The East Carolinian, December 7, 1995






THUHg
December 7,1995
Vol71,No. 28
TheEas
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
20 pases
Around the State
RALEIGH (AP) - In what may
prove the beginning of a new era
of cooperation, an environmental
group and the state's largest pri-
vate landowner have agreed to
work together to protect a tract of
wetlands in eastern North Carolina,
both groups announced on Tues-
day.
The Environmental Defense
Fund has dropped a federal lawsuit
against Weyerhaeuser Co. over an
area of wetlands that the EDF al-
leged was being used improperly.
Both groups said they will work
together on an environmental man-
agement plan for the land.
CHAPEL HILL. N.C. (AP) -
University of North Carolina offi-
cials are working with University
of Pennsylvania authorities and
two other unnamed Internet pro-
viders to track the source of a rac-
ist message posted last week.
Although UNC-Chapel Hill of-
ficials still don't know who posted
the racist message, they say they
know who didn't - former UNC
business student David Pyle. who
owned the e-mail account associ-
ated with the posting.
Around the Country
HUNTINGTON BEACH. Calif.
(AP) - Three police academy in-
structors lost their jobs after or-
dering two cadets to eat cigarette
sandwiches as punishment for
smoking.
The cadets vomited. One col-
lapsed and was taken unconscious
to a hospital.
Citing legal concerns. Hugh
Foster, director of the Criminal
Justice Training Center at Golden
West College, wouldn't say whether
the three part-time trainers were
fired or resigned.
PULASKI. Tenn. (AP) - The
14-year-old brother of a high school
senior charged after a deadly shoot-
ing spree was arrested for trying
to recn ;t students to "finish the
job his brother started a prosecu-
tor said.
Jeremy Rouse apparently was
angry that his brother. 17-year-old
Jamie, was arrested in the Nov. 14
shooting at Richland High School.
A teacher and a student were killed
and a teacher was wounded.
Around the World
LUSAKA. Zambia (AP) - Hun-
dreds of Zambian soldiers seeking
revenge for a comrade's death
killed a villager, slaughtered live-
stock and burned 2.000 huts, ac-
cording to police and newspaper
reports Wednesday.
Paramilitary units were
brought to Zambia's sparsely popu-
lated north-central region after
troops from the Lukonga military
training camp reportedly looted
and burned 10 villages.
STOCKHOLM, Sweden (APt-
A 286-pound bouncer who sat on
a restaurant guest and suffocated
him was sentenced to eight months
in prison Wednesday.
Witnesses told a court the
doorman was trying to stop a fight
Seniors bid farewell
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
This year's fall commencement
address will be presented by Dr. Erwin
Hester, a veteran faculty member and
administrator who has been a part of
the university since 1966.
The address will be given on De-
cember 9 at ECU's fall graduation
ceremony, where about 2.000 degree
candidates will be waiting to turn their
tassels.
According to Chancellor Richard
Eakin. Hester has had a number of
key roles at the university. He entered
the university almost 30 years ago as
a faculty member of the English de-
partment where he later served as
chairperson from 1968 to 1982. From
1989 to 1991. Hester was acting dean
of the School of Art.
"Hester has had a long, distin-
guished career at this university
Eakin said, adding that he was pleased
to have him deliver the commence-
ment speech.
Hester said he is very honored
to have been chosen to deliver the
address. He added that at the end of
this academic year, he will be saying
farewell to the university as well.
"I'm sure I will miss the contact
See BYE page 5
SGA proposes additional fee increase
$2 fee to reinstate yearbook
exceeds state cap
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The Student Government Association (SGA) has
passed a motion to increase student fees an additional
52. moving the total proposed student fees to $45 (com-
pared to $43 set originally). This proposal is a con-
tinuation of a debate which began Nov. 13. and ex-
ceeds a five percent cap set by the state.
Harry Bray. SGA speaker, announced that the me-
dia board has decided to approve the fe� increase and
support the yearbook's reappearance. The yearbook,
however, may not take the traditional form as it has in
the past, but it will return in some torm.
In a formal resolution document, in reference to
bringing back the print yearbook, Angie Nix, SGA trea-
surer, stated "whereas many students have expressed a
desire to bring back the print yearbook, be it therefore
resolved the Student Government Association will sup-
port a referendum to address the concerns and desires
of the student body
After a turnout of 500 votes, earlier in the semes-
ter. SGA calculated that 96 percent of students voted
in favor for the yearbook. 91 percent voted that they
would purchase a yearbook. 89 percent voted yes to a
See SGA page 5
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S 4 A A A kry I �
easonsGreetings
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Mr ' , - ! �
Photos by KEN CL4RK
Hope Willis stands by a menorah in the foreign languages department. Ashley Mobley
gives herwish listto Santa in the Plaza Mall, while James and Shantel Sadlervisit Jingles.
Pirates
on the
Street
What is your
favorite
holiday
memory?
Michelle Re see, senior
"When my family was
sitting around the
fireplace opening
presents and my mother
gave me someone else's
present to open and I
had to rewrap it
Jamie Ewing, freshman
"Receiving a brick for a
present
Amy Beth Williams
"My dad hides our
presents every Christmas
and gives us clues as to
where to find them. The
best gift I got was a 4-
wheeler
Mark Carroll, grad.
student
"When our Christmas
tree went up in flames
and my mom put it out
with a wet diaper
White House tree
turns puple, gold
Tambra Zion
News Editor
Six ECU students are giving new-
meaning to the old phrase "White
Christmas
The White House Christmas'tree
in our nation's capitol is adorned with
ornaments created by art and environ-
mental design majors Nancy C. Leach.
Tyler Dockery. Rex Zachery, Jeannette
Austin. Melissa ShaVonne Exum and
Susan Johnson.
Dockery and Zachery are room-
mates at ECU.
"We both produced artwork far
it. we started with ornamentation
sketches Dockery said. "We kind of
brainstormed over what we wanted.
The coordinators gave us a list of
suggested topics
Twos The Sight Before Christ-
mas" was the theme selected by Bill
and Hillary Clinton for the White
House tree this year.
"Instead of just doing a picture
of a chimney, we wanted to break it
down into a feeling to give it volume
and warmth Dockery said. "We de-
cided on 10 designs which we broke
up amongst ourselves
Dockery and Zachary decided to
get involved after seeing an advertise-
ment.
"They had posters up in the art
building with pictures of Hillary
Rodham Clinton and Picasso I fig-
ured, why not?" Dockery asked.
After a few meetings and a de-
crease in the number of participants,
the students created 10 ornaments
which are now hanging in the Blue
Room of the White House.
"I made a spiral staircase out of
some sturdy wood that would last over
time Zachary said. A train was also
made which symbolized toys and trav-
eling during the holidays.
The ornaments will be curated by
the Smithsonian Institute once the
tree is taken down. Zachery said he
put a lot of time into making his or-
nament.
"It took a lot of thinking about
what kind of messages we wanted to
convey he said. "A staircase, to me.
was kind of majestic somehow it re-
minded me of Christmas
He said America's first family pre-
sents a majestic symbol to the nation.
ECU students participated in mak-
ing ornaments for the White House last
year, and the university is one of 148
schools nationwide selected to partici-
pate in the project through its chapter
of the American Institute of Architec-
ture Students (AIAS).
Shopping on a budgetpage O
Editor says goodbyepage t)
B-ball schedule conflictspage I t)
Thursday
Partly cloudy, mild
High 62
1 Low 40
Weekend
Partly cloudy, mild
4Z HiSh 62
' � j Low 40
mmmmmmmmmij
We have exams too, so the
next TEC will
be after the
New Year.
Pick XT$ Xfp on Jan. 1
0
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- .
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
UNC fraternity loses charter
$

November 29
Public inebriate - A non-student was confined under the Public
Inebriate Act He was found intoxicated in Joyner Library.
November 30
Larceny - A non-student reported that her cello bow was stolen.
Larceny - A student reported that his wallet was stolen while play-
ing basketball at Christenbury Gym.
December 1
Damage to property - A student reported that someone had burned
the door and a poster on the door to his room in Garrett Hall.
Vandalism - A Garrett Hall resident was served an order for arrest
for setting a residence hall door on fire.
December 2
Controlled substance violation - A student was issued a state cita-
tion and campus appearance ticket for possession of marijuana.
Assault - A student was assaulted by her ex-boyfriend. The male was
arrested for assault on a female and was incarcerated at Pitt County
Detention Center.
Weapon possession - A student was issued a state citation for pos-
sessing a knife on campus. He was also issued a campus appearance
ticket
December 3
Damage to property - A student was issued a campus appearance
ticket for damaging a window at Jones Hall and for visitation violation.
His girlfriend was also issued a campus appearance ticket for visitation
violation.
December 5
Bomb threat - A staff member from Erwin reported that someone
called her and said there was a bomb in Erwin and Ragsdale buildings
and hung up. The building was checked and no device was found.
Tampering with voice mail - Two students from Scott Hall reported
that someone keeps changing the voice mail greeting on their phone.
Harassing phone calls - Two students from Aycock reported that
they had received more than 40 harassing phone calls in two days.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Miriam Brooks
Staff Writer
The UNC chapter of the Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity at Chapel Hill
had their charter suspended after a
questionable memo addressed to
pledges came to the attention of the
UNC community and the national Phi
Gamma Delta chapter.
The memo contained lewd com-
ments encouraging pledges to take ad-
vantage of inebriated sorority girls at
an upcoming party during Rush
Week.
A group of protesters gathered
in front of the Phi Gamma Delta house
on the evening of Monday, Nov. 13
chanting "Phi Gam is a sham" and
"Sexism has got to go" according to
The Daily Tarheel, the campus news-
paper of UNC-Chapel Hill. Two sorori-
ties were evidently mentioned in the
memo, but did not participate in the
protest the paper reported.
The UNC Director of Greek Af-
fairs Ron Binder and the assistant
executive director of the fraternities
national chapter Nick Altwies stated
in the paper that the suspended char-
ter would not be removed until a com-
plete investigation is conducted. Many
at UNC believe that the memo is a
symptom of a larger issue concerning
the politics of gender relations on
campus.
In The Daily Tarheel, Chancel-
lor Michael Hooker is quoted as say-
ing, "I don't want people to focus
solely on the fraternity. We need to
focus on the broader issues that we
have allowed to develop an atmo-
sphere, a culture in which students
fail to recognize this is something
profoundly wrong
In addition to the public derision
and criticism, the fraternity is facing
disciplinary action from the national
Phi Gamma Delta chapter. They are
currently doing community service at
the Rape Crisis Center in Chapel Hill.
According to ECU's Dean of Stu-
dents Ron Speier, there are national
standards which prohibit this kind of
behavior among the Greek commu-
nity. At ECU, standards are set by both
the national fraternities and the
InterFraternal Council.
"One of the standards is that they
(fraternities) are to be held account-
able for activities that bring bad pub-
licity Speier said.
Another national standard bro-
ken by the memo is that "behavior,
statements and activities must not be
derogatory or demeaning towards
women, races or religion" Speier said.
According to Speier, ECU has
consistently promoted proper behav-
ior among the Greek community.
"We provide programs to let
groups know what is inappropriate
and appropriate" Speier said.
Recently, the InterFraternity
Council held a forum in which some
of these issues were addressed.
Joyner holiday schedule
Joyner will be closed Saturday, Dec. 23 through
Monday, Jan.l, 1996,
needed
ECU's Business Ser-
vices Unit is sponsoring a
can drive for needy univer-
sity employees and their
families. Boxes are located
in Central Printing, Cen-
tral Supply, Central Re-
ceiving and Warehouse,
Mail Services, Materials
Management, Parking and
Traffic Services, ECU Po-
lice and the Student
Stores.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, December 7, 1995
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittmar. Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
wraps up semester
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
9�et Santa biing
piesente (piesence)
oj mind ttus yeai.
cXtie classics on fess.
. The InterFraternity Council
(IFC) ended the semester in full
blast after holding elections last
week and an awards banquet prior
to Thanksgiving Break.
"I think all the candidates were
really good said Justin Conrad,
10 to 90 discount
BOOK
WAREHOUSE
3525 S. Memorial Dr
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East Carolina University's Student Union is
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previous IFC president and active
brother of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.
"It was a tough election. It was the
closest one. I've been involved with
IFC for three and a half years now.
and it was the closest election I've
ever seen for all of the offices. I
think that's promising because it
is a big sign that people are more
interested in becoming a part of
IFC, and we're now starting to get
some of the leaders
Although anyone is welcome to
attend IFC meetings, there is only
one voting representative allowed
for each individual fraternity.
Whether the representative is the
president of the fraternity or an
appointed delegate by the president
is the responsibility and decision
among the different fraternity chap-
ters.
The executive council for 1996
consists of the following people:
Tau Kappa Epsilon Bill Burnette,
president; Theta Chi George Davis,
executive vice president; Sigma Phi
Epsilon Chris Arline, administrative
vice president; Pi Kappa Alpha Reid
Griffen, treasurer; Phi Kappa Psi
Micah Retzlaff,
secretary and Pi
Lambda Phi
Brandon Haines,
RUSH chairman.
There are
other various
committee heads
and appointed of-
fices as well.
Ideas have al-
ready been tossed
around, but the
first real perfor-
mance that the
newly elected
IFC can prove
their abilities on
is Spring RUSH.
Fraternity
RUSH has been doing extremely
well. In the past two semesters,
spring and fall of 1995, men rush-
ing fraternities has increased 30.
"If we could continue raising
30 percent, we should be up to
1,000 Greek men by the end of next
year. RUSH is
most impor
tant Conrad
said.
Conrad
consistently ex-
pressed his en
thusiasm fcr
the new execu-
tive council and
proudly handed
over the gavel
to Burnette at
4:00 p.m. on
Dec. 5.
"I think
that the coop-
eration of the
exec this year
and the people
that are now becoming involved in
IFC, the quality of the officers is
See IFC page 5
"If we could
continue raising
30 percent, we
should be up to
1,000 Greek men
by the end of next
year. RUSH is
most important
� Justin Conrad, previous
IFC president
Teachers get graded
Miriam Brooks
Staff writer
Now students get a chance to
grade their teachers.
Throughout the week of Nov. 27
to Dec. 1st, students were given ques-
tionnaires designed to assess their
opinions of each instructor's effec-
tiveness as a teacher.
A ritual surrounds the survey.
Instructors distribute pencils, ap-
point a student to be responsible for
the collection of questionnaires and
pencils and then they exit the room.
The Faculty Senate Committee
for Teaching Effectiveness and the
Office of Planning and Institutional
Research created the questionnaire
and estimated in a news release that
it should take approximately 15 min-
utes to complete. Out of the five stu-
dents TEC questioned, most insisted
that they are usually out of the door
in five minutes tops and they do not
view the questionnaires as having
any serious impact on their profes-
sors.
"I take them seriously said stu-
dent Bonnie MacMillan. "But 1 feel
bad for the teachers because the
questions are not pertinent for the
most part
The results of the questionnaire
are given to instructors only after fi-
nal grades have been posted. The
point is to help them improve their
skills as teachers.
The administration takes the re-
sults of these surveys seriously, us-
ing them as guidelines in questions
of tenure and promotion. Students
are not allowed to see the results of
the survey. This issue was taken up
by the SGA this summer. According
to Ian Eastman SGA President, the
scores from the Fall semester's sur-
vey will probably not be published.
Preliminary investigations by the
SGA have shown that students are
more likely to have access to the
scores of tenured professors, than
those that are untenured.
"It's in the process Eastman
said. "I would think that it is pos-
sible, but I do not know at this time
2nd Annual
Student Christmas Party
In Association with Gamma
Can Food Drive
13 Beta Phi

When: Friday Dec. 8
Time: Doors Open at 9pm
Adm $1 w 2 Cans of Food
0

fdals
.10 Draft & $2.50 Ice Teas
Don't be a nut, get in for a buck and
bring two cans for the Hungry Man
AII Donations Given To Greenville
Community Shelter
2nd Annual Student
Christmas Party
Before Home





Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
Popular class addresses rock group
(CPS) - You saw The Beatle
Anthology. The "new" Beatles song
has hit the airwaves. But if you
haven't had enough Beatlemania
yet, how about taking a class on the
fab four?
The most requested class at
Northwestern University is "The
Beatles: An Interdisciplinary Mys-
tery Tour" and is taught once a year
by music professor Gary Kendall.
Kendall said he believes his
class is so popular because many
students view

No
editorial
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meeting
today,
happy
holidays
HAST
CAROLINA
COIN &
PAWN
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Al Transactions Strictly Confidential
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Comer of 10th & Dickinson
FACT:
Underinflated tires
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ciency by up to 10
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Kids today have
fewer rites of
passage
� Gary Kendall, professor at
Northwestern
the group as
role models, of
sorts.
"Kids to-
day have fewer
rites of pas-
sage Kendall
said. "The
Beatles can be
a vehicle for a
student's own
transition. They identify with them
and as The Beatles matured they
became a metaphor for transition,
from being adolescants to adults
with a complex world view
Although Kendall wasn't big
on The Beatles in the '60s, looking
�i ���������
back he realized that The Beatles
reflected and affected what Ameri-
can society was going through
"1 knew
about The
Beatles, but they
weren't my favor-
ite band. I was
into avant-garde
music he said.
"When The
Beatles arrived in
America in 1964,
they represented
freedom from gen-
der roles. For many women who
were screaming, they represented
an alternative vision of what life
would'be like. The Beatles were un-
encumbered, quick, witty and in
control.
"Their songs dealth with male-
female relationships as give and
take. They wrote about strong
women and the problems men have
dealing with strong women
As the '60s progressed, and
,U.S. troops became embroiled in
Vietnam, life in America changed
rapidly. And the music changed,
too, Kendall said: no more happy-
go-lucky, "I Want to Hold Your
Hand
"What the album) Sergeant
Pepper that came out in the sum-
mer of love is about the transition
from adolescence to adulthood. Not
drugs. The Beatles career moves to
an end simultaniously with the
breakdown of 60s idealism
So what does Kendall think of
the latest blast of Beatle-m?nia?
"It's a very appropriate time,
but you can't go back
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The East Carolinian
15 Y .fc from page 1
with students Hester said, "but I am
also looking forward to the leisure of
retirement
Hester said he sees his retire-
ment as an opportunity to catch up
on his reading.
The dedicated administrator's
history with academics started years
before his association with ECU. Be-
fore becoming a part of our univer-
sity, Hester directed the freshman
composition program at the Univer-
sity if Virginia.
Hester received three degrees
from UNC-Chapel Hill and is the edi-
tor of A Rhetoric Reader, a success-
ful English composition textbook.
Fall commencement is scheduled
to begin at 10 a.m. in Dowdy-Ficklen
stadium unless inclement weather
moves the ceremony indoors to
Minges Coliseum.
The commencement ceremony
will be preceded by a band concert at
9:15 a.m.
Thursday, December 7,1995
SGA
from page 1
IFC
$2 increase in student fees for the
yearbook and 77 percent said they
would pay between S30 and $40 for
a yearbook.
"The resolution records that
SGA officially supports the year-
book Nix said.
The increase will be added
along with the other fees to be pro-
posed in front of the Board of Trust-
ees tomorrow by Chancellor Eakin.
Among other things discussed
during the last meeting of the se-
mester, was the offensive article that
appeared in The News and Ob-
server, pertaining to ECU playing
against Stanford at the Liberty
Bowl.
In an article titled, "Memphis
the host of 'Twins Chip Alexander
portrayed ECU in a negative light
and received hundreds of letters
from loyal Pirate fans.
Justin Conrad, SGA senior class
president, read aloud his statement,
printed in a resolution document,
that the article issued on Nov. 30
"degregated and misrepresented fac-
tual inaccuracies, and the stereo-
types represented are damaging to
the academic integrity of the stu-
dents and our alumni
After being brought to the at-
tention of all SGA representatives,
a vote took place to resolve the is-
sue. It passed by acclamation, a very
strong consent.
"The article is attacking the
academic integrity, which has no
place in a sports editorial Conrad
said.
The issue will be pursued at a
later date by committee.
There were two brief discus-
sions on appropriating funds to or-
ganizations.
"The main problem in the Rules
of Judiciary is that people are not
attending meetings said Dale Em-
ery, SGA vice president. "If this con-
tinues, they (organizations request-
ing appropriations) will be put in the
back of all the files and dealt with
after everyone else
Also, graduate students are
given one lump sum by SGA. This
lump sum is given to the Graduate
Student Advisory Council (GSAC),
who, in turn, is then responsible for
dividing and distributing the funds
amongst the graduate organiza-
tions.
There was an unanimous con-
sent to pass the constitution of the
English Graduate Student Organiza-
tion of ECU, which would add them
to the appropriations committee file.
The financial report ending Dec.
4 leaves a total available of $84,714
($262,433 actual and estimated to-
tal revenue and $177,719 total ap-
propriations made).
The next meeting of SGA will
be held on Jan. 8 at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center, room
213. All meetings welcome public
attendance, however, only represen-
tatives may speak and vote.
from page 3
rising dramatically. And I don't
mean that as an insult to anyone
that's been in positions in the past,
but I think now you're seeing the
leaders, and that's very positive for
Greeks Conrad said.
On the Thursday before
Thanksgiving break, IFC held an
awards banquet to wrap up the end
of the year with the old executive
council. The Most Outstanding Fra-
ternity Award went to Delta Sigma
Phi, Community Service Award to
Pi Kappa Alpha, Most Improved
Fraternity Award to Pi Kappa Phi
and Conrad received the Greek Man
of the Year Award.
IFC is the governing body for
all 17 of the fraternities campus.
"It creates policy, it enforces
that policy and it also acts as a go
between between the fraternities
and the administration Conrad
said.
IFC also holds events with
Panhellenic, the governing body for
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the eight national sororities. The
two organizations have worked to-
gether on Greek forums, Greek
Week, RUSH events and summer
orientation sessions, which took
place for the first time this past
summer.
"So, we do have a lot of inter-
action with Panhellenic Conrad
said.
This past fall, IFC had put to-
gether an All Greek Band Party,
which was a no cost gathering
closed to active members in Greek
organizations.
Halloween has been brought
back for celebration in the last two
yearsTo assure any doubts, many
campus groups provided their in-
put and help in maintaining student
safety.
"Since they wanted to have the
cooperation of student groups, with
IFC as the largest student group na-
tionally, we were considered said
Conrad. "I was able to sit in on a
meeting with the mayor, chief of po-
lice and other city officials, in rep-
resenting Greeks on campus, as
well as the students
IFC does not have a specific
philanthropy, however they have
worked with many groups, includ-
ing Pitt County AIDS Association.
"We've done a lot. It's been an
active semester Conrad said.
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mt





�a�
Thursday, December 7,1995 The East Carolinian
Our View
Lock your
doors
before
you head
out for the
break.
Theft in
the area
is up. You
may be
the next
victim.
Soon it will be the season to be jolly, and after draining
our brains from exams and celebrating the end to a long,
long semester, we are going to be ready to jump on that plane
o load up that car for the trip home for ham, turkey and
presents.
But, wait, before you zip up that last suitcase remember
to lock your doors.
As recently reported in TEC, our campus has seen an
increase in criminal activity. We have had three more burglar-
ies and 24 more vandalism cases this semester than last year
during the same period of time. Also, two people were at-
tacked andor robbed in a medical school parking lot back in
November.
In these particular cases, police stated that they believed
the attackers wanted money for drugs. Captain John Ennis,
patrol division commander for the Greenville Police Depart-
ment said that most of the assaults, robberies and home break-
ins in Greenville happen because someone is trying to raise
money for drugs. Obviously, because the ECU campus is part
of the larger community, the problems of the city will occa-
sionally spill over to campus.
It is no secret that in any college town that students will
be leaving their dorm rooms and apartments over Winter break
and you can be sure would-be criminals are on the look out
for easy targets. Don't be one.
The number of police patrolling campus will decrease dur-
ing the break because so few students will actually be here.
So, follow police tips and resident hall guidelines for securing
your property, so you won't be a victim reporting a crime to
the police. Put your bikes in your dorm rooms, take home
those stereos, televisions, VCRs and anything else you think
is valuable that thieves might break into your dorm room for.
Students who live off campus are probably even more
vulnerable than the ones on campus. The Greenville police
department has a much larger vicinity to cover than the ECU
police. Their job is not to specifically patrol student living
areas, therefore, students must take precautions themselves.
Use bolt locks, secure windows, or have your mail held at the
post office or temporally sent to your permanent address while
you are away. If you are staying in Greenville over the break,
don't face the possibility of watching a thief jump out a win-
dow of your house as one TEC staff member did.
However, whether you are spending your holiday season
here or at home, be careful out there. When you are doing
that Christmas shopping, go in a group, check the back seat
of your car, don't carry cash, put gifts in the trunk of your
car, etc.
We know this is an ugly side of the holiday season that no
one wants to think about at this time, but we have to. Every
one out there is not filled with the love and warmth that the
season is supposed to bring out. Simple precautions may
save our property andor our life.
So, have a happy and safe holiday. We want you back in
January.
WF
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Tambra lion, News Editor
Wendy Ronntree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Wadded, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erika Cohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photo Editor
Xlaii Yang, Systems Manager
Rick Lucas, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Lani Adkinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, whkh may he edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Leaving home
In August of 19891 thought this
weekend w Ad never get here. But
in two days I'll be walking across the
field of Dowdy-Ficklen with the rest
of the class of 1995. Unlike many of
my fellow students, I'll be looking
back with tears.
Sounds corny, yes, but leaving
ECU is something I've dreaded since
Dec. 1993 when I donned the cap and
gown for the first time. Leaving
Greenville seemed so devastating
that I applied to graduate school and
despite much skepticism, was actu-
ally accepted.
Those philosophic words of my
parents "You better improve your
grades or you won't be able to go to
graduate school just didn't sink in
- until I applied for grad school and
was told it was doubtful I'd ever be
admitted. Suddenly 1 regretted my
behavior over the previous four and
a half years. You see, going out four
nights a week and chasing boys ev-
ery ailernoon just wasn't very con-
ducive to learning. Besides at that
time, grad school was the farthest
thing from my mind. But thanks to
hours of studying the GRE books, I
scored well enough to be admitted
to grad school.
Those first couple months were
tough. My best friend moved home,
my boyfriend dumped me and my
landlord said pets weren't allowed so
I had to give up my cat, but after
throwing myself into school and The
East Carolinian, life was once again
great I couldn't believe how fun it
could be to meet new people. I was
always one of those people who was
happy with one best friend, but since
she graduated and moved away, 1 was
left to fend for myself.
Through grad school I met a
whole new set of friends, found pro-
fessors who cared about my academic
and personal well being and suddenly
saw school in a whole new light
I won't go on and on to say how
important it is to become involved,
but I will say that I've lived and
breathed The East Carolinian for the
last three years. 1 know my friends,
Stephanie Lassiter
Editor-in-Chief
� a �. -t
I can t imagine
going to any
other job and
working 12
hours a day and
not complaining.
Lmily and boyfriend will be glad
when I have something new to com-
plain, and rave, about, but I won't
I've written this column over in
my head at least 10 times, but I still
know I'll forget something, but the
bottom line is that there is no greater
feeling than producing something
you are proud of and being able to
say thanks when others compliment.
True, I won't miss the many
nights when the printer died at mid-
night, the early mornings when the
publisher called to say they screwed
up, but I had to resolve the problem
and the endless arguments over cen-
sorship, but I'll take those headaches
any day for the experience The East
Carolinian has given me.
I never thought when I accepted
this position that I'd be dealing with
issues as hot as censorship, but it
seems that censorship has become a
daily topic for our staff. Members of
your student body wanted to have me
fired because they didn't like the tim-
ing of a story I covered. Don't you
expect news in a timely manner?
Would you want to hear about a
bombing a week after it occurred?
Would you mind if we told you who
won the latest basketball game a
week after it was held? Timing, they
said, was the problem. Yeah, the tim-
ing didn't parallel with their agenda.
To their chagrin, the first amendment
to the U.S. Constitution prevailed.
The last time someone at-
tempted to censor The East Carolin-
ian they ended up in federal court
and the paper won thanks to the ef-
forts of our forefathers. When threat-
ened with slander, I simply said I
understand the difference between
the truth and lies. If you tell the
truth, there is no problem. The opin-
ion page and the cartoon page are
the avenues for personal opinion. The
East Carolinian prides itself in be-
ing unbiased and impartial, but for
some people the truth hurts.
When I began working at TEC
three years ago. life as a student jour-
nalist was a lot different Our facili-
ties were horrible - old. dirty, messy
and inadequate, our adviser showed
up about once a year U complain
about headlines and a typical produc-
tion night went on until the wee
hours of the morning.
When our staff began interview-
ing candidates for a fuli-time media
adviser many were worried the per-
son would drastically change the pa-
per, but what this person, Paul Wright
has done is cut our production time
drastically, totally remodel our facili-
ties, purchase new equipment inform
us on the power of the press and acted
as both an adviser and friend to our
staff, as well as the staffs of the other
student mediums.
A thousands thank yous to Mr.
Wright wouldn't be enough to show
him my personal gratitude for improv-
ing your newspaper. The East Caro-
linian won a silver medal from the
Columbia Scholastic Press Associa-
tion and with the help of Mr. Wright,
next year should bring a gold medal.
I can't imagine going to any other
job and working 12 hours a day and
not complaining. Last week I woke up
at 6 a.m. and realized after this se-
mester I'll never see my friends from
the paper again. It's hard to think of
your coworkers as friends, but despite
the diversity of our newsroom, we all
manage to get along, and I think of
these people as some of my closest
friends. Leaving is part of growing up,
but it's a part I wish I didn't have to
experience.
idvertisements
be allowed in
newspapers?
Heather Wellman, freshman
� Sure, I think pro-choice
advertisements should be
allowed. Everyone knows
about it, but everyone may
not approve. Pro-life and pro-
choice is something that
affects a lot of people.
Everyone has their own
opinions, so why not be able
to advertise and express your
feelings no matter how you
feel about it.
Janice Burnette, sophomore
� Yes, there should be
advertisements of pro-life
and pro-choice. It educates
everyone about the
differences, allowing
individuals to come up with
their own decisions about
the issues.
Stephanie Webb, freshman
� Yes, I think there should
be advertisements of pro-
life and pro-choice because
this can help educate
everyone. Anybody who may
be facing the dilemma should
know what they are about to
experience or may
experience.
t
Nathan Snead, freshman �
Yes, I think that freedom of
press is one of the great
things about America.
Advertisements either way
should not be censored.

Free expression it turns out, isn't always free. The Left has its own ever-changing rule book
for determining whose speech should be defended and whose must be silenced
� Cal Thomas, columnist, 1993
mmmmmmsm
�T





Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
Let the exams begin
That time has already come upon
us, and we need to get ready for the
race. The "ice, what race? The race
to finish this semester. Everybody that
I know is like myself and just wishes
for this never-ending semester to
reach its end.
I cannot wait until my truck hits
the road and 1 am homeward bound.
The journey North we shall call it But,
there is that one obstacle that seems
to be standing in my way before I can
make this journey home, that is those
pesky FINALS!
So, in order to get ready for this
trip, I need to take my finals. That
can cause a lot of stress if it is not
handled properly. So, I have come to
you, the students of ECU, with some
ideas of how to handle these stressful
exams and how to relieve this stress
following the exams.
First of all, do not cram for these
exams! You can not possibly learn ev-
erything that you need to know if you
are trying to cram it all in one night
or even two. Space your studying out
with many snack breaks and rest pe-
riods. Stressing yourself out before
even taking the exams almost cer-
tainly guarantees you an F, if your
lucky, F!
After spacing out your studying
and you feel prepared to take this
exam, walk in with a clean spirit,
knowing that you have done all that
you can do for this exam and that you
will do the best that you can do. That
is all that can be expected of you.
Right before the exam begins, take a
deep breath, let out all your stress and
all your other thoughts with the ex-
haling of this monstrous breath.
Now sit down and take the exam.
Be thoughtful in your answers, but
do not take up too much time on each
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
No use in
stressing over
the grades.
They wilt come
when they
come
question. There is never .ough time
to thoroughly sit ' ,wn and really
think out eaui uuuoa. Do your best
-ad try your hardest. DO NOT
STRESS! If you stress, then your
the nts begin to wander and soon
j are wondering about how your-
parents will react over your flunking
grades and what will you do next se-
mester.
There is no benefit in these ac-
tions. Relax and think before you an-
swer. Once the exam is over and you
have turned in your answers, do not
look back. Walk out and be secure in
your heart that those answers you just
turned in were the best you could do.
That is all that you can do at this point
Do not begin to stress at this point
either. What will you accomplish by
stressing right now?
After all your exams have been
taken in this fashion, now is the time
for a drastic change to occur. You have
no more finals, there is nothing hold-
ing you back from leaving Greenville,
so why are you still here. For me, it
will be to have that ceremonial
margarita that I have had since the
end of my first exams here. I've
worked hard and it s time to reward
myself. So, go out and have fun with
your friends.When you go out, go to
have fun and relieve all the stress that
has been building up over the semes-
ter.
Alright, after my last exam has
been taken, I have gone out and re-
lieved some stress, I've made the jour-
ney all the way back home, it's time
for more relaxing. I plan on waking
up when my body feels like it is ready
to do so. That could be at 9 a.m. or
3p.m I don't care. I may be working
over the break. I will not allow myself
to work more than six hours a day.
This is the true spirit of the
break, no school work. Yes, I may
think about what I plan on doing the
next semester or how I can improve
from the last one, but I will not stress
over it. Still, the grades from my
classes have not been sent to me and
I am beginning to wonder how I did.
As with myself, many of you count
on those exams to either raise or kill
your grade.
No use in stressing over the
grades. They will come when they
come, there is nothing we can do to
speed up the process. So, relax, sit
back, have a drink and wait patiently
until your grades arrive. For many
of us, the stressing begins after we
actually receive our grades, and there
is no point in ruining this other time
with needless stress.
So, go into those exams, do your
best, and then walk away. Remember,
do not look back, relax and wait un-
til the grades are sent to you. Enjoy
your break and get some much
needed rest and relaxation, and come
back ready to work your butt off an-
other semester.
Letters to the Editor
Censorship hypocrisy
To the Editor:
Censorship is an ugly thing, and
in theory everyone is against it In
practice, however, it seems that things
are different.
In a delightful iron, the same Stu-
dent Stores that celebrates Banned
Books Week every year has apparently
decided that T-shirts with sophomoric
comments are too dangerous for the
ECU community.
I refer of course to the story in
Tuesday's paper. "Students protest T-
shirts 1 was shocked to learn that
such shirts would cease to be ordered
based solely on one student's taking
offense.
Surely the Student Stores would
not have removed, say, Al Gore's book,
or Rush Limbaugh's book, because
someone was offended by it. This is
blatant censorship. While the idea
being censored may be offensive, this
is the chance for the Student Stores
to back up their proclaimed belief in
the First Amendment The manage-
ment of the Student Stores should im-
mediately reinstate this T-shirt and
apologize to the entire ECU commu-
nity.
Moreover, The East Carolinian
should have immediately, on Tuesday,
stood against this act as well. As jour-
nalists, you have a special obligation
to condemn censorship.
Refusing to speak out against
censorship only legitimizes it. I urge
everyone to speak out and tell the
Student Stores that we will not stand
for such actions, now or in the future.
W. Brian Hall
Graduate Student
History
The letter to the editor printed in Tuesday's paper was written
by Steven VT Starling, a history major, not Steven M. Starling
who is a political science major. We apologize for any confusion.
140 plus presidents
and nothing to show
A few weeks ago over 140 heads
of state from all over the world came
together in the greatest nation the
world has ever known (the great old
'U.S. of A.) The purpose was to cel-
ebrate the 50th anniversary of the
United Nations, the closest thing that
any of us will ever see to world gov-
ernment (assuming that Earth is not
invaded and taken over by aliens.)
It's been almost 80 years since
President Wilson first proposed the
idea that there be some kind of world-
wide coalition to promote world peace.
The underlying goal was to insure that
there would never again be a world-
wide conflict like that in WW I. The
movement failed, and about 30 years
later the world found itself in similar
circumstances.
The UN was formed in 1955.
Since that time there have been many
memorable events. These range from
various peace keeping efforts, to the
formation of Israel and. Nikita
Khrushchev banging his shoe on the
podium during a speech in regards to
pulling the Soviet Union out of the
UN.
There have been noteworthy
events galore since its formation of
the UN, yet the simple fact of the
matter is that the big birthday bash
that was thrown a few weeks ago was
not In fact it was, for all intensive
purposes, worthless.
It could have been fantastic. The
sheer potential of having that many
world leaders together in one place
could be the ultimate ideal melting
pot. But it was not to be. The best
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
The world was
forced to act as
witness to the
showcasing of
world leaders as
if they were
movie stars
that we got out of it was a much un-
needed media circus.
It's not often that so much tax
money from so many countries goes
to throw a recognition party. I'm sure
that David Letterman or Billy Crystal
would have made good hosts. I can
hear Crystal now" And now the award
for the third world nation that has
done the most to keep the US border
control the busiest the winner is
The fact of the matter is that the
idea of recognizing that the UN is a
good and needed thing is okay. The
problem is that it was a wasted op-
portunity.
There was an opportunity to capi-
talize on the presence of a media cir-
cus. With all the publicity there any-
way, why not use it to promote some
landmark legislation or hand down
some big ruling on human rights or
environmental legislation. It is said
that people remember things better
and pay more respect to them if they
were done on a significant date. It is
doubtful that we would remember
when and what happened at Valley
Forge if it were not on Christmas.
Instead the world was forced to
act as witness to the showcasing of
world leaders as if they were some sort
of trendy movie star .
Yasir Arafat went on MTV. His hair
stylist went on interview with The New
York Post about how upset he was that
he couldn't put his hair up in an afro.
New York City Mayor Rudolph Giulani
had him kicked out of a concert at the
Lincoln Center, a move which was later
called a cheap shot by Clinton.
The man of the week was Cuba's
Fidel Castro. His speech at the gen-
eral assembly, which he wore a suit to,
won more support than any other all
week. Later in the week he brought
out the all to familiar green fatigues in
order to rile up support in Harlem.
Only in America could a world re-
nowned abuser of human rights and
symbol of communism be capable of
raising support
The Filipino president's wife went
shopping for shoes and Boris Yeltsin
said nothing important again.
Who was it that said, "give me all
the worlds leaders together in one
room and we can work out anything
Wow, talk about decisions that will
affect the rest of our lives. Holy worth-
less world summits. Batman.
Have a Safe and Merry Christmas,
Happy New Year and I'll see you in
Memphis or in '96.
Advertising propaganda
I am writing in regards to the
advertisement from the Human Life
Alliance of Minnesota inc before I
begin though, I would like to con-
gratulate the authors of this piece,
for they truly excel as propagandist
There sic misleading word-
ings and bending the truth so that
the fact and opinion are not distin-
guishable by any means certainly
helps there sic purpose along. In
fact is seems to me that many of
my classmates who had little opin-
ion on the matter are now dead set
against abortion.
I am writing from a different
opinion, and only intend it as some-
thing that my fellow classmates can
read and base there sic opinions
on more than the one view pre-
sented on Thursday.
I am not saying my opinions
are right for anyone but myself, and
my intent is not to have people
chose sic my side exclusively, but
to be able to make a more informed
and personal position on which
they can stand. Please keep in mind
that I am not a professional writer
by any means, nor do I have there
sic time or recourses to prepare
an argument that can top every-
thing that was addressed in the
flyer.
It seems appropriate thai I be-
gin with some definitions, as the
first article inside the cover was
entitled "The War of the Words
It is from this article that they are
able to setup the fallacies to come.
Here are a few definitions I bor-
rowed from the oxford American
Dictionary, which appear o'page
512:
George Knott
Quest Columnist
If we deny
women the right
to on abortion,
we might as well
ban all heart
transplants.
Life (lif), n. the sum of experi-
ences and actions that constitute a
persons sic existence
Lifeless (lif-lis), adj. without life
or unconscious
Given these two definitions
(which the authors failed to do) we
can begin to unravel the ornate web
of deception that the skilled writ-
ers have woven.
The one thing that separates
us from rocks or tress or animals
is our consciousness, our unique
ability to think, reason and remem-
ber. This is what makes us human.
Human (hyoo-man') adj. char-
acterized by tenderness, compas-
sion, and sympathy for human be-
ings and animals
It is what makes us alive.
Alive (a-aliv) adj. living (pg 22)
Now you must ask yourself if
the fetus is alive. The fetus has the
ability to move and grow. It must
certainly be alive then, Right? Per-
haps, But not more alive than a kid-
ney or a hear is alive. Rememberer
sic the fact that we are human is
entirely just because we are only
human.
The ability to laugh and cry
and love and hate sets us apart and
above from animals. We are crea-
tures shaped by our environment,
by our ability to interact and
change according to our surround-
ings. The fetus, an appendage of the
pregnant woman knows nothing. It
has no knowledge.
knowledge (nol'ij), n. acquit-
tance sic or familiarity gained by
experience. It cannot think or rea-
son. It doesn't understand hot and
cold. It doesn't know of the joys
and sufferings of life. All it has (if
in fact it is applicably sic to say it
can have something) is its womb.
In short the fetus is an unconscious
part of the female.
Lifeless (lif-lis) adj. with out life
or unconscious
The human life Alliance state
that there is no constitutional right
for abortion. There sic reasoning
for this the right to "life liberty and
the persuit sic of happiness So
if we deny living women the right
to an abortion in interest of the
fetus, we might as well ban all heart
transplants, for the hearts sic
sake.
Lets sic stop hip transplant
surgery, and make blood transfu-
sions illegal. After all, what about
the life I "jerty and happiness of a
tumorous kidney. Doesn't it have
every right to thrive and grow and
prosper, because it is an uncon-
scious appendage to a person, jest
sic like a fetus. Right, Human Life
Alliance of Minnesota inc'
WALLACE





8
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
Gift-buying made cheap
Jennifer Coieman
Senior Writer
It's the thought that counts, right?
Wrong. At least, wrong according
to many materialistic business owners.
CEO's of companies such as Sears,
Belk and Wal-Mart want you to believe
that your loved ones won't be happy
unless they unwrap a $1200 stereo or
a $2000 computer from you on Christ-
mas morning.
While this is all well and good if
you happen to be one of those CEO's
and can actually afford such extrava-
gant gifts, these prices are a bit out of
reach for most of us. What is the poor
college student to do?
The answer is simple. Break away
from the capitalist Christmas tradition
and bring back the "good old days
when it was the thought that counted
and not the price tag. With a little
imagination and effort, you can find
mderful presents for your friends and
family for under $20.
The first thing to do is look at the
recipients of the gifts. Are they male
or female? What are their hobbies?
Their likes and dislikes? Their favorite
food, color and kind of music? All of
these questions can point toward pos-
sible present ideas. Sure, we'd all like
a new stereo, but it is the personalized
presents that we will remember and
treasure. By tailoring the gift to fit the
person, you show your friends that you
really thought about what kind of gift
they would appreciate.
So once you've got all this infor-
mation, the question becomes what to
do with it Here's an example. You dis-
covered that a friend's favorite food is
Mexican. Why not get them a gift cer-
tificate to Chico's or Mazatlan? It's not
very expensive, and what college stu-
dent wouldn't enjoy a free meal?
Another example. Say a friend's
favorite color is red Why not get them
an assortment of strawberry, raspberry
or cherry scented candles? Even unlit
these candles can make an entire room
smell good. And they'll really thank you-
after their next romantic candlelit din-
ner with that special someone.
The possibilities are endless.
Someone likes classic rock music? Why
not get them a gift certificate to a music
store? That way you don't have to keep
up with what they already own, and
they can use the gift certificate for CDs,
t-shirts, posters, carrying cases or any-
thing else they might need.
If you don't like the idea of giving
gift certificates, there's still a cheap
alternative for musical gifts: used CDs.
Greenville has several local record
stores with a wide variety of used mu-
sic Most of the discs are in excellent
condition, and can be made to look new
with fresh jewel cases (which are also
cheap).
By the same token, the readers
on your Christmas list can be satisfied
with used books. While some of these
get a little dog-eared, like-new used
books can usually be found in almost
any genre of fiction. Also, hunt .e
bargain bins and remaindered book
tables at any major book store chain.
Good deals lurk everywhere
Here's a great idea for the gour-
met in your circle. An assortment of
gourmet coffees, complete with a new
See GIFT page 12
'Tis the
Season
Each year, Mendenhall
decorates the main
lobby for the holiday
season with a Christ-
mas tree. Nobody will
be opening these pre-
sents Christmas morn-
ing, however. They're
just pretty boxes.
Photo by PATRICK IP.ELAN
CD. Reviews
Mark Brett
lifestyle Editor
i
The influence of the Butthole
Surfers lurks all over the self-titled
debut album from P. Since lead
Burfer Gibby Haynes is one of the
wo major creative forces behind
jhe band that only makes sense.
Who's the other creative force?
)Nhy, none other than Gibby's fel-
low Texan Johnny Depp. Yes. that
i

i
I
Johnny Depp. Edward
ScissorhandsEd WoodWhat's
Eating Gilbert Grape? Johnny
Depp. Former star of "21 Jump
Street" who's been making movie
after excellent movie to prove that
he's more than just a pretty boy
Johnny Depp. Him.
This one must be sending
record reviewers across the coun-
try into fits. On the one hand, we've
got Gibby Haynes. Whether we like
the Butthole Surfers or not, we at
least have to admit that he's paid
his musical dues. Then we have
Johnny Depp. He still has some
kind of stigma attached to him;
despite the impressive array of
films he's done, people still want
to dismiss him as a lightweight. The
comparisons to David Cassidy are
inevitable.
But I happen to like Johnny
Depp. Anybody who's got the guts
to star in a black-and-white film
about a transvestite movie director
is okay in my book.
P is far from an attempt by a
movie star to cash in on his celeb-
rity with some frothy pop music.
Hell, Depp doesn't even sing! He's
credited only with guitar and bass.
All vocals are performed by the
afore-mentioned Mr. Haynes. No, if
Depp had wanted to do that, he'd
: i
have scraped together some even-
worse-than-the-original Hootie
clone band and released a nice, safe
roots rock spectacular. An album
that would make Milli Vanilli look
sincere.
Instead, Depp gets his buddy
Gibby Haynes, leader of one of the
most iconoclastic and obscure al-
ternative bands of the last 10 years.
Gibby's not a guy you work with if
you want a radio-friendly sound, es-
pecially not in the current field of
studio punk and classic rock
wannabe bands dominating the air-
waves these days (God, I love MTV).
So, not surprisingly, P is a
pretty diverse album. Its tone is
constantly shifting, seldom staying
at the same level for two songs in
a row. While this could be distract-
ing for some bands, P manages to
hold it together.
The album opens with "I Save
Cigarette Butts a nice little ditty
that would be at home on a Lou
Reed album. In fact, though I've
never heard the song before, 1
wouldn't be at all surprised to find
out that Reed had recorded it at
some point.
This song (along with several
others) finds Gibby Haynes stretch-
See P page 11
HomeGrown chaHt)
benefit hits the Attic

Brandon Wadded
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
' In the hustle and bustle of the
Christmas season, many of us lose
sight of the true meaning of the sea-
son. Only how many shopping days
left?
The coming of the season should
remind us of those who are less for-
tunate than ourselves. But the fact of
the matter is we tend to lose track of
who needs our help the most
Christmas is a stressful time of
year, but imagine not being concerned
with the "clearance sales" at Brody's.
Instead imagine being worried about
feeding your family or being able to
put a warm coat on your child's back.
It's a sobering thought
Instead of just thinking or being
concerned, some local businesses have
decided to join hands to help the
Greenville area's less fortunate
Local businesses such as Back-
stage Music, Peasant's Cafe, City Mar-
ket and Big Splash have pledged their
support of the HomeGrown Charity
Benefit "It seems at this time of year
we're more aware of the needs around
us that many have. We re glad to have
a small part in sharing our blessings
with others stated City Market's
owner Grant Wright
In association with Palomino
Advertising, LeeWay Productions pre-
sents the HomeGrown Charity Ben-
efit on Dec. 15 at the Attic to support
the National Child Rights Alliance,
PICASO (Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization) and the Salvation Army.
The HomeGrown Charity
Benefit's organizer, Lee Crumpton,
concurred. "We see it as a way to help
out some needy charities for the holi-
day season he said. "In return all we
ask is that the public come out and
enjoy these talented up and coming
bands
The event's headliner is Flyin'
Mice. The Chapel Hill quartet is play-
ing in support of their newest LP re-
lease, Brighter Day. The eclectic band
has enjoyed a regional following since
Photo Courtesy of LeeWay Productions
These upstanding young men are the members of Chapel
Hill's Flyin' Mice, who will be the headlining act at this year's
HomeGrown benefit concert, to be held Dec. 15 at the Attic.
their beginnings in 1989.
The charity benefits also give
some of the lesser known local acts
the opportunity to perform to a larger
audience. Greenville trio Melanie
Sparks Band has been playing at
Peasant's Cafe and the event gives
Sparks more regional exposure. A full
length CD is underway for the band,
but in the meantime the band has
been enjoying collegiate radio expo-
sure from their six-song demo cas-
sette, Guess What's In My Shorts!
Those attending the HomeGrown
Charity Benefit are encouraged to
bring a donation in exchange for a
cover charge. Canned food or other
clothing donations give a $2 discount
and will go to PICASO (Pitt County
AIDS Service Organization). Bring a
winter coat and get in free. AH cloth-
ing donations will be distributed to
the Salvation Army. If you have noth-
ing to give, get in for $5. All door pro-
ceeds go the NCRA (National Child
Rights Alliance), a group directed by
youth and adult survivors of abuse
and neglect
Next week's hectic exam sched-
ule is a stressful time for most of us,
just as tax time is for business. But
especially this time of year, it's impor-
tant to keep the needs of the less for-
tunate in mind.
tf
7�a�
QVC breaks TV Whore
The following is a foer dream
conjured by the tired brain of our be-
loved TV Whore after trying valiantly
to fill an assignment that proved too
much for even he The TV Whore may
have no shame, but he does have a
breaking point, as you will see
Kevin Chaisson
Senior Writer
I was reading "Back to the
Batcave Adam (TV's Batman) West's
autobiography, when my editor gave
me a call on the Batphone.
"Yo, Kevin he says, " I have an
assignment for this week's TV Whore
column
I placed an "X-Files" trading card
in the book to hold my place, muted
the TV, and listened intently, ready for
danger.
"What I'd like you to do is some-
thing similar to that piece that Hugh
Gallagher did for Rolling Stone, re-
member? It was "Seven Days and Seven
Nights Alone with MTV where they
holed him up in a hotel room and
forced him to watch nothing but MTV
for 168 hours
I asked, "You're paying for a ho-
tel room for me?"
"Ah, no. We just have some guys
that are going to beat you if they catch
you trying to leave your apartment"
"Well, MTV has been done. What
do you want me to watch for 168
hours?"
"We were thinking QVC. Oh,
and Q2 also. Just fluctuate between
those two channels. We're not com-
pletely evil at TEC
So again the gauntlet was thrown.
I planned to answer this challenge and
spend my waking moments with the
happy hosts of QVC and Q2. Here goes.
26 November, 7:00 a.m. - Begin-
ning the morning with host Pat James
DeMitri and the QVC Morning Show.
Pat usually has some guy as a co-host
but today her perky personage is fry-
ing solo. This isn't too bad. Pat is aw-
fully cute, kind of like that fourth grade
teacher you had a crush on. She is ra-
diating warmth, and you can barely see
that she is showing (about three
months) under her Christmas iron-on
and Aleene's Puff Painted sweatshirt
And, I am still able to get the news
and weather, thanks to encapsulated
bits from USA Today. My roommate
comes in, grabs her sunglasses, and
asks if I'm going to class today. I
mumble something through milk and
Pop-Tart and she rolls her eyes at me,
closing and locking the door behind
her. Hey, these Lee Sands Holiday
leather items look kind of cool!
2:39 p.m. - My roommate wakes
me up coming in the door. She asks if
I know that there are some big guys in
a 7ECvan parked outside. I hardly hear
her, because I am angry at myself for
falling asleep during the two-hour Ba-
varian Art Glass Jewelry special. As I
stand, wiping crumbs off of my bath-
robe, I notice a yellow notepad with
QVC codes scribbled all over it I don't
remember writing them.
4:00 p.m. - After falling asleep on
QVC, I decide to flip over to its younger,
hipper spin-off: Q2. I am just in time
for Santa Shape-Up, hosted by Jenni-
fer Dempster. Hey! She's also on
ESPN's "Bodyshaping Well, so I've
heard, because I never personally
watch the show. The big item for sale
See QVC page 10
TPCewe IRevceta
Toy Story offers shallow fun
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
The hottest family film this holi-
day season is Disney's Toy Story. Fea-
turing completely computer-gener-
ated images, Toy Story brings the
toys in the bedroom of a little boy
named Andy to life.
The main toy in Andy's bedroom
is a cowboy named Woody (voiced by
Tom Hanks). Woody garners the most
attention from Andy and is therefore
in charge of all the other toys in the
bedroom. At a meeting early in the
film, Woody explains that the fre-
quency with which the toys get
played with is not as important as
being there for Andy when he does
want to play. This concept is easy for
Woody to say but difficult to do,
when later in the film Woody does
not get played with very often.
Joining Woody in the toy chest
is a dinosaur (Wallace Shawn) who
cannot figure out how to be fero-
cious, Little Bo Peep (Annie Potts)
who has an infatuation with Woody,
a piggy bank (John Ratzenberger), a
platoon of plastic army soldiers (lead
by the voice of R. Lee Ermey). and
Mr. Potato Head (hilariously voiced
by Don Rickles). One of the strengths
of Toy Story is that almost every one
of the toys takes on an individual per-
sonality.
The funniest lines come from Mr.
Potato Head, who has a grumpy de-
meanor from having his face con-
stantly knocked off. When Andy
opens presents for his birthday, Mr.
Potato Head wishes hard for a Mrs.
See TOY page 9





The East Carolinian
Thursday, December 7,1995
L
Harris Teeter
Tis The Season!
Fresh Premium Harris Teeter
Ground
Beef
USDA Choice
Cubed
Steak
lb.
2
Hormel
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Sweet
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5 Lb. Bag
Red Or White
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Washington Golden
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Apples Jjf�(1)
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18.25-
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Soft Drink Feature
American
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16 oz.
Jropicana Premium
Orange
luice
2 Liter
TOY
from page 8
Potato Head, says he must shave, and
rips off his mustache.
Woody becomes Andy's second
favorite toy early in the film when
Andy receives a Buzz Lightyear (Tim
Allen). With a flashing laser, retract-
able helmet and a digital voice, Buzz
immediately becomes Andy's favorite
toy, much to Woody's consternation.
Though a conflict is usually nec-
essary to tell a story, the conflict in
Toy Story seems forced. The scenes
involving all the toys were much more
enjoyable than the feud between
Woody and Buzz. When Woody
knocks Buzz out of a window, the
story really bogs down. And when
Buzz and Woody wind up in the sa-
distic neighbors' house, the story
slows to a crawl. The most memo-
rable scenes occur at the beginning
and end of the film in Andy's bed-
room, not during chase scenes or
action sequences.
I would have liked to have seen
Woody and Buzz come to an agree-
ment of the differences through life
in the bedroom. Talking through
their problems could have been as
interesting as the overblown adven-
ture in the "real" world.
Toy Story has no real substance.
Beauty and the Beast succeeds so
well as an animated film because it
deals with the larger issue of beauty
while involving the audience in its
captivating plot. The makers of Toy
Story seem so enthralled with the
idea of computer animation that they
put Woody and Buzz in as many un-
usual places as possible without re-
maining true to the story. In place
of an interesting story, the filmmak-
ers substitute a multitude of con-
flicts.
Along with the conflict between
Buzz and Woody is the conflict aris-
ing because Buzz refuses to believe
that he is a toy. He thinks he is the
real Buzz Lightyear. His depression
when he learns the truth develops no
empathy from the audience because
his character has never become com-
passionate and the conflict feels con-
trived.
Toy Story's innocuous plot will
draw in audiences all season long.
Unfortunately, Disney has again aimed
at the lowest common denominator
in a film. Ever since Beauty and the
Beast, the finest achievement ever in
animation, the filmmakers at Disney
have relied on formulaic plots which
take no chances. What a crime to take
such an innovative concept such as
toys that vhink, talk and walk and give
it a storyline with the all the ingenu-
ity of a Sylvester Stallone movie.
Toy Story is certainly fun. I just
wish Disney would take a few more
risks. Movies with the intelligence of
Million Dollar Duckand That Darned
Cat leave the audience flat Next time
Disney tries a new concept in film, 1
wish they'd try the concept of writing
an interesting story to go with it
On a scale of one to ten, Toy Story
rates a seven.
Pepsi Or Diet
Pepsi
0
�12 Inch
oinsettias
ea.
5
79
99
Selected Varieties
Crest 489
Toothpaste 6.4 oz. I
Selected Varieties
Eagle �
Peanuts 11 us oz
Prices Effective Through Dec. 12,1995
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday December 6, Through December 12, 1995 In Our Greenville Stores
Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
T
Presbyterian Church (USA.)
First Presbyterian Churc
invites ECU students
for an evening of Christmas
Celebration.
in
The annual lov Gift Service. December 10, 5:00 PM, an
informal service of music to open the Christmas season.
"This Day is Born Emmanuel
A Christmas Cantata offered by the Gallery Choir,
Children's Choir, and the Greenville Youth Orchestra.
Sing in the Christmas Season, and then join us for Chili!
N.Cs
Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
24th year in
downtown
Greenville
Every Wednesday
Thursday 7th
Comedy Zone Hall of Fame Presents
Hiki Hum "bft
World's most powerful Hypnotist
East Coast
music
Quicksilver
Wash Pub
Attic
Advance tickets only $8
Capricorn Recording
Artist
Friday Dec 8th
Capitol Recording Artist
Aquarium
Rescue Unit
fartoojones
-m
� i V
Advance Tickets Only $6 Available at: East Coast Music&Video
The Attic & The Wash Pub & Quiksilver
T3
Saturday Dec 9th
id release
Party
purple schoolbus
Watch the Liberty Bowl Dec. 30,
Here on Our 15ft TV!





10
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
� V V from page 8
is J-2638. the Cardioglide exer-
ciser. It's only $299.95, plus $14 ship-
ping and it looks fab-u-lous! Jennifer
tells me all about it while some model
demonstrates the machine, complete
with weird video and music effects.
It's kind of like watching a Human
League video, circa 1984. There is also
a HeartMonitor setup for sale, a tight-
looking little belt you wrap around
your chest that keeps track of your
heart rate through a crappy-looking
watchband. Only $69.95, plus $5.99
shipping!
6:10 p.m. - My roommate tries
to wrest the remote from my hand be-
cause she wants to see the local
weather, but I can't let her have it
It's the Beauty Shop hour and I'm
watching a demonstration of II
Makiage products. Soon, they're go-
ing to have Item C-13675, the Per-
sonal Roll-On Waxer, priced to sell at
$29.95, plus $5.95 shipping. She men-
tions something about The Shining
and leaves.
27 November, 2:32 a.m. - That
evil woman drugged my tea! Just to
see "Chicago Hope That harlot! I
missed the Diane Von Furstenburg
Collection special, Fashionable Gifts,
100 Reasons to shop Q2 and Christ-
mas Electronics! At least I have caught
the QVC Star Wars Collectibles spe-
cial, co-hosted by Mark Hamill (Luke
Skywalker himself). I decide to take
phone in hand and order the Franklin
Mint Collectible Millennium Falcon
plate, and some other odds and ends.
Mark Hamill smiles at me seductively.
"Buy my autographed 24 carat
gold foil trading card he is saying,
"only $155.95 Only 52 seconds left!
Suddenly the X-Files cardbookmark
becomes less than impressive. I reach
for the phone as the cameraman pans
back to a long shot of the host talk-
ing. Luke Skywalker looks away and
reaches to his crotch, adjusting his
package while the world looks on.
4:20 a.m. - Am sad. Old woman
just called Cifts Under $25 show, with
Jill Bauer. Has lumbago and is an in-
somniac because the swelling keeps
her up sometimes. She loves QVC be-
cause it gives something to do nights
when swelling too much. Cried a lot,
but bought the S'Warms fingerless
gloves, steal for $19.95, plus SH, to
make happy.
28 November, 10:14 a.m. - Ship-
ment of stuff arrived today during
Joan Rivers Collection. Don't remem-
ber buying it, but looks interesting.
Sent 2-day UPS-Express. As roommate
tries to get ready for school, I show
her how the Aerobed is so easy to in-
flate with touch of button. She wants
to know why we need four of them,
but I ignore her to unpack Levitron
Amazing Anti-Grav Top. Joan Rivers
is so pretty.
1:50 p.m. - Think roommate mad,
so I order II Makiage set for her, plus
Roll-On Waxer, Home Decorating Vase
Set, Tomy Big Big Loader playset, a
cable chenille fringed sr.arf, Don
Mattingly signed rookie card and
Little Tykes Soft-Plus Rocking Cow.
Waiting for SoftSounds 5 CD set at
4:00.
5:54 p.m. - Got to talk to host
today! Talked to Rachel Weiss on Q2
Beauty show! Ordered Leg Cover cov-
erage makeup. Rachel asked if I was
ordering for wife or girlfriend. What
does she mean?
6:05 p.m. - AUUUUGH! Rachel
and an ugly pink puppet! Aieeeeee! Can
order Tomy Big Loader to attach to
Big Big Loader ordered earlier. Pup-
pet makes me want to kill.
7:58 p.mLast note. Roommate
called people to break down door to
room after I carried TV in with exten-
sion cord. Can't miss Richard Simmons
I ALF
College Night I Sundays
I Mondays
2 Slices Hopping & Drink
$2.75
Dally Lunch Special
Mon-Frl
Tiies. 990 slices 990 32oz draft
Wed. large deluxe pizza
$5.99 til 1am
pick up or carry out
EDO'S II
NOCOVER
Sun. '1 CBloody Marys'
Mon. U Draft
Tues. 99t Long Island
Ice Teas
Wed. Dollar Nite
Thurs. 99C 320 draft .
. Fri. 2i32o7 draft
Sat. 2 32oz draft
LIVE rntertdinment
Thurs Dec 7th: Drive Train
alfredo's I & II will be open during
the Holrdays at 10pm
Deal-A-Meal special. Ordered the Weslo
Aerobic Manual Treadmill ($199.95,
plus $14.50 sh) for her to make peace,
but didn't work. She wants to see
"Ellen" tonight Can't feel toes.
And there you have it 29 hours
of QVC and Q2 instead of 168, but I
feel I am the better man for it After
all, QVC is like any kind of over-the-
counter medication. It is best in small
doses, and with food or milk. And any-
way, I got all of my Christmas shop-
ping done. Right now, my roommate
is using the Roll-On Waxer to seal en-
velopes. Or at least I think she is. I
haven't been allowed to see anybody
since I was admitted. Come to think of
it I haven't even been allowed to use
my Ab-Flcx or anything else. Well, at
least I got this review in on time. Hope
the typesetters can read Crayola Brand
Travel Crayon, with little sparkleys.
$19.95, plus sh.
On a scale of one to ten, QVC and
Q2 can't even make the entertainment
scale. I have hives.
2
CUJMTMAS IS JUST ABOUND
0
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f bos those Holiday Gift Ideas
that you've been looking for.
Stop by and take a look at
our Christmas Trees
lV Poinsettias, Centerpieces,
yf Goody Baskets, and
Ornaments.
117 W 4th St
Greenville, NC
758-2183
Get NYolVeDI
The ECU Student Union Barefoot Committee is now accepting
applications for committee members to help plan and organize
Barefoot on the Mall next spring. 3 d eyv
Applications are available in the Student Union Office, �
Room 236 - Mer.denhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply is Friday, December 8th.
For more information, call the Student Union Office at 328-4715.
about the
Internet is that it allows you to stay
in contact with your parents.
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8MB RAM700MB bard drive, PowerPC 601
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ip-opera character, us
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You've left your parents' nest. They thought they were finally rid of you. They were step into a world of endless possibilities. From Colin Powells political views to the one-hit
wrong. Because right now, when you purchase an Apple" Macintosh" computer, you can also wondersof the '80s to what happened to your favorite daytime soap-opera character. R!s
get a great deal on the Apple Internet Connection Kit- everything you need to easily surf the power that can keep you in touch with your supporters and
the Net. It allows you to step outside your world of lectures, pep rallies and studying and with theworld.The power of Macintosh.The power to be your best!
Student Stores
Wright Building � 328-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
- Internet
lection
����.
Anata lulanial Pimif lUnn Kit
Quid and easy internet access.
Na4 �U tUHfmtm amt rU t n$4rm A mo4tm U tmtaaty to motel to Ibt Mtmtl. cv W fr Comf.uirr. In Mi ryUx nrarrmi iffk. Hie,vpfe lm- Maanlmi. Itroma, SlyieVmer and IWpmtr k be your best
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, December 7,1995
11
k from page 8
ing his vocal abilities into places
I've never heard him go before. On
"Cigarette Butts" he gives us a
deep, sing-song drone, the kind of
sing-speaking Lou Reed has based
a career on. It sounds great; I didn't
know Gibby had it in him.
"Michael Stipe" also finds
Haynes stretching his wings a bit
on a solid alty ballad about the
weird world of celebrity. Obviously
a song penned by Depp, "Michael
Stipe" casts the introspective REM
singer as a sort of celebrity mes-
siah.
finally talked to Michael
Stipe Haynes croons, "he touched
me on the arm I met him up in
the Hollywood hills among the
movie and TV stars Sophia
Copolla looked at me I didn't
HOW
$1.50 Sangrias
$2.25 Bloody Marys
12 Price Draft, Ole
.950 Mugs
$2.50 Lime Margaritas
WEDNESDAY $1.50 Mexican Imports
THIRSTDAY $2.25 Tequila Sunrise
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Downtown Greenville (Across from U-B.E. 757-1666
know what the hell to do Michael
Stipe and I cried tonight In an im-
age I'll never forget, our hero bids
a speechless farewell to the savior
as Stipe drives away in River
Phoenix's car.
Though the guitar work on this
sne's kind of simple, Haynes trans-
forms his usually gravelly vocals
into a lovely, soft patter. Again, I
didn't think he was capable of such
a stretch, but Haynes proved me
wrong.
One stretch I kind of wish
Haynes hadn't made is on P's cover
of Abba's "Dancing Queen They
chose to play this one straight, and
the vocal is completely outside of
Gibby's range. It was funny to hear
him warbling so earnestly through
this trash at first, but after five or
six listens the joke wears thin.
A note to every band on Earth:
yes. Abba (and most other cheesy
disco era pop) is funny, often hys-
A couple of verses of "Dancing
Queen" is a good laugh. A four-
minute cover is torture.
Musical departures uch as
these are carfully placed through-
out the album. Between them, P
swings into what I think of as their
refrain, a series of songs in the
swirling, blues-from-the-eighth-di-
mension style of the Butthole Surf-
ers. Tunes like "Zing Splash
"Oklahoma "Mr. Officer" and
"White Man Sings the Blues" could
have come right off Independent
Worm Saloon or even Locust Abor-
tion Technician.
That's not to say that these
songs are bad. Quite the contrary,
these tunes give ' a snap it would
lack without them. "Mr. Officer for
example, is a vicious bluegrass at-
tack on close-minded right wing
culture about a redneck sherriff with
a gay son. It's music with sharp
teeth that's not afraid to sink those
Another stand-out track is "Jon
Glenn (Mega Mix) a nine-minute ex-
travaganza of swirly space music
that sounds like the soundtrack to
some demented astronaut movie.
Along the same lines is "Scrapings
from Ring a quiet soundtracky
thing that runs nearly eight minutes.
I also really like "Die Anne a
'50s-style slow-dance number about
a girl who wants to commit suicide.
"Be true to yourself the gravel-
voiced Haynes croons, "die Anne
It's a cruel pun, but it makes me
laugh.
While it may be obvious that
Depp wrote the softer stuff and
Haynes wrote the weird stuff, that
doesn't take away from P's success.
The two styles mesh surprisingly
well.
The guitar work, half of which
is Depp's, is nice stuff as well. It's
not always something to write home
about, but it often soars. Kind of like
ast Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
ITUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1996-1997 Term
Any full-time student with
a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available
at the Student Union Office -
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline To
Jjpfy
: January 12, 1996.
Tiki Bar
Come visit
$ponPn&
Scott Mueller
live in the
TIKI BAR
No waiting in lines
We open 4 doors
D a n c e � B i M i a r d s � R o c k - n - R o I. I
Santa Claus
For
Photos
and
Giveaways Come in for a chance to
win a
Mountain Bike
Courtesy of
V7
Cycle Center!
Free aclmission before 9prn
.�





�n
iiiiiiiifiifiiirrrr" - �
.
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
THIS WOK'S TOWC
TV CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
1. As we discovered after
presstime Tuesday, there were two
storxnotkm animation specials with
religious stories: "The Little Drum-
mer Boy" and "Nestor the Long-
Eared Christmas Donkey All the
rest had secular or even pagan back-
grounds.
2. Kris Kringle's adoptive
mother in "Santa Claus is Coming
to Town" is known as Tanta Kringle,
the leader of a group of toy-making
dwarves
3. Heat Miser and Cold Miser
appear in "The Year Without a Santa
Claus
4. As everybody knows, "No child
wants to play with a Charlie in the
box Actually, I always kind of wanted
one of those, but I was a weird kid
5. Herbie the elf fixes the dolls'
teeth in "Rudolf the Red-Nosed Rein-
deer Get your mind out of the gut-
ter.
6. The Who that finds the Grinch
stealing her Christmas tree is none
other than little Cindy-Lou Who, "who
was no more than two
7. The sequel to "Rudolf the Red-
Nosed Reindeer" isn't a Christmas
special at all, but a New Year's spe-
cial. It's called "Rudolf's Shiny New
Year
8. The real villain of "Santa
Claus is Coming to Town" is the
grumpy Burgomeister
Meisterburger, who never had toys
when he was a child and therefore
hated them as an adult
9. The Grinch's dog is named
Max.
� 10. Mice, a pissed-off Santa and
a broken clock are the central plot
elements of "Twas the Night Before
Christmas
GIFT
from page 8
mug, all arranged in an attractive gift
bag. This one comes in handy when
they're cramming for exams next se-
mester. Or a gourmet cookbook and a
set of measuring cups (this one might
get you an invitation to dinner - a
bonus!)
Gifts for family members are
slightly easier. Parents have to love you
matter what so wrap up the En-
paper you got an A on. They'll be
to know their tuition money is
�ing put to good use. Or give them
idmade gift certificates for house-
chores or visits if you make them
cute enough, they'll never turn them
in).
This is an idea that costs more
than $20, but can get all of your Christ-
mas shopping done in one fell swoop.
Portraits. That's right portraits. Go
down to your local Wal-Mart or Sears
portrait studio and have a portrait
taken. Then give copies to every rela-
tive and friend on your list Want to
split the cost? Get your siblings to-
gether and take a family shot This is a
guaranteed favorite on any parent's or
grandparent's wish list and you can
keep a few copies too.
No matter which gifts you decide
on, the important thing is not how
much money you spend, but how much
thought you put into it Remember,
presentation is a big part of any gift
so wrap whatever your gift is in a nice
i
box, with lots of ribbons and bows.
With a little effort you can take the
chore out of gift-giving and even have
fun! And you might even have enough
money left over to buy a little some-
thing for yourself.
We re Decked for the Holidays
Come in and
enjoy our
O, thoughtfully
ft prepared menu
as well as
great beer and
drink specials!
Including 95� DRAFT EVERYDAY
703 Greenville Blvd.
Across from the Plaza Mall
in the K-Mart Shopping Center
321-0202
Ufc�CTM fcOwl TW
For Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni
TRIP INCLUDES:
$r
Coupon
Buy one
Get one FREE.
Expire 113095
The Plaza, Greenville NC ONLY
Round-Trip Bus Transportation
� Liberty Bowl Game Ticket
� ECU Pre-tailgate Breakfast
� Hotel Accommodations for Two Nights at Ramada Inn
SCHEDULE:
Thursday, December 28
� Departure at 6.00 PM from Mendenhall Student Center
� Meals and rest stops on the way
Friday, December 29
� Arrival at Ramada Inn in Memphis at 2:00 PM
� Transportation to downtown Memphis for Liberty Bowl Parade
� Overnight stay at Ramada Inn
Saturday, December 30
� 11:00 AM-Liberty Sowl Game
�Depart for return trip after game
�Overnight stay at Ramada Inn in Nashville, TN
Sunday, December 31
�Trip Home - Arrival in evening at Mendenhall Student Center
COST PER PERSON:
$175 - Quad Occupancy Room
$180 -Triple Occupancy Room
$190 - Double Occupancy Room
$250 - Single Occupancy Room
Contact Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
328-4788 or 1-800 ECU ARTS
Student Union Hotline - 328-6004
mm RAM50QMB bard drwe,CD-ROM drive,
IS"color momtnr 14.4 modem, keyboard, mouse
and all the soflwareyouYe likely to need
NnvS2
lmforagtdealonacorandapnn.ercanbeawholeloteasier cangMworkdonefasa.JwilllookgKatandcananemflSO
tafMngaroorm.BecarlwtoupurchaseaMacinrfMorm- sa.mtm.e.Sotieamenltolookinlolhcpo.erthalcanlp i1 �B
Student Stores
Wright Building � 328-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
800 6007808orTTY800-7550601. ���
StytotMrltM'1200
mk cartridge and cable included
�W"W(i





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SOLUTION�ACROSS
1. Deserve 5. Cupid 7. Blemish 8. Rival 10. Evil 11. Resisted 13. Killed
14. Tactic 17. Accurate 19. Trio 21. Trend 22. Amorous 23. Asked
24. Stealth
SOLUTION�DOWN
2. Special 3. Ruin 4. Echoed 5. Cardigan 6. Pivot 7. Breakfast
9. Ludicrous 12. Degraded 15. Turmoil 16. Strays 18. Clerk
20. More
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81





14
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT WOULD LIKE TO
INTRODUCE YOU TO THE TUITION PAYMENT PLAN!
The Student
Government Association
listened to your request
and needs and we have
responded by introducing
the TUITION PAYMENT PLAN
starting Spring 96
The SGA would like to thank the following
people for their help in bringing the
Tuition Payment Plan!
For more information, contact
1-800-63SO120ASSOCIATION
an Eastman (SGA President 94-96)
Mike Carries (SGA Treasurer 94-95).
Sheila Boswefl (SGA Treasurer 94-95)
Keith Dyer (SGA President 93-94)
Dale Emery (SGA Vice President 95-96)
Angle.Nix (SGA Treasurer 95-96)
Caren VonHoene (SGA Secretary 95-96)
Chris Artine (Executive Assistant to the
President 95-96)
Chris Artine
Call The Education
Payment Experts
Today For:
?v Expert advice on paying
for education
4 Answers to all your
questions about paying
monthly
4 Help in filling out the
Monthly Payment Plan
Enrollment Form
Help in applying for the
Academic Credit Line
and AMS EXTRA
We're Ready to
Assist You
1-800-635-0120
Weekdays 8 un. - 10 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. - 3 p.m
Eastern Time
nwwfnnii
Pay Tuition
Monthly
Interest-Free
Getting Your Plan Started
t799
It's Easy To Enroll
Begin by filling in the top two sections of
the Enrollment Form to the right. Please ott
that the student's social security number will
serve as the AMS account number.
Worksheet
Use the Worksheet at the bottom of the"
Enrollment Form to help you determine the
total amount of your AMS Plan.
If you are not certain of your exact expenses
or deductions, please est:mate an amount.
The ToUl Amount or AMS Plan (Box C"
on the Worksheet) must be completed in
order for AMS to establish your account.
Please do not include books, personal
expenses or workstudy in your calculations
on the Worksheet.
What Tc Send AMS
The cost to enroll ,is $30 which includes
Tuition Payment Insurance. The Enrollment
Schedule below will tell you when the AMS
Plan begins and if you will need to "catch-up"
on monthly payments that have passed.
Calculate one monthly payment by using
this formula:
Total Amount j. One Monthly
of AMS Plan Payment
(Bo� -C- oa Worksheet)
Your account can be established only when
the Enrollment Form is:
� fully completed
accompanied by the enrollment fee
and any monthly payments) due
? received before the Plan's deadline
The AMS Monthly
Payment.Plan
Once You've Enrolled
at
East Carolina University
?v No Interest Charges
?� No Borrowing
?� Tuition Payment
Insurance At No
Additional Cost
administered by
Academic Management Services
1-800-635-6120
� Academic Management Services will
notify your school of your enrollment in
the Plan once your account is established.
A confirmation of enrollment, your
certificate of insurance and additional
information will be sent to you at that
time.
? Refunds of monies paid ;o AMS. except for
the non-refundable enrollment fee. will be
handled by the school according to its policy.
� There are no interest charges or late fees with
the AMS Plan. However, there is a charge
for checks returned for insufficient funds.
Questions? Call AMS toll-free at 1-800-635-0120.
j � .in .ii,� '�� 3BSEES5 � jy-im " 3ES � '�'��
Academic Management Services
50 Vision Boulevard. P.O. Box 14608
East Providence. RI 02914-0608
The Advantages of Pa. Monthly with AMS
The AMS Monthly Payment Plan lets you pay education expenses te,e�eJ
period of months. With monthly payments, you avoid the difficulty of pay.ng large sums all
at once. ,
Pavinz monthly allows you to pay as you earn - one month at a lime. Your savings will last
Ker! and y Jwill need to borrow less (or not��all). Since the Plan is not a loan program,
there is no credit check and there are no interest or finance charges. You pay only one low
enrollment fee.
Since 1972. more Shan 3 million families have used the AMS Monthly Payment Plan. AMS
admbt stcrs plans at over 1500 colleges, universities and independent schools nat.onw.de.
Enrollment Schedule for S Payment Plan Beginning November I
If EaroUmeM Farm It
Received At AMS-
Payment
Needed TaE�ra
Remaining
Payments
Next
Payment Due
Before October 25 Fee only
October 26 - November 25 Fee & 1 monthly payment
November 26 - December 22 Fee ft 2 monthly payments
November I
December I
January I
f After December 22, call AMS for payment options. Please allow S dayi for mailing.
Additional Benefits
�.��.r.
East Carolina University
Monthly Payment Plan Enrollment Form
Student Information (ftwePwrt
�-tj -��?. ����-J?r
Name MrAtsJMn.
Social Security f
Anticipated year
of graduation
BouNC; JjcrotAutioNTurnoN Payment Insurance isiarr)
No Interest Charges
? No hidden costs
? Much less expensive than loans
? AMS works with your school to keep
the cost of your Plan low
Monthly Statements
? Serve as a convenient reminder
? Show payments and changes each month
? Superior to coupon books
TumoN Payment Insurance
? Included at no additional cost
? Should the person responsible for paying
the AMS bill die. your remaining AMS
payments will be paid to the school
Flexibility
? Use the Plan to pay all or part of your
education expenses
Security of Funds
? Payments are deposited in a Trust
Account at Fleet National Bank for
disbursement to your school
AMS EXTRA
? You may also apply for the Academic
Credit Line to use when cash is tight
? AMS EXTRA links your Payment Plan
to a back-up source of funds
? Check the box at the bottom of your
Enrollment Form, or call AMS for more
information
Tuiaca haama femrac (TK) Baal e eaaaa1 kaama of la nui mm of if AMS Planiht�a�pmMKac���ilk�xmriiieJSe&ll
tic TH ia prankal under a (coup piaa ouMnwt wm Wimii MuaiaL Comtc aura a fire payment due daat noul on tte
ana nji c ��my � �"m��- An kanaaaa aawaoae aaaaaanj oraje w� be sr .a ����� ard �iwiu upon
Bcrsoti responsible
for paying AMS bill Mr.Mi.MrsyDr.
Birthdale.
Street .
Ape I
City.
Suit.
Zip Code.
By signing below I am indicating my agreement to use the AMS Monthly Payment Plan for this Semester.
Signature Tel )
!yS-vyT' Worksheet A:r4tf What To Send AMS �-��-
Superior Customer Service
? Ready when you need us: Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.(Eastem T.me)
Sat 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Eastern Time)
? Toll-free automated information anytime you need it
Expenses
Tuition
Room A Board
(if applicable)
Other
Total Expenses
Deductions
ScholarshipsGrants
Loans
School DepositOther
Total Deductions
ToUl Amount of
AMS Plan (a-B-C) C
�d
Payment Needed To Enroll
Monthly Payment) if required f
(� EmunmcM Schedule)
Enrollment Fee
30.00
Total of check enclosed �
Make check payable to:
FLEET NATIONAL BANK
(All pamcats an to be made ia U.S. dollars.)
Mail your check and this form to:
Academic Management Services
30 Vision Boulevard
P.O. Box 14601
East Providence. RI 029I4-060J
?
Yes. Pteasc send me AMS EXTRAAcademic
Credit Line information and aa application.
(L
34S7I0-0
11151222 ECU





15
Thursday, December 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
�Www
Sweet
Pirate
tunes
Members of the
Marching Pirates
practice before they
head to Memphis to
play for fans at the
Liberty Bowl.
Photo by KEN CLARK
"Butterfingers" capture
flag football tournament
David Gaskins
Rec. Services
A number of intramural sports
activities reached closure this week
as participants engage in the final
action of the semester before prepar-
ing for exams.
In perhaps one of the most ea-
gerly anticipated match-ups in several
years "Butterfingers" defeated the
defending champion "Showtime" in
the Co-Rec Flag Football Gold Divi-
sion finals Monday night
This contest between the only
two undefeated teams in the league
contained numerous individual match-
ups including boyfriend against girl-
friend, two sets of roommates against
each other, relative against relative
and co-worker vs. co-worker. However,
when all the talk was over and the
game began, it was the challengers
who came to play.
Jeff Schutte of "Butterfingers
took the opening kickoff back for a
touchdown and then Steve Roberson
intercepted a pass on "Showtime's"
first possession to set the tone for the
c itest.
Later in the first half, Schutte
struck again when he took a short
pass from Roberson and turned it into
a 65-yard touchdown play. In the sec-
ond haif, "Showtime" held on defense
and capitalized on a short touchdown
pass from Anderson to Steve Flippin
and followed that with a conversion
pass to Heather Dawson to pull within
12-7.
However, on the ensuing drive,
"Butterfingers" got a big play as Chris
Nunn got behind the defense and
caught a Roberson bomb to set up
the first and goal from the 5-yard line.
After holding for the first three plays,
"Showtime's" defense took a cruel
bounce on the fourth down play.
Roberson's pass into the end zone
ricocheted off the face of the defender
and took a fortuitous bounce into the
hands of Jennifer Collins for the game
clinching touchdown.
Lynda' McCormick caught the
extra point pass also off a tipped ball
in the end zone to account for the
final margin.
Members of the champion "But-
terfingers" team include those men-
tioned above as well as Colin
Mohlmann, Lisa McCarthy, Chip
Flynn, Amanda Ross, Zina Briley and
Melissa Dawson.
"Showtime" was anchored by the
pass-catching and defensive efforts of
Russell Duvall and Allison Kemp.
Other members of "Showtime" in-
cluded Matt Snyder, Ronell Jessup,
Stephen Smith, Debra Riffle and
Rahha Gil.
In the Purple division, results of
the final were not available at press
time for the match-up of "Phi Sigma
Pi" and "Silent Attack In the semi-
finals, "Silent Attack" rode scores from
Peter Crume and-Misty Triplett to a
12-6 win over "Fleming Hall The "Si-
lent Attack" unit featured outstanding
efforts from several longtime IM vet-
erans such as Scott Smith, Fred Royer,
Kelie Valdez, Mo Beetham and Josh
Lothridge. Aaron Jacobs tallied the
lone touchdown for "Fleming Hall
In the other semi-final, Vu Donie's
fall domination of Co-Rec sports was
ended as "Club 106" fell 27-6 to "Phi
Sigma Phi" behind three touchdowns
by Romel Roucasas. David Emmons,
Jason Pointer and Denny O'Brien also
scored for the winners while Nick
Phillips scored the only touchdown for
"Club 106
Doak Walker Award 0
Ohio State's Eddie George
(AP) - Like an excited child anx
ious to shake hands with a star ath-
lete he's only seen from afar, Doak
Walker looked forward to meeting
Ohio State's Eddie George.
"I saw most of his games on tele-
vision and I'm excited to finally meet
him Walker said Monday after it was
announced that George won the top
college running back award named for
the former SMU great
"His statistics and the love his
teammates had for him was very im-
pressive. I wish I was that young again.
He'd be my idol
The pair met at an awards ban-
quet in Dallas. Walker, who attended
Monday's news conference at the
headquarters of award sponsor GTE,
presented George with the trophy.
George, speaking via satellite
from the Ohio State campus, said he
was eager to meet Walker. "It was
quite an experience for me he said.
George, a senior, also was a final-
ist for the award last year.
But a year ago, he ran more like
a bulky fullback than a swift tailback.
So he dedicated himself to a grueling
offseason workout geared to improve
his speed, quickness and outside
moves.
The results were phenomenal,
both for George and the Buckeyes.
George became a Heisman Tro-
phy finalist by leading Ohio State to
an 11-1 record and a No. 4 ranking
with 1,826 yards and 24 touchdowns,
all but one rushing. He led the na-
tion in scoring, was fourth with 2,225
all-purpose yards and fifth in rushing.
He also was consistent, with 100
yards in every game and more than
200 yards three times, including a
school-record 314 yards against Illi-
nois.
Buckeyes coach John Cooper
admitted he wasn't bashful about let-
ting George carry the offensive load.
"The ball's not very heavy. He can
carry that thing as many times as we
let him have it Cooper said. "The
amazing thing about it is, after play-
ing a tough game Saturday, he'd be
out there leading our team when we
ran wind sprints the following week
Just as amazing is George also
has found time to remain on sched-
Scheduling woes
First four home
gomes played
over break
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Wondering why you haven't seen
the ECU men's basketball teams play
lately? You're not the only one.
When this year's schedule came
out, many people asked why weren't
there more basketball games sched-
uled at home. True, there are four
regular season games this semester
for the men, but they have all been
scheduled over holiday breaks.
ECU's first home opener game
against Elon was Nov. 25. during
Thanksgiving break. Attendance was
low for the first game, when there
should be a lot of fan support for the
home opener, especially since this is
Joe Dooley's first year, as head coach.
The same can be said for the
Four of ECU's top 20 crowds at Minges
Coliseum came during the '9495
season.
1. 7,670 vs. UNC-W (Feb. 25, 1995)
2. 7,611 vs. James Madison (Jan. 14, 1995)
3. 7,500 vs. EastTenn. State (Jan. 6, 1995)
5. 6,865 vs. Old Dominion (Feb. 20, 1995)
women s
team. Anne
Donovan
and her play-
ers have
played one
home game,
but that
game wasn't
over break.
However,
they too have two games over Christ-
mas break.
The next game in Miriges before
everyone goes home for Christmas
break is actually during the break.
These are not the best times to hold
basketball games, since most of the
students are gone for the holidays.
However, this scheduling is not done
on purpose. In fact, a lot of the games
on the schedule are determined years
in advance.
Conference games are mandated
for each year, and the schedules are
put out in advance. For example, the
conference schedule for next season
has already been set
Several factors determine when
non-conference games are to be
played. Games must be scheduled
around exam schedules since aca-
demic studies are very important for
athletes.
According to assistant coach
Martin McGillan, every team tries to
get the best home schedule they can
because most of the fan support
comes from students and they are the
backbone to the crowds. In fact, ECU
has 14 homes games this season
which is the most since 1935, but the
games this semester are played when
See SCHEDULING page 17
ule to graduate this spring while also
volunteering at a cancer hospital and
spending time talking with children.
Those factors also contributed to
him winning the Walker award. As a
bonus, Ohio State receives $10,000
for George's honor.
George beat out Karim Abdul-
Jabbar of UCLA, Tiki Barber of Vir-
ginia, Tim Biakabatuka of Michigan,
Warrick Dunn of Florida State,
George Jones of San Diego State,
Wasean Tait of Toledo and Moe Will-
iams of Kentucky.
Although Troy Davis of Iowa
State and Darnell Autry of Northwest-
ern also are running backs and
Heisman finalists, they weren't up for
the Walker award because it goes to
players within a year of graduating,
and both are sophomores.
After accepting the Walker,
George will be honored for it again
tonight in Orlando, Fla in a nation-
ally televised ceremony for all colle-
giate award winners.
And then he's off to New York
See EDDIE page 17
Sto4ltte&
ECU's men's basketball team
traveled to Spartanburg, S.C. to
take Wofford College, in what was
thought to be an easy victory.
The Monday night game pit-
ted the Pirates against the Terri-
ers, who are making their debut
in the Division I level of play in
collegiate basketball this season.
The Pirates did come away with a
victory, but only by a 10 point mar-
gin, 68-58.
"This is a tough place to play
said ECU Head Coach Joe Dooley.
Indeed it was tough for the
Pirates. Wofford was down by nine
points at one time and cut the lead
to 57-52 with 4:12 remaining in
the game. The Pirates pulled ahead
by four when Tony Parharn hit one
of two free throws, but after a
Terrence Giiyard bucket for Wofford
ECU's lead was held to two points,
5856. '
Morris Grooms and Tim Basham
stepped up big in the final moments
of play after an eight-foot jumper by
Grooms and a three point basket
from Basham.
The Pirates shot poorly from the
free throw line hitting just 16 of 31
shots. However, when the shots were
needed the Pirates pulled through
and hit 5 of 6 free throws in the fi-
nal 49 seconds.
Dooley realized the importance
of hitting free throw shots and
thought his team could have done
a better job.
"We could have put the game
away earlier if we made our free
throws said Dooley. "It seemed if
we had done it earlier we wouldn't
have had to make a lot of pressure
free throws as we did later
Leading the way for Pirate
scorers were Jonathan Kerner with
19 points. Grooms with 11 points,
Basham with 10 points and Parham
with nine points.
The Pirates will travel to
Conway, S.C. to take on the Coastal
Carolina Chanticleers. Tip off is
slated for 3 p.m.
ECU PLAYERS FG FT R F A Pt
MEADOWS 1-6 2-3 4 1 1 4
RIPPEY 0-1 2-42242
PARHAM 1-5 7-10 6 1 4 9
GROOMS 5-7 1-4 6 3 0 11
HAMILTON 3-4 O-l 14 0 6
BASHAM 4-8 0-0 8 4 0 10
KERNER 8-14 3-5 11 2 2 19
BRYANT 3-3 1-4 4 3 1 7
TEAM 1
TOTALS 25-49 1631 43 20 12 68
Martial arts kick into action
David Garner
Rec. Services
This past weekend the Goju-Shorin Karate Club
and the Isshinryu Karate Club joined together to rep-
resent ECU at the Carolina Karate Classic held in Co-
lumbia, S.C.
ECU's competition included: Duke, Wake Forest,
USC, Georgia Southern, Clemson, FSU and UNC-G.
ECU had 12 competitors in events such as kata
and sparring. Nine ECU individuals placed fourth or
higher on their respected division.
The names and places of these competitors are
as follows in descending order from black to white
belts: T.D. Gribble kata second place, Michelle Tran:
kata fourth place and sparring first place, Chris Ne- ��
ton kata fourth place and sparring first, Erin Hainan
sparring second place, David Garner sparring second
place, Derek Fuller sparring third place, Brad Stokes
kata second place, Ernest Solar sparring fourth place
and Ben Baughunan kata fourth place and sparring
third place.
The clubs will have demonstrations at the begin-
ning of the Spring semester. Individuals interested are
invited to participate in the ECU Martial Arts Clubs
sponsored by recreational services. For more informa-
tion contact rec services at 328-6387. �
NBA referees reach agreement
(AP) - NBA officials, missing
games and missing paychecks be-
cause of a two-month-long lockout,
have ratified a new contract and are
ready to return to work.
Many are not happy with the
final offer from the league, as shown
by the narrow 27-26 vote in favor
Monday night. But it means they
could be back on the courts blow-
ing their whistles within a week.
And many NBA players, tired
of replacement refs, are glad they're
coming back.
"I can't wait to see the old refs
back. It's going to be incredible. It's
time to get this B.S. out of the way.
When you have inexperienced refs,
they try hard, but they make
crummy calls Miami Heat forward
Kevin Willis said.
Replacement officials, mostly
from the CBA, have been handling
NBA games since the lockout be-
gan Oct. 1, amid complaints from
players that they sometimes didn't
have games under control and
didn't know the NBA game.
In a game Monday betwee Mi-
ami and Boston, there was a fight
between the Celtics' Pervis Ellis and
the Heat's Kurt Thomas that
prompted police and security
personel to separate players and keep
fans off the court Boston won the
game in double overtime.
"Even though we beat ourselves,
the refereeing was horrendous. They
shouldn't be able to call a high school
game. It's sickening what they do.
They blew the whistle too much, I
thought there was an echo in the
building. At one point I was scared
to touch anyone said Heat center
Alonzo Mourning, who complained
last season about the regular refer-
ees and their calls in the playoffs.
When the regular refs will return
is not certain. They voted Monday on
the day that replacement crews were
to expand from two to three. And the
vote reflected the dissatisfaction of
some.
"Not everybody was totally
pleased with the deal, b?jt the rank
and file spoke said Fred Slaughter,
the attorney representing the offi-
cials. "It was a majority
Slaughter couldn't guess when
the referees will be back on court.
"I hope soon he said. "I can't
get you a date
Jeffrey Mishkin, the NBA's chief
legal officer, said he planned to meet
today with Slaughter to work out
details.
"If we can reach a signed agree-
ment in the next few days, then the
referees should be back on the court
within a week he said.
Veteran official Mike Mathis,
who was on the committee negoti-
ating with the owners, said his
group was split.
"You could say it was a good-
news, bad-news situation if you want
to Mathis said after Monday's 4
14-hour meeting at a hotel near
O'Hare International Airport.
"We're all happy to be going
to back to work, but there are some
veteran officials who feel this deal
wasn't good for them. Obviously
there are some questions about pen-
sion and severance money we have
to discuss
Fifty-three of the 55 referees
voted, with Jake O'Donnell and Jack
Madden the absentees because of
health reasons.
Paul Mihalak, a 26-year veteran
official, said the absences of those
two could have swung the outcome.
"This could have gone the
See NBA page 16
PUMthL �pi�il�.





���.� . ��

r"i

16
Thursday, December 7,1995
The East Carolinian
'NBA from page 15
y other way he said. "But we'll live
with it"
" Slaughter said there were sev-
eral issues debated Monday, includ-
� ing a pension plan. Under the new
deal, pensions would go from $2,700
for every year worked to $3,330 in
�' the final year of the contract
Under the five-year agreement,
first-year referees would make
$75,000 this year and $99,000 in the
final year of the deal. Veteran offi-
cials would be paid $211,000 this
year and $278,000 in the final year.
The league has claimed the
raises would make NBA officials the
TEC WISHES
THE PLAYERS
AND COACHES
GOOD LUCK IN
MEMPHIS
highest paid in sports, but the refer-
ees said they would not
"With our new deal, we feel we'll
be close to baseball, but still well be-
low where hockey officials are at"
Mihalak said. "We'll never catch
hockey officials
The NBA said the referees will
not get retroactive play for the games
missed since the lockout began.
"There is nothing to indicate we
will receive play for the time we
missed. Nobody walking out of this
room feels that we will Mathis said.
And Mihalak stressed that the
pension plan is a concern, especially
for the older refs.
"I'm one of those officials"where
the pension situation in this deal is
not a great one he said. "What it is
going to do is force me to work longer
than I planned on doing he said.
Now it's time to get back to do-
ing what they know.
"All our guys need to take physi-
cals in New Jersey. After they pass
the stress test and physicals and a
short briefing on the rules, they
should be ready to go Mathis said.
ZVlTZLX
if
b
��LQn2,
3
At the Plaza M
Victoria'
all in Front of
s Secret
Newman Catholic
Student Center
. 4
F3EAST OFTHEIMMAttLATE
4 CONCEPTION
Friday, December S
Mass Schedule:
VIGIL MASS (Ttie Dee.7 5:30pta
FEAST 0AY CFrL �ec &�� Noon, S:3ftpm
When All The
Comforts Of Home
(953E.10TB STREET - 2 HOUSES
FROM TBE FLETCHER MUSIC BDG.)
Don't Fit
Having trouble getting your stuff
back to college? From computers
and stereos orbooks and furniture,
Mail Boxes Etc can pack and ship
just about anything.
pa3 MAIL BOXES ETC"
Ix's Not What We Do.
It's How We Do It
5 Copies for ECU Students
740 Greenville Blvd.
Suite 400
Greenville, NC
TEL 919 321-6021
The Area 's
Best Selection of
Sterling Silver
and Gold
Paul, Open Your Mind
irgssCouUfl
BY: PAUL HAGWOOD
votT
No Fraternity member at ECU has been convicted of sexual assult
since before 1990. This is due to extensive Date Rape education
throughout the Greek system. The Interfraternity Council does not
think date rape is a joke, so why do you! ?!
-�-






-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, December 7,1995
17
SCHEDULING from page 15
CjteenoiLUs only
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam
CASH PRIZE -M
�Contestants need to call &. register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
ECU
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
I
se
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Ave.
HMtDiiMir
; (Behind John's Conveniem Mart)
Jy.N.C UX.Re�ia��S4-zrzL
CONV.
MART
I
I
I
I
I
-I
For a Gift
r0A RAfmNJsSI iimis
Orientation & The Eirst-Fear Experience- � 203 Trwin � 328-4173
NOW HIRING
ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS FOR SUMMER 1996
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in Room 14 at the Mendenhall Student Center:
December 5 (Tuesday) 4 p.m.
January 8 (Monday) 4 p.m.
Applications are now available in Room 203 Erwin
Deadline for completed applications is January 12, 1996 at 5 p.m.
students most likely will not be there
to cheer on the Pirates.
When scheduling the games, a lot
of the decision making comes down
to where ECU has played before, and
if those teams are willing to make a
commitment to come back and play
in Greenville. A good example of this
is Colorado St when four years ago
ECU traveled to Fort Collins, Colo, to
take on the Rams, in agreement they
would come to ECU and play the Pi-
rates. The Rams will now come to
Greenville this Dec. 20 for a match-
up with the Pirates.
"It's a big peg board said
McGillan. "Everybody is trying to play
everybody else
The schedules try to accommo-
date all the teams involved. Some-
times it is not that easy. When confer-
ence play starts most teams don't want
to venture too far away from home to
play non-conference contests. Confer-
ence season is more important there-
fore, players and coaches must con-
centrate more on those games than
non-conference games.
Attendance is also a must for the
conference games, as squads vie for
conference championships and a spot
in the NCAA tournament Needless to
talog !
onnection
25 i
Any One Regular
Priced Item
Expires December 1"
I Discount Catalog CTothinj
For Men And Women
iui 5ih sjicci A division of.l.B.F.
say, cheering is vital during these
games.
"If you had your druthers you
would want students at conference
games than non-conference games
McGillan said.
ECU has never finished worse
than third in attendance in the CAA,
and they hope to keep it that way.
When the Pirates play in January, the
coaches and players hope to see the
stands crowded with cheering students.
Christmas break will be over so most
students should be back to watch the
Pirates.
Over Christmas break if you are
in Greenville or nearby, go to one of
the three games over the break. The
men will play Dec. 18 vs. Campbell;
Dec. 20 vs. Colorado St; and Dec. 23
vs. SW Missouri St The women will
play Furman Dec. 19 and Appalachian
St Dec. 28. All games start at 7 p.m
except the SW Missouri St. game,
which will begin at 3 p.m.
EDDIE from page 15
for Saturday's Heisman Trophy an-
nouncement, where George hopes to
follow Colorado's Rashaan Salaam as
the second straight Walker winner to
bag that award, too.
Other previous Walker honorees
are Byron Morris of Texas Tech in
1993, Garrison Hearst of Georgia in
1992, Trevor Cobb of Rice in 1991 and
Greg Lewis of Washington in 1990.
CREST COMICS!
's,s SM0.
P.
�TMOC Comics C1M4
Nostalgia Newsstand
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, N.C.
758 � 6909
-�fiSlSSisr-
�ssss
- .���o2i
�&&��&
Sill
Currency
Bring us your used books
anil we'll exchange them for cash.
Buvhack hours in the Wright Building:
Fit, December 8: 8 am -5 pm
Sat December 9: 9 am - 3 pm
Mon December 11 - Thurs December 14:8 am -1 pm
Fri December 15:8 am - 5 pm
it Remote locations:
Monday through Friday,
December 6,11-15: 9 am - 5 pm
C- On the Hill m Mendenhall Bus Stop
m On the Mall Q Speight Bus Stop
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Mere than just books � your dollars support student scholars!
Centrally located on campus, in the
Wright Bulletins, just off Wright Circle
(919) 328-6731





-�'
h
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
SPEAKS OUT!
TO THE STUDENTS, ADMINISTRATORS, BOARD OF TRUSTEES,
ADVERTISERS, AND THE ECU AND GREENVILLE COMMUNITY.
Did you know that the EAST CAROLINIAN thinks that "DATE
RAPE" is FUNNY and SHOULD BE JOKED ABOUT!
( Yeah, we -didn't either until this article below came out.)
On Thursday, November 16, 1995, THE EAST CAROLINIAN printed
a comic entitled: " If Pigs Could Fly" The East Carolinian, in this
comic makes "HUMOROUS" and "COMICAL" innuendoes at "DATE
RAPE
if�s Could rf
BY: PAUL HAGWOOD
We at the STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION are appalled
and embarrassed at the ETHICAL and MORAL BEHAVIOR of the
EDITOR, NEWS EDITOR, and the WRITER of the COMIC
We all know the 1st Amendment guarantees the "Freedom of Speech"
but for everyone that your Newspaper affects we think MAKING
HUMOROUS and JOKING COMICS about "DATE RAPE" should even
question your MORALS just a bit?
We believe that the Easi Carolinian
revised If this is what our EDITOR of the paper finds HUMOR0
reviseu. crimFNTS should demand 'hat this
Co� "s no, UM as a "BATE RAPE SOOETY
,�.t think of the image our paper has portrayed �� C-� after
publishing 12,000 copies. Great image for our Future Students,
Athletic Recruits, Med. and Grad School Applicants.)
The Student Government Association as well as the Students
Administrators, Board of Trustees, Advertisers, mgm BO! and
Greenville community members strive to make EC� and
Ration increasingly better and we apologia for the views ha.
our Editors and the East Caroliman have Expressed! ��" f
serious of an issue this is and that its not a JOKING MATTER. We
bTve the East Carolinian and its Editing Staff shou.d receive some
education on "DATE RAPE" and understand how serious this sublet
really is. Furthermore if we can educate people on DATE RAPE
maybe we can help people understand this problem.
To the EDITOR and the East Carolinian Staff we will gladly
provide you with information in regards to this issue. You can also
call The Real Criser Center at 758-4357.
P.S. We think an apology is in order to the whole community.
The Student Government Association would also ���;
anyone else who has any questions about "DATE RAPE PLEASE CALL
758-4357.
IF YOU DISAGREE WITH THE
VIEW THE EAST CAROLINIAN
HAS PORTRAYED OF ECU THEN
CALL:
Stephanie Lassiter (Editor-in-Chief)
Tambra Zion (News Editor)
Paul Hagwood (Comic Writer)
Paul Wright (Advisor)
328-6366
328-6366
328-6366
328-6009
EXPRESS YOUR OPINION!
GIVE THEM A CALL!
Respectfully Submitted,
IAN EASTMAN
SGA PRESIDENT
DALE EMERY
SGA VICE-PRESIDENT
CAREN VONHOENE
SGA SECRETARY
ANGIE NIX
SGA TREASURER
HARRY BRAY
SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE





v
19
Thursday, December 7,1995 The East Carolinian
For Sale
CONDOMS! Wide selection! Shop from the
privacy of your own home. No mailing lists.
Discreet packaging. Help stop the spread of
AIDS. Send for a free brochure. Francie's, 312
Crosstown Road, PO Box 178. PTC, GA 30269.
t?
Help
Wanted
&
!I il
For Rent
�II-f - -
For Rent
225.
For Rent
2
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENTS
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club, close
to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2 Bedroom.
Townhouses over 1000 sq. ft 1 12 baths, private patios,
dishwashers, all electric, water furnished, swimming pool,
volleyball court, cable TV available and on site laundry. No pets.
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
HOUSES FOR RENT near campus. $450-$550.
Call Cindy. Pro Management of Greenville. 756-
1234.
For Sale
AZAltA GARDrN.S
ALSO UNIVERSITY AfARlMiNT'S
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &.
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
RINGGOLD TOWERS EFFICIENCY Apart-
T ment. Available with two weeks notice. Main
J campus. Bus Stop, and Downtown in walking
- distance $275 monthly, include water and
" sewer. 754-2795.
ROOM FOR RENT: MALEFEMALE non-
- smoker, neat three bdrm duplex ten min. walk
" to campus. $190month13 utilities. Call
I 754-2735. Spacious and very' clean. Call Now.
LOOKING FOR 2 ROOMMATES to share a
big 5 bedroom house. 1 block from campus.
Available Jan. 5th. If interested call 752-0640

- GRADUATINC IN DECEMBER! Need persons
- to take over lease in January on a spacious two
" bedroom apartment next to campus and down-
town. Applicances. washdryer hookups, and
" low utilities.Georgetown Apartments $520.00
: and well worth it Call Mike 830-9030.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 block from campus.
$250 month, clieat air available Dec. 20th. Call
Z 758-5140
- NO DEPOSIT! Take over my 7 month lease at
Wilson Acres and I'll give you the Deposit Call
I 757-2566.
; ROOMMATE NEEDED! Three Bedroom Apt
in Tar River available now. 13 utilities$208
month, and own room! Close to campus. Ask
; for Kerry or Lisa 757-2441.
- ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2BR. 2 full
Z bath Apt at Kingston Place. WasherDryer in-
" eluded. $240 per month plus 12 utilities. Call
; 757-1522
. 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH DUPLEX. Walking
l distance from campus. Lots of amenities! 5275
mo. plus 12 utilities. Non-smoker requested.
- Call 758-2232.
; ROOMMATE NEEDED FEMALE NON-
- SMOKER to share fully furnished two bedroom
- Apt very nice. Call for details 3534765. leave
J message.
SUBLEASE WYNDHAM COURT DUPLEX
Spring semester. 2 bedrooms. 2 full baths, dish-
washer, washer and dryer hookups. Close to
campus. Great condition call Elke at 752-7465.
ROOMMATE NEEDED BY JANUARY 1; $167
12 utilities; own room; call Jody it 551-7624;
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
two bedroom, two bath Apt in Dogwood Hoi-
Ijw. $245.00 per month half utilities. Washer
Dryer, cable and water included. Call Brandee
at 752-4914.
NONSMOKING, RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. Tar River. Own
room. $165.75, 14 utilities and 14 phone.
WasherDryer. Call 757-0406.
ROOMMATE WANTED. NONSMOKER to
share 2 Bdrm Apt 1 mile from campus, on bus
route. Low rent Call Kim 830-9036 after
6:30pm.
STUDENT TO SHARE 3 BDRM APT. 1 12
blocks from campus. 13 rent 13 utilities. No
Pets. Please call 758067.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR APARTMENT
in Downtown Greenville. Quiet and Clean. Key
location. $230 month. Call 758-9962 leave
message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 br 2 bath
apartment in Dogwood Hollow for Spring Se-
mester. Cable, water, washerdryer included.
Call Melanie at 8304926.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male nonsmoker to
share 2 bedroom furnished duplex. Walking
distance to campus and downtown. Sublease
for Spring Semester. Available Dec. 15th.
$190.00 rent 752-6738 Frank
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: to share 2
bedroom apartment across street from cam-
pus $22750 and 12 utilities. Water and cable
included in rent ASAP. Call Amy at 8304149.
2, 3 Bedroom 2 12 Bath, 1500 Square fiet.
Apartments FOR RENT ABOVE BW3s for
$775.00 a month. Please contact Yvonne at 758-
2616 M-F 94.
SEEKING MATURE LAID-BACK PERSON to
share Large House close to campus. Private
Bedroom & Study. Great place to live. Rent
$310. Call Tom at 757-3566.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FEMALE non-smoker
to begin next semester Kingston Place Apts.
$215 per month. Call if interested 8306081.
GRADUATINC IN DECEMBER! Need person
to take over lease at PLAYERS CLUB APT. in
January. Own Room. 2 Full Baths. Washer &
Dryer Lighted Tennis CourtsBasketball &
Volleyball Courts Weight RoomPool. Call
Kyle 3534668.
NcJCASHW
We Buy CDS,
Caswettes, Mid Lp'
WrTl pay up to $5 eaah tor
CD
� �
?.III1
GIFT GIVING: Punted by what to give Mom
or Aunt Suiy for Christmas? Select a beauti-
ful hand-crafted stained glass angel. Select
from many styles and colors. Prices range
from $6.50 � $22.50. Order now for Christ
. Call Janet. 756-8061 for showing.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Lsrpect Llbrmry ot Information in U.S. -
ill nubptcr
Orcfor Cauloa Today with VltaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310H77-8226
FOR SUBLEASE UNTIL MAY! 2 bdrm, 1 bath
apt $405mo. Please call! 5514920
NICE ONE BEDROOM. WasherDryer and
cable hookups. Full Kitchen with dishwasher
and small bar. Central heatair condition. Wa-
! tersewer included. Available December 15th
; 7564984 - corrected phone number.
EXCELLENT CONDO FOR RENT, starting
J mid Dec or Jan. 1st Two bedrooms, two baths.
Deck and laundry room. Cable included, rent
'� $450.00 monthly. Call 758-4986.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED JAN. 1st for
great condo! Two story, two bedrms. two and
1 2 baths, fully furnished! Rent $250. 12 utili-
; ties. Cable included. Please call 7584986.
ROOMMATES NEEDED Two people to share
- rent for three bedroom house. Rent $200mo.
Z Walking distance from campus. Non-smoker
: preferred. Needed ASAP. Contact Jody at 830-
2664 or leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for three bedroom
apartment dt Wilson Acres. To share 13 rent
and utilities. Please call 830-1334.
; FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 4
bedroom apt Private bedroombathroom $250
- per month14 utilties. Includes dishwasher.
- washerdryer, pool, weight room plus more.
: Needed ASAP call Karen at 353-0966.
LOOKING FOR A MELLOW FELLOW to
- share 3bdrm duplex on Willow St. Excellent
neighborhood. No deposit needed. Call Matt at
; 551-3108 for details.
" NON-SMOKING FEMALE NEEDED to share
two bedroom 1 12 bath townhouse at
' Sheraton Village, pets allowed, for more infor-
mation call 756-9064
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
i townhouse. Private bedroom and private bath-
room ("lose to campus Call any time $225
I per month and 13 utilities. 830-1359 leave
message
ROOMMATE NEEDED! Three bedroom house
on Library St. within walking distance of cam-
pus Washerdryer hookups. Prefer another
student. Rent $200 per person. Ask for Todd
or Will. Phone 758-5261.
FOR RENTBRAND NEW 2 Bedroom2 Bath
Duplex, Fireplace. Patio. Fenced-ln Backyard.
$575month, located on Old Stantonsburg
Road, Five (5) minutes from Hospital, Call 747-
3136 (day or night)
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 & 2 Bedroom, Range.
Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer Hookups, Decks
& Patios in most units. Laundry Facility, Sand
Volleyball Court Located 5 blocks from cam-
pus. Free Water & Sewer.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 Bedrooms Stove
Refrigerator Dishwasher Washer & Dryer
Hookups Patios on first floor. Located five
blocks from campus. These and other fine prop-
ei s managed by Pitt Property Management.
Km A Brownlea Drive, 758-1921.
LANCSTON PARK APARTMENTS, 2 BR with
free water, free cable (Beside Tar River Apts.)
$355 month rent. Call 7589977
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW STUDENT REC-
REATION. Rent $225 month at 810 Cotanche
St Call 758-1921.
RESPONSIBLE, NON-SMOKER needed to
share 3 bedrm duplex ASAP until June 30.
1996. $190.00 rent & 13 utilities. Please call
Monique or Danyelle at 7584625
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS 2 bed-
room1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from campus. Wa-
ter & basic cable included. 7524900. Profes-
sionally managed by Pro Management of
Greenville.
TOWNHOUSE 2 bedroom 1 12 bath. 2
blocks from campus. $475 per month. Pro
Management of Greenville. 756-1234
KINGSTON PLACE CONDObedroom 2-
bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per month.
Pro Management of Greenville. 7561234
DALMATION PUPPY SIX MONTHS OLD.
AKC registered, lots of energy, very beautiful
and loving, house broken. $200 call 8304909.
RINGGOLD ONE BEDROOM FURNISHED
with new carpet. Priced below tax value. Great
for student or rental. Rents for $400mo. Call
7574787 or leave message.
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR for sale. Good
condition $50. Contact Annie at 328-7776
CT MOUNTAIN BIKE. Excellent condition
$300. Mint see. 6'4 Island Classic Tri Fin Surf-
board, leash and board cover $50.00. Call Sean
at 752-9991.
MOVING SALES: Beds Dressers. Couches.
Book Shelf. Coffee Table. Night Stands. Please
call 830-1776 or leave a message.
LIKE NEW PHILCO VCR FOR SALE, with
Remote $90 � egotiable call Christina 757-
0914.
ALMOST NEW 1992 2 BEDROOM SET-UP
IN PARK. Only $665 down. $179 30 per month.
For more information Call 32 i-8863 after 5pm.
MUST SELL! Full size sofa in Perfect condi-
tion. $75 please call 5514920
MUST SELL CRUISE FOR 2 to the Baha
mas for four nights, hotel included. Only $275.
Also, a FREE stay in Orlando for three nights
bonus. I can't go. so I need to sell it! Tickets
good until May. Call Peyton 328-7224 Paid
$350. worht $699. selling for S275 negotiable
'95 FLEETWOOD SW 14X76 2BR. 2 bath.
All options. 10 min. from ECU. Take over pmts.
plus cash back from owner. 1-919-5564905.
RETRO YARD SALE. 1970s clothes. Big Pile
2$l. Mod coats. Saturday December 9th All
Day. 100 S. Summit St. Corner of 1st and Sum-
mit
FOR SALE TWIN BED with Head Board 75$.
Dresser 25$. Full size bed. Two dressers. 2 night
stands and mirror 150$. Call 7583320.
ATTN: LADIES CLUB FOR WOMEN Free
membership. Pregnant Will pay 1st month's
fee of $39.00. Includes tanning. Call Tammy.
Day-7561135. Night-946-1438.
'87 DODGE ARIES. 4DR. silver, 70.800MLS.
AC, very good condition. $2499. Call Claudio
ASAP 7569562
84 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE. V6.3.8L, 108U.
MLS, Mint Cond. AC. PS, AT, Safety Insp till
08. $1400, NEC. Call Michael 756-2865.
VERY DEPENDABLE PRINTER! Great for
papers. $150 Panasonic KX 1124 Dot Matrix.
Comes with paper. 24 PIN. Call Tom or Jen
7588815.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTOR: Individual ca-
pable of teaching basic gymnastic skills, floor
exercises, and tumbling to children 3 to 7 years
of age. Mondays thru Thursdays 3:30 to 7:00pm
- Previous work with children necessar6y. Con-
tact: Carol T Power, Greenville Recreation &
Parks Department at 8304542.
STUDENTS NEED A JOB? ROADWAY PACK
ACE SYSTEM is looking for PACKAGE HAN-
DLERS to load Vans and unload Trailers for
the AM and PM Shift's hours 4:00am to 9:00am.
$6.00hour. tutition assistance available after
30 days. Future career opportunities in opera-
tions and management possible. Applications
can be filled out at 104 United Drive Crjenville
7521803.
COMMUNITY BIBLE STUDY, a women's In-
terdenominational Bible study meeting at
Oakmont Baptist Church. Thursday mornings.
9am to 11:30am, needs a few young women
(18 or older) to work in our nursery area to
provide patient loving care to our youngest par-
ticipants. Church nursery experience preferred,
references requested. Must provide own trans-
portation and be able to make commitment
starting in January through May 2. Call Mrs.
Baker, class coordinator at 3554368.
HELP WANTED. Experienced waiUUff day-
time and night shifts available. Must be able to
work at least two weekday lunch shifts. NO
CALLS, Please apply in person between 8am
and 10am or 2pm and 4pm. Professor O'Cools
Winn Dixie Market Place
COURTYARD TAVERN is now accepting ap-
plications for Wait Cook and Dishwashing staff.
Apply in person only please. 703 Creenville
Blvd. SE. KMART Shopping Center.
JOB OPPORTUNITY: PROGRAM COORDI-
NATOR Full time Position Responsible for
planning and administering activities for a coun-
cil on aging. Occasional evenings and some
travel. NC Drl.ic. own transportation and high
school grad or equivalent required. Prefer a
four-year degree in communications, public
work; oi an equivalent combination of educa-
tion and experience Excellent organisation
skills, positive, energetic personality and desire
to help the elderly a must Salary: $12,000 to
$18000 per year. Qualifications necessary in-
clude: ability to coordinate a variety of taks
and people within set deadlines, and consider-
able knowledge of computer operations, mar-
keting, publicity, the English language, and
public speaking techniques. Resumes and state
applications will be accepted until De. 15,1995.
Send to Director. PO Box 547, Kinston, NC
28502. No phone calls please. EOE.
TROPICAL BEACH RESORT JOBS - Lwuri
ous hotels are now hiring seasonal positions.
Lifeguards, food service, housekeepers, host'
hostess, and front desk staff Call Resort Em-
ployment Services 1-206432-0150 ext R53621.
��FREE TRIPS CASH Find out how
hundreds of students are already earning FREE
TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH with America's 1
Spring Break company! Sell only 15 trips and
travel free! Choose Cancun, Bahamas, Mazatlan.
or Florida! CALL NOW! TAKE A BREAK STU-
DENT TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK!
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Oldest and
Largest Escort Service is now hiring due to
our expanding Business. Eam up to1.500 plus
per week. Escorting in the Greenville and sur-
rounding areas. You must be at least 18 years
of age, Have own phone and transportation.
We are also hiring Male and Female Dancers
for Private Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7584896 or Emerald City Escorts at 757-
3477 for an Interview. Est 1990
S1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our circulars.
No experience required. Begin now. For info
call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being broke,
want to get paid everyday. Call Playmstes Ms
sage. Snow Hill. NC 747-7686.
CHRISTMAS CIFT OR FUNDRAISINC OP-
PORTUNITY: Hotel Express Card, save on air-
fare, car rental, cruises, condominum rentals
and 50 off regular rates at over 2.700 hotels
worldwide. $49.95 price of one year member-
ship will pay for itself after one stay in hotels
listed in Hotel Express Directory. Great
fundraising for organizations, sororities, frater-
nities, and clubs. Call Paradise Travel for more
information (919) 6384638.
Greek
Personals
DELTA CHI: Thanks again for giving us a tour
around the world. We all had a blast traveling
with you guys. Love: Chi Omega.
KAPPA SIGMA PLEDGES: Thank you for a
wonderful social at the Elbo. It was a great time.
We hope to do it again. Love. Chi Omega
Pledges.
TO ALL CASTAWAYS ON THE PAMLICO
QUEEN: the boys lined along the rail, was a
sight to be seen. Renee. the mermaid, with the
wind In her face. Wendi how did you drop your
drink with such style and grace? With Steve
hiding out nd Laurie's crazy hose. Booze
Cruise 95 proved that anything goes. Love the
Sisters of Alpha Phi.
CONGRATS TO MOLLY WILKENSON. Alpha
Phi pledge of the year. Love your Alpha Phi
sisters.
CONGRATS TOTHENEWEXECOF ALPHA
PHI: President Jonni Wainwright, Vice Presi
dent - Pam Miller. Treasurer - Tristan Lee. Frat
Ed. � Kelly Joyce. Rush - Julie Smith. House
Mgr. - Fabiola Price. Pan Del. - Anne Newton.
Chpt. Prom. � Heather Tilley. Social Chair
Wendi Hill, Adm. Asst � Laura Benfield. Schol
arship Jackie Kirby. Rec. Sec. - Leigh Anne
Whitley. Corr. Sec. Erika Rupp. Activities -
Tracey Sorrell. tntramurals - Liz Wull. Gamma
� Teresa Belton. Love your sisters of Alpha Phi.
DELTA ZETA, it was a great day Sundae for a
Saturday. The Herseys and S&M were great.
You whipped us this time but next time you're
going to get licked Love. The Bros of Sigma
Nu.
7t services
� Offered
A QUIET PLACE TO STUDY? First Presbyte-
rian Church open during exam week 7pm-7am,
1211 to 1216. Corner, 14th & Elm. snacks
and.quiet. Wednesday midnight Breakfast
served!
THE PARTY IS ON! Your party ain't thump'n
until MMP is pnmp'n. Mobile Music Produc-
tions is "the" disc jockey service for your party
or social function. Widest variety of any disc
jockey company in Greenville. Speicaiiqing in
the needs of ECU organizations and Creeks
Dates are filling fast so call early. Ask for Lee
7584644.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS To lose 10-30lbs
Next 90 days. New Metabolism Breakthrough
Guaranteed. $35.50 visamc .1400-2114382
SINGLE GUYS A GIRLS: Meet someone spe-
cial on The New Date Une leave & retreive
messages 24 hrs a day. 1-900-2554585 ext
7726 2.99 per minute. Must be 18 yrs Touch
Tone Phone Required S4u-U-(619) 6454434
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion in
private sector grants & scholarships is now
available. All students are eligible regardless
of grades, income, or parent's income. Let us
help. Call Student Financial Services: 1400363-
6495 ext F53623.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOMETHING
MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services is your
ANSWER! We have the best selection of music
in Creenville. Call 758-5026 ask for Sean and
Book your Party Now!
FOREIGN STUDENTS-VISITORS. DV-1
Greencard Program available. Tel: 1400460-
7167 & (818) 772-7168. 20231 Stagg St.
Canoga Park, CA 91306
Sfc
Travel
Spring Break!
Bahamas Party Cruise
$279
It's Better In The Bahamas
15 Meal � 6 Parties
800-678-6386
Cancun $359!
Jamaica $419!
7 Nights Air & Hotel! Parties &
Discounts!
Florida $119!
1-800-678-6386
Ski Snowboard
iHmuouiGim ski wans tb
Uw) � S�rtntf �
.Campus Reps
Needed
?FlffTrir, ?tH�.�tei
k� New to lw�x�H tyif
Jf taajty ttr mw Mftw waa Wai
1-800-999-Ski-9
iUm!iea$prlRg Breaker!
Book Now! JamaicaCancun $369,
Bahamas $299,
Panama CityDayton $129.
Sell Trips, Earn Cash, Go Free!
1-800-234-7007
WANTED Individuals. Student Organizations
and Small Groups to Promote SPRINC BREAK
�96. Earn MONEY and FREE TRIPS. Call the
Nation's Leader. Inter-Campus Programs http:
www.icptcom 1400-3274013
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED: $5hour plus
bonuses. Day or evening shifts, full or part-time.
3554210
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make up to
$2545hr. teaching basic conversational En-
glish in Japan. Taiwan, or S. Korea. No teach-
ing background or Asian languages required.
For information call: (206 632-1146 ext J53622.
CRUISE SKIPS NOW HIRING Eam up to
$2,000Vmonth working on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies. World travel. Seasonal
& full-time employment available. No experi-
ence necessary. For more information call 1-
2064344468 ext. C53622.
M
Greek
Personals
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH
FOR YOUR USED,
HILFIGE1
POLO ffc
s�
y-
WEALSCMANT:
NICE T SHIRTS &
SHCCTS
Studini Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FR1 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN, DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
MEMBERS OF ALPHA DELTA PI ARE
LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING ALL NEW
SORORITY MEMBERS AT OUR CHRISTMAS
TEA! SEE YOU TONIGHT!
PHI SIGMA PI � Congrats to all new brothers:
Danielle Danzai. Becky Gier. Steve Moore, Greg
Rodden. Cathy King, and Mike Wltodky. You
have proven "Only the Best are Brothers
DELTA ZETA, We hope that you had as much
fun as we did in Margaritaville. Tragically yours,
the Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi.
DELTA SIGMA PHI would like to wish all
Creeks Good Luck with exams and a Happy
Holiday Break. See you next year!
TO ALPHA SIC: Congratulations to Alpha
Sigm�Phi for 150 years of Brotherhood. Good
Job Cuys! Keep up the tradition.
CHI OMEGA: Merry Christmas and Happy
Holidays. Looked like a winter wonderland
Sunday night See you soon. Love Theta Chi.
ALPHA PHI - Yet another awesome party.
Congrats to your new sisteis. Only tradition
can create such lasting friendships and memo-
ries. Happy Holidays. Love Theta Chi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO GEORGE DAVIS
for being elected Executive Vice President of
IFC and MATT DRUMMOND for being elected
Intramural Representative of IFC. Good Job!
Brothers of Theta Chi.
THE BROTHERS OF THETA CHI would like
to congratulate our new brothers on their ini-
tiation. The best is yet to come. Your Brothers
of Theta Chi.
CONGRATS NEW BROTHERS OF SIGMA
PI Fraternity. Brandon Barnes, Larry Leftovis.
Kevin Mobley. Ben Williams. Jeff Yurfest It's
about time.
PI DELTA PLEDGES: You guys were great
Saturday night at Formal! We loved the song.
You're doing a great job: Love the Sisters.
PI DELTA would like to thank Jen and Kerri
for a wonderful Formal weekend. It was a job
well done! Cheers to Five years!
KAPPA ALPHA: We all had a great time danc
ing to that funky music in lite hood. Hope we
can do it again sometime. Thanxs Chi Omega.
SPRING BREAK, Bahamas or Florida Keys.
Spend it on your own PRIVATE YACHT, one
week only $385.00 per person. Including food
and much more. Organisers go for FREE! Easy
Sailing Yacht Charters. 1400-783-4001 See us
on the Net http:www.shadow.net-essail
FREE TRAVEL! SPRING BREAK 9�! Party
in Jamaica. Cancun Bahamas, Florida. Padre.
Guaranteed lowest prices. Organize Group.
Travel Free! Call for free information packet!
1400426-7710.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS! Book
Now! JamaicaCancun $359. Bahamas $299.
Panama CityDaytona $129. Sell Trips, Earn
Cash, Go Free! 1400-234-7007.
SKI A SNOWBOARD WINTERBREAK &
SPRINCBREAK "96 Intercollegiate Ski Weeks,
ONLY $219. Includes: 5 day lift ticket 5 nights
lodging (luxury condo)5 days intercollegiate
activitiesldrinking age 18). Sponsors Include
Molson & Labatts. MT. ORFORD. CANADA
(just across the Vermont Border) Croup
LeaderRep. Discounts. Call Ski Travel Unlim-
ited. 1400-9994KI-9.
Wanted
BARBIE DOLLS WANTED � paying cash for
dolls, clothing and accessories from thr 1950's
and 1960's. If you mon. aunts, etc. are 30-45
and still have their dolls, give me a call � 328-
7338.
Personals
LOOKING FOR A RIDE TO MARYLAND FOR
CHRISTMAS VACATION. IF YOU ARE GOING
ANYWHERE ABOVE NORTH CAROLINA.
PLEASE CALL 328-7589, ASK FOR
KATHLEEN. CAN LEAVE DEC. 11TH �
CROCK ITS YOUR BIG DAY. HOPE YOU
GET A GREAT LAY TURNING 22 DON'T LOOK
FOR ANYTHING NEW WHEN YOUR OUT ON
A LIMB. LOOK FOR EM AND WHEN YOU
HEAR BELLS, JUST THINK OF SHELLS,
ROSES ARE RED. VIOLETS ARE BLUE. THIS
IS A MESSACE SAYING HAPPY BIRTHDAY
TO YOU.
SHELLEY B MY BEST FRIEND. How could
you do this tc. me. Don't play dumb. Gradual
ing before me and leaving me with Who. What
Where. When and How. Congrats.
SHANE, The one from Havelock Have I told,
showed you today How much 1 love you? If not
then ask.
FREE PHONE CARD � NOT JUST A FEW
FREE MINUTES � Unlimited Useagc with anv
phone system. Other incentives-including cash-
just for using it. Call 355-3789
- Wii
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 7, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 07, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1114
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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