The East Carolinian, July 3, 1996






July 3,1996
Vol71, No 62
The
t Carolinian
Circulation 5,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pases
� Olympic team to pratice in Minges
wit s ��
Across The State
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Drunken driving deaths were up
last year for the first time in a
decade, a study released yesterday
by the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration shows
The total number of people
killed in 1995 in alcohol-related
crashes was 17.274, the report
said. That's a I percent increase
from 1994.
The number of drunken driv-
ing deaths is down from a decade
ago by 28 percent.
The percentage of alchohol-
related deaths compared to the
total number of highway accident
deaths also increased slightly to
41 percent in 1995. The change
stands out from the steady decade
of decline in the percentage, from
52.2 percent in 1986 to 40.8 per-
cent in 1994.
WASHINGTON (AP) - College
and university officials were
tapped by the FBI in the early
1960s for information on Mark
Lane, a lawyer retained by Lee
Harvey Oswald's mother to clear
her son's name, according to
records released yesterday.
The records are among a
batch of 141 FBI documents and
33 CIA documents released by the
Assassination Records Review-
Board, which is compiling a pub-
lic record of President Kennedy's
assassination. Some of the infor-
mation has previously been re-
leased.
The FBI documents offer a
glimpse of the bureau's extensive
efforts to track Lane's public ap-
pearances in 1964. during the
Warren Commission's investiga-
tion of the Nov. 22. 1963. assassi-
nation.
Around The World
COLOMBO. Sri Lanka (AP)
- Wounded by a series of defeats,
separatist rebels today called for
a truce and renewed talks to end
Sri Lanka's 13-year-old civil war.
The government has previ-
ously said the separatists must
surrender their weapons before
renewed talks and vowed to "tame
them" if they did not comply.
Over the past nine months,
the guerrillas have suffered a num-
ber of sethacks with the military
capturing their longtime capital
of northern Jaffna city, and forc-
ing the rebels to withdraw to
jungle towns.
T KY) I AP) - An American
inmate sued Japan today over al-
leged prison abuses, saying he was
tied up and put in solitary con-
finement for opening his eyes be-
fore a meal and wetting his hair
to straighten it.
Kevin Mara, who is serving a
4 1 2-year sentence for smuggling
marijuana, is seeking $917.0(10
from the government in compen-
sation for alleged abuses at Fuchu
Prison.
His lawyers say he is the first
U S prisoner to take such action
in Japan, but Japanese prisons
have been criticized for human
ins including arbi-
trary use of solitary confinement
and retaliation tor contacts with
law-y. �
Brazil's best
practice hoops for
Atlanta
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
The Brazilian Olympic basketball
team will take a bit of Pirate Pride
with then to Atlanta this month.
The team, expected to he a seri-
ous medal contender, will hold pie-
Olympic training in William's Arena
July 10-18.
"How ECU became involved in
the Olympics is kind of odd Al Delia,
associate vice chancellor for regional
development and coordinator for the
Brazilian team. said.
"North Carolina made the com-
mitment to try to get as many teams
as possible to train here, and kind of
left the responsibility up to the state
I )epartment of Commerce Delia said.
"Through my everyday workings with
! he 1 tepartment of Commerce. I heard
about it about eight months ago and
brought it to the attention of the chan-
cellor and he said let's go with it
"The organizing of the event took
a while because of the transition with
the athletic director and all that
During their stay in the Emerald
City, the athletes and coaches will stay
in Slay Hall and eat most of their
meals in Todd Dining Hall.
Scouts for the team looked at
other North Carolina cities, including
the N.C. State and Duke University
campuses, for potential training sites
for the team. Greenville was selected
for the superior facility ECU had to
offer, as well as Greenville's "off-the-
beaten-path" location and for what it
had to offer the athletes during the
time that they are not in training.
The team set tentative practice
times twice a day from 9:30 a.m. to
1 1:30 a.m. and from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m.
"Most, if not all. practices will be
open to the public Delia said. There
may be a nominal charge of two or
three dollars if we need to clean up
"The team has the facility com-
pletely at their disposal and reserves
the right to close practices" Delia said
"When I was talking to their people,
they said that the fans in Brazil can
get in such a frenzy that they have to
go as far as putting up chicken wire. 1
told them that we don't have to worry
about that kind of crowd control
here
"People don't realize the caliber
of the team we're going to have here
Delia said. "This is the last team to
beat the U.S. in the Pan-American
games years backThis is the team
that led to the NBAs decision to al-
low NBA players to participate in the
Olympics
"This team has one of the big-
gest international superstars. Oscar
Schmitt. on it. He's the Michael Jor-
dan of Brazil, and on the international
basketball scene, is just as good and
just as famous as any NBA player. He
could have played for the NBA: he is
responsible for almost single-handedly
beating the U.S. in the Pan-American
games
Early on, we had support for an
NBA team to play against Brazil as
an exhibition game in William's
See MINGES page 3
Silent speech: the
norm in some classes
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Sign language instructor Mike Lupo "speaks" with senior Amy Moore, one of the three
students in his American Sign Language IV class.
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
ECU is well known across the state
and even the country for the depth ot its
programs for deaf and hardi Shearing stu-
dents.
The support services tor deaf and
hard-of-hearing students recently became
part of the department for disability sup-
port services. Tony Schreiber is the as-
sociate director of the program and elabo-
rated on the services his department
provides.
"We provide) the full range of com-
munication services, which would be
manual interpreting, oral interpreting.
cued speech, note-taking services, and
tutorial assistance Schreiber said. "We
provide services for approximately 30
deal and hard-of-hearing students. It's the
largest deaf population ol any of the UNC
schools
The program started in 1976 with
four students, the result of the efforts of
one man on the board of governors who
had a college-aged deaf daughter.
Schreiber said the services at first were
very clumsy and rudimentary, but
through the years the program has
grown.
"Now the university has a national
recognition in terms of the support ser-
vices that we provide Schreiber said.
"The deaf students that are attending
ECU are here only because we exist"
ECU teaches classes in American
Sign Language for those that are inter-
ested in learning it and also has a sign
language pre-interpreter minor. But
Schreiber cautions that the pre-inter-
preter minor by itself will not prepare a
See SILENT page 3
Professor researches TV violence
Presentation given
at Duke Universtiy
Amena Hassan
Staff Writer
smmmmommmuommmammmmmmimmmmmtHmmm
v oncerns about television vio-
lence and its effects on children has
been a focused issue during the past
year. A conference co-sponsored by
the government and national cable
groups was held at I Hike University
from the L'7th to the 30th of June,
and teatured speakers from across the
country, including ECU'S assistant
.speech, professor, Marina Krcmar.
Krcmar was involved in an in
depth study oi the effects ot parent-
child relationships in light ot advisory
viewer warnings tli.it label some tele
vision programs. Krcmai also re
searched "parental guidance" ratings.
as well as some ot the reactions ��!
children and parents who were given
the opportunity to discuss them.
1 found
children were
more inter-
ested m pro
grams that
had advisory
viewer warn-
ings said
K r c m a r .
There was
much more
conflict be-
tween par
ents and chil-
dren when
p r o g i a m s
had warnings
displayed
Krcmar has been teaching as an
' nit professoi at ECU since Sep-
tember. She received her Masters
"I found children
were more
interested in
programs that had
advisory viewer
warnings
� Marina Krcmar, ECU's
assistant speech professor
degree at the University of Pennsyl-
vania, at the Annaberg School of Com-
munication, and her PhD from the
University of Wiscon-
sin-Madison. Krcmar
has been working on
the project for the last
year and a half and
has studied children
between the ages of
kindergarten through
sixth grade.
Other universi-
ties that were involved
in the research stud-
ied children from a
variety of age groups.
Research was funded
by the government
and an independent
group called Media Scope, and each
university that took part in the re-
See TV page 3
� i ifyte
Summer theatre rolls on
HlkllfHtl
Wage increase whatever.
Scenes from Micheal Jordon Classic
5
4
8
"p&recaJt
Wednesday
Partly Cloudy
High 88
low 75
Thursday
Partly Sunny
High 85
Low 72
Future doctors get
hands-on experience
High school
students venture
into medicine
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
ECU's School of Medicine re-
cently prepared the graduating class
of 2006 for future careers in health
care professions.
Twenty of eastern North
Carolina's rising high school freshmen
and sophomores were selected for the
Ventures Into Health Careers program.
The program, designed to intro-
duce highly motivated and disadvan-
taged youths to various health care
careers, ran from June 16-29.
"Before the program, I knew 1
wanted to be a doctor Lauren Price,
a freshman from White Oak High
School in Jacksonville, said, "but I
wasn't sure I was ready for it"
The program is open to disadvan-
taged black, Hispanic and Native
American students from the region.
The Ventures program allowed
participants to gain first hand experi-
ence in what it is like to work in health
professions. In addition to attending
classes in math, science and commu-
nication, participants followed doc-
tors, nurses and physical therapists
on rounds in mental and health de-
partments and at Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital.
"If participants have the infor-
mation on what it takes to be a health
care professional, then they can make
a good decision in high school about
their academic curriculum Debbie
Ramey, Ventures program coordina-
tor, said.
"We were seeing years ago. when
there was a big need for health care
professionals, that they (students)
weren't prepared when they enrolled
in the community colleges or univer-
sities which forced students to spend
time in remedial studies, Ramey said.
The program began three years
ago to address the concern toward
the disproportionate number of mi-
nority health care workers to the mi-
nority population. The program aims
to increase the number of minorities
entering health care professions.
"In eastern North Carolina, we
have a large minority population, and
in many cases, they are in rural un-
deserved areas Ramey said. "We
hope someone who comes from there
would want to return home to prac-
tice
Students interested in the pro-
gram must currently be enrolled in
either eighth or ninth grade and nave
no less than a B grade point average.
They must also have the recommen-
dation of a counselor or teacher, com-
plete an application and essay, as well
as show an interest in health careers.
Out of nearly 200 applicants,
only 20. eight boys and 12 girls, were
selected for the program.
By the end of the two-week ses-
sion, most participants had found
their niche in various health care pro-
fessions.
"I've found out about careers
that 1 didn't even know existed Rob-
ert White of New Bern said. Before
the program, Robert considered a
career in business. Now he said he is
interested in biomedical engineering
Simone Brown, a West Craven
High School student decided on a
career while accompanying a local
doctor on rounds.
"I was dead set on psychology
until I met Dr. Robin Taylor. I really-
like her field, and that's family prac-
tice she said. "She influenced me
to try a lot of different fields of medi-
cine
The program is free to partici-
pants due to a grant through East-
ern Area Health Education Center.
Agency offers Internships
Students ggain experience, get head
start in working world
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
A number of ECU students are gaining valuable experience in real world ca-
reers through the internship program of Northwestern Mutual Agency in Greenville,
Northwestern Mutual Agency was founded in 1857 and is a nation-wide com-
pany with assets of over $50 billion. Then internship program began in 1967 and
has over 5ti student participants a year.
"We have offices in every state said Jeff Mahoney, who is the director of the
College Agent Program for Northwestern Mutual at ECU.
Northwestern Mutual ha no set deadline each war for admission into the
program, which is not limited to any particular major. They recruit mainly students
See AGENCY page 3
yfy(Ufi to 7cact UJ
Phone
(newsroom) 328-6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
l TIM @ECUVM. is.K U.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Jovner





Wednesday, July 3,1996
The East Carolinian
nine
OttfCU
� 1 I
June 25
Larceny - A staff member reported that someone had stolen
money from her desk drawer in the Graham building. The staff mem-
ber reported the crime at 2:01 p.m.
Larceny - A staff member reported that someone had stolen her
bicycle from the lobby of the Printshcp. She reported the crime at
1:30 p.m.
Damage To Property � A staff member reported that his truck
was damaged while it was parked east of the nursing building. He
reported the damage at 3:40 p.m.
Larceny - A student's cellular telephone was stolen from her
vehicle which was parked at Jarvis Hall. She reported the phone
missing at 8:51 p.m.
June 26
Escort - An orientation student requested an escort to Student
Health after being injured on College Hill Drive. The request was
made at 1:17 p.m.
AssistRescue - A non-student was transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by Greenville Rescue after falling and complain-
ing of neck and back pain.
ECU Police Request Information - The ECU police are asking
for students assistance regarding a hit and run. Any student with
information regarding an accident that occured around noon on Col-
lege Hill Drive. A student's foot was run over by a car. Anyone who
saw this occur is asked to contact the ECU police department
June 27
Larceny - A staff member called and said that someone stole
miscellaneous office supplies and keys from her desk. The crime
was reported at 8:17 a.m.
AssistRescue - A non-student was transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital after experiencing abdominal pains at
approximatley 10:46 p.m.
June 29
Larceny - A mirror was stolen from an activity bus that was
parked north of White Hall. The crime was reported at 8:50 p.m.
Traffic Accident - A minor accident was investigated that occured
on Chamberlin-Pigford Court around 7:15 p.m.
June 30
Driving While Impaired - A non-student from Texas was ar-
rested for driving while impaired, driving without an operators li-
cense and for a one-way street violation at the corner of 5th and
Reade Street
July 1
Larceny - A staff member reported a fire extinguisher stolen
from Ragsdale at 9:52 a.m.
July 2
Driving While Impaired - An orientation student was arrested
for driving after consuming alcohol, underage drinking, overloaded
vehicle, possession of alcohol and possession of drug paraphernalia.
The vehicle was initially stopped for being overloaded. The vehicle
was traveling north on Founder Drive. The student was arrested at
1:08 a.m.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Joyncr Library Regular Summer Hours
Monday - Thursday 8 am. to 11 p.m.
Saturday 10 am. to 5 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Joyncr Library Extended Exam Hours
July 25 8 a.m. to midnight
July 26 8 am to 6 p.m.
Joyner Library Closed July 4.
Music Library Regular Summer Hours
Monday - Thursday 8 am. to 11 p.m.
Friday 8 am. to 5 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday CLOSED
Music Library Exam Hours
July 25 8 am. to 8 p.m.
July 26 8 am. to 6 p.m.
Music Library Closed July 4.
Preparations for the move are currently underway. In the lobby of Joyner Library, a sign indicates where activity is occurring each day.
Note: Joyner Library will be closed July 27 - August for the move into the new addition.
Weekend Universtiy maximizes options
Non-traditonal
students benefit
from new option
Amena Hassan
Staff Writer
This year, ECU has created a
new method for students to obtain
a degree. The plan is called Week-
end University, and is designed for
people who work full-time during
the week, have little opportunity to
pursue college course work.
"We talk about Weekend Uni-
versity as another extension of the
population of ECU said Dr. Rob-
ert Denney, director of the program.
"It is not separate from the rest of
ECU, but is just being held at an-
other time of the week
At the present time, the pro-
gram is seeking new students
through a series of information ses-
sions being held during this month.
About 150 people attend each ses-
sion, in an effort to explain the grow-
Do you like
writing,
have good
grammar,
?and have
an eye for
news
stories?
Well, you may be the
person we are
looking for. The
East Carolinian is
now accepting
applications for
News writers. Stop
by our office today
and fill out an
application. We are
located on the 2nd
floor of the Student
Publications
Building across from
Joyner.
No Pool At Your
Apartments?
bPlayers Club Can Help!
(5j PLAYERS CLUB
I LT5J APARTMENTS j
Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 27858
11
Join us Wednesday Juty 3rd, from 7:00-11;00 at Players
Club for a Party! Featuring The Thomas Brothers band,
food and lots of fun!
You've heard about it
Now Experience it!
PLAYERS CLUB
A.RA.RTIVIEIMTS
)
ing trend among colleges and uni-
versities to provide greater educa-
tional services to non-traditional
students. The sessions provide po-
tential students with information
about admissions documents, de-
gree options, and financial aid.
"A lot of the students are older
students who need to know what
kind of financial aid is available, and
what aid is tailored towards their
needs said Denney.
Other areas that the informa-
tion sessions cover are the subjects
of advising, since the program pro-
vides post-admission advising and
advising throughout the student's
career. Advising is based in the
Weekend University office, located
in the Erwin Building.
Denney said that the program
is not just for adults who want to
begin a degree, but is also open to
others who began a degree in the
past and simply want to finish their
education. Weekend University of-
fers a total of four undergraduate
degrees.
"We have a three to five year
rotation schedule, and everything
that's required for the major is fit
into that time span Denney said.
"Students can finish their degrees
in as little as three years while they
attend on the weekends, or they can
take up to five or six years, depend-
ing on their needs
Weekend classes will be held on
Friday nights and Saturdays. Infor-
mation sessions also cover the
schedule of classes. The classes on
Saturday are broken into sections
from 8 to 11 a.m 11:15 to 2:15 p.m
and 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Students have
the option of taking these classes
with a combination of other classes
offered during the weekdays.
Information sessions will be
held in the General Classroom Build
ing and registration for the Week-
end University begins on July 20.
For more information, contact Rob-
ert Denney at 328-6488, in the Of-
fice for Continuing Education.
DISCOVER A
�v r a m �-
LITTLE CORNER OF
U
P
T
O
ti I
across from the courthouses on the comer
of Evans and Third Street
fo a cafe setting, serving breakfast and
lunch
9fonday - Friday
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
757-1716 � 300 Evans gtreet � 757-1716
"
"�
204 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27835
919021 1700 Phone
919321 �2267 fax
11 am-9pm Sun-Thurs
11 am-10pm Fri & Sat
The Menu
"The Freshest Thing Qoing" says it all when the
name Boston Market is mentioned. We
offer a wide variety of entrees and
over 20 vegetables and side items.
With our fresh ingredients and
made from scratch dishes, Boston
Market brings the memories of the
past to the presesnt.
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
$2-00i
Off
Any
Family
Meal
Expires July 3, 1996
iHool
Any Carver
Sandwich,
Side Item and
Drink
Expires July 3, 1996
$2i99:
j 14 Chicken Meal
With Com,
i Homestyle Mashed
Potatoes, &
i
Combread
Expires July 3, 1996
Boston Market Catering
Boston Market will cater your business luncheon, church
event, picnic, banquet, wedding, or party!
I





����
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 3,1996
ELTORO
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Tube & Float Rental S3.00 All day
Inside & Outside Showers
Volleyball- Novelty Shop
Gameroom-Grill-Mtni Mart
Prices
Gate Admission
WeekdaysS1.00 person
WeekendsS2.00person
Children 5 and under Free
Flume WiUerslKk
Open Daily S3.00person lor 45 minutes
Priate Party Bookings at
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Donee Club & Bar
OPEN EVERY SATURDAY NICKT f
"Eostorn Carolina's largest Dant� Oub"
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SILENT from page 1
person for a career as a professional in-
terpreter. Learning sign language is just
as difficult as learning any other lan-
guage.
"American Sign Language is in fact
just like any other legitimate language.
It has its own grammar, syntax, and a
culture that supports it Schreiber said.
Mr. Michael Lupo, who is an educa-
tional specialist in the department for
disability support services and teaches
sign language classes, agrees with
Schreiber's assessment He said that the
sign language minor offered here at ECU
will prepare students only for the most
elementary communication.
"The sign language minor students
can only hold a basic conversation in sign
language Lupo said.
Both Schreiber and Lupo said that
their program will provide a good base
for students who are planning to con-
tinue their study elsewhere.
"The interpreters that we use nowa-
days have gone through our training
program, but they've also become pro-
fessionals in their own right" Schreiber
said.
Lupo said that there are places for
further study for those who wanted it
"They would go to Gallaudet Uni-
versity, or the National Technical Insti-
tute for the Deaf Lupo said. "The ideal
interpreting program would be four years
of American Sign Language only, and
then a Master's degree in interpreting
Both Schreiber and Lupo also elabo-
rated on the other areas that are ad-
dressed in the pre-interpreter minor, such
as the ethical issues involved in being an
interpreter.
"There's a code of ethical conduct
which is drilled into students from he
moment they get into pre-interpreting
classes, and it's reinforced and examined
from ten different angles Schreiber said.
"Everything is confidential. An in-
terpreter has to go in and be profes-
sional Lupo said.
Prospective interpreters can take
exams to be officially certified, although
certification is not a requirement to be
an interpreter. On the state level, there
are two different exams, the Educational
Interpreter Certification and the Com-
munity Interpreter Certification. There
is also an exam given by a national orga-
nization, Registry of Interpreters for the
Deaf. For interpreters who find jobs in
special fields, such as legal or medical,
they would need to have a background
in the appropriate vocabulary.
The best way to learn sign language,
both Schreiber and Lupo agree, is to go
where it is being used. Just as learning a
foreign language is most productive in
the country in which it is spoken, a sign
language student will have the most suc-
cess when among other sign language
practitioners. As ECU'S program for deaf
and hard-of-hearing students demon-
strates, there is a need for people who
can communicate in sign. Both
Schreiber and Lupo agreed the need for
good professional interpreters is high.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
AGENCY from page 1
for their sales positions, but also use col-
lege students in some areas of public re-
lations.
"It's open to all majors. We're more
interested in individuals than in majors.
50 percent of our college agents are non-
business majors Mahoney said. "It's
open to full-time college students here
at ECU. The program exists on over
400 campuses
throughout the U.S
The sales agent
applicants are inter-
viewed at Northwest-
em and are given a
sales aptitude test to
determine how well
they would respond
to a sales environ-
ment They also need
to be in good stand-
ing in the commu- wmmmmmmmm
nity.
Once accepted, the students are
trained by Northwestern for their intern-
ships. They are provided with an office,
secretarial support, and any computer
equipment they need. Northwestern in-
terns are licensed to sell life, accident and
health insurance by the North Carolina
Department of Insurance.
"They do the same thing our full-
time agents do, they just do it parttirne
Mahoney said.
Mahoney said that the agents have
very flexible schedules and usually work
about 10-15 hours a week, with the ma-
jority of their time spent in prospecting
for clients and in actual sales.
"You're working for yourself. It's
commission based. You get paid for what
you produce Mahoney said.
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
These students are eligible to con-
tinue in the internship until they gradu-
ate if they so desire.
"They can hold a college agent con-
tract as long as they're in school
Mahoney said.
While the majority of the student
interns work in sales, there are also a
few students who work in public rela-
tions.
"We have
five or six college
students who get
credit for the
public relations
internships
Mahoney said,
adding that
those students
were usually
communications
wmmmmmmmmmmmmm majors who
worked for a se-
mester as part of their major require-
ments.
"We're using public relations ma-
jors to market the college agent pro-
gram Mahoney said.
Mahoney also said that one in three
students in the College Agent program
goes on to work-full time for the com-
pany.
The students who are currently par-
ticipating in the college agent program
are Jason Arp, Harry Bray, Chris For-
tunes, Jason Freeman, Paul Ghesquiere,
Robert Jolley, David Kennedy, Heather
Mann, John Mix, McGee Moody, Ron
Price, Randy Schwartz, and Carlton
Ware.
Students interested in the program
may contact Jeff Mahoney at 355-7700.
"It's open to all
majors. We're
more interested in
individuals than
in majors
� Jeff Mahoney
TV
from page 1
search received a different section of
the problem.
Krcmar said the Telecommunica-
tion Act passed in February 1996 has
already taken steps in minimizing the
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Office 204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC
impacts of television violence upon
children. It allows parents to screen
out programs that are considered vio-
lent through the inclusion of a "V
chip" in the television set. The chip
will be a required component of all
sets that will be assembled in the fu-
ture
"This issue is really going to af-
fect whether additional laws are go-
ing to be enacted to control the prob-
lem of television violence said
Krcmar. "It has come to a point where
the government will have to step in
and deal with the problem if televi-
sion companies do not begin to react
before the passing of more laws
The conference held in June, had
been called specifically in response to
the media and included representa-
tives from major networks who were
involved in a broad discussion of the
issue. Krcmar said she hopes to see
how the networks react to the re-
search that was presented.
MINGES from page 1
Arena Delia said, "but the NBA
would not sanction anyone other than
the Dream Team
"There is a possibility of an exhi-
bition game with the Lithuanian team,
the bronze medal winners in the '92
games, but they are practicing in
Phoenix and may not want to disrupt
their practice schedule
Delia is also trying to organize a
team of former collegiate all-stars to
play against Brazil while they are in
Greenville.
Delia said that most of the plans
are tentative due to practice sched-
ules. "The team basically requested
that they have time to practice and
prepare Delia said.
"This situation is unique for the
university because most of the time,
events like this are planned well in
advance Delia said. "Here, every-
thing is up in the air. We make it up
as we go along
While the majority of their stay
will be dedicated to practice, the team
will take time out of its schedule to
attend a handful of community events.
ECU will host a luncheon on July
11 to welcome the team to the city. It
will mainly be a low-key event, hosted
by the board of trustees and a few
local legislators.
Greenville will also host a fare-
well pig-picking for the team on July
17.
"It's good this is scheduled for
the 17th Delia said, "because they'll
have two days to recover from all the
barbecue before the games
The state will also hold a "Going
for the Gold" ceremony for all 36 in-
ternational Olympic teams visiting the
state. The public can attend for $10-
$12. For more information and a com-
plete calendar of events, contact
Kirsten Weeks at the Public Affairs
Office of the North Carolina Depart-
ment of Commerce at (919) 733-7651.





Wednesday, July 3,1996
The East Carolinian
4 The East Carolinian
tor .
4
Our View
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Chris Walker, Staff Illustrator
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Randy Miller, Production Assistant
Ellyn Felts, Copy Editor
Deanya Latttmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The minimum
wage is due to
increase soon,
but that still
won't help
meet the costs
of attending
college.
In a time when the Chief Executive Officers of some of our
leading corporations are making over 200 times the amount of
money that their average employee takes home, it seems a bit
ridiculous for Congress to be haggling over a mere 90 cents.
We wonder why Congress should be the decision-maker in this
process.
When was the last time a Senator made minimum wage? It
it was about a decade ago, then he or she would have been
making about 90 cents less than the minimum wage is now.
That's right, 90 cents. Ten years ago the minimum wage was a
whopping $3.35. Today it's gone up to the unbelievably high
$4.25.
That means that a minimum wage earner working 40 hours
per week for 52 weeks would bring in $8,840, before taxes. No
Christmas holiday, no Thanksgiving break, and especially no
July 4th off for that lucky stiff. No siree, they would have to
work eight hours a day. five days a week to garner that fat
paycheck. They would be lucky to if they could take a weekend
off once a month.
Ten years ago that same person would have made $6,698
for the year. But think about the standard of living back then.
Although it was the '80s when everything seemed to cost an
arm and a leg, it wasn't nearly as much as it is now. Reagan
was in the middle of his second term and prices were begin-
ning to skyrocket, but the financial crunch didn't come along
until Bush was in office. Seven thousand dollars would have
gone much farther at that time then nine thousand dollars
goes in 1996.
Now, a bill passed the House of Representatives in May
that would raise the minimum wage another 90 cents over the
next two years to a total of $5.15 per hour. That's $10,712 a
year for our hard-working friend mentioned above. Not great
bv any means, but a start
What does that mean to us, the students of East Carolina
University? Well if you're here, that means you've already taken
an incredible risk. Getting a college education isn't cheap, and
taking on that expense is dangerous. Either someone is paying
for you to be here, or you're paying for it yourself, or you're
using financial aid to help meet the expense of attending col-
lege. , ,
If someone is paying your way through, then you re one of
the lucky ones. You probably won't need to get a job to supple-
ment your income (as well as get in the way of your classwork)
and you hopefully won't have any debt hanging over your head
when you get out
If you're paying for it yourself, then you already know the
harsh reality of minimum wage and how far it will get you. If
you're going to school full-time, then more than likely you only
have a part-time job, which also means there is a good chance
you're making minimum to boot Of course, you could be full-
time, but that's a shame because it can really cut into your
studies. Even if you aren't making minimum now, you probably
did when you started, so you're savings may not be that much.
If you're on financial aid, then the actual monetary con-
cern may not hit you until you leave the university and have to
pay off those loans. But pay you will, and you better pray that
you're making more than minimum wage when those bills come
Needless to say, the minimum wage isn't nearly enough for
most people to live on in this country. In fact that 40 hour per
week worker might be classified as earning a wage that is be-
low poverty level. To raise the minimum wage by a mere $1.80
in 12 years is criminal, especially considering the exponential
increase in the cost of living.
Yet despite all of these despairing remarks, we should feel
comforted that we live in North Carolina, not only because the
cost of living here is so low in comparison to many parts ot the
country North Carolina has one of the lowest percentages of
hourly workers making at or below minimum wage in the en-
tire South. We come in at about four percent, whereas Missis-
sippi and Alabama are over double that at eight and half and
nine percent respectively.
If North Carolina had to come in last at something, we at
The East Carolinian are glad it was that
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, As'tant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Jay Myers Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatley, Electronic Editor
Servina the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday The lead editorial ir, each
mMZ oHhe Edrtoria. Board The East Carolinian we.comes letters to the editor, llmrted to 250 words wh.cn jnay be edited
decency or brevity The East Caroiinian reserves the right to edit or re)ect letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letter should
SmI The East Carolinian. Publications Building, ECU, Greenvi.le, NC 2785M353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Cosmic Clinton delivers overdue laugh
� -�������� lI" .�rtUw4 nr,A nav' WP n3
In an election year, there always
seems to be a new standard set in the
media's theater of the absurd. Just
when I thought that Gerald Ford's
cabinet meetings with his dog and
Nancy Reagan's meanderings were the
ultimate in political ha-ha's, we find
Mrs. Clinton breaking through to the
other side. All it took was Bob
Woodward's new book The Choice to
open up a can of beans that consisted
of Hillary talking to Eleanor Roosevelt
through some spiritual exercise. So.
is this some diabolical republican
smear campaign, or is it all just a
comic footnote in an already stressful
year? Boy, I'd have to say that media
is just having a little fun.
With the Unabomber and a rash
of church burnings as the daily head-
lines, the First Lady's eccentric prac-
tices are a welcome relief. Hillary
practices a simple meditation process
called visualization. This technique
is commonly used by athletes to so-
lidify their goals. There is no ritual
involved, nor are any sacrifices neces-
sary; it is a focus enhancer. What is
so funny is that the media knows that,
but that's alright because ultimately
this is good press for the Clintons.
Hillary has to appreciate every
news magazine in the nation putting
her picture right next to Eleanor
Roosevelt This is exactly what she
Anthony Slade
Opinion Columnist
So, is this some
diabolical
republican smear
campaign, or is it
all just a comic
footnote in an
already stressful
year?
needs in the wake of the Whitewater
circus. Maybe that's why so many
republicans have been rallying to Mrs.
Clinton's defense. They must certainly
be aware of the fact that it's in her
husband's favor to be sharing the bill
with one of the great names in 20th
century politics. Unfortunately , the
elephants haven't been so lucky and
would gladly have this media atten-
tion laid to rest
This media spoof has done little
damage in ail reality. Actually. 1 can't
help but find Hillary that much more
appealing because of her New Age
exercises. The 18-to 25-year-old gen-
eration has been waiting for a slightly
more hep figurehead and now we have
one. Besides, all the concrete meth-
ods of political reform have been ex-
hausted. What's wrong with a little
spiritual healing if it stops the bleed-
ing in Washington? Bi'l and Hillary
should take this thing and go with it.
How about Seance Across America?
We can all hold hands and contact
Lincoln. What about National Yoga
Day? Me and Bill on the Whitehouse
lawn in the Mantra. These are just
some suggestions for the visionaries
out there. Change is good.
Ultimately, the press has just de-
livered a light-hearted punchline. No
harm, no foul. Perhaps the media
possesses an uncanny knack for know-
ing when America needs a tension
breaker. It's something that keeps
Saturday Night Live on the map and
our democratic juggernaut rolling.
Soon enough it will be time to put ail
kidding aside and si.art digging into
the real mud-sling of November. None
of this other-worldly escapade should
be taken into account when you
launch your ballot. It's just a nice
piece of democratic memorabilia to
put in your back-pocket for a day
when laughs are scarce. Until then,
we should all keep our fingers crossed
that Hillary's next cosmic contact will
be with J.D. Rockefeller, asking to help
bail us out.
�90s Women more than sex machines
� � cue pv. fashion model ?
The
, public doesn't want reporters and editors
withhold information and give them only what
they 'need' to know. The public wants it all. And
the news media are doing a better job than ever
telling everything they know

- Charles L. Overby, President, The Freedom Forum, 1994
Are women sex objects? Do we
ask to be treated as pleasurable ob-
jects for the opposite sex?
Head out on any Thursday
night in downtown Greenville and
it would appear that we are all in-
volved in a huge sex market. It feels
like a human assembly line with the
viewers selecting the merchandise
as we pass by. "Oh. I'll take the
tall dark man with the yellow shirt,
and add the Italian man for dessert
with cream on top We are seen
as purely sexual toys. I find this
scene and the recent media atten-
tion of men and women completely
degrading.
I thought the modern women
of the '90s were intelligent, think-
ing people of any color or shape
who defined themselves not by
their bed-buddies and style, but by
their own character, career, goals
and compassion. But. it the ideal
woman is displayed by many
women's magazines these days, my
view doesn't hold water.
Look at a recent Cosmopolitan
cover: "The Mayflower Madam re-
veals 16 surefire ways to please
men Glamour's cover screams:
"His orgasm, what makes it �ood.
better. GREAT Eleven other
women's magazine covers now on
newsstands also trumpet sex as
sport, affairs as routine (and how-
to lie and conceal the deceit) or
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
Orgasms are
wonderful in the
right context.
porn stars as celebrities.
Of course, most women's mags
have long used romance, love, fam-
ily and sex as mainstays, but now
some are pushing the limits of de-
cency. They're becoming more taw-
dry and displaying women more as
bodies, without souls or minds. If
women accept these images of
themselves, they are losing the
battle against rape, domestic vio-
lence and sexual harassment.
Advertisements in other peri-
odicals are busy playing the sex
game.
�Many of the ads are as close
to pornographic as you can get
some ads display women as help-
less objects, having to look good
and be sexually available to men
ays ex-fashion model Ann
Simonton of Media Watch (quote
appeared in USA Today). Another
often-heard criticism is that
women's magazines, which sell
glamour and depend heavily on cos-
metic ads, help create an unrealis-
tic image for women, shutting out
their pages to women who are eld-
erly, disabled, homely or over-
weight. No wonder a recent sur-
vey by Grey Advertising found 70
percent of women think that ads in
magazines insult their intelligence.
It is hard to see how American
women can be content to see them-
selves displayed in magazines as sex
toys, and at the same time, break
the glass ceiling in Corporate
America and beyond. Women are
making a huge mistake not to ques-
tion this overdose of sexual images
and obsession with the Big O. Or-
gasms, are wonderful in the right
context. However, the American
media has taken an obsessive turn
and gone overboard with sexual ex-
ploitation of women and men in our
society.
With Heidi Fleiss in the news,
pornography, violence and AIDS
growing globally, it's wrong to pass
off all sex as pleasurable or mor-
ally correct If women tolerate an
image of themselves as sex objects,
it will make gender equality un-
reachable.





Wednesday, July 3,1996
The East Carolinian
LIF&wfe
76ez&ie Prectteca
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Independence Day, like most
post-Christian holidays, has its
base in something horrible.
Not independence, certainly.
There's nothing horrible about
freedom. But often the price of
freedom, the sacrifice that has to
be made to attain freedom, is hor-
rible. And tragic. But somehow,
it's also glorious.
The founding of America, as
we all know from history class,
is one of those horrible, tragic,
glorious things. The freedom we
enjoy today was paid for by gal-
lons of blood, American and Brit-
ish both. Well, 1 guess technically
it was all British in those days.
And conditions would probably
have gotten better over here
eventually even if we hadn't re-
belled. But that's beside the
point.
It's the sacrifice of all those
people whose blood was spilled
in the name of freedom that we'll
be celebrating tomorrow, with
our picnics and cookouts and
fireworks displays.
But, again like most post-
Christian holidays, we don't re-
ally think about that so much.
Who, after all, can ponder blood,
bayonets and bombs bursting in
air when they're chomping down
on a hot dog with the works?
Who would want to? We get
caught up in the trappings of the
celebration rather than its more
serious intent
And that's okay. I don't
think all those people gave their
lives so that we could sit around
and be mopey once a year. The
Fourth of July is like a wake in
some ways, a celebration of our
forefathers' lives and accomplish-
ments. I like to think that they're
all floating around in whatever
afterlife there might be, celebrat-
ing right along with us.
But maybe we should take
just a minute to be serious. A
wake is a complicated emotional
event, after ail. People may chan-
nel their grief into joy, but that
grief is still present There's still
a serious undertone to the cel-
ebration, a pondering of matters
larger than a hot dog, a thought
process that cleanses the soul.
But what to ponder?
Sacrifice? Possibly. But, and
forgive my tone, sacrifice is too
commonplace. People make sac-
rifices all the time, and other holi-
days are about sacrifice too, so
why ponder that when the
Fourth offers its own unique con-
cept to ponder? What better
thing to keep in mind on Inde-
pendence Day than, well, inde-
pendence?
Freedom. The freedom to
choose. The freedom to vote. The
freedom to think what you want,
when you want, and to act upon
those thoughts. The freedom to
have that hot dog with the works,
or maybe just some mustard and
ketchup if you want. In matters
large and small, freedom is per-
haps the most important founda-
tion on which America is built.
But how free are we? We're
all slaves to something, after all.
Whether it's love, family, a job
or even mere survival, there are
some things in life to which we
must surrender a few freedoms.
Corporate America, for ex-
ample, demands certain appear-
ances and conformities; deviation
is frowned upon. So if you hold
See DROP page 7
3 &otcett eviectM,

mm
- nrE i i- jM
V 7 .r
Photo Courtesy of the Attic
The hair, the clothes, the ridiculous preening It could only
be KISS. Or maybe just the amazing facimile, Strutter.
Attic gets KISSed
Classic KISS cover
band burns up
downtown
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
Burnin' down the house! That's
probably what some of the mass audi-
ence would say after attending Satur-
day night's Strutter concert. This Kiss
cover band is known for their bril-
liance to step up and fool the audi-
ence into believing that they're actu-
ally seeing KISS, and what a hell of
an illusion it was.
It sort of freaked me out to see a
bunch of maniacs on stage running
around in black and white make-up;
however, the music was excellent The
band was on time and surprisingly
they sounded exactly like the origi-
nal '70s rock and roll nightmare.
The most amazing thing 1 saw at
this show was the ability of each band
member to be able to concentrate on
their part and their part alone while
still keeping in mind how to react with
each other as a band, stay on time
and smile for the fans. And this was
all done with the same enthusiasm
that Gene, Paul, Ace, and Peter would
have presented. Well, maybe not ex-
actly the same. I mean, we are talking
about KISS here. Anyone who is a
true fan knows that there is only one
KISS.
As the night wore on and the
smoke was just starting to split my
vision into a haze. "Cold Gin" streaked
out through the amplifiers. Gene
picked up a massive torch and began
to breathe fire. The audience and its
energy grew to levels higher than I
could have imagined. I could have
sworn it was the devil himself as he
began his bass solo with a stream of
See STRUTTER page 7
Sting wins over
Walnut Creek
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Sting, the former leader of the
Police, is back in action with a new
album and a new tour. Last Saturday
night the stage at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheater was not only graced with
Sting's royal presence but also that of
Natalie Merchant, who is following
Sting's lead by going solo these days.
While both Sting and Merchant are not
as musically exciting as they were when
they both were part of a band, their
joint ticket made for a solid night's
entertainment that was almost worth
Ticket Master's over-priced service
charge.
Around 8 p.m Merchant strolled
onto the stage dressed in a form-fit-
ting, polka-dot dress that seemed to
symbolize the new Natalie Merchant.
With her first solo album apart from
10,000 Maniacs, Tigerlily, Merchant
seems to be asserting her desire to be
her own artist and not simply an ex-
Death returns
to spotlight
Summer theatre
season continues
with Daddy's Dyin'
Joseph Elchehabi
Staff Writer
Daddy is on his death bed, mum-
bling last-minute I-love-you's and
babbling about midget wrestlers,
while his adult children tear the
house apart, desperately trying to
lay their hands on his will.
A country-fried comedy, full of
laughs and, yes, even tears, Del
Shores' Daddy's Dyin Who's Got
the Will? is East Carolina Summer
Theatre Managing Director Gary
Faircloth's current project. The play
is unlike any he's directed so far at
Natalie Merchant
Sting
tension of her former band. Her set
consisted mostly of songs from her solo
effort. Merchant could have easily-
played the more popular 10.000 Mani-
acs songs, such as "Like the Weather
but she didn't
In fact I wonder if a large part of
the audience even knew who she was.
The ignorant group sitting behind me
either didn't realize who Natalie Mer-
chant was or they simply didn't care
because they talked loudly through her
entire set
To be honest I couldn't really en-
joy Merchant's set because of the crowd
at Walnut Creek. While many of
Merchant's songs are difficult to dance
to, many make swinging your body
around seem natural, as a couple a few
rows in front of me were demonstrat-
ing.
That is, they were demonstrating
it until another audience member de-
cided he would threaten the man danc-
See STING page 7
East Carolina. "It's a play about
people who live in a rural part of
the country. And we've never had a
play like that, at least not a com-
edy
But Faircloth says the play isn't
just a simple comedy about greedy,
quarreling siblings who suffer every-
thing from obesity to broken hearts.
"It deals with people and relation-
ships It's about the restoration of
fractured family values. It's about
the rebirth of the spirit of the fam-
ily. For all its great humor, this play
speaks to every family, everywhere.
"I love this show said
Faircloth with a smile. "From the
beginning to the end we see these
people who are greedy and arguing
and fighting with each other, but at
the end they're still all family. They
realize they still have each other.
"I kind of like what the play
says about people. We may have our
moments of being greedy, ugly and
fighting with everybody we know,
but at the end we're still family, and
that's what holds us together. And I
like that
As with all the summer plays.
Daddy's Dyin' is not a student pro-
duction. It is instead performed by
a large cast of professional actors
who were hired from across the
country.
Daddy's Dyin' promises to be
a big-hearted comedy. Texas-style.
Its run began last night and will con-
tinue through Saturday. Tickets can
be purchased in person at the box
office, Monday through Friday, or
by phone with VISA or Mastercard
at 328-6829. Prices range from $17
tn $25.50 for the general public, and
$15 to $22.50 for ECU facultystaff
and senior citizens.
M
ate zeceta
Striptease needs stripping down
Jay Myers
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
I'll be the first to admit that I fell
for Striptease's in-your-face promo-
tional campaign, but not for the obvi-
ous reason. I wasn't as much inter-
ested in seeing Demi Moore nude-as I
was seeing a film version of a Carl
Hiaasen novel and possibly seeing
Burt Reynolds' big comeback. But
that's not why most of you are read-
ing this review, is it?
In order to get the question out
of the way, yes Demi flashes her
breasts on the big screen. Was it worth
it? No, and I'll explain why. It seems
that when Demi is hired for her sexual
presence (which is more often than
not), the films tend to be horrible.
Cases in point: Disclosure, The
Scarlet Letter and Ghost. In each of
these movies the focus is more on her
body than her acting, which I guess
is good because her acting in those
films is pathetic. Perhaps that's as it
should be, since her body seems to
be what brings in the big bucks. It is
rumored that she received 12 million
dollars to appear in Striptease, the
highest salary any actress has ever
made.
She doesn't deserve it Her char-
acter, Erin Grant, is supposed to gar-
ner sympathy from the audience be-
cause of the difficulties she faces. Yet
Moore looks so bored and dispassion-
ate in her role that it becomes easier
to forget she's in the movie than it is
to root for her.
Here's the skinny on the plot.
Erin Grant's husband Darrell (played
by Robert Patrick, the former
morphingT-1000 from Terminator 2)
is a small-time criminal and big-time
loser who causes Erin to lose her job
at the FBI because of his thievery.
Without a job, she also loses custody
of her daughter Angela (a fine perfor-
mance from Demi's real-life daughter
Rumor Willis). In order to raise
enough money to support her daugh-
Demi Moore never gets much
latest body-conscious motion
ter, Erin must turn to stripping.
The first complication comes
when Senator David Diibeck (Burt
Reynolds at his senile best) comes to
the Eager Beaver club to see some
skin. Captivated by Erin, Diibeck
Photo Courtesy of Columbia Pictures
more exciting than this in her
picture, Striptease.
jumps up to help her after a fight
breaks out during her routine. He's
spotted by a regular at the club who
also loves Erin. The regular decides
See STRIP page 7
CD Reviews
Pat Reid
Staff Writer
The Hazies
Vinnie Smokin' in
the Bis Room
Nothing's worse than being
stuck in a rut unless you count
occasionally sticking your head out
to see what you're missing.
That's the best way to describe
The Hazies' debut album. Vinnie
Smokin' In The Big Room: gener-
ally monotonous with occasional rays
of sunlight peeking through the sur-
rounding fog. Unfortunately the rays
aren't bright enough to keep The
Hazies from becoming another luke-
warm band of the '90s.
Vinnie Smokin' In The Big
Room is a blend of smashing drums
and the same guitar licks with less
than stellar singing. While this may
work for one song. The Hazies go to
the well too many times to keep the
album fresh. Instead of going in dif-
ferent directions they end up sound-
ing like a heavy opening club band
who made one song turn into 11. It
almost didn't have to be that way.
though.
See HAZIES page 6





Wednesday, July 3,1996
The East Carolinian
Dming
till H ti IIS
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Wednesday, July 3
Kevn Kinney
at Peasant's Cafe
Magnapop,
Triple Fast Action
and the Figgs
at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Thursday, July 4
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Friday, July S
Frog Legs
at Underwater Cafe
Guy Clark
at the Cat's Cradle
Come
and Sonora Pine
at the Lizard & Snake Cafe
in Chapel Hill
John Tesh
with the North Carolina
Symphony
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Saturday, July 6
Allman Brothers Band,
Edwin McCain
and Jupiter Coyote
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Sunday, July 7
Steely Dan
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Tuesday, July 9
Rustic Overtones
at Peasant's Cafe
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If so,
please send us information (a
schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858
HAll-Lb from page 5
The disc starts out pretty well
with a song called "Trip Free Life
It's not a bad song, with a simple
message of wanting no responsibil-
ity in life. The album was looking
promising.
The road stayed smooth with the
current single, "Skin & Bones A
definite album highlight, it shows
that these are actually some versa-
tile musicians who know what they
are doing.
Or maybe they don't. Just when
the album gets rocking, it lulls badly.
A barrage of mediocre songs charac-
terized by monotonous music and
vocals and disjointed lyrics follow for
a while until the next high point,
"Dancin' At Seven The instant the
song starts you can tell it's different
from the rest. With a more upbeat
and definitive groove, it starts to
make you have faith in The Hazies
yet
But fame is fleeting. It's back to
the grind of monotonous tunes until
the end of the album and its final
song, "Floating Away Were they sav-
ing the best for last? Not exactly. It's
more like ending on a good note.
Though "Floating Away" is simple,
it turns away from the steady crunch
of the songs before it to become a
confirmed good song. A few more of
these and The Hazies would have a
hit album.
The general problem with the
album is that the band will have a
good groove and not know what to
do with it. "I'm The One, for ex-
ample, starts out with a great little
guitar riff but then the rest of the
band plays the same thing as before,
leaving the good part subdued and
ultimately wasted.
With a little time and guidance,
The Hazies could become a great
band, but with a debut like Vinnie
Smokin'In The Big Room, they may
never get that chance.
Correction Box
In recent issues of The
East Carolinian, two
events were incorrectly
credited. The College Hill
outdoor showing of Top
Gun, credited to Rec
Services, was co-
sponsored by the ECU
Student Union Film
Committe and Rec
Services. The Mendenhall
Ice Cream Social, also
credited to Rec Services,
was sponsored by the
Student Union Special
Events Committee. We
apologize for the
confusion.
Mondays: 9 01. Prime Rib
(includes choice of starch and saladi only $9.99
Domestic Drafts only $1.00
Wednesday: "Restaurant Appreciation Night"
2 for 2 until 2
($2.00-2oz. rail highballs until 2 AM)
Staying open longer for your business!
Fridays: $3.99 Margaritas
"Biggest Glass in Town'
Every Night: "Pargo Goes Progressive"
(Today's college selections after 9PM)
pwad
"we serve full Menu until the minute we c
(MTH 12 AM, Fri & Sat 1 Am, Sun 11 PM)
w�
Looking for
direction to
E a new job?
S Try our classifieds.
The East Carolinian
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
"BARS THAT WON'T GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW"
2903 E. 10th St
Sunday - Thursday
11:00-9:30
Friday - Saturday
11:30-10:00
Delicious
Chopped Sirloin
with mushroom, gravy or peppers & onions
includes chioce of potato and hot Texas toast
FREE SUNDAE BAR
"EAT IN ONLY"
FREE POTATO BAR
Limit 4 persons pet coupon Must
present coupon when ordering. Coupon
expires July 17. 1996. Not valid with
any other discounts or specials.
Good at Greenville locations only
758-2712
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
Editor, Rebel
for the 1996-97 academic year
and for the position of
Day Student Representative
to serve on the Student Media Board
for the 1996-97 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, August 23 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
The Media Board office is also seeking a student assistant
for the remainder of the summer term to do data entry
for as many as 15 hours per week.
Applications are available on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building.
Tune in to us for the latest up-to-the-minute ECU, local, state
and national news. Pick up our news updates 8 times daily at
8 a.m 10 a.m. 12 noon, 2 p.m 3 p.m 5 p.m 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Pirate Talk, WZMB's hour-long sports show, highlights the latest
happenings in Pirate athletics and the rest of the sports world.
Tune in Wednesdays at 8 p.m. for the latest in ECU sports.
Listeners are invited to participate in Pirate Talk
by calling 328-6913.
01.3 FM
- East Carolina UmVersitv
ssst!
OlJH SECRET AGENTS
HAVE
CHOSEN YOU TO LIVE AT
Tar River
We're recruiting
residents who want
TO ENJOY AMENITIES
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214 Elm Street 5
- Gin in viii i, NC 27B5�
(919) 752-4225
kt&
e





The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 3,1996
5 11JN VI from page 5
ing unless he sat down. A fight nearly
broke out over the right to dance ver-
sus the duty to sit down like the rest
of the lazy crowd. Security made the
dancers sit down, and the crowd ap-
plauded the guy who was willing io
fight for his right to sit without being
disturbed by a joyous man dancing.
But not me. If you want to sit at a
concert, save yourselfsome money and
watch VH-1 at home.
After witnessing such a ridiculous
display of aggression and oppression,
I was so angered that the only thing
that made me smile was the thought
of Merchant kicking the bully in the
crotch while she danced around.
Merchant is an excellent per-
former, and she exudes a natural, sexu-
ally-charged stage presence many rock-
ers try to capture but few manage to
ensnare. She put on a good show; un-
BURGER&
route oa
1.99 pins tax
'�f;&fJ A
m or 2)
Sonic
Burger,
& Route 44
Big Drink
OFFER GOOD THRU
JUNE 30,1996
fortunately, I was too angry at Walnut
Creek and everyone around me to fully
enjoy the performance.
Fortunately, I calmed down by the
time Sting appeared and everybody got
to their feet and danced. For some rea-
son, the collective consciousness of
Walnut Creek indicated that it was OK
to stand up and dance if you wanted
to now that the main act was on stage.
This show was the fourth time I've
seen Sting solo, and staying true to
his nature he once again displayed solid
talent His new album, Mercury Fall-
ing, isn't as light and fun as his last
album, but it still illustrates a creative,
intelligent mind at work.
Unlike Merchant though, Sting
doesn't mind going back to his popu-
lar roots with the Police. The audience
constantly sprang up like a jack-in-the-
box when Sting crooned such songs
as "Roxanne" and the ever-popular
"Every Breath You Take
Highlights from his solo efforts
were the songs "Englishman in New
York which included a rap segment
sung by the saxophonist and "Frag-
ile which featured Sting playing
acoustic guitar as opposed to his usual
bass.
Sting is an old pro who has been
making music for two decades. He is
good at what he does, and judging from
Saturday night's performance he still
enjoys his art My only complaint is
Sting's unwillingness to vary his song
choices. When you include his Police
songs, Sting has an entire library of
songs which he could play. However,
time and time again he chooses the
same selections. I would like to see
Sting again in the future, but I would
also like to see him be a bit more dar-
ing than he has been in the past
Despite all of its problems and
disappointments, the StingNatalie
Merchant show was time well-spent
For the most part the performers dis-
played solid talent and a willingness
to put on a good show. I'm glad I went
but I'm still not sure if I ever want to
suck up to Ticket Master's price and
see another show at an arena as con-
fining and suffocating as Walnut Creek.
On a scale of one to ten, Sting
and Natalie Merchant each rale a seven.
Walnut Creek, however, rates a two.
J5
618 GREENVILLE BLVD. � 355-9815
C1996 America s Dnve-in Trust
SOWC a reflisterw iraoemark of
MnttTfl Orw m Trust.
rfmenicab'DrtKk
1JmJk from page 5
unpopular political beliefs, belong to
a strange religion, or like to wear
leather when you have sex, you bet-
ter keep it under your hat. Repress
it. Lock it away. Live in fear of its
discovery. No wonder there are so
many pinch-faced guys in business
suits out there.
But a lot of positions in our so-
ciety demand conformity. It seems
that out of all the freedoms we do
possess in America, the freedom to
be weird is not among them. And
that's too bad, because people are
inherently weird. We've all got our
idiosyncrasies and odd habits, and
when we keep them clamped down
they can blossom into full-blown pa-
thologies.
But all that is just kind of whiny
when you really think about it There
are choices that have to be made in
Help
Wanted
ECU TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS
ECU TRANSIT is looking for mature, dependable, and
outgoing individuals to
provide quality service for the transit system.
Must be a registered ECU Student or
incoming student with at least two or more semesters
remaining to work.
Punctuality is a must!
Must complete all training this summer to
start full work schedule for Fall semester.
Must have good driving record!
(DWTs and Frequently ticketed drivers need not apply!)
� North Carolina class "B" CDL license with passenger
endorsement is required.
We will help you obtain your license.
Previous experience is a plus, but not necessary.
Must be in good standing with the University.
For more information and applications,
stop by the ECU Transit office in Mendenhall (RM258),
or call 328-4724.
Monday - Thursday 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM
life and freedoms that sometimes
have to be surrendered. Still, it's bet-
ter than living in China, where the
government dictates how many chil-
dren you can have. It's also better
than living in some Third World dic-
tatorship where the death squads
come through periodically to weed
out traitors.
It's better than starving in Af-
rica, living under the constant threat
of war in Eastern Europe, dealing
with oppressive religious factions in
the Middle East, or living anywhere
that treats freedom like a bug to be
squashed underfoot.
So enjoy your cookouts and fire-
works tomorrow. Enjoy them with
the knowledge that, as much as
America sucks, things could be a
whole hell of a lot worse. That's what
all those people really died for 200
years ago, and that's definitely worth
celebrating today.
And by the way, I think I'll be
getting that hog dog with chili and
onions, if you please. It's my right as
an American.
3 JL Jvli from page 5
to help Erin get her daughter back
by putting pressure on Dilbe:k, threat-
ening to expose his club-hopping.
Then the regular turns up dead at a
lake where Lt. Al Garcia of Miami
Homicide (the always amicable
Armand Assante) is vacationing with
his family. From there the movie turns
and turns and turns around on itself
in the pulp crime novel way familiar
to avid Carl Hiaasen fans.
Although the story is captivating
and funny, it tends to fall down when
the camera turns to the strippers.
Most of their lines aren't needed for
the film to pro- ,�
ceed and their
stripping cer-
tainly isn't nec-
essary to the
plot. This is a
major drawback
for the film, one
that keeps it
from being a
truly good film.
Besides
that, the strip
routines aren't
the least bit
sexy, even
Moore's highly
touted ones. �������������
This is both good and bad for the film.
It's good because it conveys the sense
that these women are just doing their
job, going through the routine time
after time to earn the almighty dol-
lar. It's bad because it's boring and
bogs down the film's otherwise excel-
lent pacing.
The other unsightly flaw in the
movie is the ending. From what I un-
derstand, test audiences not only
laughed at all the wrong parts in the
body of the film, but also blanched at
the original ending in which Dilbeck
allegedly rapes Grant. Because
Reynolds is so likable and funny as
Dilbeck, the audience couldn't accept
this violent act from his character. So
the filmmakers did some re-editing to
Moore looks so
bored and
dispassionate in
her role that it
becomes easier to
forget she's in the
movie than it is to
root for her.
clean up the comic pacing and re-shot
an entire new ending. This new end-
ing has merits as a concept but fal-
ters seriously in its execution.
Even though Reynolds turns in
an eccentric performance as the white-
haired, addle-brained Dilbeck (one
that should have his agent's phone
ringing off the hook) and Robert
Patrick is equally good as the
bumbling, pill-addicted ex-husband, if
anyone deserves the outrageous sal-
ary Moore took home it is Ving
Rhames.
Rnames is best known for his
������ performances as
Marcellus Wallace
in Pulp Fiction and
Eriq LaSalle's
brother-in-law
Walter on NBC's
ER. He also ap-
peared earlier this
summer in the Tom
Cruise action block-
buster Mission Im-
possible. In Strip-
tease, Rhames
steals the show as
the Eager Beaver's
animal-loving, over-
protective bouncer,
"��������'����� Shad. His perfor-
mance alone could rate an eight for
its delivery. Every scene Rhames ap-
pears in adds another level to the rich
characterization of Shad, whose story
is so funny and compelling that you
end up wishing they had made the
film about him instead of Erin Grant
Unfortunately, that was not the case.
As good as this film is, it has
some serious flaws. If they had taken
as much time fine tuning the last
scene as they did getting shots of
Moore's butt and had taken out most
of the quick non-sequitor jump cuts
to strippers doing their thing, then
the film could have rated as h'gh as
an eight.
As it is however, Striptease rates
a mediocre six.
STRUTTER from page 5
his skin. The
blood flowing down
thought of it!
Things began to quiet down and
Peter Criss took the stage by himself
and sang "Beth These guys knew
tfteenoitU's only
6xeiU flighlclub
uk zfoack o� C�oss
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers'
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants need to call & register in advance.
Must arrive by 800
llpm-lamy?
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
r-
1
1
1 ,
I ECU
1
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
lLl STl DKNTS SPtCIAL
I McDonald
I
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
X, Dickinson Ave.
1
I
I
I
I
I
I (Behind John's Convenient Mart)
CONV.
MART
KISS right down to the center. After
massive applause, Peter jumped be-
hind the kit and began to play a drum
solo so in sync that it could have been
none other than the man himself. Not
only did these guys look and sound
like KISS, but they played their in-
struments the same way their forefa-
thers did.
After seeing the course of events
that led up to the guitar solo 1 fig-
ured that I was about to be let down
at any time. Luckily, I was wrong. Not
only did 1 catch a ten minute solo from
the spaceman himself, his expression
never changed and he gazed off into
the lights as he had been for the en-
tire duration of the evening.
Much deserving of praise was the
true essence of the band, its feminine
side, Mr. Paul Stanley. This guy had
it down. From the smiles to the shouts
to the kisses blown to the crowd, he
never let you forget how important
his presence was on that stage.
Stanley was an excellent frontman. He
let you know he was there and didn't
give a damn whether you liked it or
not. He got the show done, got paid,
took the make-up off, grabbed his girls
and left for yet another evening full
of festivities. Hopefully, it worked out
the same way for Strutter.
Hey, as close as these guys were
to KISS, I wouldn't doubt it
YOU'LL FIND A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE WHEN
2 BEDROOM
1050 SQUARE FEET
3 BEDROOM
I 350 SQUARE FEET
� PETS ARE ALLOWED WITH A FEE
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All UNITS HAVE WAI K IN CLOSETS FROST FREE REFRIGERATORS, SELF Cl EAN'NG c JvFNS
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� washer!dryer CONNECTIONS
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LOCATION: S
BLOCKS FROM
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$50 off June and July rent
Wilson Acres Apartments, Ltd.
752-0277
P.O. Bo 772
I860 E1st St.
Greenville, N.C. 27835-0772
I





8
Wednesday, June 3,1996
The East Carolinian
On the links at
Brook Valley
Players commit
to baseball team
Overton recruits
strong players for
next season
Dill Dillard
Senior Writer
After a sub-par year by the stan-
dards of the ECU baseball team, Head
Coach Gary Overton and his staff hit
the recruiting trail to fill holes in the
Pirate Roster. The first items Overton
and his staff needed to shop for were
position players to fill the gaps that
All-CAA second baseman now Phila-
delphia Philly Lamont Edwards and
co-captain outfielder Jason Head left
The purple and gold staked their
first claim in Garner where they found
Macon Jones, who is expected to fill
the hole at either shortstop or sec-
ond base. The Pirates also sought
another infielder from Belmont, N.C.
named Jason Linburger who can play
first base and is described as a power
left-handed hitter.
Despite the loss of Head and
Edwards, Overton's cupboard is still
not bare. This year's club was a more
potent offensive team and the Bucs
look to build on that with the combi-
nation of the incoming freshmen
along with key returning starters.
"We're not starting from scratch
by any means Overton said. "We
have four key players coming back
that we're ex-
cited about, that
being (catcher)
Tim Flaherty, (10
Steve Salargo.
(cf) Antaine
Jones and (lb)
Randy Rigsby
With a
nucleus such as
the one present
in Overton's pro-
gram, one would
think that if the
right players are
incorporated
into the ECU sys-
tem, in laymen's
terms, the Bucs
won't be bad.
"We want to
try to surround
these quality
players with tal-
ent in hopes of
not just to fill
offense Overton said.
This freshman class that has
more than enough offensive firepower
will be accompanied by N.C. State
transfer third baseman Ryan Massimo
who had to sit out
a year due to the
NCAA transfer
rule. Massimo will
bring an excellent
defensive game
along with solid
lumber to this po-
tential-filled squad.
Considering
Overton's usual
success with re-
cruiting in-state
talent to go along
with the nucleus
of proven starters
returning to the
squad. CAA con-
tention is close at
hand.
"I'm pleased
with the recruiting
year so far
Overton said. "We
have gotten play-
ers, all of which
'We want to try to
surround these
quality players
with talent in
hopes of not just
to fill positions in
the lineup, but to
make it a solid
lineup that will
produce a great
amount of
offense
�Head Coach Gary Overton
Course review for
potential golfers
this summer
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Note: This is the third install-
ment in a series of reviews of golf
courses in the GreenvillePitt
County area.
I know that the Brook Valley
Country Club, site of this year's
Michael Jordan Celebrity Classic, is
probably out of the price range of
most college students, but I'm go-
ing to tell you about it anyway.
First of all, it's the most con-
venient golf course in the area as
far as location goes. For the three
people who didn't come out to the
course this weekend, follow 10th
street away from the campus and
you'll eventually come to the inter-
section where you cross Greenville
�i
Boulevard. Go straight through the
intersection and take the first right
past the shopping center onto Ox-
ford Road. The club is on the left,
down the road a piece. Sounds like
directions to the OK corral, huh?
I was lazy
this weekend
and took the
shuttle from
Minges to Brook
Valley for the
Jordan Classic.
There were sev-
eral buses run-
ning, and I made
the round trip
twice, but I had
the same bus
driver each time. He obviously
couldn't drive a manual transmis-
sion, as we sputtered and jerked
through every gear. By the end of
the day. Dill Dillard and I were sar-
castically referring to the older
gentleman as Keanu Reeves
("There's a bomb on the bus").
Anyway, the course itself is su-
perb. The fairways are of outstand
H �
ing quality. The greens are good,
but on the same level as the other
local courses. They will deceive you,
however, as they're not as fast as
they look.
Brook Valley is not a really
long course, and
there is plenty of
shade and beau-
tiful scenery. Ac-
cording to Bryan
"the Mudd Man"
Mudd of WITN
Sports, who
played in the
Classic on Sun-
day, the course is
not as challeng-
ing as you might
think.
"You don't have to be a long
hitter to play well on this course
Mudd said. "If you hit it straight,
you'll be okay
That's the problem. If you don't
hit it straight, you'll be out of
bounds because the fairways are
See BROOK page 9
You don't have
to be a long
hitter to play well
on this course"
� Bryan "the Mudd Man"
Mudd of WITN Sports
positions in the
lineup, but to make it a solid lineup
that will produce a great amount of
are from North
Carolina, that are East Carolina type
players
Bunting Track, behind Harrington Field, will be
closed during the month of July due to a
construction project. The track is tentatively
scheduled to re-open for use on Monday August
5,1996 or upon completion of the project.
Scenes from this past weekend's
Michael Jordan Classic
5ee Sewice,
Summer programs
continue at Rec services
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
(Clockwise from left)
Michael Jordan
strolls down to the
number one green to
the crowds delight.
Jordan reacts after
missing a putt on the
number two green.
Former Pittsburgh
Steeler and current
sportscaster Lynn
Swann, signs
autographs for the
crowd.
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Interested in building for a
healthy lifestyle? The summer could
not be a better time to get involved
with recreational services. Rec ser-
vices has something for everyone,
from Intramural Sports to drop-in rec-
reation.
The Recreational Outdoor Cen-
ter (ROC) is the place to rent a wide
range of outdoor equipment. The
equipment is available to students,
faculty and staff. The ROC is a great
way to help plan a camping trip for a
weekend getaway or a day of fun at
low cost.
If you're interested in living with
the wildlife for a few days, the ROC
rents backpacks, sleeping bags, tents,
tarps. lanterns, cooksets, stoves and
coolers.
The ROC is open Monday
through Thursday 3:30 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. and Friday 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
The equipment rental rates are daily,
or on a three or seven day basis. Res-
ervations can be made in advance for
those who like to plan ahead. A valid
student ID or staff ID must be pre-
sented when borrowing equipment.
For those who enjoy the thrill of
heights, rec services also offers a
climbing tower. The tower is located
behind the Belk Allied Health Science
Building across from Ficklen Stadium.
It is open Tuesday and Wednesday
from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. through July
24. Everyone can be challenged at the
tower with routes ranging from be-
ginner to advanced.
Beginners are only allowed to
climb, not belay (spot the climber). If
you are just starting out and would
eventually like to become an advanced
climber, you must pass a written test
and perform certain skills (all skills
are taught during the school year).
Rec services offers day passes at $2
for students and $3 for staff and
guests. A five-punch card costs stu-
dents $10 and staff $15 and a semes-
ter pass costs students $25 and staff
$35. The tower is open every Wednes-
day to students and staff for free climb-
ing.
Rec services also offers drop-in
recreation. Drop-in recreation includes
access to Christenbury Gym, the
Equipment Check-Out Center.
Christenbury Swimming Pool, Minges
Swimming Pool, Christenbury Weight
Room and Garrett Weight Room.
Christenbury Gym offers a place
to play some oasketball with a group
of friends or even individually. Bas-
ketballs, tennis balls, tennis racquets,
racquetball racquets and much more
can be checked out in the Equipment
Check-Out Center.
You can also cool off or swim
some laps in Christenbury or Minges
Swimming Pools. Christenbury and
Garrett Weight Rooms offer a variety
of free weights and cardiovascular
equipment for all types of individual
workouts.
For more information on these
programs stop by 204 Christenbury
Gym or call 328-6387.
ECU accepted into
Conference USA.
At press time no officials could be
reached to discuss the details of
the plan. However, look for a full
story in next weeks paper.





m�a -v-
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 3,1996
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA
NEWSSTAND
The comic book store
919 Dickinson Ave.
1-919-758-6909
l-TMOCCo-mwClBM
We want you
to write sports
for us. It's that
simple.
Come by today
and put in an
application.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense ; - : - v v
� 24-Hour Message Service m 13�" wfiV
Drop-In Recreation
Christenbury GymnasiumMon, Wed, Fri Mon. - Thurs.11:30 a.m1:30 p.m. 4 p.m6 p.m.
Equiptment Check-out CenterMon. - Thurs. Fri.10 a.m6:30 p.m. 10 a.m2 p.m.
Christenbury Swimming PoolMon. - Fri. Mon. - Fri.6:30 a.m8 a.m. 11:30 a.m1:30 p.m.
Minges Swimming PoolMon. - Fri. Sun.4:15 p.m7 p.m. 2 p.m5 p.m.
Christenbury Weight RoomMon. & Wed. Tues.& Thurs. Fri.6:30 a.m8 a.m. 6:30 a.m6:30 p.m. 6:30 a.m1:30 p.m.
GarretMon. - Thurs.1 p.m6:30 pan.
Weight Room
Of" l&J2-�
& 4&
1996
w&tf sunal
32bu&becfe
with facial
For more imformatJon about the
following programs stop by 204
Christenbury Gym or call 328-6387
"where Me sun neiset sete "
$10.00 Off RegularYear
Membership
Coupon Expires 73196
START THE WEEKEND EARLY
� Professional, inntm ltrtU tii
� All fov Interior Construction
� frinU. lumfoiL MrMitiotei horn
� UwfleU Lin of Professional Tamiii Products
� Gift Certificates Available
-3.39VIITrTU
MNlTU Of JULY
10 Off
All Tanning Lotions
Coupon Expires 73196
m8"SessionTf6rT5"00"
plus 2 Free Sessions With Coupon
Coupon Expires 73196
All Games
at 7pm
Relax after classes
with WRNS THIRSTY
THURSDAY at
Grainger Stadium.
75 cent 12oz. drinks
all game!
fjROOlv from page 8
very narrow. Also, there is plenty
of sand and some big bodies of
water to make you talk ugly.
One of my favorite features of
the course is the names that are
given to each of the holes. Some of
the more amusing ones include: Wa-
tery Grave, Long John, Valley of
Sin. Bunker Hill, Little Joe, Para-
dise Lost. Baffling Brook and
Smooth Sailing.
The highlight of the tourna-
ment Sunday was the appearance
of Ronald McDonald. Ronald, of
whose establishment I am a proud
patron, was hanging out at the 17th
hole. He had this huge putter he
called "the McSinker which he
said had a maximum distance of
150 yards. When asked whether he
was a short game or a distance
player, Ronald said he had trouble
of a different kind.
"I've always had trouble with
the hole that has the windmill on
it McDonald said.
If you just won the lottery, are
a spoiled rich kid. or just want to
splurge, you can call the Brook Val-
ley Country Club at (919) 756-5500
for more information on member-
ships, tee times and prices.
Rating: This week's rating was
I based solely on the quality of the
1 course, landscaping, difficulty and
convenience, not taking into ac-
count the affordability or the eat-
ing facilities. On a scale ranging
from driver to putter, with putter
being the best, 1 give Brook Valley
a "McSinker
Ihings Really Move
In me Classifieds!
Advertise witn
us in
The fast
Carolinian.
9000
East Carolina University Student Union Films Commitee and Recreational Services
Natural Life Events
presents:
s.
ii
Next home stand 710-718
(800)334-5467
0H !im83, 100 foo, ipsat msr.
I'm So Excited I
Live On Campus
The Return of
FLEMING
FRESH AIR
Thursday, July 11
9:00 p.m. in the Flemin& Hall Courtyard
Raider of the LostflKk
Free popcorn and snowcones!
Bring lawn chairs and blankets!
No Alcohol!
For more information contact the Student Union Hotline at MX-MHH or Recreational Sentces at 32H-MH7.
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
"Last year I had an opportunity to live on campus and be
a winner. But instead I chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. 1 got stuck with utility, phone and cable bills.
The security deposit I had to pay for the apartment really
cut me short on money. I had to eat my own cooking
and then wash all the messy dishes. 1 even had to clean
my own bathroomYuck! I didn't have time to meet new
friends because I had to spend so much time cleaning
my apartment-not to mention shopping for groceries. I
had an 8:00 class, and searching for a commuter parking
space was a big headache. If I had lived on campus, I
could have just walked to class. Boy, did I learn from my
mistakes. Now I'm back on campus with my friends!
lavsrstty Housir.� ssrvicss
fj8stior,$? caH sea-toms (32&-4W3)
��
-ES





� t
�ft wifTiT-fci'iittii "I'liWi
10
Wednesday, July 3,1996
The East Carolinian
PIRATE.
I
I NOW THERE'S A 8R0KEM
MAW; OF COURSE, CAVM05
� CAN' Do THAT To A PSRSON.
' U SEE- WHAT.
i CAM Do.
V
Excuse Ml,
BUT WHAT
5frog�
THE.
I'VE Dove
SOAAErWWfr
Too HORKl&U
fRodim. r� l j
I BET ANP
LOST ALL U
QF MY WM PO
REirtpEER. you
�THINK.
YOU ARE
m
SPARE TIME
BY ANDY FARKAS
AND PAVEL , Both 'r
TRylNO- To OrCT-fO
AMERICA UHEKXTHfV
Wil �C EXCHANGE
' STUDENTS
UNFORTUNATELY THEy
doakde-o A Boat oll
OF RICE. A- RONi OCS-riMtD
To CRASH INTO AH ICE. 60R.O
IN THE NOKTH ATLANTIC
HEM AMIDST A
SEA OF 'PACE.
KONI , NOAH
�, MEETS 70HN, LAST
1 't'of the & heat lemon
WAlRuS
DAVE THEN R�30IN
ThS DUO. DRIVlAlfr Hs
MEW ftUVP MX RICE A
RONI 3000. ANP NOW WHAT?
you uy AJ yourself.
HERE'S A HiMT:
'ARE TIME
BY ANDY FARKAS
WHO ARE fHESE. frAH&LLRS,
WHAT HAS BECK BET' ?
W'Li. HE SET AIL 12- ?
WE JWT ?owr (cvow �?
wair Ma re l�e?
WHAT KU ME ���'?
"Too ufe For Quet,ohS,
Tut BCT tfA5 BCi-K 5lT
to finp our rue ansuek
n Tt Questions w seek
TuKU To THIS PA.OE
im nc paper hut week.
Help
Wanted
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
BRASSWOOD APTS.
One and two bedroom apart-
ments S285-S340. Water-
sewage, Free Washer-Dryer
Hookups. Quiet location
near Malls and Restaurants.
Call 355-4499
Brasswood apts.
Near Lowes
For Rent
Pitt Property Management
758-1921 "
1 08a Brownlea Dr.
12 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT
�WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bed-
room, range.refrigerator. washer, dryer
hookups, decks and patios in most units,
laundry facility, sand volley court.
Located 5 blocks from campus. Free
water, sewer, cable.
�WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1 st floor, located 5
blocks from campus.
�LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM.
appliances, water, basic cable, 5 block;
from campus. New ownership. $375
deposit, $375month
�AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BED-
ROOM, $275, on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bed-
room, on-site laundry.
EIhl
For Rent
AKC BASS
spad, black
eluded, all s
home, great
I
HOUND SIX months old,
tan, extra large kennel lo-
ts and medicines to a great
.i people. $250 (752-9523)
NON-SMOKING STUDIOUS FEMALE
roommate wanted to share 2 bedroom, 1 1
2 bath apartment. $175month 12 utili-
ties and phone. Washer Dryer. Call 754-
2419
ROOMMATE WANTED WYNDHAM CIR-
CLE Duplexes. 2br, 2 bath, fireplace, deck,
ceiling fans. $27512 utilities. $200 De-
posit. Lease available August 1st 752-0097
3 BEDROOM APTS ABOVE BW3S For
Rent - Rare Opportunities - Available June
1st For $775.00 a month. Please contact
Yvonne 758-2616. New Fire System and Se-
curity!
ROOMMATE NEEDED JULY 1ST to share
3 bedroom house close to campus. $250.00.
112 bath. Possible Pets. No furniture need-
ed. Call Kim at 830-9036
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2BR
apt; Available 81796; Rent is $167.50 per
mo. Non-smoker, grad student preferred &
must like cats! For more info call (910) 371-
3543
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 2 BR apartment near campus. 12 rent
& utilities; cable included in rent WD hook-
ups, dishwasher. Call Dawn 752-8401.
DOCKSIDE: NEW DEVELOPMENT
NEAR ECU ON RIVER FRONT
3 bedroom, 2&12 bath Townhomes
Pets allowed, 401b limit. Carport,
balcony, exterior storage room.
Amenities: washer&dryer included,
garbage disposal, dishwasher. Nothing in
the area compares Reasonably Priced!
Call Pitt Prop. Management at 758-1921
ROOMMATE WANTED TO FIND an apart
ment with for August Must be responsible
upperclassman with fun attitude and no para-
sitic boyfriend who'd want to move in. Call
(910) 845-2379
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR A three bed-
room house on First and Warren. $200
month plus 13 Bills. NEED ASAP. Please
call Rich or Shawn at 931-0940.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR apt
12 block from campus, 3 blocks from down-
town & 2 blocks from supermarketiaundra-
mat. Rent includes utilities, phone & cable.
757-1947
HOUSE MATE NEEDED! F or M. aircondi
tioned, private driveway, close to campus,
$250.00 each share electric, phone, non-
smoker must like goofy cat neat but not anal,
older student that is responsible, easy go-
ing, liberal does there own thing Call Jen-
nifer 758-6834. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
August 1 to share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom
apartment near campus. Own room and bath-
room. $163 per month. WD, DW. Call 758-
4325 Anytime'
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Duplexes
and Townhouses for rent Many locations to
choose from. Currently Pre-Leasing for the
Fall. Call Wainwright Property Management
756-6209
113 E 13TH ST. 1 BD1 Bath. Avail. 6-1
$200Month 830-9502
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share three bedroom house on
Meade St Close to CamDus. WD. AC.
$242month13 bills. Call 752-6999
115 E. 13TH ST 5BD2 Bath Avail. 8-1
$850Month. 830-9502
SUBLEASE AVAILABLE AUC 1 or before.
One bedroom close to campus. Water, sew-
er, cable. No deposit Pets okay. Call 752-
8985. Leave a message.
105 E. 11TH ST. 3 BD1 bath WD, DW,
Central AC $640Month. 830-9502
MELLOW FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED Immediately. Two bedroom duplex, W
D, fenced yard. $275 utilities and phone.
Must not mind animals. Dead head. Call 756-
5340
MF ROOMMATE. NICE HOUSE. Walking
distance to campus. Own room, washer and
dryer, and lots of extras. Call 752-8682
2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATHROOMS Town-
house. Excellent Location! A must see Place.
$400mo 752-9880 - On ECU Bus Route.
ROOM WITH LAUNDRY AND Kitchen priv-
ileges. Female Professional or Graduate Stud-
ent $200 per month plus utilities. Call Eliz-
abeth at 355-0687 evenings or Dr Adler's
residence 355-6203.
HOUSE FOR RENT: Graduate Students
only. Close to Hospital. 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath.
Could be 3 Bdrm. Central Heat & Air, Lots
of storage, Large yard wlarge dog run, New
fridge, Washdry hook-ups. One year lease
@ $600mo. References required. Call 321-
0278. Available August 1st
EASY-GOING, FUN-LOVING, clean room-
mate wanted ASAP to share 4-BR house on
Jarvis St Pet OK. Washerdryer, private
room wcable. MF call 752-9102
(910) 643-8197.
VFR 750 "93" MOTORCYCLE, metallic
white, corbin seat, Yosh pipe, center stand,
new tire and chain, optional clock, never
been down, all records, excellent shape, 24K
$6,200. 752-9523
WHITE 1992 GEO PRIZM with automatic
steering, AC, AMFM cassette stereo and
still under low mileage range. Call 321-7362
84 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE, V6, 3.8L,
108U, MLS, Mint Cond, AC, AT, PS, $1495,
NEC. Call Dmitry 413-0711.
"IT
Help
Wanted
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT EARN
up to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information
call:(206)97 l-3570exU53625
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR PART-time
work with flexible hours? ECU is looking
for a few good Pirates to contact alumni for
the Annual Fund program. $5.00 per hour.
Contact the Telefund Office at 328-4215
FUN & MONEY Progressive International
Company looking for outgoing people. Per-
sons who want to have fun while making
money. Call 355-6834
PERSONAL GROWTH: LEARN HOW to
be successful in personal life and business.
Looking for a few people that want to grow
and be successful. Call 7584229 2
PUBLIC RELATION INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE with Northwestern Mutual
Life. Must be good public speaker. Call Jeff
Mahoney at 355-7700
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT Stud
ents Needed! Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and Board!
Transportation! Male or Female. No experi-
ence necessary. Call (206) 971-3510 ext
A53625
ATTN: CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS.
Bail Bonders needed for Greenville Area. If
you are looking for an excellent paying part-
time job and career experience, give us a
call. Blackwell's Bail Bonding Co. 1-S0(W14-
9744 pager or 752-4807
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give us a
call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC - 919-
747-7686
ACCOUNT MANAGER: HOTTEST
BROADCAST Station in Eastern North Car-
olina WFXI Fox 814 is seeking Two Account
Manager's. One to service the Greenville Area
and another to service the Morehead City,
New Bern, Jacksonville Area. Candidate must
possess strong communication skills and a
willingness to learn in a fast paced lucrative
environment Broadcast sales experience is
a plus. WFXI Fox 8 & 14 is home of the
Carolina Panthers, Dallas Cowboys, the NFC
Football Television Schedule, The 1996
World Series, and Superbowl XXXI. If you
are interested in selling the hottest station
in the market Please send resume to GSM.
WFXI 5441 Television Place. Morehead City,
NC 28557. EEO.
WANTED: MALE HOUSEMATE NEEDEI
to assist physically disabled student Mus
be non-smoker. Will require about 35 hrs'
day wk Vacation 1 wkd6 wks off Pay i
negotiable; or willing to subsidize rent Cal
Kevin at (919) 467-5804
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING Travel the worli
while earning an excellent income in th
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Seasor
al & fuil-time employment available. No en
perience necessary. For more informatioi
call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53626
ACOUSTICAL GUITARIST AND SINGEI
wanted to play in Band. Classic and Progres
sive Rock. Please call Steve at 754-2171
Leave message.
L
Services
Offered
HOUSE CLEANING, WINDOWS TOO
$35.00 half day. ECU graduate student Cal
Nikki 746-7511 leave message.
THE GATHERING HTTP:WWW.TA
KEME.COM scholarships, academic & a
reer resources, internships, sports, news, en
tertainment, travel, music, debates am
1,000's of links.
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING for rain
Rent a canopy! Two canopies for rent
$125.00 delivered and set-up or $80.00 as-i:
per day. Deposit required. 752-5533 Ask fo
Jenn.
College Agent Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
Announcements
NEED A JOB? NEED MONEY? NEED EX
PERIENCE? Need a "jump start" towan
your career? Got at least an overall 2.0 GPA
Then Cooperative Education may be the an
swer for you! Inquire at the Co-op Office
2300 GCB. 328-6979. Help yourself by let
ting us help you!
CAREER SERVICES PROGRAMS: ORI
ENTATION to Career Services: An overviev
of services offered to seniors and graduati
students to assist you with the job search
Includes registration procedures, informa
tion on participating in the campus inter
views, and establishing a credentials file
Wed. July 10, 3:00pm: Wed. July 17
10:00am: Tue. July 23, 3:00pm. WORK
SHOPS: Interview Skills: Tue. July 16j
2:00p Resume Writing. Tue. July 9;
2:00pm; Thur. July 18.3:00pm. The staff wil
critique students' resumes andor conduc
mock interviews for practice by appointmer
only. Information on using the Internet f
career and job search information is al
available by appointment. The above acti
ties will be held in the Career Services Ci
ter, 701 E. Fifth St
-rHsasaBSH





Title
The East Carolinian, July 3, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 03, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1148
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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