The East Carolinian, August 27, 1996






TUE�
August 27,1996 ;
Vol 72, No. 02 I
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
Center welcomes class of
2000, announces calendar
Student leaders,
staff greet minority
freshman class
Marguerite Benjamin
News Editor
The members of the new freshman
class seem to be enthusiastic to say the
Ipast Still th?np is no wav of knowing
whether their excitement is due to an
anticipation to begin learning or the thrill
of being away from home.
Upperclassmen and staff members
realize how great the temptation may be
for new students to involve themselves
more with parties and extra-curricular
activities than with classwork, so several
groups united in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center last Thurs-
day in a mission of welcoming and warn-
ing.
The 1996 Minority Student Convo-
cation was organized by Minority Stu-
dent Affairs and the Ledoni? Wright Af-
rican American Cultural Center in order
to insure that the
vised the freshmen to be "captains of
their own ships" and to beware of vari-
ous objects that might obstruct their
course.
"Look around you Poison said,
motioning around the Great Room.
"Some of these same people who sit be-
side, behind and across from you will not
be here at the end of the semester be-
cause they took their eyes off the desti-
nation, because they allowed others to
side-track them or simply because they
were somewhere too busy making un
excuses when the should have been pay-
ing attention to their navigation
Also in attendance were Pamela
Gilchrist, a NC Teaching Fellows Scholar
and president of the Kappa Sigma Chap-
ter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Inc.
who delivered a presentation entitled
"The History of Blacks at ECU Brian
Cotten, president of Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality (ABLE), who
presented the new student leaders of the
various minority student organizations,
Dr. Edwin Bell, president of Educational
Leadership and the Organization of
Black Faculty and Staff (OBFS) who in-
troduced the minority faculty and staff
members present
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
Fall 1996 Calendar
AUGUST INOVEMBER
27
Nubian Novel Dis-
cussion Circle: "Black labor,
White Wealth" Sneaker: Dr.
Claude Anderson. Time & Place:
6 p.m. Bloxton House
SEPTEMBER
1
u
class of 2000 will
have a memorable
and productive
stay at ECU.
According to
the Center's direc-
tor, Taffye Benson-
Clayton, the con-
vocation was a suc-
cess. Clayton said
the center received
a lot of support
from individuals
and groups ca-
pable of making a difference in the new
students' academic careers.
"In my opinion, things went su-
perbly Clayton said. "1 was very pleased
with the level of involvement of students,
student leaders, and faculty and staff
members
The program segments included a
welcome speech presented by Dr. Alfred
Matthews, Vice Chancellor of Student life,
who advised the freshmen to take full
advantage of all the univeisity has to offer
and never to hesitate to contact a staff
member for guidance.
"I really can't say enough about
the support we received especially
from students and student leaders
Clayton added. "I was really impressed
with how many came out and partici-
pated fully
Clayton also applauded the contri-
bution of the speaker of the hour, Dr.
Ronald Poison, whom she said was "ab-
solutely dynamic"
"There was an energy and enthusi-
asm felt that will add momentum to this
academic year Clayton added.
In his keynote address, Poison ad-
I really can't say
enough about the
support we
received, especially
from students and
student leaders
� Taffye Benson-Clayton
MHMHMMMHHMHMDMHHHH
and Debra Dixon
Trayhan. director of
the ECU gospel
choir who extended
an invitation for
new members.
As far as the
Center's new calen-
dar of events is con-
cerned, Clayton
said, "We have and
array of programs
planned which will
primarily appeal to
students but will also be of interest to
the greater community. We have several
in-house, on-going programs as well as
some special programs lined up, the first
of which is a lecture by Dr. Claude Ander-
son
Anderson is scheduled to speak to-
night (Aug. 27) at 6 p.m. at Bloxton
House as a part of the Nubian Novel Dis-
cussion Circle. Anderson will speak on
his text, "Black Labor. White Wealth
Clayton said she is looking forward
to seeing what the rest of the semester
will be like for new students as well as to
seeing if the present level of enthusiasm
will escalate.
"We want to continue to explore the
wealth of resources within the univer-
sity as well as within ourselves Clayton
said. "We have many people with a lot to
offer, and we will try to utilize that in
every way we can.
The Cultural Center is about estab-
lishing traditions in academic and lead-
ership excellence at the university. I hope
last week's convocation was an indica-
tion of the type of success we will have
this year
12
The African American
State of Affairs at ECU Spon-
sors: Admissions, Org. of Black
Faculty and Staff, Minority Affairs,
the Center. Time & Place: 4:30-6
p.m. Great Room, MSC
ECU Black Alumni
Activities ECU Black Alumni Reg-
istration 5-10 p.m. and Reception
7-10 p.m. Place: Bloxton House
Allied Blacks for Leadership
and Equality Fashion Show.
Tickets: (in advance) $5 students,
$7 non-students, $10 All at the
door. Time & Place: Todd Dining
Hall 10 p.mmidnight
O
i�ECU Black Alumni
Registration. Time & Place: 9
a.mnoon
18
Brother to Brother.
Time & Place: 6 p.m. Bloxton
House
11
Career Development
Workshop. Time & Place: 6 p.m.
Bloxton House
28
Parents' Weekend
Open House. Time & Place: 10
m2 p.m. Bloxton House
OCTOBER
i "Black Man Rising"
(a play) Sponsors: Student
Union Lecture Committee, Cul-
tural Awareness Committee, the
Center. Time & Place: 8 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
13,
1 Minority Student Aca-
demic and Leadership Achieve-
ment Ceremony and Reception.
Speaker: Congresswoman Eva M.
Clayton
Time & Place: 6:30 p.m. Hendrix
Theatre, MSC
15
8
Opening Program-
The Search for Power and Eco-
nomic Justice Sponsors: Office
of Vice Chancellor of Academic
Affairs, College of Arts and Sci-
ences, BB&T Center for Leader-
ship Development, the Center
Speaker: Dr Claude Anderson.
Time & Place: 7 p.m. Great Room,
MSC
'Young Aspiring Pro-
fessionals Network. To be Young
Black and Enterprising Speaker.
Bobby Hardy, owner Headlines
Bookstore. Time & Place: 6:30
p.m. Bloxton House
91
Jam I Brother to Sister.
Time & Place: 6 p.m. Bloxton
House
DECEMBER
4
24
Thespians of Diver-
sity Play. Time & Place: 7 p.m.
Room 244, MSC
Sister to Sister. Time
& Place: 6 p.m. Bloxton House
5
fe3
Karamu Feast. Time &
Place: 6 p.m. Bloxton House
6,
Pre-Kwansa Celebra-
tion. Time & Place: 6:30 p.m.
Room 244, MSC
New budget niay mean pay raises
Legislature allows
for merit-based
pay increases
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
After a summer of over-drawn
debate, the legislature finally de-
cided on a budget for the UNC sys-
tem that includes more money for
ECU than has been allocated in re-
cent years.
The budget includes a four and
one half percent salary increase for
teachers across the UNC system.
This increase will be allocated based
on merit. For ECU, there will be an-
other one half of one percent pay
increase for outstanding faculty.
According to Richard Brown,
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs,
the one half of one percent addi-
tional increase will effect only 25
percent of ECU's faculty.
The legislature included $9 mil-
lion in planning money for new
buildings at a handful of universi-
ties. Brown said that FXU will re-
ceive $1 million of the planning
money which will be used specifi-
cally for new science and technol-
ogy buildings.
"We have a dire need for addi-
tional laboratory space in the chem-
istry and biology labs especially
Brown said. "We just received fund-
ing and we will advertise for an ar-
chitect
According to Brown, compara-
tive studies of funding levels at in-
stitutions similar to ECU showed
that ECU was $3.1 million less well
funded on an annual basis. Due to
this lack of funding, the legislature
will allow ECU to spend $1.7 mil-
lion that in previous years were man-
dated as savings.
"Normally, we give back 2 per-
cent of appropriations to savings
Brown said. "Now where we will ben-
efit is that this money will be used
towards computer technology and
academic equipment
Brown said that lack of fund-
ing for ECU stems from the univer-
sities enrollment expansion which
came during a decade when the leg-
islature was not prepared to fund the
expansion. Other universities which
were cited as underfunded and given
one-time allocations by the legisla-
ture are UNC-Charlotte, UNC-
Greensboro, UNC-Wilmington and
Appalachian.
See RAISE page 3
Pirates
on the
Street
Photo brCamon
Scott Repess, freshman
Major: (Intended)
Biology
"To friends and hanging
out making sure I get
to class on time, and
doing work
Nelson Brockway,
senior
Major: Math
"To doing well in my
classes
Minnie Diaz, Sth year
senior
Major: Chemistry
"Graduating getting
good grades so I don't
have to be here
another year
Monlque King, senior
Major: Biology
Chemistry
"Getting the
construction over with.
It's really bad, especially
for new people. Also
looking for a change and
meeting new people
Vacationing trio
returns as heroes
Students rescue
drowning children
at Emerald Isle
Jacqueline D. Helium
Staff Writer
What was meant to be a care-
free day at the beach turned into a
rescue effort for three ECU stu-
dents one Saturday during first
summer session.
Hannah Barabasz, Taffy Tyler,
and Scott Green had driven to Em-
erald Isle for the'day, thinking that
it would be a nice break from
school. Their relaxed mood was in-
terrupted when they noticed that
two young boys who had been play-
ing in the surf were having trouble
getting back to shore.
"We had just come in and were
drying off. We were tired ourselves,
because it was a lot tougher to get
back in than we thought it was
Barabasz said. "The undertow was
bad, and the waves were very un-
even
Barabasz added that they had
seen the boys playing out in the
surf, but didn't see any cause for
concern at first, since they were
both swimming well. But she had
noticed that they were both young,
and didn't seem to have anyone
supervising them.
"I didn't find out their names.
They were probably eight and ten-
fairly young, but old enough to be
able to swim Barabasz said.
The boys had been shouting
and playing so much that when
they began to call for help, the
three students thought at first they
might have been just playing a joke,
but then realized the kids were in
trouble.
"Scott noticed that they were
really in distress and needed help
Barabasz said, adding that the boys
must have panicked when they sud-
denly realized their predicament.
"They just realized that they
weren't going to be able to get back
in. They were swimming fine, but
they were past the point where the
waves were helping them get in
The three of them swam back
out into the water. Tyler went to
the closer boy and began helping
him get in to shore. Barabasz said
that he was almost to the point
where he could touch bottom, and
Tyler was able to get him in her-
See HEROES page 4
?�Mdc
megu
The Fan sucks windpage O
Minimum wage finally increasespage
SPQRT&e
Pirate car revs up its enginepage
12
Tuesday
Rainy
High 84
Low 67
Wednesday
Cloudy
High 89
Low 67
1m U tee� a
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTECECUVM.CISifCU.FDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from loyner





MHHMH
Tuesday, Ausust 27,1996
August 20
Driving While Impaired - A student was arrested for driving while
impaired. He was also cited for driving while his license was revoked.
Worthless Check - A student was arrested for writing five worthless
checks after a warrant was issued for his arrest
Damage to Property � A faculty member reported that the window
pane on the Whichard Building was broken.
Stolen License Plate � A staff member discovered a stolen license
plate on a truck that was in the area of his work.
August 21
Fire Alarm Activation - The Greenville Fire Department responded
to a fire alarm activation at Jones Hal The area was checked and no fire
was located.
Solicitation � Two non-students were banned from campus after
being found soliciting perfume in Scott Hall.
Larceny - A student reported that his parking decal was stolen while
it was parked west of Jenkins Art
August 22
Indecent Exposure - A student was arrested for several indecent
exposure cases that occurred earlier this week at the Brody Building.
Possessing a Weapon on Campus - A student and resident of Aycock
Hall was issued a campus appearance ticket for possessing a weapon on
campus.
Damage to Property - A student reported that someone dented the
fender of her vehicle while it was parked in the 3rd and Reade Street lot
August 23
Larceny - A student reported that his parking decal was stolen while
his vehicle was parked at Jones Hail.
Larceny � A student reported that his parking decal was stolen while
his vehicle was parked at Aycock HalL
Possession of Marijuana and Drag Paraphernalia - Two students
were issued state citation and campus appearance tickets for possessing
marijuana seeds and pipes at Fletcher HalL
Giving False Information to a Police Officer - A non student was
stopped by an officer and presented a false identification card.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Alumnus
climbs
corporate
ladder
Jesse Frank Bullard III
Staff Reporto
A Morehead City branch of
BB&T has promoted ECU graduate,
Frank Bullard, to senior vice presi-
dent
Bullard, a native of Chadbourn,
earned his bachelor's degree in
business administration at ECU and
went on to earn a graduate degree
from the Louisiana State University
Graduate School of Banking of the
South.
Bullard first joined the BB&T
family in 1981 and has since be-
come city executive in Morehead
City. Bullard also serves as trea-
surer of the Morehead City Rotary
Club.
Bullard and his wife, Nancy,
have three children, Jesse, 9, Ross,
6, and John Charles, 1.
BB&T is the principal subsid-
iary of Southern National Corpo-
ration, a $20 billion bank holding
company based in Winston-Salem.
BB&T has 432 offices in 219 cities
across the Carolinas and Virginia,
and holds the second largest share
of deposits in North Carolina.

eCos
Plus, check out the in-store
Business Center for all your
printing and copying needs
Call 1-800-557-3376
for the store nearest you
�i

Apex woman suspected in Sigma Chi Fire
A former acquaintance of a Sigma Chi fraternity member has been
charged with intentionally setting the June 8 fire at the fraternity house
near UNC-Chapel Hill. Erika Lee Biemer, 19, of Apex was indicted Tuesday
on charges of first degree arson, first-degree burglary and damage to prop-
erty, Chapel Hill police said.
Biemer was expected to turn herself in Wednesday and be formerly
charges. The suspect use to attend N.C. State University, although she is
not registered for fall semester, the registrar's office said.
Police could not comment on the possible motive for the fire. Beimer's
attorney, William D. Young IV, could not be reached.
Director of Greek Affairs Ron Binder said he could not believe that
someone would intentionally set the fire, especially after the May 12 Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity house fire that killed five UNC students.
"This is a very scary proposition that someone would do this he said.
Escaped mental patient found in Chapel Hill
Of all he people at the GreyhoundTrailways bus station one Monday
afternoon in late July, there was one man wandering around who was very
far from home.
Clifford Leslie White, 45, an escaped mental patient from Cherry Hos-
pital in Goldsboro, was found walking around the Franklin Street station at
about 1 p.m. and was promptly taken into custody by Chapel Hill police.
White, who was indicted in the murders of his aunt and uncle, had
escaped from a locked ward at Cherry Hospital late the previous Friday
evening.
The East Carolinian
INTERESTED
HIESIIMEX AND
BEGINNING
NEWS WRITERS
REMEMBER TO
MARK YOUR
CALENDAR EOR
THIS
THURSDAY'S
MEETING IN
MENDENIIALL
ROOM 14 AT
4:30 P.M.
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
Experience
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7 2oi J ttiek
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10
on the corner of Evans and Third Street
In a cafe setting, we serve ixtaifaut
from 8:00 a.m. through 10:30 a.m. and
UtcA. from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Ask about our Frequent Diner Card.
Call ahead & we'll have your favorites ready to go
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CHINESE DE&TAUDANT
Lunch Special:
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ll:30am-9:30pm
Fri-Jat
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Items a, Prices Good Thru Aue 31,1996
Wed. 28 Thurs.29 fti.30 Sat. 31
Copyright 1996 - The Kroner Co. items
& Prices Good In Greenville We reserve
the right to limit quantities. None sold
to dealers.
food& Drug
Always Good. Always Fresh
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Doritos
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Bush's
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NORTHERN ULTRA OR
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ASSORTED VARIETIES 12"
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Nabisco $�99
FRUIT NEWTONS OR
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REGULAR OR COLLEGE
Top Flight Filler Paper Mechanical Pencils
100-Ct
5-Pack





tllgl ' �
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 27,1996
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
lut and Style Shop'
faulty Since.
f9?S
w

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East Carolina University Wv��ilY
JVnLlJld from page 1
There will still be no state health
insurance for UNC system graduate stu-
dents who are teaching or who are re-
search assistants.
"It makes us less competitive with
states that do offer insurance but we
are on par with other UNC system
schools Brown said.
According to administrative official
Andrea Harrel of the division of research
and graduate studies at ECU, the $1.7
million appropriated for tuition reduc-
tions for graduate students translates
into little for ECU's graduate students.
"The only thing that will effect
graduate students will be three more
out-of-state tuition waivers for graduate
students Harrel said.
This brings the number of gradu-
ate students receiving out-of-state tu-
ition waivers at ECU to 63.
There will also be no money in-
cluded in the capital budget to fund the
expansion of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
ECU asked for $6 million from the leg-
islature after raising $12 million pri-
vately. Last Thurs N.C. Representative
Henry Aldridge said that ECU would
receive $3 million for the expansion
through another outiet Aldridge also
said Speaker of the House, Harold
Brubaker had committed to another $3
million in January.
The capital budget included a $4.9
million repair and renovation fund for
ECU. The fund will allow for roof and
air conditioning repairs as well as gen-
eral renovations to buildings on cam-
pus. This fund will allow for renovations
to the classrooms in the Raw! building
as well as new furnishings for academic
spaces.
"This fund will have a very visual
impact on students Brown said.
Overall, Brown said university of-
ficials are content with the UNC sys-
tem budget
"I would say, we are pleased the
general assembly acted as they did to
improve raises Brown said.
South Greenville's
Neighborhood
Restaurant and
Gathering Place
Game Day or Any
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U. MEMurphy'g
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Sunday Brunch 11:30 - 2:00 PM
� Featuring Grilled Entrees & Sandwiches
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� Quaint, Relaxed Atmosphere
� Full Service Bar
1914 Turnbury Dr.
(919) 355 -7956
Please inquire about catering
"Experience the Excitement"
of ECU away games and other sporting events
on our TV's
What the UNC-system
Budget Means to ECU 1
93

W
� Four and one half percent
salary increase faculty
� Additional half of one
percent increase for
outstanding faculty
� $1 million in planning
money for new science and
technology buildings,
specifically new labs
�$1.7 million for computer
technology and academic
equipment
� 3 out-of-state tuition waivers
for graduate students
� $4.9 million repair and
renovation fund, specifically
renovated classrooms in Rawl
� No state health insurance for!
graduate students who are
teaching or who are research
assistants
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
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RUSH begins August 26th through the 29th.
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im-�mm
Tuesday, Ausust 27,199o
The East Carolinian
Ieroes
from page 1
sejf, while she and Green went to
help the other boy.
I "Scott and I went to the fur-
thest boy out, who was maybe 200
yards out in the water. I got there
fist, and it was all I could do to
tread water myself, and help him
ke;ep his own head above the wa-
let Barabasz said.
; Barabasz said that the under-
toW was so strong, and the boy had
drifted so far out, that it became a
group efforf iust to get him in to
shore.
I "Scott got there what seemed
HKe five minutes later, but I know
it Was probably only a minute, and
w4 just kept passing the boy be-
tween us Barabasz said.
The two tried different meth-
ods of helping the boy, such as try-
ing to put him on their backs and
let him ride, but they didn't seem
to be making any progress.
Meanwhile, Tyler had already
reached shore with the other boy.
An older woman on the beach who
had seen what was happening of-
fered the use of a Boogie Board,
which Tyler took, and then swam
back out to help her friends. The
three of them put the boy on the
board and with all of them push-
ing and pulling on it, finally were
able to get to shore. Barabasz esti-
mates that it took a half-hour to get
the boy to shore.
After reaching safety, the three
students found out from the boys
that they were at the beach with
an older brother of one of the boys,
and walked down the beach to con-
front him. Barabasz said that the
older brother-who she estimated to
be seventeen or eighteen-was play-
ing Frisbee with some friends and
didn't seem to realize the serious-
ness of the predicament even when
the students explained that the
boys might have drowned if not for
their help. After that, the students
decided to call it a day.
"We were going to stay all day.
but after that happened we were
mad and tired, and we all had swal-
lowed so much salt water, we de-
cided to leave and were home by
late afternoon. It kind of cut our
day short Barabasz said.
The physical aftereffects of the
rescue included nausea from the
salt water they had swallowed, but
that was gone by the next day. Fear
and uncertainty played an emo-
tional part following the events of
that day.
"We were shaky, and just
scared, because you're thinking,
God, what if we weren't there?
Would those boys down the beach
really have heard them?" Barabasz
said.
Adding to the uncertainty they
all felt was the fact that the num-
ber of students who went that day
could have easily been one more or
one less. Barabasz said that her
boyfriend was supposed to go. but
had a change of plans, and because
of that she almost didn't go that
day.
"You just wonder-what if my
boyfriend was there, whether that
would have helped, what if I didn't
go, would those two have been able
to get both of them in? We were
just sitting there playing mind
games-what if, what if Barabasz
said.
None of the students who
saved the boys that day were
trained in any kind of rescue skills.
in high school I was certified
in first aid. and I know CPR from
here and there-I could probably do
it if I had to-but I'm not certified.
And to my knowledge, I don't think
Scott and Taffy are either
Barabasz said.
Barabasz said that even
though the older brother in charge
of the two boys didn't show any
remorse for his lack of responsibil-
ity or thank them for their efforts,
the two boys they rescued thanked
them again and again, and seemed
to realize they might have drowned
if not for the three students. The
feeling of having saved someone's
like was a new one to Barabasz.
"It was strange. I've never felt
so in control of somebody's life be-
fore. That was the weirdest thing
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��N
Tuesday, Ausust 27,1996
The East Carolinian
Ou1te�
The minimum
wage is due to
increase soon,
but that still
won't help
meet the costs
of attending
college
In a time when the chief executive officers of some of our
leading corporations are making over 200 times the amount
of money that their average employee takes home, it seems a
bit ridiculous for Congress to be haggling over a mere 90
cents. We wonder why Congress should be the decision-maker
in this process.
When was the last time a Senator made minimum wage?
If it was about a decade ago, then he or she would have been
making about 90 cents less than minimum wage is now. That's
right, 90 cents. Ten years ago the minimum wage was a whop-
ping $3.35. Today it's gone up to unbelievably high $4.25.
That means that a minimum wage earner working 40 hours
per week for 52 weeks would bring in $8,840, before taxes.
No Christmas holiday, no Thanksgiving break and especially
no July 4th off for that lucky stiff. No sir, they would have to
work eight hours a day, five days a week to garner that fat
paycheck. They would be lucky if they could take a weekend
off once a month.
Ten years ago that same person would have made $6,698
for the year. But think about the standard of living back then.
Although it was the '80s when everything seemed to cost an
arm and a leg, it wasn't nearly as much as it is now. Reagan
was in the middle of his second term and prices were begin-
ning to skyrocket, but the financial crunch didn't come along
until Bush was in office. Seven thousand dollars would have
gone much farther at that time then $9,000 goes in 1996.
Now, a bill passed the House of Representative in May
that would raise the minimum wage another 90 cents over
the next two years to a total of $5.15 per hour. That's $10,712
a year for our hard-working friend mentioned above. Not great
by any means, but a start
What does that mean to us, the students of East Carolina
University? It affects students from the northeastern and west-
ern p?rt of the state the most because these regions have the
highest percentage of minimum wage worker, according to
the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina. The
legislation raises minimum wage from $4.25 to $5.15 an hour
in two stages. The first stage goes into effect on October 1,
1996 with a 50 cent increase. The second stage occurs on
September 1, 1997 when there will be an additional increase
of 40 cents per hour.
The Employment Security Commission estimates some
308,000 North Carolina workers will be directly impacted by
the new legislation. They represent just over 16 percent of the
state's hourly work force and about 9 percent of the overall
work force.
If you're paying for college yourself, then you already know
the harsh reality of minimum wage and how far it will get you.
If you're going to school full-time, then more than likely you
only have a part-time job, which also means you're probably
making the minimum.
Needless to say, the minimum wage isn't nearly enough
for most people to live on in this country. In fact, that 40 hour
per week worker might be classified as earning a wage that is
below poverty level.
Yet despite all of these despairing remarks, we should feel
comforted that we live in North Carolina, not only because
the cost of living here is so low in comparison to many parts
of the country. North Carolina has one of the lowest percent-
ages of hourly workers making at or below minimum wage in
the entire South.
If North Carolina had to come in last at something, we at
The East Carolinian are glad it was that

The East Carolinian
Brandon WaddcH, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Randy Miller, Asst. Prod. Manager
Any L. Royster, Assistant News Editor Crlstte Farley, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Dale Williamson, Assistant Lifestyle Editor Ellyn Felts, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Deanya Lattlmore, Copy Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Randall Rozzell, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
3284366.
Childhood, an anachronism in the "90s
Childhood has become far too
burdensome for the American public
to bear. It is no longer good for the
country's well being. It isn't even good
for the children who are captured in
an unwholesome prolonged state of
dependency.
One must remember that allow-
ing children to be free and young is
fairly new in America. One should re-
member that childhood is nothing but
an anachronistic leftover from the
original liberals. Before the so-called
enlightenment, before Rousseau, be-
fore the left-wing conspiracy of the
18th-century, the young dressed,
worked and were looked upon as
shorter adults in society.
Children existed for the purpose
of furthering our existence, but they
were made to pull their own weight
in the family. They didn't have a place
to be educated and nurtured until
they reached maturity. Adolescence,
for that matter, wasn't invented until
the early 20th century.
Children having children is be-
coming a dangerous and common
occurrence in our country. Young-
sters are having sex and using drugs
as young as 12 years old, maybe even
younger in respect to using alcohol
and drugs. The controversial movie
Kids, based on the lives of young
lower-middle class kids in the city is a
fictional illustration which mirrors
reality. Our children are running so
fast toward adulthood and crime that
in ten years we could have a national
epidemic on our hands. America's
children are losing control with no
idea what is right, wrong or decent.
Should we go back to the idea of
child labor in America? If parents are
not teaching their children responsi-
bility, then maybe a little work ethic
could help out. We are already eras-
ing the line between childhood and
adulthood whenever it suits our pur-
pose. The cost of living is on the rise,
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
' ����, ��-� - ,
America's
children ar
losing control with
no idea wheels
right, wrongor
decent.
and in order to support families to-
day both parents must work. When
little Johnnie gets off the schoolbus
at 3 p.m. (after his first week in fourth
grade) there is no one to greet him at
the door, because mom is at work until
six and a baby-sitter is too expensive.
This is a common and sad scenario
for many American kids, and loving
parents are pushed in this direction
at times. However, there must be a
better option than latchkey kids, com-
ing home to an empty house for sev-
eral hours of the day.
Hollywood has been exploiting
children for over two decades. Young
actors are put to work, taken out of
regular schools, told to work long
hours and chances are that they would
much rather go out on the playground
with their friends. Do their parents
ask them to act or force them? It is
exciting for children to play in front
of the camera, but can a five year old
really make a decision to act in a apple
juice commercial. No, his parents or
agent make the choice for him.
At the Olympics, we had 14-year-
old gymnasts on the "Women's Team
In the states, we now have plans to
try 13-year-old lawbreakers as adults.
In Congress they are considering do-
ing away with juvenile jails and
"mainstreaming" kids with older crimi-
nals.
If we eliminated the entire notion
of caildhood we wouldn't have to
worry about children having children,
child care, or schools. Child labor
would become another "work oppor-
tunity
Of course, we could retain child-
hood as a luxury for those who could
afford it Sort of like an Ivy League
college. The rest, the poor especially,
will have to do without childhood the
way they do without so much else with
our government plotting against
them.
Jonathan Swift offered in 1729:
"A Modest Proposal for Preventing the
Children of Poor People in Ireland
from Being a Burden to Their Parents
or Country and for Making Them
Beneficial to the Public
Swift proposed, modestly and
satirically, that the Irish young be sold
and eaten. They would be as well off
as growing up in poverty under Brit-
ish policy.
Children sold as stock, cattle
carts turned into child carts? No, I
would never think of such an outra-
geous solution for our youth in �
America. Childhood has its good -
points when the parents are kind, lov- ;
ing and nurturing, and sometimes j
the kids become loving adults. We
live in a less than ideal world.
The future of America rests in '
our children's hands, and we need
to open our eyes wider to their needs
keeping their best interests in mind.
We could wake up one year and find
out the next generation of America
is gone. Ignoring the dilemmas fac-
ing the children of the next decade
in respect to drugs, sex, violence and
neglect could cost us the lives of our
precious young citizens. America's
children are dying both figuratively-
and literally.
� if yu wt
get th$ tfa
Jkttr. i l
ho rtyr�
$ 01)
If YOU tlANL A COMPLAINT OK. CMMC-NlT WR.ITE. A
LLTTtE. JO Tilt CDIT0B
All letters must be:
� typed
�� 250 words or less
�? include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publications bids.
(2nd floor) across from Joyner Library or mail them.
Editor, Student Pubs. bids
NC 87858-4353.
tfet us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
� Nelson Mandela, South African president, 1978
�n �
�� �" ' '�"





Tuesday, August 27, 1996
The East Carolinian
Scwtd eoceca
Attic show knocked down
frownin1 by Chapel Hill band
Critic finds good
crowd doesn't
equal good band
Derek T. Hall
Senior Writer
Last Friday night the Attic was
definitely turned on to a sound. The
only problem was that the sound
had been heard so many times be-
fore, so many times in my life, for
sure.
Knocked Down Smilin' started
off very well. Bandmembers Martin
Godwin (lead vocals and rhythm
guitarist), Mason Pitts (bass guitar).
Bogie Bowles (drums), and Sam
Sloyd (lead guitar) came out, at-
tacked the crowd, and let everyone
know that they were serious. It was
their self-titled CD release party. It
was their long awaited event. It was
their time to shine.
Well, for the most part, they
did shine. Knocked Down Smilin'
were one of the most intense bands
to step into the Attic within the last
year. I was into the groove for the
first couple of songs. That is, until
I had questions about the Godwin's
guitar playing. Basically. Godwin
was going through the motions, fill-
Photo Courtesy of Knocked Down Smilin'
Local N.C. band Knocked Down Smilin' took the audience by
storm at the Attic in downtown Greenville last Friday night.
ing in where he needed to, and lay-
ing it down when necessary.
As the night progressed on,
Knocked Down Smilin' played a
song that sounded a little familiar.
It sounded like the old Bob Dylan
tune "Knockin' On Heavens Door
I was stunned at first. Then I
thought that they were getting
ready to make a transition and
maybe slide into "Heaven's Door
but they didn't. They just kept com-
ing up with different lyrics and rip-
ping off one of the classics.
If that wasn't enough, Godwin
insisted on asking the crowd if they
had heard the tune before. A couple
of true souls stood up and shouted
out for Dylan, others stood back as
if they had never heard the song
before. Due to the overwhelming
amount of screaming and cheering
going on, the band was unable to
hear those few people who had no-
ticed the original they were steal-
ing from. Lucky for them. The band
See DOWN page 7
if
M
ovte fZevceo
The Fan provides minor league fare
@wtecUf, eviecv
Carrot Top cracks
up campus again
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
"Ladies and gentlemen, let's get
ready to rumble
The opening lines of the Carrot
Top show on Saturday night were
most appropriate. From the time he
bounded on stage to the time he
bounded off, I felt as if I were at a
three-ring circus - a high-tech, loud,
colorful, psychedelic, hazy, foggy, in-
sane circus.
When the lights went down and
the lasers came on, there was an erup-
tion of applause and shouts that her-
alded the beginning of the real show.
Carrot Top started the show just like
a native. "When are they gonna fin-
ish this place?" (out comes an orange
cone) "Here's a little piece of ECU for
ya
Then Carrot Top launched into
his diatribe on parking. "They ought
to make parking a class here. You can
have parking from eight to ten. There
is nowhere to park Believe me. guys,
Carrot Top does not jest. Parking at
this campus sucks. He was here for
one day and already knows it.
He also talked about driving
around campus (looking for a place
to park, of course) and trying to find
something good on the radio. Every
station he turned to was playing a
different Hootie and the Blowfish
song. "Enough Hootie he cried. This
was a continuing gag throughout the
show, and it never failed to get laughs
from the crowd.
The first few gags of the show
were very particular to ECU and the
Greenville area, like the graduation
cap from Farmville-1 John Deere base-
ball cap with a tassel attached.
And then there was the job ap-
plication to work at Hooters. It's a
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Robert De Niro portraying a psychopath is not
exactly the most original casting choice of recent
years. He's made a career for himself by playing men-
tally unstable characters in such films as Taxi Driver
and Cape Fear. Likewise, Wesley Snipes playing an
egotistical, self-assured sports figure is not unfajnil-
iar territory. He's shown his talent for such roles in
Major League and While Men Can't Jump.
Tony Scott's latest film. The Fan, places both De
Niro and Snipes back in roles with which they are
comfortable. Unfortunately, the combined talents of
these two notable actors isn't enough to make this
film a worthy addition to their resumes.
Admittedly. The Fan is effective on certain lev-
els, and the film's premise does carry much poten-
tial- Basically, the plot (written by Phoef Sutton) re-
volves around two characters, Gil Renard (De Niro)
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
The always amusingCarrotTop returned to Wright Auditorium
Saturday night to harass an audience member named Betty.
huge white card with two holes in the
center. "All you have to do is just fill
this out" he said. When the person
behind me actually got that joke (sev-
eral minutes later), I was still laugh-
ing.
A few of his newer jokes didn't
quite cut it, but Carrot Top is not too
high and mighty to laugh at himself.
"Boy, when you guys don't like some-
thing, you're all together. 'No, we
don't like that. Uh-uh. Nope. Not
gonna laugh at that
At one point in the show he got
serious for a minute, and told us how
tired he was. "I didn't get any sleep
last night he started, and the whole
audience let out an "Awwww" of sym-
pathy. Carrot Top started to giggle.
"My nipples got hard when the whole
audience did that he said. It turns
out that the hotel he stayed in the
night before was right next to a car
dealership. "At seven o'clock this
morning all I could hear was 'Bob.
please pick up line one. Bob, line
one
The most memorable moment of
See CARROT page 9
ewteco&
liM HETTY
HEMTBHAIK
mm i.
Cowboy Mouth
Are You With Me?
Tom Petty And The
Heartbreakers
She's The One
Derek T. Hail
Staff Writer
Photo Courtesy of TriStar Pictures
Psychopathic baseball nut Gil Renard (Robert De Niro) plays hardball with his hero Bobby
Rayburn (Wesley Snipes) in The Fan, a new psychological thrilier from director Tony Scott.
and Bobby Rayburn (Snipes). Renard is the epitome of
the American failure. He is a failed husband, a failed
father, and a failed businessman. The American dream
does not work for Renard. Rayburn, however, is the
American dream. He is a $40 million major league base-
ball player who uses his talents to their extremes.
Renard. who is an extremely obsessive baseball fan,
idolizes Rayburn and everything he represents. Unfor-
tunately, Renard. as it turns out, is a gun waiting to
go off. The more his life unravels, the more obsessed
he becomes with Rayburn. This obsession, of course,
eventually becomes deathly dangerous.
With all of the sports related films being released
these days, one focusing on the darker, more obses-
sive side of an American pastime would seem to be
promising, and The Fan does exhibit some very prom-
ising elements. The opening sequences, for example,
effectively establish the two main characters by juxta-
posing Renard's stressful and dreary nine-to-five life
with Rayburn's rock and roll superstar lifestyle.
Also. Renard's relationship with his son and his
obsession with baseball is handled in a disturbingly
honest manner. A scene in which Renard takes his son
to a major league baseball game unnerves through
subtlety and honesty, not through needless and graphic
See FAN page 8
Sad is what most will feel if
they decide to purchase this album.
Not only does it lack the momen-
tum to keep you listening all the
way through, the songs are too re-
petitive as well.
On the cover of this album
you'll find a picture of a jester.
Makes you wonder if the album is
a joke, doesn't it? Well, would you
believe that on the back cover is a
picture of the band laughing hys-
terically? They probably just fin-
ished listening to their album.
It starts off with an upbeat
tune called "Jenny Says The lyr-
ics include "Jenny says turn off the
radio Jenny says turn out the
light Jenny says turn off the video
You beat yourself up to bring
yourself down Let it go Wow, I
haven't seen lyrics like these since
Jim Morrison was writing. Psyche!
If you're going to make a good
melody, at least don't cut it in half
by adding cheesy lyrics. Who the
hell is Jenny? Is she his mom?
Maybe his daughter? Who cares. It
sounds like his life is being run by
See COWBOY page 8
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
Call it experimentation, call it go-
ing in a different direction, or call il
needing a vacation. Whatever you call
Tom Hetty's new album, the soundtrack
for the movie She's The One. call it dif-
ferent. Gone are the happy-go-lucky
songs like "The Waiting" and "You
Wreck Me Gone are the transcenden-
tal messages behind 'Even The Losers
"Here Comes My Girl and "I Won't
Back Down In their place are darker,
more mellow messages of bad love and
hard life. Maybe it's the type of music
needed for the movie, or maybe Petty
has changed his point of view.
The album starts off happily
enough with the first MTV single. "Walls
(Circus) This light-hearted love song
is typical Petty featuring an instrumen-
tal combination that creates the sensa-
tion of being at the circus. However,
radio stations have been playing a later
track called "Walls (No. 3)" which is a
more musically simplified version of the
song. Either way. it's still a good song.
The sadness starts with "Grew l'p
Fast" a mediocre song that starts to
See ONE page 9
Theft is nothing more use-
less than screaming at a wall.
It's just spittle and bricks, bricks
and spittle. However, if you put
enough voices together, that
wall might just be blown over.
So join in another futile at-
tempt to change the status quo
and listen to a "Scream at the
Watt
lay Myers
Lifestyle Editor
Man Jo 1 feel old now.
1 didn't until 1 read Mark
Brett's farewell "Drop in the
Bucket' column, where he came
to the realization that he was
"the old guy" at The East Caro-
linian. He talked about turning
�ing his master's thesis
: turning his "baby the
I ifestyle section, over to a chop-
buster.
Well, that chop-buster is me.
And truth be told. I'm older than
'the old guy a whole six
months older. Whereas most of
the staff here at TEC is below
drinking age. I had my first le-
gal alcoholic beverage in 1989.
when Rush was still in office
land that was a time when ev-
eryone needed a drink, so I guess
I was lucky).
Like Mark, the Zombie Lord.
I in working on my master's de-
gree and I teach freshman com-
position t'nhkt him, I'm married
(another indication of my ever-
increasing distance from youth).
Most of my freshmen students
this year were born in 1978. the
year after Star Wars came out. I
saw that film in the theater when
I was nine years old. Are you be-
See SCREAM page 7





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 27, 1996
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SCREAM from page 6
ginning to get the picture? In com-
parison to the rest of campus, I'm
an old fart.
But don't you dare call me that.
I refuse to be part of the establish-
ment. My grandad's an old fart, sure.
Even my dad might be. But not me!
I still go to shows at the Cat's
Cradle. 1 still listen to the cutting
edge of music. I still buy comic
books and toys for chrissakes! How
can I be old?
Who am I kidding? Mark's right,
age does creep up on you. And
mostly it does it through responsi-
bility. My theory is that the more
responsibilities you are given in life
the quicker you age. Well I've been
one hell of a responsible person in
the last six years or so and I guess
that's the reason for the gray in my
hair (yeah. I've got that too). But it
was forced onto me. I took on re-
sponsibilities because 1 needed to
make a living. If there was any other
choice, I would never have taken
that first job at the auto parts store.
Instead. I would have stayed a kid
forever.
But Peter Pan's just a fictional
character and we all have to grow
up sometime. 1 really don't hate the
choices I've made. I love my wife and
I wouldn't give her up for the world.
Being a teacher and a newspaper
editor ain't so shabby, either. Heck,
even being a graduate student has
its bright and shining moments.
I guess what I'm trying to say
is that enjoy your youth while you've
got it, because before you know it
someone will tell you you're an old
fart. You won't believe it at first, but
they'll be right. It's how you make
your peace with it that counts. Good
luck Mark, you old fart.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY
A T
W
NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
24-Hour Message Service �
752-7S
DOWN from page 6
continued feeding off the crowd's
energy and didn't miss a beat.
As Knocked Down Smilin'
crashed into the next song, the
band appeared to be totally confi-
dent. I couldn't understand why.
Their next groove appeared to be
"Soul Fish the group Everything's
most popular song. It really freaked
me out. It makes you wonder where
the band is coming from, especially
since they didn't mention where
they got the tune.
By now 1 was becoming skepti-
cal about the band. However, the
level of intensity was still amazing.
The light show and the way the
band presented itself were all good.
The house was packed, and every-
one seemed to be having a good
time. But even a juke box sounds
groovy with a couple of beers.
All in all, I would have to say
that it was a good show for the
Chapel Hill band. Knocked Down
Smilin' is very entertaining. They
hit their mark. They're doing very
well in the club scene and probably
will hit a major label in the future
(providing they don't notice that
the band is ripping off other art-
ists). It's amazing to see how the
same sound sells over and over
again. In an ironic sort of way, I
guess Dylan was wrong when he
said, "The times, they are a
changin
ALL HONOR STUDENTS
are invited to attend
ECHO Fall Cookout
on
August 29
at 4:30 p.m.
in the
COURTYARD OF FLEMING HALL
I
Check out our classifieds
every Wednesday during
the summer, and every
Tuesday and Thursday
during the fall and spring
semesters. Whether
you're looking to rent or
just a new roomate,
your always on target
with The East Carolinian!
Rush Pi Kappa Alpha
Here's what we did last
M
semester:
Athletics
Flag FootbalL 2nd Both A & B Sports
Basketball Semi-finals
Softball 1 st A Sports
Water Polo 1 st A Sports
Indoor Soccer A & B Finals
Community Service
1,980 Total Hours
$2,475.25 donated to
Ronald McDonald House
1 on campus!
RUSH
Utarmbba: !pljt
What will YOU do this
semester?
Call 752-4181 for Rides or Information
IIKA
OPEN RUSH!
August 27th - 29th
7:00pm
For more information and rides, call
355-4433 or 830-9565.
��" i i - � t��





8
Tuesday, August 27,1996
The East Carolinian
FAN
from page 6
violence.
Ironically, the film loses its
drive and edge when Renard
crosses the line and becomes a
killer. From a narrative perspective,
the film logically leads us to
Rayburn confronting a crazed
Renard, but by this point the film
loses its originality and De Niro
becomes a character we've seen
countless times before.
De Niro and Snipes are both
wonderful actors who always give
professional performances no mat-
ter what role they're playing. Stay-
ing true to their talents. De Niro
and Snipes do their part to make
their characters interesting and
real. However, their performances
are distracted by Tony Scott's MTV
directing style.
Scott can be a good director
when he doesn't let his flashy style
overpower a story's substance. He
wisely toned his act down for the
exciting film Crimson Tide, and he
used his quick-edit visuals to great
effect in the ultra-violent True Ro-
mance. However, his direction for
The Fan seems misguided. He fills
the screen with quick edits, glow-
ing visuals, and a constant
soundtrack (featuring music by
such acts as The Rolling Stones and
Nine Inch Nails) that would be more
appropriate for a film like Top Gun.
Scott, like Rayburn, is a rock
and roll kind of guy. Unfortunately.
The Fan is not a rock and roll kind
of movie. The film works best dur-
ing its subtle, more intimate mo-
ments and loses credibility when it
tries to speed things up. While
Scott's visuals are appealing to the
eye (the opening credit sequence is
quite interesting), his ability to
delve deeper into the substance
beneath the flashy surface seems
limited. The result: The Fan burns
out before it really gets going.
So, if you want to see De Niro
as a more complex psychopath, see
Taxi Driver. If you want to see
Snipes at his athletic best, see
White Men Can't Jump. And if you
want to see Scott at his flashy best,
see True Romance. If you want to
see a better baseball movie, you
have your pick of such films as Bull
Durham. The Natural, or Eight
Men Out at your local video store.
If you still want to see The Fan,
save yourself some cash and wait.
COWBOY from page
this Jenny girl. Hey buddy, stop
whining.
This character we are referring
to is one of the band's lead sing-
ers, Paul Sanchez, who also plays
rhythm and acoustic guitar on the
album. Other band members are
Fred LeBlanc (drums). John Tho-
mas Griffith (lead guitar), and Rob
Savoy (bass), all of whom also sing.
All of the songs are written by the
entire band. I guess they're all just
one big, happy singing and
songwriting family. How precious.
However, this smashing band
from New Orleans does have a song
that could put them on the charts,
a song called "So Sad About Me?"
It's the eighth track on the album,
and if you can manage to get that
far into the disc, you might enjoy
the tune. It's a song about finding
peace within yourself, something
that most people can relate to.
Here's a hint, guys. Maybe if you
wrote more about what you feel to
be true rather than whining all the
time, the words wouldn't seem so
far fetched or annoying.
If you want to be in a world of
your own. that's great. You can just
sit in your house complaining and
pouting all day. However, if you're
looking to make it big, you have to
connect with people, most of whom
don't care about your little prob-
lems (including me).
There's always a chance that a
curious listener might come to your
show, maybe even go the record
store and buy your album. If you
speak the truth to them, they might
stay and listen. However, if you
throw a fit, they will run away. Are
you with me?
Natural Life I �
;�A
Each American spends about $250.00 a year on
fast foods.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
�NATURAL"
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services KtSIT�
ATTIC
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Adv. Tlx location
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Tuesday
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Original 70's & 80's
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Lots of Prizes and Ticket �j:jJ�
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WITS END
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
ARE NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES AND
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
FOR THE 1996-1997 TERM
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Rill time Student
Resides off Campus
independent
Deadline to apply: FRIDAY. Sept. fi
plications am be picked up at the" Student
(Inion Office - Room 2Mi Mcnclenhall
I or More Information.
Contact Student Union 32K-47I
00M7
ti�
1 109 Charles Blvd.
Open 10am - Midnight Everyday!
Phone-758-4251
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ItMA
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to Mendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
MnIPS Video Games
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FOOD
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Free phones fipcpKc
ART Gallery �K"rVO j
Computer Lab
and more
ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN,
n! 084THE TRIBUTE IS ALMOST HERE
Tit l &LATLL6 .btk? 16 OPhJk; 10 WallT A! I IJM
PARLNlTi VCUdOlD. 6CPTCMeCR 27 AT 800PM
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MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER - Your Center of Activity"
HOURS Mo Huns 8a.m llp.mFri 8a.m12a.mSat.12p.m I2a.m Sun Ip.m I lpm





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 27, 1996
Tired of trying to find a parking space?
���
�. s. �-���
effl
V


O?
X
i"6
3
S
We may have your eolutlonl
The Technology Reinvestment Project offers courses which are
taught online. Using your own computer, or one on campus, you
can take courses through the Industrial Technology Department,
including the entire Masters degree! Call today for details or check
out our Web page! For more information,
or visit:
Call 328-6704
http:www.siteaa.edubphome.htm
Register by August 28th,
Ottts
Discount Art Supply
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August 29th
1:00-4:00 pm
Firetower Road-6 CO c o
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ores nyRose's Gym
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Dixon � Berol � Canson-Talens � 3M
Yarka � Bienfang � X-Acto � Demco
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VAJJiJJ from page 6
the show was the time Carrot Top spent
talking about Betty. 1 didn't know
Betty before the show, and I still don't
know her. but apparently Betty had to
leave for a few minutes in the middle.
Carrot Top took off running down the
aisle after her. bringing the whole au-
dience to their feet to watch. Poor
Betty. When she was gone, he had all
of the people she was with switch seats
so she wouldn't know where her seat
was. When she came back, Carrot Top
said, "Betty! Betty, are you in the right
theater?"
After the show, I got a chance to
talk with Carrot Top, and let me just
say, he's a really cool guy. He's not at
all stuck up. Here's a little highlight of
the mini press conference:
TEC: Is that your real hair color?
Carrot Top: Yeah, it's the real
color. Hell. I wouldn't do this to it
TEC: When does your movie come
out?
Carrot Top: April. It's called Chair-
man of the Board, and it's really cool.
There's this guy, and his car breaks
down, and I stop to help him. And then
he dies, and I inherit his company, and
I get to invent all of these really cool
things. So go see it like 12 times.
TEC: What's up with the Rolling
Stone article?
Carrot Top: That was really uncool.
This guy went on the road with us for
three days, and one night I met this
girl, right? And we sort of hung out
and the next day he's asking me, So
ONE
from page 6
does that happen all the time? Being a
comedian, I bet it's easy to get laid
All we did was hang out. I mean, look
at me! Do I look like I get laid every
night? He was just looking for an angle
to write the article on, but it wasn't
cool. So 1 wrote them a letter. But all
they said was. That's what our read-
ers want to hear But they didn't have
to put me in the middle of it They
didn't print the letter though.
TEC. When you make it big in
the movies, are you going to stop tour-
ing colleges?
Carrot Top: No! This is the best
part. When you're in the movies, you
can't get this kind of feedback It's like,
you do your scene, and youp like,
'Was that funny?' And they're like,
'Yes, it's funny But nobody laughed.
You're not allowed to laugh! You have
to be quiet. So I love doing the shows
live
TEG, What was your first gag?
Carrot Top: It was a little hat with
hair sticking up out of the top for my
Grandma to wear so people can see
her over the steering wheel.
TEC: What would you like to say
to everybody in Greenville?
Carrot Top: Just tell them that it
was a real pleasure to come back. I
love performing in Greenville. I appre-
ciate everybody coming out to the
show, and just tell them good luck
with everything
And that's it, straight from the
Carrot's mouth.
Good Neighbor service
makes State Farm unique
my policyholders swear by it
year after year. 99
Bill McDonald
2710 E. 10th St.
Phone � 752-6680
CALL ME.
Like a good neighbor. Stale Farm is there.�
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Hume Offices Rloomingttm. Illinois
rock a few times before mellowing bad
out into the same dullness it starts with
Overall, this is not a good second sonj
and it makes Petty one for two so far.
Then, like sunshine peeking
through a cloudy day. comes tin
rockabilly tune Zero Prom Oatei
Space Anybody who has the 'laytkich
box set or has seen Petty live knows
that he loves to do a little rockabilly
every now ai.J then. "Zero" is probably
one of the few times that this side ot
him has made it on an album, though
The next few songs range from slow
and mellow to mid-tempo and mellow
with the shared theme of being bogged
down in life and love. For example.
"Climb That Hill" is all about having to
overcome the challenges and pressuies
we each face day to day, while "Change
The Locks" is a declaration of indepen-
dence from a bad relationship. In fact.
bad relationships run rampant through-
out this album. As Petty sings in "Hope
You Never "1 hope you never fajl in
love with somebody like you This Sold
line sums up the tone of the whole CD.
The only happiness left on the Cl
is found in the songs "Angel Dream"
and "California "Angel Dream (No. 4)"
and "Angel Dream (No. 2)" are profes-
sions of love along the lines of "Alright
For Now" from his Full Moon Fever
album. Like "Walls they are the same
song, but "No. 2" lacks the percussion
of "No. 4 You can decide which you
like better. From its sound, "Califor-
nia" could be viewed as a holdover from
Wildflowers, but the song has a
shadow that clings to it. making it bet-
ter suited for this soundtrack than
Wildflowers.
Finally, under the "miscellaneous"
file, we have "Airport" and "Hope On
Board two instrumental. Hope On
Board" almost sounds like country
music, while "Airport" reeks of a
lounge music motif. Different doesn't
even begin to describe how "Airpoft"
stands out like a sore thumb.
So, what caused such a drastic-
change in sound? Let's face it, in the
past few years Petty and the Heart-
breakers have been working hard. Af-
ter Petty recorded his smash album
Wildflowers, he and the Heartbreak-
ers embarked on a marathon tour of
North America, put the finishing
touches on a six disc boxed set. ind
then went straight to work on this new
album with a tour already planned to
support it. That much work is enoygh
to get anybody down. Or maybe it fas
written in a way to support the movie,
and the band is just as happy as t&ey
have ever been. 1 guess we'll just hSve
to hear the next album to find outlor
sure.
RUSH
IN
Be a part of the
Legion of Honor
Sigma Nu Fraternity
501 E. 11th St.
(Located behind Miami Subs on 10th st.)
Phone : 830-5439
mmmmmmmmmmm
mmmmw
wiiHWii ii'wWMBW
�l " � ' �- - m-





10
Tuesday, August 27,1996
The East Carolinian
m
Help
wanted
Other
R1NGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TWO FOR RENT. ONE house and one town-
house. Three bedroom, large kitchens, central
air, on bus route. $650.00 each. Call 754-2708
Leave message. Pool, Dishwasher, etc
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 3 bed-
room duplex. $17750 per month. No rent fee
in August! Friendly neighborhood, 4 blocks
from campus. Call 758O607. Security deposit
$17750 needed. No lease requirement
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE house on
river 5 miles from campus. $651 a week.
�$100.00 deposit Possible trade work for rent
everything included except phone. Call 830-
1787.
IN SEARCH OF HONEST, easy going, female
�oommate(s) to apartment hunt ASAP! Non-
smokers preferred. Have all furnishings Call
Any at 407-1552
ROOMMATE NEEDED SERIOUS STUDENT
lor Professional to share contemporary apart-
ment Rent $270 plus utilities. 2 bedroom, 2
�bath. Call 353-1027
ROOMMATES WANTED. NICE HOUSE dose
o campus. Male or Female. Smokerspets wel-
come. AC. WD. Dep. $220, Rent $200-240.413-
�0957
3385A MONTH, 2 bedroom, 1 bath new brick
'duplex in Ayden, minutes from Greenville, Call
�)ay 321-6406 or Night 321-2329 or 756-2456.
.Ask for Ben or Ken.
JFM ROOMMATE NEEDED TO share 2 bed-
room. 1 bath apartment close to campus. Rent
4200 mo. - 12 bills. If interested call 758-3299
.ASA.P.
'WANT TO UVE OFF campus this year? I need
a roommate, male or female, smokers OK, to
; take over half of the lease. Call for info. Lori
;T52-0009
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE new
apartment near ECU. Walk-in closet and pri-
vate bath. Rent $240.00. Available now. Call
754-2050. Please leave message.
MALE OR FEMALE NEEDED to rent one
room in three bedroom house. Three blocks
from campus. $200 per month. Call Abby 830-
)jj42
115 E. 13TH ST. 5BD2 Bath, WD Hookup,
Stove. Frig. Central Heat Big Rooms, Lots of
Parking. Lawncare included. Pets OK! $750
month. 830-9502
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
ChA Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
ROOMMATE WANTED $250 PER month
"3534451 leave message
�RENT BEFORE AUGUST 31, get last 10 days
September free -1 2 bedroom's in Summer-
field. Brasswood, Riverbluff, and Williamsburg.
Call Potomac Properties 752-9722.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 3 BLOCKS from cam-
pus. $200 a month and 12 utilities. Own room
in 2 bedroom duplex. Serious student preferred.
Call Jamie at 758-5140.
WALK TO CLASS! AVOID parking hassles!
Available September 1st 4 Bedroom. 2 12
Bath, 1 block from campus. Safe off-street park-
ing, central air, WD hookup. No Pets. Non-
srooking females. After 5 75&-7515
1205 FORBES ST. 3BD 1 Bath. WD Hook-
up. Remodeled Kitchen & Bath, Centra! AC
& Heat Nice yard. Pets OK, Lawncare includ-
$500month 830-9502
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW Student Recrea-
tion Center. Rent $225 month at 810 Cotanche
Street Call 752-2615. Bill Williams Real Es-
tate beside Cubbies on Evans Street
105 E. 11TH ST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW, Cen-
tral AC & Heat Nice Private Back Yard. Lawn-
care included. Pets OK! $60Umonth. 830-9502
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOMMATE need-
ed ASAP! Great condo, 2 bdrm, 2 12 baths,
pool, cable included. Rent $250.00. Please call
Debbie at 758-0308
MALE OR FEMALE NEEDED to share rent
for 2bdrm townhouse in Village Green. Free
heat cable, WS, low utilities. Kind pref. Call
Jim 757-9625
Help
Wanted
arth Ff iendlqr
Seeking people with
environmental awareness
and a need for excellent
part time income potential.
Flexible hours, good
feeling. Call Ms. Collins:
321-6250
FREE T-SHIRT$1000. Credit Card fundrais-
ers for fraternities, sororities & groups. Any
campus organization can raise up to $1000 by
earning a whopping S5.00VISA application.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext 65. Qualified callers
receive FREE T-SHIRT.
4
Greek
Personals
For Sale
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR $50, Student
Desk $50, Girls 12 speed Bike $60, FulQueen
size Blonde Headboard with matching night-
stand $50. 13 inch color TV $65 Call 758-0101
FOR SALE: USED DORM refrigerator $45.00.
Used trombone $125.00. 756-7208
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE, 303 S.
Evans St (Mall) across from Courthouse. Tus-
Wed-Thurs. 10am-4pm 757-2740
TIOGA CLIPMAN MTB CLIPLESS pedals w
cleats Brand New for $95. Call Hal 756-3393
after 8:00
FOR SALE: QUEEN SIZE bed. $250.00. Call
Jason at 752-7107
MICHELIN ALL SEASON RADIAL tires (2),
P18575R14 approx. 8000 mi. Call 757-8704
CARS FOR SALE. WE can finance. Choose
from various styles, makes, such as 88 BMW,
89 Chevy Blazer, etc. -Cars-R-Us" 355-3620
TWIN BED FOR SALE. Mattress, boxspring
and frame. Almoit new. Must sell $75.00 or
Best Offer. Call Tricia 830-9431
0lr MOUNTAIN BIKE: $60.00. Brand
new Trek Sport 800 Mountain Bike: $250.00,
Brother Word Processor � Like new $95.00. Call
Marcia at 752-3074 after 5:30pm
MOUNTAIN BIKE 970 TREK. Great condi-
tion. $350.00 Firm. Call 522-7696. Ask for
Keith.
DRUM SET - six piece with many extras. Must
sell. Worth $1,000.00 or more. Asking $�50.00.
Call Kevin 752-1955 .
FOR SALE ACOUSTIC YAMAHA guitar.
Model FG-401 $300.00 Call Suzanne 328-8011
LEASE PARKING. FORBES STREET bhind
Hardee's on 10th and Cotanche. Paved lot light-
ed, numbered spaces, tovig enforced $288.00
year or $175.00 semeste-
M600 CANNONDALE GOOD CONDITION
$300, Harmon-KARDON Tape Deck $125 OBO
BSM Amp Equalizer $100 752-9850
If
Help
Wanted
WALE ROOMMATE NONSMOKER
DRlGF.iEE mature. 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex
-Heritage Village WD $250mo. References re-
.355-2944
RENT: SINGLE BEDROOM with full
Jafchen d livingroom newly painted, new car-
pet and vinyl throughout Great location next
-Jcimpus, 1 block from downtown. Need some-
Tgfct" take over lease until May 97 $325 month.
: eudes Cable, Water, Sewer. Call (School) 931-
56. (Home) (910) 475-3506 or call 355-8731.
sk about Sycamore Hill Apt 10
ljg3 FORBES ST. 1BD 1 Bath WD Hook"
Remodeled Kitchen & Bath. Big Rooms,
Yard, Pets OK, Lawncare included! $300
h 830-9502
PARKING TROUBLE? TWO SPACES avail-
able .1 mile from Brewster. $150 for whole year.
'TBS for Fail semester. Call 758-4000 ask for
Ptock or leave message
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPARTMENT of
Athletics, Office of Student Development is cur-
rently hiring full-time ECU students and gradu-
ate students to tutor student-athletes in all sub
ject areas. Minimum 25 GPA required. Call 328-
4550
OFFICE FURNITURE DELIVERY PERSON
needed IMMEDIATELY. Full and part time po-
sitions available. Mechanical abilities helpful.
Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now being
accepted for domestic & international staff!
Flight attendants, ticket agents, reservationists.
ground crew more Excellent travel benefits!
Call Airline Employment Services for details.
1-206-971-3690 ext L53622
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE -
Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching cer-
tificate or European languages required. Inex-
pensive Room & Boardother benefits. For
info, call (206) 971-3680 ext K53623
STUDENTS, LOOKING FOR A part time job?
RPS has package handler positions available
from 5pm-9pm. Tuition assistance available af-
ter 30 days. Fill out an application at 104 Unit-
ed Dr. - near the Creenville Aquatics and Fit-
ness Center.
SPRING BREAK '97 - Sell Trips, Earn Cash.
& Go Free. STS is hiring CAMPUS REPS
GROUP ORCANIZERS to promote trips to Can-
cun, Jamaica, and Florida. Call 80O6484849
for information on joining America's 1 Stud-
ent tour Operator.
PART TIME POSITION: FILE Clerk position
available in local Greenville office. Approximate-
ly 15-20 hours per week. Willing to work ar-
ound class schedule. Send resume to Adminis-
trative Manager. 1428-2. Aversboro Road, Gar-
ner, N�27529
BOWEN CLEANERS IS NOW accepting ap-
plications at its Bells Fork location for morn-
ing customer service representatives. Hours will
be 7:00am til 2:00pm or 8:00am til 5:00pm.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the Cruise
Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Seasonal & full-
time employment available. No exp necessary.
For info, call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53627
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - PLAZA MALL
NEEDS cashier Tuesdays, Thursdays, 114 and
some night hours (15-20 hoursweek). No
phone calls please, apply in person 11-9.
EARN MONEY READING BOOKS. Begin
now, for free info call 202-2984)683.
FALL SOCCER COACHES: THE Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer coach-
es for the fall girls and boys soccer programs.
Applicants must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-16, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00pm until 7:00pm
with some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from September to mid-No-
vember. Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben James at
8304567 or Michael Daly at 8304550
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: FREE
room. In exchange for help every other wee-
kend with mentally handicapped daughter. Pre-
fer student whose major is in related field. Call
756-9890 after 6pm
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER WANTED TO
keep two young children in my home on Mon-
days, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 12-5. Own
transportation required. Non-smoker. Call 756-
0941
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS, full or part-time available. Top pay
with benefits package. Call today 355-0210
earn cash weekly For local civic organization,
must have good phone voice, earn up to $14.50
per hour evening hours 5:45- 9:00 PM MF.
Call John 10:00 am � 5:00 PM. 752-3014.
MISS YOUR HORSE? ROCK Springs Eques-
trian Center needs part-time help with getting
horses and riders ready for lessons. Experience
with HunterJumpers necessary. Beginner In-
structor also needed. Contact Tina at 830-8849
A NEW START. DEGREE not required. Crow-
mg telecommunications company needs enthu-
siastic, aggressive self motivators. Personal free-
dom and a chance to motivate others come with
job. Flexible hours, part or full time. Make mon-
ey without losing your personal freedom. Call
now 752-8090. Independent rep. Excel Telecom-
munications
AFTERSCHOOL SITTER NEEDED FOR two
eleven year-old girls (sixth graders at St Pet-
er's Catholic School). They are good, motivat-
ed students and well-mannered, independent
children. 2:45-5:15pm Mon-Fri (but there is
flexibility when it is needed by you). Very little
driving involved, but must have your own car
for school pick-up and when needed. Good Pay
and Comfortable Home Situation. Experience
in childcare preferred and references required.
Please call 757-1378 (there is an answer ma-
chine if you need to leave a message with your
name and number and best time to contact).
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT - Earn up
to $25-$45hour teaching basic conversation-
al English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea. No
teaching background or Asian languages re-
quired. For info call: (206) 971-3570 ext J53626
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-level
& career positions available worldwide (Hawaii,
Mexico, Caribbean, etc Waitstaff. housekeep-
ers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness counselors, and
more. Call Resort Employment Services 1-206-
971-3600 ext R53624.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
LOOKING for self motivated individuals wish-
ing to gain valuable work experience with a
rapidly growing company. Ideal applicant would
be energetic, efficient willing to learn, and have
excellent communication skills. We are current-
ly taking applications for part-time telephone
collectors willing to work any hours from 8am
until 9pm Monday thru Friday and Saturday
morning from 8am until 12 pm. If interested
please contact Brian Franey at 757-2127
STUDENTS: LOOKING TOR PART-time work
with flexible hours? ECU is looking for a few
good Pirates to contact alumni for the Annual
Fund Program. $5.00 per hour. Contort the
Telefund Office at 3284215
KIND PATIENT AND LOVING sitter wanted
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday to care for
two boys, ages 2 years and 4 years. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children. Please
rM vrm
LAW OFFICE ASSISTANTS. MORNING po-
sition and afternoon position. Answer tele-
phone, photocopy, filing, light typing. No smok-
ing. Starting salary negotiable depending on
experience. Room for growth and salary in-
crease. Downtown, location. FAX resume to
919752-1016.
-MOTHERS HELPER" STAY AT HOME
MOM needs help with care of young children
and light housekeeping (laundry, dishes, toys,
etc) Part-time or Full-time hours, flexible but
steady once set Must be organized and love
kids! Please call 321-6931 .
WANTED: PART-TIME WAREHOUSE and de-
livery. License required. Apply in person at Lar-
ry's Carpetland. 3010 E. 10th Street Green-
ville, NC
brody's welcomes you back to school!
As eastern North Carolina's leading fashion re-
tailer for women and men, Brody's offers all
students the opportunity for 10-29 hours per
week, flexible scheduling around class sched-
ule, and a clothing discount to start off your
year with a great fall wardrobe! Applications
for sales positions are accepted Tuesdays, lpm-
5pm, Brody's. The Plaza or Carolina East Mall.
MAP SALES: PART TIME work including Sat-
urdays with The Map Store. Knowledge of
mapsgeography helpful. See Joe or Stacy, 563
S. Evans Street @ Reade Circle. 757-2511.
HOPE ALL FRATERNITIES HAVE a great
rush this year. Go GREEK! Love, the sisters of
Alpha Delta Pi.
THE SISTERS OF PI DELTA would like to
wish all the national Fraternities and Sorori-
ties good luck with Fall Rush. GO GREEK!
THE SISTERS OF PI DELTA want to welcome
everyone back to ECU! Good luck with your
classes and we look forward to seeing you ar-
ound campus!
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI would like to
welcome back all students. GO GREEK!
DELTA SIGMA PHI WOULD like to congratu-
late Eddie Ledford, Dave Owens, and Tim Ri-
ley on becoming our newest Brothers. Good
job guys! From the Brothers.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI would like to
thank the brothers of SAE, Theta Chi, Pi Kap-
pa Phi and TKE for all their help during Rush.
"It's not every young gentleman who gets the
opportunity to come through these marvelous
portals You made wonderful rushees. Love.
the sisters of Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS AMY VOLATILE ON
your engagement nice rock! Lucinda Autry
on your little surprise Cherie Lamb on your
wedding and Finally your wedding night! Love.
your Delta Zeta Sisters
ATTENTION: 5TH STREET HAS now opened
if s newest and hottest attraction: the new Del-
ta Zeta house! Bring a camera to check out
tnis time or history in tne mamng:
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank Panhel-
lenic for a great rush and congratulate every-
one on their new sisters.
ALPHA DELTA PI WANTS to congratulate
all new sorority members. Good luck for a great
new year:
Announcements
m
Services
Offered
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
public and private sector grants & scholarships
is now available. All Students are eligible re-
gardless of grades, income, or parent's income.
Let us help. Call Student Financial Services 1-
800-263495 ext F53628
LESSONS: ENGLISH RIDING LESSONS
available at Rock Springs Equestrian Center.
Board your horse with us or use our schooling
horses. 830-8849
ZAP YOUR FAT! EXPERIENCE more ener-
gy, lose weight and inches. All natural. Doctor
recommended. 30 dayBack Guarantee. Call
7584)997.
Do you like to hear good music at Parties? Then
call DJ Dave to book your next party at 758-
5711. DJ Dave is a professional DJ with top of
the line equipment If you want a wide variety
of music at you next party, then DJ Dave is
your man. Call DJ Dave for more info, at 758-
5711
NEED MONEY? WANT TO know how to make
money everytime someone else uses their
phone? Call Kevin 752-1955.
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF The Wall with Bub-
ba Rocks DJ Services. CountryRockTop 40
Dance. S200 for 3 hours of Pure Jammin! Call
321-1144
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door &. ring buzzer
em
College Agent Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY, will be conducting a Soccer Coach-
es Training School on Sat, September 21st
from 9am-4pm for all individuals interested in
volunteering to coach soccer. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball skills, team basketball, swim-
ming, rollerskating, and bowling. No experience
necessary. For more information please con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 8304551 or Dean Foy at
8304541.
WANT TO LEARN HOW to officiate volley-
ball and make money? Come to the Volleyball
Official's Meeting on September 3 at 9:00 p.m.
in Brewster C-103. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328-6387.
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CEN-
TER welcomes all students to ECU and wishes
to announce its 9th annual open house and
pig pickin' on Wednesday, August 28,4 - 7 p.m.
at the Newman center. 953 E. Tenth Street (2
houses from the Fletcher Music building at the
east end of campus). There will be fun,
food,friends and fellowship! For more informa-
tion, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
FIRST EXPERIENCES ARE ALWAYS the
most exciting! Recreational Services Adventure
Program is offering an adventure trip, First Year
Experience, at Ocracoke Island on September
7-8. Interested freshmen must register by Au-
gust 27 in the office of Orientation. For more
information call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
INTERESTED IN BEING ON a volleyball
team? Intramural Sports is having a volleyball
registration meeting on September 3 at 5:00
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center 244. Come
out and join a team! For more information call
Recreational Services at 328-6387.
FREE FOOD, AEROBICS, AND prizes! Re-
creational Services is offering "Energy Explo-
sion" on August 27 at 4 p.m. in the Christen-
bury Gym. Come out and participate in the fun.
For more information call Recreational Servic-
es at 328387.
THE ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB will be hav-
ing it's first meeting on Thursday, August 29
at 5:00pm in the General Classroom Building
room 1026. We would like to invite all return-
ing members and anybody interested in invest-
ing, especially business majors.
REGISTRATIONORIENTATION � CAREER
SERVICES: Students who will graduate in De-
cember, 1996 or May, 1997 are encouraged to
attend a Career Services presentation to learn
about the programs and services available to
help you in the job search. Dr. Jim Westmore-
land, Director, and Margie Swartout, Assistant
Director, will explain procedures for establish-
ing a credentials file, participating in campus
interviews and registering with the Career Serv-
ices office. The meetings will be held in Men-
denhall Student Center, Room 221 on Tue. Aug.
27, Wed. Aug 28 and Thur. Aug. 29 at 4:00pm.
WANT TO RIDE A horse on the beach? The
most popular adventure trip is back! On Sep-
tember 8 the adventure program will be horse-
back riding once again on the beaches of Ce-
dar Island. Interested individuals should reg-
ister in 204 Christenbury by August 30. For
more information call Recreational Services at
328-6387.
LEARN TO READ WITH the help of a volun-
teer tutor. This is a free and confidential serv-
ice. Call Literacy Volunteers at 752-0439.
Announcements
THE ECU STUDENT UNION is now accept-
ing applications for the position of Chairper-
son of the Popular Entertainment Committee.
The Popular Entertainment Committee spon-
sors concerts, performers, and other entertain-
ers at ail levels. Applicants should have much
free time and plenty of energy to devote to this
position. They should aiso have a broad knowl-
edge and appreciation of a wide variety of en-
tertainers. Organization skills are a must as
well. Applications may be picked up in the Stud-
ent Union office. Monday through Friday.
8:00am - 5:00pm. For more information, please
call 328-4715. or stop by our office. Deadline
for applications is Friday. August 30th.
WANT TO BECOME A Monica Seles or
Michael Chang? The Lifestyle Enhancement pro-
gram will be offering tennis lessons this semes-
ter. Interested individuals should register in 204
Christenbury August 26-September 6 from 9am-
5pm. For more information call Recreational
Services at 328387
ATTENTION ALL ADULT STUDENTS. The
Adult Student Services Office is looking for peo-
ple to serve as Mentors for incoming adult stud-
ents. If you have completed one semester or
more here at ECU and would like to pass along
your knowledge of campus life to another, we
need you! Please contact Wilda Hart at UCWL-
HART@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU or Dr. Lucy
Wright in the Office of Special Populations in
211 Whichard Bldg 328882. Training ses-
sions for new mentors the Fall semester will
be held the beginning of September.
START YOUR SCHOOL YEAR on the right
foot and register for the first aerobic session of
the year. Interested individuals should register
in 204 Christenbury between August 21-31
from 9am-5pm. For more information call Re-
creational Services at 328-6387
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC has openings in its
choral ensemble for male singers with prior
choral experience. Three chorus classes are
available for participation by all East Carolina
University Students. Chamber Singers and Con-
cert choir are auditioned groups. Both chorus-
es meet at 1:00 Monday through Thursday. For
information about auditions, please contact Dr.
Rhonda Fleming (3286243) or Dr. Brett Wat-
son (3284280). University Chorale is not audi-
tioned and meets at 12:00 Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday. For information about partici-
pating in University Chorale, please contact Dr.
Janna Brendell (328-1252). Interested students
may also audition for the Greenville Choral So-
ciety. This group is an adult community-based
ensemble that meets on Tuesday evenings from
730-9:30pm. Contact Dr. Rhonda Fleming (328-
6243) for more information.
GET READY TO HIKE the football for this
year's Flag Footbal Register your team dur-
ing the Flag Footbal! Preview Registration
Meeting on August 27 at 5pm in Mendenhall
244. For more information call Recreational
Services at 328387
THE SOCIETY FOR THE Advancement of
Management (SAM) is starting back up this
Tuesday at 3:30p.m. in room GC1012. We will
be continuing the tradition of excellence that
the ECU chapter has shown in the past Many
prominent speakers are lined up to talk to the
club, including Mr Tom Smith. CEO of Food
Lion Inc. Last year at the International Man-
agement Conference in Texas, our team placed
third in the group competition. This year we
have more of the same events scheduled, and
all of the meetings are open to anyone that is
interested. At the end of the meeting, on Tues-
day, food and refreshments will be served.
Golden Corral is now accepting applications
for all positions.
Benefits include
� Education Fund
� Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
�Insurance available
Apply within
M-F between 2-4 p.m.
IMP
crirs HRS! L- � A PIPARTY SOURCE,
CALt 758-4644 FOB BOOKING
INTERESTED IN TAKING AN aerobic class?
Recreational Services will be offering Drop-in
Aerobics August 21-33 at 3pm, 4:15pm and
5:30pm in Christenbury 108 and Carrett Stop
by 204 Christenbury to get a pass today! For
more information call Recreational Services at
328387
FREE ADVENTURE! LEARN MORE about
the great outdoors with Outdoor Living Skills
Workshop. On September 3, Recreational Serv-
ices Adventure Program is Exploring Eastern
North Carolina. The registration deadline is Au-
gust 30. For more information call Recreation-
al Services at 328387.
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY: 1ST meeting
of the year is Aug. 29th, Thursday in Brewster
305C. We will be discussing issues for the se-
mester and fundraisers. All are welcome to join!
THE VOLUNTEER GUARDIAN AD Litem
Program is looking for advocates for abused,
neglected and dependent children. Volunteers
are trained, then appointed with an attorney
to represent the child s best interest in juvenile
court hearings. The program works with other
agencies in locating and developing resources
that would benefit the child and their family.
Volunteers can assist by speaking out for Child-
ren's rights to grow up in a safe and caring
environment For more information, contact
Catherine Darby. Guardian ad Litem District
Administrator. PO Box 1391, Greenville, NC
27835 or call (919) 830217. Training classes
for new volunteers will begin September 26.
THE OFFICE OF SPECIAL populations in
211 Whichard Building is looking for some spe-
cial people to help other special people. Incom-
ing Adult Students are in need of Mentors to
help them get acclimated to ECU campus life
and help them get used to how things operate
on campus. If you have the special gift of mak-
ing people feel at ease and have at least two
hours week to give a new adult student we
need your time and special talents. Please con-
tact our office at 328881 or e-mail Wilda Hart
a UGWLHART to get more information or to
volunteer.
TOURS OF THE JOYNER Library Addition:
ECU students, faculty, and staff are invited to
tour the new Joyner Library addition. Tours
will be offered Mondays through Thursdays at
10am and 3pm. Those interested should meet
in the old lobby at the tour sign near the infor-
mation desk. These tours, approximately half
an hour in length, will be offered from the first
week of classes until fall break.
COMMUTER STUDENTS - If you are commut-
ing to ECU this Fall and would like to share
the driving with another student or if you need
a ride or riders check out the Commuter Ride
Rider Board temporarily in the Croatan. to be
permanently located in The Wright Place as
soon as it reopens.
THE ECU GOSPEL CHOIR will have rehears-
als on every Thursday at five o'clock pm in
Room 105 A. J. Fletcher Music Bldg. There are
no auditions. Dues are $12.00 per semester.
The first rehearsal will be on August 29. 1996
at 5:00pm. Any questions call 752-0275 or 758-
8135
GRAB A PADDLE AND come to this years
day long Canoe Trip to Merchant's Mill Pond
on September 7. Interested individuals should
register in 204 Christenbury by August 30. For
more information call Recreational Services at
328387
"KMIP" .J'PPH
a���S





11
Tuesday, Ausust 27, 1996
The East Carolinian
Race schedule for the East Carolina Car .
September 6 October 5 October 19 November 3Autolite Platinum 250 All Pro Bumper to Bumper 300Richmond, Va. Charlotte, N.C. i
AC-Delco 200 Jiffy Lube Miami 300Rockingham, N.G Homestead, Fla. 1
1 i See story below for more information
Fans, start yoiir engines
Photo Courtesy of Bryan Clodfelter
Pictured are the members of the race team with the East Carolina Car. The car will be back at ECU on Sept. 7 by the Pirate
Club Building. (L-R) Darrel Sckeen, Chris Beeson, Bryan Clodfelter, Michael Ritch, Christian Lovendall and John Ritch.
Sean R. O'Brien
Staff Writer
Pirate football will not be the only
event gaining national coverage on
television this fall for ECU, so buckle
up and get set to enter the world of
NASCAR.
Thanks to Lee Workman, AssL
Athletic Director, and along with uni-
versity officials, ECU will be sponsor-
ing a Busch Grandnational race team
in the Autolite Platinum 250 at Rich-
mond International Speedway Sep-
tember 6.
Students were able to take an up-
close look at the purple and gold
Busch car in front of the student store
Wednesday and Thursday. For those
who did not get a chance to see the
car last week, there will be another
opportunity beside the Pirate Club
building on September 7 before the
kick-off of ECU's home opener against
East Tennessee State. Driver Michael
Ritch will be on hand to answer ques-
tions about the team and to sign au-
tographs.
Many may be asking how in the
name of cutbacks can ECU afford to
spend valuable dollars on a NASCAR
sponsorship. Not to fret Pirate faith-
fuls, this is just what makes the deal
so beautiful according to team man-
ager Bryan Clodfelter, a '91 ECU
graduate.
"ECU does not handover one
nickel to the race team Clodfelter
said. "The way the deal works is that
ECU and Collegiate Licensing Com-
pany allow the race team to use the
ECU name and logo on the car
The race team then has the right
to use the logo on memorabilia on
things such as hats, T-shirts and die-
cast cars. A royalty is paid to the uni-
versity out of all sales of the team's
merchandise, the team is then allowed
to keep all remaining earnings to help
support the team financially.
The school is not only gaining
money from the sale of the team's
merchandise, but is also gaining valu-
able air time on nationally televised
races.
"Every 30 seconds the logo is in
view equals into approximately
$10,000 in air time Clodfelter said.
"Six to nine million people tune into
a nationally televised race each week,
making NASCAR the largest specta-
tor sport in the country
The race team, which is based
out of High Point. N.C is fairly new
to the Busch Grandnational Circuit,
with appearances in only two other
races in Atlanta and Rockingham.
The team is anything but new to the
world of racing however.
Ritch. 23 of High Point, has been
racing since the age of eight where
he got his start in go-cart racing. He
then moved on to be crowned Na-
tional Cart Champion before testing
his skills in stock car racing. At 19,
Ritch won the Mid-Atlantic Region
championship in the NASCAR Series
Championship.
When Ritch got the nod to drive
on the Busch Grandnational Circuit
he added even more experience to
the team with the addition of crew
chief Christian Lovendall. Lover ;all.
24 of High Point, came to the Pirate
race team, owned by John Ritch,
Michel's father, he brought with him
four years of experience as assisstant
crew chief on Mark Martin's Busch
team.
Depending on the success at
Richmond, the team is scheduled to
run three more nationality televised
races.
NuGrape, Dick Mooney Inc. of
Benton Arkansas and O & W Rent-
als of Greenville are all associate
sponsors for the Pirate Racing Team
and help support the team financially
throughout the year.
"I'd like to especially thank Lee
Workman of the athletic department
for putting this deal together along
with Jeff Charles, and all the students
teachers and employees of ECU for
all their enthusiasm and support
Clodfelter said.
It has been said that NASCAR
fans are the most loyal fans in all of
sports, they can say that with a little
more certainty now with the Pirates
now in that following.
Runners strive for top finishes during season
Team building a
strong program
for the future
Dill Diliard
Senior Writer
rTOP 5 CROSS COUNTRY
Lady Pirates
Suzanne Bellamy,
sophomore
As the summer ends, another
cross country season begins. Tra-
ditionally not known for a strong
distance team, the Pirates, led by
men's Head Coach Mike Ford and
women's Head Coach Charles
"Choo" Justice, are slowly but
surely making a name for them-
selves.
Last season Justice's women's
team finished fourth in a highly
competitive CAA conference.
We ran well early in the sea-
son and peaked too early, which in
a way pleases me Justice said. "De-
spite the down swing, we still fin-
ished fourth
The Lady Pirates will return
their top five runners from last sea-
son led by sophomore sensation
Suzanne Bellamy. Snagging
Rookie-of-the-Year honors in both
CAA track and cross country,
Bellamy will come into the '96 sea-
Tara Rhodes, senior
Dava Rhodes, senior
Karen Rienhard, junior
Kerri Hartling,
sophomore
son as the top runner for the purple
and gold.
"We're pleased with Suzanne
Justice said. "Last season she just
got better and better as the season
went on, and we expect more of the
same this season
One of the keys to the cross
country team's success is the abil-
ity of the top five runners to run
effectively as a team.
"Early in the season we ran
well as a pack, but with some bad
timing and the im-
provement of Bellamy,
the pack broke up to-
wards the end of the
season Justice said.
In the scoring of
cross country meets,
the wins and losses are
determined by the
middle runners. This
season the Lady
Pirate's team glue will
include the outstand-
ing running of Tara
and Dava Rhodes, who
will be hungry for a
better senior season af-
ter a disappointing jun-
ior campaign.
"Tara and Dava
were running well un-
til they had a bout with mono
which really hindered them from
performing to their abilities Jus-
tice added.
The top five will also be held
together by Karen Rienhard and
Kerri Hartling who have often been
described as steady dependable
runners.
"The performance of the team
will greatly depend on their finish
Justice ended.
In the past two years the Lady
J
Men's soccer to 1
kick up victories
Strong recruiting
class provides
depth
Jon Lauterer
Staff Writer
It's the start of a new season
for men's soccer and Head Coach
Will Wiberg is counting on taking
his team to the top.
The booting Pirates held their
first scrimmage on Friday and
Wiberg got the chance to see how
his players will compete in the Co-
lonial Athletic Association (CAA)
during '96.
Wiberg was quick to point out
the new roster is flooding with new
players and an abundance of fresh-
man. But Wiberg was even quicker
to point out the fact that this team
will have no trouble facing up to
any team in the CAA.
The mass influx of freshman
newcomers is the result of a new
born, wide spread recruiting drive,
launched by the ECU Sports De-
partment
"There was not much effort put
into recruiting last year Wiberg
said. "Another setback was the fact
that I wasn't hired until a few days
before last year's pre-season
This year he has been given the
opportunity to do it his way.
"This is the first year we have
brought the players in, a week be-
fore classes for training Wiberg
said. "Most days we had three field
sessions and one 45 minute weight
room session
By the time most of us were
getting up, these players had al-
ready gone through numerous train-
ing exercises. From 6-8 a.m 11 a.n
to 12 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. This may
sound like boot camp, but this is
what it takes to put together a win I
ning team for Wiberg.
Judging from the Friday scrim
mage, strong defense, running and j
passing are strong points for this a
year's team. The emphasis is on
teamwork and effective communica- -
tion on the field.
"This team has really come to-
gether in the pre-season, and seem
to be playing for each other Wiberg'
said. j- jj
Endurance is another impres-
sive factor which this team pos-
sesses. After the full regulation time
had expired, the guys where stilf
sprinting in the Greenville heat, in-
tent on showing the coach what
they've got ?
Players to watch this year will
be the six upperclassmen: Jay Davis, ;
Kevin Johnson, Darrec Jones, Chris -
Padgett, Jon Smiley and Kevin
Smith.
Wiberg is very confident in
Padgetts' playing ability and sees.
the team captain having a success-
ful season, jjjjj
"Padgett is as good as any
player in the conference Wiberfc
said. "If he is not voted as one of;
the best top 11 players, it would be
a great injustice
The men's soccer team has a i
challenging home opener with Vir-
ginia Tech September 1. They will'
be playing on the newly developed
Bunting Field (inside the track), kw
cated directly across from the old
practice field behind Scales Field
House. ��
The game begins at 3 p.m. and
admission is free to all students.
Let's fill the stands and cheer the
Pirates onto victory.
Spirits fly high over
Pirate Country
Pirates have become a solid con-
tender in the CAA with a steady
group of five that could lead them
above and beyond expectations.
The men's team will be a much
improved squad from last year's
sixth place finish in the CAA's. Ford
will return eight runners along with
a strong freshman class.
"We're going to be young
again Ford said. "We return eight
runners and very few upperclass-
men, so the future looks bright
Leaders for the Pirates will be
veterans Mike Marini and Larry
Lewis, from a leadership stand-
point, but as far as times go it'll be
the youngsters taking center stage.
"As a program, we're getting
stronger and stronger and now our
younger guys are starting to push
our more experienced guys Ford
said.
Two of those younger guys
would be Jeremy Coleman and
Jamie Mance who both turned in
outstanding years for the Bucs.
Along with those two new main-
stays will be a strong recruiting
class that will include immediate
contributors.
"We've got two guys that stand
See RUN page 13
Photo by PATRICK IRLEAfl
Flags like this one, by the Rec Center, show Greenville's
support of ECU.
David Councilman
Staff Writer
1
f
With all the hype of the upcoming football season and the great
expectations that the football team holds, it is a wonder anyone ha
bothered to take a look at the surroundings here in Greenville. j
There might be one addition that everyone has overlooked, arm
that is the new ECU flags that are flying around town. The flags
will replace the old ones that were purchased by the Athletic Com-
mittee five years ago and have been flying ever since. The new, more
colorful ECU flags were installed Thursday by Greenville Utilities,
and they will continue to fly during the football season. The new
flags all coincide with the celebration of ECU football.
These flags were put up to help spread the spirit of ECU. Local
businesses, private citizens, the ECU Athletic Department and funds
raised by the Chamber of Commerce Athletic Committee, provided
See FLAGS page 13






12
Tuesday, August 27, 1996
The East Carolinian
IRec Sewtceb
Programs offer variety for all
Various activities
aenerate
excitement
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
Ready for an exciting year? Rec
Services offers countless activities for
everyone.
There are may exciting activities
happening this fall: from the climbing
tower, to watching a movie to the new
Student Recreational Center opening
- it's all happening this year.
Rec Services once again had im-
proved their programs to help make
the students, faculty and staffs leisure
time more enjoyable and convenient
The Lifestyle Enhancement Pro-
gram is a great way to help maintain a
healthy, well-rounded lifestyle. Count-
ing fat grams and calories can get a
little boring. But with the Lifestyle
Enhancement Program you can make
living well more lively.
Learn how to play tennis with our
beginning tennis lessons, choose frcm
a wide selection of aerobic classes, or
learn about nutrients, making healthy
choices and proper exercise techniques
with "Burgers, Buns and Thighs
Maintaining a healthy lifestyle also
includes your safety. Rec Services can
teach you the basic skills of safety with
Personal SafetySelf Defense class.
If you had too much fun this sum-
mer and need to drop a few pounds,
the Fitness Assessment Program and
Fitness Instruction and Training (FIT)
Program are great places to start
The Fitness Assessment Program
offers an opportunity to help set your
goals to improve. The FIT offers one-
on-one instruction to help you reach
your goals with the facilities on cam-
pus. The Lifestyle Enhancement Pro-
gram also offers Aerobic Instructor
Training for those interested in be-
coming certified
at the national
level.
For indi-
viduals inter-
ested in the out-
doors, whether
it's for a leisurely
trip or a rugged
hike, the Adven-
ture Program is
the place that
provides you
with those activi-
ties.
The Adven-
ture Program of-
fers weekend
get-a-ways or
daily trips.
Choose from canoeing the Tar River,
kayaking, hiking or white water raft-
ing.
For a natural high, the Climbing
Tower is great for beginners or ad-
vanced climbers. Gear up and leam
the basics of climbing with the Climb-
ing Skills Workshop.
If your new to the outdoors, Out-
door Living Skills is the perfect oppor-
tunity learn more about the outdoors.
Water is also a great place to explore.
The Adventure
Program offers
weekend get-a-
ways or daily
trips. Choose
from canoeing the
Tar River,
kayaking, hiking
or white water
rafting.
Why You Shouldn't Mutilate
Materials in the Library
� Mutilation is a
misdemeanor
� Takes away from other
students' rights to learn
� Many materials are
irreplaceable
Alternatives to
Mutilation:
� You could ask the
librarian if you could
possibly check out
materials
� Ask the librarian about
other sources
� You can copy materials
that you need instead of
taking them
The Library is Looking in to Providing
Color Copiers for Student Use.
Try tht Scuba Workshops and dive into
the underwater world in a safe and
serene environment
Going on Adventure Trips are al-
ways full of new experiences that don't
want to be missed. If your schedule con-
flicts with any of the trips, put together
your own with the Adventure Rental
Center (ARC).
The ARC rents a wide selection
from individual ca-
noes, tents, tarps,
sleeping bags, to
backpacks, cook
sets and a camping
combo. The camp-
ing combo is a
camping package
already put together
with the proper
equipment for a
camping trip. The
ARC is located in
the basement of
Christenbury.
If you like com-
petition. Rec Ser-
vices offers a variety
of Club Sports. The
ECU Sports Club
Program is composed of regional, state,
and national champions. Some of our
most popular sports are disc golf, men's
and women's rugby, lacrosse, volleyball,
several martial arts and many more. If
Rec Services does not offer a particu-
lar club, we will help you start your
own.
Sports may be in your interests
but serious competition is out then
check out Rec Services Intramural
Sports Program. Intramural Sports
offer NFLECU Pick'em, flag football,
volleyball, soccer, basketball, bowling
and many more. Become a captain and
lead your team to becoming winners.
Another one of the great things
about Rec Services is that they work
to meet everyone's needs on the ECU
campus. The ARISE Program. Adapted
See REC page 13
ECU
HILLEL
Lets gather and meet our
fellow Jewish classmates.
Organizationalsocial
meeting to eat pizza
and plan for the
upcoming holidays.
Mendenhall 212 - 6:00pm
Debbie s 752-
8607 for more
- into
Are you interested in working for one off the best
student magazines published in the East? Then,
expressions
wants you.
We are looking for talented and ambitious
individuals for the following positions:
Managing Editor
Advertising Director
Advertising Representative
Staff Writer
If you are interested in gaining valuable work experience on
this nationally-recognized publication, go by the Media Board
office on the second floor of the Student Publications building
(across from the library) and fill out an application.
The only place for scrumptous quality
authentic Greek food, speciality Pizza,
Sandwiches, and the best Subs in this part
of the World!
We introduce others copy.
706 S. Evans St (919) 752-3753;
752-0326
FAX 758-8811
We Deliver
Try our new outstanding Eggplant entrees
to increase variety in vegetarian items.
Open Sundays; 4pm-9pm
Mondays & Tuesdays; 1 am-9pm
Wednesday Saturday; Ilam-lOpm
11vshmen Receive 10 Discount vilh Valid ID
(Offer not valid foi specials or deliveries)
not banking.
If you've got better things to do at night than wrestle
with your checking account, the College Account
from Wachovia is for you. We make it easy, with
free checking and a Banking Card
with Visa Check, for free transactions
at any Wachovia ATM. Your card is also
accepted anywhere they take
Visa�-so you can pay for everything
from pizza to car repairs right from
your checking account, but with credit
card convenience. And when you need
help balancing your checkbook.
Wachovia's toll-free telephone banking lines are just
a phone call away. You can get your balance or find
out if a check cleared with our auto-
mated Phone Access� service. Or call
800-WACHOVIA (1-800-922-4684)
to reach a real Wachovia banker any-
time, 24 hours a day. Plus, you may
qualify for special student overdraft
protection, credit card and savings
accounts. It's easy! (At this point in
your life, shouldn't something be?)
And it's yours until you graduate.
ACHOVIA
Wad � mber FDIC Accounts subject to approa).
Credit cards are issued by Wachovia Bank Card Services, Delaware






The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 27, 1996
13
BUY ONE
GET ONE
Mini-Sundae
coupon expires 91596
Limit 1 per customer.
Not Valid with any otter purchase
Hank's
Homemade Ice
Cream
316 East
10th Street
within walking
distance
from ECU
758-0000
REC
from page 12
Recreation & Intramural Sports En-
richment Program is designed to give
students, staff and faculty with disabili-
ties an opportunity to enjoy the fun
Rec Services has to offer.
Rec Services in conjunction with
University Housing and Campus Din-
ing organized a unique and fun pro-
gram that gives students an opportu-
nity to participate in a nonalcoholic
social event called Natural Life Spe-
cial Events.
Some of the unique events hap-
pening this fall are Energy Explosion,
King & Queen Of the Halls, Camp out
at the Tower and Exam Jammathon.
Students also can join the Rec FAN
Club. With the Rec FAN club stay up
all night on several Friday nights with
a lot of fun and excitement
"Drop into" any Rec Services fa-
cility during the Drop-in Recreation
Hours. It makes it convenient tc swim
at Christenbury Pool, play basketball
in Christenbury Gym, work out in
Christenbury, Garrett or Aycock weight
rooms, rent equipment at the ARC or
climb the Tower.
Rec Services offers something for
everyone. For upcoming programs or
more information, stop by
Christenbury 204 and pick up a Pro-
gram Catalog or call 32&63S7.
i JLAviCl from page 11
the necessary means to purchase
the new flags.
The flags are more durable
and larger than the old flags.
They have a three color design
on a solid purple canvas and they
feature our beloved mascot "Pee-
Dee The areas where Pirate
fans can spot one of these flags
are Cotanche Street leading into
the ECU campus, Evans street
into downtown, First Street,
Greene street, Reade Circle and
Reade Street.
The newly purchased flags
will also be flown on Ficklen
Drive leading to Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. The new flags will greet
any new visitor to the Greenville
area who will be arriving by
plane. The Pitt-Greenville Airport
will also have a flag posted. So,
any opposing football team arriv-
ing by plane will immediately see
the spirit here at ECU.
More importantly the flag?
promote the ECU football pro-
gram. Our football team brings
in money for the local businesses
and they also provide recognition
for Greenville.
"The five home football
games this year will generate ap-
proximately $10 million in rev-
enues for Pitt County busi
nesses said Chip Cherry, Presi�,
dent of the Greenville-Pitt
County Chamber of Commerce.
This is good for the area
businesses as well as ECU. It pro'
vides positive recognition.
So when you pass by the
flags give them a wave, a smile,
a thumbs up or what ever you
feel necessary to salute Pee-Dee
and his new home.
RUN
from page 11
well Give you 10 weeks.
Ten weeks may not seem like much time to prove you're capable of being a
leader But if you're tough, smart and determined, ten weeks and a lot of
hard work could make you an Officer of Marines. And Officer Carididates
School (OCS) is where you'h jet the chance to prove you've got what it takes
to lead a lite full of excitement full of challenge, full of honor. Anyone can say
they've got what it takes to be a leader, we'll give you ten weeks to prow I
Marines
WANTED
if you think you can handle this crash course in
management contact Captain Tingle or
Lieutenant Beltran at 1-800-722-6715.
Students interested in becoming
representatives for the
Department of Athletics
as members of The
Pirate Crew. The
Pirate Crew is a
volunteer
organization that
assists ECU
Athletics in fund
raising activities and the
recruitment of student
athletes
For an application and information call
3 2 8-4570
out to me in true freshman Brian
Beal as well as Andrew Worth, a
transfer from powerhouse North-
eastern Ford said. "I feel they wi
immediately contribute to our
team
The Pirates will also have ail
other advantage en route to an im-
provement on their sixth place fin-
ish last season � home course ad-
vantage. This year the CAA cross
country meet will be held in Green'
ville on the morning of the Home-
coming game.
"We're excited about having
the CAA's here in Greenville Fofd
said "I feel we're a much improved
team, with a bright future, and with
the home course advantage on our
side we could make some noise
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise with
us in
The East
Carolinian.
VcuvwlIce
THE
PANTRY
ELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
GO PIRATES! 4lw
- 7 . . A
COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON
,
THE
PANTRY
$1.00 OFF GAS
PURCHASE OF 8 GALLONS OR MORE.
LIMIT 1 COUPON PER PERSON PER PURCHASE. Offer good through 9-7-96
Good only at Greenville, NC Pantry Locations
THE
PANTRY
�y mm mm '��'
-
"E "Vmm m "





14
Tuesday, August 27, 1996
The East man
Greenville: University Commons Shopping Center, Greenville Blvd. and Evan . Open Monday-Saturday, 9.30AM-930PM; Sunday, 1 7PM





PJ�I

Welcome to HEALTH SCIENCES
1996-1997
Welcome to the William L Laps Health Sciences Library!
The Health Sciences Library, located in the Brody
Medical Sciences Building on ECU'S West Campus,
serves as the primary information center for stu-
dents, faculty and staff in the Division of Health
Sciences and the School of Social Work. The library
has a collection of approximately 310,000 volumes
and currently subscribes to about 1,727 journals.
The HSL has a staff of 14 Ubnrians and 27.5 sup-
port staff to serve your information needs.
Horizon - The Health
Sciences Library's Online Catalog
Horizon, the online catalog of the Health Sci-
ences Library, provides computerized access to the
book, journal, and audiovisual holdings of the li-
brary. In addition, you can search the collection of
Joyncr Library, the main academic library on ECU'S
east campus, through the Horizon catalog at the
HSL. Horizon offers many ways to find out what
the library owns. Specific items can be located us-
ing an author or title search; if you do not know the
full title of a book or journal, a keyword search can
help find the item for you. You can locate materials
by medical subject heading or by subject keyword
as well. Items in the HSL are catalogued using sub-
ject headings bom the National Library of Medicine
(Mesh) and the Library of Congress while the Joyner
collection is catalogued using subject terms from
the Library of Congress.
The Horizon catalog lets you search selected parts
of the collection as well. If you are interested only
in audiovisual materials, Horizon will let you limit
your search this way. You can also limit your search
to journals or books. Limiting your search to the
reference collection will show you the non-circu-
lating reference materials owned by the library.
Various other limits and the ability to combine sub-
jects and keywords also assist you in narrowing
down your search.
The bookmark feature available in Horizon allows
you to compile a list of items you are interested in,
and either print it out or download it to a disk for
word processing. The Horizon catalog tells you the
location of each item in the library, and indicates
whether the item is available, or its due date if it is
checked out.
Horizon offers many features to make your search
for information in the Health Sciences Library suc-
cessful We encourage you to ask for assistance from
the librarians on duty, or attend a class on the use
of Horizon, which are offered regularly throughout
the year. For more information about classes, please
call Reference at 816-2258.
Health Sciences Library Departments
Library Hours
Regular Academic Year
Sunday 12.00 noon - 12:00 midnight
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 12:00 midnight
Friday 7:30 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Reference Librarian on Duty
Sunday 12:00 noon - 10:00 pir.
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 10:00 pm
Friday 7:30 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
aunvner noun
Sunday 12:00 noon - 11:00 pm
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 11:00 pm
Friday 7:30 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
The library's hours will vary slightly during
holidays: call 816-2222 for information. During
Fall and Spring semester breaks, hours of
operation remain unchanged.
"During the Summer and holidays, hours for a
reference librarian on duty will vary.
Administration - JoAnn Bell, M.L.S MBA Ph.D AHIP 816-2212; e-mail: joabeiahsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- oversees library's function as a unit of the university
- oversees budget, policies and procedures for the library
- handles personnel matters for the library
Audiovisual tnd brtonuaUu - Gary Greenstein, MLSIS, MPA 816-2232, e-mail: gargre�hsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- acquires, maintains, and circulates audiovisual materials
- operates the computer lab
- provides assistance and consultation in using a variety of computer-based applications
CatalogingAcquisitions - Patricia Greenstein, MLS. 816-2244; e-mail: patgreehsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- orders, processes, and organizes materials purchased by the library
Circulation - Elizabeth Winstead, M.L.S M.P.A AHIP 816-2222; e-mail: betwinehsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- oversees circulation of library materials
- provides courier service on east and west campuses
- provides document delivery services including fax, interlibrary loan, and photocopy services
- operates a reserve collection for course support
- provides library materials to off-campus students
Computing a Information technology - Susie Speer, M.S.L.S M.S.E.H AHIP 816-3921
e-mail: susspeehsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- supports computing and automation of the library
- maintains library hardware and software
Outrcadt - Janet Bangma, M.L.I.S Librarian for Outreach Education and Systems 816-2066
e-mail: janban�hsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- Evangeline Norfleet, B.S.L.S Outreach Coordinator 816-2242
e-mail: vannorehsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- provides information services to health professionals throughout eastern North Carolina and to
other North Carolina Area Health Education Centers
Reference - Jean Hiebert, M.L.S AHIP 816-2258; e-mail: jeahie�hsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- provides assistance in using information resources by phone and in the library
- provides innovative assistance in meeting information needs of library clients
- provides consultation services on library education and curriculum support
- oversees educational activities for the library
- conducts library educational activities
Serials - Melissa Nasea, MSLS, M.B.A AHIP 816-2234; e-mail: melnas�hsl.hsl.ecu.edu
- selects, orders, processes, and maintains journals purchased by the library
PARKING
S Staff
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SV Staff & Visitors
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Health Sciences Library





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National Library of
Medicine (MM)
Classification
Preclinical Sciences
QSHuman Anatomy-
QTPhysiology
QUBiochemistry
QVPharmacology
QWMicrobiologyImmunology
QXParasitology
QYClinical Pathology
QZPathology
Medicine and Related Subjects
w
WA
WB
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WD 200
WD 300
WD 400
WD 500
WD 600
WD 700
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WT
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Medical Professions
Public Health
Practice of Medicine
Communicable Diseases
Nutrition Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Immunologic and Collagen
Diseases. Hypersensitivity
Animal Poisons
Plant Poisons
Diseases and Injuries caused
by Physical Agents
Aviation and Space Medicine
Musculoskeletal System
Respiratory System
Cardiovascular System
Hemic and Lymphatic
Systems
Digestive System
Urogenital System
Endocrine System
Nervous System
Psychiatry
Radiology. Diagnostic Imaging
Surgery
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Dermatology
Pediatrics
Geriatrics. Chronic Disease
Dentistry. Oral Surgery
Otolaryngology
Ophthalmology
Hospitals and Other Health
Facilities
Nursing
History of Medicine
Circulation Policies
�i
Responsibilities of the Client
Clients must present a library card with appropriate identification each time to
borrow or renew items. Items must be brought to either the Circulation or Audio-
visual and Informatics Desk for checkout andor renewal. Clients are responsible
for all uses of their card. Clients are responsible for all fines and fees accrued
on their card. Faculty clients must provide written permission for another person
to borrow materials with their card. It is the responsibility of the client to notify
the Circulation Department if their library card is lost or stolen. It is also the
responsibility of the client to inform the library of any address changes.
Incorrect address information is not grounds for waiving fines or fees.
Borrowing Privileges
North Carolina residents 16 years of age and older may receive an area resident
library card for use in the Health Sciences Library. Loan periods are:
Books all clients, except Faculty until end of current semester
Books Faculty until end of Spring Semester each year
Journals Faculty only 3 days
Audiovisuals all clients 7 days
Renewals
An item may be renewed if another client does not have a hold on it. Items may
be brought in to the Circulation or Audiovisuals and Informatics Desk for renewal.
Phone renewals are allowed for 5 items or less.
Holds and Recalls
Items checked out by another client may be recalled. Forms are available in a
variety of locations throughout the library to recall an item. A letter is mailed to
the client that has the item checked out stating that the item is due in one week.
The client who has the item is given a minimum of two weeks to use the item.
Once the material has been returned to the library and is available, it will be held
at the Circulation Desk for one week. Items not checked out by the requesting
client within 7 days will be reshelved. Clients are responsible for returning
recalled items even if they are not in the geographic vicinity.
Overdue Notice
An overdue notice is sent to the client if the item, is not returned within 5 days of
the due date. A second overdue notice is mailed for items not returned within 2
weeks. An invoice for the replacement cost of die item, plus a processing fee, is
mailed after the item is more than one month overdue.
BMi
Fines are charged for overdue books at the rate of $1.00 per item per day. Fines
may be paid in cash or by check. Ten dollars is"the maximum overdue fine for
one item. Fines may be paid at the Circulation Desk.
Suspension of Privilege
Libraiy privileges are suspended for clients with overdue books or unpaid fines.
Student university records will be tagged online prior to registration for students
with overdue books or fines.
Lost and Damaged Rooks
Books that are lest or returned to the library damaged are charged to the client.
The client is charged the list price plus a $15.00 processing fee. The list price for
lost books is refundable if the book is later returned in usable condition. Clients
are responsible for all damages to materials. Damaged books are a danger to
other books in the collection.
lockers
Lockers are available in the library. Locker applications are accepted until the first
day of classes for the current semester. Locker assignments are made within one
week of the application deadline. Locker keys are due at the end of the current
semester.
Document
Delivery Services
Table of Contents
The Health Sciences Library provides
copies of tables of contents for current
journal issues. Faculty who subscribe
to this service receive a copy of the
table of contents for the journals they
have identified. Copies can be faxed
directly or delivered within 24 hours of
the receipt of the journal by the library.
Automatic Journal Irtati
Faculty may also request titles to be
automatically routed to their offices.
These titles are routed after they have
been in the library 30 days. The
combined total of the journals received
through automatic journal loan and the
table of contents service may not
exceed 30.
The Circulation staff will photocopy
materials for faculty, medical residents,
and third- and fourth-year medical
students. Photocopies done by library
staff are $1.50 per article. Requests are
accepted by telephone, mail, fax or
walk-in. Materials are routinely
delivered within 24 hours of the
request. The library's request forms
must be used in order to comply with
copyright laws.
Brifatg Service to lovner Ufarwy
The Health Sciences Library provides
courier service between this campus
and Joyner Library. Materials from any
campus library may be delivered to or
returned to any library location for
your convenience.
toterlibrary Loan
Items not available at the Health
Sciences Library (or Joyner Library)
may be borrowed through interlibrary
loan. There is a minimum charge of
$6.00 per item, and delivery takes an
average of ten days. Electronic mail
andor telefacsimile can be used for
rush requests at an additional charge
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Computerized Resources
available at the Health Sciences Library
The Health Sciences Ubrary at East Carolina University has computerized resources that are available for information searching on the first floor of the library
HEALTHMEDKAL
MEDLEVE: A biomedical database produced by the National Library of Medicine. Its print counterparts are Index Medicus, International Nursing
Index, and Index to Dental Literature. Coverage is 1966 to the present. International in scope and updated monthly, this database includes citations
to journal articles, editorials, and letters to the editor from over 3,600 journals.
CESAHL: A nursing and allied health database produced by CINAHL Information Systems. Its print counterpart is Cumulative Index to Nursing and
Allied Health Literature. Coverage is 1982 to the present. Updated monthly, it includes citations to journal articles, the publications of the American
Nurses Association and the National League for Nursing, nursing dissertations, selected conference proceedings, standards of professional practice, and,
beginning in 1992, educational software in nursing.
PsydNFO A database covering all areas of psychology and related fields produced by the American Psychological Association (APA). Its print
counterpar is Psychological Abstracts. C verage is 1984 to the present. International in scope and updated monthly, this database includes biblio-
graphic citations to technical reports, dissertations, over 1400 periodicals, and other sources.
HAH. Health and Psychological Instruments is produced by Behavioral Measurement Database Services. It includes citations to descriptions of
information on instruments of use in assessing the health and behavior of infants, children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly. It also includes title,
author, publication resource, development date, publication date, subjects, description, and reliability factor of the cited instrument.
Health Reference Center: A consumer health oriented database produced by Information Access Company. Coverage is for three rolling years. Updated
monthly, it includes full-text coverage for 100 titles on health, fitness, nutrition and medicine as well as indexing to citations in over 150 publications.
SAM-CD: A database containing the full text of Scientific American Medicine produced by Scientific American. Inc Coverage is the current year.
Updated quarterly, it provides coverage of developments in clinical medicine.
Stati-Ref: Provides complete text, tables, and references from selected textbooks.
Mayo Clinic Family Health Book: Provides information concerning all aspects of family health and medical care.
OCLC Electronic Journals Online: Online Current Clinical Trails and Online Journal of Knowledge Synthesis for Nursing.
COMING SOON: HeahhStar: Focuses on both the clinical and the non-clinical aspects of health care delivery. Coverage will be 1975 to the present.
SOCIAL WORK
Social work Abstracts: A database including all aspects of social work and social policy produced by the National Association of Social Workers. Its
print counterpart is Social Work Research. Coverage is 1977 to the present. International in scope and updated quarterly, it includes citations to journal
articles and doctoral dissertations. It also contains The Register of Clinical Social Workers, a list of registered clinical social worker including the type of
practice, and educational and employment background.
CMMMAL JUSTICE
Criminal Justice Abstracts: A database indexing most of the major journals in criminology. Coverage is 1968 to the present. International in scope, it is
updated monthly.
�WMMi
SPIN: A database of funding opportunities (federal, nonfederal, and corporate! Updated weekly, it also provides information about fellowships,
postdoctoral opportunities, development and education curriculum projects, sabbatical and publication support.
DRUGS
Mlcromedex or COS (Computerized Clinical Information System): A drug database for PCMH and ECU professionals. Updated quarterly, it
contains reliable and current information on toxicology, drug therapy, and acute care.
Complete Guide to Prescription & NonprescriptJon Drugs: Provides information about generic drugs.
OTHER RESOURCES
New York Public Library Desk Reference: An electronic version of the New York Public Library Desk Reference. With no updates, it includes the
most frequently sought facts from the New York Public Library.
North Carolina Union Catalog: A database that allows the user to locate books owned by medical libraries in North Carolina.
Internet: Telnet, FTP. and Netscape.
Microcomputer
Laboratory
The library's microcomputer laboratory provides
a variety of hardware and software in a
networked environment.
Hours:
Monday-Thursday7:30am-10:45pm
Friday7:30am-8:45pm
Saturday9:00am-8:45pm
Sunday12:00pm-10:45pm
Hardware:
August 1. 1996
60 PCs
15 Macintoshes
25 multimedia workstations
Software: Includes, but is not limited to
MS Word
Excel
Harvard Graphics
dBASE
Power Point
150 Computer-assisted programs in basic
and clinical sciences, nutrition, and
basic skills
19 intetactive videoCD-ROM programs
Basic assistance with the software we provide is
available at all hours the lab is open.
In-depth instruction in the software we provide
is available to individuals by appointment.
Classes are taught to groups of 3 or more by
appointment or at the request of a faculty
member. Classes are available in a wide range
of areas, including MS Word, Hard Disk
Management, DOS, and Using the Internet.
Services:
Several services are available to clients in the
microcomputer laboratory.
Printing: Clients may print out all documents on
a laser printer, up to 50 pages. Only one final
copy of any document is allowed.
Scanning: The lab houses a Hewlett Packard
Scanjet Ilex. Clients may scan text or graphics
into a digital form to be used by most word
processing software or in another application.
The scanner scans in monochrome or color.
Color printing: A color printer is available for
output from any of the software programs which
support it. There is a per page charge for color
printing.
E-malL Students, faculty and staff in the Division
of Health Sciences and the School of Social Work
may obtain a password for Internet mail through
the Microcomputer Laboratory.
Internet Access: Anyone may access the
Internet using Netscape in the computer lab.
This allows full access through the World Wide
Web.
The Health Sciences Library homepage
can be found at http:www.hsLecu.edu
Individuals with disabilities who require accommodation in order to participate in any event at ECl are encouraged to contact the Department for Disability Support Services at 919-328-4802 (VoiceTTD) forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program
12.400 copies of this public document were printed at an approximate cost of $820 50, or S 066 per copy.
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 27, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 27, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1153
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58638
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