The East Carolinian, June 26, 1996






-
June 26,1996
Vol 71, No. 61
The East Carolinian
Circulation 5,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pages
Storm season causes concern
Across the State
NAGS HEAD, N.C. (AP) - Vto-
ter pollution, a cold winter and in-
creased rockfish populations have
posed problems for commercial crab
fishermen in North Carolina, but
Virginia and Maryland crabbers are
really suffering.
Commercial crabbers in North
Carolina are benefiting not only
from severely depleted hard shell
crab stocks in Viiginia and Mary-
land, but also from a late season
run of soft shell crabs.
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) -
A court hearing brought together
hundreds of people supporting a
sheriff under fire after undercover
agents had sexual acts performed
on them to build the case against
an adult business owner.
The practice has been ques-
tioned by top government officials,
but local citizens have backed
Onslow County Sheriff Ed Brown,
who worked with ALE officers and
has publicly defended the officers'
tactics.
Across the Country
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
window industry is promising that
by next month, miniblinds linked
to lead poisoning in children will
no longer be available in the United
States.
The industry is responding to
pressure from the federal Consumer
Product Safety Commission, which
said Monday that aging plastic
miniblinds can deteriorate and turn
to poisonous lead dust, which chil-
dren can swallow.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) -
Three dimbers fell to their deaths
in a popular part of the Sandia
Mountains, tethered together as
they plunged down a steep diff.
The bodies of the three health
professionals were recovered early
yesterday.
The bodies were spotted Mon-
day about 800 to 900 feet below
10,678-foot Sandia Crest east of
Albuquerque
Around the Work)
ABERDEEN, Scotland (AP) -
The Makah Indians of Washington
state appealed yesterday for permis-
sion to hunt a few whales again in
a renewal of their andent culture.
Although commercial whaling
has been banned worldwide since
1986, the United States is seeking
approval of a five-whale quota for
the Makahs.
The Makahs want to hunt gray
whales, once nearly extinct but now
removed from the U.S. endangered
spedes list
QUEBEC (AP) - Rioters broke
hundreds of windows, looted shops
and set fire to a government build-
ing early yesterday as Quebec's holi-
day celebrations turned violent
Five police officers were in-
jured and about 80 people were
arrested in the rioting in the his-
toric Carre Youville district of
Quebec's old quarter. The damage
was estimated by police at around
$370,000.
The holiday, formerly known
as St. Jean Baptiste Day, is cel-
ebrated only in Quebec
Severe weather
calls for safety
measures
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
Tropical Storm Arthur is mak-
ing headlines only two weeks into hur-
ricane season. ECU'S Environmental
Health and Safety Office wants to re-
mind students and faculty about hur-
nranp ca
fofri.
"The threat of a hurricane is
always there Tom Pohlman of Envi-
ronmental Health and Safety said.
"People didn't think that (Hurricane)
Hugo would be a threat to Charlotte,
and it was
Pohlman encourages students
and faculty to prepare for disaster
ahead of time.
"The best thing to do is to be
knowledgeable and plan ahead
Pohlman said. Pohlman encourages
students and faculty to put together
a hurricane kit consisting of basic
supplies in case of an emergency. Most
supplies should be easily found
around the house and should be
stored in an easy to carry container.
The kit should include a first aid kit
and essential medications, a fire ex-
tinguisher, bottled water, rainwear
and blankets and battery-powered ra-
dios and flashlights with extra batter-
ies.
Alternate routes inland should
also be included in the kit along with
: marl man an.H a HpcrrinUnn rtf hnw
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to turn off utilities and appliances.
Several things can be done to
prepare for severe weather in addition
to the kit such as testing batteries
and filling gas tanks.
Pohlman said that in case a hur-
ricane warning is issued, there are
certain things students and faculty
can do to protect their homes and
valuables.
See STORM page 3
When the storm is forecast:
� Learn the evacuation route. If you
live in a mobile home, plan to
evacuate.
� Check with your insurarr company
to see what will be covered. Separate
policies are needed tor wind and flood
damage.
� Take a full inventory of your
personal property to help in filling out
daims List descriptions and take
pictures.
When the storm threatens:
� Check supplies and make sure you
have on hand: portable radio with
fresh batteries, flashlight, candles or
lamps, matches, first aid kit, canned
or packaged food that can be
prepared without cooking or
refrigeration, several days' supply of
drinking water (one quart per person
per day) and a full tank of gas in your
car.
� Watch television and listen to the
radio for hurricane position, intensity
and expected landfall.
� Prepare for high winds by boarding
up or taping windows and other
glass, anchoring objects outside,
bracing garage doors and lowering
antennas.
� Move boats and trailers dose to the
house and check mooring lines of
boats in the water.
� Put important papers in water proof
containers (take them along if you
evacuate) and move all valuables to
higher levels in your home.
When the storm hits:
� Stay indoors in an inside room away
from doors and windows. Don't go
out in the brief calm during the eye of
the storm.
� Keep television and radio tuned for
information form official sources.
� If you evacuate, take blankets, first
How you fare during a
hurricane can depend on
how prepared you are for it.
aid supplies and other essential items
to the nearest shelter. Don't travel
farther than necessary. Before you
leave, turn off gas, water and
electricity.
After the storm has passed:
� Beware of loose or dangling power
lines, and report them immediately.
� Walk or drive cautiously. Watch out
for debris-filled streets and weakened -
unuyco. wimnco emu mocv may uc a
problem.
� Use your emergency water supply or
boil water before drinking until local
officials say the water supply is sate.
Report broken sewer or water mains.
� Make temporary repairs to protect
property form further damage or
looting. Beware of unscrupulous
contractors who may show up.
� Notify your insurance agent or broker
of any losses
'Infomtalion taken from The Hem MhM and -
VVTVDNew�Chinnel11�-Hu�rtMntWadi,9rOM,
Head
Start
Future freshmen are
eager to see what they
will be learning in the
fall.
Photo by KEN CLARK
ECU fire safety
up to par
Road changes eliminate spaces
Amy L. Royster
Assistant News Editor
Traffic patterns around the mall will be perma-
nently changed on campus this week as part of the
Map courtesy of Student Services
The map above reflects the changes that will
begin on Alumni Circle. Upon completion,
there will no longer be a circular drive around
the mall.
mall redesign project.
According to Leslie Craigle, director of marketing
for business services, the traffic changes are needed
in order to accommodate the additions of the Cupola
and an extended mall area. When the changes are over,
there will no longer be a circular drive around the mall.
"The project is going to be an extension of the
mall area which will adjoin to the area in front of
the library Craigle said. "The project is being
handled by facility services
Craigle said that the mall project will enter a
new phase when Alumni Circle changes from one-
way to two-way traffic. Alumni Circle, which runs
along the north side of the Flanagan building, Stu-
dent Health Services and Joyner Library will end
with vehicles turning in to the Student Health Ser-
vices parking lot. The two-way portion of Alumni
Circle which presently runs from Faculty Way near
Student Financial Aid, toward Joyner Library, will
dead end near the library and the State vehicle lot
near Mail Services.
Pat Gertz, director of parking and traffic ser-
vices, said that the traffic changes would begin be-
fore the next phase of construction on the mall be-
SeeMAP page3
Improvements still
being made
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
The safety of the dorms at ECU
has been under investigation. Ac-
cording to recent news reports,
ECU did not do well when submit-
ted to a fire
safety inspection
by the North
Carolina Depart-
ment of Insur-
ance.
Jim Roberts,
the Deputy Com-
missioner of In-
surance at the
department, said
the initial report
was misleading
in regard to
ECU'S fire safety.
"Many of the
items on our re-
port are not code
violations. They J
are recommendations for optimal
safety Roberts said.
Roberts specifically mentioned
that the wording in the rough draft
of the report, which was the draft
that The Daily Reflector baed
their article on, was exaggerated.
For instance, the report mentioned
an "urgent" need for sprinkler sys-
tems in the dorms. In fact, sprin-
kler systems are not required by
code, but there are plans in the
works to install them.
"Sprinkling the dorms is to be
done at all 16 campuses, but it will
take five years Roberts said.
Regarding the fire alarm sys-
tems in the dorms, Roberts said
that they may not be as fancy or
have as many features as some of
the newer models available on the
market, but they do the job just as
well.
Those systems in the dormi-
tories were put in around 1980
he said, adding that that particu-
lar model is still on the market and
parts are still being manufactured
"There's a clear
distinction here,
from what is
required by code
versus what is the
most prudent and
safest thing to do.3
n
� Jim Roberts, the Deputy
Commissioner of Insurance
for them. "I would not have any res-
ervations about those alarms to-
day
While Roberts did stress that
ECU'S fire safety standards are es-
sentially up to par, he also said
there could be things done to im-
prove safety still more, such as the
sprinkler systems that are being
planned.
"There's a clear distinction
here, from what is required by code
versus what is
the most pru-
dent and safest
thing to do,
he said.
Roberts
mentioned
that some of
the old class-
room buildings
have fire alarm
systems which
still comply to
code, but
which he
would person-
ally consider
out-of-date and.
������������� in need of re-
placing.
The classroom buildings would
not be top priority for any
retrofittings which may be sched
uled, due mostly to the fact that
unlike dorms, no one sleeps in the
classroom buildings. In order of
importance, the high-rise dorms
with interior exits would be first,
followed by other high-rises, build-
ings with combustible structural
elements, laboratory buildings and
shop and storage buildings.
Roberts also mentioned that
ECU led the way in trying to make
the dorms safe from fire.
"ECU was one of the first cam-
puses in the UNC system to equip
the dorms with smoke detection
and fire alarm systems Roberts
said.
According to Roberts, there are
many things that can be done to
make the dorms at ECU even safer,
but they are up to the standards
required by the Department of In-
surance and any changes which
need to be made are in the works.
UjFgjffe
Plan your weekend with Coming Attractionspage 5
Ah, those carefree orientation dayspage T
All the action from Lake Kristipage O
Wednesday
Mostly Sunny
High 88
Low 72
Thursday
Mostly Sunny
High 86
Low 72
??W 5cjt reae� U4,
Phone
6366
2000
(newsroom) 328
(advertising) 328
Fax
328-6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.C1S.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Mudent Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
� i
I
!� g





4
Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
Alumnae land top jobs
New Swastikas Found At UNC-CH
A Davis Library employee found 30 books defaced with swastikas similar
to an earlier incident when 45 books marked with the symbol were discov-
ered at the Undergraduate Library in March.
Swastikas on 20th century German history books were found by an
employee who was shelving books.
The swastikas were written with a black magic marker on the outside
spine of books on varied topics that concentrated on German history.
Classroom connects students to the internet
The classroom of tomorrow is here, today.
Using over $112,000 in grants, donations and sponsorships, the Col-
lege of Business has converted a classroom into a fully computerized in-
struction room at Appalachian.
Designed for CIS students, this new classroom features 32 powerful
laptop computers, all of which are connected to the Internet. The instruc-
tor station includes a regular PC with a CD-ROM drive and a computerized
overhead projector allowing students to follow along more easily with teach-
ers from their laptop.
New DA policy: use fake ID, lose license for year
Underage drinkers convicted of using fake IDs to purchase alcohol
could lose their driver's licenses for a year due to a new policy from the
Orange County District Attorney's Office.
Director of Student Legal Services Dottie Bemholz said she had dealt
with many students given deferred prosecution for using a fake ID.
The new policy will become effective this summer. The D. A said he
based the change on the amount of effort it took to obtain fraudulent
identification.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from various college newspapers and CPS.
CRJME(SENE
BB&T awards
hefty promotions
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
Two East Carolina University
alumni recently climbed a notch
higher on BB&T's corporate ladder.
Dorothy G. Pruitt, an alumna
from the class of 1957, secured a place
on the Oxford local advisory board to
the bank. Pruitt said the position calls
for her to act as a director of the bank
at a local level. Her tenure began in
June.
While attending ECU, Pruitt was
a member of the home economics club
and received her bachelor's degree in
home economic education and a mi-
nor in science.
Pruitt taught in Granville County
Schools for 12 years and was a con-
sultant for the North Carolina Depart-
ment of Instruction for ten years.
During the nine years she served
as principal for the school system, she
was named the Principal of the Year
twice and led C.G. Credle Elementary
School to receive the National School
of Excellence Award in 1990. She is
also listed in Who's Who of American
Business and Professional Women.
During this time, Pruitt also
earned her master of education de-
gree in counseling at the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She
later went on to earn her doctorate
of education in administration from
Nova University in Florida.
Aside from her appointment to
the advisory board, Pruitt still man-
ages to make education an important
part of her life.
The Oxford native is a part-time
instructor at Vance-Granville Commu-
nity College and an adjunct professor
at Barton College, where she has su-
pervised student teachers for the past
four years. She is also a board mem-
ber of the Granville County Board of
Education.
In addition to her duties at the
bank and in the classroom, Pruitt has
been recognized for her outstanding
contributions to the community.
"My activities take up quite a
bit of my time Pruitt said.
In 1994 she received the
Governor's Award for Outstanding
Volunteer Service and is still active
in volunteer organizations.
"My background gave me the
opportunity to be with people, and it
gave others the opportunity to real-
ize my experience through community
activities Pruitt said.
Pruitt is also chairperson for
Leadership Granville, an organization
that runs annually from August to
March to "identify potential leaders
and further develop their leadership
qualities Pruitt said.
She is currently the president of
the Pickwick Papers Literary Club
and a deacon at the Oxford Baptist
Church.
Camille Smith, also an alumna of
the university, received a promotion
from the bank in late May. She started
working for BB&T-Parsons Insurance
Services in 1990 and is the current
business services supervisor to the
Dorothy G. Pruitt
firm, where she acts as an insurance
officer.
"BB&T-Parsons Insurance Ser-
vices is owned by the same entity as
the banking division, and is the larg-
est independent insurance agency in
North Carolina Smith said.
The Greenville native earned her
bachelor's degree in business admin-
istration in 1984.
Exchange opportunities pJK3 Si"
wide open for students i
I
I
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
June 21
False Report Filed - A mental patient at Pitt County Memorial Hospi-
tal called the ECU police department and filed a false report
June 23
AssistRescue - The ECU police assisted the Pitt County Memorial
Hospital Police in attempting to locate three people involved in a shooting
incident
Compiled by Amy L. Roystec Taken from official ECU police reports.
According to a recent survey, 73.4 percent of ECU students are interested in
some kind of international exchange program. However, the number of students
who actually participate in exchanges is much lower.
Dr. James Van Fleet and Dr. Linda McGowen of the International Affairs office
both say that the opportunities are there and the potential benefits great for stu-
dents who do decide to pursue either an exchange or a study abroad program.
"There are lots of opportunities. There are opportunities for almost every
student" McGowen said.
While the Office of International Affairs has been around for a long time, Van
Fleet who is the director, believes the program is not operating at its optimal level
and hopes to expand the program. Van Fleet came to ECU in JuV of 1995 from the
University of Toledo.
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The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 26,1996

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EXCHANGE from
"My interest is in being in the
South-I'm a Southerner, not a Yankee
Van Fleet said of his decision to leave
the University of Toledo.
Van Fleet said he was also attracted
to the fact that the International Affairs
office at ECU had some growing still left
to do.
�'It's always more fun where you can
be in a position to build up a program
Van Fleet said.
For instance, there have been hopes
to revive the International Studies mi-
nor.
"We have an International Studies
minor, which has been kind of dead in
the water for marry years Van Fleet said.
According to Van Fleet, there will
soon be a graduate level program, a
Master of Arts in International Studies.
It will be a 36 hour program consisting
of 12 credit hours of core courses, 12 in
the student's focus area, and 12 hours
comprised of an internship and master's
thesis.
Van Fleet compared the number f
international students who attend ECU
each year as opposed to other schools of
about the same size.
"A university of this size, like ECU,
growing in graduate programs, will have
a fairly substantial international popula-
tion he said.
Van Fleet quoted some approximate
numbers to back up his statement, say-
ing that other schools of ECU's size have
about 350 to 400 international students.
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page 2
ECU has approximately 70. He says the
International Affairs office is working to
increase those figures.
"Over the course of the past year
we have been getting ready to admit
international students in substantial
numbers Van Fleet said.
Having more international students
come to ECU could also increase oppor-
tunities for ECU students to go abroad.
This results from the fact that before a
student from here can go study in an-
other country on an exchange program-
which is usually the cheapest way to go-
another student from that country has
to come here.
Van Fleet stressed that international
exchanges and study abroad programs
are not the same thing: An exchange
program means that the ECU student
pays his or her tuition, fees, and prob-
ably room and board here at ECU, just
as if they were going to be here for that
year. Meanwhile, a student at the over-
seas destination has done the same at
their home university, and then the stu-
dents simply switch places. The only ad-
ditional cost are those of overseas trans-
portation and spending money.
In contrast a study abroad program
means that the ECU student pays the
program fee directly to the school they
will be going to, which is generally much
more expensive.
Another difference is that an ex-
change program student will be enrolled
in classes right alongside the native stu-
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dents of the foreign country, taught by
that countries' teachers and subject to
all the same rules.
But a study abroad program, most
of the time, would keep all the American
students together and they would be
taught by American teachers, with the
occasional guest teacher from the host
country.
Van Fleet said the prospect of go-
ing to a foreign country for a semester
or a year is a daunting one, and that a
summer study abroad program lasting
only a few weeks may seem like a much
more viable option to some students. He
said that it was his belief that any experi-
ence abroad had its benefits.
While the journey to an overseas
exchange is a long one, it is a goal within
reach for anyone who wants to go.
McGowen, who is the overseas op-
portunities coordinator, is available in the
International Affairs office to help stu-
dents understand their choices in study
abroad and exchange programs.
"We can help students find the op-
tion that's best for them McGowen said.
McGowen encourages students to
keep an open mind about what kind of
overseas experience they want
"A lot of students come in with the
idea that they want to go to a particular
location. And that may not be the best
way to start McGowen said.
Both Van Fleet and McGowen
JYLA. Jl from page 1
gin?.
"The work to the road is prob-
ably already started Gertz said. "It
(Alumni Circle) will be officially
closed off Friday
According to Craigle, the por-
tion of Alumni Circle which cur-
rently runs in front of Joyner will
be closed in order to be incorpo-
rated into a pedestrian area of the
mall.
Gertz said that in the process
of redesigning the mall, a number
of parking spaces will be eliminated
or transferred to other areas. Pa-
tient parking will be relocated be-
tween the Student Health Services
building and Joyner Library. Con-
tractor parking will be located in
the same lot.
Parking along Alumni Circle
will be eliminated July 1. Additional
Staff parking will be located in the
lot south of Joyner.
"The old commuter lot behind
� Joyner is now a university regis-
tered lot Gertz said. "Staff can
park there now
Updates and details about this
and other projects taking place on
ECU's main campus can be found
on the university's home page, un-
der a link entitled Parking Adjust-
ment Notices.
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agreed that students need not confine
themselves to considering only English-
speaking countries such as England or
Australia.
Van Fleet had examples of countries
which speak a foreign language but have
instruction in English, such as Norway,
Sweden, the Netherlands, and Finland.
On the other hand, he said, if a student
plans to go to a country such as France
or Germany, they need to know the lan-
guage.
McGowen said that most of the time
it is possible to find a school that caters
to a student's particular academic inter-
ests. For example, Jyvaskla University in
Finland has excellent programs in health
and fitness, while De Montford Univer-
sity in England is strong in literature and
theater.
McGowen also cautions students
that the process of applying for any kind
of overseas study and preparing for the
experience is a long one. and students
should start early.
"A year in advance is not too soon
she said. "There are some places where
you can apply in spring and go in fall
Once the application process is done
and the students are accepted, the Inter-
national .Affairs office can also help stu-
dents prepare for their trip. There is al-
ways at least one orientation meeting.
"We talk about matters like health
and safety, insurance, traveling, what
documents you need, passports-in some
cases you need a visa or a residence per-
mit" McGowen said. J
"We talk about educational systems
in ether countries, what people's ofc
cems are and what their expectation"
she said. y
While applying and preparing for
study overseas is not easy, both Van Fleet
and McGowen say students should put
forth the effort
"It does enhance job prospects, and
it is an enjoyable experience Van Fleet
said.
"I would encourage students to keep
their interest up, because it can be the
most significant part of their educational
involvement It's something students can
look back at and say. I learned more in
that experience than in all my college
years put together McGowen said.
The Office of International Affairs
is located at 3t�6 9th street In addition
to the catalogs on study abroad and ex-
change programs, there is a travel cor-
ner with guide books and tourism infor-
mation from various countries. Any of
this information is available for students
to browse.
�3 1 OIvJVl from page 1
"The type of damage a storm
causes in Greenville! is different from
the coast Pohlman said. "It depends
on the situation; there could be heavy
rains to flooding, wind damage, tor-
nadoes
"The best way to protect valu-
ables is to try to cover everything
susceptible to damage with plastic
covering Pohlman said. "They might
even want to go as far as boarding up
windows
Pohlman stressed the importance
of staying calm and listening to
weather reports. Computer hard
drives and software should also.be
backed up and stored in a dry plaice
at shoulder level. All electrical appli-
ances should be unplugged and valu-
ables need to be moved away from
windows.
Pohhnan also reminds students
that a hurricane is not an occasionlo
party. "The best thing for people to
do is to get further inland and away
from the storm he said.
"If you're caught in a building
Pohlman said, "stay inside, away from
the windows and near the center of
the building. After the storm, walk or
drive carefully, watching for dangling
power lines and scattered debris.
Snakes and insects may also be a prob-
lem. Also, be sure to check for spoiled
food and contaminated water supplies
before eating and drinking
Students and faculty should also
be aware that ECU has a plan for
weather emergencies as well. The urji
versity worked in conjunction with the
city of Greenville to establish a hanil
book outlining procedures for each
department to follow to minimize the
damage to the university.
"University housing and facilities
services also have preset plans how
to respond to the weather as a storm
watch turns to a warning Pohlman
said.
Hurricane season lasts from June
through November. On the average,
for every 100 tropical disturbance
every year, only ten become tropical
storms and only six develop into hur-
ricanes.






Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
No matter
how hard
orientation
students try to
fit in, they
stand out like
sore thumbs.
You've seen them walking around on campus. Scores
and scores of new freshmen going through the orienta-
tion tours and trying hard not to look scared or new.
It's a lost cause though.
You can always pick them out of the crowd. They're
the ones walking around clutching bags from the student
store. (Right now they don't care that the prices are too
high, they're just happy to be in college.) The other dead
give away is the map. You recognize all the signs because
not too long ago that was you.
Oh sure, now that you're a big time senior, you won't
admit that there was a time when you couldn't find
Mendenhall, but you also heard someone mention the mall
area once and got happy because you thought there was
shopping to be done on campus. At night, when you
thought everyone had settled in for the evening, you and
your equally clueless roommate would sneak back on main
campus with your maps and try to learn where every-
thing was so that when August came you could walk
around looking informed. It was a good plan, but it didn't
work because when you got your schedule it didn't have
the location of your classes written in plain English. How
were you supposed to know "BB102" meant your class
was in room 102 of Brewster's B-wing? Sure, now it's ob-
vious, but at the time you were stumped, and in between
classes you still found yourself sneaking to the bathroom
for another quick peek at your map.
And don't forget the culture shock of having to go in
the student store for the first time and actually buy books.
What ever happened to the days when the teacher passed
out the books you needed and the only fee involved was
85 cents at the end of the year because you forgot to
erase the pencil marks?
But orientation wasn't all bad. Your mother was a safe
distance away and you were free to discover the joys of
downtown. You'll never forget your first ride on "the drunk
bus the shuttle that transported all the crazies to and
from west campus on Thursday nights. You came and went
as you pleased, hardly got to sleep before 2 a.m. on any
night and you got phone calls after 12:30 a.m.
Life was grand.
You didn't even have to go to class, and most of the
time you didn't (Ignorance really is bliss.) You lived the
life of a rock star until December. You had to go home
again. Your mother was there and she hadn't changed. It
was torture, you were bored senseless and then when you
thought it couldn't get any worse your report card came.
Well, your carefree first semester had placed you on aca-
demic probation, and you had a choice of which class you
wanted to take over first.
Now you can laugh at that first year. You've grown
older and at least more experienced if not wiser. You've
redeemed yourself. And now when you see all of the ex-
cited, fresh new faces on campus, you can't help but grin
and remember the immortal tune from All in the Family
"Those were the daaaays
The East Carolinian
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Jay Myers Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatiey, Electronics Editor
Brandon Waddeli, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Chris Walker, Staff Illustrator
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Randy Miller, Production Assistant
Eltyn Felts, Copy Editor
Deanya Lattimore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity.The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publlation. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor,The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
3284366.
If YU JJANL A Cc?MPUAlNT 6?R
Cc?MMtNT WRJTL A LLiTTCtZ JO
Ttfc CPJTtfRJ
AH letters must be:
�?typed
�� 250 words or less
� include name, major, year, and telephone number
Drop your letters by the Student Publicatic
(2nd floor) across from Jovner Library or rr
), to the Editor, Student Pubs, btefe
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353;
w w
'On a par with the atomic bomb, television
is the most important invention of our
century
� Newton Minow, media critic, author, 1995
If you have an opinion, good
grammar, and an ability to
express yourself well in writing,
then we may just have a job for
you. The East Carolinian is now
accepting applications for
opinion columnists. Apply at our
office today on the 2nd floor of
the Student Publications
Building across from Joyner.
�'���
���� ' " �)'�





Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
Mttfle
TfiwleleuceuA
Hunchback renews
animated faith
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
The Southern Baptist Conven-
tion is angry at Disney for providing
health benefits to its gay employees,
and they are expressing this anger by
boycotting Disney World. I doubt any
member of this religious organization
is going to see Disney's latest ani-
mated feature, The Hunchback of
Notre Dame, and I doubt they would
approve of the film if they did see it
Disney's latest entry in its ani-
mated library is filled with controver-
sial elements that, ironically, apply to
the Southern Baptist situation. The
film's hero is a societal misfit, the vil-
lain is a Minister of Justice who uses
religion as a justification for hate and
violence, and the story's central theme
revolves around tolerance of others
despite differences. No matter your
stance towards Disney as a corporate
entity, their animated features tend
to tower above other animated feature
films, and Hunchback, as it turns out
is a giant film that ranks with Disney's
best
The story, inspired from Victor
Hugo's novel, is filled with the classic
fairy tale elements that have made
such Disney fare as The Little Mer-
maid and Beauty and the Beast so
popular. Our unlikely hero is
Quasimodo
(voiced by Tom
Hulce), a physi-
cal freak of na-
ture who is basi-
cally imprisoned
in the cathedral
towers of Notre
Dame. While
Quasimodo may
by a monster on
the outside, he is
the epitome of
gentleness on
the inside.
Quasimodo's
solitary life is
given a jolt when
he meets
Esmeralda (Demi Moore), a gypsy who
believes in freedom. Through her,
Quasimodo experiences his first taste
of tenderness and affection.
The film's conflict comes in the
form of Judge Frollo (Tony Jay), a righ-
teous man who desires to clean the
world of sin through violence and fear.
When Frollo centers his wrath to-
I doubt any
member of The
Southern Baptist
Convention is
going to see The
Hunchback of
Notre Dame, and I
doubt they would
approve of the film
if they did see it.
wards Esmeralda, Quasimodo dares to
leave his prison and help. Tagging
along with our hero is Phoebus (Kevin
Kline), a soldier who disagrees with
Frollo's politics
and who is also en-
amored with
Esmeralda.
Hunchback
works so well for
several reasons,
and a big one is the
simple fact th t
Disney seems to be
going back to ba-
sics here by once
again tapping into
the fairy tale genre.
One reason The
Lion King and
Pocohontas didn't
totally succeed
from a narrative
perspective is because Disney was out
of its territory with those stories.
Those films tried to squeeze large,
complicated concepts into Disney's
tight structures. However, a Disney
film is best when it bases itself in a
simple concept and builds from there.
See HUNCHBBACK page 7
Escape
from the
sun
Luba Eribo attempts to
escape the searing,
sweaty Greenville heat
under the shade of a
tree outside the
General Classroom
Building.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
,
7e One 76at
Shakespeare receives
decidedly modern twist
CD Reviews
Madball
Demonstrating My Style
Imperial Teen
Seasick
Some films never make it to the
Emerald City. Some are too contro-
versial. Some are too small. What-
ever the reason, we just never get to
see some mighty good movies on the
big screen. When they hit video, how-
ever, they're ours for the taking. This
series will look at some of the films
that didn't make the Greenville cut,
the ones that got away
Jay Myers
Assistant lifestyle Editor
Whether you like Shakespeare or
not, there's no denying that he has a
mass appeal. If you
want guaranteed
critical praise as a
1 ector. actor or
cinematographer
then you make a
film of a
Shakespearean
play. The new ver-
sion of Richard III
is no different, for it
is truly worthy of
the highest acclaim.
In recent years,
there have been a number of excel-
lent renditions of the Bard's works
done on film. The most accessible and
cinematically powerful versions have
been done by Kenneth Branagh,
whose Henry Kand Much Ado About
Nothing were box office winners.
Branagh also starred in a new version
of Othello with Laurence Fishburne
in the starring role that was well re-
ceived. And let's not forget Mel
Gibson's Hamlet, another big budget
Shakespearean piece that drew people
in.
All of these films had big name
actors in the leading roles and lots of
money dumped into their worldwide
promotion. However, such was not the
case for Richard III, and so it has
passed by the big screen with only a
fraction of the attention that was paid
. to the others.
Luckily, it is
now out on
video and may
be enjoyed by a
(hopefully)
larger audience.
Perhaps
the reason the
film didn't gar-
ner the
populace's at-
tention and
their money at
the theatre window was because the
setting of the film was so radically dif-
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is just
what it claims to be: a very tiny
drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opin-
ion. Take it as you will
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Ian McKellen
chews up the
screen with his
deliciously evil
portrayal of
Richard III.
See RICHARD page 7
KMFDM
XTORT
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
In the wake of the break-through
and subsequent break-down of alter-
native music, in the current spas-
modic music scene melange of soul-
ful hippy wannabes, kiddie punk all-
stars, 1970s cock rock flashback art-
ists and those enduring soul divas,
it's nice to see that some alty rock
peopL are sticking to their guns.
Three discs that crossed the TEC
Lifestyle desk recently proved this to
me. Even though their musical pedi-
grees are miles apart, Imperial Teen's
Seasick, Madball's Demonstrating
My Style and KMFDM's XTORT
seemed to make a natural joint re-
view.
Starting with the most user-
friendly of these bands, we consider
Imperial Teen. Two of the band's
members are virtual newcomers to
the mujac world, while the other two
are seasoned veterans. But even
though former Sister Double Happi-
ness drummer Lynn Perko and cur-
rent Faith No More keyboardist
Roddy Bottum have been paying
their musical dues for a while, Impe-
rial Teen manages to sound genuinely
fresh and earnest
This happy outfit belongs to that
lovely pop music school that writes
happy-sounding songs with mean, bit-
ter lyrics that make you wince and
laugh at the same time. They're in
good company; people like Matthew
Sweet, Too Much Joy and even Elvis
Costello have built careers on this
kind of thing.
A good example of this happy
bitter split is Seasick's opening track,
the eponymous "Imperial Teen
Amidst a stream-of-consciousness
litany of bizarrely pessimistic lyrics
comes the inspired line, "One fat lip,
one black eye, one bat True love's
not worth much more than that
Imperial Teen
And, punctuated by some nice,
raunchy punk guitars, that's pretty
much the way Seasick goes.
Moving right along, we come up
just short of the bitter, ugly, heavily-
tattooed young men who make up
our second band, hardcore patriots
Madball. Their latest Demonstrating
My Style, has all the attitude and
heavy, heavy guitars you'd expect
from a hardcore album in the vein of
bands like All and Gang Green.
No, you're not dreaming. This is
1996, and yes, hardcore did indeed
die around the same time as glam
metal. I know it you know it, and
hell, even Madball knows it But they
refuse to let go.
Don't believe it? Then look no
further than a little tune called
"Hardcore Still Lives Other Madball
song title gems include "Live or Die
"True to the Game "Streets of
Hate" and (my favorite) "Ball of De-
struction
With titles like that, they've
gotta be for real. There's a sort of
funny, almost-Danzig-like cheese
whiff permeating this album, and I
must admit that I dig it. What can I
say? They make me laugh.
The best way to sum up Madball,
Demonstrating My Style, and the
entire '90s hardcore movement for
those of you who still don't get it is
to quote the opening lines of the title
track: "The years pass and people
change But I'm stayin' true to my
See ALTERNATIVE page 6
Avoid food
poisoning
GradyShue
ECU School of Medicine
ca s
� (' m JV aj

Food poisoning has caused much illness and even death in the United
States, especially that associated with hamburger meat and chicken. As a
consumer, what can you do to prevent food-borne illness?
� Make grocery shopping your last stop before going home and put food
into the refrigerator and freeze immediately.
� At the grocery store, frozen food should be rock hard and refrigerated
food should be cold to the touch.
� At home, make sure your refrigerator is set to 40 F and your freezer to
OF.
� Ifyou plan to use meats within a few days, place them on a plate in the
refrigerator so their juices will not run into other foods.
� Thaw food in the refrigerator or with the microwave, never on the
kitchen counter.
� Cook food thoroughly. Red meats should be brown in the center, poul-
try should have clear juices when prepared, fish should flake with a fork, and
eggs should be firm, not runny (ovei-easy).
� When mkrowaving, cover the dish with a lid or plastic wrap to hold the
heat in and thoroughly warm the food. Also, turn and stir the food oftea
� Usi clean plates, not those that held the food before cooking.
� If food has been out for more than 2 hours, throw it away.
� If you are unsure about a food's safety, throw it out
Do you
have
KodiAzarl
ECU School of Medicine
gas?
We have all experienced the problems
that a bowl of chili can cause us and the
people who happen to be around us. But did
you know that behaviors other than eating
collards and beans can cause intestinal gas?
� Chewing sugar-free gum: Some sugar
See HEALTH pagi 6
I've never liked children's mov-
ies.
I didn't even like them much
when I was a child. Anytime Holly-
wood sets out to make entertain-
ment for kids, they get it wrong.
Anything labeled "For Children" is
bound to have some stupid cutesy
puppet or anthropomorphic tree
sloth on hand to yuk it up for the
kiddies. The adults are generally
treated as buffoons, the plots are
blandly non-threatening, and it's all
just an uninteresting mess.
Whenever people talk about
something being too serious or too
violent or too intense for children,
what they're really saying is that it's
not boring enough. It hasn't been
watered down until it's more devoid
of taste than a jar of Gerber's
strained peas.
This debate has risen in some
circles over Disney's new animated
feature, The Hunchback of Notre
Dame. It's too dark, some parents'
groups are saying. The evil villain
is too evil. The ending isn't happy
enough. To my mind, these people
are being incredibly over-protective.
Granted, I watched my fair
share of "safe" stuff when I was a
kid. But most of it was on televi-
sion, where only the worst shows
reach the insipid level of most
children's films. But still, Saturday
mornings were filled with safe pro-
gramming, and I'm sure I had my
favorite tree sloths at some point
or other.
I suppose I was also force-fed
morals and lessons and the like
from the preachy kidvid fare de-
signed to "teach kids a little some-
thing while they're being enter-
tained Another way to keep things
safe, apparently, is to not only im-
plant lessons in the stories, but to
spell them out so clearly that the
kids can't miss them. Thankfully, I
tended to avoid that crap when pos-
sible, preferring the message-free
likes of Scooby Doo to the more
heavy-handed stuff.
Still, I logged a lot of hours in
front of Fat Albert just like every-
body else, and there's seldom been
as message-heavy a series as that
one. That show was fun, but man
was it ever preachy.
The lessons that really stuck
with me were the ones I figured out
all on my own. On Scooby Doo, it
was simple: crime (and dressing up
like a ghost to scare people away
from the scene of your crime)
doesn't pay. As modern-day kidvid
star the Tick would put it "Evil is
See DROP page 7
�? ,





Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
CD Reviews
Percy Hill
Straight On 'Til
Morning
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
Ask anyone who may have seen
Percy Hil! at the HomeGrown festi-
val and they'll tell you just how ma-
jestic this band is. Although their
live performances seem to be able
to impress everyone, their second
album, Straight On Til Morning,
will not even come close in com-
parison.
The thing with most live bands
today is that their albums don't
hold the intensity that one would
feel at a live show. It's almost like
false representation if you think
about it. A band like this needs to
be recorded so delicately. The
sound has to be there.
When the album starts off
you'll hear an upbeat tune called
"Lifetime When the album ends
you'll hear a tune called Tree at
Last" All the rest of the material
seems to just blend in the wash.
Straight on Til Morning, al-
though not easily categorized lyri-
cally, could prove to be one of the
most impressive vocal albums on
the roots scene this year. Although
the lyrics sound a little bit like
Phish and the music sounds a little
like Purple Schoolbus, don't be
afraid to pick it up and explore.
The sextet evolved at the Uni-
versity of New Hampshire in April
of '93. They have recorded two al-
bums since then and have taken
their spirits to the road. The band
is composed of Nate Wilson (key-
boards, vocals), Zack Wilson (per-
cussion), Jeremy Hill (bass), Tom
Powley (guitar, vocals), Joe Parrell
(guitar, vocals) and Dylan Halacy
(drum kit).
The most amazing thing about
Percy Hill is that no band member
is singled out It seems that every-
one works, plays, and writes well
together. Having something like
that in common when you're in a
band is like being three steps ahead
in a chess game: it's where you need
to be.
On two songs, "Hi & Lo" and
"When I Go the band is joined by
Stephen Guerra on soprano saxo-
phone. They were the most relax-
ing songs on the album. It's like
someone came into this room where
these guys were jamming and just
dimmed the lights a little. Its good
to see how one musician can make
a difference.
The only advice that I can give
when listening to Percy Hill is not
to compare them with anyone else.
Just enjoy it. If you get the chance,
see these guys live. It's where they
represent themselves to the high-
est level. If you don't get the chance
to see the live show, light a candle,
breathe, and let Straight on Til
Morning slide you into oblivion.
ALTERNATIVE from pages
ways Hardcore is my life, I'll carry
the name Demonstrating my style
It don't get much more hardcore
than that
In the same sort of true-to-your-
school vein, we arrive at German in-
dustrial powerhouse KMFDM. These
guys have been kicking around the
industrial scene for years and they've
always had the same problem. Each
release would feature one or two re-
ally head-crushing tracks, but the rest
of the album seemed kind of flaccid
in comparison.
But, after last year's grinding
Mortal Kombat soundtrack and a col-
laboration with members of indus-
trial giants Ministry and the Revolt-
ing Cocks, KMFDM has hit a new
stride on XTORT. A successful mix-
ture of heavy guitars, dance beats,
soulful choruses and industiial
music's ever-present mechanical
rhythms, this album is a definite step
above previous efforts.
Out of a set of ten strong tracks,
my favorite is the eerily-filtered and
lyric-heavy "Dogma In this song,
with guest vocals from Nicole
Blackman, we get lots of cool lines
like, "Let's stop saying 'Don't quote
me' Because if no one quotes you
You probably haven't said anything
worth saying
That's a little different from the
usual choppy, slogan-heavy lyrical
content of KMFDM, but it's still nice
stuff.
A solid album all the way
around, XTORT also gets at least half
a letter grade up because of the bom-
bastic propaganda-style cover art.
KMFDM albums are always striking
to look at, but XTORT has particu-
lar power.
So that's the state of alty rock
these days. While the great majority
of alternative styles have either
drowned in their own popularity or
been watered down into bland formu-
las, these three bands give us some
pure, unadulterated alternative music
Of course, as quickly as the MTV
machine is chewing up sounds (I hear
the skaloungesurf scene is hitting
the banquet table next), any of these
bands might be going in the Buzz Bin
even as I write this. Maybe that's good.
Maybe it means that the Top 40 charts
actually represent an even playing
field for the first time in my memory.
If that's the case, I wish these
bands luck. They're not incredible, but
they do deserve their time in the sun
a lot more than certain other bands I
could name
Oh, all right I'm ragging Hootie
and Silverchair again. Can I help it if
they suck? Geez
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Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
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THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
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Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Wednesday, June 26
Puddleduck
at Peasant's Cafe
Thursday, June 27
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Nameless?
at the Attic
Friday, June 28
The Ultraviolet
with Cravin' Dogs
at the Attic
All God's Children
at Peasant's Cafe
Saturday, June 29
Strutter
at the Attic
KISS Tribute!
Blue Miracle
at Peasant's Cafe
Happy VanGogh
at Underwater Cate
Sting
with Natalie Merchant
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Tuesday, July 2
Daddy's Dyin Who's Got the
Will?
at the ECU Playhouse,
McGinnis Theatre
HEALTH from page 5
free gums contain the artificial sweet-
ener sorbitol. which cannot be di-
gested. However, the bacteria in our
gut can use it, and this can create gas.
� Soft drinks: The gas bubbles
in soft drinks and other carbonated
beverages usually are released
through the mouth, but some can go
the other way and cause intestinal gas.
� Guzzling and drinking
through a straw: Anytime you gulp
liquids, you are swallowing large
quantities of air which can become
trapped. This problem is even worse
when you drink from a straw. As with
soft drinks, if it doesn't go up, it's
got to go down.
� Stress and caffeine: Stress and
caffeine cause acid buildup in the
stomach. This acid can destroy the
vaive which keeps gas from coming
back up.
BURGER&
route aa
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� plus tax
(1 or 2)
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wmmjammsmmmm
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 26,1996
RICHARD from page 5
Mondays: 9 Oz. Prime Rib
includes choice of starch and saladi only S9.99
Domestic Drafts only S1.00
Wednesday: "Restaurant Appreciation Night"
�1 for 2 until 2
($2.00-2oz. rail highballs until 2 AM)
Staying open longer for your business!
Fridays: $3.99 Margaritas
"Biggest Glass in Town"
Every Night: "Pargo Goes Progressive"
(Today's college selections after 9PM)
"We serve full Menu until the minute we c
1M-TH 12 AM, Fri & Sat 1 Am, Sun 11 PM)
ferent. It takes place in England in
the 1930s, quite a bit later than the
historical Richard's time.
The setting must be the reason.
It certainly wasn't because of a lack
of big name stars. Although Ian
McKellen's name may not be instantly
recognizable in the role of Richard III
(although after this film it should be-
come so), Robert Downey, Jr. and
Annette Bening's names are as Lord
Rivers and Queen Elizabeth, respec-
tively.
This makes it doubly significant
that in this ingenious take on old Bill's
tale of power and corruption, Bening
and Downey are the only actors whose
performances mar an otherwise per-
fect production. Both talents are
wasted in this film, with Downey
overemoting and Bening being almost
wooden. They are detrimental to the
overall film because none of the
scenes in which they appear are
helped by their presence.
On the other hand, Ian McKellen
chews up the screen with his deli-
ciously evil portrayal of Richard III.
McKellen's Richard contains the per-
fect blend of charisma and ruthless-
ness. In fact, he is so charming that
the audience is very tempted to cheer
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Help
Wanted
fanit
ECU TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS
ECU TRANSIT is looking for mature, dependable, and
outgoing individuals to
provide quality service for the transit system.
Must be a registered ECU Student or
incoming student with at least two or more semesters
remaining to work.
Punctuality is a must!
Must complete all training this summer to
start full work schedule for Fall semester.
Must have good driving record!
(DWI's and Frequently ticketed drivers need not apply!)
North Carolina class "B" CDL license with passenger
endorsement is required.
We will help you obtain your license.
Previous experience is a plus, but not necessary.
Must be in good standing with the University.
For more information and applications,
stop by the ECU Transit office in Mendenhall (RM258),
or call 328-4724.
Monday - Thursday 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM
for every brutal act and every unfor-
givable sin that he commits.
When the club-footed, hump-
backed Richard woos the wife of a
nobleman he has just murdered while
they are both standing next to the
man's heavily mutilated corpse, you
know he's a wizard with words. When
he runs down the hallway afterwards
proclaiming his victory over the
woman with the rapturous glee of a
schoolboy, while at the same time re-
vealing that all of his posturing be-
fore her was a bold-faced I.e. you will
hate yourself for taking some pleasure
in his happiness. He's that good.
Over the course of the film, as
Richard becomes a force to be reck-
oned with, he also becomes more and
more fascistic. Eventually, he devel-
ops into a full-fledged dictator with
all the Naziesque trappings that go
along with the role. Yet despite the
lesson this film delivers on the over-
whelming power one man can attain
through charismatic manipulation, it
never becomes heavy-handed or mor-
alistic. The film is as insidious as Ri-
chard, in that it beguiles you as H
horrifies you, ultimately leaving you
without a sense of where you should
stand. J
On a scale of one to ten, this filfe
should rate a ten, but Bening arid
Downev bring it down to a unforB
nate nine.
mJHXJMl from page 5
just plain bad
It's a simple lesson, but I got it
They didn't need to spell it out for me,
or hit me over the head with it When
the creators of children's entertainment
be it for TV or the movies, make things
too obvious, they're doing kids a disser-
vice.
That's why 1 always preferred
things that were technically for adults.
I devoured horror films, for example,
like there was no tomorrow. They scared
me, and sometimes I even had night-
mares, but at least they didn't talk down
to me. And other than the odd facial
tick I get when someone mentions
Rosemary s Baby, they didn't do me any
permanent harm.
Likewise, my entire generation
went to see Star Wars, and we all came
out okay. What's wrong with Star Wars,
you ask? Think about it for a minute,
and maybe you'll remember all the hor-
rifying details.
"?
Here's a film that features a guy
being choked almost to death by Darth
Vader, the implied torture of Princess
Leia, the on-screen mutilation of one of
the Cantina aliens by Ben Kenobi (he
chops off the guy's arm), and the exter-
mination of a whole planet full of people.
In addition, every parental figure
in the film is murdered. Luke
Skywalker's aunt and uncle are slain
by Stormtroopers (and we briefly see
their charred corpses), and then Ben
Kenobi is struck down by Vader. And,
of course, Leia's unseen parents die in
the destruction of planet Alderaan.
And if all that's not horrifying
enough for you, think about this: we're
introduced to Han Solo when he shoots
the alien Greedo, an act of cold-blooded
murder committed by one of the film's
heroes!
If that's not dark, I don't know what
is.
And yet 1 don't recall there ever
being any great outcry over Star Waft
being unsuitable entertainment for chif-
dren. And maybe that's because it's not
The world is filled with horrors, and we
certainly need to protect our children
from them. But they still need to know
those horrors exist
That's a lesson we don't need to
club them with. They're more than ca-
pable of learning it from context both
in real life and in fiction. Movies like
Star Wars, or Jurassic Park, or Hunch-
hack, while they might momentary
disturb, teach us something valuable
They teach us that the adult world
is not a Mice place, and you've got to
keep your guard up around the bad
guys. They teach us that good friends'
are invaluable, if hard to find, and they
come in all shapes and sizes. And finally,
they teacn us that even the tree sloths
can be good to have around.
I just don't think you need mudi
more than that
HUNCHBACK from P.ge 5
As simple as Hunchback's con-
cept may be, the film's writers dare to
explore the darker, more complex ele-
ments with great success. As a Disney
villain. Frollo is much more than a
caricature. He is a demented soul who
views the world only through his lens.
He, however, is forced to confront his
own lustful temptations towards
Esmeralda. A musical number where
Frollo sings of Hellfire and sexual
desire is visually stunning, but not
exactly something we would see in
Bambi.
Hunchback is possibly Disney's
most mature animated feature ever,
but it is stili packed with the standard
Disney fare for kids, including a goofy
musical number featuring three nutty
stone gargoyles. By balancing the
darker elements of the story with the
lighter ones in an undistracting man-
ner. Hunchback allows itself to be
accessible to both adults and kids
without pandering down to either.
Overall, this film is a teturn to
form for Disney. The musical numbers,
an essential element in most Disney
animated features, are once again
wonderful. After the death of lyricist
Howard Ashman, Alan Menken's
scores have not been up to standards.
However, Alan Menken works won-
ders with Stephen Schwartz here to
create musical numbers that may
stand the test of time.
As for the animation, no one can
compete with Disney's detailed visu-
als. Admittedly. Disney is using com- �
puter effects more and more with each
film (the computer-generated cathe
dral is simply amazing), but these ef
fects are incorporated effectively into ,
the rest of this fluid, hand-drawn 1
world.
Despite its best efforts to appear 1
so, Disney is not a perfect entity. As a
corporation and a film studio, it suf-
fers problems. However. Disney does j
take its animation seriously and The
Hunchback of Notre Dame clearfy
illustrates Disney's willingness and
desire to progress as the leader in
animated features.
On a scale of one to ten, The
Hunchback of Notre Dame rates u
rare ten.
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Do you have an opinion of what's happening around EC
and the nation? Check out "Insight WZMB's hour-long news
talk show which highlights the week's news around the
campus and the nation.
Insight airs Thursdays at 6 p.m.
Listeners are invited to call in at 328-6913
Lollapalooza '96 is coming to Rockingham, NC, on July 20!
And WZMB has your ticket! Stay tuned for more information
on how you can win!
01.3 FM
r East Carolina University
-�






mmmmmmmmBammsm
8
Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
Summer fun on the greens
Intramural champs crowned

Basketball and
softball playoff
action
comes to a close
David Gaskins
Rec Services
u. Intramural Sports playoffs for
.the first summer session were com-
pleted last Monday. In Men's Gold
Basketball, the playoffs went as
many predicted with "The Return of
,the O.D.Bs" meeting the "Elite
;Squad" in the final contest.
s The "Elite Squad" reached the
inals by forfeit while the "O.D.Bs"
streaked past "Flossin" 49-41. In the
,championship contest, the
O.D.Bs" relentless, high-speed,
full-court press caused numerous
early turnovers and lead to a num-
er of easy baskets as they sprinted
t to a 30-16 halftime lead.
Sean Moore and Marcus Stukes
ovided tough inside play to
mplement the fast break attack
d three point shooting. However,
the second half, the "Elite Squad"
Sfrade several runs aided by Brian
iasvering's inside play and Matt
�-�
L
Wecker's slashing drives. While they
were able to cut the margin several
times, solid free throw shooting
down the stretch by Chris Pressley.
Derrick Harris and Rodney Young
enabled the "O.D.B. s" to defend
their summer 5-on-5 Basketball title
for the second year in a row.
The Purple division also pro-
duced an expected final as the
"TPK's" faced "Alpha Sigma Phi"
matching the two teams with the
best regular season records. As was
the case in their regular season con-
test, the "TPK's" depth and pressure
defense proved to be too much as
they captured the title with a 69-56
win.
"Alpha Sigma Phi" reached the
finals with a convincing second half
dominance in running past the "Cul-
ture Club" 53-34 in one semi-final.
Rob Brogdon and John Presto keyed
the run with outstanding all-around
play to complement the playmaking
skills of Brian Jones and the bomb-
ing of Jakes Forbes.
In the other semi-final, Chris
Brantley's "Mighty Possums" neariy
pulled off a stunning upset before
falling 42-41 to the "TPK's Kevin
Parrish and Dave "Meat" Williams
lead the defense while Brad Thomp-
son displayed his varied offensive
skills to fuel the attack for the
"TPK's For the "Possums Jeff
Wooten controlled the backboards
with a Rodman-like rebounding ef-
fort while Eddie and Tim Kemp sup-
plied much of the offense.
In softball. as has been the case
throughout the season, the weather
was the big winner washing out nu-
merous games and suspending oth-
ers.
In Men's Gold, "Ten Greatest
Hits" won the title with an 18-11 vic-
tory over the "Gamecocks Mark
Andrews and Jim Bob Bryant lead
the "Hits" offense with towering
home runs while Ken Lewis knocked
a homer for the "Gamecocks "Hits"
unleashed a powerful hitting display
in their final regular season game
to win 21-12 over the "Cavemen"
after being held in check for much
of the contest. Gabe Hardison, Wes
Crawford and Todd Boyd lead the
offense while Matt Crisp made sev-
eral outstanding defensive plays
from his shortstop position. The
"Gamecocks" defeated the "Cave-
men" in the semi-final earlier in the
evening. Key players for the "Cave-
men" in the latter part of the sea-
son included the magic bat of Jeff
Smith, the Golden Glove of Tony
Piercy and the all-around play of
See CHAMPS page 9
Photo by CRAIG PERROTT
This is the beautiful ninth hole at the Farmville Country Club, which was reviewed last
week. Better late than never. This week's stop is on the links in Ayden.
B
Sta$7Ute4
jft ECU's quesi to get into a football conference has
gPen delayed. Conference USA is halting meetings with
jUjb Board of Directors until June 28. The reason for
the delay is because Louisville, whom the conference
is trying to kick out, got an injunction that bars the
league from trying to expel the Cardinals.
I Louisville and the conference have been disput-
ing whether to expand the league from its current six
members for football. Louisville, Memphis, Southern
fjliss, Cincinnati, Tulane and Houston begin league
rJlay this fall.
The conference has been meeting to propose in-
vitations to ECU and Army as football-only members.
Louisville vetoed the proposed expansion, fearing it
would hinder the school's ability to schedule strong,
n;on-conference opponents.
The conference issued this statement, after the
lawsuit was filed:
"It is of utmost importance that the affairs of Con-
ference USA be administered for the benefit of the
Conference as a whole. Louisville has repeatedly op-
posed actions that in the view of all the other Confer-
ence members, are of substantial benefit to the Con-
ference as a whole and necessary to the continued
success of the Conference
Affordable golf at
the Ayden
Country Club
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Note: This is the second install-
ment in a series of reviews of golf
courses in the GreenvillePitt
County area.
Fore! That word is a familiar one
on the crowded golf courses this sum-
mer, and a word that is often used in
my vocabulary.
This week I used it at the illus-
trious Ayden Golf and Country Club,
but that's another story. Let me give
you directions.
To get to Ayden, take Memorial
Drive south towards Kinston until
you get to a sign that indicates that
you need to turn left to get to Ayden
(it's not brain surgery, folks). Follow
that road all the way through town.
When you get to an intersection out
in the farmlands, turn right on Ayden
Golf Club Road and it's on the left.
There's a quicker shortcut down
the backroads, but I couldn't explain
that if I tried. Ride with somebody
that's been that way before if you
have the means.
Ayden is open from eight to eight
during the summer, and it's good to
call ahead and get a tee time in ad-
vance, although I never do. But any-
way, it costs $18 to ride 18 holes.
It's $14 for nine, so it's worth it to
spring for the extra four bucks if you

Scenes
from the
U.S.
Open
(Top) 1996 U.S. Open
slalom water skiing
winner Kristi Overton-
Johnson defended her
title Sunday at the lake
named after her here in
Greenville. It's her
second straight title
and fourth major title in
two years.
(Bottom) A large crowd
was on hand to watch
the competition.
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
have the time and energy to play the
whole course.
In my opinion, the front nine is
harder than the back nine, since my
score is a lot lower during the sec-
ond half of my game. It could be that
it's harder, or that I'm just getting
into the rhythm, I don't know.
The first hole is parallel to the
driving range on the right, which is
not good for me, since I slice the ball
like a raw tomato. I hit it out there,
and after three hours, I found my ball
and played it off the range.
On the third hole, there is a sand
trap just outside the green. I was let-
ting an older gentleman play through
(which I thought was sad because he
was playing faster than me). The old
goat hit it right into the bunker. But,
before I could laugh, he chipped it
right from the sand into the hole. I
think it was Jack Nichlaus's father.
One of the best parts about the
course is there is a telephone at the
beginning of the ninth hole, complete
with a laminated menu, where you
can call the grill at the clubhouse and
order some grub so it'll be ready
when you get there. What will they
think of next?
I had a hamburger and fries and
the clubhouse, and some delicious
iced tea. Refills were $.55, though. I
then proceeded to drink two
Powerades because it was 112 de-
grees outside.
Time seems to move a little
faster on the back nine, and I was
thankful because a thunderstorm was
settling in. I didn't want to be out
there with a three iron in :rv hand.
Ayden had some trouble with
Olympic torch crosses NC
Former Olympian Jim Beatty will face another challenge today -
keeping himself calm enough to carry the Olympic torch through his
hometown of Charlotte.
"I'm going to have to keep myself from being completely over-
whelmed said Beatty, a 1960 Olympian, who two years later became
the first person to break the four-minute mile indoors. "To have the
flame come through my hometown, to carry the flame the last letIt's
almost spiritual
After 58 days and more than 11,500 miles, the propylene-powered
symbol of the Olympic Games is scheduled to arrive on the outskirts of
Charlotte at 8:30 p.m. from Greensboro, a 95-mile trip that usually takes
less than two hours by car.
But during its 15,000-mile trek from Los Angeles to Atlanta, the
torch caravan is taking the long way, slowing and stopping in small towns
and cities so that as many people as possible get a chance to see u.
Today's route is a serpentine, 150-mile journey that will take 17
hours. Some of the cities included in the route are Greensboro, Colfax,
Kernersville, Walkertown, High Point. Winston-Salem and Charlotte.
"I may come out to watch it, just to see what I missed today said
Jettie Pharr, a Statesville volunteer who carried the torch Sunday on
the campus of North Carolina State University. "It felt tremendous -
unbelievable - to carry it. Seeing it pass is a different experience
The former chancellor of North Carolina Central University and cur-
their fairways earlier in the spring
on the last half of the course. A
couple of holes are still soft, but oth-
erwise they look a lot better.
The back nine is a longer walk
if you're hoofing it, but there is
plenty of shade. Ayden is known for
its narrow fairways lined with pine
trees, and I know I hit at least half of
those suckers.
Speaking of hitting things, let
me tell you a little story. The 11th
hole is the last hole before you cross
the road for the rest of the course.
The green is located right at the road,
and on the other side is a telephone
pole. One time I hit a nine iron with
a full swing when I should have just
chipped, and you can fill in the
blanks.
There's a pretty fountain on the
13th, but it could be a problem for
those of you who practice at an aqua-
driving range. You might subcon-
sciously want to hit it in the water.
I enjoyed my visit to Ayden and
look forward to returning. The num-
ber to call for tee times, directions
or information is 754-3389.
Rating: On a scale ranging from
driver to putter, with putter being
the best, I give Ayden a pitching
wedge. Taken into account is
affordability, quality of the turf, land-
scaping, food and hospitality.
See TORCH page 9
June
26
Registration
for
Intramurals:
Softball and 3-on-3
Basketball
registration is today
from 10 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. in Christenbury
Gym, Roprn 104-A.
July
2
Registration
for sand
volleyball
will be
Tuesday July 2, at 4
p.m. in the Biology
Building, room 103.
SPMHHMHI





The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 26,1996
DISCOVER A
across from the courthouses on the comer
of Evans and Third Street
Jn a cafe setting, serving breakfast and
lunch
Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.sn.
757-1716 � 800 Eva�s gtreet � 757-1718
TORCH from page 8
rent president of the United States
Olympic Committee, Leroy Walker,
was at a Sunday celebration in
Durham.
The first black president of the
USOC expressed his gratitude to
the people of North Carolina.
"This is sort of a culmination
of all the things in the past and all
the shoulders I've stood on for all
these years to get where I am to-
day with my roots here in North
Carolina Walker said.
The flame traveled
through Cary and Morrisville Sun-
day before heading to Duke Univer-
sity where the bells at the school's
ornate chapel chimed the Olympic
theme.
A crowd of thousands gathered

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Children Under 12 $2.95
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909 South Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
for an outdoor service cheered as
Duke track coach Al Buehler
paused outside the chapel with the
torch.
Also carrying the torch
through Durham was Olympic
swimmer Marcia Morey, now an as-
sistant district attorney and
children's advocate. At one inter-
section, she was surrounded by
fans who started an impromptu au-
tograph session.
"Twenty years later, it was
probably more thrilling to run the
Ninth Street of Durham than it was
to be in the Olympics because it's
about this, it's about the kids. It's
about peace and hope the 1976
olympian said as she signed auto-
graphs.
From Durham, the torch made
a stop at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill before trav-
eling to Burlington and Greensboro
where it was scheduled to spend
Sunday night.
The flame will journey through
the state until Tuesday before mak-
ing a quick swing through South
Carolina and returning to western
North Carolina on Wednesday.
CHAMPS from page 8
Chris Beaver. "The Gamecocks"
suffered through some hitting woes
in the latter part of the season but
relied on Patrick Adams for speed
at the top of the order and defense
from Tuell Waters and David
Emmons.
The Co-Rec playoffs were most
affected by weather with semi-finals
and finals completed on the last day
of first session classes. In a surprise,
"Extenuating Circumstances" cap-
tured the title that had eluded them
in the spring with a 15-6 win over
the previously undefeated "Purple
People Eaters" in the finals.
"Extenuating Circumstances"
reached the finals with a 12-2 victory
over the "Economics Society" in a
game that had been suspended by
rain. Speedy leadoff man Stephen
"Silent Wonder" Smith, crafty pitcher
Shelley Teachey and magic mascot
dog "Buffy" lead "EC
The "Economics Society"
reached the semis with a tough 11-
10 win over "Little Big League" as
Dana Wilson and Brian Robinson
lead the offensive attack. The "Purple
People Eaters" reached the finals by
a default win over "Paisons" but were
OFKNINO HOURS
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11 30-9 30
11.30-10 30
SAT
SUN
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service
752-7529
THU
All games
at 7 pm
Relax after classes with WRNS THIRSTY
THURSDAY at Grainger Stai
75 cent 12 oz. drinks
seriously hurt by the absence of sev-
eral players due to athletic commit-
ments. Jody Jones, Sue Graner and
Katie Walsh lead the "PPE" offen-
sive effort in the final game.
The Basketball Shooting
Triathlon was conducted in
Christenbury on Tuesday, June 14
and winners were crowned in Free
Throws, Hot Shots and Three Point
Shooting. Terrance Barnhill had the
top score in Three Point Shooting
while John Presto captured the Free
Throw event.
David Montague was the big win-
ner in earning the t-shirt for the top
overall score and also placing near
the top in the Hot Shots. Robin Tay-
lor swept all three events in the
women's division. Other top shoot-
ers included Mike "Stockton"
Edwards, Marquise Samuels, Brian
Jacobs, Moahad Dar and Brandon "3
Inch Vertical" Yohn.
The second session calendar of
activities will begin with registration
for softball and 3on-3 Basketball to-
day, June 26 from 10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
in 104-A Christenbury Gym.
There will also be a registration
meeting for interested team captains
for Sand Volleyball on Tuesday, July
2 at 4 p.m. in 103 Biology Building.
For further information regard-
ing the Intramural Sports program,
please contact David Gaskins,
Paulette Evans or Melissa Dawson at
Recreational Services at 328-6387
29th - PespiWRNS Baseball
1st 1J00 fans with full paid
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
'
Advertise with
us in
The East
Carolinian.
MOO
0C� timss, 00� too, �rsat frisks
I'm So Excited I
Live On Campus
East Carolina University Recreational Services
"Last year I had an opportunity to live on campus and be
a winner. But instead ! chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. I got stuck with utility, phone and cable bills.
The security deposit I had to pay for the apartment really
cut me short on money. I had to eat my own cooking
and then wash all the messy dishes. I even had to clean
my own bathroomYucki I didn't have time to meet new
friends because I had to spend so much time cleaning
my apartment-not to mention shopping for groceries. I
had an 8:00 class, and searching for a commuter parking
space was a big headache. If I had lived on campus, I
could have just walked to class. Boy, did I learn from my
mistakes. Now I'm back on campus with my friends!
4)
a
H
s
s
GS
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ur.ivsrsity nou3�r, ssrviogj
fjsstior,s? calf gay-tows (328-4883)
a
s
S3
INTRAMURAL SPORT PROGRAMS
July 2 Sand Volleyball Reg. Mtg. 4:00 p.m. BIO 103
July 10 1-on-l Basketball Deadline 5:00 p.m. CG 204
July 16 Golf Singles Entry Deadline 5:00 p.m. CG 204
Julyl7&18 Frisbee Golf Singles 3-6 p.m. Fris. Crs.
NATURAL LIFE EVENTS
Don't forget about the Fleming Fresh Air Flick
on July 11 at 9:00 p.m. in the Fleming
Courtyard. The Movie will be Raiders of the
Lost Ark! Sponsored by ECU Recreational
Services and the Student Union Films Commitee.
FITNESS PROGRAMS
Session II Fitness Class Registration until June 21
8:30 a.m5 p.m. MonThurs. CG 204
8:30 a.mll a.m. Fri. CG 204
Session II runs June 24-July 25
Class Student FacultyStaff
Fitness Class Sessions $10.00 $10.00
Belly Busters $5.00 $5.00
Drop-In Ticket $7.50 $10.00
Drop-In Belly Busters $3.00 $5.00
CLIMBING TOWER
Open until July 24
Tues. & Wed. 5:00 p.m7:30 p.m.
Free Climbing on Wednesdays.
RECREATIONAL OUTDOOR CENTER(ROC)
Open until July 22
MonThurs. 3:30 p.m5:30 p.m.
Fri. 11:00 a.ml:30 p.m.
DROP IN RECREATION
Christenbury
Gymnasium
Equipment
Check-Out Center
Christenbury
Swimming Pool
Minges
Swimming Pool
Christenbury
Weight Room
Garrett Weight
Room
Mon Wed Fri.
MonThurs.
MonThurs.
Fri.
MonFri.
MonFri.
MonFri.
Sun.
Mon. & Wed.
Tues. & Thurs.
Fri.
MonThurs.
11 "0a.m-1:30 p.m.
4 p.m6 p.m.
10 a.m6:30 p.m.
10a.m2p.m.
6:30a.m8a.m.
11:30 a.m1:30 p.m.
4:15 p.m7 p.m.
2 p.m5 p.m.
6:30 a.m8 p.m.
6:30 a.m6:30 p.m.
6:30 a.m1:30 p.m
1 p.m6:30p.m.
For more information call Recrektional Services at 328-6387.





e
10
Wednesday, June 26,1996
The East Carolinian
&XoZc6
HE Nokth Polk, a
riARRLN WASTCL.ANP
COV�"R�D W�7W SNOW - �
5ITTIM6- ATOP THE WOfcLP
0M� To
,P014R SfASS
?EH6UIHS i
ANP SOME
5ty HDMff�
To THE-
GREATEST i-E�rNO
the, world has
�V�R. KMflWAl.
Saint MickLAUS,
Bur is he
; MAN
A nysfERy no longer as our.
iwsusPtCTiMG Trio will sootl
fnd our.
NoAH, HOWS MORE LIKE
SPARE TIME JiPtVies
BY ANDY FARKAS
4AJP VuwR. SO CAi-�0
'FUlCSP" SAY
r'�) iuc�, ap 4 5M&�
�y 'Ai ry wALi-iT Flit UllulE
T-MS ,
I CANY8�.LI�VF
a stuck our HERE
TV THE IMPOLE OF i
w'Ow��R� WlfH "3 '
.� CHANCE OF RESCUE!
W�'Z.L 8�
5uR� -To
IE Of COLPt0R
LACK OF UAKwrH,
OR MABE BE
SA-re.fi fly a
Ciahf monkey
CC MNCrHy
��� !CLAR BEAR.
Jon, WHAT COULP
THERC PoSJiBl -
BE OUT HEB.E llJ
The nipple or �
THE NORTH PotX,
5ESIPES �,
SNOW AND jr
OS?
NoTWNG- fo Po o4
�WE
4i(lCAN'6tT
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� 9UtEV� Tm jcsr afMwe
: fou �M� A R�P SvtT.UvE
j AT.THC. AfoRTH POU,AH0
PRCSEHTLy EMPLoy
0V& fOo ttWf
Hoy, frfJ
SEAta PecyEiTcH
XEinceez.
SvXH
J
BRASSWOOD APTS.
One and two bedroom apart
ments S285-S340. Water-
sewage, Free Washer-Dryer
Hookups. Quiet location
near Malls and Restaurants.
Call 355-4499
Brasswood apts.
Near Lowes
Dockside 3 ond 2 bedrooms. 2 baths. 4
car carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace
dining room, balcony, exterior storage
room, nothing in the area compares
Reasonably Priced!
Call 758-1921
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FtlHlMs 1 or Ken
Hi is 1 Ceiitr.nrbis Slrt il lfc.it t-t. "1UtXTKn
SWrrii sini). i'iMoilIhVs
in I.12th Mm1 'MKi i :
B.ilhs( Is Sp.k� IK,it.Sllll I.Vr
Monti1. �l IVts . 1 1 ,1 V.I�.V-
lii.t'h.Dgffus. RealtyliH �
B-H&t, ,c-2h, 5
CLOSE TO EVERYTHING
EXCEPT AVERAGE
Jasmine Garden
�walking distance to campus
?pre-leasing for June 16
�1 and 2 bedroom units
? washerdryer hookups
�All major appliances
Remco East, Inc.
1807 S. Charles Blvd.
355-1313
1 AND 2 BEDROOM apartments. Vari-
ous locations - some with new carpet Call
Potomac Properties, 2706 E. 10th St Ste-
B 752-9722
2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATHROOMS Town
house. Excellent Location! A must see
Place. $400mo 752-9880 - On ECU Bus
Route.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
to share 2 BR apartment near campus. 1
2 rent & utilities; cable included in rent
WD hookups, dishwasher. Call Dawn 752-
8401.
MELLOW FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED Immediately. Two bedroom du-
plex, WD, fenced yard. $275 utilities
and phone. Must not mind animals. Dead
head. Call 756-5340
NONSMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share three bedroom house on
Meade St Close to Campus. WD, AC
$242month13 bills. Call 752-6999
105 E. 11TH ST. 3 BD1 bath WD, DW,
Central AC $635Month. 830-1015
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! MF Non
smoker to share 2 bedroom apartment on
ECU bus route. Close to Everything. $190
? half utilities. Call 531-0695 or 758-0308.
FEMALE TO SHARE 2 bedroom duplex
close to ECU $200 12 utilities. Pet OK.
Call 551-0592 before 12 or after 6:00
MF ROOMMATE. NICE HOUSE. Walk
ing distance to campus. Own room, washer
and dryer, and lots of extras. Call 752-8682
115 E. 13TH ST 5BD2 Bath Avail. 8-1
$825Month. 830-1015
NON-SMOKING STUDIOUS FEMALE
roommate wanted to share 2 bedroom, 1
12 bath apartment. $175month 12
utilities and phone. WasherDryer. Call
754-2419
3 BEDROOM APTS ABOVE BW3 S For
Rent - Rare Opportunities - Available June
1st For $775.00 a month. Please contact
Yvonne 758-2616. New Fire System and
Security!
113 E 13TH ST. 1 BD1 Bath. Avail. 6-1
$200Month 830-1015
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments. Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent. Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756-6209
ROOMMATE NEEDED JULY 1ST to
share 3 bedroom house close to campus.
$250.00. 1 12 bath. Possible Pets. No
furniture needed. Call Kim at 830-9036
SOPHOMORE STUDENT WITH AN
available 2 bedroom apt. needs one room-
mate. Busline access plus cable, security
& laundry facilities provided. Call today
or tonight for details. Phil 321-2813
HOUSE MATE NEEDED! F or M
airconditioned, private driveway, close to
campus, $250 each, share electric, phone,
non-smoker, must like goofy cat neat but
not anal, older student that is responsible,
easy going, liberal does there own thing.
CALL JENNIFER 758-6834. LEAVE MES-
SAGE
Pitt Property Management
758-1 921
108a Brownlea Dr.
12 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM, appli-
ances, water, basic cable, 5 blocks from
campus. New ownership. $375 deposit.
$375month
i2 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BED-
ROOM, $275. on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bed-
room, on-site laundry.
12 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom
range.refrigerator, washer, dryer
hooicups decks and patios in most units,
laundry facility, sand volley court.
Located 5 blocks from campus. Free
water, sewer, cable.
12 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwast .r. washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor, located 5
blocks from campus.
For Sale
ACCEL 486 COMPUTER WITH CD-
ROM, 5 14" and 2.5" Floppy Drives; 14"
VGA color monitor; keyboard; mouse.
$800.00. Sell after July 15th. Contact: Jim
Keller 355-4641
For Sale
2 LAWN TICKETS TO 629 STING with
Natalie Merchant Concert Walnut Creek,
Raleigh. $25 each. Call 830-2966
PONT1AC PARESIENNE, S7, 124K mi.
silver, auto, power, exc. cond new radia-
tor, battery, good tires, AMFM, cass. must
sell! 754-2375
FOR SALE: DAYBED WITH sliding trun-
dle. Call 752-3546. Price is negotiable.
If
Help
11 Wanted
AIRLINE JOBS - Applications are now
being accepted for domestic & internation-
al staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents,
reservationists, ground crew more. Ex-
cellent travel benefits! Call Airline Employ-
ment Services for details. 1-206-971-3690
ext L53621
College Agent Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
tf
Help
11 Wanted
PUBLIC RELATION INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE with Northwestern Mutual
Life. Must be good public speaker. Call
Jeff Mahoney at 355-7700
SPORTS MINDED: Our new branch of-
fice seeks area team players to help with
local and regional expansion. Call 353-
4217 ext 118
PUBLIC RELATIONS: New branch office
seeking team players with public relations
skills to help with expansion. Call 355-
6834.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
EARN up to $25-45hr. teaching basic
conversational English in Japan, Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For information
call:(206)971-3570exU53625
CHECK THIS OUT! NEW explosive in
ternational company is looking for five en-
ergetic students seeking fullpart time op-
portunities. Must be in pursuit of success,
phenomenal income, and have a positive
attitude. CALL NOW! 3534217 ext 116
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING Travel the
world while earning an excellent income
in the Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry.
Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53626
ATTN: CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS.
Bail Bonders needed for Greenville Area.
If you are looking for an excellent paying
part-time job and career experience, give
us a call. Blackwell's Bail Bonding Co. 1-
800-614-9744 pager or 7524807
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give
us a call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill
NC - 919-747-7686
Services
Offered
i
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING for rain?
Rent a canopy! Two canopies for rent.
$125.00 delivered and set-up or $80.00
as-is per day. Deposit required. 752-5533
Ask for Jenn.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53627l.
7A
Services
Offered
THE GATHERING HTTP:WWW.TA-
KEME.COM scholarships, academic & ca-
reer resources, internships, sports, news,
entertainment travel, music, debates and
1,000's of links.
rr Personals
EASYGOING MUSICIAN - TYPE seek
ing partner to share healing massages.
Also seeking Fun-Loving ladies to share
music & sunshine. Write now: DT, POB
8663, Greenville, 27835. Photos helpful.
Announcements
COMMUTER STUDENTS: IF YOU are at-
tending the Second Summer Term and are
in need of a ride or riders please check out
the Commuter Boards in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center and The Croatan. Sharing the
drive with another student can help ease the
commuting strain for you and your car.
FINAL REGISTRATION IS NOW being
held for the 18th Annual Bryan Adrian Sum-
mer Baskeball Camp. Boys and girls ages 5-
18 are eligible. Included on the camp staff
are: Jerry Stackhouse(NBA), Dante Cala-
bria(UNC), Jeff Mdnnis(UNC), Matt Harpring
(GA TECH). Locations include: Charlotte,
NC; Greensboro, NC; Spartanburg, SC; Vir-
ginian Beach, VA; Elkin, NC; Mount Olive,
NC; and Concord, NC. Ca anytime for a free
brochure at (704) 372-3236
1-ON-l BASKETBALL: Shoot for the hoops!
Recreational Services is offering 1-on-l Bas-
ketball. The entry deadline is July 10 at
5:00pm in 204 Christenbury Gym. All inter-
ested individuals welcome. For more infor-
mation call Recreational Services at 328-
6387
SAND VOLLEYBALL! JOIN THE fun in
the sun! Recreational Services is having a
registration for Sand Volleyball. Interested
individuals can register on July 2 at 4:00pm
in Biology Room 103. For more information
call Recreational Services at 32&6387
TREASURE CHEST: THE 1995-96 Video
Year Book is available to be picked up at
The Media Board Office located in the Stu-
dent Publications BIdg. across from Joyner
Library.
NEED A JOB? NEED MONEY? NEED EX-
PERIENCE? Need a "jump start" toward
your career? Cot at least an overall 2.0 GPA?
Then Cooperative Education may be the an-
swer for you! Inquire at the Coop Office.
2300 GCB, 328-6979. Help yourself by let-
ting us help you! t
�v m





Title
The East Carolinian, June 26, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 26, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1147
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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