The East Carolinian, June 19, 1996








June 19,1996
Vol 71, No. 60
The East Carolinian
Circulation 5,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pages
University symbol returns
Around the State
rocky mount, n.c. (ap) - a
man died in a shootout at a basket-
ball court and three others were
wounded, one critically, authorities
said.
Dwayne Crudup was pro-
nounced dead Monday at Nash Gen-
eral Hospital, a police statement said.
He was shot once.
Antwon Coleman of Battleboro
was wounded by Crudup and was
listed in critical condition at the hos-
pital. The police said Coleman was a
suspect but no charges had been
filed.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Although
there may be a connection between
satanic symbols and the burning of
a black church, experts say devil wor-
ship is not widespread.
The occasional appearance of a
pentagram scratched on a rock, a
"666" spray-painted on an aban-
doned bam or a cross turned upside
down are probably the work of re-
bellious teens who use satanic sym-
bols for shock value, authorities said.
Around the Country
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - Petr
Taborsky was a brilliant young chem-
istry student earning $8.50 an hour
as a lab assistant when he made the
discovery that won him U.S. Patent
No. 5,082,813 - a process that turns
Kitty Litter-like clay into a cheap way
to treat sewage.
Seven years later, Taborsky was
in maximum-security state prison,
working on a chain gang, because of
a dispute over whether he or the Uni-
versity of South Florida owns his in-
vention.
"We want our property back
said Kevin Carey, a lawyer represent-
ing the university. "Just like if some-
body steals your car, you want your
car back
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP)
- A police detective who beat a black
doll with a police baton in a skit at a
"Good 01' Boy Roundup" has been
fired.
Police Chief Michael Brasfield
said Monday that Don McCawley's
behavior at the roundup four years
ago destroyed his ability to work as
a police officer. The gatherings of law
officers were held annually in Ten-
nessee.
McCawley was singled out in a
Justice Department report for his per-
formance in a "Redneck of the Year"
competition, in which he pulled a
painted black doll from a hollowed-
out watermelon and began beating
it
Around the World
BELFAST, Northern Ireland
(AP) - The parties in Northern
Ireland's peace negotiations agreed
Monday that a weekend bombing
should keep Irish Republican Army
supporters locked out of the talks.
Sinn Fein's position was further
undercut Saturday when a truck
bomb exploded in Manchester. En-
gland, injuring more than 200
people.
Although no one has claimed
responsibility for that explosion, lo-
cal police and British and Irish lead-
ers said they had no doubt it was
the IRA.
Alumni, students
recognized in
process
Marguerite Benjamin
News Editor
Among the construction projects
in progress on campus, one of the sites-
to-be is not so much new as it is re-
newed.
In 1968, amid much protest the
oldest and longest standing building
on campus was torn down in order to
make room for bigger and better struc-
tures. Now a replica of the Old Austin
Cupola is being built after nearly 30
years.
At the construction site, located
in the center of the on-campus mall
area, a commemorative walkway is be-
ing constructed in order to honor
alumni and their family members.
The idea to reconstruct the cupola
was developed along with the
University's Master Plan. The expense
of building the gazebo-style cupola to-
tals $250 thousand.
The organization most responsible
for the courtyard of recognition is ECU
Telefund, one of the university's pre-
mier fund-raising organizations.
ECU Telefund Assistant Director
Brian Hardy said recreating the cupola
will bring back a symbol of the
university's past
"As well as being a reminder of
the past, the cupola will become a new
symbol and a focal point for the uni-
versity Hardy said.
Hardy shared some Telefund his-
tory with TEC stating that the organi-
zation was started in January 1994 in
order to raise unrestricted dollars for
the university. Telefund employs stu-
dents who call various groups and in-
dividuals associated with the univer-
sity and request donations.
"In relation to the Old Austin
project, students were told to inform
alumni that for each gift of $250 do-
nated, they could have a brick reserved
in their name to be placed in the area
around the cupola Hardy said, add-
ing that 3,000 of the available 10,000
spaces in the courtyard have been sold.
Hardy said most of the alumni who
were called were excited about the re-
turn of the cupola.
"The older alumni were pleasantly
surprised because they wanted to keep
it (the original structure) in the first
place Hardy said. "There was actu-
ally a fight to keep the building since
it was the first one constructed when
the campus was founded
Hardy said he also received a large
response from parents who wanted to
recognize their children who are cur-
rently enrolled.
"People are excited about being
recognized Hardy said.
Hardy said the original location
for the replica was set for an area near
the Student Recreation Center which
Photo Courtesy of ECU Archives.
The original structure of the Old Austin cupola was torn down
in the late 60's amid much protest from students. Old
Austin was the first building constructed on campus.
Sex offender sentenced
Former housing
employee pleads
guilty
Amy L Royster
Assistant News Editor
Last week, a former ECU employee
was convicted and sentenced to prison
for statutory sex offense with a minor.
Ronald Finnegan, 31, of Rt 2 Box
700 Greenville, was indicted Jan. 16 on
46 counts ranging from indecent liber-
ties with a minor and statutory rape to
crimes against nature and statutory sex
offense. The alleged offenses occurred
in July of 1995 against a child under the
age of 16.
Files in the Pitt County Superior
Court show that Finnegan plead guilty
two weeks ago to one count of statutory
sex offense. Finnegan was sentenced to
at least 240 months in the department
of corrections. It is possible that he could
serve up to 297 months.
According to the investigating of-
ficer, Karen Kilpatrick of the Pitt County
Sheriffs department, Finnegan's plea
was part of a deal struck with the dis-
trict attorney's office.
"With the plea bargain arrangement
reached by the district attorney's office,
all other charges were dropped
Kilpatrick said.
Before locating in Greenville,
Finnegan left the state of Colorado vio-
lating a probation sentence for similar
crimes. Kilpatrick said that after
Finnegan completes his jail sentence in
North Carolina, he will be expected to
serve the remainder of his probation in
See SEX page 3
Theft, forgery suspect at large
Investigation on-going since
September
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
The East Carolina Police Department is looking
for a suspect in connection with a theft from two ECU
students and vandalism of Fletcher Residence Hall in
September 1995.
Mark Anthony Allen came to Greenville to visit
two females in Fletcher in September. After Allen left
the University the students realized that several items
were missing. Among the items missing were checks.
Allen proceeded to forge one of the student's
names on two of the checks and attempted to cash
them. He was unable to because he had an out-of-
state driver's license. He was able to cash a third check.
Police warn that there may still be checks float-
ing around in Greenville. Tracy Williams, one of the
victims, has numerous checks that have not turned
up. Officer Joseph Horst. a patrol officer for the ECU
Police Department, asks that if the residents of
Greenville know any information, to please report it.
Allen is also wanted in Maryland for forgery.
Stealing checks was not the only crime Allen com-
mitted while visiting Greenville. Allen caused $800
worth of damage to Fletcher Residence Hall. Horst
said Allen participated in an activity known as tag-
ging. This is where a person vandalizes property by
spray painting or marking their nickname on prop-
erty. Allen tagged his nickname "Marco" all over
Fletcher.
Horst does not feel Allen will physically harm any-
See THEFT page 3
Photo by Chris Gaydosh.
The new gazebo-style cupola is going up in the center of the
mall.It will be dedicated thisfall during Homecoming weekend.
is also under construction.
"Later it was decided that the ar-
chitecture of the buildings in that area
did not match the design of the cu-
pola which would be made to match
the original architecture of the Old
Austin Building Hardy said. "So they
thought it would be better to move it
to the mall area near the old cafeteria
building and the surrounding residence
halls
After the construction on Joyner
Library is completed, the cupola will be
visible from both 10th and 5th Streets.
"It will sit right in front of the col-
umns of the library Hardy said.
The remaining (brick) spaces
around the cupola are still available but
will be sold at a higher price. For more
information, contact Hardy at 3284215.
Pirate
on the
Street
Photos by Carlton Turnage.
Are you returing
for the 2nd
Summer Session?
Whlfthy not?
Graduate students explore a ship down underpage 3
Looking for a date? Try the netpage 4
SPORT&dW
Hits and misses during try-outspage O
?eca4t
Marquieta Taylor
Junior, Biology major
"Yes. I want to get my
hard classes out of the
way
Ryan Behannon
Senior, Political Science
major
"Yes. 1 need to finish
school
Rashawn Deans
Sophomore, ASIP
"No! I'm taking a break
form school
Kim Dorn
Junior, Psychology major
"No. I'm vacationing at
the beach
Wednesday
Rainy

High 88
Low 67
Thursday
Party cloudy

High 90
Low 69
"f&aoi t eoe& u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Jovner






ill 1 1 I�
Wednesday, June 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
gppffll
June 10
Motor Vehicle Accident - A minor motor vehicle accident oc-
curred in the Harrington Field lot at 12:03 p.m.
Motor Vehicle Accident - A minor motor vehicle accident oc-
curred on College Hill Drive at 12:55 p.m.
June 11
Simple Possession of Marijuana - A student was issued a state
citation for possessing traces of marijuana during a traffic stop west
of Umsted at 3:20 a.m.
Billing Dispute - A staff member reported the university was
being billed for long distance telephone calls made by a student.
The investigation revealed that the student should not have been
issued a long distance calling card by the long distance card com-
pany. The investigation also revealed that ECU was not responsible
for the bill and that no criminal violation had been committed by
the student.
June 12
Driving While License Revoked - A student was arrested for
driving with a revoked license. A non-student was cited for allowing
the student to drive her vehicle knowing that his license was re-
voked. The two were stopped for a one-way street violation on
Ormond Drive at 8:15 p.m.
June 13
AssistRescue � An officer responded to a call from the Gra-
ham Building at 12:35 a.m. to assist in a rescue after a staff member
was struck by a falling step ladder. Greenville Rescue did not trans-
port the staff member to Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
June 14
I
Larceny - An ECU camp counselor reported the larceny of prop-
erty from several summer camp participants around 6:18 p.m. The
campers were in the Christenbury Gym.
Driving While Impaired - A student was arrested for driving
while impaired at 11:57 p.m. The student license was also revoked.
Compiled by Amy L. Royster. Taken from official
ECU police reports.
Carousel begins to turn
ECU Summer
theater gets
underway
Jacqueline D. Kellum
Staff Writer
�l
The East Carolina Summer The-
ater production of Carousel opened
yesterday and will run through the end
of the week. But students and other
theater patrons have more theater to
look forward to this summer after Car-
ousel closes.
There will be the
comedy Daddy's
Dyin'� H 'ho's Got the
Will from July 2-6.
followed by Sleuth
from July 16-20.
All of these plavs
are being put on by
East Carolina Sum-
mer Theater, which
Managing Director
Gary Faircloth
stresses is different
from East Carolina
Playhouse.
�They're two
completely different things Faircloth
said.
The major difference between the
two is that the Playhouse is amateur
and Summer Theater is professional.
"During the school year, it's an
amateur production, so no one gets
paid. During the summer, it's profes-
sional, and everyone gets paid he said.
The summer productions are also
different in that guest actors are
brought in to play some of the parts.
"We have auditions in New York,
and we have auditions here Faircloth
said.
Faircloth said the auditions in
New York were open casting calls, giv-
ing anyone a chance to try to land a
part Talent and experience were the
key factors in winning a part in a play.
"We have five guest actors from
New York. We look for people who have
a lot of talent and have done a lot of
, , regional the-
We look for
people who have
a lot of talent and
have done a lot of
regional theater.
We look for
experience rather
than names
ducer decides those things. But we
have a formula we follow. We do one
musical, one comedy, and one play
that's had an impact on theater he
said.
The rehearsal schedule for sum-
mer theater is intense, with only two
weeks to rehearse for a play. Faircloth
said rehearsals typically ran from nine
to six. with only one day a week off.
ECU has the only theater company of
this kind anywhere in the local area.
"We're the only indoor profes-
sional theater in this part of the state
he said.
Looking ahead to the school year.
Fast Carolina Playhouse has a full sea-
son already planned. They will present
Big Rirer, a musical about the adven-
tures of Huckleberry Finn, J.B a
modern interpretation of Jove, and the
dance theater production. Dance '97.
Two more plays, Suburbia and
Lysistrata, will rou.id out the season.
Students wishing to go see any of
the summer productions are eligible
for a discounted rate on tickets.
A seat in the front section is $13.70.
the middle section is $12.75, and re-
maining seats are $10.50. Anyone who
wants to buy tickets should call the
ticket office at 328-6829.
ater. We look
for experience
rather than
names
Faircloth said.
Some of
the technical
and backstage
positions are
also filled by
out-of-town ap-
plicants.
"We inter-
view for those
positions at the
Southeastern
Theater Conference Faircloth said.
Faircloth said the method of
choosing which plays would be done
each summer was up to the artistic
director and producer of the depart-
ment.
"Our artistic director and pro-
Gary Faircloth, Managing
Director
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I'm So Excited I
Live On Campus
Bfi
CAROLINA
ITNTVERSrTY
"Last year I had an opportunity to live on campus and be
a winner. But instead I chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. I got stuck with utility, phone and cable bills.
The security deposit I had to pay for the apartment really
cut me short on money I had to eat my own cooking
and then wash all the messy dishes. I even had to clean
my own bathroomYuck! I didn't have time to meet new
friends because I had to spend so much time cleaning
my apartmentnot to mention shopping for groceries. I
had an 8:00 class, and searching for a commuter parking
space was a big headache. If I had lived on campus, I
could have just walked to class. Boy, did I learn from my
mistakes. Now I'm back on" campus with my friends!
uravsrsity hou$ir. ssrvicss
fj8$tion$? ea� scu-kews (32MI63)





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$400 SECURITY DEPOSIT
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$50 off June and July rent
from page 1
Colorado.
Finnegan's file in the human re-
sources department at ECU shows that
he worked as a maintenance mechanic
from April of 1995 until Jan. of 1996.
There is no evidence that Finnegan's
crimes were connected to ECU's cam-
pus or that his work performance was
lacking in any way.
"During my investigation, 1 did not
find anything that related Finnegan to
the ECU campus other than his job
there Kilpatrick said.
In a story which ran in TEC last
semester, Manny Amaro director of
housing, confirmed Kilpatrick's state-
ment
"It's really disturbing Amaro said.
"He (Finnegan) went far beyond ju$t
work, every day
In the same story, personnel em-
ployee Joan Taylor said Finnegan re-
signed from his position in a letter with-
out stating a reason.
Kilpatrick said that she believes
Finnegan's sentence will begin immedi-
ately.
Wilson Acres Apartments, Ltd
752-0277
P.O. Box 772
I860 E. 1st St.
Greenville, N.C. 27835-0772
1 HEFT from page 1
one. He does ask people to be cau-
tious.
"Allen is not a threat" Horst said.
There are two warrants out for
Allen's arrest. The reason the ECU
Police cannot find Allen is because
he has no permanent address.
"He is a drifter Horst said.
Allen was entered into the Na-
tional Crime Information Center
(NCIC). The NCIC is a division of the
FBI. If Allen ever comes in contact
with the police for a major or minor
offense anywhere in the United States,
his name will come up in their com-
puters and he will be extradited back
a
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a
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to North Carolina. His name will re-
main on the national computer until
he is apprehended.
Horst said he believes all students
need to be protective of their belong-
ings.
"Basically students need to insure
valuables are kept in a secure place
Horst said. "Leaving items ruch as
checks and credit cards out in the
open only makes it easier for students
to become victims of similar crimes.
Obviously, even people that are famil-
iar with students or are friends of stu-
dents can take advantage of them.
Caution and common sense will in-
sure that similar crimes will be pre-
vented before they can ever start
Horst said reporting the crime is
very important.
"Students should be aware that
if they're victims of crime and discover
any information about it even a year
later, they should contact the police
department" Horst said.
I
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Are You An Adolescent Or An Adult, Ages
12-45 With Moderate To Severe Asthma
And Currently Taking Steroid Medication?
We invite you to consider participating in our research study
program to evaluate the effectiveness of a new drug on your
quality of life.
If you are eligible for this study, we will provide a complete
physical exam, allergy skin testing, lab work, medication and
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For more information on how to qualify, please call Lisa
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immmmmmmamm
Wednesday, June 19,1996
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Politicians
make
legislative
decisions that
affect us all. If
we don't
keep an eye
on them, who
will?
As a child, who ever fully understood the adult fascina-
tion with reading the morning paper, watching the evening
news or discussing politics?
Although these activities may have seemed remote if not
boring, they were once symbolic of adulthood. Most college
students do not have a "real" job yet. We lack the station-
wagon, kids or anything else conjuring images of adulthood.
At 18, what we all do have is a chance to participate in poli-
tics. This opportunity presents itself as exciting, depending
on your point of view.
Undergraduates who worried out-loud over the recent N.C.
Houses' decision to cut $6.3 million from the UNC system
budget were discussing politics. Graduate students who wished
the governor's proposed health insurance and tuition remis-
sions would pass stayed alert to political developments. Stu-
dents under 21 who complain every tin.e they are denied the
right to purchase a beer can thank politicians. Freshman who
will pay much more for their first year of college than seniors
did can bet that state politicians voted for legislature which
indirectly resulted in tuition increases. Students working hard
to pay tuition will either curse or cheer legislature on the
minimum wage.
Funny thing, but these issues are not so remote as we
once thought. Excited or not. we are affected by countless
facets of politics.
We have come full-circle toward an appreciation of poli-
tics simply because there are issues that affect us.
The real irony is despite all these hot topics, many stu-
dents don't vote or get involved. People, at least get mad.
There are older columnists who have tried to dismiss and
shame our generation for our apathy. We are a large group,
no doubt, many would like to keep us down.
Protesting students may say that they are turned off by
politics or that they are disillusioned by scandals. This is un-
fortunate for the rest of us who are with the program. While
students are busy being turned-off by politicians, the govern-
ment is quietly screwing us over.
Who voted for the representatives that voted against Gov.
Hunt's university budget anyway? How many of us even know
who those representatives are? Just in case you don't know,
someone will assist you at The General Assembly telephone
directory at (919) 7334111.
Closer to home, only 13 percent of the student popula-
tion at ECU voted in the student government elections last
spring. At least this figure is three percent higher than the
national average for college elections.
It does not take a genius to realize that there are a lot of
students who are not excited by politics. Maybe they are all
still watching cartoons instead of the evening news.
Whatever the case may be, the fact is that we can no
longer afford to be hushed by adults busy watching the news,
reading the paper or talking politics. Our opinions and more
importantly our votes count just as much as any 40-year-olds.
Let's make them count.

The East Carolinian ��
100.
recycled
paper
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Chris Walker, Staff Illustrator
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Randy Miller, Production Assistant
Ellyn Felts, Copy Editor
Deanya Lattimorc. Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building. ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
3284366.
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Jay Myers Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatiey, Electronics Editor
Signs, signs, tearing down the signs?
To the Editor:
One of the greatest weapons we
have is our freedom of speech and
expression, and I cannot think of
many more evils greater than restrict-
ing that freedom. Well, I write this
letter to remind the student popula-
tion that this restriction goes on ev-
eryday. 1 am involved in politics, and
as being president of this University's
ttic party, you'll see me with
,al sign in my yard, or a
bumper sticker, etc. In order to reach
students with my organization's mes-
e will post fliers around cam-
pus espousing our cause, letting the
� ermine if he or she will join
ere are cowards around
are taking such signs
.� the reason that they
don't agree with us. Cowardly actions
like these restrict our freedom of ex-
pression, and this garbage has got
to stop.
1 started a committee known as
Students United fo Defeat Jesse
Helms. We have nothing against Mr.
Helms personally, we just want to
point out to the student body that
we feel he has not represented stu-
dents well at all, and we also want
them to know about his questionable
stances on student loans and the en-
vironrrnt We realize that many stu-
dent may disagree with us. That's
cool, and we counted on that fact.
What we did not count on is that
some morons would rip our signs off
' the bulletin boards. What we did not
count on is that Democratic politi-
cal signs would be stolen during the
primaries.
I would hope that most people
frown on this sort of thing. Over the
years, 1 have seen many Republican
signs and fliers, but as opposed as I
am to their message, 1 wouldn't even
think of taking them down. Every-
one has a right to freely express
themselves, regardless if you agree
or not. I certainly hope the Young
Republicans of ECU frown on this as
well, and 1 certainly hope they are
not responsible. I simply ask the idi-
ots that are doing this to give us our
right to speak. You most certainly
have a right to speak as well.
Larry Freeman
Senior
Political Science
'Journalists must seek and speak the
truth for we are the voice of the voiceless
millions
Reach out and touch someone
The world of dating and finding
your future mate is about to undergo
a major transformation. Instead of
looking for Mr. Right in the supermar-
ket, clubs or at the gym. many singles
are opting to stay home on Friday
nights and chat online looking for
potential dates.
Digital City is an America online
site (keyword: Digital City) that show-
cases hundreds of cities in the United
States. The site tours the city of your
choice and gives access to newspa-
pers, universities, restaurants, enter-
tainment and personal ads. Individu-
als can place personals and browse
ads already placed. Members can
place their pictures in the photo li-
brary if they are daring.
I thought it would be interesting
to see what type of response I would
get by placing an ad in Digital City:
Washington D.C. I was honest no lies.
The response was amazing. I received
almost 50 e-mails the next day. Men
from Washington D.C, Raleigh and
Charlotte and they all seemed nice. I
receive at least two new e-mails each
day. They told me their names, descrip-
tions and some even sent their photo
along with their e-mail. 1 must admit,
a few of the responses were a bit
strange, but I just hit delete and move
onto the next lonely heart seeking
someone special to share their
thoughts.
Warning: do not give out your
full name, address or phone number
to anyone online who asks. Be care-
ful and selective and make sure you
get to "know" your cyberhunk very,
very well before you plan a meeting
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
If you are a short
fat brunette,
don't describe
yourself as a
Kim Basinger
look-a-like
and always meet in a public place
(bring a friend too).
I responded to a few and 1 am
not going to divulge any details. Also,
just to let you know: 1 am not into
Cybersex and Digital City personals
does not promote this online behav-
ior. It is just a high-tech way to meet
people in the '90s and possibly meet
and date in the future.
Digital City is separated into dif-
ferent regions. In the Mid-Atlantic re-
gion, you can visit Greensboro. Ra-
leigh, Winston-Salem, Charlotte or
Baltimore. The lists are almost end-
less. Sorry folks, the one city I could
not find was our own little Greenville.
Many of the cities offer personal ads
and photo libraries.
Here are some tips for online
dating from aol's "net girl"( no. it is
not me!):
1. Be honest:
If you are a short, fat. brunette.
don't describe yourself as a Kim
Basinger look-alike. If you are hon-
est and up front, you will get re-
sponses from guys willing to accept
you as you are.
2. Be different:
Is there anybody who isn't warm,
funny, caring and intelligent and look-
ing for the same? If you want your ad
to stand out dare to be different (Sen-
sual Redhead works well).
3. Be Realistic:
Understand that most of the
people who respond to your ad won't
be Prince Charming, so don't expect
too much. On the other hand, there
are many great people online these
days, so you may end up pleasantly
surprised.
4. Be open-minded:
Even if the people who answer
your ad aren't exactly what you are
looking for, give them a chance. The
great thing about cyberspace is that
you can meet people mind -to- mind
by swapping e-mail before you meet
them face-to-face.
5. Be Patient:
Don't be disappointed if you fail
to find a date right away! Even
though the online medium lets people
respond to your ad as soon as it en-
ters the database doesn't mean you'll
always be flooded with responses the
next morning.
Cyberspace is waiting for you, so
go grab a computer and sign onto
Digital City. Who knows the possibili-
ties that can be explored? You may
even meet the man or woman of your
dreams. Be honest, safe, and have a
great time!
0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
� Razia Bhatti, Pakistani journalist, 1994
If you have a complaint or comment write a letter to the
editor. Letters must be typed, 250 words or less and
include name, major, year, and telephone number.Drop
your letters by the Student Publications bldg. across
from Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what you
think. Your voice can be heard!
4
mnrr-1 if ��





Wednesday, June 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
Students explore
sunken shipwreck
Confederate
gunboat found in
NC creek
Angel Whitiey
Staff Writer
Recently, a graduate student re-
search team lead by Dr. Lawrence
Babits of East Carolina's Maritime
History and Nautical Archaeology
program has been working at the site
of a sunken Confederate gunboat in
Chicod Creek near Crimesland.
According to Dr. Babits, the gun-
boat was built in Washington, NC in
late 1861 by the Confederate Navy.
When Union officers got too close,
however, the Confederacy moved the
operation to Chicod Creek. Unfin-
ished timbers that matched the wood
used in the gunboat were found in
the hull, indicating that the boat
wasn't complete at the time of the
move. The Confederacy had appar-
ently planned to continue the work
while it was in the creek.
The further invasion of Union
soldiers into the Chicod Creek area
squelched that idea, though, so the
Confederacy scuttled and burned the
boat to keep it out of Union hands.
It has remained at the "bottom of the
creek ever since, although several
dives have been made to study it.
During the Civil War Centennial
in the 1960's, an attempt was made
to raise the gunboat, but that even-
tually failed. In 1973, Cape Fear Tech
came up with the Underwater Ar-
chaeology Unit of the Department of
Cultural Resources to perform re-
mote sensing on the gunboat. In the
fall of 1973, the Office of State Ar-
chaeologists dove on the site for a
week and recorded basic information
about the length, beam, and depth
of the boat.
Research has shown that the
gunboat was approximately 151 feet
long and 25 feet wide in its heyday.
It is the only gunboat over 150 feet
to survive the Civil War and is there-
fore crucial in studying the shipbuild-
ing methods employed at the time
when the last of the wooden warships
were being built
Since the boat was actually built
in Washington, it will also give the
team a chance to "concentrate on
North Carolina's heritage, as op-
posed to that of more exotic places
Babits said.
The team has made repeated
dives at the low visibility site. They
expect to have finished assessing and
drawing the structure of the entire
port side of the boat by the time this
story aees print.
But this is not the first time ECU
students have made dives at the site
o. the Chicod Creek gunboat. Last
summer, students dove there to do
the work that makes this year's
project possible. According to Babits,
this summer's team will continue and
finish the job.
East Carolina's Maritime History
and Nautical Archaeology program
offers graduate students a chance to
participate in similar field studies
each summer and is one of only two
programs in the country that allows
for dives at very low visibility sites.
Ice
cream
frenzy!
Starving students
gleefully line up to get
their share of the booty
at the Ice Cream Social
held outside
Mendenhall last week
by Rec Services.
Photo by CARLTON TURNAGE
CD Reviews
i
t
IfovU 7�ev4et
that speaks
Ho-Hum
Local
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer ,
k by Joe Orlando, courtesy DC Comics
When I walked into the dark, book-
filled lair of the Skull Cave, 1 immedi-
ately saw the man (ghost?) I was looking
1 possibly miss him? He
dresses in a tight,
form-fitting purple
outfit that covers
even his round head;
his face is plastered
with a small, yet
snug, black mask; he
hangs out with a wild
wolf; and when he
does make a public
appearance, many
times it is on top of a
white stallion. Any-
one who knows any-
thing about comic
strip heroes knows
exactly who I .a talk-
ing about the Phan-
tom!
Now, I don't nor-
mally hang out in hid-
den caves located in
the Bengalla jungle,
but I had a reason for
meeting with the
Phantom. A new
movie inspired from
his life adventures is
out, and I wanted to
know his thoughts
on the film.
The Phantom
sat silently in his
throne, the purple
gleaming even in the
darkness, and he
beckoned me to sit
with a wave of his
hand. I sat with a
slight chill down my
spine (is this man re-
ally a ghost'). I no-
ticed my hands were
shaking, so I pulled
out a cigarette. Sud-
denly a hand swiped
the drag from my fin-
gers. "No smoking in
the Skull Cave the
Phantom's native as-
sistant snapped.
Accepting the
house rules, I leaned
back in my chair and
asked the all-impor-
tant question: "So,
Mr. Phantom, what
do you think of the
new movie The
Phantom He
smiled his cocky smile and replied, "It's
better than any of the other comic adap-
tations floating around I gave him a
puzzled look, unsure as to why he would
say such a thing. The Phantom leaned
forward and peered into my eyes.
"At least my movie knows what it
is he said, "and it knows how to have
fun The Phantom then began his own
review of his movie.
"For starters, I am not a super hero
in the same vein as Batman or Super-
man. I'm more of a pulp hero, popular-
ized in the comic strips by Lee Falk. You
know, I'm more like the hero from those
1930s movie serials. I'm from the same
breed of hero as Indiana Jones, except I
came before that guy. I know people
unfamiliar with me are going to gripe
about how many of the action scenes in
the movie are Indiana Jones ripoffs, but
face the facts: Indy copied me.
"Jeffrey Boam was an appropriate
writer for my story, particularly since he's
worked with this genre before when he
wrote Indiana Jones and the Last Cru-
sade. Boam sets up characters that are
standard for the adventure serial. You
have a hero who is pure good and fights
for good (that would be me, as played by
Billy Zane); you have a villain who is pure
evil and desires global power (Treat Wil-
liams as the nasty Drax); you have a hero-
ine who also serves as the love interest
for the hero (Kristy Swanson); and you
even have a deadly femme-fatale
(Catherine Zeta Jones).
"With these characters in place,
Boam sets all of them off on a wild ad-
venture worthy of my life. The evil Drax
is after the three Skulls of Touganda that
when placed together, can create a power
strong enough to destroy the world. My
job in the movie is to stop Drax. That's
basically it as far as plot but that's good
enough for the movie's purposes. We
don't need well-rounded characters; we
need adventure with a capital 'A
"The director, I believe his name is
Simon Wincer, handles the adventure
with an old pro's masterful hand. In the
movie, I get to jump off a crashing plane,
I get to ride a horse through the jungle
and New York City, I get to fight pirates,
and I get to escape explosions on a sub-
marine. Even with all that Wincer doesn't
let the action take away from Boam's
nifty premise. Wincer and Boam work
well together to create an adventure film
with some effective pacing, something
that many of this summer's other films
are having problems with
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
From a little town in Arkansas
comes a band that certainly is in a
world of their own, Ho-Hum. Although
it may seem, with a huge record deal
from Universal Records, that the band
is a huge prospect for any TV show
or magazine article, their sound might
not support such widespread fame.
What's the problem? Ho-Hum's
sound is certainly all in their own, but
it's also everybody else's. On their
debut, Local, these guys paint pic-
tures, lots of pictures. Most of their
work, although camouflaged by their
own amps and effects, sounds like
someone else's.
Ho-Hum seems to be revolving
around one man, Lenny Bryan. Bryan
sings and plays guitar and piano on
wammsmmaBmammmammmmmmmmmimr
Local. His vocal style is very similar
to the sound produced by the lead
singer of Everclear. It's very noncha-
lant
The album starts off with a tune
called "Around the World I like this
one. but 1 don't think it makes a good
lead into an album that is as diverse
as this one. It sounds very progres-
sive and everyone knows these days
that if it sounds progressive. REM
pretty much covered it in the '80s.
The biggest thing this band needs
is to be able to take the level of inten-
sity they've created to another level.
Whether higher or lower, it doesn't
matter. You can't stay in the same
place for the entire duration of the
song. If you don't grab people's at-
tention when they give it to you, more
than likely they won't come back.
Everyone knows, be it a date, a job
interview, or in this case a debut
record, that first impressions are ev-
erything. Although that statement is
not carved in stone, it's there. It's up
to us as individuals to work around
it
The album's most impressive
song is called "One Out of Ten Who
would figure a song that started off
with a punk riff that might have been
played by anybody in their wonder
years could prove to be the most im-
pressive song on the album. It's a good
tune. It goes from one place to an-
other, changing its level of intensity
from one minute to the next It holds
your attention long enough for you
to finish the song and perhaps check
out the next.
Who knows? Maybe their sound
will take off and they'll become one of
the biggest bands of all time. Or then
again, maybe not. The answers are all
in the future. Let's just hope they re-
member the artists they've heard in
the past without turning into them.
gaolZevcew
The Goddess awakens
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
See GHOST page 7
It's hard to find a good fantasy
novel these days.
That may be due in part to the
fact that the great majority of them
bow in slavish devotion to the spirit
of JRR Tolkien and his epic Lord of
the Rings trilogy. As my mom and the
Tao say, too much of any one thing is
bad for you. There's only so many
times you can read about a group of
unlikely heroes going off on a quest
to save the world from the evil dark
lord before you want to retch.
All the lyrical quality and pure
creative spirit that powers Tolkien's
work has long since fled the fantasy
community, and that's a shame. The
current fiction sections of our local
bookstores are fairly bursting with
new novels that build themselves on
ancient myth.
In this publishing climate, the
fantasy novel should be undergoing a
rebirth. Some bright young fantasist
should be diving head-first into world
mythology and building his own
Middle-Earth on the plundered ruins
of Tolkien's dream. But that's not
happening. And fans of fantasy fiction
are missing out on some damn good
See MOON page 6
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Jay Myers
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Man, am I proud to be a
Southerner. No, really. I'll tell
you why.
In this area of the U.S we've
got more idiotic, backwards,
close-minded, unsympathetic, no-
common-sense morons grouped
together than anywhere else.
Heck, we've even got DC, New
York and Los Angeles beat.
Want proof? Well, for one we
keep on putting Strom
Thurmond and Jesse Helms back
in office. Their policies were old
and outdated before all of us
younguns reading this paper
were even born.
Also, a shamefully large per-
centage of us Southerners think
that draping a sheet over our
heads and yelling out racist epi-
thets like "nigger" or "kike" ev-
ery other word is our God-given
duty. In fact, the belief that we
were screwed in the Civil War is
so prevalent and pervasive that
it's impossible to go a day with-
out seeing one of those damn
rebel flags, whether it's on
someone's butt, waist, chest,
head, back, crotch, car, bike,
house or pet
(Dramatic pause)
I'm growing misty-eyed with
pride.
But those choice tidbits
above are just the tip of the ice-
berg. You want a really good ex-
ample of the standard type of
religio-political brain fart that our
esteemed southern leaders con-
ceive of on a regular basis?
Just last week, the 15.6 mil-
lion members of the Southern
Baptist convention (the largest
Protestant group in America)
were asked by their leaders to
boycott Disney. That's right,
Disney, the world leader in fam-
ily entertainment
Of course, I can see why
someone would want to boycott
Disney. As a corporate entity,
Disney is out to make money,
most of it off kids. That pap that
they force down our collective
American throat is so politically
and ethically correct that it lacks
any substantive value. So yeah,
right on Southern Baptists, go
get that evil corporate entity.
But wait, that's not the rea-
son those pesky Baptists want to
boycott Mickey Mouse. No. they
like that marketing and fluff just
fine.
What really gets in the holy
craw of our protesting Protes-
See DROP page 7
"
�hi . � ����i. .���
�milJlllgBWMIMM�J�W





�������
Wednesday, June 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
MOON from page 5
fantasy novels because they're being
tossed in with the "straight" fiction.
One such novel is Elizabeth .
Hand's Waking the Moon. Delving
into the mysteries of Christianity, an-
cient Goddess worship and the ever-
popular secret society mythos. Hand
has put together a cracking good fan-
tasy world here, and grafted it onto
everyday reality. In fact, it's the ev-
eryday reality, and the everyday char-
acters who inhabit it. that ultimately
become the most compelling thing
about Waking the Moon.
In tiie beginning, however, that's
not the case. The book opens on our
apparent central character. Katherine
Sweeney Cassidy. on her first day of
college at the University of the Arch-
angels and St. John the Divine (called
the Divine for short). Sweeney is con-
cerned with the usual college fresh-
man stuff: learning her way around.
making friends and finding an iden-
tity for herself in a strange new world.
Exactly how strange Sweeney's
new world is becomes apparent on her
first night at the Divine, when two
winged angels appear in her dorm
room. Understandably confused,
Sweeney is ready to write the vision
off as a dream when she finds a long,
blood-red feather at the foot of her
bed.
The mysteries continue to pile up.
as we learn that the founders of the
Divine (and the apparent masters of
the angels), a secret masculinist or-
der called the Benandanti, are prepar-
ing for the return of an ancient foe.
That foe is the goddess of the moon,
worshipped under many names in
many prehistoric cultures around the
world. The Goddess' earthly agents
consort with angels of their own, and
readily kill in their deity's multiple
names.
This is all great stuff: secret soci-
eties, ancient conflicts between the
male and the female, angels walking
the earth, and a powerful occult world
that exists beneath the surface of our
own. In the face of all that, I swiftly
grew weary of trying to care about
Sweeney and her college pals.
But Hand drew me in. Through
sharp prose, electric sensuality and
'deft, quirky characterization, she
hooked me. I found myself caring
about Sweeney, about her unrequited
love for the beautifully insane Oliver;
her strange, erotic friendship with
Angelica Di Rienzi, Sweeney's rival for
Oliver's affections; and even her rela-
tionships with angry lesbian Annie
and the cynical poet Baby Joe.
Through these characters. Hand
draws a sharp picture of college life.
It's a raw time, when people are most
vulnerable, experimenting with every-
thing and trying to figure out who
and what they are. Intense friendships
can spring up almost overnight, and
they often last a lifetime. Sweeney
goes through all this, and more.
Hand does such a good joo with
this aspect of the story that, when it
inevitably crashes headlong into the
occult plotlines. Waking the Moon
develops a sense of real peril. The
reader has a lot invested in these char-
acters, and when the nastiness begins
we don't want to see them hurt.
This novel is that rarest of all
fantasy stories that manages to
ground itself firmly in reality and still
create an imaginative and awe-inspir-
ing fantasy world. Every time an an-
gel walked into a scene, my heart
skipped a beat. Hand establishes the
other-worldliness of these creatures
with style and urgency; one of the
novel's driving forces is the need to
know more about these mysterious
beings.
Unfortunately, that's exactly
where Waking the Moon fails. In the
end. we never really find out much
about the angels that haunt the
book's pages like enticing spirits.
That may have been intentional: over-
exposure makes the unknown into
the commonplace.
But Hand barely gives us any in-
dication as to what these creatures
really are. or why they're in the story
at all. Keeping such awesome mysti-
cal beings mysterious is one thing,
but leaving them utter enigmas is
quite another.
This is especially a problem
when you consider that the big cli-
max of the story gives us so much of
the Goddess that she comes off as a
cheap special effect. I don't want to
give too much away, so I'll just say
this: the ending becomes so overpow-
eringly cosmic that Hand loses touch
with the human aspect that made her
novel so compelling in the first place.
But the ending is the only real
complaint I have with this book.
Elizabeth Hand's Waking the Moon
is a fascinating read all the way up
to those final unfortunate 20 pages.
The fact that it falls short at the end
is disappointing, but you'll still have
one hell of a ride getting there.
On a scale of one to ten Wak-
ing the Moon rates an eight.
w.
y
EASTBROOK
VILLAGE
GREEN
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s-
:mSmmmimmm�r
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 19,1996
1
s4K0tcca'4&t&e'&t�.
TUESDAY NITE! MON-FRI
10R2 ! 2-5 PM
HAMBURGER! SOFT DRINKS
990
12 PRICE
618 GREENVILLE BLVD. � 355-9815
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Ql .3 FM
9jf East Carolina University
Pssst!
Our secret agents
HAVE
CHOSEN YOU TO LIVE AT
Tar River
Estates
We're recruiting
residents who want
TO ENJOY AMENITIES
LIKE A FITNESS CENTER,
OLYMPIC-SIZE SWIMMING
POOL, RECREATION
ROOM, AND SAND
VOLLEYBALL COURT.
This is your
MISSION
If you choose to
accept it, contact
our office asap.
If you do not, your
chance to move in
will self-destruct in
1996.
214 Elm Stkkii 5
faii, NC 27858
(919) 752-4225
EJmJm? from page 5
tants is the fact that Disney gives
health coverage to their employees.
What? No wait, I got that wrong.
I left out a word. They give health
coverage to their gay employees. Ahh,
I see.
I can just hear Mr. Fundamen-
talist Southern Baptist now. "We
can't have them fairies gettin' medi-
cal attention, specially them ones
what started that AIDS curse. Why,
God put that curse on them so he
could wipe 'em out. If'n we stop it,
God'U be right angry with us, and
we don't want that
These same conventioneers also
cited the release of the controversial
film Priest (through the Disney sub-
sidiary Miramax Films) as another
reason for the boycott
For those of you who haven't
seen Priest, it's the story of a young
Catholic priest who comes to terms
with his call to minister and his ho-
mosexuality. If anything, the film
shows the church to be as comfort-
ing and nurturing as it is cold and
harsh in the face of controversy, be-
cause of the humans who make up
its membership. It is a truly remark-
able movie with a more positive mes-
sage in support of Christianity than
any of the attacks that have been
hurled against it
God forbid that anyone try to
solve a controversy with love, under-
standing and mutual respect. That
just doesn't cut it in the South,
where hatred, intolerance and dis-
dain are the rule.
Or so it would seem.
Despite all my ranting and rav-
ing about the poor state of things
in the South, I am proud to be a
part of it. Why? Because I have
friends.
Friends who are not hetero-
sexual, friends who are not white,
friends who are not male, friends
who are not racist, but friends who
are nevertheless Southern.
Because of the very fact that my
Southern friends and I exist, we be-
come proof that the South isn't just
the stereotypical hell-on-earth that
I've described above. Those idiotic
elements in the South do exist and
they are very vocal, but they aren't
the whole South.
We Southerners are more than
just a bunch of ignorant hicks and
I, for one, am tired of the vocal mi-
nority speaking for me.
Anyone else?
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FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
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C.cenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
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8:00-4:00
jrrl.Vo Jl from page 5
I jotted down some notes and asked
the Phantom a question I wasn't sure
he wanted to be asked. "How about
the acting?"
The Phantom glared at me with a
raised left eye brow. I adjusted my ques-
tion. "I mean, do you think the actors
were appropriate?"
He smiled his cocky smile once
again. "Do you see this smile?" he said.
"Only an actor like Billy Zane could
capture this smile. And only an actor
like Billy Zane could possibly wear my
purple Phantom outfit without look-
ing just plain stupid. I'm proud of the
boy. He did me justice.
"The entire cast is good, particu-
larly Treat Williams. I've read other re-
views that state how Williams was mis-
cast but I disagree. Williams blends his
Drax character with the qualities of a
tyrannical crime lord, a conniving busi-
nessman, a raving lunatic, and an in-
nocent boy in search of an adventure.
Sure, his performance may be way over
the top, but so is the whole movie.
"Look, if you can just accept the
fact that the movie is about a white
guy who lives in the jungle, dresses in
a purple outfit, rides a white horse,
and has a plucky wolf companion, ev-
erything will fall into place. The Phan-
tom, unlike the mishandled pulp ac-
tion film The Shadow, knows what it
is and meets all expectations. It may
even exceed many expectations if given
a chance
Smiling, I closed my notebook. "I
see. Tell me, Mr. Phantom, how do you
know so much about the movie indus-
try if you live here in the remote
jungles of deepest Africa?"
Suddenly, the Phantom lifted his
head and stared deeply into the open
air. "Someone needs my help he whis-
pered. With a leap and a bound, the
Phantom sprang from his throne and
darted out of the Skull Cave.
After he was gone, I gathered up
my things and started to leave, only to
notice a small piece of paper lying at
the foot of his throne. I picked up the
paper and written on it, in the
Phantom's handwriting, was this
simple sentence: "On a scale of one to
ten, The Phantom rates an eight
Help
Wanted
trahit
ECU TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS
ECU TRANSIT is looking for mature, dependable, and
outgoing individuals to
provide quality service for the transit system.
Must be a registered ECU Student or
incoming student with at least two or more semesters
remaining to work.
Punctuality is a must!
Must complete all training this summer to
start full work schedule for Fall semester.
Must have good driving record!
(DWTs and Frequently ticketed drivers need not apply!)
'North Carolina class "B" CDL license with passenger
endorsement is required.
We will help you obtain your license.
Previous experience is a plus, but not necessary.
Must be in good standing with the University.
For more information and applications,
stop by the ECU Transit office in Mendenhall (RM258),
or call 328-4724.
Monday - Thursday 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM
M� .





8
Wednesday, June 19, 1996
The East Carolinian
Area golf courses rated
Graded on price
and overall course
appearance
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Xote: This is the first install-
ment in a series of reviews of golf
courses in the Greenville Pitt
County area.
After watching the U.S. Open
this weekend on TV. 1. like many
Americans, decided to hit the links
expecting to play like the pros. That
was a dream, but I did have fun.
It's kind of like when the Tour de
France is on the tube and then you
notice that there are more bicycles
than cars on the road. Anyway, this
week I played at the Farmville Coll
and Country Club.
The Farmville Country Club is
located in. you guessed it. the thriv-
ing metropolis of Farmville. It's lo-
cated near the downtown area, so
it's not hard to find.
You can go west on Greenville
Boulevard until you get outside of
town, then follow the signs to
Farmville. Once you get into town,
keep going until you pass the
Piggly Wiggly. Zippy's Food Mart,
and the Colonial Inn Dining Room.
When you get to a stoplight that
has a gas station on the right, and
a store diagonal from you called the
Corner Pocket, turn right. Go
around the bend, pass a couple of
warehouses, and the Country Club
is on the right.
You
in also go out on
Mi4
west until you see a sign that says
Farmville with an arrow pointing
left (or as the guy at the gas sta-
tion giving us directions said:
"left "I. Proceed down this road and
follow the signs until you get down-
town and you know the rest.
Farmville is probably the most
atfordable golf course in the area.
During the day. it's $20 to ride and
$10 to walk 18 holes. They don't
have a nine hole rate until after ti
See GOLF page 9
Be one
with the
ball!
Robin Taylor
concentrates on making
her free throw during a
shoot-out contest in
Christenbury last w
Photo bv CARLTON TURNAGF
Field
Last Saturday, Harrington Field was host to
major league baseball try-outs. Braving the
sun and hot, humid weather, men of all ages
and sizes tried to make the cut for the newly
added baseball team, the Arizona
Diamondbacks.
Dill Dillard
Senior Writer
They came from as far as Chesa-
peake. Va. as well as across the Caro-
linas in hopes of making "the show
The Arizona Diamondbacks held open
try-outs at ECL's Harrington Field
this past Saturday.
Diamondback Area Scouting Su-
pervisor Howard McCullogh, who was
a catcher on the ECU '75 & '76 base-
ball squads, ran the try-out for base-
ball hopefuls between the ages of 16-
22 years.
"What we do is run the players
through drills and grade their offen-
sive and defensive skills bv Major
League standards to see where they're
at as baseball players McCullogh
said.
The mix of players ranged from
rising high school and American Le-
gion stars to college and junior col-
lege standouts.
"This is a good way to get my
name in the hat seeing that I didn't
get drafted and my.eligibility is up
here at EC said Bryan Smith. ECU
pitcher and second team All- CAA selec
tion.
This open try-out was not only ben-
eficial to guys like Smith who are trying
to get into the professional ranks, but it
was also benefi-
cial for the
younger kids to
see where they
are as baseball
players by MLB
standards with-
out ruining
their college
eligibility.
This try-
out is not the
only one f o r
McCullogh in
the eastern
part of the
state.
"We have
these things all
around the
area trying to
familiarize our-
selves with the talent in this area
McCullogh said.
The next stop lot the Greenville resi-
dent will be the Port City when he'll hold
a similar try-out on the campus ol I NC
Wilmington
When I started out in scouting with
the Red Sox
organization,
I was flying
from here to
there and
never had a
c hance to
scout this
area as close
as 1 wanted
McCullogh
said. " Nil w
that I'm with
the Diamond-
ha c ks, t h e
system is al-
lowing me to
scout this
area moi e
The Ari-
zona Dia-
mondbacks is one ot two expans
teams added this past year to up the team
membership to the MLB to an even 30
teams. The Diamondbacks, along with
the Tampa Devil Rays are starting to
build their minor league or farm league
system before their inaugural MLB sea-
sons in 1998.
"With a young franchise such as tins
you have t. build from tin- ground up.
and in profes I you have
the talent, i ter w here you're from,
a scout will find you, McCullogh said.
"That's why we I ere today, to find that
t alent
This area of tl en his
torically known I
1 hi' talenl out didn't
provi othei
'In the past, 11
good pros-
pects, Hut our
main goal
here today
was t.i t'nui
young talent
ami follow
then progress,
and the best
I hing
could happen
to the players
i. that their
names were
put into the
pot. so to
s p e a k .
McCullogh said.
Another Pirate putting his name into
Sat was i ight fielder . I anz,
"I haven't hit in a while, since the
CAA tournament, but I felt I did pretty
well Clanz said.
Pretty well indeed Pit
showings in the try-oul vith C hit-
ting a dinger out ol right-centei and
Smith sitting down hii if hatters.
"I hav n't tl while, hut I feel
I threw prett) h a tew nastv curve
balls Smith said. The way I see it. I've
put my n I he pot. and a Arizona
don't like 29 othei
chances for
McC
I NC before his 10 �.��
ed this cami
rospect thai an fol
low hi nd keep in
touch with a! these things,
you'vi
� his was a ful out
ing





����.�����-��
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 19, 1996
SELL your USED books and BUY your
USED books at the ECU Student Stores!
�-� � -� i �?
Currency Exchange
Bring us your used books
and well exchange them for cash.
Book Buyback Locations Open:
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Monday, June 17 - Thursday, June 20
3 North of Wright Building, Bekwith Drive
m Speight Bus Stop
On the Mall, near Financial Aid & Mail Services
uncut
Student Stores
.where your dollars support student scholars!
CHECK OUT OUR
USED BOOK INVENTORY
Plus, We've Got a Large Selection of
Sale Priced Apparel, and
1996-1997 Academic Year
CalendarPlanners are Here!
$5 offTVER? $50 purchase
i That means if you've got $100 in textbooks, J
i well take off $10. j
No coupon necessary. No other coupons or discounts may be used in
conjunction with this offer. Offer excludes computer hardware and software, ,
I and special order items. Offer expires 62196.
L?j
Summer Hours: Monday-Friday: 7:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wrisht Buildins 396-6731 http:www.studentstores-ecu.edu
c;r.lat
ipeap let
328-6366
GOLF from page 8
p.m when its $10 to ride and $5
to walk. Cot that, math majors?
The course itself consists of a
majority of straight-on holes on the
front nine, and more dog legs on
the back. If you're walking, the
front nine is very close together,
while the back is a journey.
The first half of the course has �
one par 5, six par 4's, and two par
3's. I personally think this part of
the course is easier and I have lost
a lot fewer balls here. There is wa-
ter on every hole but one of the
par 3's. One of the great things
about the course that 1 like is the
wide open fairways. This accommo-
dates even the most vicious hooks
and slices (even though I always
find some way of hitting it in the
bush country).
The second half of the course
contains two par 5's, five par 4's,
and two par 3's. It's a long walk,
like I said, and it's kind of swampy
CjteenoilU's only
6xeiu fliqkuiub 4 9Jbuefi oj C&iss
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers .�
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam
CASH PRIZE
�Contestants need to call &. register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
� 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
V Dickinson Ave.
(Behind John's Convenient Mart)
L� jiy N.c LELRfqg'g4.m;�-
ECU
McDonald'
back there. They need to cut back
some of that brush. I lost six balls
last week on the first six holes of
the back nine. If you don't keep it
fair, you can kiss your Pinnacles
good-bye. I'm going to start just
using Top Flites, because you can't
lose those suckers even if you
threw them in the lake.
The fairways are in great con-
dition, especially compared to some
of the other local courses. The ma-
jority of the greens are good, with
the exception of a couple that have
fallen victim to extreme summer
temperatures and are turning into
"beiges" instead of greens. This will
get worse as the summer goes on,
so get out there now and enjoy the
smooth putting services.
The food at the clubhouse is
excellent. They have a grill where
they cook everything when you
order it, and even have fountain
drinks. That's living, my friends.
Nothing tastes better than a greasy
hamburger and french fries after
walking nine holes.
If you have any questions
about the course, want to set up a
tee time (which you usually don't
need except on weekends and holi-
days), or my directions were not
adequate, you can call the
Farmville Golf and Country Club at
(919) 753-3660.
Rating: On a scale ranging
from a driver to a putter, with the
putter being the best (drive for
show, put for dough), I give
Farmville an eight iron.
things Really Move
Inm&assifieds!
Advertise witn
us in
The East
Carolinian.
Home Stle Meals
204 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27835
919321-1700 Phone
919321 2267 fax
llam-9pm Sun-Thurs
11 am-10pm Fri &. Sat
� The Menu
"The Freshest Thing Qoing" says it all when the
name Boston Market is mentioned. We
offer a wide variety of entrees and
over 20 vegetables and side items. A
With our fresh ingredients and
made from scratch dishes, Boston
Market brings the memories of the
past to the presesnt.
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i i
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i i Homestyle Mashed
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i i
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Potatoes, &
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Expires July 3, 1996 j ; Expires July 3, 1996 EM31�
Boston Market Catering.
Boston Market will cater your business luncheon, church
event, picnic, banquet, wedding, or party!
�SMUMMMP





M
0�
��:�
:
IT II ill � III"
Wednesday, June 19,1996
The East Carolinian
�IKMc
" VOttC Or ;IMy fM : ��
NOW CIJTEM t��tFut4.y;T TMl�
YEW Moi�mt owe or you MSUK&fc�$
II COTWi BorrtB I HAVi PLAKTtT
IN YOUR AlRLIHE FOOD. 0�JCE SO�H-Ckltt
ytUl 'USEHCER WILL SEirlM T6
HICCUP. . . If THt HlttVP COUNT
CKCtCOS M.THl SO"� W�.C 60 �Ff
�fce.
SPARE TIME
BY ANDY FARKAS
ViW Hours.
ALRIGHT MISS, NOU yOU'VC SOT TO STAY CALM
yttuWC SwALLOWCP A BoMB AND IF YOU HICCUP
tfoRZ THAN 20 TiM�S. TH� BoMB WLL &0 OFF
MovJ YOU'VE ALREADY MCCUPPCP S
TIMES AND if WE" fiOAl'r PifAM
f'y this BoM& Soon you'o. Blow up.
7A
Small SiTS of youR. LoweR IHTCSrNC
wit, se srtewfi THtoviHour
TH� FUSCIOO&C Wirn BXAHls.
CAfTAiH, IT SEEMS w� HA.Jt A
PRoBLtn, A PASSEH&CR SftMS td
HAVE HU HEAP STtK. llJ T� ISfUT.
ehbl
For Rent
Sbl
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
BRASSWOOD APTS.
One and two bedroom apart-
ments $2S5-$340. Water-
sewage, Free Washer-Dryer
Hookups. Quiet location
near Malls and Restaurants.
Call 355-4499
Brasswood apts.
Near Lowes
MELLOW FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED Immediately. Two bedroom du-
plex, WD, fenced yard. $275 utilities
and phone. Must not mind animals. Dead
head. Call 756-5340
2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATHROOMS Town-
house. Excellent Location! A must see
Place. $400mo 752-9880 - On ECU Bus
Route.
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756209
DUPLEX FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms, 1 1
2 bath, Large Closets, Deck, Balcony, 3
blocks from campus. 114 S. Woodlawn,
Washer and Dryer Hook-ups, $500
month. 758886
SOPHOMORE STUDENT WITH AN
available 2 bedroom apt needs one room-
mate. Busline access plus cable, security
& laundry facilities provided. Call today
or tonight for details. Phil 321-2813
115 E. 13TH ST 5BD2 Bath Avail. 8-1
$825Month. 830-1015
For Rent
College Agent Program
Immediate Opportunities for
Self-Motivated, Well Rounded Students in
Good Academic Standing
�Actual business experience for their resume
�Develops networking and business relationship skills
�Flexible work schedule
�One in three college agents becomes a full time associate upon graduation
Jeffery H. Mahoney � 217 Commerce Street � (919) 355-7700
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share three bedroom house on
Meade St Close to Campus. WD, AC
$242month 13 bills. Call 752-6999
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! MF Non-
smoker to share 2 bedroom apartment on
ECU bus route. Close to Everything. $190
half utilities. Call 531-0695 or 758308.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
to share 2 BR apartment near campus.
12 rent & utilities; cable included in rent
WD hookups, dishwasher. Call Dawn
752-8401.
105 E. 11TH ST. 3 BD1 bath WD, DW,
Central AC $635Month. 830-1015
1 AND 2 BEDROOM apartments. Vari-
ous locations - some with new carpet Call
Potomac Properties, 2706 E. 10th St Ste-
B 752-9722
ROOMMATE NEEDED JULY 1ST to
share 3 bedroom house close to campus.
$250.00. 1 12 bath. Possible Pets. No
furniture needed. Call Kim at 830-9036
113 E 13TH ST. 1 BD1 Bath. Avail. 6-1
$200Month 830-1015
For Sale
i?
Help
Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
apt 12 block from campus, 3 blocks from
downtown & 2 blocks from supermarket
laundramat Rent includes utilities, phone
& cable. 757-1947
THREE BEDROOM DUPLEX, MEADE
ST $450.00 monthly. One bathroom. 758-
1909. Available Today.
PART-TIME SUMMER POSITIONS (and
possibly fall) with the Student Patrol Unit
Students wanted for night work hours. Must
be reliable and self-motivated! $6.15hr. Stop
by the Police Dept for an application. ECU
Police Department is an Equal Opportunity
Employer. Females and minorities encour-
aged to apply.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give us a
call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC - 919-
747-7686
AIRLINE JOBS � Applications are now be-
ing accepted for domestic & international
staff! Flight attendants, ticket agents, reser-
vationists, ground crewmore. Excellent
travel benefits! Call Airline Employment
Services for details. 1-206-971-3690 ext
L53621
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Travel the world
while earning an excellent income in the
Cruise Ship & Land-Tour Industry. Season-
al & full-time employment available. No ex-
perience necessary. For more information
call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53626
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT EARN
up to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information
caIl:(206)971-3570exU53625
PUBLIC RELATION INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE with Northwestern Mutual
Life. Must be good public speaker. Call Jeff
Mahoney at 355-7700
Services
Offered
FOR SALE: HUFFY MOUNTAIN bike.
Great shape - just tuned-up $65.00. Broth-
er word processor, IBM compatible like
new $110.00. Call 328795 Day. 752-3074
Night
ACCEL 486 COMPUTER WITH CD-
ROM, 5 14" and 2.5" Floppy Drives; 14"
VGA color monitor; keyboard; mouse.
$800.00. Sell after July 15th. Contact: Jim
Keller 3554641
FOR SALE FULL SIZE mattress with
boxspring and frame. Only 10 months old.
Almost new. Asking $155.00 or Best Of-
fer. Call 830-9073 or 231-3048.
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING for rain?
Rent a canopy! Two canopies for rent
$125.00 delivered and set-up or $80.00
as-is per day. Deposit required. 752-5533
Ask for Jenn.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53627
THE GATHERING HTTP:WWW.TA-
KEME.COM scholarships, academic & ca-
reer resources, internships, sports, news,
entertainment travel, music, debates and
1,000's of links.
?I Personals
EASYGOING MUSICIAN � TYPE seek-
ing partner to share healing massages.
Also seeking Fun-Loving iadies to share
music & sunshine. Write now: DT, POB
8663, Greenville, 27835. Photos helpful.
Announcements
TREASURE CHEST: THE 1995-96
Video Year Book is available to be picked
up at The Media Board Office located in
the Student Publications Bldg. across
from Joyner Library.
Announcements
USHERS ARE NEEDED FOR CAROL1 S-
EL (June 18-June 22); DADDY'S
DYINWHO'S GOT THE WILL, Jury 2-Ju-
Iy6); and SLEUTH (July 16-July 20). Ten
ushers are needed for each evening and
matinee performance. Usher sign-up
sheets are located in the Messick build-
ing on the board under the correspond-
ing show; a telephone number is required.
Those who sign up for evening perfor-
mances need to be in the lobby of Mcln-
nis Theatre by 7pm sharp! Those who sign-
up for matinee performances need to be
in the lobby of Mclnnis Theatre by 1pm
sharp! People who arrive late will be asked
to leave.
NEED A JOB? NEED MONEY? NEED
EXPERIENCE? Need a "jump start" to-
ward your career? Got at least an overall
2.0 GPA? Then Cooperative Education
may be the answer for you! Inquire at the
Cc-op Office, 2300 GCB, 328979. Help
yourself by letting us help you!
FINAL REGISTRATION IS NOW being
held for the 18th Annual Bryan Adrian
Summer Baskeball Camp. Boys and girls
ages 5-18 are eligible. Included on the
camp staff are: Jerry Stackhouse(NBA),
Dante Calabria(UNC), Jeff Mdnnis(UNC),
Matt Harpring (GA TECH). Locations in-
clude: Charlotte, NC; Greensboro, NC;
� Spartanburg, SC; Virginian Beach, VA; El-
kin, NC; Mount Olive, NC; and Concord,
NC. Call anytime for a free brochure at
(704) 372-3236
The East Carolinian
Summer Classifieds
DEADLINES
2p.m. MONDAY for
next Wednesday's
edition
no
All Greek organizations must be spelled out
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 19, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 19, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1146
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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