The East Carolinian, August 20, 1996






TUES?
August 20,1996 �
Vol 72, No. 01 �
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
50 pages
JflR-v'
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
The new Student Recreation Center is expected to open next month. Planning for the building began in 1987and it will be the largest recreational facility on campus with a total sauare
footage of 150,000.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
The Wright Place gets a new face.
Incoming freshmen may find the fountain located in the traffic circle in front of Wright Auditorium an invaluable landmark if they are lost.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
UFfcyfe
The Student Union and The ECU Playhouse both
unveil their plans for the fall
Jimmy Buffett and The Monkees blow banana
winds through Walnut Creek in Raleigh Page
41
Jn4tcte
OPINION 7
Find out how to survive at Camp ECU
Can Bob Dole dig up enough support to move
into Bill's house?
page
19
SPORT&eJ6;tg
Check out ECU'S players to watch
Marching Pirates drafted by the NFL
page
21





Tuesday, August 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Recreation Center ready to open
September will
end near decade
of anticipation
Amy L Royster
Assistant News Editor
The long-awaited Student Recre-
ation Center is finally opening and the
entire campus community will reap
the numerous benefits of a center that
has been a work in progress since
ftotw pimn cy thte wtontKi ptww ttf rfC SRi
The second floor of the new center will
house three aerobic studios (3).
1987.
The Student Government Asso-
ciation passed a resolution to con-
struct the facility in 1987. The
150,000 square foot complex located
adjacent to the Mendenhall Student
Center is 139,000 square feet larger
than any current recreational facility
on campus.
According to Nancy Mize, direc-
tor of recreational services, the facil-
ity is as large if not larger than any
comparable facility in the state.
"The architect did a great job of
making it attractive as well as effi-
cient, Mize said.
"It's really going to
be state of the art
compared to any-
thing in the United
States, not just east-
ern North Caro-
lina
Mize said that
the facility will in-
clude a six-court
sports forum for
basketball, volley-
ball and badminton.
The 10,000
square foot weight
training facility is
equipped with
Cybex equipment as
well as cardiovascu-
lar equipment and
free weights.
There is an indoor swimming
pool with eight lanes which can ac-
commodate lap swimming and water
polo. A leisure pool is connected to
the main pool and has jets and seat-
ing. The indoor pool ranges from three
feet to five feet two inches.
The outdoor pool is 20 feet by
40 feet A large deck circles the pool
and will be furnished with deck chairs.
Another feature of the center is
a three-lane track on the second floor.
Mize said that five circles around the
track is equivalent to one mile.
Mize said one end of the facility
is anc lored by a 28-foot high climb-
ing wall. There will be climbing in-
struction provided by recreational
services.
Seven racquet courts line one
side of the sports forum. Mize said
equipment will be available for check
out at the front desk.
According to Mize, students do
not need memberships to use the cen-
ter. Students need to show their stu-
dent I.Ds and can bring as many
guests as they like.
Mize predicted that there would
be between three and five thousand
students using the facility daily.
"We are looking at large .lumbers
of people but the primary users are
students Mize said.
The complex was scheduled to
take only 18 months to complete. The
center has been under construction
for two and a half years.
Mize said that the ex-
pected date of comple-
tion is Sept 19.
"It will take three to
four weeks to become
operational after the
19th Mize said. "We
are shooting for fall
break
Some students
have been hired to staff
the center already. Mize
said that there are still
positions available and
the entire staff will num-
ber around 150.
"We'd love to have
freshmen turn in appli-
cations Mize said.
Mize said physical
education classes would
be taught in the build-
ing during limited times.
"This is the first
time in the history of
ECU that there has been
a facility dedicated to
students Mize said.
Mize encouraged
students to come by 204
Christenbury if they are
interested in joining the
recreational services
advisory council. The
council will decide on the rules and
regulations of the facility.
The center's first floor has a six-court sports forum(l), a weight training
center(2), four pool areas(4), and an outdoor adventure center(6).
Future of parking deck looks grim
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
Parking concerns were just one
of the topics discussed at a board of
trustees meeting in July.
In the meeting, trustees heard
reports from ECU administrators
about plans to relieve parking con-
gestion, including the feasibility of a
parking deck.
Layton Getsinger, associate vice
chancellor for business affairs, told
the board that the construction of a
parking deck could cost more than
$9,000 per space and could raise
parking fees by $80 a year. Students,
faculty and staff currently pay $96
per decal.
"The bottom line is that a deck
will cost $9,000 per space with an
increase of only 1000 spaces
Getsinger said. "It would cost us $9
dollars over a 20 year period with
the bond if we appropriate the cost
over 13,000 decals every year. Each
decal would cost $175.
"There is also the ongoing cost
of maintenance with a parking deck.
There's security, lighting and 24-hour
staffing. Currently enrolled students,
including freshmen, would never get
to use the completed deck, but they
would have the privilege of helping
to finance it
Getsinger continued to give as
many reasons against the deck as in
favor of it
"As far as my personal interests
go, a parking deck adds some type
of beauty to a campus, but in my ex-
amination of other campuses with
Gicks, I have found that it would not
be the best utilization of land on our
campus Getsinger said.
"Just because other campuses
within the UNC system have decks
is not a good reason for us to build
one he said. "A deck is something
we can always build if we have to,
but I believe that there are other
solutions.
"I believe that we can create
2,000 spaces over the next five years
without increasing the cost of decals
because it will be an incremental in-
crease instead of all at once
See PARK page 18
Spmi Vu-Pnl
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i nil ii in riii �� �. i ii.il � i ii in �Timmi-
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20,1996
Favorite campus
hangout gets facelift
Expansion creates
sophisticated
new atmosphere
AmyLRoytter
�UJIiCuLit Ntim OnHtor
The heart ofcampus began a seven-
month evolution this summer which
started with construction of the Wright
Plafe hxpansion and will end in Decem-
ber wita sopWsticatJd student plaza.
' 0-r the summer, the Wright Place
E&asion and the plaza development
project tore up the road between the
Wright Place and the Rawl building,
Hooked off pedestrian traffic through the
area all summer and temporanly relo-
cated the entrance of the student store.
Noty. half of the construction area from
Wright Circle towards the entrance to
the Ravi building, including the Student
State and the newly renovated Wright
Place, will be open when students return
to class. The new addition to the Wright
Place as well as the student plaza will be
complete at the end of the fall semester.
According to Frank Salamon, direc-
tor of Campus Dining Services, there are
three goals of the project adding seats,
speeding up service and creating a stu-
dent plaza.
The primary goal of adding seating
was to increase the number of seats 50
percent The seating will be housed in
an additional box-shaped space with
three glass walls and a ceiling.
"Ovr expansion will move the num-
ber of seats from 200 to 300 Salamon
said.
Salamon said that increasing the
speed students moved through the facil-
ity was another objective which was met
this summer. Cashiers have been moved
together into a group near the front of
the food court area in order to create a
more efficient traffic flow. A second deli-
catessen was added in the back and grab
and-go type items were placed near the
cashiers.
The Wright Place will offer all the
same items as last semester. Students can
purchase hot sandwiches, hot dogs, pizza,
packaged salads, home-made snacks, bev-
erages and gourmet coffee.
The final objective of the plaza de-
velopment project was to create an at-
tractive place for students to gather out-
side of the Wright Place.
"The outside will visually impact
campus more than anything has in a long
time Salamon said. "It will turn a street
and sidewalk scene into a student and
pedeXstrian plaza
Salamon said that by the end of the
semester, the area between the Wright
Place and the Raw! building will be a
brick walkway. A wall with seating will
be built on each side of the Rawl build-
ing and on the side of Wright Audito-
rium
A new entrance and lobby to the
Student Store will also be added this
semester, as well as a vine-covered trellis
and outdoor seating for the Wright Place.
Salamon said that
the landscaping will come
as cooler weather does.
"In the second
phase, we will be planting
trees. We will put more
trees into the area than
were taken out"
While Salamon con-
cedes that it will still be
an inconvenience to get
through the unfinished
plaza, he points out that
the construction is in re-
sponse to students needs.
"We respond to stu-
dents' input" Salamon
said. "Students told us

that they needed to get
out of the Wright Place
faster and they needed
more seats. This is a stu-
dent-driven project We
rery on our customers
Photti Courtesy of Campus Living Magazine
This architectural drawing shows what the Courtyard Cafe located
between Rawl and the Student Stores will look like in December.
Construction causes changes in traffic pattern
Recent changes
have eliminated
the circular drive
around the mall.
Amy L. Royster
Attlttmt Newt Editor
Photo Courtesy of
Parking and Traffic
Services
Traffic patterns around the mall have
been permanently changed on campus as
part of the mall redesign project.
According to Leslie Craigle, director
of marketing for business services, the traf-
fic changes were needed in order to accom-
modate the additions of the Cupola and
an extended mall area.
"The project is going to be an exten-
sion of the mall area which will adjoin to
the area in front of the library Craigle
said in an interview this summer. "The
project is being handled by facility ser-
vices.
Craigle said that the mall, project
would enter a new phase when Alumni
Circle changes from one-way to two-way
traffic. Alumni Circle, which runs along the
north side of the Flanagan building. Stu-
dent Health Services and Joyner Library
will end with vehicles turning in to the Stu-
dent Health Services parking lot. The two-
way portion of Alumni Circle which pres-
ently runs from Faculty Way near Student
Financial Aid toward Joyner Library, will
dead end near the library and the State
vehicle lot near Mail Services.
Pat Gertz, director of parking and traf-
fic services, said that the traffic changes
would begin before the next phase of con-
struction on the mall begins.
"The work to the road is probably al-
ready started Gertz said. "It (Alumni
Circle) will be officially closed off Friday
According to Craigle, he portion of
Alumni Circle which currently runs in front
of Joyner will be closed in order to be in-
corporated into a pedestrian area of the
mall.
Gertz said that in the process of rede-
signing the mall, a number of parking
spaces will be eliminated or transferred to
other areas. Patient parking will be relo-
cated between the Student Health Services
building and Joyner Library. Contractor
See TRAFFIC page 18
tjfl fiSS! mi �f�:ff fi'�! ftiff fi MH 5 5g
YOUR CENTER OF AC T I V I T Y
� to MenetenhaU Student Center
g
I Movies . .
ju Transit IflJO
Vidao Gamtt
Desk
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m
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5 ABLE
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25
FOOD
TV
Student
Union
BOWLING
Newspapers
Central Ticket Office
Meeting Rooms
Free phones QREEKS
SGA � i
5 I
I
is
5: r
PIRATE OIL FILTER SPECIAL $30.28
Includes oil and filter change with 4 qts. of oil,
and official Honda 21 point inspection.
Bob Barbour Honda
355-2500
Service Department Hours
� Monday - Friday 8:00-5:30
Expires 10-31-96
Free Shuttle service
to ECU Campus
Factory Trained
Technicians
� Plus tax where applicable. Please present coupon during write-up. Not to be combined with other discounts
g , 10 OFF ALL SERVICES UP TO $200.00 ,
�r I
ART Gallery
s. � . Billiard
s Computer Lab
5 and more
i
2? �
i
i
THE F.JkM. CLUB
(Friday All-Nighter)
Friday, August 23 at Mendenhall Student Center
LIVE JNlWSiC from 4-7 p.m. featuring
The Melanie Sparks Band and IMANI
Plus a t�P RALLY from 7-8 p.m.
and a fttoVW at 8 p.m.
The Birdcage (R)
Free admission with ECU ID card � One guest admitted per ID
TQww IteCRriTiOH
Bowling, Billiards, Table Tennis fromlO p.m. until closing
MENDENHALLitUDENTCENTER nlHHi
� HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.rn12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m
SfeMfcii Si rAil!f Si fc�W.f fS MH5 r
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Mi
Free Shuttle service
to ECU Campus
Factory Trained
Technicians
i
Mi
Bob Barbour Honda
33tiO S. Memorial Dr.
355-2500
Service Department Hours
Monday - Friday 8:00-5:30
Expires 10-31-96
Plus tax where applicable. Please present coupon dining unite-up. Not to be combined with other discounts �
TioAi�BcSa OVER $ioo.oo"l
Bob Barbour Honda
33lOO S. Memorial Dr.
355-2500
Service Department Hours
Monday - Friday 8:00-5:30
Expires 10-31-96
Free Shuttle service
to ECU Campus
Factory Trained
Technicians
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Plus tax where applicable. Please present coupon during unite-up. Not to be combined with other discounts t
(BD
� Hirers'
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GENUINE PARTS A ACCESSORIES
��-





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$t&
Tuesday, August 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Student fee riddle solved
Jacqueline D. Helium
Staff Writer
Many students will be coming
back to ECU during the first week
of classes, and all of them, in one
way or another, will pay their tu-
ition and fees at the Cashier's of-
fice.
While paying for tuition is self-
explanatory, students may not al-
ways know exactly what they are
paying for when they pay their stu-
dent fees each semester.
"There is as much misinforma-
tion as there is no information to
students as to what their money
supports University Cashier
Michael Balko said. "Tuition goes
toward the educational cost of in-
structing students here at East
Carolina. At the current time there
are three required fees in conjunc-
tion with tuition
Those three required fees are
the educationaltechnology fee,
the health services fee, and univer-
sity fees.
Mr. 3alko elaborated on what
services are paid for by what fees.
"The first one is an educa-
tionaltechnoiogy fee of $30 per
semester. This fee funds an initia-
tive to give students hands-on, state
of the art equipment Balko said.
The health fee students pay is
$65 a semester.
"The health service fee is self-
explanatory. It furnishes a staff and
facility for your immediate medical
needs while you're here on cam-
pus Balko said.
Any medicines which students
receive through the student health
.center are provided to them at dis-
count prices, while health fees help
pay for the rest of the expense.
The university fees are $344 a
semester, and cover a variety of ser-
vices from recreational to athletic.
"It supports the student gov-
ernment association, transit ser-
vices, the media, fine arts,
WHERE DO YOUR
STUDENT FEES GO?
STUDENT ACTIVITY FEESPER SEM 12HRS $121.00
STUDENT FUND$29.25
Student Government Association$4.88
Transit$12.50
Media$9.37
Fine arts$2.50
SPECIAL FUND$44.50
Intramurals$40.00
Minges operations$3.00
Student Fund Accounting Office$1.50
STUDENT UNION PROGRAMS$9.25
STUDENT UNION OPERATIONS$38.00
. ATHLETICS$12.50
DEBT SERVICE FEES$90.50
Ficklen Stadium Fund$7.50
Student Recreation Cemter$48.00
Minges Coliseum Renovation$35.00
1. UNIVERSITY FEES TOTAL$345
2. HEALTH SERVICES FEE$65
3. EDUCATIONALTECHNOLOGY FEE$30
4. GRAND TOTAL
$440
BfJ
F.
S T
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Office of the Chancellor
103Spilman
919-328-6212
This breakdown of the student fees is per semester and is for full time students.
intramurals, the operations of
Minges and Mendenhall and the
soon-to-be Health and P.E. build-
ing Balko said.
While many of the services that
the university fees support are not
directly related to textbooks and
classrooms, Balko says they are nec-
essary for ECU to be competitive
with other schools, and that stu-
dents seem to want them.
"The tuition goes toward the
educational facet of your life here
at the university, and the fees sup-
port not only what the students de-
mand, but what we think we need
to offer to be competitive with
other schools of our same size and
stature in the state Balko said.
Balko said that sometimes stu-
See FEES page 18
Greenville,
North Carolina
27858-4353
August 13, 19 9 6
I welcome you to the campus as we begin the 1996-97
academic year. You have my best wishes for meaningful
and productive experiences at ECU this year.
If you are a returning student, you will note that the
summer has brought some changes on campus. The firsc
phase of the Joyner Library renovation is complete and
you will find far more effective space for your library
work. The Wright Plaza, the Cupola, and the Student
Recreation Center are also among the improvements soon to
be completed that we hope you will enjoy.
If you are a transfer student or a freshman, I join with
colleagues in issuing a special welcome. ECU has a
special place in our hearts and we hope that you will
soon consider the University to be your new home.
Indeed, we strive to create and maintain an academic
community small enough for you to feel at home but large
enough to provide the kind of opportunities you will need
in your preparations for the years ahead.
Work hard, enjoy yourself, too, and fill your year with
both the good memories and the accomplishments that will
cause you always to hold East Carolina dear!
All best wishes.
SUz i(ft c4&-
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
consirtuun! mstituiian of Tin University Ol North Carolm.i
N t� Af4on EmptffyW
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The





m '��M
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
University symbol returns
Replica of original
honors alumni,
adds distinction
Marguerite Benjamin
News Editor
� Among the construction
projects in progress on campus, one
of tjhe sites-to-be is not so much new
as it is renewed.
I In 1968, amid much protest,
t&e oldest and longest standing
building on campus was torn down
in order to make room for bigger
arid better structures. Now a rep-
lica of the Old Austin Cupola is
being built after nearly 30 years.
At the construction site, lo-
cated in the center of the on-cam-
pus mall area, a commemorative
walkway is being constructed in
oider to honor alumni and their
family members.
The idea to reconstruct the
Cupola was developed along with
the University's Master Plan. The
expense of building the gazebo-
style cupola totals $250 thousand.
! The organization most respon-
sible for the courtyard of recogni-
tibn is ECU Telefund, one of the
university's premier fund-raising or-
ganizations.
ECU Telefund Assistant Direc-
tor Brian Hardy said recreating the
Cupola will bring back a symbol of
tlfre university's past
! "As well as being a reminder
of the past, the Cupola will become
a! new symbol and a focal point for
tie university Hardy said.
Hardy 5l,ared some Telefund
hjstory with TEC stating that the
organization was started in Janu-
ary 1994 in order to raise unre-
stricted dollars for the university.
Telefund employs students who call
various groups and individuals as-
sociated with the university and
request donations.
"In relation to the Old Austin
pjroject, students were told to in-
form alumni that for each gift of
�250 donated, they could have a
bjrick reserved in their name to be
placed in the area around the Cu-
pola Hardy said, adding that 3,000
of the available 10,000 spaces in
the courtyard have been sold.
; Hardy said most of the alumni
vfho were called were excited about
the return of the Cupola.
j "The older alumni were pleas-
aintly surprised because they
wanted to keep it (the original
structure) in the first place Hardy
said. "There was actually a fight to
keep the building since it was the
first one constructed when the cam-
pus was founded
Hardy said he also received a
large response from parents who
wanted to recognize their children
who are currently enrolled.
"People are excited about be-
ing recognized Hardy said.
Hardy said the original loca-
tion for the replica was set for an
area near the Student Recreation
Center which is also under con-
struction.
"Later it was decided that the
architecture of the buildings in that
area did not match the design of
the cupola which would be made
to match the original architecture
of the Old Austin 3uilding Hardy-
said. "So they thought it would be
better to move it to the mall area
near the old cafeteria building and
the surrounding residence halls
,After the construction on
Joyner Library is completed, the
Cupola will be visible from both
10th and 5th Streets.
"It will sit right in front of the
columns of the library Hardy said.
The remaining (brick) spaces
around the Cupola are still avail-
able but will be sold at a higher
price. For more information, con-
tact Hardy at 328-4215.
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���������������Hli
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
HEROES
ARE HERE
I
COMICS - MAGIC CARDS
WE OFFER A SUBSCRIPTION SERVIC
10 OFF NEW COMICS
NEW BOOK ON WEDNESDAY
MON-FRI - 12-6
SAX � 11 -6
HEROES ARE MERE TOO!
11 6 E. 5TH STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
(919) 757-0948
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
would like to welcome ECU students to
morning worship at 11:00 a.m.
August 25th
Free luncheon afterwards
1827 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
A dollar is
a terrible
thing to waste.
Used books cost a lot less. And UBE has a lot more used books than anyone else. Use your head. Shop UBE
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Wednesday-Thursday, Aug. 21 & 22 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday, Aug. 238:00 am - 7:00 pm
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Sunday. Aug. 251:00 pm - 6:00 Dm
Monday-Thursday. Aug. 26-299:00 am - 8:00 pm
Friday, Aug. 309:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday, Aug. 3110:00 am - 5:00 pm
REGULAk HOURS:
Monday - Friday, home football Saturdays 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Other Saturdays10:00 am - 5:00 pm
any purchase of
$75.00 or more. '
One coupon per customer.
Not valid with other offers.
Not valid on previous sales.
Not valid after 831-96.
1 516 S. COTANCHE STREET " UPTOWN GREENVILLE 758-263 j
How to Keep
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crack is so dangerous.
That marijuana can
often lead to hard
drugs. That every
illegal drug has the
potential of causing
catastrophic damage
to your child. To learn
more about drugs and
how to talk with your
kids about the subject,
call for a free parent's
handbook.
1-80Q-624-O100
Partnership For A
Drug-Free North Carolina
Partnership For A Drug-Free America
1-888-732-DFNC
Check out our classifieds
every Wednesday during
the summer, and every
Tuesday and Thursday
during the fall and spring
semesters. Whether
you're looking to rent or
just a new roomate,
your always on target
with The East Carolinian!
I
516 S. Cotanche Street Uptown
Greenville
HHwan
758-L616 http:UBEINC.COM





If-
rmuMW
8
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
ROTC offers direction
Jacqueline D.
Kellum
Staff �Mter
For freshmen
who are just entering
college and are not
sure about what path
to take for the next
four years, or who are
simply up for a new
challenge, the Army
Reserve Officer's
Training Corps may
add some direction
and definition to your
college experience.
Capt. Thomas
Cooke, who teaches
the freshman ROTC Photo Courtesy of Army ROTC
class, wants to make ROTC Cadet Israel Angeles gives a briefing to classmates at Fort Bragg
sure freshmen know during a weekend training exercise,
about the various ad-
Signing up for Army ROTC
does not obligate students to per-
form years of military service.
"There is no obligation to the
military as a freshman, "Cooke said.
"As a freshman, it's a two-credit
hour class. You don't have to buy
anything; everything is provided for
you
The freshman ROTC classes
meet for one hour a week in the
Welcome Back to ECU from
Dai r n
Queen
i
i
i
i
i
i
vantages.that the ROTC can give
them.
Cooke said he believes that
many freshmen are frightened away
from considering ROTC as a class
option because of misconceptions
they may have of the Army. Accord-
ing to Cooke, these misconceptions
result from films in which military
service is presented in an unflat-
tering light
classroom, and for a two hour lab
once a week. If students do a se-
mester of ROTC and decide they
don't like it, they don't have to sign
up for the class the next semester.
Students who decide that the
military has something to offer
them will be part of a group that
will provide them training, disci-
Buy One
Cone!
Get One
Cone
Free

r
i
Buy One
iBIizzard Get!
one at
12
Price
1011 D. Charles Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27858
(919) f58-0655
See ROTC page 15
WANTED
Students interested in becoming
representatives for the
Department of Athletics
as members of The
Pirate Crew. The
Pirate Crew is a
volunteer
organization that
assists ECU
Athletics in fund
raising activities and the
recruitment of student
athletes
For an application and information call
Are you interested in working for one off the best
student magazines published in the East? Then,
expressio
wants you.
We are looking for talented and ambitious
individuals for the following positions:
Managing Editor
Advertising Director
Advertising Representative
Staff Writer
If you are interested in gaining valuable work experience on
this nationally-recognized publication, go by the Media Board
office on the second floor of the Student Publications building
(across from the library) and fill out an application.

3 2 8-4570
LIVE&
LEARN.
We Make it
Convenient.
DISTINGU
MEMBER
Your biggest concern as a student should be your studies-not the cost
of a checking account East Carolina Bank has taken care of that expense
for you.
With our University Club Checking account, any full-time student is
eligible for a checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking
at any automatic teller machine with no ATM fee charged, no-fee traveler's
checks and a free order of 50 checks.
If you maintain a $100 minimum balance in the account, there are
no service charges. We also don't limit your checkwriting or ATM
withdrawals. Make life easier. Try University Club Checking.
ECB
SINCE 192?;
7s
NOW 3 LOCATIONS:
Red Banks Road Office � 1001 Red Banks Road
Greenville, N.C. 27858 � 919-355-8200
Walmart Supercenter � Greenville Boulevard
Greenville, N.C. 27858 � 919-355-5988
Supercenter Hours:
MonFri. 10am - 8pm
Sat. 10am - 6pm Sun. 1pm - 6pm
University Medical Center Office
2400 Stantonsburg Rd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 � 919-752-6609
JARVIS ST.
LAUNDROMAT
WASH FOR
'Minimum balance required is $100 or average $300. If balance requirement is not
met, fees are: $5 per month and $.35 per debt.
MEMBER FfilC
203 Jarvis Street,
Greenville
open euery day 6 a.m to IB p.m.
conuenient parking
single-load, double-load and
triple-load washers
and HOI DRYERS
fa wu&h and fold Avarice, aee Syxane
plus
�JT . ff � L Jtff





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20,1996
NEWS WRITERS NEEDED
Do you like to write? Do you have a good
sense of what is newsworthy? If so, then
you need to write for us. Apply at our office
on the second floor of the Student
Publication Bldg (across from Joyner).
SPECIAL INVITATION TO ALL STUDENTS
REENMLLE
HRlfellAN
ELLDWSHIP
.�"
I
GCF Provides;
� Family Atmosphere
� Contemporary Praise Of Worship
� New Life Christian Fellowship at ECU
Come join us each Sunday at 10:00am, on the
corner of Evans and 14th St. beside Grand Slam.
For More Information, call Eddie Hillird at 321-6262
Overtoil's
Over WaterOver Land NEVER OVER PRICED
SUMMER SAVINGS
3 PACK COTTON SOCKS FOR
MEN & WOMEN
RUSSELL
ATHLETIC
SC95
6
ENTIRE STOCK
CHAMPION
APPAREL
Shorts, tees,
sweats, dream
team apparel
OF
OLYMPIC
40
OFF
WOMENS
TENNIS
TSHIRTS
$
19
95
with colorful
designs
and prints
RUSSELL
ATHLETIC ECU
FOOTBALL
MESH SHORTS
95
$
24
SOFT
NYLON
PANT
2495
UMBRO SHORTS
ADULT b YOUTH STYLES
BUY ONE PAIR GET ANOTHER OF
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE AT
50 OFF
WOMENS TENNIS
SKIRTS
J3495
ONLY
9 colon to choose
sizes Irorr. 4 to 18
HOOPS APPAREL
FROM AND ,
S1JC95
"UP
16
T-shirts, game shorts,
and sportswear
ECU BAR
DESIGN
EMBROIDERED
TSHIRT
95
$
19
ENTIRE STOCK OF
BIMINI BAY APPAREL
25 OFF
Cargo shorts
& outdoor shirts
Reg 16 95
to 29 95
PENN REELS ANGLER JACKET
waterproof- breathable
matching
angler pant C
$4995
89
95
TEAM
TAFFETA
WARMUP
MESH
ATHLETIC
SHORTS
J2495
SEVERAL COLORS TO
CHOOSE FROM
JANSPORT
KEYSTONE
PACKABLE
JACKET
$3995
S599S
TEAM
EQUIPMENT BAG
WASHATCH
DAYPACK
$
24
95
TEAM TUNNEL
DUFFLE BAG
$2995
GEAR TOTE BAG
$3995
JANSPORT
BIG STUDENT
DAYPACK
$0yf95
34
JANSPORT
AGUA CALENTE
DAYPACK
S3495
ATHLETIC SHORTS'
MENS BASIC COTTEN AND MESH
STYLES ONE RACK OF EACH
I BUY ONE PAIR GET ANOTHER OF EQUAL
kOR LESSER VALUE AT
ENTIRE STOCK OF
SUNSHINE
MOUNTAIN
BACKPACKS
$
19
95
Reg 34 95 to 39 95
CHAMPION
CEAR
TOTE BAG
39
95
RUSSELL
50 OFF
CHAMPION
MESH
POCKET
SHORT
$2495
SALE ENDS MONDAY
l l l Keel Banks Koa
Greenville, NC
919-355-5783
STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday 9AM to 8PM
WHAT'S COOKING
ONXAMPJJS ?
Name and Hours
todd Dining Hall and
�MendenhaH Dining Hall
The Galley
Croatan
The Spot
The Wright Place
Hours
Monday - Friday
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday
10:30a.m: -7-p.m.
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Midnight
(Friday until 9:00 p.m.)
Saturday
noon - 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
noon - midnight
Monday - Friday
7:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday
Closed
Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m11:00 p.m.
(Friday until 9:00 p.m.)
Saturday
noon - 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
noon- 11:00 p.m.
Monday - Fnda'y
7:30 a.m 9:00 p.m.
Location
College Hill:
West Carripus
(MendenhaJI Student Center
College Hill
(Jones Residence Hall)
Menu
Full-meal services
Hot entrees, soups, fast-food,
homemade desserts, soft-serve
ice cream, pizza bar, salad bar,
grill items, fruit bar, pasta bar,
delicatessen '
fast food, breakfast biscuits,
bagels, pastries, fried chicken ,
hand-tossed pizza, Philly
cheesesteaks, burgers, frozen
yogurt, snacks
Adjacent to Brewster
and Austin
West Campus
(Mendenhall Student Center)
complete hot breakfast stir-
fried specialties, fried chicken,
burgers; packaged salads,
sandwiches, snafks
breakfast biscuits, bagels,
pastries, pizza, burgers, fried
chicken, delicatessen, Philly
cheesesteaks, snacks
Central Campus
(next to the Student Stores:
;tv, t'eakfast
d tossed
ciehcatessen,
xn
we
iAt
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
MOW 0WTY $220 PER PERSON
� WasherDryer in Every Apartment- ,
� Large Pool and Sand Volleyball Court a
� Lighted Basketball and Tennis Courts
� Clubhouse with Fully Equipped Fitness Room. �
� ECU Transit Service
Nozv Leasing (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd�reenville,NC 27858





10
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
Center offers major information
Photo Courtesy of ECU Report. Alumni Publication
Students learn about the latest career options and job listings on
bulletin boards at the Career Services Center.
It is never too
early to start
career planning
Amena Hassan
News Writer
ECU has a variety of majors,
and as students begin entering their
career fields, they have the option
of exploring information related to
their career interest on campus.
Although many freshmen begin
looking into their career options at
the counseling center, they can also
begin at career services. Career ser-
vices, located on East Fifth Street
opposite the Jenkins Fine Arts
Building, is a facility that enables
incoming freshman to explore po-
tential majors.
"We have a system called
MACES (Major and Career Explora-
tion System) that lists all the ma-
jors available at ECU with a brief
description of those majors said
Jeff S. Henley, assistant director of
career services. "Students car. find
MACES on the Internet and connect
to our home page from most com-
puter labs on campus, where we are
listed under Student Life
Students can reach the home
page at http:ecuvax.cis.edu
studlifecareerindex.htm.
"We also have other software
such as Siggy, an easy-to-use com-
puterized guidance program. Dis-
cover, and listings from the Occu-
pational Outlook Handbook, which
lists over 300 occupations Henley-
said.
Later, when freshmen have
chosen their majors and approach
their senior year, Career Services
becomes a major tool for many stu-
dents.
"Career services
can help them with
more active tasks at
this point Henley
said.
Some services
available are job refer-
rals, assistance in
writing resumes and
mock interviews
which polish commu-
nication skills.
The facility also
co-sponsors Career
D. vs. The annual
events welcome repre-
sentatives from sev-
eral companies and
small businesses to
talk to students and
provide valuable in-
formation.
"Career Days that
occur during the aca-
demic year are the Criminal Justice,
Business. Technical Writing, and
Health Career Days Henley said.
The cooperative education of-
fice, located in Room 2300 in the
General Classroom Building, is an-
other facility that freshmen may
want to visit. Pointing students to-
wards jobs before they graduate
provides the experience that many
employers require.
"However, students have to ob-
tain a minimum 2.0 grade point av-
erage to apply for any job through
the co-op office said Mary M.
Cauley. EdD, director of coopera-
tive education. "Once a student is
eligible, they can attend any of the
seminars given by co-op twice a
week
Dates for the seminars can be
found at the co-op office or in the
"Clue Book" which can be picked
up at Mendenhall.
"Freshmen will be in college
for a long time, and once they settle
into ECU. we are ready to help them
with their needs Cauley said.
"Even if students have not entered
their major, they can still obtain
preparatory experience through
other jobs
SALE
ftug. 19-24
Up to 50 off items daily
5Jidden treasures rift ghop
A 1012 Dickinson jftve.
cgreenville, Jflcg
T52-0111
'Thrift �bop is a work training
program through pitt ego. Rental health Renter
Quality
is OUR
MOTTO
MUe ' DELI
Quality Subs & Sandwiches
Yum, Yum
Wfrat a,
pizza!
Photo Courtesy of ECU Report, Alumni Publication
Formerly located in Bloxton House, Career services is now
at 701 E. Fifth Street, once home to ECU'S first president.
17tines Really
In the Classtfix. .s!
We've
got yew
favorite
"Kiomks
U1KVtn
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
91 9 Ddickinson Ave.
1-919-758-6909
uh in
The I, us I
Carolinian
,o
PIZZA IS COMING
SOON TO m DELI
10TH ST. LOCATION
Two Locations,
830-6686 355-8883
810 E. 10th St. The Plaza M.ill.
Open 7-10 7 Days a Week Food Court
FAX 830-6686
$2.99
I
LARGE SANDWICH CHIPS & DRINK I
Not good with any other offer. Expires 10-31 -96
I
STUDENJ.
DISCOUNTS
Walk-iw
Tues - Fri 9-6 Sat
South Greenville's
Neighborhood
Restaurant and
Gathering Place
Game Day or Any
Day
C3JF
X
I J. MCMurphy'g
BAB & GRILLE g
�irv-3
Sunday Brunch 11:30 - 2:00 PM
Featuring Grilled Entrees & Sandwiches
Also Salads, Appetizers and
Freshly Created Soups
� Quaint, Relaxed Atmosphere
� Full Service Bar
1914 Turnbury Dr.
(919) 355 -7956
Please inquire about catering
"Experience the Excitement"
of ECU away games and other sporting events
on our TV's
not banking.
If you've got better things to do at night than wrestle
with your checking account, the College Account
from Wachovia is for you. We make it easy, with
free checking and a Banking Card
with Visa Check, for free transactions
at any Wachovia ATM. Your card is also
accepted anywhere they take
Visa�-so you can pay for everything
from pizza to car repairs right from
your checking account, but with credit
card convenience. And when you need
help balancing your checkbook,
Wach
a pho
ovia's toll-free telephone banking lines are just
ne call away. You can get your balance or find
out if a check cleared with our auto-
mated Phone Access service. Or call
l-800-WACHOVIA (1-800-922-4684)
to reach a real Wachovia banker any-
time, 24 hours a day. Plus, you may
qualify for special student overdraft
protection, credit card and savings
accounts. It's easy! (At this point in
your life, shouldn't something be?)
And it's yours until you graduate.
Wachovia Bank is a member FDIC Accounts subject to approval
Credit cards are issued by Wchovia Bank Card Services. Delaware
WACHOVIA





AUGSEPT
1996
I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I � I I I I I �� H II � I I I I I I I 1 IT
mmmm
BJiijiIIIil
�,���. � .���� .����
$1.00 Bottle Beer
Ladies FREE til 11pm
AUGSEPT
1996
25 DRAFT
EVERY NITE
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS!
20 tues hot fm - BREAKFAST CLUB (win pair of tix to carrot top)
21 wedM.3FM - COMEDY ZONE - The Fat Doctor
(WIN PAIR OF TIX TO CARROT TOP)
22 thur wsfl fm � COWBOY MOUTH and FAR TOO JONES
(WIN PAIR OF TIX TO CARROT TOP WIN PAIR OF TIX TO HOOTIE)
23 friMX � KNOCKED DOWN SMILIN1 -
CRAVIN' DOGS -TREADMILL TRACKSTAR
(WIN 3 PAIR OF TIX TO ALANIS MORRISETTE � WIN 1 PAIR OF TIX TO CARROT TOP)
24 satCHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD (beach musics 1 show)
28 wedCOMEDY ZONE - Dave Parker i$l.00ECUADM.9-9:30PM)
EVERYTHING and THE DRAG (25c draft)
29 THUR.
)31 FRISATTBA
s 4 wedCOMEDY ZONE � Peter Hefty � Ventiloquist
5 thur DISCO INFERNO - 70's Disco Band (cash costume prize)
6 FRITHE BACK DOORS (25C DRAFT)
7 satPURPLE SCHOOLBUS (actual birthday night specials)
�v:
11 WED
12 THUR
13 FRI
14 SAT
COMEDY ZONE � Michael Reed
1 SKINNY J,$(25cDRAnk
PULSE -Pink Floyd Show ($20,000 light show)
GIBB DROIL BAND (25c draft,
18 WED iSSft
19 THUR att
MIKEMESMEFTEYES
!l
WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL HYPNOTIST 4�
20 friHEADSTONE CIRCUS and THE BACKSLIDERS (25e draft
21 sat THE NIGHTHAWKS - World's Best Bar Band (blues harp)
25 WEDCOMEDY ZONE-BILL KeLL0R(S1 .00 ECU ADM. 9-9:30PM)
26 thurGRAINGER - CD Release Party 25c draft)
27 FRI TBA
28 SAT
1971 - 1996
Tix available at: The Attic
Quicksilver Records � East Coast Music & Video � The Wash Pub
(JOE TRONTO)
� (JEFFCOBB) 752-7303 (STEWART CAMPBELL
2Q3.EaiHiSIRFFI.rGRFFNVH1 E-Nfl
NORTH CAROLINA'S
LEGENDARY ROCK N' ROLL
NITE CLUB
NOW IN IT'S ZSTH YEAR
IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CELEBRATES WITH
DURING ANNIVERSARY
SEASON
CHECK OUT OURTICKET
GIVEAWAYS ALL THIS WEEK
JL
BREAKFAST CLUB
TUESDAY, AUGUST 20
Acue 'pava-utej fan t&e '0&
THE FAT DOCTOR
"I'M SWEATIN' GRAVY"
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21
CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD
SATURDAY, AUGUST 24
EVERYTHING
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29
DISCO INFERNO
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
4 Picfe. � Get '70x
OtctU
V&&-s J.
PURPLE SCHOOLBUS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
(pteeHviUe 4 'peuwute &�ctl





�!�!�- .��� ��S "
i 1
12
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
crimfQene
This is a compilation of the highlights of
our Summer '96 Crime Scene.
May8
Larceny - A staff member reported that a statue was stolen from the back
yard of the chancellor's residence.
May 20
DWI - A non-student was arrested for driving while impaired, littering, oper-
ating an overcrowded vehicle, failing to stop for a duly erected stop sign and
obstructing and delaying a police officer.
Nay 25
Larceny, Damage to property, & Delaying a law enforcement officer - A
student and a non-student were arrested for stealing the plants from the Green-
house located west of the English Annex. The non-student was also charged with
resisting, delaying and obstructing a law enforcement officer after giving false
information regarding his identity.
June 20
TrespassingyBesistrag Arrest7 Assault On A Law Enforcement Officer-
An ECU alumnus was arrested north of Joyner Library after refusing to leave
campus. She was previously banned from campus. During the arrest she at-
tempted to flee and assaulted a police officer.
June 21
False Report Filed - A mental patient at Pitt County Memorial Hospital
called the ECU police department and filed a false report
Jury 8
Suspicious Person -A student reported that a male subject approached him
and another student and tried to sell them drugs. The student advised the sub-
ject to leave. When police arrived at 3:05 am. the subject was gone
Jury 9
Larceny - A non-student reported that floor tiles and tools were stolen from
the Recreation Center construction site while the crew was on vacation.
Jdy21
AnnedRobben'DischargingArTrearmtoTte
and one non-student were victims of an armed robbery at the Willis Building at
12-38 am During the commission of the robbery, the suspect fired a shot into
the ground near the victims.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from official ECUpolice reports.
Briefs
Senior track team
member wins pageant
Miss Keisha Johnson, a senior Thera-
peutic Recreation major at ECU was
crowned 1996 Miss North Carolina
Desert Shrine of the Ancient Egyptian
Arabic Order Nobles Mystic Shrine in the
annual W.C. Parker, Jr. Talent and Schol-
arship Pageant The pageant was held at
A & T University in Greensboro.
Keisha represented Rofelt Pasha
Shrine Temple 175 and Court 108 of
Rocky Mount She is a member of the
ECU women's track team and a dean's list student As her talent, she sang
"1 Dream A Dream" from the broadway musical, Les Miserables
Alumna appears as
Izzy in Atlanta
Many people may be familiar with
the mascot of the Atlanta Olympic
Games, a large blue creature named
Izzy. What they may not know is that
the person inside the costume is an
ECU alumna.
LaTara Bullock graduated from
ECU in 1991 with a degree in commu-
nications. She was also a cheerleader
and a Pure Gold dancer while at ECU.
Later she was a cheerleader for the
Atlanta Falcons.
Bullock took her job as Izzy very
seriously and said that Izzy has a per-
sonality in his own right
University employee laid to rest
ECU Student Stores reluctantly bids farewell to one of its dearest
allies, James E. Harris, who passed away after a heart attack on June
13.
Harris, who was responsible for the art and school supplies in the
Student Stores since 1967, took pride in his work and made sure the
book store kept up with the latest trends.
Harris, a native of Farmville, attended NC A&T in Greensboro and
is survived by his wife, Pearl, two daughters, Jennifer and Debbie and
two grandchildren, Emily and Wesley. No photo was available.
tjk. 'cfouch o 0�ass
6otu NufadU
TUESDAYS
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night For Female Dancers
Hpm-iam
CASH PRIZE
'CMtututt mi k Ml mi rtlrtw la ttnmt. Hart �iiw h It. J
THURSDAYS
Country Night
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ DANCERS WANTED $
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties. Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties. & Divorcee
ECU
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Ave.
I
McDoMld
I
(Behind John's Convenient Man;
I
CONV.
MAST
"I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
VlTlltfLIT A JtfE!
Get the experience you need
at The East Carolinian, The
following positions are open
for the Fall semester:
� News writers
� Sports writers
� Lifestyle writers
� Photographers
� Production
Assistants
� Copy Editors
� Cartoonists
� Opinion Columnists
� Staff Illustrator
Apply at our office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Bldg.
(across from Joyner).
'l�
DELTA SIGMA PHI
EPSILON PHI CHAPTER
Steve Briley's vi
Automotive Service Center
"A Full Service Center"
"complete computer prognosis"
1993-94 Most Improved GPA
1993-94 Most Improved Fraternity
11 Chapters in North Carolina
Annual Tunnel Party attracting
500 students
Highest Cumulative GPA on Campus
1994-95 Most Outstanding Fraternity
on Campus
Please Stop By Our House and Meet the
Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
Fall Rush '96
August 26-29
Bid Night August 30
510 E. 10th St.
If you need directions
or a ride please call
7571817 or 7572885.
ECU CAMPUS
inth Rtraftt
CoolmemTlush
Lube, Oil & Filter
�Check Hoses
�Check Belts
�Check Cooling Fan
$37.99
�Change Antifreze
�Flush System
�Inspect Radiator
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96
� -Oil Change up to 5 quarts �Gastrol GTX 20W50
'Replace Oil Filter -Lube Chassis
m �Check AUFliud Levels 'Check Air Filter
� � Check Belts & Hoses
�$14.95
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96
Computer Rotate &
Balance
4 Tires
95
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96
i Tune-Up
14 Cylinder
6 Cylinder
�8 Cylinder $40
�30�
835.�
�Replacement
Spark Plugs
�Adjust Timing
"Adjust Idle
�Check PVC
System
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96,
Fuel Injection Service
Our Fuel Injection service cleans clogged fuel
injectors to help restore performance and
economy.
$59.95
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96
II
II
II
II
Front Wheel Drive Axle
Replacement
Limited Lifetime Warranty
Most Passenger Vehicles
$159.99
II
JL
with coupon offer
expires 9-30-96
3142-A Moseley Dr.
Greenville, N.C.
(Behind Parker's BBQ off
Greenville Blvd.)
7 5 2-5043
Hours:
MonrL30ri30pjTi.
�J -VJL"





HMHMH
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
13
ALFREDO'S
.ew York 1'IZZA
ALFREDO'S
SPORTS
Lunch & Dinner
2 Slices 1
Topping
and Drink
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til 8pm Daily
MONDAY NIGHT
FOOTBALL
SPECIAL
8-12 �
2 LARGE PIZZAS
CARRY OUT .
$6.99
BAR
Wfed
$ I Rolling Rock
Thirsty Thurs.
$1 Fosters
Monday
Night
Football
10 Draft
SGA: For students, by students
Amy L Royster
Assistant News Editor
Greenville, NC 27858
Whether or not incoming students
decide to get involved, ECU's Student
Government Association (SGA) makes
decisions which effect all Pirates.
According to Jonathan Phillips.
SGA's treasurer, the primary purpose
of SGA is to provide a link between stu-
dents and administration. The second-
ary but more widely known role of SGA
is the appropriation of funds to various
campus organizations.
"There are about 80 organizations
SGA provides funding for Phillips said.
"We also assist all kinds of academic
clubs on campus
Phillips said SGA has an annual
budget of $180,000 which is derived
from $9.75 per student The organiza-
tion also has an interest-drawing reserve
fund which is used for special projects.
Last year. $40,000 rolled over into the
fund.
Appropriations are made after a
campus group submits an official re-
quest and a line-item budget Phillips
said that the size of the group and merit
are considered when the ten-person
appropriations committee makes a de-
cision.
"The committee tries to give the
organization enough money to go to
their conference Phillips said. "We
never fully fund organizations because
we like to see them put forth an effort
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Kim Anderson's
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August 20-23
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to raise their own funds
SGA is composed of three branches
which provide many positions for stu-
dents to fill, in the executive branch,
students hold the positions of president,
vice-president, trea-
surer and secretary ������
for the entire SGA
and for each of the
four classes.
The judicial
branch offers stu-
dents the chance to
hold seats on the
honor board. Fresh-
men have a good
opportunity to par-
ticipate in the legis-
lative branch as rep-
resentatives.
The final
branch is the legis-
lative, which con- �����������
sists of student-representatives. In or-
der to be a representative students can
come to Mendenhall 225 and fill cut
an application. Approximately 45 stu-
dents are elected anil ten are appointed
after a screening process. Two students
per residence hall and one student per
every 350 day students fill representa-
tive positions.
According to Eric Rivenbark, SGA's
Wee-president freshmen can participate
in SGA during their first semester.
"It's easy to get involved and I
would recom-
mend it
Rivenbark said.
"Don't be intimi-
dated. Jump in
with both feet"
Fall elec-
tions take place
during the fifth
week of the se-
mester. Phillips
said that the
SGA plans to an-
nounce exact
dates in The East
Carolinian
(TEC). Executive
������������� pOSjtions are
elected during spring elections.
Anyone with a valid student iden-
tification card is eligible to vote in SGA ,
elections. Phillips said that in the 19
spring elections, 2,200 students voted.
The total number of votes accounts for
See SGA page 15
"The committee
tries to give the
organization
enough money to
go to their
conference
n
Jonathan Phillips, SGA
treasurer
Student patrol
unit on duty
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
The student population of ECU is
protected by the ECU police force which
is on duty full time on campus grounds.
Supplementing the efforts of the police
is the student patrol.
The student patrol is on duty every
night on the main campus and at the
Brody Building to keep an eye out for
anything unusual or
suspicious and to
act as an extension
of the regular police
force. They also run
an escort service
which helps stu-
dents get around
campus, especially
at night
"Our job is
mainly on-campus,
with the residence
halls, and special
events like football
and basketball
games, and what-
ever else should hap-
pen to come up
said Student Patrol
Director Rinardo
Reddick.
The majority of the student patrol's
time is spent monitoring the residence
halls at night usually on foot
"For residence hall patrol, they're
on foot, going around their sections, and
then if someone needs to have a escort
done, we have a vehicle we use for that
Most of the things we do are on foot"
Reddick said.
The student p trol is equipped with
communication gear rather than weap-
ons. If they come across a situation which
'Our job is mainly
on-campus, with
the residence
halls, and special
events like
football and
basketball games,
and whatever else
should happen to
come up
� Rinardo Reddick, director
of student patrol
Greenville's Best Kept Secret!
onnecuon
Division Of ffiffiJIi
Apparel Outlet Specializing in Discount Catalog
Clothing for Men and Women
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
M-S 10-6, Sun 1-5
the regular police force is better equipped
to handle, they are able to contact them.
"The radio is what we mainly count
on, because it gives us direct access to
what they're doing, and vice versa. We
could easily come on the radio and say
there's a ten-forty, which is a fight and -
the officers would be right there to help �
us. We are basically their eyes to what's '�'
happening on campus Reddick said.
Other than the radios, the gear
which the student patrol carries is mini-
maL
"We have
regular walkie-
talkies like the;
sworn officers ��2
here do, and the �
same ashlight.
And then we have 2
the keys we use to �
get into the resi- ���
dence halls, if�"
there was an �
'SSI
emergency or ��
something of that jg
nature, or we g
needed to check a ��
door. If we found SI
a door unlocked j�
late at night we 3
have the keys in
our possession to
lock them Reddick said.
If there are students interested in 3
becoming part of the student patrol, �
Reddick says all majors are welcome to �'
apply. S
"I'm looking for persons who are J
very person-oriented and easy to get �
along with, take orders very well friendly, z�
outgoing, they're not afraid to ask ques- �
tions We do criminal background checks, �!
because of the liability that we have S
Reddick said. E
Students on the patrol are expected : �
to keep their grades up, and Reddick said �
grades would be checked.
"There's a certain grade point aver- 3
age that you have to maintain, just to be �;
a student patrol officer, which is a 2.0 Jj
Reddick said. gj
Reddick said that students on the J
patrol may have to plan ahead a little J
better with their studies than most, given Z
the hours that they work.
"Typically the hours during the
school year for the student patrol are-
from eight p.m. to 2 a.m. There are usu-�
ally eight students out each night jj
Reddick said.
m
For the student who is looking to;
supplement their financial aid or earn Jj
spending money, the student patrol is a '
paid position.
"The pay will be $5.10 an hour for:
residence hall iatrol, and $6.15 an hour
for special events. There's a maximum
of twenty hours a week for residence hall!
patrol, and 19 hours a week for special v
events Reddick said.
Special events could include basket
in
ball or football games, or just the gen
eral confusion that usually accompanies;
the first day of registration and paying
for fees.
If any students are interested in join
ing the student patrol, the office is k
cated in the police headquarters on tenths
street
wfgram �-mar- i -






14
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
BUY ONE-GET ONE
SALS ALL WSW
f
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE, SPRITE,
Diet coke or.
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WEDNESDAY
21
Copyright 1996. The Kroger Co.
Items & Prices Good hi
We reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to dealers





v
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20,1996
15-
SGA
from page 13
125 percent of ECU'S student popula-
tion.
"That percentage is around aver-
age Phillips said. "Nationwide, ten per-
cent is the average in college elections
The current SGA president, Angela
Nix. is a senior accounting major.
Rivenbark is a senior business major
and Phillips is a senior with a double
major in political science and finance.
SGA's secretary Julie Thompson is also
a senior who is majoring in education.
Phillips said that so far, the SGA
has already delivered one campaign
promise by changing the times of home
football games from around noon to
later in the afternoon. The first three
home games of the season are sched-
uled to begin at 4 p.m. Momecoming
and the Ia-t home game are scheduled
for 2 pjit kick-offs.
Phillips said SGA plans to initiate
a book bartering system to be utilized
by students. The system would allow
students in need of particular books to
locate other students with those books
via computers.
"SGA wants to use it (The Book
Barter System) in the spring semester
Phillips said. "It will save students
money
Another point of interest to SGA
are the residence halls that lack air-con-
ditioning.
"We're trying to help the adminis-
tration form a plan to have all residence
halls air conditioned Phillips said.
Another project mentioned to be
in the works wus a plan to paint the
railroad overpass, which passes above
Charles Blvd. between Greenville Blvd.
and 14th St, purple and gold.
Phillips said that in light of con-
troversy over 60 contested votes dur-
ing the spring elections, SGA is look-
ing into more efficient polling proce-
dures.
"Hopefully, as of this year we will
be going to an electronic system
Phillips said. "SGA is looking at the
possibility of students having a card
that combines the student identifica-
tion card, the meal card and the library
card. This card could also be used at
the poll place
With all the changes Phillips ex-
pects SGA to implement, he encour-
ages incoming students to join the or-
ganization.
"The benefits are numerous
Phillips said. "SGA builds character
and leadership skills. It prepares you
for the business world early by start
ing students off in the right direction
���
No Hassles.
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Up to 60 hours of local access. One-time sign up fee of $14.95, additional
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campusMCI Internet service provided pursuant to
campusMCI program. � MCI Telecommunications Corporation, 1996.
KUIC from page 8
pline, lifelong friends and the eligi-
bility to compete for scholarships.
"We can help people get
through school because there's a
lot of money there he said. "It'll
pay for your full tuition, $450 for
books a year and a $150 (a month)
stipend. Freshmen can compete for
a three-year scholarship just after
their first semester
A minimum 2.5 GPA and at
least an 850 SAT is required to be
considered for Army ROTC schol-
arships. Students accepting schol-
arships are required to serve a cer-
tain amount of time in military ser-
vice.
The ROTC can be a valuable as-
set to incoming freshmen by help-
ing them to settle in. Cooke said
that all ROTC freshmen are as-
signed a sponsor, who will be a
sophomore, junior, or senior ROTC
member. The sponsor shows their
freshman around campus, helps
them with registration if necessary
and answers any questions they
might have.
"I would say that the students
learn more from each other than
from us Cooke said of the spon-
sor system.
After the initial settling-in pe-
riod, there are many activities avail-
able to ROTC students, some of
which are training-related and oth-
ers purely social.
"We do a lot of adventure train-
ing Cooke said. "We do
rappelling, we're taking a ski trip,
and we also do weekend exercises.
We do those (weekend exercises)
about once a month
Cooke said the social activities
might include events such as pic-
nics, tailgate parties at football
games and a formal dinner held
once a semester.
There is also a chance for in-
terested ROTC members to com-
pete in their own sport
"We have a varsity sport, which
most people don't know, called
Ranger ChaMenge Cooke said.
"It's a series of military events like
physical fitness, marksmanship, and
land navigation. Cadets cross a
river with a rope bridge, and they
do a 10 km march
After completing their four
years of ROTC in college, those who
choose to make a career of the mili-
tary will not necessarily be spend-
ing all their time on rifle drills and
outdoor marches. There are many
other jobs in the military covering
a variety of disciplines.
"For every guy shooting a rifle,
there's ten people behind him
Cooke said, referring to people
working at desks and driving trans-
ports as examples. "It's amazing
the things you can doYou can be
a lawyer, a dentist, or anything. It's
really very diverse
The ROTC has as many oppor-
tunities for female students as for
anyone else.
"It's not broken down-you're
male, you're female. Everyone gets
the same training and is held to the
same standards Cooke said. "The
percentage of women is about 20
percent, which is really not as much
as we'd like
Cooke said the ROTC has much
to offer incoming freshmen�disci-
pline, motivation and physical fit-
ness among other things. And for
those who choose it, a military ca-
reer after college can be equally as
rewarding. Some cadets choose to
serve a few years in order to pay
back scholarships. During their en-
listment, they can receive training
that prepares them for finding a job
when they get out
"We can offer you a job and
you do something worthwhile for
four years; and you have a resume
that's two or three pages long
Cooke said.
For anyone who would like
more information about ROTC be-
fore enrolling, there will be an in-
formation session on day two of ori-
entation in Room 1016 of the Gen-
eral Classroom building. Students
can also go by the ROTC office in
Rawl Room 346 or call 328-6967
and ask for Captain Cooke.
:r
nmer -





f
��
16
rv
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
ems
jf
Help
Wonted
Do you have some
things you need to get
rid of?
Advertising in our
classifieds can help.
Call Steve English @
328-2000
jtRINGGOLD TOWERS
jjNow Taking Leases for
Jg bedroom, 2 bedroom &
! Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1203 FORBES ST. 1BD 1 Bath WD
Hookup, Remodeled Kitchen & Bath. Big
Rooms, Nice Yard, Pets OK, Lawncare in-
cluded! $300month 830-9502
IALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
YERS Club Apartments. Washer
fcr, use of all amenities, split cable,
(le and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-
L Very Affordable!
1 BEFORE AUGUST 31, get last 10
September free -1 & 2 bedroom's in
nerfield, Brasswood, Riverbluff, and
Jamsburg. Call Potomac Properties
9722.
FORBES ST. 3BD 1 Bath, WD
kup, Remodeled Kitchen & Bath, Cen-
C & Heat, Nice yard, Pets OK, Lawn-
j included! $500month 830-9502
W)MMATE NEEDED SERIOUS
ENT or Professional to share con-
tertftorary apartment Rent $270 plus uMl-
ititl 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call 353-1027
Sap A MONTH, 2 bedroom, 1 bath new
brjfit duplex in Ayden, minutes from
Orftnville, Call Day 321-6406 or Night
32jg2329 or 756-2456. Ask for Ben or Ken.
FgfcALE ROOMMATE NONSMOKER
nlJtJGFREE mature. 2 bdrm, 2 bath du-
pl4 Heritage Village WD $250mo. Ref-
ces required. 355-2944
SEARCH OF HONEST, easy going,
le roommate(s) to apartment hunt
Non-smokers preferred. Have all
jshings Call Amy at 407-1552
For Sale
OSNG TROUBLE? TWO SPACES
jabie .1 mile from Brewster. $150 for
)e year. $85 for Fall semester. Call 758-
ask for Drock or leave message
ACROSS FROM NEW Student Re-
ion Center. Rent $225 month at 810
e Street. Call 752-2615. Bill Wil-
Real Estate beside Cubbies on Evans
t
MMATE WANTED TO SHARE
e on river 5 miles from campus,
a week. $100.00 deposit. Possible
work for rent. Everything included
ipt phone. Call 830-1787.
LOVESEAT - COMFORTABLE, in great
condition, $75 or best offer. Also, lamps,
other items. Call 756-3017 evenings.
ATTENTION PARENTSSTUDENTS -
Why Pay Rent? You can buy a Manufac-
tured Home less than Rent Special, No
money down Gov't Financing for Students
and Parents! Call 919) 749-5932 leave
message.
GREAT CAR, GREAT DEAL, Bought
New, Kept in Family 1988 Subaru GL, 4dr,
Loaded-Tilt Cruise, Alpine Stereo Cassette
PW PL Cold Air $1950.00. Cash Call 749-
5932 Leave Message.
DRUM SET - six piece with many extras
Must sell. Worth $1,000.00 or more. Ask-
ing $650.00. Call Kevin 752-1955
FOR SALE - Dorm refrigerator - $50. Call
753-8798
TWIN BED FOR SALE. Mattress,
boxspring and frame. Almost new. Must
sell $75.00 or Best Offer. Call Tricia 830-
9431
FOR SALE QUEEN SIZE sleeper sofa.
Well used. $25 cash only. No delivery - U
pick up. Call 355-7691
1987 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Fully
Loaded - Dark Blue - Leather Interior. Cold
AC. Need the money $1850.00.551-6759
leave message.
JVC STEREO COMPONENT CABINET;
one pair stereo floor speakers; two bar-
stools; two Liz Claiborne duffle-style hand-
bags. Call between 8am-8pm 752-9243
COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS
STARTING at $100.00. RECOMPUTE,
303 S. Evans St (Mall) across from Court-
house. Tue-Wed-Thurs. 10am-4pm 757-
2740
10HET11TH ST. 3BD1 Bath, WD, DW,
Ce ral AC & Heat Nice Private Back
Ya$. Lawncare included, Pets OK! $600
' h. 830-9502
' TO LIVE OFF campus this year?
I a roommate, male or female, smok-
)K, to take over half of the lease. Call
.rjlifo. Lori 752-0009.
LE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
I Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
II amenities, split cable, phone and
ties 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very
able.
1BE. 13TH ST. 5BD2 Bath, WD
Hfjitup, Stove, Frig, Central Heat Big
Rqcgns, Lots of Parking. Lawncare includ-
ed! Pets OK! $750month. 830-9502
m
Help
wanted
WANTED: STUDENTS INTERESTED
IN becoming representatives for the De-
partment of Athletics as members of the
Pirates Crew. The Pirates Crew is a volun-
teer organization that assists ECU athlet-
ics in the recruitment of Student Athletes.
Call 328-4570 for an application and more
information
Golden Corral is now accepting
applications for all positions.
Benefits include
� Education Fund
� Vacation for employees
� Flexible hours
� Insurance available
Apply within. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
-F between 2-4pm
M-
DO SOMETHING DIRTY TODAY
Come take a walk through the construction
site of our newly renovated complex located
on West Eighth Street.
it
I
f 6 month or 1 year leases
Professionally
Managed by
Iff Help
wanted
Driver -with own
car. Wanted part -
time after school to
drive children to
soccer practices ect.
Female preferred.
Call 830-9316
after 7 p.m.
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now
being accepted for domestic & internation-
al staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents,
reservationists, ground crewmore. Ex-
cellent travel benefits! Call Airline Employ-
ment Services for details. 1-206-971-3690
ext L53622
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the
world while earning an excellent income
in theCruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry.
Seasonal & full-time expioyment available.
No exp necessary. For info, call 1-206-971-
3550 ext C53627
STUDENTS: Looking for part-time work
with flexible hours? ECU is looking for
few good Pirates to contact alunmi for the
Annual Fund program. $5.00 per hour.
Contact the Telefund Office at 3284215.
CREATIVE BUSINESS
SERVICES
� Research papers
�Thesis & Dissertations
� Career resumes
�Text & Graphic Scanning
�Tables, Charts, Graphs
PICK UP AND FREE
DELIVERY
QUICK TURNAROUND
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Betty Hines - 20 years experience
756-9895
The East Carolinian is
now accepting applications
for all positions.
Please apply at our office on
the second floor of the
Student Publications Bldg. (across
from Joyner)
em
College Agent Program
immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Wsll Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
Brand new 3 bedroom apartments
2 full baths
Water and sewer included
Close to campus and downtown nemco
Laundrv facilities on site IB reea8t
IO inc.
- 355-1313
!�
AFTERSCHOOL SITTER NEEDED
FOR two eleven year-old girls (sixth grad-
ers at St. Peter's Catholic School). They
are good, motivated students and well-
mannered, independent children. 2:45-
5:15pm Mon-Fri (but there is flexibility
when it is needed by you). Very little driv-
ing involved, but must have your own car
for school pick-up and when needed. Good
Pay and Comfortable Home Situation. Ex-
perience in childcare preferred and refer-
ences required. Please call 757-1378
(there is an answer machine if you need
to leave a message with your name and
number and best time to contact).
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: FREE
room. In exchange for help every other
weekend with mentally handicapped
daughter. Prefer student whose major is
in related field. Call 756-9890 after 6pm
TIRED OF WORKING FOR peanuts?
Call 3556834 ext 133
CHILD CARE WORKERS NEEDED:
Community Bible Study, a women's inter-
denominational Bible study is in need of
several young women to work with child-
ren four and under on Tuesdays 9-11:45am
at St. James Methodist Church andor
Thursdays 8:30-12:30am at Oakmont Bap-
tist Church to provide patient loving care
and instruction to our youngest particip-
ants. Experience preferred, references re-
quested, must be able to provide own
transportation and make commitment
through December 12. Call Mrs Baker,
class coordinator at 355-8368
BOWEN CLEANERS 13 NOW accepting
applications at its Bells Fork location for
morning customer service representatives.
Hours will be 7:00am til 2:00pm or 8:00am
til 5:00pm.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT -
Earn up to $25-$45hour teaching basic
conversational English in Japan. Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For info, call:
(206) 971-3570 ext. J53626
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 4 month
old. Regular Saturday Nights and some
Friday Nights. Experience with infants is
required. Graduate student preferred. $5
per hour. References a must 353-1797
CHILDCARE NEEDED: Tues and Weds,
2-5; Mon. thru Fri. Sam- lpm. Call between
8am and 8pm 752-9243. Leave message
with available hours.
brody's welcomes you back to school!
As eastern North Carolina s leading fash-
ion retailer for women and men, Brody's
offers all students the opportunity for 10-
29 hours per week, flexible scheduling ar-
ound class schedule, and a clothing dis-
count to start off your year with a great
fall wardrobe! Applications for sales posi-
tions are accepted Tuesdays, lpm-5pm,
Brody's, The Plaza or Carolina East Mall.
If
Help
wanted
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 3 year old.
MWF 9:30am-2:30pm. References and own
transportation required. Please call 830-
1497
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry
level & career positions available world-
wide (Hawaii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc. Wait-
staff, housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders,
fitness counselors, and more. Call Resort
Employment Services 1-206-971-3600 ext
R53624.
FAMILY IN WESTHAVEN DESIRES in
home caregiver 7:30-9am Friday. 7:30-lpm
Thursday. Two children 2 yrs & 8 months.
Start Aug. 21st Need own transportation.
CPR and 1st Aid preferred. Call 756-9950
Becky.
EARN MONEY READING BOOKS. Be
gin now, for free info call 202-298-0683.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Board other benefits. For info, call (206)
971-3680 ext. K53623
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics, Office of Student De-
velopment is currently hiring full-time
ECU students and graduate students to
tutor student-athletes in all subject areas.
Minimum 2.5 CPA required. Call 328-4550
STUDENTS, LOOKING FOR A part time
job? RPS has package handler positions
available from 5pm-9pm. Tuition assis-
tance available after 30 days. Fill out an
application at 104 United Dr. - near the
Greenvjlle Aquatics and Fitness Center.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER WANT-
ED TO keep two young children in my
home on Mondays. Wednesdays, and Fri-
days from 12-5. Own transportation re-
quired. Non-smoker. Call 756-0941
LIFE SUCKS WHAT ARE youdoing to
change it? Is money the answer? Call 355-
6834 ext 110
FALL SOCCER COACHES: THE Green
villt Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the fall girls and boys
soccer programs. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-16, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00pm until
7:00pm with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid-November. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James at 830-4567
or Michael Daly at 8304550
"MOTHERS HELPER" STAY AT HOME
MOM needs help with care of young child-
ren and light housekeeping (laundry, dish-
es, toys, etc) Part-time or Full-time
hours, flexible but steady once set Must
be organized and love kids! Please call
321-6931
t
Services
m Offered
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE AVAIL-
ABLE. Call 830-0760. Reasonable rates
with fast turnaround.
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF The Wall with
Bubba Rocks DJ Services. Country
RockTop 40Dance. $200 for 3 hours of
Pure Jammin! Call 321-1144
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All Students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext
F53628
VEED MONEY? WANT TO know how"
to make money everytime someone else
uses their phone? Call Kevin 752-1955.
Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
apt 12 block from campus, 3 blocks from
downtown, supermarket & laundromat
Rent includes utilities, phone & cable. Call
757-1947
m
Greek
i Personals
PRE-RUSH PARTY Alpha Sigma Phi
would like to invite everyone out to the
Pre-Rush Party on Aug. 23. For more info
call 757-3516
Announcements
IS THERE OBJECTIVITY IN Science?
Perspectives, A Noon Time Lecture Ser-
ies, Fall 19. Monday, August 26, 12:30-
1:30pm in Brody 2W-50. "How the Social
Sciences Construct Their Own Objects of
Investigation" Johann Louw, PH.D Pro-
fessor & Chair, Department of Psycholo-
gy, University of Cape Town, South AfU-
Ca
INTERESTED IN TAKING AN aerobic
class? Recreational Services will be offer-
ing Drop-in Aerobics August 21-31 at 3pm,
4:15pm and 5:30pm in Christenbury 108
and Garrett Stop by 204 Christenbury to
gel a pass today! For more information
call Recreational Services at 328-6387
OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISOR-
DER SUPPORT: New Group Forming.
This is an exciting opportunity to gain in-
sight and support from those that best
understand the issues-others that also
struggle. The benefits from a circle of sup-
port are many You are encouraged to par-
ticipate and to share. This first meeting
will include an educational film regard-
ing obsessive compulsive disorder and dis-
cussion on the future group dynamics and
structure. Your input is valuable. First
meeting - Monday, August 26, 1996,
7:00pm at immanuel Baptist Church, 1101
S. Elm Street Greenville. Facilitated by:
Karen Smith. Sponsored by: The Mental
Health Association in Pitt County. PO Box
167, Greenville, NC 27835. For addition-
al information call: 752-7448
WANT TO BECOME A Monica Seles or
Michael Chang? The Lifestyle Enhance-
ment program will be offering tennis less-
ons this semester. Interested individuals
should register in 204 Christenbury Au-
gust 26-September 6 from 9am-5pm. For
more information call Recreational Serv-
ices at 3286387
WANT TO RIDE A horse on the beach?
The most popular adventure trip is back!
On September 8 the adventure program
will be horseback riding once again on
the beaches of Cedar Island. Interested
individuals should register in 204 Chris-
Announcements
tenbury by August 30. For more informa-
tion call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
GRAB A PADDLE AND come to this
year's day long Canoe Trip to Merchant's
Mill Pond on September 7. Interested in-
dividuals should register in 204 Christen-
bury by August 30. For more information
call Recreational Services at 328-6387
THE VOLUNTEER GUARDIAN AD Li-
tem Program is looking for advocates for
abused, neglected and dependent child-
ren. Volunteers are tra.ned, then appoint-
ed with an attorney to represent the child's
best interest in juvenile court hearings.
The program works with other agencies
in locating and developing resources that
would benefit the child and their family.
Volunteers can assist by speaking out for
Children's rights to grow up in a safe and
caring environment For more information,
contact Catherine Darby, Guardian ad Li-
tem District Administrator, PO Box 1391,
Greenville, NC 27835 or call (919) 830-
6217. Training classes for new volunteers
will begin September 26.
GET READY TO HIKE the football for
this year's Flag Football! Register your
team during the Flag Football Preview
Registration Meeting on August 27 at 5pm
in Mendenhall 244. For more information
call Rprrpatinnal Services at 328-6387
START YOUR SCHOOL YEAR on the
right foot and register for the first aero-
bic session of the year. Interested individ-
uals should register in 204 Christenbury
between August 21-31 from 9am-5pm. For
more information call Recreational Serv- ,
ices at 328-6387V.
FREE AEROBICS, FUN AND food will
all be on hand during this year's Energy
Explosion on August 27 at 4pm in Chris-
tenbury Gym. For more information Call
Recreational Services at 3286387.
LOOKING FOR A WEEKEND getaway
already? Recreational Services will be of-
fering a Labor Day Backpacking Trip to
Mt Mitchell August 30-September 2. In-
tercstt"I individuals should register in 204
Christenbury by August 23. For more in-
formation call Recreational Services at
328-6387
SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN GREENVILLE-
PITT COUNTY, will be conducting a Soc-
cer Coaches Training School on Sat, Sep-
tember 21st from 9am-4pm for all individ-
uals interested in volunteering to coach
soccer. We are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: basket-
ball skills, team basketball, swimming, rol-
lerskating, and bowling. No experience
necessary. For more information please
contact Dwain Cooper at 8304551 or
Dean Foy at 8304541 � '
COMMUTER STUDENTS - If you are
commuting to ECU this Fall and would
like to share the driving with another stud-
ent or if you need a ride or riders check
out the Commuter RideRider Board tem-
porarily in the Croatan, to be permanent-
ly located in The Wright Plaoe as soon as
it reopens.
PICK THE WINNING NFL teams and win
a t-shirt This year's NFLECU Football
Pick'em Entry forms will be available on
August 26 at 10:00am in Christenbury
204. For more information call Recreation-
al Services at 3286387
ATTENTION ALL ADULT STUDENTS.
The Adult Student Services Office is look-
ing for people to serve as Mentors for in-
coming adult students. If you have com-
pleted one semester or more here at ECU
and would like to pass along your knowl-
edge of campus life to another, we need
you! Please contact Wilda Hart at UGWL-
HART@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU or Dr.
Lucy Wright in the Office of Special Pop-
ulations in 211 Whichard Bldg 3286882.
Training sessions for new mentors the Fall
semester will be held the beginning of Sep-
tember
TOURS OF THE JOYNER Library Addi
tion: ECU students, faculty, and staff are
invited to tour the new Joyner Library ad-
dition. Tours will be offered Mondays
through Thursdays at 10am and 3pm.
Those interested should meet in the old
lobby at the tour sign near the informa-
tion desk. These tours, approximately half
an hour in length, will be offered from
the first week of classes until fall break.
The East Carolinian
Advertising in the Classifieds
HOURS
Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
PHONE
Advertising Phone No.
(919)328-2000
Fax
(919)328-6558
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$2
Each word over
25, add 54
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to reject any ad for libel, obscenity andor
bad taste.







?��
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K '
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
"The Best Value
In Town"
;
Ki
GREEN
APARTMENTS
i
EDR00M$285.
2
3
BEDROOM $370.00380.00
BEDROOM $465.00
$5,000 Rent Giveaway
$100 Off First month's Rent
$100 CASH COMMISSION if you refer someone who leases
$200 Off First month's Rent if you refer yourself
FREE MOVING SERVICE for Greenville Residents
CALL FOR AUGUST
SPECIALS!
v V
We are open
everyday to serve
you (8-6 M-F, 9-5
Sat, 1-5 Sun). We
have 24 hour
maintenance, on-
sight management &
security, heating and
air conditioning,
swimming pools, free
cable XV, free
watersewer, all
appliances, nice
carpeting, ECU bus
service and much
more!


h
On August 31, 1996, a drawing will occur at
4:00pm from a list of persons leasing
apartments at Eastbrook and Village Green
Apartments between July 15,1996, and August fA XJocfUtvnlr Tlf4t7l�
31, 1996. The first name drawn will receive LJ IafclUlUUIV JLIIVC
$2000 rent credit, the second name drawn will
receive $1500 rent credit, the third name drawn
will receive $1000 rent credit and the fourth
name drawn will receive $500 rent credit. All
special promotions will end August 31, 1996.
752-5100
"
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,48
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
t�
I PERFECT IMPRESSIONS
�HAIR SALON
Full ServicTSalorr�
830-1987 f
Walk-ins Welcome!
Student Discount Year Round
HOURS: T J. �. .
Mon-Fri 12-8 Located m University
Tue-Fri 9:30-8 Center near Harris Teeter
Sat 9:30-5
TRAFFIC from page 3
parkin will be located in the same
lot.
Parking along Alumni Circle
will be eliminated as of July 1. Ad-
ditional staff parking will be located
in the lot south of Joyner.
"The old commuter iot behind
Joyner is now a university regis-
tered lot Gertz said. "Staff can
park there now
Updates and details about this
and other projects taking place on
ECU'S main campus can be found
on the university's home page, un-
der a link entitled Parking Adjust
ment Notices.
Editor's Note: After this story
was printed, Parking and Traffic
Services made the following an-
nouncement:
The following parking lot per-
mit designation changes will be
strictly enforced beginning on Mon-
day, August 12.
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516 S.Cotanche Street � Uptown Greenville � 758-2616
North of Slay Hall south of
Flanagan: 27 spaces will change
from STAFF to RESIDENT.
10th Street and College Hill
Drive: parking lot on corner, east
of College Hill Drive will change
from UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
to STAFF.
South of Joyner Library: UNI
VERSITY REGISTERED parking
lot changes to STAFF.
East of Carret Hall west o
Jenkins Art Center: UNIVERSITY
REGISTERED parking lot change
to STAFF.
?NEW PARKING LOTS OPE
COMMUTER LOT: Corner c
Third Street and Reade Street
STAFF LOT: Corner of Fourt
Street and Reade Street
JffnLKJ. from page 2
Under the administration's plan
ECU expects to add an additiona
2,000 spaces of surface parking ir
the area north of Dowdy-Ficklen Sta
dium currently used as intramural
fields. New intramural fields will be
constructed on donated land neat
the Allied Health Building.
The first step in the plan is to
add 879 spaces in the field behind
Dowdy-Ficklin Stadium once the
new intramural fields are completed.
This will take about a year and a
half, Getsinger said.
Other inexpensive parking op-
tions are also being explored, includ-
ing the widening of Chancellor Way,
the road that runs in front of Cot-
ton, Jarvis and Fleming dorms, to
allow perpendicular parking.
Getsinger said that parking will
come back on line after current cam
pus construction winds down.
"Parking should start getting
considerably better he said.
Money isn't the only reason
other options should be explored,
Getsinger said. While a parking deck
would increase parking spaces, there
is also evidence that it would in-
crease crime on cam) us.
"Through my exploration of the
possibility of a parking deck, I have
become aware that on other cam-
puses with decks, the number of per-
sonal assaults and instances of ve-
hicle vandalism have increased.
Decks bring a new set of problems
to the campus
One of the reasons Getsinger
sees a parking deck as an unneces-
sary expense is the level of success
that the transit system has had with
the shuttle service.
"We've gotten to the point
where there is a ten-minute turn-
around with the shuttle system
Getsinger said. "A ten-minute walk
to anywhere on campus is consid-
ered an easy distance and reason-
able traveling time
FEES
from page 4
dents have to pay fees for services
that they don't think they person-
ally will use, but that making the
fees mandatory for everyone is the
best way to bring the services to
the majority.
"We understand that when you
make something required for 17,
700 students, it's not going to be
100 percent applicable 100 percent
of the time for all 17.700 students,
but we know by making it a re-
quired fee that we are bringing the
services to the mass number at the
lowest price Balko said.
Balk wished to stress to stu-
dents that paying for tuition and
paying fees are two very different
things. Tuition is determined by the
state and covers strictly educa-
tional costs, whereas the required
fees are reviewed and set by the
board of trustees, with final ap-
proval by the N.C. Board of Gover-
nors.
Things Really Move
Advertise
with us in
The East
Carolinian.
minmjHM�
����





� - sammmms
19
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Oun,1teui
While you're
home sleeping
or downtown
partying, the
staff of The East
Carolinian is
hard at work
producing a
paper full of the
latest in news,
features, sports
and
commentary.
"Pick m$ up
We're available
every Tuesday
and Thursday.
By the students and for the students-7e East Carolin-
ian.
The student newspaper celebrates its 71st year of publica-
tion this fall, and thanks to students, we're still going strong.
We give thanks to not only the students who read TEC, but to
the students who spend countless hours running it
We stay late and rise early to make sure this publication
is the best it can be, and yes, we make mistakes-that goes
along with the learning experience we gain by working for
the newspaper. We have exams and social events to attend
just like anyone else, but TEC gives us an extra identity with
campus. We always look forward to seeing new faces and you
never know, yours could be next
TEC News always aims to get the scoop (sometimes suc-
ceeding and other times not) The news section features ev-
erything from the latest hard news to studentfaculty pro-
files and the never-ending construction projects. If anything
interesting happens, we'll make sure you're informed. And if
YOU see anything happening that is of interest to the student
body, please call us anytime.
Lifestyle is the coolest section. Our lifestyle writers will
tell you anything and everything from what the local sound
sounds like, to what free movies are playing at Hendrix The-
ater. Not only do they write restaurant CD and book reviews,
the lifestyle section gives you the extra twist you may need to
stay hip with college life.
Sports is the favorite section for Pirate fans. Our football
tabloid, The End Zone, is better than any other because our
writers are students, just like our athletes. You'll find our
sports writers on the gridiron, the track, the diamond, the
frisbee golf course or anywhere else ECU students are com-
peting.
Advertising pays the bills. TEC takes pride in the fact that
we are one of the only completely self-supported, student-run
organizations at ECU. Our ad reps worked through the swel-
tering heat for weeks in order to find the great deals in our
Back-to-School issue. The ad reps also gain valuable sales ex-
perience they can take with them away from Greenville when
they graduate.
Without our production department, there would be no
newspaper. This department creates and fine-tunes advertise-
ments and puts the paper together like a puzzle.
Don't forget "to check out our classifieds and announce-
ments section. If you need a roommate, have something to
sell or want to send your sweetheart a personal, TEC
Classifieds is the place to advertise. It's not free, but it's cheap.
Enough patting ourselves on the back, TEC employees
will continue to work for students for the next 70 years or so,
hopefully longer. We don't try to compete with other publica-
tions because we don't need to. ECU students are our audi-
ence and as long as we're in print we'll cater to you.
If you'd like to learn more about TEC, give us a call at
328-6366 or stop by the Student Publications building (across
from Joyner Library.) We are always in need of more employ-
ees and most students look forward to a little more cash at
the end of the month.
4s
S&
&.
The East Carolinian
.
1925
Brandon Waddelt, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Randall Rozxell. Staff Illustrator
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Amy L. Reyster, Assistant News Editor Randy Miller, Production Assistant
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor Deanya Latthnore, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor Janet Resness, Media Accountant
Matt Heatley, Electronics Editor Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, whkh may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (91?1
3284366.
. Dtd t Jeot tit
W i Jock SH vie
Welcome to Camp ECU
Welcome campers! For all fresh-
men, transfer students and newcom-
ers to Greenville, this article will act
as your survival guide for the next few
weeks. The information was collected
painstakingly by veterans of ECU life.
Camp rules and regulations: The
first thing to know about living among
the ECU faithful is that almost every-
thing you must do will require an
undetermined number of signatures.
These signatures will be required from
four to six people, three of which will
be out of the country or most certainly
unattainable by any means of commu-
nication.
Because of this, all of your en-
deavors will likely take 12 hours
longer than initially planned, so pack
a lunch. If you attempt to speed this,
or any process up, you could extend
your stay here for one to two years
and there's a good possibility that
you'll miss the sing-along at the end
of the year.
Transportation on campgrounds:
If you have a car, give it away. This
may sound strange, but once the first
parking ticket is written, and the first
45 minute wait in the parking lot has
occurred, there will be no confusion
about this particular suggestion. The
best advice that this counselor has for
Patrick Ware
Optnhn OmmmM
the brave few who decide to keep then-
car would be to refrain from parking
anywhere in the city limits.
A parking sticker, obtainable
from the camp traffic office on 10th
Street, will only provide a false sense
of security for the ECU camper. You
will get a ticket You will learn to ig-
nore signs. You will feel the power of
the camp traffic office when attempt-
ing to complete any of the tasks dis-
cussed in the first section. Oh yes, you
will have your records tagged. Do not
fear, simply sell your car and you can
avoid this common camp problem
Camp activities: Camp ECU has
many extracurricular activities that
can be beneficial to the general camp
experience, but there are some things
to know. When attending sporting
events, make sure to learn the proper
clapping rhythms to the camp songs
before entering any camp facility. It
is a little known fact that improper
clapping in a public place can result
in social outcast
Do not follow the trend of camp-
ers past by driving circles around
downtown until you see someone you
know. This activity has caused moral
problems for some of the older camp-
ers and it has been suggested that I
include this helpful tip.
Lastly, if you are a camper that
likes big hats and big belt buckles,
which many of our campers do, make
sure and restrain yourself from exhib-
iting these articles at the aforemen-
tioned sporting events. Trust me, your
counselor, your friend.
We here at Camp ECU wish only
the best for the new members of our
community. It is the hope of the coun-
selors that you will heed these little
suggestions and find your stay here
as wonderful as we attempt to make
it There will be basket weaving in
Mendenhall and lunch in Todd dining
hall all year long
a
Upset about the parking situation? Upset about
the construction on campus? Upset about the.
long lines for registration? If you have problems
that get you so hot smoke comes out of your -
e&rs then you need to express them in a healthy
way. Try writing a letter to the editor. The East
Carolinian w�JI be glad to publish your complaints
or praise about stories we have written, activities
going on around campus and Greenville. Please
send your comments to The East Carolinian, East
Carolina University, Second Floor, Student
Publication BidgGreenville NC, 27858-4353.
Include your name, major, year and phone
number Please limit letters to 250 words or less
The East
Carolinian is
taking
applications for
political
opinion
columnists.
The issues of
Election'96 will
be the primary
focus.
For more
information
caH Brandon
Waddell at
328-6366.
Are you giving enough of yourself?
What have you done lately for
your community, state, nation or
Mother Earth? I believe our nation
is overpopulated with selfish, ego-
centric individuals who buzz
through life and expect everything
to fall into their laps.
If we expect Earth to last an-
other billion years, we need to take
care of her and show her a little love
and appreciation for all her riches
she so generously gives. We have
become a taking tribe, and many of
us do not take time to give back to
the Earth.
For starters, recycling is an easy
approach. Almost everything is re-
cyclable: paper, plastics, glass,
shampoo bottles, grass, the list is
very long. If you would like to be-
gin recycling call Pitt County Recy-
cling at 830-4522, and they will be
more than happy to set you in the
right direction toward a healthier
planet.
If recycling is too arduous for
you, then maybe you could give one
hour to save someone's life. Yes, it
only takes about one hour to give
life to another person via blood do-
nations. The nation's blood banks
are in desperate need of your help.
It doesn't hurt to give life, and it is
an incredible reward to know that
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
your blood could save someone in
need. Also, you don't need to wait
until the the American Red Cross
comes to campus, you can go to
them at your convenience. The lo-
cal American Red Cross is located
off of Memorial Drive in the Caro-
lina East Center (next to the Caro-
lina East Cinema). You do not need
an appointment, just show up ready
to give. Give the gift of life today.
Do you adore kids and animals?
Yes, I thought so. If you have read
this far, then you must adore nature's
gifts of life. Volunteers are always
welcome and needed in the local com-
munity. ECU offers a great program
called East Carolina Friends, which
is similar to other Big BrotherBig
Sister organizations. The program
pairs college volunteers with children
ages 4-13 who have been identified
through their schools as having a
need for a positive adult role model.
Volunteers are expected to make a
sound commitment to the organiza-
tion for one academic year, during
which time they are to spend at least
two hours per week with their "little
friend Volunteers must also main-
tain a g.p.a. of 2.2 or higher. This is
an excellent program and I am going
to volunteer this fall. These kids need
us. If you are interested, pick up an
application in Brewster A-409.
These examples are just a few
things you could do to help out our
planet. There are so many other ways
to promote a better life for someone
in need. Simple things, as well as
marking "yes" on the organ donor
card when you renew your driver's
license. I know life tends to be hec-
tic and we sometimes get caught up
in our own lives, but please take a
moment and review what you could
do to make our environment a bet-
ter place.
Your future children and grand-
children will graciously thank you.
fc





20
Tuesday, August 2C, 1996
The East Carolinian
where your dolla
i i
tores
ort student scholars
USED Books than Eucr Before!
Iwore Check-outs -� Faster Service �- New Items!
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21
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
(L) Practice
the first off





Aim.
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22
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Pirates find new home
Conference USA
extends invitation
to ECU
Amanda Ross
SportsEdKor
ECU is now breathing a sigh of re-
lief. The university's quest to
be affiliated with a football con-
ference has been met
Over the past year, Con-
ference USA was showing a lot
of interest in accepting the Pi-
rate football team into its pro-
gram. That interest is now a
reality and the only thing left
to do is work out the fine de-
tails of the contract
ECU will not play in the
conference this year, but Ath-
letic Director, Mike Hamrick.
hopes that ECU will begin con-
ference play in 1997.
A big plus with the affili-
ation to the conference is the
scheduling of future non-con-
ference games.
"Over the next eight years
our norvconference games will
improve Hamrick said.
I me of the teams sched-
uled for the next several years,
which include games played
here in Greenville and away, in-
clude Duke, Miami, Navy, N.C.
State, Syracuse, Virginia Tech,
Wake Forest and West Virginia.
Along with non-confer-
ence games, ECU will play
games within Conference USA.
Those teams include Cincin-
nati, Houston, Louisville, Mem-
phis, Southern Miss and
Tulane (with Army possibly be-
ing added to the conference
later on as well)
"We will have a great con-
ference schedule and we are
really excited Hamrick said.
A conference affiliation will also
mean that ECU will have the chance to
play for a national championship, some-
thing that hasn't been possible since
1977. Conference USA is affiliated with
the Liberty Bowl right now, but as
Hamrick pointed out when the contract
talks are up with all the conferences and
their bowl tie-ins in about three years.
Conference USA could possibly be affili-
ated with another bowl.
ECU is very familiar with the Lib-
erty Bowl, going for the past two years
and winning the bowl game last year
against Stanford.
Earlier in the talks with the board
of directors of Conference USA, there
were some problems between Louisville
and the board. Louisville was concerned
about adding another member to the con-
ference because it would cut down on
See HOME page 35
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 'JEST
art Sporu Medicine �.ill!inf � Greenville. Nonh Ciro�n�27a58-4J? B Hone 9195JS-50! � FX�W32W557
August 19
Den Students:
Welcome to Campus! I hope you hid � good summer �nd �re ready for a fun-filled year with ECU
Athletics. Memorable moments that will include exciting victories, national television appearances, and
full stadiums and arenas with electric atmospheres are all ahead in 1996-97.
It will all kick-off with the football Pirates, who have been picked in the preseason Top 25 by Athion
magazine. An exciting fall is in store for ECU students that begins at home on September 7. Phis, the
season includes the chance to get on national television in r "wdy-FickJen Stadium in October and to be
in the stands when the Pirates and the Wolfpack renew "the rivalry" in Charlotte on November 30.
There is nothing like making as much noise as possible in a full Dowdy-Ficklen stadium for the ECU
team entrance and yelling "First DownPirates" after ECU first downs. During the winter you will want
to be surrounding the court, standing as part of the Minges Maniacs, in noisy Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum creating the one of toughest home court atmospheres to be found.
We encourage you to support all your fellow students who compete on athletic teams. From the Lady
Pirate volleyball and swim teams to Pirate baseball and soccer, there are 19 men's and women's
intercollegiate teams that you can support throughout the year. Each one offering exciting moments for
you to experience.
As ECU students, each of you are in a position to make an extremely positive statement about your
university to the state of North Carolina and the nation on national television this fall. Wear your purple
and gold with pride, show visible enthusiasm at games, and exemplify class (sportsmanship) in your
actions at all athletic events.
We look forward to seeing you this fall. One of our traditional cheers says it bestHey. Hey. EC You
Look So Good To Mel There are no better students in the country than ECU students. Fill the stands at
all home games for your ECU Pirates!
The Spirit of the East is Growing Strong! Go Pirates!
Sincerely, .
Mike Hamrick
Director of Athletics
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Chancellor talks athletics
Amanda Ross
SportB EdUof
The spirit of ECU athletics goes beyond the players,
coaches and fans. It extends deep in the ailministration of
ECU. Just ask Chancellor Richard Eakin. Some might not
know but Eakin is an avid sports fan whose roots extend
back into athletics. Eakin, who is beginning his 10th year
as chancellor, is the former president of the College Foot-
ball Adrriinistration and serves on the Presidents Council
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Eakin
attended Geneva College and was a member of the basket-
ball team. He is excited about the upcoming sports season
and recently sat down with me to discuss issues relevant to
this upcoming school year.
CONFERENCE AFFILIATION
"We are delighted to have the opportunity to join Con-
ference USA. It is a conference that is a very good fit for East
Carolina. The universities in the conference, in many respects,
are very similar to our university. I think they hold high
academic standards as do we. I believe that they are very
interested in having our membership, which is a wonderful
thing to be able to say. We are simply looking forward to the
association
STADIUM EXPANSION

"The football stadium expansion, at the first phase will
be about a $12 million project As I understand it, the bids
See CHANCELLOR page 39
Welcome back ECU
students and faculty
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- -�
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
23
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
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;
mmwmmikm
High-powered offense
threatens opponents
Cralg Perrott
Awlttant Sports Editor
Ever since Steve Logan's days as
an offensive coordinator, ECU has been
known for its high-powered offense.
With the largest senior class since the
1991 season and nine starters return-
ing, this season will be no exception.
Last year, the Pirates ranked 22nd
in the nation in passing offense, and
the unit averaged 396.1 yards per
game. ECU will look once again to
All-America candidate quarterback
Marcus Crandell to lead the squad as
they hope to build on last year's 9-3
Liberty Bowl Championship season.
Crandell has already re-written the
ECU record books by surpassing Pi-
rate legend Jeff Blake's marks as all-
time total offense (6,026 yards) and
passing yardage (5,691). During his
junior season, Crandell connected for
235 of 447 passes for a whopping 2,751
yards and 18 touchdowns. He was
named National Offensive Player-of-the-
Week following his performance
against Syracuse.
In this, his senior year, Crandell
is expected to assume a leadership role
now more than ever. In the high-pres-
sure position of quarterback, Crandell
is as calm and collected as one can be.
"I'm going to try to put up the
same kind of numbers again, but I try
not to think of myself as "The Man
Crandell said. "I try and keep that at
the back of my mind; it takes a team
effort"
Crandell is a product of the Logan
system, and Crandell gives the Pirate
head coach a lot of credit for his suc-
cess.
"He's helped me out a lot
Crandell said. "He's been very patient
with me
Last season, we saw a new dimen-
sion of the Crandell machine: running
the football. Crandell's targets for his
aerial assault are of-
ten the targets for
opposing defenses.
ECU now has the
available weapon of
Crandell tucking the
ball and trying to
pick up the first
down or a TD.
"I've gotten
more comfortable
with it Crandell
said. "You might see
a lot more of it this
year
Hopefully,
Crandell will not
have to resort to run-
ning the ball, as
ECU's top five receiv-
ers return from last
fall. Wide receivers
Mitchell Galloway
and Jason Nichols
lead the Pirate receiv-
ing corps.
In last year's
campaign, Galloway
caught 46 passes for
619 yards and three
touchdowns. Gallo-
way is also fifth on
the ECU all-time re-
ception list with 83
grabs, and believes
this season, his last
at ECU will be his
best ever.
"This is going to be the year Gal-
loway said. "We're going to perform
the best we can and hope good things
come out of it"
Junior Jason Nichols is fourth on
the all-time reception list himself (85
catches), after tallying some impressive
numbers a year ago. Nichols had 43
catches for 502 yards and two TD's.
Nichols has high hopes for 1996.
"We have a lot of depth and expe-
rience this year Nichols said. "We're
Photo by CARLTON TURNAGE
Starting QB Marcus Crandell his arm
during the first day of practice.
looking forward to this season
Other notable receivers returning
include junior Larry Shannon, sopho-
more Tioy Smith and senior tight end
Scott Richards.
Richards was one of the team's
top performers last season. The 6'5
260 pounder caught at least three
passes in seven of the final ten games
in 1995. Senior Sean Richardson, is
an excellent back-up at tight end and
See OFFENSE page 35
MEveningWith
SATURDAY, AUGUST 24
8:00 PM� Wright Auditorium
Individuals witn disabilities who requ'nj accommodations in order to participate in any event at ECU are encouraged to contact the Department for Disability Support Services at 919-323-4802 i(VoiceTOD forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program.
w
TICKETS
On sale at the Central Ticket Office
Monday-Friday 8:30 AM-6:00 PM
in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
Student $15.00
FacultyStaff $15.00
General Public $20.00
At the Door $25.00
Mastercard and Visa� accepted.
All tickets are Reserved Seating.
Doors open at 7:00 PM.
For more information, call
Central Ticket Office
Toil-Free 1800 ECU ARTS
Locally 328-4788
DeafSpeech Impaired 328-4736
ECU Student Union Hotline
328-6004
Student Union Internet Address
www.cis.ecu.eduStudentUnion
THEH0MEPAGE.html
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mxmmmwwMmmmmMmwma0im0amHm
MMHMKWBHWM
24
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
Players fo
Watch
Defense returns experienced players
Marcus Crandell
QB, V-Q 204, Senior
� Ali-American Candidate
� Started all 12 games at QB
� No. 1 on ECU list for career
passing yards (5,463) and total
offense (6,026)
� First-team QB for 1995 All-
Independent Team
� Finished each of the past two
seasons ranked among the top
ten nationally in total offense
� Needs one more touchdown
to surpass Jeff Blake's career
record of 42 at ECU
� Has led Pirates to back-to-
back bowl appearances
� Led Pirates to 27-24 come-
back win at Syracuse last
season as he threw for a school
record 392 yards (280 in second
half)
� Led team with six rushing
TDs
� In summer issue of FOOT-
BALL NEWS, Crandell was
listed as one of five players
nationally in group labeled
"Piayers Worth Price of Admis-
sion"
Key loses should
not be factor for
team
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The name ol the game is defense.
Some may think it's not as important
as offense, but if you can't stop your
opponent, your Jays are numbered.
ECU'S "I ' has stepped up and was
a key factor in the Pirates 19-13 vic-
tory over Stanford last yeai in the Lib-
erty Bow The Pirates limited the Car-
dinal offense to 211 yards and a single
touchdown and Stanford had one of
the most high-powered offenses In the
PAC-lo going into the bowl game.
ECU finished the 1995 season
ranked 51st in rushing defense. 38th
in total defense and seventh in pass
efficiency defense. In 1991 ECU ranked
106th. 105th and
98th respectively
in the same cat-
egories. The Pi-
rates have come
a long way.
The Pirate
"D" will be with-
out some key de-
fensive players
this year, but ECU will return more de-
fensive starters than it lost following
last season. 1 )efensive Coordinator Paul
Jette will have a lot of talented and
experienced players to work with this
year.
' Back in 1984. when now Head
Coach Steve Logan was offensive co-
ordinator at the University of Tulsa and
Jette was the defensive coordinator at
Oklahoma State. Jette's defensive play-
ers led the nation in take-aways with
57. Anyone that knows football knows
that those kind of numbers are a
coache s dream Take- aways arc a big
part in the defensive success a team
can achieve.
'This is a focal point that Paul
coaches to, which is the take-away part
of the game Head Coach Steve Logan
"We're looking
forward to every
said. Last year we had 38. Paul Jette
i - ci iaching to 57. Yeah, we had 38 and
that was nice and wasn't bad. He re-
ally believes that the talent we're work-
ing with is comparable to the talent
that was on that particular team
The void of linebackers Mark
I.ibiano. Morris Foreman and Aaron
Black will be felt, as will the departure
of cornerback Emmanuel McDaniel
who ranked eighth nationally in inter-
ceptions with six and finished his ca-
reer sixth on ECU's all-time list (13
NTs). Also lost is tackle Walter Scott
and cornerback Hank Cooper.
But never fear, if you think Logan
doesn't have talented players to fill
those voids, you don't know much
about ECU football.
Senior end Lorenzo West is one
to keep your eye on as he ranked
among the nation's leaders in sacks
with nine. He also contributed with six
tackles behind the line of scrimmage.
Travis Darden, who started as a
true freshman at
nose guard all 12
games, looks to
have another suc-
cessful season with
the Pirates. Darden
is quick to point out
that no team will be
taken for granted.
"We're looking
forward to every game Darden said.
"You have to get them one by one. I'm
not familiar with East Tennessee State,
but we aren't going to take any team
for granted
The linebacker position will be
filled by three seniors, Marvin Burke.
BJ. Crane and Carlos Brown. These
players split time with last year's se-
nior linebackers, so they are all com-
fortable with their positions. To Crane,
this season has every potential to be
better than the last.
East Carolina is an avalanche
right now Crane said. "We have just
come off the steepest part of the hill
and it's fast- so if you're in the way -
move
Burke was third on the team with
stops with 91. while Brown added 61
and Crane 59. Crane will move to the
outside this season after backing up
Burke on the inside in '95 Backup:
for Brown wili be redshirt fres
Jeff Kerr and senior EJ. Gunthrope.
ECU's pass efficiency defense will
return three of four starters, inc lad-
ing the double trouble Hart brothers
at safety. Strong safety I )aren I lart was
the Pirate's second leading tackier with
92 stops. It was also this Hart brother
who ignited ECU's scoring drive aftei
returning an interception for a TD
against Stanford. David Hart, who oc-
cupies the free safety slot, retui
ter recording 65 tackles of his �.
season.
"We have a lot of veterans on this
team even though we lost smc good
ones last year Dave Hart said. "This
defense is real strong in the sense that
we have depth everywhere at every po-
sition, even three deep in some posi-
tions. There are just a lot of players we
See DEFENSE page 39

game
� Travis Darden
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i
XAVVVVVVVVVV
s
s
PIRATES
Help us spread Pirate spirit.
Come and enjoy the excitement, fun and
travel with our Football and Basketball teams.
Be a part of 96-97 cheerieading team.
Practice:
8-22
8-23
8-24
4pm-6pm
4pm-6pm
10am-12noon
Where:
Grassy area in front of Scales Field House
Final tryouts Sun. 8-25, 1pm-4pm
For more information, contact Paula Corbett(Coach) @ 328-4510
August 22-26,1996
Register now in Wichard 204
or call 328-4235
For more information,
attend the
Information Fair,August 21
In Mendenhall Student Center
A
Ua will Ld
- -





'
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
25
IvfesgicxoxiaeslcnjuccEit k
$3.95 LUNCH
SPECIALS!
SUNDAYBLOODY MARYS $2.25 SANGRIAS $1.50
MONDAY12 PRICE PITCHERS OF DRAFT MU6$0FDRAFT.95$
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WEDNESDAYMEXICAN IMPORTS $1.50
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DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 757-1666 ALL ABC PERMITS
Special teams is no joke
Dill Dillard
Senior Writer
With the dawning of a new and
exciting season for the Pirates comes
a whole slate full of high expectations.
In seasons past, a team labeled as
strictly an offensive club, Steve Logan's
defending Liberty Bowl Champion Pi-
rates now are described by many as a
Players to
Watch
Marvin Burke
LB, 6T 250, Senior
� Started all 12 games last
season
� Ranked third on team in
tackles in 1995 with 91,
including 39 solos
� Had season-best 15 tackles
in 23-20 victory over West
Virginia
� Had 10 tackles in Liberty
Bowl win over Stanford
����������������
The East Carolinian
Distributed each Tuesdav and
i
Thursday, The East Carolinian
serves the campus as the major
source of information about activi-
ties and events as well as a forum
for discussion of issues and ideas.
This student-run paper provides
numerous opportunities, including
communications, business and
management experiences where
students can apply what they learn
in the classroom.
TEC Newsroom328-6366
TEC Advertising328-2000
WZMB
WZMB is ECU's student-run
FM radio station that offers a vari-
ety of alternative music including
rock, jazz, rap and heavy metal.
The station also offers news and
sports reports and call-in type par-
ticipatory shows at 91.3 on the dial.
Various opportunities, including
both on- and off-air experiences,
are available in this hands-on envi-
ronment, allowing students to pre-
pare for a future career.
WZMB Studio328-4751
Request Line328-6913
W� of for tlio
experience of
lifetime.
Expressions
Expressions is a magazine that
serves as the voice of the campus
minority population.
Published four times a year, its
pages carry stories, artwork and
poetry that address the concerns
and problems ofthe various ethnic
and religious groups represented
on this multi-cultural campus.
Various opportunities to write,
design and illustrate are available
between the magazine's covers.
Expressions328-6927
The Rebel
The Rebel is ECU's literary arts
magazine published annually each
Spring. The featured artistic and lit-
erary pieces are selected by a panel
of judges from entries submitted by
the ECU community. An annual art
display showcases those selections.
Staff members can get various
types of experience from adminis-
tering the contest to arranging the
annual art show to producing the
magazine.
The Rebel328-6502
Join us for the experience!
solid team from top to bottom. Yes this
is including special teams. The same
special teams that was laughed at by
many only a tew short years ago has
grown up along with their stats.
In the 93 season the Pirates could
have been described, from the kicking
standpoint, as a team with very little
bright spots. The Pirates put a true
freshman kicker in Chad Holcomb in
front of an ESPN audience for his col-
lege debut The results for the season
were 8-13 FG-FGA along with a 15-16
PATstat
"It seems like a long time ago, al-
most forever, since I stepped out on
that field my freshman year against
Syracuse Holcomb said.
With experience comes improve-
ment. In the '94, 7-5 bowl campaign,
the Pirates put up 44 points courtesy
of Holcomb opposed to the 39 from
the previous 2-9 season. With a slight
increase in point production, but still
hints of inconsistency, Pirate fans con-
tinued to hold their breath when the
kicking unit came onto the field.
"I saw myself improve as a kicker,
but there was inconsistency still in my
game and I knew I had to change that
to bring it to another level Holcomb
said.
Despite an early season slump.
Hoicomb's junior season saw shades
of drastic improvements and a little
heroics. After nailing ten field goals and
68 PAT's Holcomb kicked the decid-
ing field goal in the West Virginia and
Southern Miss games, as well as re-
ceiving the Offensive MVP at the Lib-
erty Bowl.
"Last season was gr;at for me, but
it has put a lot a pressure on me to
improve upon my performance of last
season Holcomb said.
Along with the pressure of top-
ping his Liberty Bowl record, four field
goals in a game, Holcomb will have a
little competition in true freshman
Brantly Rivers.
"He's gonna have it easier than I
did Holcomb said. "I'll be able to
teach him things I had to leam on my
own when I was a freshman
Rivers, from Kingston. Tennessee.
has shown promise and power in his
early summer workouts.
"Rivers is young, and Chad will
have to teach him some things, but this
kid has plenty of leg and a lot of
power Logan said.
Rivers made the All East Tennes-
see team as well as booting a career
best of 47 yards his senior season.
"He's a natural kicker. He will be
fun to watch Holcomb said.
Along with a great defense there
must be a great punter to give the big
"D" real estate to work with. After
coming in as a super freshman, punter
Matt Levine was heaven sent after the
miserable punting by Bill Wilson in
the '93 season. Levine started his ca-
reer at ECU with a 42 6 yard average
for his first season.
"Weil, when Matt came in he was
15th in the nation in punting. That's
because every time he shanked the
ball it would roll for 8,000 yards
Logan said. "He wasn't punting it to
anywhere, he was like a shotgun on
full choke, it went everywhere
After a disappointing sophomore
season, Levine dropped his average
to 37.1 thus raising a few eyebrows.
"We need to get our punters to
punt down the field Logan said. "I'm
not asking for a 60-yard punt, just a
40-yard punt with four-second hang
time
True freshman Andrew Bayes, a
punter out of Hyattsville, Maryland,
has impressed the staff in the early
stages of summer pract'ee by deliver-
ing what Logan is requesting punt-
ing the ball downfield.
"Bayes is a talented young man
and he is punting the ball down the
field, but we're waiting to see how he
adjusts to the much more rapid pace
of kicking in a college football game
situation Logan said.
With the vast improvement of the
veterans ofthe Pirate specialists along
with a promising freshman class to be
taught by the upperdassmen, special
teams at ECU could make the Pirates
a solid team from top to bottom.
WELCOME
BACK STUDENTS
HAMS
Old-fashioned
Homemade
� Preov
CREAM
7�& Ice Cream,
Yogurt &
Sorbet
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
. � - within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE
1 Item Blend-In
coupon expires September '0, 1996
�"�
- M Jf � -��





26
Tuesday, August 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Opponents reviewed
Brian Paiz
SenforWWter
East Carolina vs.
East Tennessee State
This will be the first meeting be-
tween the Pirates and the Buccaneers
since October 20, 1984 when ECU de-
feated ETSU 246 at Ficklen Stadium.
East Tennessee finished 4-7 in 1995 and
is a member of the Southern Conference
which produced two-time national cham-
pion Marshall. The Bucs offense is led
by QB Greg Ryan. Ryan threw for 2,473
yds. and 17 touchdowns. Coach Logan
has called this game "The Super Bowl"
for ETSU. The Pirates are the only Divi-
sion 1 program on the schedule this sea-
son for ETSU.
East Carolina vs. West Virginia
Any time you visit Morgantown,
W.V. on a football Saturday, you are in
for a fight Plus, Mountaineer fans are
still upset about last season's, S6 record
and the fact that one of those six losses
came at the hands of the Pirates in
Greenville. WVU returns 42 lettermen
which includes quarterback Chad
Johnston and wide receiver Rashan
Vanterpool. Johnston had an up and
down season in '95. He threw for 2,019
yards, but matched his 13 touchdowns
with 13 interceptions. At wide receiver,
WVU has an AU-American candidate in
Rashan Vanterpool. Vanterpool had 34
receptions for 303 yards and six touch-
downs. On defense, right linebacker
Canute Curtis and defensive back Mike
Logan lead the way. Curtis, a second
team All-Big East selection in "95, fin-
ished top 20 in the nation last season for
quarterback sacks. Logan, a third-year
starter for the Mountaineers, also
doubles as a return man. This could be a
telling season for Head Coach Don
Nehlen, whose Mountaineers haven't
won a bowl game since the 1984 Blueb-
onnetBowL
East Carolina vs. South Carolina
When the Pirates and Gamecocks
meet on September 21st in Columbia,
SC. excuse USC fans if they are still
upset about October 8.1994. That's when
ECU embarrassed their neighbors from
Columbia 5642 during their homecom-
ing. In that game. ECU threw out the
game plan and went to the air, as Marcus
Crandell and the Pirates lit up USC in
the offensive yardage category. This sea-
son Head Coach Brad Scott has handed
over the quarterback reigns to sopho-
more Anthony Wright Wright should be
familiar to eastern North Carolina foot-
ball fans. He had an outstanding prep
career at nearby West Craven High
School. USC football fans were disap-
pointed in last season's 46-1 record, and
this year doesn't get any easier for the
Gamecocks in the SEC. A week before
USC hosts the Pirates, a team by the
name of the Georgia Bulldogs visit town.
East Carolina vs. Central Florida
Central Florida, welcome to Division
I football. The Golden Knights and the
Pirates are no strangers to each other.
ECU and UCF have met three times in
the past six years. The most memorable
game was in 1993 when Marcus Crandell
had his leg broken by Golden Knight
defender Emil Ekyor. This season, UCF
is no longer a Division I-AA member as
school officials decided that they wanted
to upgrade their football program and
move to Division I. The Golden Knights
are led by quarterback Daunte
Culpepper. Culpeper threw for 2.071
yards and 12 touchdowns in "95.
East Carolina vs.
Southern Mississippi
Thursday night A national televi-
sion audience. What more do you need
to get ready for a football game? Well.
East Carolina and Southern Miss need
none of above. All these two teams need
is a ball and a patch of grass. When the
Golden Eagles and Pirates hit the field,
it's like two brothers in the backyard
fighting for supremacy. Southern Miss
is still a little ticked off about the game
in HattiesbuiK last season. The Golden
Eagles do not need to be reminded that
they held a 34-33 lead with 51 seconds
to go and had a ciiance to help them
selves to a spot in the Liberty Bowl. But
then the call of all football calls came
from General Logan. Chad Holcolmb did
his best impression of Steve Young and
hurled the ball down the field. Tight End
Scott Richards was open, but see. there
See FOOTBALL page 33
Players to
Watch
Mitch Galloway
WR.S'IO 175, Senior
� Team leader among
receivers in receptions with 46
for 619 yards
� Already ranks No. 5 on
ECU'S career list for receptions
with 83, just 19 shy of Luke
Fisher's career mark of 102
� Had three TD catches in
1995, including an 85-yarder
vs. Tulsa
� Caught four passes for 70
yards in Liberty Bowl
� Caught nine passes for 106
yards and one touchdown
against Southern Miss
� Also returns kicks for
Pirates and averaged 18.5 per
return in 1995
���������������
Drop-Ad with
Ef NO lines.
NO waiting.
Ef NO headaches.
Were talking classifieds, not classes. s
The East Carolinian introduces
NO HASSLE DROP-AD!
Pick up one of our classified
ad envelopes (like the one
$$�t shown here), fill it out and
ZgsS&aS place your payment inside.
. Then drop it off in our
boxes located around campus.
Placing a classified ad
couldnt be easier!
Just look for our logo
around campus for
No Hassle Drop-Ad!
dS8
2511 E. 10th St.
752 5222
"CRAZY FROM 7H� U6flT
MOmM"
k k � UNTIL")
See campus
wiripnter store
for details.
Buy an IBM PC 340 or
350 desktop computer
and an IBM Multimedia
Kit. And you'll get a CD
software package that includes Windows 95,
Lotus SmartSuite, Netscape Navigator, World
Book Multimedia Encyclopedia and the Infopedia
collection of essential reference software.
Buy a ThinkPad and you'll get Windows 95 and
Lotus SmartSuite. You can also take advantage
of special student, faculty and staff financing.
Just call 1-800-4IBM-LOAN for information.
Hurry, visit your campus computer store today.
After all, no one looks ��. � �
good in a checkered 5 S-T J!Z
apron. 552S 2 "
IBM and ThinkPad are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation Windows � a registered trademark oi Microsoft Coitoratior
Other comaany product or service names may De trademarks or service marks ot others �1996 IBM Cora All rights reserved
2 Washes for $1
�Conned Beer $1
Free Popcorn
RockDonee Music
�Air Conditioned Lounge
Earlybird Fluff & Fold Special -45lb until
10:30 a.m. M-F, 75 Wash
�With This Coupons
i
iLimit one per customer Exp. 9896





mn, i mm�w��
rhe rast Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
27
Step Up To Your Plate
���
WITH
LITTLE
CAESARS
PIZZA!
� �

WE WANT TO BE YOUR CHOICE FOR
HOT DELIVERED PIZZA TO YOUR HOME!
WE NOW DELIVER IN ALL (3) THREE OF OUR RESTAURANTS.
LANDMARK 3120 E. 10TH ST. BELLSFORK
(Next to FOODLION)
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ECU-CAMPUS
CALL THE LITTLE CAESARS NEAREST YOU
i
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BEST VALUE COUPON
"DELUXE" MEAL DEAL �
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Plus 10 Little Caesars Chicken Wings & a 2 Lifer Coke8 m
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Expires: 9-29-96
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Plus an 8 pc. Crazy Bread� & 2 Liter COKE0
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Expires: 9-29-96
Valid for a limited time at porticipcting locations.
�1996 Little Caesar Enterprises, Inc.
CARRYOUT
PLUS TAX
A SPECIAL CARRYOUT VALUE!
Offer valid only tit participating locations fot a limited time.
No coupon necessary. �1996 L.C.E Inc.
Expires: 9-29-96
� Valid for a limited time at participating locations.
Valid on Original Round or Deep Dish pizzas only.
�1996 Little Caesar Enterprises, Inc.
1 � " -yes "
LITTLE CAESARS'
LOW FAT PIZZA
CHOOSE FROM:
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Offer valid only at participating locations for a limited time. No coupon necessary.
Valid on Originol Round or Deep Dish pizza onh. �1995 LC.E Inc
2 MEDIUM PIZZAS
(98
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with cheese and 1 topping
Minimum purchase for delivery may apply. ,
Plus tax

in
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I





��nmi
�HMMH � �
28
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
Marching band to
perform at NFL game
Amanda Ross
Sport Editor
Not only will the Marching Pi-
rates be marching in Dowdy-Ficklen
this season, but expect to see them
in RFK Stadium in Washington. D.C.
On September 29, approximately
220 ECU band members will travel
to D.C. to perform in a half-time show
during the RedskinsJets game.
Christopher Knighten, who is
heading into his fourth year as di-
rector of the Marching Pirates, said
ECU finally got the bid after trying
for the past two years. ECU did not
receive a bid during the 1994 or '95
season.
"Every NFL team goes through
a selection process Knight said.
"Most NFL teams have an entertain-
ment committee that chooses who
will perform at half-times
Knighten knew about this pro-
cess when, while attending graduate
school at the University of Colorado,
they played at a Denver Broncos'
game.
The process begins by sending
a videotape of various routines per-
formed throughout the season. The
committee reviews the tape and se-
lects a school to perform. Not since
the 1960s has the ECU Marching
Band performed at a Redskins game.
The band will leave following the
Sept 28 game between ECU and Cen-
tral Florida. They will roll out early
Sunday morning en route to D.C.
ECU will be the only band to per-
form during half-time, and local fans
will get to see a glimpse of what they
will perform in RFK Stadium during
the first home football game on Sept
7 against East Tennessee State. Then
during the Central Florida game, the
Marching Pirates will perform the
whole show for the ECU crowd. A
James Bond theme will prevail dur-
ing the half-time show on the 29th.
This will be a new routine that
hasn't been used in the past Even
during home football games the
Marching Band varies their shows.
"We'll never do a show more
than twice, so there is some variety
for the home crowds Knighten said.
The marching band, which al-
ways provides the ECU half-time
shows, hasn't had a chance to receive
national exposure like this, and
Knighten says they are really excited
to get this chance.
"We have been trying for some-
thing like this for years and I think
this is a big step for us to continue
to grow. In 1993 we had 140 people
in the band and we have grown al-
See MARCH page 35
Players fa
.Watch
10 Mn
Brieps
Former Lady Pirate basketball standout Danielle Charlesworth
has been name assistant women's basketball coach at ECU an-
nounced ECU Head Coach Anne Donovan.
Charlesworth, a three-year starter at ECU from 1993-1996,
replaces Gaynor O'Donnell who resigned her position in June.
i am extremely excited that Danielle has decided to remain
with Lady Pirate basketball Donovan said. "Her competitiveness
and work ethic as a player are strengths that will greatly benefit
her as she begins her coaching career
During her career at ECU, Charlesworth averaged 9.5 points
and 3.5 assists a game. In three seasons, she moved into ECU's
top-10 career list for assists and steals, ranking fourth in career
assists with 192 and sixth in steals with 281. She also was third
in career three-pointers made, hitting 87.
Charlesworth, 23. is a native of Raleigh, N.C. and gradu-
ated in May with a degree in exercise and sports science.
Daren Hart
Safety, yiO 195, Senior
srepads 43410 Aue itjim pijeA vn
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� Has started 34 of 35 games in
his first three seasons at ECU
� Ranked second on the team
with tackles last season (total 92)
� ECU'S defensive player-of-
the-game vs. Stanford
� Had 16 tackles against Illinois
for season best
Also had four sacks and three
interceptions during regular
season in 1995
K .7
ttn
mo
Tit'
-�?Wf
I "Best Sub
in Greenville" by
the Greenville
Times!
� 1NV�M id
9i. "i
uivicnn
Chivalry is
Alive and
Well at
Kappa
Alpha
Order
Dear Rushee,
As you are
contemplating
rushing a
fraternity this
fall, a number of
doors will be
opened to you.
Here at Kappa
Alpha, we offer &T$�
the door like no
other. . ,
As a rushee, you must choose the
organization which you wish to join A
fraternity of men with whom you will call
your brothers for the rest of your life.
We believe you will agree that, in fact,
Kappa Alpha is the most unique and tradi-
tional college fraternity. We strive for both
unity and selection.
Good Luck Rushees!
For Rides & Info: Call 757-0128
AUGUST 26-29
7-UPM
REPRESENTATIVES
FROM EACH SORORITY
WILL BE PRESENT
EVERY NIGHT OF RUSH
COME OUT & MEET THE
BROTHERS OF
KA
KA
11th St.
Pantry
10th St.





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
29
ESP Plus
From FINE GIFTS
To UNUSUAL ITEMS
Student Pirate Club offers benefits
Extra Special Products
Lava Utes, Motion Waves, Puzzles & Games
Bbcklites, Blacklfce Velvet Posters
Rne Collectibles from: Lilliput Lane, Iris Arc

Living Stone and John Perry Studio
COLLECTIBLE CARD GAMES: Star Trek, Star Wars,
Rage, and MAGIC The Gathering
Extra Special Pirates shop at ESP Plus
Ifs an Extra Special Place in Arlington Village
ESP Plus, 803A Red Banks Road, Greenville, (919) 321-3946
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
What's one of the best ways to
get involved in Pirate athletics? It's
the Student Pirate Club (SPC).
The SPC is a club exclusively
for ECU students who want to be
closer to Pirate athletics. The SPC
offers exciting events and special
privileges for members only.
Mark Wharton, Pirate Club rep-
resentative, believes this is a good
way for students to get a jump on
things when they graduate. The
regular Pirate Club, which is for
alumni and the community, offers
members privileges like advance
seating, special socials and lots of
planned events throughout the
year.
"It's (SPC) a club to acclimate
themselves with the Pirate Club
Wharton said. "It gives them an op-
portunity to build priority points
Players to i
JVdtch
Lorenzo West
DT, 6'3 245, Senior
Otfe
Discount Art Supply
Warehouse
Open
House
August 29th
1:00 - 4:00 pm
Art Supplies Up To
75 Off Retail
Dixon � Berol � Canson-Talens � 3M
Yarka � Bienfang � X-Acto � Demco
Bondstar Portfolios � Faber-Castell
Winsor & Newton � Grumbacher
Liquitex � Fredrix � Koh-I-Noor
Hunt � Strathmore � Staedtler
&More
Convenient Mail Order Shopping In Town
Just call, place your order and pick up.
Call for a �� AEf �
FREE Catalog 750-V50
c
50C
Off Tickets
With Student
ID
GoKarts � Games
!
Features;
2 GoKart Tracks
Road Track
Kids Track
Miniature Golf
Bumper Boats
Game Room
Snack Bar
Monday
Game Room League Might.
Get More
Information at Fun Park.
Tueiday Night �pecial
8-10pm
$20 per person
Unlimited Rider
Wednesday Night
Wrong Wag Wednesday
Ride Road Track
Backwards
Located on 264 & Old Creek Rd.
1842 Progress Rd.
757-1800
� Started in all 12 games last
season and finished with a
team-high nine sacks to rank
26th nationally
� Recorded 56 tackles in
1995, including 44 unassisted
stops
� Had six tackles for loss
during ths season
� Named to ECAC first-team
defensive squad for his
outstanding season
� Had eight tackles (seven
solo) and three sacks against
West Virginia
� Also had a pair of sacks at
Syracuse in '95
towards tickets and special events
The way this works is each year
you are a member, you build up
points that will enable you to get,
for example, better seating for foot-
ball games when you graduate.
Joining now is a good way to start
building up those points for when
you become a part of the Pirate
Club.
Throughout the year, the SPC
has socials in the same building
that the Pirate Club uses. These
meetings consist of talking with
other members and is a good way
to meet new people. During these
meetings, a special guest speaker
comes and talks to the group. These
guests are usually coaches.
Anyone from the head football
coach to head basketball coach will
come and talk about his or her
sport and answer any questions you
might have. This is an excellent way
to become more oriented with the
athletic program, and it gives you
a chance to ask coaches questions
you normally wouldn't get a chance
to ask.
One of the big trips the SPC is
planning for its members in the fall
is an away bus trip to Virginia Tech
on Nov. 9 to watch the ECU foot-
ball team take on the Hokies.
Wharton also says that during
the Pirate Club weekend, which in-
cludes the first football game of the
season on September 7, they plan
to have a special social for SPC
members. This would include tail-
gating and group seating at the
game.
A big advantage SPC members
have is that they can get their game
tickets for football games a day ear-
lier than the student body. SPC
members can pick up tickets on
Monday for Saturday games instead
of on Tuesday.
Members also get priority seat-
ing down in front in the stands,
right behind the ECU football team.
"They (members) have priority
seating which is the best available
seating for students, and also thejjf
get priority in getting away game-5.
tickets and bowl tickets Whartoa.
said. 5
And after the games, the mem-
bers can read about the game and
any other club events in the 20 is-
sues they will get of the Purple Re7i
port Pirate's Chest: a special news-i.ii
paper for members only. 5 �"��
Last year, the SPC did not
make it to any of the away football!
games because the location of the i
away opponents was too far for a"b
bus trip. However, they did plan a
trip for an away basketball game :ri
against UNC-W in Wilmington
Members rode down on an ECU bu�2
and had a pre-game social at Jungle.oi
Land, where they could play games
and eat, and then rode over to�
Trask Coliseum to watch the game.
The SPC gets involved iff f
sports from the beginning of theM"
fall to the end of the spring semesv.rn
ll
ter.
"We do cookouts for baseball
to try to get everyone together,?
Wharton said. "1"w
This year the SPC will look for"?
added exposure. Flyers tellings
about the SPC will be at the book-
stores and all around campus, so- �
students can grab one and get more.o'i
information. t
However, nothing is for free-oi
and there is a price for the menvii
bership, which costs $25. But for
all the benefits members get
throughout the year, it is a smalts
price. Not every college offers ac'J
club like this for its students. E
This price can be paid in install-
ments and doesn't have to be paid.i
all at once. For all the benefits, thi�i��
is peanuts. The SPC is a club madei
solely for you - the student. It's ���
great way to get involved in a grow T
ing athletic program. �b
To receive more informations"
call Wharton at 328-4540. ?:�
Join the Student Pirate Club.4
and be a part of the "team behind")
the teams
HAVE AT LEAST 4 SEMESTERS
OF COLLEGE REMAINING?
THE U.S. AIR FORCE HAS A JOB FOR YOU ,
AND WE CAN HELP PAY FOR COLLEGE
Starting salary as an officer is approximately $25,000;
it increases to over $42,000 after four years.
Jobs in almost any career field - we accept students in ALL
majors.
Best opportunity to become a pilot in years.
Outstanding medical, travel, and retirement benefits.
Incentive scholarship available to ALL juniors and seniors. All
juniors and seniors and seniors also receive $150 tax-free monthly
stipend
YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO CONSIDER ALL
YOUR OPTIONS. AIR FORCE ROTC IS ONE
Anyone on campus can sign up and check us out
with absolutely no obligation.
AIR FORCE.
ROTC"
LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE STARTS HERE
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT THE AIR FORCE
ROTC DEPARTMENT ON THE THIRD FLOOR OF
WRIGHT ANNEX (ABOVE THE STUDENT STORE),
OR CALL 328-6597
i �
: . �
- . J . JBW





mmmmmmmmtm
AIO
Alpha Sigma Phi
c u
R
Delta Chi
Delta Sigma Phi

Kappa Alpha
KZ
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Kappa Psi
OKT
Phi Kappa Tau
nKA
Pi Kappa Alpha
nKO
Pi Kappa Phi
riAO
Pi Lambda Phi
IAE
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
EN
Sigma Nu
IOE
Sigma Phi Epsilon
in
Sigma Pi
ITT
Sigma Tau Gamma
TKF
Tau Kappa Epsilon
ex
Theta Chi
FRATERNi
AUGUST 26-S
5 th Street
AIO
Downtown
Greenville
ITT
c
o
C
13
Fraternitie6 'Vithout
Housing At '1 his Time
OK4
nKA
nAO
IAE
in
AX
14th Street
Arlington Boulevard
-o
O
u

O
o
10th Street
0X
nAO
nKO
FRATERNITY HOUSE LOCA
RUSH IS
the time when you get to visit with
the different Greek organizations to
find out if you like the Greek life
and decide which fraternity or so-
rority you like the most. It is also
the time when the Greek organiza-
tions get to look at the you and de-
cide who they want to invite to join
their organization.
FRATERNITY
RUSH
SCHEDULE
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 -
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2?
Sign up booth in front of Student
Stores
MONDAY, AUGUST 26
Guided tour or all fraternity houses
TUESDAY, AUGUST 27
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29
Free time to journey to house of liking
ZTA
SORO
I





K
O R
N I
I O N
Z9
AUGUST 22-26
u

E
s
C5
Si
1
IOE
w


riKA
5th Street
AX
in AiD
IN

KI
KA
1 lth Street
IAE
e

rt
.1
Q
6
5
IONS
Aon
AZ
III
as
Johnston Street
AAn
XQ
5th Street
10 th Street
AD
ITY HOUSE LOCATIONS
AAn
Alpha Delta Pi
Aon
Alpha Omicron Pi
AO
Alpha Phi
ASA
Alpha Xi Delta
XQ
Chi Omega
AZ
Delta Zeta
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Pi Delta
ZTA
Zeta Tau Alpha
SORORITY FORMAL
RUSH SCHEDULE
THURSDAY, AUGUST 22
Orientation
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23
Introduction Day4 P.M10:30 P.M.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 24
House Tour Day10A.M5 P.M.
SUNDAY,AUGUST 25
Skit Day12 P.M4 P.M.
MONDAY, AUGUST 26
Preference Night4 P.M7 P.M.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 27
Bid Day
For information about sorority rush, go to
Whichard 204 or call Laura Sweet at 328-4235
:��
���L, � Jff





32
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
Student ID needed for tickets
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
h ! Pirate football is right around the
comer, and the Spirit of the East is grow-
ing strong. Soon Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
wjH-be filled to capacity and fans will
marvel at the feats of Marcus Crandell
and, the defending Liberty Bowl Cham-
pion.
Boy, that part about defending Lib-
erty Bowl Champs sounds good. But to
ke�p the winning tradition going that
Head Coach Steve Logan's Pirates have
ignited here at ECU. ti.e team needs your
support
T Getting tickets for the games is easy,
and,fun is had by all in attendance. All
students with a valid ECU ID (the one
with the ugly picture on it thai you get
at orientation) get a FREE ticket for each
home game. A limited amount of half
prwe guest tickets for your family or
friends that don't attend the university
is available on a first-come, first-serve
basis.
i i, The regular student pick-up days are
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and
group pick-up day is on Monday. Groups
of 25 or more people who want a block
of tickets together can send just one
person to the ticket pick-up location on
Monday to order the tickets, and then
come back later in the week to receive
thejr prepared tickets. This service is most
often used by organizations such as fra-
ternities, sororities, dorm floors, or dif-
ferent departments who want to sit in
the'same section.
� Student tickets are general admis-
sion, so you don't have an assigned seat
but you do have a designated section to
si� in shown on your ticket If you want
tojjnake sure you get in the same sec-
tion with your best friend, students are
allowed to bring one additional ID with
them to pick up their friend's ticket if
they are in class, at work or wherever.
When you head out to the stadium,
don't forget to bring your ID with you.
Identification is checked with your ticket
at the student gate.
.u, "This is basically designed to pro-
1


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tect the students said Lee Workman,
assistant athletic director for ticket sales
and promotions.
Workman said that the administra-
tion wants all the students to be able to
have a ticket and not let someone from
outside the university take away that
opportunity.
I suppose you want to know,
"Where can I pick up my tickets?" Well,
Jason Nichols
FL.5'11 170, Junior
� No. 4 on ECU'S career list
for receptions with 85
catches, just 17 short of
record
� Has caught 42 and 43
passes respectively in his
first two seasons
� Started in 22 of 24 games
� No. 2 receiver in 1995
with 43 catches for 502 yards
and a pair of touchdowns
� Averaged 8.1 yards on 22
punt returns
� Had four-game stretch
during '95 in which he caught
24 passes for 337 yards
����������������
that is actually up in the air right now.
Mendenhall and the ECU ticket office
have historically been the only two places
to pick up tickets, but Workman said that
the Student Store could be added to that
list
The highlight of this year's football
season is the resurgence of the series
with the hated Wolfpack of N.C. State.
The game isn't until November 30, but
ticket sales have already begun. Regular
ticket prices for that game are 25 and 38
bucks, but 3.000 specially-priced student
tickets will be offered at $10 for one day
only, on September 10.
If you want to sit with your mom
and dad or a non-ECU friend, $25 tick-
ets will be available for your guests, and
yes, you will be able to sit together. All
student tickets will be upper-deck seats
at Carolinas Stadium in Charlotte, and
will be full price once the 3,000 allotted
are sold out
It should be noted that the only
place you can get tickets for this game
at this time is from ECU or N.C. State.
Also coming up fast is Parents' Day.
The game will be on September 28
against Central Florida.
If you have any questions regard-
ing ticket sales, call 1-800-DIAL ECU or
(919) 3284500.
THE FASTEST-
SELLING
DC COMICS
AREAT:
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
919 Ddickinson Ave.
1-919-758-6909
The East Carolinian
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(P
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
33P
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC-
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
FOOTBALL frompage26
r �
was a little problem: the Southern Miss
defense saw Richards a little too late, and
in the words of ESPN's Keith Olberman
"they were not going to get him The
rest is history and ECU squeaked out of
Hattiesburg with a win and a Liberty
Bowl berth well in hand. There's not too
Gift Certificates
Available
georges
hair designs
-Full Service Unisex Salon
-Tanning
-Skin and Nail Care
-Walk-Ins Welcome
-European Trained Stylists
-Latest In Facial & Body Wax
-Professional Hair Products
much more to say. We'll see you on Oc-
tober 10th.
East Carolina vs. Miami
East Carolina, welcome to sunny
Miami, Florida, home of professional
sports. The Dolphins, the Heat the Pan-
Players to
THE PLAZA MALL CHARLES BOULEVARD
Greenville Blvd. SHOPPES
Open MonSat.
9:30 a.m9 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
Tel: 7566200
Charles & 10th Street
Open MonFri.
� 9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6 p.m.
Tel: 8305536
STANTON
SQUARE
Stantonsburg Road
Open MonFri.
10 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6p.m.
Tel: 7570076
HoirCut
$2�bff
Expires gg
I September 30, 1996 hop
1 F'
Perms or Tonning fbckoge
$50(b
Expires
September 30,1996
J L,
Scott Richards
TE, 6-5,251, Senior
� Starter for all 12 games
last season
� Caught 33 passes to
rank fourth on the team
� Catches totaled 341
yards with three TD's
� Had at least one recep-
tion in final 11 games of
season
� Ranked among national
leaders at tight end recep-
tions
� One of best games was
in 36-34 victory at Southern
Miss as he grabbed four
receptions for 62 yards
including TD grabs of 23
and 11 yards
� Had eight catches for 93
yards and a TD in win at
Syracuse
���������������
thers and of course the Hurricanes. Well,
the Hurricanes aren't a professional team,
but the way their football program was
being run the last ten years could have
fooled anybody. Bring in the savior, Head
Coach Butch Davis. Davis inherited a pro-
gram that had fallen in recent years,
partly due to off the field incidents. Last
season Miami went 8-3 in Davis's first
season, but could not participate in a
bowl game because of NCAA probatioa
This year the Hurricanes return 55
lettermen, and a bright new outlook
Miami leads the East Carolina series &0.
The last time the two teams met was in
1989, when the Hurricanes handed the
Pirates a 40-10 loss.
East Carolina vs. Arkansas State
It's East Carolina's homecoming.
Not too much more to say besides, won-
der who will win homecoming queen?
NEXT
East Carolina vs. Virginia Tech
It's funny how a coach's fortune can
change in such a small time. Just a few
years ago, people in Blacksburg were
calling for Virginia Tech Head Coach
Frank Beamer's job. Now he would prob-
ably win the mayor's race in Blacksburg.
Virginia Tech had a dream season last
year going 10-2 and shellacking Texas in
the Sugar Bowl 28-10. East Carolina and
Virginia Tech is always a great footfall
matchup. These two teams have a lot in
common. They both have the same re-
cruiting grounds, and both have risen
into the college footballs spotlight in re-
cent seasons. Virginia Tech's top gun is
QB Jim Druckenmiller. Druckenmiller
threw for over 2100 yards in '95. Coach
Frank Beamer and his squad know that
they will have their work cut out for them
when the Pirates visit town on Novem-
ber 9th.
East Carolina vs. Ohio
Ohio is not a football school plain
and simple They are, however, improv-
ing. Last season the Bobcats went 3-8
under first year Head Coach Jim Grobe.
The Bobcats play eight games on the
road in '96, and are a member of the
very underrated Mid-American Confer-
ence. Look for ECU to be using second
string players by the third quarter.
East Carolina vs. Memphis �
Rip Scherer knew what he was in
for when he took the head coaching job
at Memphis last season. He took over a
program that had come within one game
from going to a bowl game in the prev"
ous year. But he also took over a pro-
gram that was struggling for supporttfT'
the city of Memphis. See, Memphis isV
basketball town They love the basket
ball Tigers. The Pyramid, where Mem
phis plays its home basketball games, is
a city landmark Besides Elvis, Anfemee"
"Penny" Hardaway is the city's proudest
son. So where does Memphis football fit1
in? People are still wondering. But ddnT
underestimate Rip Scherer and his Ti-
gers. Scherer came from James MadisoTI'
University, where he built a strong foefc:
ball program under another basketball
shadow by the name of Lefty Drisell.
Memphis always gives ECU a hard time
and this season should not be any differ-
ent
East Carolina vs. NX. State
Throw out the records. Throw out
the history. Throw out that this gan�T
is being played at an NFL stadium. Hell,
you could set these two teams up at a '
peewee football field and they would"
be ready to get it oa This game has tm:
cities in the state of North Carolinalff
sort of a civil war. There's the big rf
tropolis of Raleigh, N.C. The folks up'ta
the state capital don't feel that N.Cj-
State should have to play ECU. The
Wolfpack is a member of the prestigioas
ACC, and playing ECU is a step dowa
Then there's the Emerald City of Green-
ville. A town that still talks about beat"
ing th�irirstate rivals in the 1992 Peacti"
Bowl, and a university that feels like' it
is not getting respect ECU Athletic D�
rector Mike Hamrick is almost a her
in these parts, having finally pushed
and buiiied his way into a matchup be
tween the Pirates and Wolfpack. Now
the stage is set on November 30th in a
neutral town, Charlotte, N.C The Qurf
City better be ready for this one. Theft'
is no love loss between these toW
schools. This game will be talked about
for years to come.
SSSfews
SANDWICHES

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PLUS 52.75 SHIPPING AND HANDLING
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�Available only to students, faculty, and staff of East Carolina University�
The "Off Campus Meal Card" is a personalized, Non-Transferable, plastic card, the size of a credit card, which, when presented
with a valid ECU ID, enables you to participate in the discount program offered by the following restaurants:
I i
YES, 1 want to take advantage of the discounts offered by the participating restaurants on the "Off .
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(800) 371-230? or Fax (910) 760-5888
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2. Boli's 5th Street Pizzeria-buy one sub,
get second for half price (dine-in only)
3. Checkers Drive-ln-buy one Chicken
Sandwich, get the second free
4. Domino's Pizza-buy one, get one free
(cany out only)
5. Jersey Mike's GiantSubs-15 discount
or free regular size drink with sandwich
purchase
6. Marathon Restaurant-free fries with
purchase of any Sub or buy one Platter,
get the second for half price
7. Papa Oliver's-25 discount on any pizza
(carry out only)
8. Pizza Transit Authority-25 discount
9. Sonic Drive-ln-Buy a 1 or 2 and get
one free (not good with other special offers)
10The Bagel Store-50 discount on bagels
and sandwiches
11.The Emerald City Grill-25 discount
Restaurants and Discounts are printed on the back of the card
To Place Your Order or
For More Information,
Call 1-800-371-2305
!VWWWWMWiMWVS.VMV '
AAAAMWMAAAAAMMM





34
Tuesda, August 20, 1996
The Ea: oilman
.�d .1- head coach ECl
10 Minute
Briefs
v received her undergraduate
�mpleted her master s de-
; ithletic administration at
irtei and letterwinner. Kee played lor the
� n she was a two-time captain, in
iding Defensive Player and she
i tte Classic Golden Glove Award in 19S9
M4
ijl;
Players to Players to
Watch
Watch
Ron Suddith
OT, 6T, 297, Senior
David Hart
Safety, S'KT, 183, Senior
� One of team's best pass
blockers
� Has been a starter on
Pirate's offensive line for
virtually all of the past three
seasons
� Starter 10 of 12 games in
1995 at right tackle
� Missed contests vs. Centra!
Micnigan and Illinois due to
ankle injury
� � � � �
� � � � �
� Same intensity as twin
brother Daren
� Ranked fifth on team in
tackles with 65 including 38
solo hits
� Had a season- best 20
tackles in victory at Army last
November
� Had one interception in
1995 vs. Temple
��������������a
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v
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
35
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE"
NOSTALGIA
NEWSSTAND
The comic book store
919 Dickinson Ave.
1-919-758-6909
�TMOC Comet C1M4.
HOME from page 22
their non-conference games. At one point
there was some speculation whether Lou-
isville would remain a member of the
conference, but according to Hamrick,
Louisville will stay.
"Louisville and the conference had
some disagreement on some issues, and
after some serious discussion they came
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to the conclusion that the best thing for
the conference would be to expand
Hamrick said. "Obviously that expansion
dealt with us here at East Carolina and
now we are in the process of working
out the details
There was also a lot of speculation
that the Big East conference was look-
ing to end its affiliation with Temple and
allow ECU to join, since we play many
Big East opponents and have fared well.
"We did have some discussion with
the Big East but at this time, Confer-
ence USA is the direction we are head-
ing to Hamrick said. 'We need a con-
ference to play football in
Besides scheduling perks, being af-
filiated with this conference will boost
ECU's participation in working with
other conferences around the nation, as
well as some of the top football programs
around the country.
"Conference USA is one of the eight
major equity conferences, therefore we
will have a significant vote in the gov-
erning of the NCAA. If there is ever a
national playoff for a national champi-
onship in football, I'm sure the eight con-
ferences will be involved with that play-
off. There are a lot of pluses Hamrick
said.
Another plus is the national expo-
sure ECU will receive with more air time
on television.
"They have an excellent television
contract" Hamrick said.
Hamrick sees nothing but positive
things resulting from ECU joining the
conference.
"It gives us good scheduling oppor-
tunities, we create rivalries and we will
play for a conference championship
Hamrick said. "We need to be in a cor
ference. There are very few schools tha
aren't in a conference and I just don'
think we can survive without being in i
conference, unless you're a Notre Dame.
Many schools who have tradrtionafl
been iridependent football programs are now
seeking affiliation with conferences. Army's
future with Conference USA is an
example
"Army is now considering joining a
ference, and they have never been in a
ference to my knowledge Hamrick
The future looks promising for our
ball program, which has already made i0
nationally known. Affiliation with the
ence will only strengthen ECU's growth
football.
"I think the fans are very exciteSJ
Hamrick said. "We needed a home for ��
footbaO program and now we have it" �j
hwiflt
OFFENSE from page 23
�i
icar
iNCE 192
NOW 3 LOCATIONS:
Red Banks Road Office � 1001 Red Banks Road
Greenville, N.C. 27358 � 919-355-8200
Walmart Supercenter � Greenville Boulevard
Greenville, N.C. 27858 � 919-355-5988
Supercenter Hours:
MonFri. 10am - 8pm
Sat. 10am - 6pm Sun. 1pm - 6pm
University Medical Center Office
2400 Stantonsburg Rd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 � 919-752-6609
"Minimum balance required is $100 or average $300. If balance requirement is not
met, fees are: $5 per month and $.35 per debt
MEMBER FDIC
will see a lot of action again this sea-
son
The backfield formation will not be
a surprise this year. The Pirates will run
the usual one-back set but the person-
nel that's going to be in the backfield is
still up in the air.
Sophomores Scott Harley and
Raymond Mabry, along with red-shirt
freshman Damon Davis all vie for the
starting job. Harley broke the single
game rushing record for freshmen last
year against Temple, netting 263 yards
on 61 carries. Davis is small (5'8 170
lbs.), but is exceptionally fast
With the youth in the backfield
this year, Crandell will be relied on
to make the transition period while
finding a starting running back
smoother.
"I'm going to help them as much
as I can Crandell said. "I'm just go-
ing to try to keep them focused
There will be some movement in
the offensive line this year, but it will
consist of experienced blockers. Se-
nior tackle Ron Suddith is probably
the top protector up front, along with
right guard Lamont Burns, ho
started in every game last season.
Other seniors Logan will look upon
to dominate opponents' defenses will
be Jamie Gray and Shane McPherson.
Sophomore Danny Moore is ex-
pected to see action at center after
sitting out last year. Big Stacey
Whitehead is also expected to m�ft
an impact this season, and the s8-
tus of Mpumi Masimini is unkndSS
as he continues fo recover frorrS
broken leg sustained against TemiJ.
Crandell does not have any va-
ries about his veteran offensive liflg.
"We've been together since rj$
been here Crandell said. "Tl
have a lot of confidence in trU
selves, and I have a lot of confides
in them also
With the depth and experieii
of this year's potent offensive ui
ECU fans can have a lot of coj
dence that the Pirates can only I
prove on the standard of excellerJJ:
that has already been established
i4S-
eaS'
MARCH from page 28
most 50 percent and that is uncom-
mon to grow that quickly
The rapid growth can be at-
tributed to a lot of things, accord-
ing to Knighten.
"The success of the football
team, the publicity we have re-
ceived and the two bowl games
helped us in exposure Knighten
said. "We have also had a very ag-
gressive recruiting campaign,
which includes a variety of people
from different majors
Knighten says that not all
band members are music majors.
He says about half are music ma-
jors and the rest represent a wide
variety of majors, from biology to
pre-med.
To what does he attribute
their success that allows the band
to continue its growth?
"It's a combination of the sS-
cess of the athletic departmgt
and the recruiting campaign ��
Whatever the combinatiqj.
Knighten hopes this is the firstjgf
many shows that will gain them Q
tional exposure and keep tfi
marching band program growirX
"This is a really significant
step for us and it will allow us�
continue to grow
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36
x
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
Gremille: University Commons Shopping Center, GreenyiUe Blvd. and Evans St. Open Monday-Saturday, 9:30AM-9:30PM; Sunday, IPM-7PM





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 20,1996
37
Purpose of SGA
The purpose of the Student Government association is to serve students,
to advocate student interests, to provide a forum for ideas,
and to provide linkage between students and administration.
� i a A�itlVvPacU-
�T IMU-� �UOl!s
1 JAcademic Affairs Committee
�to- � B ?Chair(s) Academic Affairs Committee � .9
J ?Admissions and Recruitment Comm. (1) U
?Calendar Comm. (1)
?Career Education Comm. (1)
?Course Drop Appeals Comm. (1)
?Credits Comm. (1)
?Faculty Computer Comm. (1)
?General Education comm. (1)
?Libraries Comm. (1)
?Readmission Appeals Comm. (1)
?Student Advising Retention Comm. (1)
?Student Scholarships, Fellowships, & Financial Aid Comm. (1)
?Teaching Effectiveness Comm. (3)
?University Curriculum Comm. (2)
?Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
?Student Services Committee?External Relations Committee
?Chair(s) Student Services?Chair(s), External Relations
CommitteeComm.
?Parking and Traffic Coordinator
?Information?Local Relations Liaison,
TechnologyComputing FacilitiesGreenville Community
Coordinator?State Relations Liaison
?Libraries Use Coordinator?National Relations Liaison
?Health Services Reform Officer
?Housing Liaison?SGA Elections Committee
?Dining Lia'son?Elections Board Chairperson

legislative Positioii
?Speaker of the House
?Senior Class President
?Senior Class Vice President
?Senior Class TreasurerSecretary
?Junior Class President
?Junior C'ass Vice President
?Junior Class TreasurerSecretary
?Sophomore Class President
?Sophomore Vice President
?Sophomore TreasurerSecretary
?Freshman Class President
?Freshman Vice President
?Freshman TreasurerSecretary
?Off-Campus Representatives
?On-Campus Representatives
?Garrett Residence Hall Representative (5)
?Jarvis Residence Hall Representative
?Umstead Residence Hall Representative
?Slay Residence Hall Representative
?Fleming Residence Hall Representative
?Cotten Residence Hall Representative
OAycock Residence Hall Representative
?Belk Residence Hall Representative
?Clement Residence Hall Representative
?Fletcher Residence Hall Representative
?Greene Residence Hall Representative
?Jones Residence Hall Representative
?Scott Residence Hall Representative
?Tyler Residence Hall Representative
?White Residence Hall Representative
��
HOWTO GET INVOLVED
To get involved in the Student
Government Association:
1. Fill out the attached application
and file during the first week of
school in the SGA office located in
Rm 255 Mendenhall Student Center.
2. You may file as a representative
from your Residence Hall or, if you
live off campus, as a Day
Representative. You may decide to
run for a class office and as a Class
Officer you will also have a position
on the Legislature.
3. A campus-wide election will be
held in September 1996 to elect SGA
representatives.
If you need more information,
contact the SGA Office at 328-4726
MEETINGS
Student Government meetings are
held on mondays at 5:00pm with
committee meetings immediately
preceding them.
As a member of the legislature, you
will be appointed to one of the
following committies:
� Appropriations
� Student Welfare
� Rules and Judiciary
� Screening and Appointments
SGA 1996H 997 EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Angie NixPresident
EricRiverbaneVice President
Jonathan PhillipsTreasurer
Julie ThompsonSecretary
SGA OFFICE
255 Mendenhall
Student Center
328-4726
Fax � 328-2308
judicte Boards
Your academic success depends on following rules in and out of the
classroom! The student judicial system is here to support you. College
students have both rights (due process, freedom of association, etc.) and
responsibilities.The judicial process respects a student's rights while hold-
ing people who violate university policy accountable. While most student
cases are heard by a staff member, all accused students have the right to a
hearing before the Honor Board, a group of 5 to 7 fellow students.The
university's case is presented by the student Attorney General and the
accussed student is assisted in presenting their case by the student public
defender. Students who wish to be considered for a position in the judi-
cial process need to contact the Dean of Students Office on the 2nd
floor of Wichard (328-6824) in early February to obtain an application.
Final appointment to the Honor Board and Attorney General position is
made by the SGA executive branch and approved by the student legisla-
ture. The public defender is appointed by the Dean of Students Office.
Participation in the student judicial process is a wonderful way to get
involved with the campus, make a difference in someone else's life, and
learn decision making and communication skills!
Get informedAvoid ProblemsMaximize Your Success
(just a few helpful hints to assist you in avoiding trouble)
Did you know?
Possession of a weapon on campus will result in suspension.
(BB Guns, large knives, slung shots, and air rifles ARE considered
weapons)
The University is required to suspend a student for selling, man-
ufacturing, delivering or even giving away any controlled drug.
(If the drug is a schedule I or 2 (Cocaine. LSD. Ritalin, etc.) then expul-
sion is required Growing marijuana seeds is manufacturing.)
Possession of stolen street signs is against university policy.
(Keep proof of purchase available to answer any questions.)
Possession of an open container of alcohol (even if you are 21)
may result in both a city citation - major bucks - and a university
charge - major bummer.
(The parking lots and the adjacen idewalks on Reade across from
downtown are on campus.)
Date
SGA Application
iName:
SS
Campus Address:
iCampus Phone:
iHome Phone:
iPermanent Address:
(Position Filing For:
No. of Hours Completed:
IGPA:
hereby consent to have my GPA
'checked by the SGA Executive
Secretary.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
JUDICIAL BOARDS
Signature
Not applicable to Freshmen
Return to:
Student Government Association
Rm 255 Mendenhall
Student Center
. ��� �





Tuesday, Ausust201996
The East Carolinian
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On behalf of the staff at University Housing Services, we hope that you have
a happy and productive year at East Carolina University!
If you have any comments or suggestions, please contact the appropriate
office at the following numbers:

��
University Housing Services
Residence Life
Central Campus Community Service Desk
College Hill Community Service Desk
West Campus Community Service Desk
Maintenance Hotline
Aycock Residence Hall
Belk Residence Hall
Clement Residence Hall
Cotten & Fleming Residence Halls
Fletcher Residence Hall
Garrett Residence Hall
Greene Residence Hall
Jones Residence Hall
Scott Residence Hall
Slay & Umstead Residence Halls
Tyler Residence Hall
White Residence Hall
328-6450
328-4264
328-4033
328-4044
328-4022
328-6771
328-6935
328-6119
328-6689
328-6180
328-6101
328-6074
328-6110
328-6149
328-6144
328-6052
328-6455
328-6381
E A. S T
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
UNIV
ERS
TY
HOUSING
SERVICES
If you have any questions, call University Housing Services at 328-6450.
MIIHilMIMI
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
39
DOA7
THZOUQHu
t1C-
4,
1109 Charles Blvd.
Open 10am - Midnight Everyday!
Phone-758-4251
gas
&tM&-
KP(
CHANCELLOR
for that first phase are to be in later this
month and when that occurs we will
know whether we can proceed with
phase one. If indeed that occurs, we're
looking forward to 8,000 additional seats
for the opening of the 1997 football sea-
son. In fact, we will see some construc-
tion work even during this football sea-
son. And then subsequent to that we will
have the opportunity to put in some club
seating on the north side, as well as clos-
ing in the stadium on the east side (where
the scoreboard currently stands), so in
fact it will form sort of ahorseshoe. Ulti-
mately the plan would be to increase the
seating on the south side as well and we
would hope to get in the vicinity of
60,000 seats
DEFENDING LIBERTY BOWL
CHAMPS
"We clearly had a wonderful season
last year, which culminated with the Lib-
erty Bowl victory. I was very pleased for
our coaches, our players - for all of us.
�Thursday, Aug. 22nd�
Special Edition "Yard Party"
Live Music � No Cover � 8 p.m.
�Sunday, Aug. 25th�
The Original "Yard Party"
Music by the Groove Riders
No Cover � 7 p.m.
K-Mart Shopping Center
Across from Plaza Mall
321-0202
95$ Draft Every day!
MoiKkP
Tuesdays
Wednesdays
Thursdays
nftS3 I'ikhc
$2.�� Margaritas
SI. Mexican Imports
plus 1 3" oil entire too
tor groups o( r in mon
Tropical Tavern Punch $2.E
OTHER SPECIALS TOO
Be A Part Of The Best Party In Town� Rain or Shine!
from page 22
The season ended so well with the vic-
tory over Stanford. If you were to simply
look at the prospects this year on paper,
we have to say we could have another
wonderful season. 1 was taken by one of
the quotes by one of the ECU players
who said that It's not enough to talk
about winning games, you have to go
out and do it' Obviously the team has
the right perspective. They are wonder-
ful representatives of our university and
I certainly wish them very well
FUTURE OF ECU ATHLETICS
"1 think the athletics prospects for
East Carolina are very good. Our football
program certainly has led the way. You
can look at last season in men's basket-
ball and see the success they experienced
and the terrific recruiting year they have
had. When you look at women's basket-
ball with a terrific coach (Anne Donovan)
who has a great ability to recruit as well,
I think the future is very bright. We have,
over the years, been successful, year in
and year out in baseball, softball, swim-
ming, both men's and women's, so we have
a whole succession of sports in which we
have exhibited great success. Some areas
are beginning to show success. I think
our relationship with the Colonial Ath-
letic Association (CAA). and now our rela-
tionship with Conference USA for foot-
ball, give us the chance to succeed in a
level of play that I think will be very good
for East Carolina
RENEWED RIVALRY WITH NQ
STATE
"Our experience playing North Can
hna State University lias been that eaci
of the games has been wonderful footbai
games. They have been a special challenge,
for each of the teams. 1 think both teams
look forward to that game as they have i$
the past and I think they will continue to
do that in the future. I thought the gamfc
we played, for example, in the Peach BovJ
was a terrific football game no matter
which way it came out although I was
very glad with the outcome of that gamt.
1 think our ability to compete again
NCSU, and now UNCChapel Hill, Wate
Forest Duke (future games in upcoming
years), all of those provide a terrific off
portunity for the football fans of our stau.
It will give us a chance to spotlight ouV
university in a North Carolina contest'?
FAN BEHAVIOR DURING N&.
STATE CAME
"The first football game I attendejl
when I came to East Carolina was the lajt
game when we played at North Carolirb
State. That was an unfortunate experienoi.
But to the great credit of our students aril
those who support our athletic program,
there have been no further incidents. We
played N.C. State in the Peach Bowl (in
1992) and our fans represented our schopl
very well. I have great confidence goiflg
forward that that will be the case1' ;
DEFENSE from page 24
page
can play in one game
One of ECU's fastest players, se-
nior cornerback Dwight Henry who
has started 30 games in his past three
years, will try to surpass his 58 tackles
and six pass deflections. Henry doesn't
believe the loss of McDaniel or Coo-
per will play a big factor in what the
Pirate "D" hopes to accomplish.
"Those guys were good and I
learned a lot from them and I'm sure
David Hart learned a lot from them,
but Dave and myself have been here
for a while and we know the defense,
especially in the secondary Henry
said. "We're capable of doing the job,
and we just need to step in and ribt
just fill their shoes, but do better aod
elevate the defense
Kinston native Kelvin Suggs, w6o
is only a sophomore, saw significantly
more playing time at the end of last
season. Following spring practice,
Suggs was listed as the starting
"Bench" cornerback.
This defensive unit looks to be jtfst
as strong as last season's. The voids
left by some players will be picked up
by others who do have the experience
and talent Look for another strong per-
formance by all these "D" players.
. � � � � ���� . � ���� "
nriOYifrffoTipI �nrvica lirrr (o Office f fun plrvrmr-fJ for yowl
ft
The Student Recreation Center will be open soon!
Stay tuned for details!
Adventure Program
Fitness Program
AUG 30- SEPT2 Labor Day Baekpackine-Mt. Mitchell. N.C.AUG. 23
SEPT 7-8Firsi Year Experience-Hammock's BeachSEPT. 3
SEPT. 7Da Canoe Trip-Merchant s Mill PondAUG. 30
SEPT. 8Beach Horseback Riding-Cedar IslandAUG. 30
SEPT. 14-15Climbine at Pilot MountainSEPT. 6
SEPT. 21-22Beach Weekend GetawavSEPT. 13
SEPT. 21Hang Gliding Dav Trip-Kitty Hawk, N.C.SEPT 6
SEPT. 24Try ScubaSEPT 13
SEPT. 27-29Backpacking Trip-ShenandoahSEPT. 20
Hours of Operation
Drop-In Aerobics
Reg. Aerobic Session I
Reg. for Beginning Tennis Lessons
"Energy Explosion" Free Aerobics
Reg. for Burgers, Buns and Thighs
Aerobic Session 1 Begins
Reg. for Aerobic Instructor
Training Class
Burgers. Buns and Thighs
Adult Beginning Tennis Lessons
15-1027 Aerobic Instructor Training Class
Personal SafetySelf Defense
AUG.21-31
AUG.21-31
AUG.26-96
AUG.27
SEPT.3-9
SEPT3
SEPT3-13
SEPT10
SEPT10-103
SEPT15-102
SEPT18
3:00,4:15.5:30 p.m.
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
CG 108Garrett
CG204
CG204
CGGym
CG204
9:00 a.m5.00 p.m. CG 204
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
CG 102
Minges Court
CGGym
New extended hours
Christenbury Pool
Mon. & Wed.6 a.m5 p.m. & 7 p.m11:30 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs.6 a.m8 a.m. & 11 a.m5 p.m. & 7-11:30 p.m.
Fn.6 a.ml 1:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun.9a.m10:30p.m
"Thurs. 7 p.m-9m. Kayaking Club Christenbury Gym
Mon. & Wed.noon-1 p m. & 3 p.ml 1:30 p.m.
Tucs. & Thurs6 a.m1 p.m. & 4 p.m11 30 p.m.
Fn.6 a.ml 1:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun.9 a.m10:30 p.m.
"Intramural sport-& special events may affect schedule.
Christenbury Weight Room
MonFn.6 a.ml 1:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun.9 a.m10:30 p.m
Intramural Sport Program
Christenbury Equipment Room
MonFri 6 a.ml 1:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun 9 a.m10:30 p.m.
GarrettAycock Weight Room
Mon -Fri.noon-l 1 30 p.m
Sat.Sun.Booa-i0:30 p.m.
Climbing Tower
MonThurs2:00 p.m7:00 p.m.
Adventure Rental 'enter
MonThurs.2.00 p.m7:00 p.m.
Fri10:00 a.m7:00 p.m
AUG. 26NFLECU Football Pick 'Em Entries10:00 a.m. CG 204
AUG. 27Flag FootballFB Preview Reg. Mtg5:00 p.m. MSC 244
SEPT. 3Volleyball (M.W.CR) Reg. Mtg.5:00 p.m. MSC 244
SEPT. 5Outdoor 3-00-3 Basketball Deadline5:00 p.m. CG 204
SEPT. 10!M Sports Captains' Certification Clinic5:00 p.m. MSC 244
SEPT 18 & 19Frisbee Golf Singles3-6 p.m. Fris.Crs.
SEPT. 18Tennis Tourney Entry Deadline5:00 p.m. CG 204
SEPT. 24Co-Rec Basketball Registration Meetng5:00 p.m. MSC 244
Natural Life Program
AUG. 27Energy Explosion4 p.m.CG
SEPT. 5King and Queen of the Halls4 p.m.College Hill
SEPT 19Bike-n-Blade Rodeo6 p.m.Minges Lot
For the rest of
the semester's
program dates,
pick up a Fall
Pocket Calendar
in 204
Christenbury Gym.
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.





��
mmmummmmmmmmmmmammm
mmmmammmummmmm � � t �HHMwwaHHMwHMWMHnMii
40
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
TO TARGET PAYS OFF. FOR A DISCOUNT STORE, THERE'S A
EXPECT MORE. PAY LESS:
at 3040 South Evans Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
919-355-8020





41
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER
Sunday
29
Mmm W Student Union Visual Arts
Presents: Photos of P.H. Polk in Mendenhall
Gallery through OcL 27. .
30
Monday
AUGUST
20
Tuesday
Greenville Merchant Expo
'96: with Pirates, Carrots, & Margaritas. Expo
will feature a performance by John Reno. 4-7
p.m. on Mendenhall Brickyard.
22
Thursday
Student Union Sponsored
Lecture: Chew On This: "What is the Future
of Palestine?" by Yousef Sansour from noon
until 1 p.m. in Mendenhall Underground.
University Unions Travel Adventure Film
Series: Legends of Louisiana at 4 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. There will also
be a theme dinner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall
Great Room.
OCTOBER
Minority Welcome Back
Dance: Mendenhall Social Room from 9 p.m.
until closing.
23
1
Tuesday
Friday
Student Union Lecture Com-
mittee: Living the Dream: Black Man Ris-
ing at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
The F.A.N. (Friday All-
Nighter) Club: 4 p.mmidnight in
Mendenhall. Featuring local talent The
Melanie Sparks band, and the a capella
rhythm-and-blues sound of IMANI. The live
bands will be followed by a pep rally with
ECU Cheerleaders, Purple & Gold Dancers,
and the Pirate mascot from 7-8 p.m. Free open
recreation in the billiards, table tennis, and
bowling areas will be available from 10 p.m.
until closing.
2!
Wednesday
IS. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: North Carolina Dance
Theatre at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
3
Thursday
ECU Playhouse Presents:
Big River at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
through Oct. 8.
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
Imani, a Philadelphia-based quintet who will perform in Mendenhall on
Aug. 23, were seven-time winners of the Star Search TV talent show.
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
John Reno will be playing the music
of Jimmy Buffett for your listening
pleasure at the Merchant Expo '96.
24'
Saturday
8!
Tuesday
An Evening With. . . : Car-
rot Top at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
'Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center Sponsored Lec-
ture: Dr. Claude Anderson at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room.
School of Art Sponsored Lecture and Recep-
tion: Charles Kraus at 7 p.m. in Speight Au-
ditorium.
11
Friday
Jazz at Night: 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room.
School of Art Sponsored Lecture: Gabriel P.
Weisburg at 3 p.m. in Speight Auditorium.
15
Tuesday
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: Always Patsy Cline
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Saturday
Monday
NOVEMBER
2
Saturday
�Gray Gallery: Dr. Robert Lee
Humber Exhibition through Nov. 23.
National PanHellenic Council Step Show:
7 p.m in Wright Auditorium.
25
Monday
3
Sunday
Student Union Sponsored
Lecture: Chew On This: "All About Beer" by
Dr. Jennifer Crouch from noon until 1 p.m.
in Mendenhall Underground.
DECEMBER
Mendenhall Gallery: Sculp-
tures and wall reliefs by Hanna Jubran. Exhi-
bition runs through Nov. 30.
4!
Wednesday
Monday
41
I University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: The New South Af-
rica at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix The-
atre. There will also be a theme dinner at 6
p.m. in Mendhall Great Room.
Thespians of Diversity: 7
p.m. in Mendenhall Room 244.
Thursday
26'
Mmm mm International Students Asso-
ciation Presents: International Night from
6-11 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
7
Thursday
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
Crazily-coiffed prop comedian Carrot Top will once again crack up the
student body when he visits Wright Auditorium on Aug. 24 at 8 p.m.
28'
Mmm km" Student Union Sponsored
Lecture: Chew On This: "Count Dracula" by
Dr. James C. Holte from noon until 1 p.m. in
Mendenhall Underground.
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: Barber of Seville at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Natural Life Presents: Buffett Bingo at 8 p.m.
in Christenbury.
5
mw Madrigal Dinner: i p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room. Runs through Dec.
8.
Hendrix Theatre Films:
All shows at 8 p.m. The Birdcage -
Aug.22-24: Twister - Sept. 5-7; Striptease
- Sept. 12-14: Eddie - Sept.19-21;
Dragonheart - Sept. 26-2: Original
Gangstas - Oct.4-6: Mission: Impossible
- Oct. 10-12: The Rock - Oct. 24-26.
13
Wednesday
i Tuesday
SEPTEMBER
6
Friday
The F.A.N. Club: 5th Annual
Saber SlashSun SplashOrange Crush Con-
cert from 4 p.mmidnight in Mendenhall.
25
29
Mmm W S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: London Chamber Or-
chestra at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Minority Student Academic
and Leadership Recognition Program : 6
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre and Ledonia Wright
African-American Cultural Center.
14
Thursday
Wednesday
Thursday
ECU Wind Ensemble and
Concert Band: 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
31
mf Midnight Madness IV: 9 p.m
-2 a.m. at Mendenhall.
School of Art Sponsored
Lecture: Odeda Rosenthal at 7 p.m. in Speight
Auditorium.
ECU Playhouse : J.B. at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre until Nov. 19.
19
Thursday
Friday
Natural Life Presents: Bike
& Blade Rodeo at 6 p.m. in Minge Parking
Lot.
Gray Gallery: School of Art Faculty Exhibi-
tion through Oct. 19.
27
Mmm m Parents Weekend Event:
1964: The Tribute plays the music of the
Beatles at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
NOVEMBE
Saturday
Friday
20'
Mmm mw Jazz at Night: 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room
28'
Mmm mw Cultural Awareness Week: A
Splash of Color runs through Oct. 4.
More September events continued at the
top of the page.
1
19
Tuesday
Friday
The F.A.N. Club: Pirate Fest
4 p.m. until closing in Mendenhall. Float com-
petition, banner contest, canned food drive,
homecoming court announcement, pirate
chest drawing, spirit cup winner, and open
recreation from 10 p.m. unr.il closing.
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series Added Attraction:
Maynard Ferguson at 8 p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium.
20
Wednesday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: .4 Journey in Japan
at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theate.
There will also be a theme dinner at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room. , �-
Photo Courtesy of Columbia Pictures
Demi Moore shows off her acting
talents inStrinte&ig, SaeW-2





42
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Students choose movies and music for fall
Student Union
wants your help
with planning
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
How many times have you looked
at your bill at the beginning of the
semester and wondered exactly what
that pesky Student Activities Fee was
used for? Or how many times have you
seen the list of upcoming activities
jind wished you had a say in what or
who gets scheduled to appear on cam-
pus? Well, here's your answer to both
questions.
That little logo on the flyers and
posters is the logo for The Student
Union. The Student Union is just what
the name implies, a union of students
working together to provide entertain-
ment for all students on campus. They
schedule all the comedians, lectures,
concerts and movies, as well as any
late night activities such as Buffett
Bingo. In the past, The Student Union
has brought the likes of Barry Will-
iams (TV's Greg Brady), Dr. Ruth,
Chris Rock, The Allman Brothers,
Gallagher and singer Don McLean to
campus for special events. This is on
top of the regular events they have
every year, which include weekend
movies at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, a welcome back concert in August
and the annual Barefoot On The Mall
festival.
So what's planned for this year?
Some things are already scheduled,
others are in the works, and a lot more
are still left to plan. That's where we,
the student body, come into the pic-
ture. Without students, there would
be no Student Union. So, ever won-
dered how to get involved with Stu-
dent Union? Here's the answer to that
question, too.
The Student Union is made up
of eight committees that are respon-
sible for planning events in their par-
ticular area. The committees are the
Barefoot Committee, the Cultural
Awareness Committee, the Films Com-
mittee, the Lecture Committee, the
Marketing Committee, the Popular
Entertainment Committee, the Spe-
cial Events Committee, and the Visual
Arts Committee. In order to join a
committee you can stop by the Stu-
dent Union offices on the second floor
of Mendenhall room 236, or you can
call them at 328-4715. Or, if it's easier
for you to e-mail them, you can find
them at uuunion@cis.ecu.edu or you
can check out their home page at
http:www.cis.ecu.edu
studentunionthehomepage.html for
even more information.
The process of joining a commit-
tee is just as simple. You merely pick
up an application, fill it out and re-
turn it to the SU office. The office then
forwards your application to the head
of the committee(s) you wish to join.
The committee head then calls you
or interviews you and lets you know
the time and place of meetings. It's
that easy.
So far the Student Union has
many things already planned - both
old and new. These include comedy
with Carrot Top on Aug. 24 in Wright
Auditorium, a sculpture exhibit cur-
rently on display until Sept. 20, a
merchant's expo on Aug. 20 with both
giveaways and musician John Reno
playing your favorite Jimmy Buffett
songs, Living The Dream: Black Man
Rising on Oct. 1, and Buffett Bingo
on Nov. 7. This is a chance for you to
play bingo for prizes while enjoying
the music of Jimmy Buffett.
Movies already planned for this
fall include The Birdcage, Twister,
Eddie, Striptease, Dragonheart,
Sarafina, Mission: Impossible and
The Rock. These films are all shown
in Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall and
start at 8 p.m. Admission is free with
a valid ECU ID and one guest per ID
is allowed. Also, drive-in movies are
currently being planned for the fall.
SU is trying some new things out
this year, too. One of these is the
FAN. (Friday All-Nighter) Club. These
events will be held on the Fridays
before home football games and oc-
casionally before away games as
well. The schedule for these
events includes live bands
from 4-7 p.m. and a pep
rally with the ECU
Cheerleaders,
the Purple &
Gold Danc-
ers, and the
Pirate Mas-
cot from 7-8
p.m. Then
after the 8
p.m. movie,
Mendenhall
will remain
open for free
bowling, billiards, and
table tennis from 10 p.m. until
closing. The first of these events is
Aug. 23 and features the music of lo-
cal favorite The Melanie Sparks Band,
as well as the a cappella R&B sounds
of Imani. This Philadelphia based all-
girl quintet has been a seven-time Star
Search winner and finalist
So no matter what you like, be it
art movies or music, the Student
Union offers something for you.
And since you've already
paid for the entertain-
ment through your
Student Activities
fees, you deserve to
go out and enjoy
all they have to
offer. Or if you
feel misrepre-
sented by the
Student
Union or
just wish to
become in-
volved, pick a
committee or two or
three and sign up today. There's
no deadline on applications and all
are encouraged to join. After all, with-
out student participation it wouldn't
really be a Student Union now would
it?
Huck Finn ushers in new season
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Calling all shower singers!
East Carolina Playhouse has a
great season planned for 1996-97,
and if you've ever dreamed of seeing
your name in lights, there's no bet-
ter time for you to get involved than
now.
The first show of the season will
be Big River: The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn. This is a musical
adaptation of Mark Twain's classic
novel. Far from being just the story
of a young boy's escapades, Big River
deals with many of the hot issues of
the time period, including morality,
slavery and the Civil War.
Huck Finn takes off down the
Mississippi with a runaway slave (his
friend Jim) and the adventure begins.
The audience is invited into a world
not often experienced by the average
theatergoer as we watch Huck sur-
vive basically on
his own in an
adult world.
Jim, because of
his color, is not
accepted by the
public as a man.
On the other
hand. Huck,
little more than
a boy, must by
necessity as-
sume this role,
whether he is
ready for it or mmmmKmmmmmmmm
not. This poi-
gnant statement about America's his-
tory is but one of the thought-pro-
voking themes in the work. Charac-
ters involved in this piece range from
"We need people
of all colors,
creeds, ethnic
identities, and so
on.
� John Shearin, chair of the
theatre and dance
department
the kind but stern Widow Douglas
to the vile drunkard Pap Finn to the
artful con men, the "Duke of
Bridgewater" and
his sidekick "the
disappeared Dol-
phin, rightful King
of France
Big River re-
quires an unusu-
ally large cast. Al-
though East Caro-
lina Playhouse au-
ditions are always
open to anyone,
this show espe-
cially needs a large
' i - turnout. John
Shearin, chair of
the theatre and dance department
and director of Big River, hopes that
a diverse group will attend the audi-
tions to be held on Aug. 22 and 23
from 6:30 to 10 p.m.
"We need people of all colors,
creeds, ethnic identities, and so on
he said. In other words, whomever
you are, they need you.
Interested students can stop by
the Messick building for information.
Copies of the scripts will be available
in the reading room on Aug. 19 for
auditionees to study. To audition, be
prepared to read and sing (gospel,
R&B, or country). Big River will be
performed in October.
Also this semester, ECU Play-
house will present J.B a modern in-
terpretation of the Book of Job. Au-
thor Archibald MacLeish won the
Pulitzer Prize for this drama, as well
as a Tony for "Best Broadway Drama
of 1959 Set in a colorful traveling
circus, J.B. has been described by the
See HUCK page 49
DKIHd
THE NIGHT
Mark Brett
Senior Writer
So if s Saturday night and you've got nothing to do. You could spend the
evening getting some work done or playing a little Parcheesi with your pals.
Or, you could join the majority of the ECU campus in downtown Greenville.
Conveniently located within easy walking distance from campus, down-
town is the legendary place that earned ECU its "party school" reputatioa
Most of the town's bars are there, and nearly all of the favorite student hang-
outs.
What follows is an overview of the downtown experience All establish-
ments listed welcome everyone 18 and over, but remember to bring an ID,
downtown bouncers don't like underage drinkers.
See DANCE page 49
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Come by our house anytime.
RUSH begins August 26th through the 29th.
7:00- I 0:30pm
700 E. lOth St.
(beside Darryl's)
For rides or information, call
752-5543
or
57-I005





i
�Uh-ii-rVii, Hi ���� � wW �'mm
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
43
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
octte fZevtecv
on the corner o Evans and Third Street
Breakfast Menu
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Buy One Appetizer and receive 1 of eual or lesser
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Coupons
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Greenville Blvd.
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Phofo Courtesy of TrStar Pictures
Husband and wife Danny DeVito (Harry) and Rhea Perlman
(Zinnia) star in Matilda with Mara Wilson in the title role.
Dale Williamson
pjn, tin u � i
Hollywood, staying true to all that
it is, loves to tap into anything that proves
profitable. We've seen everything from
countless baseball films to an inordinate
outbreak of Jane Austen books translated
to film. Well, the most unlikely of authors
is once again "hot" in Hollywood.
Roald Dahl has inspired more than
one generation of children with his bi-
zarre and unique literary imagination,
and with the recent release of Matilda.
Dahl is inspiring Hollywood to take
children's cinema as seriously as he took
children's literature.
Film adaptations of Dahl's books
haven't always hit the mark. Willie
Wonka avd the Chocolate Factory has
become a timeiess classic with a strong
cult following. However, other films such
as The Witches and even the overrated
James and the Giant Peach never quite
captured Dahl's uniquely bizarre and
magical feel. These films suffered from
the assumption that you have to play it
sate with children and play down to their
level. What makes Matilda so wonderful
and so successful is its ability to capture
Dahl's magic without simplifying Dahl's
vision. The result is a children's film that
adults and children can both enjoy.
I must warn interested parents,
though, that Matilda may prove too in-
tense for younger children (five and un-
der). Danny DeVito directs and narrates
this film, and like his disturbingly funny
War of the Roses, Matilda effectively
makes life's darker moments funny and
entertaining. Some may disapprove of
how adults are depicted within the film
(the father is an oily con man and the
mother is a materialistic idiot), but they
simply have to get over their gripes. Like
most of Dahl's work, Matilda illustrates
how adults don't always have the answers
and can't always solve the problems.
Sometimes it is the children who know
better, and therein lies Dahl's magic
The movie's script, written by Nicho-
las Kazan and Robin Swicord, alters
Dahl's book a bit but the same concept
is intact Matilda, played to good effect
by Mara Wilson, is a six-year-old girl who
See MATILDA page 49
Parrotheads are
pleased again
Pat Raid
StaffWriter
Let's face it folks, Raleigh, N.C. is a long way from the tropics both in location
and characteristics. However, the two merged together on August 6, a hot and
sticky summer night People came from every walk of life to witness this conver-
gence. Or maybe they came for the Jimmy Buffett & The Coral Reefer Band show
that happened to be going on at the same time. Either way they went home far from
disappointed.
The day started out mellow enough, very hot and very humid. But through the
wonders of air conditioning my friends and I managed to stay cool. After spotting
See PARROTHEADS page 47
The only place for scrumptous quality
authentic Greek food, speciality Pizza,
Sandwiches, and the best Subs in this part
of the World!
We introduce others copy.
706 S. Evans St (919) 752-3753;
752-0326
FAX 758-8811
We Deliver
Try our new outstanding Egg plant entrees
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Mondays & Tuesdays; I lam'9pm
Wednesday Saturday; 11 am' I Opm
11rshmen Renew 10 Discount uilh alnl II)
(Oiler not talid lor specials or delheries)
wv
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MflBMKMI NMMMM mm�ummwm�
44
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
77ie East Carolinian
Tftovie eviecuL
L1,
Russell can't escape lame remake
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Snake Plissken is back! That's won-
derful, you might say, but who the hell is
Snake Plissken and why should I care
that he's back? While the name Snake
Plissken does not quite ignite nostalgic
glare like, maybe, Indiana Jones, there is
a cult following for this hero that is
thrilled to have Snake back.
For those of you who don't know
who Snake is, he is the renegade hero
Kurt Russell played in John Carpenter's
1981 semi-hit Escape From New York.
Well, Russell (who wants to be the next
big action star) and Carpenter (who des-
perately needs a big hit to reignite his
career) have once again teamed up to
resurrect Snake in Escape From L.A a
needless sequel that has nothing new to
say.
The script co-written by Debra Hill.
Carpenter and Russell, is virtually a car-
bon copy of Escape From New York. The
year is 2013 and America is a new place
filled with new laws. The nation's presi-
dent is a righteous man who wants to
flush America's toilet in an effort to clean
things up. Los Angeles, after being hit
by the big earthquake, is now a lawless
island where all "undesirables" are
shipped.
Our man Snake is. once again,
forced to assist the government This
time, Snake is to sneak into LA. and re-
trieve a stolen black box carrying a very
important veapons system that could put
the entire planet back in the dark ages.
Just to give Snake a little encouragement
the government injects Snake with a le-
thal virus that will kill him within ten
hours if he doesn't receive an antidote.
If this plot device sounds familiar, it
should; the same thing was done in Es-
cape From New York
There are several problems with
LA and a major one revolves around
the simple fact that this sequel offers
nothing new, nothing fresh, except a big-
ger budget Sure, the computer-gener-
ated special effects are interesting, but
they are also distractingly lame. The origi-
nal film had a
focus that made
the chaotic
world of New
York enticingly
real and fun. The
sequel, however,
meanders aim-
lessly about for
an hour and a
half with no clue
as to what it
wants to be.
Since the
original film was
filled with a
brooding seri-
ousness, one
would think
that Carpenter,
who is known for making some wonder-
ful over-the-top films, would just cut loose
and have fun with his sequel. At several
points, there are hints that Carpenter
wants to make the craziest film possible,
but he constantly pulls his punches be-
fore they hit their mark Scenes such as
Snake surfing a huge tsunami or Snake
playing basketball for his life show sparks
of originality, but Carpenter never car-
ries them to their logical extreme. In-
stead, the audience is left with a few in-
teresting moments that have potential
but never reach it
The film never captures any sense
of breathless excitement even in the ex-
plosive climax. Instead, the audience is
forced to watch Snake walk around LA.
There are several
problems with
L.A and a major
one revolves
around the simple
fact that this
sequel offers
nothing new,
nothing fresh,
except a bigger
budget.
from one wasted scene to the next
Not only are potentially interesting
scenes wasted here, but so are some no-
table talents. Russell stays true to his
character, but he is surrounded by an
entire cast known for over-the-top dra-
matics. Unfortunately, Carpenter never
taps into this goldmine. We have Steve
Buscemi (relegated to being more of a
goofy sidekick) as a greasy, fast-talking
con man; we have Bruce Campbell (way
underused) as a creepy plastic surgeon;
we have Pam Grier
(who shows up too
late in the film to mat-
ter) as Snake's former
partner in crime; and
we have Peter Fonda
(whose character is ut-
terly useless and need-
less) as an aging surfer
dude.
Unfortunately,
the bulk of the blame
must rest on Carpen-
ter, who is losing it
more with each film.
Carpenter is not an
untalented filmmaker.
His Halloween is a
masterpiece of slasher
horror; his Starman is
a wonderfully subtle dramatic treat; and
his Big Trouble in Little China (vhich
also stars Russell) is a prime example of
all the good things Escape From LA.
could have been.
Escape From LA despite all of its
potential, is nothing more than a lame,
half-hearted, uncaring, and ilkonceived
remake of Escape From New York. While
I wasn't expecting an original plot for
LA I was at least expecting enough
originality within the film itself to make
me care that Snake Plissken was back.
Well, Snake is back, but he quickly wore
out his welcome. For all those interested
in Snake Plissken, watch Escape From
New York and let LA. sink to its watery
grave.
o
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by our office
for information
on September
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Greenville, N.C. 27835-0772
ts





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
45
Are You 12-45 with asthma
and currently taking steroid medication?
We invite you to consider participating in our
research study program to evaluate the
effectiveness of a new drug on our quality of
life.
If you are eligible for this study, we will
provide a complete physical exam, allergy
skin testing, lab, work, medication and
$875.00 for the completed 8 month program.
For more information on how to qualify,
please call Lisa Cooke, R.N Research Nurse.
"TN-
(919)816-2562 or (919)816-3425
The Asthma Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NX.
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Monkees take top banana
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Chivalry is not dead and I can
prove it On Aug. 10, a "mystery man"
helped me out But more about that
later.
I got a chance to review The
Monkees (the real Monkees, not that
disaster of a spin-off group from a few
years ago) in concert as part of their
30th Anniversary Tour. Needless to
say, I jumped at the chance. I'm a huge
Monkees fan; in my younger days I
watched the TV show in reruns on
Nickelodeon religiously (if any big-wigs
at Nickelodeon are reading this, bring
The Monkees back!), listened to all of
their music, and plastered my walls
with pictures, posters and cut-outs
from all of the best teen magazines.
As a poor college student, I
scraped together my laundry money
(you can see my sacrifice - this meant
an extra trip home to wash my clothes
for free) and purchased a lawn ticket
My friend and I arrived a whole hour
early to get the best possible space on
the lawn. I was really impressed that
whole families had turned out for this
event
At a little past 8 p.m the concert
started. I could barely hear the first
few lines of The Monkees' theme song
("Here we come, walking down the
street we get the funniest looks from
everyone we meet") over the screams
and the thunderous applause. The guys
hadn't even begun to say "Hey hey
we're the before I noticed crowds of
people from the lawn flocking to fill
the unoccupied seats in the back sec-
tion of the Gold Circle. Not to be out-
done, we gathered up our things and
ran.
I'll tell you, at this point I was
feeling pretty good about life. I was
bopping along, barely able to contain
my excitement At the end of the song,
I screamed and clapped and basically
acted like a normal college student
(with a little of that ECU energy).
But the old lady in front of me
(she didn't look past forty, but she sure
acted ancient) turned around and
asked me to scream in another direc-
tion. Excuse me? We are at a live con-
cert not sitting at home watching TV,
little miss polyester suit. But I was de-
termined to enjoy this concert so I held
my peace and made a considerable ef-
fort to scream up instead of right in
her ear like I wanted to.
The concert was going great For
those of you who aren't up on Monkees
trivia, let me fill you in. The Monkees
are Davy Jones, Mickey Dolenz, Peter
Tork, and Mike Nesmith. Mike doesn't
tour with the band anymore - he's
been a little busy since he came up with
the idea for MTV. But Davy, Mickey,
and Peter do just fine on their own
(except for Davy's fashion sense, but
I'll get to that in a minute). And for a
group of old guys, they still look good.
I'm not exactly sure of their birthdays.
Corner of 5th and Reade Streets in Downtown Greenville
Photo Courtesy of Walnut Creek
The Monkees (Mickey Dolenz, Peter Tork and Davey Jones)
appeared without their pal Mike Nesmith who was busy
counting the dough his mom made from inventing White Out.
but they're probably in their 40s.
As Mickey puts it "If we do a 50th
Anniversary tour, instead of throwing
panties, girls will be throwing De-
pends To put the whole thing in per-
spective, back in the '60s when the
Monkees started giving concerts, Jimi
Hendrix opened for them. I know you
don't believe it, but it gets even better.
To show us in the crowd what that
concert was like for Hendrix, Mickey
began to play the opening chords of
"Purple Haze All
of a sudden, we
hear him start to
chant "We Want
The Monkees! We
Want The
Monkees Poor
Jimi.
About this
time (maybe it was
a little earlier; I
was euphoric and
can't really remem-
ber) the "mystery
man" I mentioned
earlier comes in. I
don't know why
Clarksville "She "Coin' Down "I'm
Not Your Steppin' Stone "Your
Auntie Griselda "Mary, Mary") as well
as some of the new songs and some of
their solo work.
Davy led the entire audience in a
rousing rendition of the Brady Bunch
theme song in memory of his cameo
appearance on The Brady Bunch. They
did something really neat throughout
the concert: every once in a while, two
of them would leave the stage and let
��� the other one
have the audience
to himself for a
few minutes. It
was really cool. I
especially liked
Peter's solo bit a
previously unre-
corded song
called "Good
Looker
There are
only two negative
things I would say
about the concert,
and they're really
not all that bad.
"Ifwedoa50th
Anniversary tour,
instead of
throwing panties,
girls will be
throwing
Depends
� Mickey Dolenz
this happened. Maybe it was the really
cool Burger King hats my friend and
I'd turned inside out and decorated
with glitter glue to spell "1 Monkees
Fan or maybe it was the fact that we
were two really excited college students
surrounded by old fogies, or maybe he
just thought we were cute. But this
guy up and offers us his inner circle
tickets. Wow, now I could actually see
the Monkees' faces. I didn't get that
man's name, but if he's out there, I just
want to say thank you.
From this point on I was in
heaven. Not only was I seeing the
Monkees, but I could see the Monkees!
We were so close it hurt our necks to
look at the screens. We stood up when
they began to play "Pleasant Valley
Sunday" and didn't really sit down
again. They played a lot of the old hits
("Daydream Believer "Last Train to
The first thing is directed at Davy. What
is up with that yellow suit? Davy
changed clothes every time he walked
off stage, and unfortunately he never
got any better. He started the show in
a bright yellow suit which prompted
Mickey to call him "Tweety Bird Even-
tually he lost the jacket and under-
neath was a black muscle shirt with
the Monkees logo on it (not bad, ap-
parently he works out). But he was still
wearing those yellow pants. From then
on he got slightly better with some sort
of animal print thing, and later an ac-
tually cool long-sleeved shirt with gui-
tars all over it (it hung down almost to
his knees, but then, he is short). Luck-
ily Mickey and Peter have excellent
taste. Both of them wore the same out-
fits the entire show: pants, white shirts,
See SHOW page 47
PREREQUISITE: ADRENALINE
Drive. Intensity. Those aren't
words you're likely to see in many
course requirements. Then again
Army ROTC is unlike any other
elective. It's hands-on excite-
ment. ROTC will challenge you
mentally and physically
through intense leadership
training. Training that builds
your character, confidence and
decision-making skills. Again,
words other courses seldom use.
But they're the credits you need to
succeed in life. ROTC is open to
freshmen and sophomores with-
out obligation and requires
about five hours per week. Reg-
ister this term for Army ROTC.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE TOD CAN TAKE
For details, visit 346 Rawl Building or call
328-6967
�1UMWliiijuji
,





MMHMi I
46
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
The East Carolina
0D1�evieai
A Tribe Called
Quest
Beats, Rhymes, and
Life
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
If you like rap and are into the
everyday sound of it, don't buy this
album. It's much more than that.
"Phony rappers, who do not
write. Phony rappers who do not ex-
cite. Phony rappers come on Q-Tip
and the gang have put out an album
that no other can stand up to. Not
only does it rise above the rest, it
does so in a classy way.
A Tribe Called Quest is ex-
tremely focused. Focused on their
religion, their rhymes, and their
groove, they reach out. They let it be
known that on top of their rhymes
people can converse, drink, smoke,
whatever. The album is what it says
it is: beats, rhymes and life.
The vibe I get from Q-Tip is that
he's not an extremist, but he believes
in what he's preaching. You don't
have to be him to stand beside him,
you just have to focus on what he's
saying.
The other members of this band,
Phife and Ali Shaheed Muhammad,
also have much to say about the
world as they know it. The best thing
about all of these guys is that they're
positive and not one-sided. If you lis-
ten closely, not all of them agree on
everything in their songs, but they
work together as people and accept
their fellow man for who they are.
Everybody's different. Just like
the songs on this record. You can tell
that each of the songs come from a
similar background; however, none
of them sound the same. That's a dif-
ficult task to accomplish.
The second song on this record
is called "Get A Hold It's about com-
ing to grips with who you are right
now and accepting the fact that no
matter what you do in life, whether
you're a professional athlete or dime
store clerk, you are you and nothing
can change that. If you're focused,
you won't slip.
The last tune, called "Stressed
Out has to be the smoothest. Faith
Evans sings back-up on this song and
her beautiful voice combined with
Tribe's beats and rhymes leaves you
feeling relaxed.
If one were given a choice be-
tween a stressed mind and a relaxed
mind, no doubt, one would choose
the latter. However, it's the stressed
mind from which these guys write.
It's the relaxed mind that they speak
from.
The album is 15 tracks long and
surprisingly has the most attractive
cover in rap history. Check it out
and see for yourself. A burnt out
town full of rage, anger, hostility,
chaos, and yet, a man of many col-
ors who roams the planet with a
promise of a better tomorrow. It
paints a picture that inspires a move-
ment, a journey, a quest, A Tribe
Called Quest.
Tired of trying to find a parking epace?
&m
B
S
We may have your solution!
The Technology Reinvestment Project offers courses which are
taught online. Using your own computer, or one on campus, you
can take courses through the Industrial Technology Department,
including the entire Masters degree! Call today for details or check
out our Web page! For more information,
or visit:
Call 328-6704
http:wwvv.sited3.�dutrphome.htm
Register by August 28th.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWi, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service ��
752-7529
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tet.
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Store Hours
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inside Bicycle Post
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Merrell Mountain Hardware Gregory

fall 96 MON TUES WED TH
East Carolina's Alternative
LUNCHTIME
POWER HOUR
A live, interactive lunch platter
WORLD MUSIC
Cross cultural music
RETRO SHOW
Music of the 70s & 80s
INTERVIEWSURF
Surf music with a comedic spice
STEEL TRAX
Techno-industrial music
ROOTS ROCK
Post-modern look at the past
FRIDAY REQUEST FEST
Listeners control the music
During the hours when we're not featuring
a specality show, you can tune in our mix
of alternative rock.
REQUEST L I M E
328-6913





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 201996
47
ELTORO
Barber & Style
Men's Hair Styling
2800 E. 10th St,
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon. -Fri. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say PIRATES &
Get Hair Cut for
$7 Everytime
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PARROTHEADS f��.Page43
PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
Men's Hairstyling
222-D Cotanche St.
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11 gl Comer of 3rd &
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some other Parrotheads getting lunch
in Wilson as we passed through, we were
well on our way to our next stop - Wal-
nut Creek Amphitheatre.
Once in the parking to my friend
and I divvied up the grass skirt and co-
conut bra that I bought especially for this
year's show. After tying on my skirt and
his bra we walked slowly through the
parking lot and separated the true
Parrotheads from the people trying to
be cool. The wanna-be's were the ones
laughing while the real Fruitcakes were
asking for a dance.
The fun continued as we entered
Walnut Creek and looked at all the other
fans who had spent too much time in
the sun. Finally, as show time neared we
found our seats. Promptly at 8 p.m we
could hear Jimmy, and there he was on
the television screens, but the stage re-
mained empty. In an attempt to put a
new spin on things. Buffett decided to
open this show from the lawn. There he
was on a raised platform at the front on
the lawn with Greg "Fingers" Taylor play-
ing harmonica. After two songs from
there, they made their way through the
crowd to the stage as the rest of the Coral
Reefers jammed on an enchanting
rhythm straight from the islands.
No sooner had Buffett put on his
guitar than the band went from their jam
straight into "One Particular Harbour
As Buffett says on his Fruitcakes album,
"It was hot and we were rocking After
finishing "Harbour he commented from
the stage that it was close enough to
tropical weather to keep us in the mood
of things. And with that he transported
Ron Nichols
Greenville Toyota
3615 S. Memorial Drive � Located Across From Carolina Circle Mall
321-3000
Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 am. - 6 pm � Saturday 8 am. - 2 pm
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PARTS
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WHEN INSTALLED BY AN
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BxcludM BtalulMs steel application. Expires 12-3 l-f6
TOYOTA QUALITY
MINOR TUNE-UP
�Includes Genuine Toyota spark plugs.
�Check air. fuel and emission filters
�Inspect ignition wires, distributor cap and rotor belts
hoses and PCV valve
$32.95
"6 cylinder slightly higher. Excludes
60.000 mi'e platinum plugs Must
present coupon at time repair
order is wntten.
Expires 12-31-96
II
II
ljlnciudes up to 5 quarts ol
� Genuine Toyota Oil
'��Install Genuine Toyota
9 double-tittering oil titter
j!$17.95
l �Turbos, 4X4's and diesels
i may be slightly higher
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5 repair order is written
l Expires 12-31-96
fOYOfA"QUALITY"
TIRE BALANCE
ROTATION
' j �Inspect tires tor wear
I 'Balance all tour wheels.
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xpires 12-31-96
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'�4 cyl. engines - 6 cyl slightly higher
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the crowd down to Havana, Cuba for
"Cuban Crime Of Passion
The next song, he explained, was
written as a dedication to the great trade-
mark of the South, the drive-in. "And any
behavior you may associate with a drive-
in is acceptable here Buffett said as he
led the band in "Grapefruit Juicy-Fruit"
Buffett then remarked it was time
to "crack open some songs from the new
album After thanking Brian Wilson
from the Beach Boys for his inspiration,
the Reefers kicked into "School Boy
Heart"
But before the next new song,
Buffett felt a story was in order. After
explaining that his job is to sail and fly
around and write songs about it he said
that one of the dangers of his job is en-
countering hostile governments. Last
year, while in Jamaica his seaplane was
shot down after being mistaken for a drug
plane.
"Can you believe they mistook me
for 3 drug dealer?" Buffett joked with
his huge trademark grin. In no time at
all the "international incident" had made
its way into The National Enquirer. "But
since they got all the facts wrong, I wrote
a song to set the story straight" Buffett
explained before playing "Jamaica
Mistaka" followed immediately by "Only
Time Will Tell
Then it was audience participation
time. In an effort to keep an old song
fresh with a new angle, he had two con-
test winners sing "Why Don't We Get
Drunk (And Screw)" while he videotaped
them.
The fun soon mellowed as Buffett
got nostalgic and started talking about
the days past when he used to play the
Gaslight bar in Raleigh: "If we had 75
people at the Gaslight we thought we
were doing great and now I look out at
you and think Aaaahhhh! But this is for
all you who have come out year after
year. It's called 'Come Monday
Later, in trying to reach all the
people he said, "Here's a song for all of
you from the mountains of North Caro-
lina. Even though it's hot here we're
going to make it hockey season when
it's cold and you just sit there with that
revolver pointed at the icebox And with
no further introduction needed, he fired
up "Boat Drinks" for the eager crowd.
Just as the applause was winding
down, a deep and ominous note sounded
and Buffett asked, "Did y'all hear some-
thing?" As the Reefers played the Jaws
theme song Buffett said "That hurricane
swept all these land sharks ashore and
now they can't get back. They're trapped
here And with "shark fins" all over the
amphitheater, he lead the band in a rock-
ing version of "Fins
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During a 20 minute filmintermis-
sion my friends and. I got our picture
taken for Buffetf s newsletter due to our
outfits, grabbed some Margarita-flavored
shaved ice, and prepared for part two.
"Son of a Son of a Sailor" got the
crowd back to the island state of mind in
a hurry. Then Buffett said he hoped we
all stayed young at heart and played
�Growing Older But Not Up
After allowing his good friend Mac
McAnally to sing "The City" (a song
McAnally wrote), Buffett said we were
all going to go sailing "off the Outer
Banks up around Cape Hatteras" and
launched into a island version of Crosby,
Stills, and Nash's "Southern Cross The
crowd was in a frenzy that only got worse
when "Southern Cross" ended with the
beginning of "Brown-Eyed Girl Then,
as if that wasn't enough to give even the
biggest Parrothead a euphoric feeling,
they went straight into "Margaritaville
After leaving the stage, the crowd
demanded encores by clapping, yelling,
and beating their seats in a frenzy until
the band came out and slid into "Vol-
cano From there, the crowd went back
down south for "Tampico Trauma From
�Changes In Latitude" to "A Pirate Looks
At 40" Buffett had covered everything
in the span of about two and a half hours,
but he wasn't done yet After the band
left the stage Buffett came back out by
himself with an acoustic guitar and with-
out a word started James Taylor's "Caro-
lina On My Mind Partway through the
song he remarked, "I don't think James
would mind, do you?" And with the end
of the song he wished everyone well, told
them to drive safe and left the stage for
good, or hopefully just until next sum-
mer.
SHOW from page 45
and nice vests. Chalk one up for the Ameri-
cans, huh?
The only other drawback to the con-
cert were the ridiculous prices. I don't
mean ticket prices. I can't complain about
those since I paid $16 and ended up sit-
ting in the Gold Circle. I mean the memo-
rabilia prices. $18 for the program. Thaf s
more than I paid to get in. And shirts for
anywhere from $22-$40. A glass of lem-
onade was $3. Unfortunately, this is a com-
mon occurrence at concerts. "Milk the fens
for all you can get" seems to be the motto
of most bands. Being the spendthrift that
I am, I managed to leave without buying
anything except for that lemonade
(Grandma's is better; she couki be rich if
she marketed that stuff).
This concert was the best The two
little drawbacks really didn't have anything
to do with the quality of the music, which
was excellent And for an older group, they
had plenty of energy. They were all over
that stage I enjoyed every minute of this
concert and yru can bet 111 go again if I
get the chance. Until then, "What am I
doin' hangin' round" here?
And there's moreyou'll also receive the "Best of Fall '96" trend
report filled with the season's key fashion news and makeup tips
from Vogue, Glamour, Mademoiselle, Self and Allure magazines.
This offer is good while supplies last One per customer, piease.
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Fri-Sat
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IJJJ I. HUll n





!��. -� �� �, ��: V
. � . . .
Tuesday, August 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
Over 150 years of Brotherhood.
Two-Time Winners & Defending
Champions of Chancellor's Cup.
"More Than Just A Circle Of Friends;
An Experience That Lasts A Lifetime
Come As You Are!

�"�
.
a a
�ft �
- � SB ��� J� ���d�
Aug. 26th - Meet the Brothers and Tour Our Historic
House. RefreshmentsWill Be Provided.
Aug. 27th - "All The Wings You Can Eat" And Witness
The Alpha Sig Experience! Meet The Ladies of Gamma
Sigma Sigma!
Aug. 28th - A Classic Cookout With The Alpha Sigs.
Come Participate in Our Traditional Pastimes! Meet
The Ladies of Gamma Sigma Sigma!
Aug. 29th - Eat Plenty Of Pizza, Enjoy The Company Of
The Ladies Of Gamma Sigma Sigma, And Watch Your
Favorite Sporting Event On Our BIG SCREEN T.V
Aug. 30th - invitation Only. Bid Night And Post-Rush
Party With The Ladies Of Delta Zeta!
AIO
For Rides Or information : 757-3516
Located Conviently Close To Downtown
422 W. 5th St.
i��
mwwwwwi
uJh; nwi m in aw mwiar �tvNtt





j �-r Hr-
7fte East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 20, 1996
49
JH U CIV from page 42
A'eu' Kor 7Ymes as "a stirring hymn
of strength, an epic of extraordinary
courage and faith Look for J.B. in
November.
Also in the works for this sea-
son are the annual Dance Theatre
performance. Eric Bogosian's Subur-
bia, and the Greek classic Lysistrata.
The ECU Dance Theatre, in Febru-
ary, combines the choreographic tal-
ent of the dance faculty with that of
guest artists to create an exciting and
innovative evening of dance.
Suburbia is a rough and
tumble, action-packed dissection of
the suburban white middle class. Set
in front of a 7-11 Convenience mart,
Suburbia promises to be another in
a series of striking and inspirational
pieces directed by faculty member
Don Biehn. Suburbia will be per-
formed from the end of February
through the first week of March.
Lysistrata, in April, is a triumph
for women in theatre. It is the story
of a minor (or is it?) sexual revolu-
tion staged by the women of Ath
ens to protest the Peloponnesian
War. Written as a political satire,
Aristophanes lets the skirts fly in
this "anything goes" comedy.
Judging by the past perfor-
mances held by the ECU Playhouse,
the 1996-97 season is sure to be a
series of hits. For audition informa-
tion, show dates, or ticket prices,
call the McGinnis Box Office at328-
6829. Be sure to ask about the new
scaled ticket prices.
DANCE from page 42
The Attic The biggest venue for live
musk in town. Ten years ago, REM hit
the Attic stage on a regular basis. Last
year it was Hootie and the Blowfish and
Dave Matthews. Not every band you'll
see here will become huge national stars,
but you might enjoy them anyway.
Peasant's Cafe: Formerly the home
of Greenville's Deadhead scene, Peasant's
Cafe has expanded to include a wider
variety of musical styles. There's still
plenty of tie-dyed granola crunchiness
about the place; but it's net the only fo-
cus. Peasant's features live music, is the
current home of Greenville's local music
. scene, and occasionally features nation-
aBy-known artists like Drivin' and Cryin's
Kevn Kinney, who hit the Peasant's stage
this summer.
Sports PadSplashSharkey's:
Three, three, three bars in one! Sports
Pad is your basic poolroom, with tables
as far as the eye can see. Splash is a tiki
bar that boasts seats ai.d the occasional
live music performance. Sharkey's fea-
tures dance music and, of course, a bar.
The Elbo: For reasons known only
to the gods, the Elbo is where most par-
tying ECU freshmen hang out Gener-
ally, the Elbo plays Top 40 dance music
It's a meat market pure and simple.
The Brig: Dark and smoky, the Brig
features dance music and a back porch
for its norvdancing customers to fill when
the weather's nice. The Brig is also
biessed with the coolest old exposed
brickwork in town.
Wrong Way Corrigan's: A blues-rock
bar with comfortable booths, Corrigan's
caters to a slightly older crowd than many
nTTcnrioft flKSiimcnu!
New Life Christian Fellowship
Invites You To Kick Off The Semester With Us.
Thursday,August 22,7:00 P.M.
General Classroom Bldg.vRoom 1028
Followed by CookoutVolleyball Friday, August 23.
Time and Location to be Announced.
We Want to Make Your Transition to College Life a Blast
For More Information,
Call Eddie & Kathryn Milliard at 321-6262
of the downtown clubs.
The Cellar: Located beneath the
Attic the Cellar offers three rooms, which
is really the only thing that distinguishes
it from the other dance bars in town.
The atmosphere is like the Elbo. but with
a twist (and fewer underagers).
The Underwater Cafe and Raw Bar
A seafood restaurant that also serves al-
cohol (or is it a bar that also serves sea-
food? It's hard to tell).
Happy's Pool Room: The name says
it all. A great place to soak in some "lo-
cal color
The Percolator Coffeehouse:
Greenville's first hip coffee joint rolls on
this fall. The Percolator offers an alter-
native to the beer-swilling mayhem of
the other downtown bars. Its atmo-
sphere is more laid back despite the
frightening amounts of caffeine being
consumed by the patrons. On a typical
trip to the Percolator you'll meet poets.
professors, punks, frat boys. Deadheads,
artists, intellectuals and just plain folks
who like a good cup of Java.
The Bean Bag: Located a few
blocks off downtown. The Bean Bag is
the hippie counterpart to The Percola-
tor.
Cup-O-Cino's: Greenville's latest
caffeinated hangout has apparently sur-
vived the summer and will be serving
up steaming hyperactive beverages
again this fall. CupOCino's has an even
more relaxed atmosphere than its coun-
terparts, with bean bag chairs and book-
shelves set off in a section that's like a
little living room away from home.
Alfredo'sAlfredo's II: Alfredo's is
a tiny little pizza joint with the biggest
slices in town. You can barely get in the
door after 2 a.m. Alfredo's II, next door,
is a small bar that attracts an odd as-
sortment of students. It's usually packed
to capacity.
BW3: A buffalo wings restaurant
that doubles as a bar at night BW3 of-
fers comfortable seats and a trivia game
that can be played on any of the TV
sets scattered around the room.
Well, that's about it for the down
town bar scene. Expect to come home
from most of these places tired, sweaty
and reeking of cigarette smoke. If that's
your cup of tea, pick a likely environ-
ment and dive in. If not there's al-
ways Parcheesi.
MATILDA from page 43
proves to be much more intelligent and
kind-hearted than her uncaring, greedy,
and sleazy parents (wonderfully played
by Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman).
Unlike her parents, Matilda has a desire
to learn and improve herself. Matilda
escapes from her family through books
until her father finally decides (through
Matilda's insistence) to enroll her in
school.
Unfortunately, school is not much
better because Principal Trunchbull
(played to grotesque perfection by Parn
Ferris) rules with a cruel and tyrannical
fist This principal would sooner hurl a
young girl over the school fence by her
cute blonde pigtails than have anyone
defy her authority.
The only comfort Matilda is able to
find in all this mess is through her sym-
pathetic teacher Miss Honey (Embeth
Davidtz), who encourages Matilda to ex-
cel in hei studies. Matilda and Miss Honey
are both victims of their circumstances
until Matilda discovers she has telekinetic
powers. Once this plot device is intro
duced, Matilda transforms into a film
about empowerment where one can con-
trol one's destiny.
DeVito, not surprisingly, is the per-
fect director for Dahl's material. He is a
proven visual talent whose past work, I i ke
Throw Momma From the Train, ef-
fectively demonstrates his ability to blend
dark elements with lighter ones. DeVito
does not insult his child audience by
making everything cute and innocent.
Instead, he stays true to Dahl's demented
wit and produces the best film adapta-
tion of Dahl's work since Willie Wonka.
Overall, Matilda succeeds in being
a film worthy of Dahl's name and wor-
thy of a child's imagination. If you are a
fan of Dahl or well-made children's mov-
ies, then Matilda is well worth the full
price of a ticket If you simply desire a
unique film of higher-than-usual quality,
then Matilda is a definite matinee.
WELC
BAC
ECU
Wednesday- Classics Nite: The Best in
Classic Alternative & Dance. 1 t Draft
All Nite & $2 16oz
Drink Specials, Too!
Thursdays: Ladies Nite: Ladies in Free
All Night. $2.50 Frozen Drinks, $1.25
Bottle Beers, & 35t Draft.
Friday & Saturday- Weekend Dance
Party: Free Admission for members 'til
10;30 all weekend. $2 22oz Bottle
Beers $3 Pitchers of Draft, Plus
other specials.
Registration
Special:
Memberships $2
for 1 year with
ECU. ID. 4
Years for $5.
Features the
BEST in Dance
'and Alternative
with something
special every
lormorp information, call 758 9451 or uisit our web-site:
HTTP UlllllK.Lreatiuetfesigns'Elbo.
To find out more specials and upcoming euents!





50
Tuesday, Ausust 20,1996
The East Carolinian
Live Remote at the Sports Pad
Thursday, August 22nd
BLOCK PARTY
WRHT
WCBZ
96.3
Morehead City
REQUEST LINE: 1-800-849-HOTT
103.7
Greenville
Monday MONDAY NIGHT MADNESS $1.75 HMsand Domestic
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
NO COVER
Tuesday � BAR CRAWL � NO COVER Dollar Domestics
$1.50 Hi-balls
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
Wednesday-COLLEGE NIGHT
(Ladies Play Pool for FREE!)
$ 1.75 HM3alls and Domestic
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
Thursday - BLOCK PARTY � NO COVER Before 10pm $1.00
Domestics, Hi-Balls, Kami's
$2.00 Shots and Shooters
Friday - WEEKEND PARTY - NO
COVER LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LIQUOR & BEER SPECIAL
Saturday - LIVELY � REAL LIVELY
GREAT BAR SPECIALS
Sunday CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION NIGHT
NO COVER
$1 DOMESTICS , KAMI'S
$1.50 HI BALLS
$2.00 SHOTS AND SHOOTERS





Title
The East Carolinian, August 20, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 20, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1152
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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