752-9243
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague. Budapest, or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive Room Boardother bene-
fits. For info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn
up to $25-$45hour teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For info, call: (206) 971-
3570 ext J53626
OFFICE FURNITURE DELIVERY PER-
SON needed IMMEDIATELY. Full and part
time positions available. Mechanical abilities
helpful. Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
WANTED: PART-TIME WAREHOUSE and
delivery. License required. Apply in person
at Larry's Carpetland. 3(110 E. 10th Street,
Greenville, NC
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. Credit Card fun-
draisers for fraternities, sororities & groups.
Any campus organization can raise up to
$1000 by earning a whopping S5.00AISA
application. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive FREE T-SHIRT-
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! no
repayments, ever! $$$ cash for college $$$
for info: 1-800400-0209.
"MONEY" WE ARE LOOKING for a few
good people that are willing to work hard
and who want to get more out of life than
just a paycheck. If this sounds like the path
for you and you are not afraid of making
money in your spare time, then call Bryan
at (919! 931-7080. Leave message.
SPRING BREAK '97. EARN CASH! THE
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS AND LOWEST
PRICES! TRAVEL FREE ON ONLY 13
SALES! FREE INFO PACKET! CALL SUNS-
PLASH TOURS 1-800426-7710
WWW.SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM
INTERVIEW SKILLS AND RESUME
WORKSHOPS: The Career Services staff
will present the following workshops to help
students prepare to enter the workforce eith-
er upon graduation or for internships or co-
op experiences while in school: Resume Writ-
ing- Fri. Sept 6.3:00pm. Interviewing Skills
- Tue. Sept. 3.3:00pm. These workshops will
be held in the Career Services Center, Room
103.
PERSPECTIVES, A NOON TIME Lecture
Series. Tuesday, September 3, 12:30 - 1:30
p.m. at Brody 2W-50. The Decline and Fall
of Managed Care as We Know it: Sooner
Than You Think by Haavi Morreim, Ph.D.
Call for more information 816-2797.
WANT TO SHOOT SOME hoops? Intramu-
ral Sports is offering an outdoor 3-on-3 bas-
ketball tournament. The registration dead-
line is September 5 at 5:00 p.m. in Christen-
bury 204. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 328-6387.
THE ECU GOSPEL CHOIR will have re-
hearsals on every Thursday at five o'clock
pm in Room 105 A. J. Fletcher Music Bldg.
There are no auditions. Dues are $12.00 per
semester. The first rehearsal will be on Au-
gust 29, 19 at 5:00pm. Any questions call
752-0275 or 758-8135
ECU MENS LACROSSE: ANYONE Inter
ested in playing Fall Lacrosse come to our
organizational meeting on Aug. 29 at 9:00pm
in Christenbury Gym Room 102. For more
information contact Brian at 830-2180 or
Les at 758-0977
GET YOUR BUNS IN gear? The Lifestyle
Enhancement Program is offering Burgers.
Buns, and Thighs. This class will teach how
to get fit. Register from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. in
Christenbury 204 September 3 through Sep-
tember 9. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 328-6387.
Announcements
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: ABSTRACTS are
now being sought for the Sixth Annual Prim-
ary Care Research Conference, which will
be held on the lNC-CH campus in the Wil-
liam B. Aycock Family Medicine Buildirgon
Saturday. March 1, 1997 The conference is
designed to promote primary care research
currently in progress at L'NC campuses, at
NC AHEC Program campuses, and AHEC
regions across the state. Deadline for sub-
mission of abstracts is November 1. 1996.
For more information, please contact l.aura
Seufert at the UNC Aastasia for the Cener-
alist Physician. CB7595,UNC School of
Medicine, Chapel Hill. NC 27599-7595 or call
her at 919. 966-3456.
THE ECU STUDENT UNION is now accept
ing applications for the position of Chair-
person of the Popular Entertainment Com-
mittee. The Popular Entertainment Commit-
tee sponsors concerts, performers, and oth-
er entertainers at all levels. Applicants should
have nvich free time and plenty of energy to
devote to this position. They should also have
a broad knowledge and appreciation of a
wide variety of entertainers. Organization
skills are a must, as well. Applications may
be picked up in the Student Union office.
Monday through Friday. 8:00am � 5:()0pm.
For more information, please call 3284715.
or stop by our office. Deadline for applica-
tions is Friday, August 30th.
FREE JUNK MAIL TERMINATOR kit. Put
an end to unwanted junk mail! Order your
free "Junk Mail Terminator Kit" from the
Pitt Co. Clean Sweep. Call Joy Hudson at
830-6391 to request the kit containing 15
postcards that can be mailed to clearing-
houses to remove your address from master
mailing lists. Be a junk mail terminator!
Reduce! Reuse!Recycle!
LEARNTOTOJAD WITH the help of a vol-
unteer tutor. This is a free and confidential
service. Call Literacy Volunteers at 752-0439.
THE VOLUNTEER GUARDIAN AD Litem
Program is looking for advocates for abused,
neglected and dependent children. Volun-
teers are trained, then appointed with an
attorney to represent the child's best inter-
est in juvenile court hearings. The program
works with other agencies in locating and
developing resources that would benefit the
child and their family. Volunteers can assist
by speaking out for Children's rights to grow
up in a safe and caring environment. For
more information, contact Catherine Darby.
Guardian ad Litem District Administrator.
PO Box 1391, Greenville. NC 27835 or call
(919) 830-6217. Training classes for new vol-
unteers will begin September 26.
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will be
having it's first meeting on Thursday. Au-
gust 29 at 5:00pm in the General Classroom
Building room 1026. We would like to inv-
ite all returning members and anybody in-
terested in investing, especially business ma
jors.
ECU AMBASSADORS, THE OFFICIAL
student represent' tives of the university are
currently having a membership drive. If you
are a full-time stucient with a 2.5 cumulative
GPA and have some time to give to the Uni-
versity, stop by the Student Stores for an
application this week or call Marsha at 830-
8861 for more information. Become a Proud
Pirate. Join the Ambassadors.
WANT TO LEARN HOW to officiate volley-
ball and make money? Come to the Volley-
ball Official's Meeting on September 3 at
9:00 p.m. in Brewster C-103. For more infor-
mation call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
WANT TO BECOME ROYALTY? Partici-
pate in King and Queen of the Halls and
rule the halls. Come to College Hill at 4:00
p.m. on September 5 for fun, games and priz-
es. For more information call Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
RIDE THE RIVER! RECREATIONAL Serv-
ices Adventure Program is canoeing the Tar
River on September 4. Come out and enjoy
a leisurely afternoon on the Tar River. Be
sure to register by September 3 in Christen-
bury 204. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 328-6387.
The East Carolinian
Personals
EASYGOING MUSICIAN - TYPE seeking
partijer to share healing massages. Also seek-
ing Fun-Loving ladies to share music & sun-
shine. Write new: DT, POB 8663, Greenville.
27835. Photos helpful.
m lost and
Found
and Spring
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACELET. Re
ward, please call 830-6839.
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include � Education Fund
� Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
� Insurance available
Apply within
M-F between 2-4 p.m.
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East Carolinian reserves the right to
reject any ad for libel, obscenity andor bad taste.
y .��





Title
The East Carolinian, August 29, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 29, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1154
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy