The East Carolinian, April 18, 1996







mums?
April 18,1996
Vol71,No. 55
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
v
V .
Briefs
Around the State
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) - Don
Clayton, creator of one of the
worlds most popular family past
times, died today. He was 70.
Clayton, founder and retired
chief executive officer of Putt Putt
Golf and Games, collapsed at a com-
munity function Tuesday night He
died at Cape Fear Valley Medical
Center Wednesday at 3 a.m.
Clayton started the chain of
miniature golf courses in
FayetteviUe in the 1950s. Mayor J.L.
Dawkins managed Clayton's first
miniature golf course 40 years ago.
Today there are hundreds of
courses worldwide.
Funeral arrangements were
pending.
WASHINGTON (AP) - A pill
Gulf War soldiers took to protect
themselves from nerve-gas attacks
can hurt the body's ability to nul-
lify two common insect repellents
before they infiltrate the brain, new
animal studies suggest
The Pentagon says it has no
evidence of a new mystery disease
causing the headaches, fatigue,
memory loss and other symptoms
reported by thousands of veterans
of the 1991 U.SIraqi conflict It
attributes most symptoms to
known illnesses.
Around the Country
MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) - A sub-
urban New York county is trying
to ban the sale of "natural" stimu-
lant pills suspected of killing 15
people across the nation and caus-
ing dangerous side effects in hun-
dreds more.
The pills, promoted as giving
a safe and legal high, contain ephe-
drine and are sold under names like
Cloud 9, Ultimate Xphoria and
Herbal Ecstasy. They are marketed
mostly to young people.
The FDA warned consumers
last week not to buy ephedrine pills,
saying they can cause heart attacks,
seizures and even psychosis.
ALICE, Texas (AP) - Rabies
and tuberculosis are more threat-
ening to humans than the Ebola
virus responsible for the deaths of
two monkeys at a research center
in Texas, health officials said.
The Ebola virus killed one
monkey and led authorities to put
another to death at the Texas Pri-
mate Center, a breeding farm that
provides primates to researchers
around the vrld.
Around the World
Russia (AP) - Rescue teams
have recovered the remains of eight
of the 21 people believed to have
died in a cargo jet crash in Russia's
Far East two weeks ago.
The plane slammed into a vol-
cano April 6 while approaching an
airport on the Kamchatka Penin-
sula. It took searchers four days to
find the wreckage in bad weather
and difficult terrain, and several
more days to find the bodies.
Authorities earlier said
there were nine crew members and
12 passengers aboard the plane.
Rescuers are continuing to search
for bodies.
SGA election
24 pages
controversy ends
Committee
dissolves, no new
election called
Tambra Zion
Editor
The Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) election process
ended Monday night following
three weeks of hearings and ap-
peals.
Election Chair Penn Crawford
declared the committee resolved
Monday April 15, following review
of three complaints filed by Secre-
tarial candidate J. Miles Layton,
President Angie Nix and Presiden-
tial candidate John Lynch. Trea-
surer Jonathan Phillips was allowed
to voice his concerns to the com-
mittee.
A new election was not called
for several reasons in the
committee's decision, including
lack of proof as to whether any of
the candidate's gained from the re-
ported fraudulence and a lack of
control over refunding any cam-
paign money spent.
Layton read his complaint first
which called for a new election.
"I don't think the elections
committee honestly knew what
was going on Layton said while
explaining his appeal. "It's the right
thing to do
He said the election chair has
done an exemplary job, but that an-
other group would be needed in or-
der to call for a new Elections Com-
mittee, perhaps the Navigators, a
Christian organization that Layton
said had worked the polls in previ-
ous years. Crawford reported that
the not only the Navigators, but an
ROTC group had also manned the
polls in the past and quit because
of dirty politics.
"I kind of expected to lose any-
way Layton said. "The point of the
matter is somebody didn't think
enough of us to let students decide
on their own (who to elect)
Layton said he had no evidence
as to whether or not the fraudu-
lent votes benefited or hurt his
campaign when questioned by the
board.
"There are so many odd little
twists and turns in this election,
you can't just turn a blind eye to
this year's election process)
Layton said.
Presidential candidate John
Lynch also called for another elec-
tion in his complaint.
"The purpose is to petition for
See Election page 7
Scandal plagues election history
Candidates look
forward to
positive future
Tambra Zion
Editor
Controversy has always sur-
rounded Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) elections, but this year
appeared to be different at first
President Angie Nix and John
Lynch fought a fair battle in the eyes
of many, but improper polling proce-
dures came as a surprise for those
who viewed this year's election as
positive.
An investigation by TEC uncov-
ered that 106 names obtained from
the signature sheets voters are re-
quired to sign were found to be
fraudulent
Nix defeated Lynch by 963 bal-
lots, according to Computing and In-
formation Services (CIS) tallies, and
neither Nix nor Lynch wanted to see
a new election before the investiga- '
tion.
"I marketed was Nix's reply
when asked why she thought a record
number 2,182 students came out to
the polisthis year. "It's (the election)
is always a chaotic process
Nix held the position of SGA trea-
surer this year.She is'&ko. a member
of the Student Union Board of Trust-
ees, the Homecoming Steering Com-
mittee and Alpha Phi sorority. She
said she spoke to more than 70 groups
while campaigning for this year's elec-
tion, and hopes to voice student con-
cerns through the proper channels.
Eric Rivenbark ran unopposed
for the position of vice president and
assumed the office when Dale Emery
resigned on April 1. Rivenbark has
served on SGA for three years, was
junior class president a member of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity and
the Student Pirate Club. In addition,
he was the co-chair of the Screenings
and Appointments Committee.
"Right now SGA has a bad repu-
tation Rivenbark said. "I want to
make sure students know what goes
on in our meetings, to get them in-
formed
Julie Thompson defeated J. Miles
Layton (who served as a presidential
campaign manager in 1990) for the'
position of secretary by 1,007 votes,
according to CIS.
Jonathan Phillips won the posi-
tion of Treasurer unopposed. He is the
chair of the SGA Rules and Judiciary
Committee, vice president and alumni
coordinator for Lambda Chi Alpha,
chair on the board of directors for
Micro United Methodist Church and
holds seat on ECU'S media and tran-
sit boards.
"We had a positive election as far
as the candidates were concerned
said Dean of Students and SGA Ad-
viser Ron Speier. He said the candi-
dates worked hard to reach students
during their campaign efforts and,
"really did hear what was being said
to them
In an April 8 interview, Election
Chair Penn Crawford said the flaws
in this year's election were minor
compared to previous elections. The
Ele ons Committee violated 10 elec-
tion rules during the election process.
"In comparison to other SGA
elections, this was average Crawford
said. "It's never been checked in this
manner before
TEC requested data on previous
years' elections and found SGA's
records are lacking.
The last time an election went to
the review board was in 1987 when
See SGA page 5
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Campus leaders, staff and administrators were thrown in the slammer Wednesday
and had to raise bail to benefit the Special Olympics before being released.
Pirates
on the
Street
PfmpyCtmiS GAYDOSH
tat are you
planning to do
to prepare for
final exams?
Rick Glide well, senior
"I plan to spend time
outside of class studying
and continue going to
class
Heather Brown,
freshman
"The main thing I plan to
do is find a quiet study
area and review all notes
and look over my books
Kendall Jones, junior
"I plan to stay in my room
and study everyday
William Cosgrove, Junior
"I plan to take each exam
one at a time and hope I
get the best grade
possible on each exam
New Vice Chancellor
appointed to office
Former Old
Dominion dean
joins business
affairs team
Sherri Parrish
Staff Writer
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin
announced the appointment of the
new vice chancellor for academic
affairs Friday, following approval by
the UNC Board of Governors.
Dr. Richard Ringeisen. dean of
the College of Sciences at Old Do-
minion University, was selected for
the position.
The vice chancellor of academic
affairs is responsible to the chancel-
lor of the university for policy and
operations relating to all academic
aspects of the university except
those of the division of health sci-
ences.
"I am very pleased that Dr.
Ringeisen has accepted this posi-
tion Chancellor Richard Eakin
said. "He brings a wealth of experi-
ence as a teacher, an active re-
searcher and an administrator. His
clear dedication to excellence in
teaching and research will be a valu-
able asset as he leads academic pro-
gram development at East Carolina
Ringeisen's commission at ECU
will be effective June 17, as he ties
up the remaining strings of his last
semester at ODU.
He looks forward to helping the
university in attaining its goals and
its progression as an institution of
hjgher learning.
"I am delighted to have the op-
portunity to join East Carolina Uni-
versitv Ringeisen said. The univer-
sity is already well regarded region-
ally and nationally, and it is clear
that it has even higher aspirations.
I am looking forward to helping it
reach its goals
In addition, Ringeisen has dis-
cussed issues with Yarbrough and
groups for directions to focus his
work when he undertakes his posi-
tion.
Ringeisen has promising plans
in continuing to move the univer-
sity in the right direction. He spoke
of these in an article in Pieces of
Eight.
ugjafr
V
See NEW page 6
�page
8
Today is the big day
Editor says farewellpage D
SPORTS
Pirates fall to N.C. Statepage 1 2
Thursday
Sunny
0PvtecAt
High 72
Low 48
Weekend
Mostly sunny
Ql
High 74
Low 55
fJW t itaeA u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
-��SP"





Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
SGA legislature passes buck
��m. r��n.ii K7 sum Omicron Delta "The only time a new election can
Financial transaction card theft & fraud � A former student was
served an order for arrest for eight counts of financial transaction card
fraud and financial transaction card theft
AprillO
Vandalism - Two students from Belk Hall reported that someone
knocked out their window and entered their room while they were asleep.
Damage was done to the closet and wails.
April 11
Miscellaneous call - A staff member in Student Publications reported
a profane message left on a typewriter in the media room.
Trespassing & Resisting arrest � A non-student was arrested for
trespassing and resisting arrest after he ran from officers who attempted
to apprehend him for being unescorted in the second floor of Jones Hall.
He and two other subjects had allegedly been walking uninvited into
student rooms. The other two subjects eluded officers.
Assist rescue - A student reported that she was going into labor in
Cotten Hall. An ECU telecommunicator certified in Emergency Medical
Dispatching gave instructions over the phone until Greenville Rescue
arrived. The student was transported to PCMH.
April 15
Annoying call - A staff member reported an annoying call on her
answering machine. An officer located where the call originated. The
subjects denied making the call. The officer advised that if the calls
continued they would be charged with harassing phone calls.
April 16
Disorderly conduct - Two students were issued campus appearance
tickets for disorderly conduct and harassment Investigation revealed
they used abusive language against two students. The incident was ra-
cially motivated.
April 17
Breaking & entering motor vehicle - Ten vehicles were broken into
at Allied Health. Officers pursued suspects; however, they eluded arrest
Greenville police investigated similar incidents and may have informa-
tion which will assist in this case.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from official ECU police reports
New officers
sworn in during
annual banquet
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The 19th and final meeting of the
Student Government Association
(SGA) was powerful as the legislature
debated the annual appropriation bill
this week.
An approval of annual appropria-
tions in the amount of $160,006.48
passed after a strong debate over
Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) National
Honors Leadership Society, leaving
two possible bills for various SGA rec-
ognized organizations for the 1996-
97 fiscal year. r
One bill contains funding for 40
groups. However, a second bill omits
ODK, leaving 39 groups to be funded.
ODK is to receive $7,330, the fourth
largest appropriated organization on
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
J
ECU professor, Patricia
Terrell Campbell, was named one
of North Carolina's best professors.
On April 12, Campbell was
recognized as among the best in the
16-campus universities of North
Carolina. She has spent the past
19 years resolving to never teach
the same class the same way twice.
Campbell, a reading education
professor, was chosen by the UNC
Board of Governors for an Excel-
lence in Teaching Award. She and
15 other winners received bronze
campus, if the group can prove to the
legislative body that they are not
funded by anyone other than SGA.
Double funding is a violation of SGA
appropriation rules.
Harry Bray,
SGA speaker of the
legislature, and Ian
Eastman, SGA
president both said
that if ODK proves
they are not
double, or triple
funded, the SGA
president will veto
the second bill, so �immmm. mm
the first bill will
pass, allowing ODK
to be appropriated $7,330. But if
ODK does not prove their funding, the
SGA president will veto the first bill,
so the second bill will pass; thus ODK
will not get appropriations from SGA.
"This is a dangerous, very dan-
gerous thing to address Eastman
said.
The top six funded groups in-
clude: SGA executive council
($95,700), Student Homecoming Com-
mittee ($12,692), Interfraternity
r named
medallions and $7,500 a piece.
"The greatest honor that 1 have
achieved is just being a teacher
Campbell said.
Campbell is a member of the
faculty in the ECU School of
Education's Department of Foun-
dations, Research and Reading. She
said she has succeeded in the class-
room because she looks for chal-
lenges, makes adjustments, displays
enthusiasm and assesses each of
her class sessions.
"1 strive to teach others like
they would like to have their own
children taught Campbell said.
Students and faculty said
Campbell radiates a love for teach-
Council ($7,840), Omicron Delta
Kappa National Honors Leadership
Society ($7,330), Honor Board
($3,039), and Panhellenic Council
($2,750). If ODK is not funded the
sixth most
funded organi-
zation would be
the ECU Na-
tional Student
Speech Lan-
guage and Hear
ing Club
($2,385).
All funds
that were not
used in the past
fiscal year
(1995-96) will revert to the SGA gen-
eral fund on June 30, 1996.
More was discussed other than
annual appropriations this past Mon-
day. The issue of improperly marked
ID cards allowed the elections com-
mittee to consider ordering a new elec-
tion. The first vote was a tie of 8-8.
The second vote was 10-6 deciding not
to order a new election, but rather to
simply amend polling practices and
procedures.
"This is a
dangerous, very
dangerous thing
to address"
� Ian Eastman
"The only time a new election can
be ordered is when one candidate is
disqualified said Dawn Woodward,
SGA attorney general.
Chris Edwards, SGA day repre-
sentative, spoke of a resolution for the
opinionated article printed in last
Thursday's edition of TEC. Upset
emotions revolved around the state-
ments, "all politics are corrupt" and
"throw the book at the culprits The
legislature made a resolution pertain-
ing to checks and balances.
Justin Conrad, SGA senior class
president, announced that the senior
class gift was a Class of 1996 Plaza.
The plaza will be located between the
General Classroom Building and Rawl.
Construction will begin the summer
of 1997 and the project will be com-
pleted during the same summer.
Angie Nix, Jonathan Phillips and
Julie Thompson were sworn in under
oath during the SGA banquet last
night for their positions SGA presi-
dent treasurer and secretary, respec-
tively. Eric Rivenbark has already
taken his position as SGA vice presi-
dent due to the resignation of Dale
Emery, the previous vice president
IM7ZA
pflPAJOms
Papa Johns Cheat Sheet
ADDA
SECOND PIZZA
Equal or Lesser
Value
Small $5
Large $6
X-Large $7
2 1 11 111
2 large pizzas ior S1.1.00 for 11 days
i ! hipping piiruiv 'Otter. ���� April 11-21,
757-7700
Serving Greenville
&ECU Campus
1322 E 10th Street
Limited Delivery
Areas
1 Large,
1 Topping Pizza
Order of
Breadsticks
2 Cokes
vj) V � S J plus tax
coupon subject to
expiration
fi�APftJ0Birsi
2 Large,
1 Topping Pizzas
JL 1 � 77plus tax
coupon subject to
expiration
LATE NIGHT
SPECIAL
1 Large,
1 Topping Pizza
$5.99 p.
T
i
i
I
i
i
i
fPflPflJOfcfr ! fpfifaJOMSl
I
1 Small, (i
11 Topping Pizza i
1 Coke
us tax
;$4.99
I
I
plus tax I
I
coupon subject to j expiration j
expiration ' J
Good from 9pm to close ! coupon subject to
. �j�
1 Large,
1 Topping Pizza
Order of Papa
John's Cheesesticks
V7�y�) plus tax
coupon subject to
expiration
2 Small,
2 Topping
Pizzas
I
I
I
i
I
I
plus tax j
i
coupon subject to
expiration
$10.00
ing and learning.
Her creativity and excellence in
teaching has won her numerous
campus awards for outstanding ad-
vising and teaching.
Campbell has been known to
dress up in plastic bags just to
teach her students. She encourages
her students to browse yard sales
for books and use things such
empty cereal and Kleenex boxes
and other environmental print
(trash) to turn into children's "word
boxes
She calls her demonstrations
"commercial breaks" but in actual-
See BEST page 6
Professor Patricia Terrell
Campbell
Htm Annual &m to
! Im. April )l. 19
PttGIK UILL CO TO THE EVTEfcKIOW OP THE C&EEMLLE CfcEEMUAV
OWMZED 6V
Ed) EWI&OMMEWIAL kttBEfi 4.U& (Cfttt)
PAMLKO-k ta fovWIOM (PUS)
THE (VPfcE� (HAPTEP Of THE �lEB (LU&
SCHEDULE OF EUQTC
l:ftM-(Ul)Q UATURE UALk D0UM
CfiEEWILLE Cpeenuav U1TH
Dfi. UDK &ELLK KU totfM
1:30PM-Mcn AT lOUW (OMMOMS
Ed) Police urn. talk a&out bike saeetv
LATE ttCKIW� AM) PICK UP I-0JIPK
:00pm-6m Rally THfiouaj Cpeewille
):)0pM-&IKE to EOS AT lOUM
(ommom
):)Q-60Qim- Speaker am) im
cuesi speaker: loamme &urkholdep (kks
Ink: Pamlko Joe & Mike Uamep. Ihe
felEVAH)
taTON K MO m AM EVEWI I-0W. DEADLINE: APRIL I). 9
(oMfAci: CAIA (lu& taaor. torn Pkum )M)
km to (hai&mam. Iepe Vupeest H&-W
L
ii ii�h� jim -
�-





The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carouna
College
, Democrates invite
YOU TO Mfpr
Seniors eligible to win vacation
rum
Raffle offers free
vacation anywhere
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Call 328-3709 for
more information on this
or the College Dems.
Seniors not only get to graduate,
now they can possibly win a round
trip ticket anywhere in the U.S. or
become involved in the giving of an
ECU scholarship.
If you are a senior with 96 hours
or more, than you are automatically
eligible to be entered in a raffle for a
number of prizes throughout the year.
The Senior Program, which was
started last year, is sponsored by the
ECU Alumni Association and the ECU
Ambassadors. Two different times a
year, the sponsors stand in front of
the student stores with a list of se-
niors that have accomplished hours
(j(tigjatucitionsy
X9S& @uk J2uaifie
STnsiuHifice Gomfeani
or more. The first 500 seniors will
receive passes, which automatically
enters them in a raffle.
"The whole purpose of this pro-
gram is to give something back to the
seniors. It's a way to acknowledge
them for all that they've done said
Jennifer Crowell, the Senior Program
coordinator of the ECU Ambassadors.
The prizes are rewarded five to
six times a year at different school
events. The next event in which a se-
nior will receive a prize is at today's
Barefoot on the Mall. The Alumni and
the Ambassadors will be giving away
squeeze bottles filled with alumni
items to the first 500 seniors. The
grand prize this year includes dinners
from Ragazzi's, Pargo's, Boli's, Chico's
and Daryll's. Another part of the
grand prize will include gift certifi-
cates from Belk's at Carolina East and
Brody's at the Plaza, along with gifts
from the Pirate Club.
During the last event, the grand
prize was two round trip tickets to
anywhere in the U.S including the
islands. This prize was compliments
of Midway Airlines and ITG Travel.
To find out more about the
events and prize giveaways, watch for
ads and flyers throughout the next
year.
Seniors can now also be part of
a good cause for their university. In
a program called the Senior Chal-
lenge, also sponsored by ECU Alumni
and Ambassadors, a senior can make
a pledge that will go towards a schol-
arship given by the senior class. The
program was started last year. What
the "challenge" is in the Senior Chal-
lenge is to have every senior pledge
$96.00. The organizations will accept
any amount of money from the se-
niors. If a senior is willing to give
their $96.00, they may pay it monthly
($8.00 a month) or quarterly ($21.00
a quarter).
The money will be used as the
class gift, which is the scholarship.
This will be rewarded to someone
who might not be able to afford tu-
ition at ECU.
For more information about the
Senior Challenge, you may call Tami
Gardner at the Taylor-Slaughter
Alumni Center at 328-1958.
Photo Courtesy of ECU Ambassadors
Last year, Jennifer Crowell handed Todd Rhodes the Senior
Program's grand prize, two round trip tickets to Florida.
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
"g� C4��a &Ua�o� cf&ance'
A&aatJ&HW&na
unrthie
chtTol
Bu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY

April 18, 19, 20, 22 and 23, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
April 21, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: $8.00 � ECU Students &. Children: $5.00
Call-328-6829
Sntell, personal class sizes
J Earn u? to lseVester hours
TalceHgraduate and undergraduate
courses
ee your advisor today!
Reading about a
new beer
in a Magazine
is sort op Mice listening to
sumo wrestling on
the radio.
You pret-t-y Much
Natural Ice. NOW, try this
31996 ANHEUSER-BUSCH !NC BREWERS Of NATURAL ICE BEERALLMALT LIQUOR ST LOUIS. MO USA
f�Hn

�' � �.
mmmmmmmmmm





Thursday, April 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
Book thefts create caution
Stolen book bags
and fraudulent
book sale attempts
alert students,
store clerks
bookbag was missing.
Items stolen from Copeland
were a black canvass East Pack
bookbag, a notebook, a Geography
book, an atlas and a planner note-
book. ,�,�,
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
ECU students are asked to be-
ware as several episodes of theft
seem to be popping up on campus.
On March 21, two students
had their book bags stolen from the
Fletcher Music building.
The first episode took place
when freshman Eric L. Jeffferson
placed his bookbag inside the
locker room of the music building.
When he returned an hour later his
bookbag was missing, along with all
the items that were inside the book
bags. There were no witnesses to
the crime.
Items take from Jefferson were
a black leather canvas bookbag, a
Math, English and Psychology
book, a binder and a Texas Instru-
ment calculator.
"In times like these it is hard
to trust anybody, " Jefferson said.
Jefferson said that someone
sold his books back to UBE. He
said when he went to buy books o
replace the ones that were stolen
he said he recognized several of his
books that had distinctive mark-
ings. The UBE store could not give
Jefferson his books back because
they could not prove that the books
belong to Jefferson.
Jefferson stated that he was
only approximate!v 10 ft. away from
where he placed his books.
Bryant C. Copeland was the
next victim of theft.
Copeland also left his bookbag
in the Fletcher Music building's
locker room. He left to meet one of
his teachers for approximately 25
minutes. When he returned to the
locker room to get his books, his
"In times like
these it is hard to
trust anybody
� Eric L. Jefferson,
freshman
Copeland
was unavail-
able for com-
ment.
On April
3 Officer
Gales, from
the ECU Po-
lice Depart-
ment was dis-
patched to the
Student Bookstore in reference to
suspicious individuals trying to sell
back books.
According to the police report
Gales spoke to Rich Howard, stu-
dent store manager, and Barbara
Ward, assistant textbook manager.
They said three suspicious individu-
als came into the student store at-
tempting to sell books back. The
first individual was a female who
entered the student store asking a
lot of questions.
The second individual, a male,
attempted to sell back a Elemen-
tary Geometry book, a Services
Marketing book, a Technical Calcu-
lus book and a
Foundations of Be-
havior book. He
could not produce
any ID. He said he
was selling his
girlfriend's books
and gave Ward his
girlfriend's ID
number. He also
gave Ward his
driver license num-
ber and ID number.
A third individual came in and
left with the other two suspects
when they were told they were not
able to sell the books back with out
proper identification.
After further investigation th
suspects drivers license number did
not belong to him. The number he
said was his girlfriend's student ID
number was also fraudulent. It be-
long to a student that has not been
to the University in the last two se-
mesters.
There is currently an investiga-
tion taking place, but the police de-
partments still do not have any
leads.
Gales and Jefferson suggest
students keep a close eye on their
book bags or lock them up. It is
suspected that people are stealing
books so that they can sell them
back to the University and make a
profit.
"My suggestions to students is
to use the lockers at the student
book store, or have a friend hold
your things while you shop Gales
said.
Jefferson agrees with Gales on
how to keep your belongings safe.
"If students leave books
around stay close by Jefferson
said. "Keep it in a locker or keep it
with you at all times "
Bikers remember
fellow student
Rally raises funds
for new bike path
Rochelle D. Owsley
Staff Writer
A little over a year ago Detlev
Michelangelo Bunger. a Biology student
was riding his bike along 10th street
when he was hit and killed by an activ-
ity bus. A tree was planted with a plaque
by the Biology building in his memory.
Shortly after Bunger's death the
ECU Environmental Awareness Club
(GIAIA) and the Sierra club organized
a Bike Rally to raise funds for a bike
path. GIAIA raised $1,000 in funds last
year to support the start of Greenville
Greenway.
On Sunday. April 21. GIAIA in con-
nection with Pamlico-Tar River Foun-
dation (P1RF) and the Cypress chapter
of the Sierra Club are organizing the
second annual bike rally to raise funds
for the Greenville Greenway extension.
The Greenville Greenway is a bike
path about 1.3 miles long. The bike rally
will raise funds to make this path even
longer.
"The city needs $250,1,00 to ex-
tend the Greenway to Minges said Jeff
Yurfest bike rally chairman. "We want
to raise money to contribute to the ex-
tension
The $250,000 will come from the
state taxpayers and donations to the
Greenway.
"The community uses the
Greenway for bike riding and walking
said Angela Parrish. GIAIA club presi-
dent. "It has scenery of the wetlands
See BIKE page 5
DUNKIN DONUTS
Rivergote Plaza
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS
o
Thur
Fri &. Sat. Starting
April 11th
Sun � Wed
Open 5 am to Midnight
Menu items
Sandwiches:
�Egg & Cheese'Chicten Salad'
' Egg 4 Cheese nt saaujt wm x mn
'Ham iCheese'Tuna Salad'
Swciajs
2 Donuts �rv! Drinle
$159
1 flMUh) Juio� v4 Com
OR
bap wG�m Us vfl
�akery
Tt�ms
JNuffins8agels
'cgookies 'grownies
�6nMSsants
oras-Kjjsiffuii 5J.19
Egg & Cheese Donm Drink SI .99
Sandwich, osfee & luice S2.99
Economy Mini Storage
Use your
student
discount
Share with a roammate
Special rates
May 1 - August 31
300 Farmer St.
Greenville
757-0373
, KINTIMATE
Women's Intramural Softball Top Picks
Gold Indepedent
1 She-Things
2 Little Sluggers
3 HOOPPHI
Purple Independent
1 Pinheads
2 Clueless
3 Aycock All Stars
Sororities
1 Alpha Xi Delta
2 Chi Omega
3 Pi Delta
4 Delta Zeta
average wage after training
GOOD-BYE
NICKS.
No soap and water shave helps
protect against nicks and dryness like
Skintimate" Shave Gel.
SKI NT IM ATE SHAVE GEL
Could your legs be a little softer?"
51995 SC Johnson & Son Inc Ail rights reserved
SKlfJMM
SfuiOeCA
S
(And Your Dad
Used To Tel You
To Get OFF The
WORLDWIDE"
Holiday Inns Inc
?
Like to talk on the phone?
Now vou can become the
voice of Holiday Inn
Worldwide � a leader in
the hotel industry, With
our incentive plan
designed to let you make
the most ofyour potential
income, our employees earn
an average of $7.20hour after
initial training! Here's your chance to
become a full-time Reservations Agent at
our Worldwide Reservation Center
located in Cary. As a team member you
will use vour professional telephone skills
to assist customers who call trom all over
the country. Holiday Inn oilers an excep-
tional working atmosphere as well as the
following competitive incentives:
Reservations
Agents
� Paid Training
� Performance Incentives
� VacationPersonalSick Leave
� Savings & Retirement Program
� Hotel Discounts
� Credit Union
� HealthDentalLife
� Educational Assistance
Get the rewards and benefits you deserve with
Holiday Inn Worldwide. Classes are being
offered now! Apply in person IMMEDIATELY.
Monday-Friday. 9am-1pm at the Holiday'Inn
Reservation Center, 2205 Walnut Street, Cary.
We're an Equal Opportunity Employer
Committed to Diversity in the Workplace.
A Bass Company
atfftk





wmammmsmm
The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18,1996
ollvJb from page 4
which is kind of unique
The bike rally begins at 1:30 p.m.
at the Greenville Greenway, where Dr.
Vince Bellis of the biology department
will lead participants on a nature walk.
At 2:30 p.m bikers will meet at
Town Commons for late registration
and to receive their T-shirts. The ECU
Police will also speak about bike safety
and the rules of the road.
The five mile bike rally will start
at 3:00 p.m. in the Town Commons.
Bikers will ride through Greenville.
Places include 1st Street. Elm Street.
5th Street and College Hill.
The rally ends at 3:30 p.m. in the
Town Commons where Joanne
Burkholder, representative of the
North Carolina Marine Fisheries will
speak about the environment Bands
like Pamlico Joe & Mike Hammer and
The Vineyard will be performing en-
vironmental songs.
In addition to raising money
through the bike rally, the GIAIA club
will be selling trees at Barefoot on the
Mall.
"Come out and participate said
Dr. Joe Luczkovich, GIAIA advisor.
"Come support us even if you don't
have a bike or want a T-shirt
The rain site will be in 244
Mendenhall in the case of bad
weather.
Officers search for seat belt violators
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
If you have driven down 10th
Street lately, you have probably no-
ticed signs showing results of the seat
belt use in Greenville.
These signs are distributed
throughout Greenville and are part of
the "Click It or Ticket" program in
North Carolina. This program was
started in 1993 by the North Caro-
lina Governor's Highway Safety Pro-
gram. The program was originally
started as a series of grants to help
Interested in living at
Players Club,
but need roommates?
Come join us on Wednesday, April 17 from 7-9pm for a
roommate Matching Social. There will be food, music, fun
and new friends for you to meet. We'll provide the people,
you make the choice! .
Model Apartments will be available for you to visit. And
don't forget to register for our $500 giveaway!
pay for overtime for police officers hi
the state system. Officials decided to
concentrate on a specific area of con-
cern for the safety of drivers. One of
the most obvious
concerns turned
out to be seat
belt use.
Seat belt use
in North Carolina
was shown to be
65 percent before
the program was
started. Since the
program has
been in effect.
seat belt use has
increased by al-
most 20 percent,
making it over 80
percent at the present time.
"The program has been very suc-
cessful said Tom Hegele. director of
"These
observations are
conducted
regularly on an
on-going basis
� Captain Ennis of the
Greenvilke Police
Department
public affairs of the Department of
Crime Control and Safety at the North
Carolina State Police. "We have seen
good results, and we will definitely
continue this pro-
gram in the fu-
ture
The overall
goal of the pro-
gram is to increase
seat belt use in the
state, help save
lives, prevent inju-
ries and avoid the
high health-costs
associated with
traffic crashes.
�Not only are police
officers cracking
down on seat belt
violations, but also on child safety seat
violations.
Test sessions started back in
1993 in Raleigh and eventually spread '
to all 100 counties in the state.
Results are determined by obser- -
vations conducted at certain check-
points throughout each county. Offic-
ers will sit at a designated checkpoint
in the county during "drive time
which might be rush hour or another
time when roads might be crowded
They will monitor all drivers for proper
seat belt use.
Last Sunday ended Greenville's,
a two-week seat belt campaign. One '
checkpoint was set up per day to ob-
serve. No reports have been made as
of yet.
"These observations are con-
ducted regularly on an on-going ba-
sis said Captain Ennis of the
Greenville Police Department. "We
officers here in Pitt County feel that
the program has been very success-
ful in increasing seat belt use
SGA
from page 1
PLAYERS CLUB
'APART ME NTS
Where weekends last all week long
Steve Pierce ran against Scott Thomas
for the office of president He was also
the last African-American to run for
president. Pierce filed a complaint
against the polling procedures, accord-
ing to an article in TEC.
"The poll tenders were biased and
there's no way I could have won un-
der these conditions Pierce said. The
article alleged thai a TEC editor walked
up to a polling site and asked who to
vote for. The poll tender replied that
Thomas was the candidate the Greeks
supported, the article stated. The dis-
pute was settled with one meeting of
the review board which did not call for
a new election due to a lack of evi-
dence. A total of 4,288 voted in the
'87 election: Pierce received 861 votes
and Thomas won with 1,303 votes,
according to TEC.
In 1994, when SGA President Ian
Eastman (the only president ever to be
elected twice) ran against Brynn Tho-
mas and David Reid, Thomas was ac-
cused frcm all sides of practicing dirty
politics; an issue which made the local
news. Eastman made allegations that
the poll tenders were biased and was
afraid he would not receive a fair elec-
tion. Election Chair Dale Emery (who
recently resigned from the vice
president's position) called in the Navi-
gators, a Christian organization to man
the polls during a runoff election be-
tween Eastman and Thomas. Reid
dropped out of the election and sup-
ported Eastman. Eastman won the
election with a 53 percent margin. A
total of 1.693 ballots were cast in the
first election in 1994, according to TEC
records.
E 'Stman won re-election last year
against Janet Stubbs with a 74.6 per-
cent majority, one of the highest elec-
tion percentages ever. Eastman and
Stubbs threatened to file complaints
against each other, but any records
filed were withdrawn by the end of the
election day. The total number of bal-
lots counted in that election was 1,386.
Keith Dyer ran unopposed and
won the presidency in 1993 with more
than 779 ballots cast according to TEC
records.
Nix is the second female to hold
the office of president Courtney Jones
was the first in 1992 since ECU was a
teacher's college in 1946. Jones was
the only non-Greek to hold the posi-
tion of SGA president in the last eight
years. In a highly debated election,
Jones ran against Jonathon Brooks,
resulting in a run-off.
Alex Martin ran unopposed for
president in 1991, in an election which
appeared to be absent of controversy.
In the SGA elections of 1990, ac-
cusations were stirred when Allen Tho-
mas ran against Robin Andrews for the
president's seat Andrews was originally
disqualified from the run-off for failing
to turn in an expense report but the
disqualification was overturned by the
Elections Committee. 1996 Secretarial
Candidate Layton served as Andrews'
campaign manager and found himself
caught in the controversy. Jones alleged
that her opponent attempted to bribe
her with a subordinate position if she
would agree to drop out of the race dur-
ing a debate aired on WZMB. Follow-
ing the debate, Andrews reported that
she made her statements based on in-
formation provided by Layton, she later
retracted the statement and said she
never knew if any such offers had been
made, according to TEC records.
"Yes they did ask Layton said
when questioned about the '90 election
this week. "The Greeks tried to fix the
election. Business hasn't changed
since
THE BEST
OIL CHANGE
IN THE BUSINESS.
In just minutes, our technicians will change your oil, Install a new
oil niter, lube the chassis, check and top off the brake fluid, power
steering fluid, washer fluid and battery. Plus, check your air ni-
tration system, vaccuum the interior, wash the windows and
check the tire pressure. That's why we are
America's Favorite Oil Change
1IC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
OPEN B am-Epm Monday-Friday & 8am-5pm Saturday
You Never Need An Appointment!
S 19.99
(most cars)
Complete 14 pt. Full Service.
Not good with any other offer. Cash
value 1 20th of one cent. Limit one,
coupon per person per visit.
Offer expires 053196
126 SE Greenville Blvd
jiffy lube
a�auww��





Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
l$�fd 1 from page 2
ity they are her way of explaining
the techniques that work best in
helping children learn to read.
A demonstration that students
remember best is when Campbell
dresses up in a
trash bag and
asks for names of
different types of
garbage. She
wrote the words
on the board and
then shows how
the words can be
used to teach vo-
cabulary, phon-
ics, spelling and
comprehension.
"What makes her stand out is
that she continues to iearn to be a
better teacher said Dr. Betty
Wheatley, a reading professor and
"This award
means more than
just my
accomplishments
� Patricia Campbell
tm �� -��� h �����������I�
coordinator of the reading center.
Since joining the ECU faculty
in 1977, Campbell has served in a
vast amount of teaching and service
functions. She is a former chair of
the Department
of Elementary
and Middle
Grades Educa-
tion and is active
in teaching and
consulting
projects with
public schools in
the area. She
also had an im-
portant role in
developing a cooperative teacher-
education initiatives between ECU
and universities in England and Ja-
pan.
"This award means more than
just my accomplishments Campbell
said. " I had a lot of support help
me. I share this awesome recogni-
tion with my family and mentors
who continue to influence my think-
ing and challenging me, my own stu-
dents who graduated or who are on
their way, the public school princi-
pals, teachers, staff students and
parents who continue to provide me
with fresh insights in teaching
Campbell feels that the honor
is not just given to her.
"This honor is not just for me,
but for all the people I work with
and teach Campbell said.
Wheatley said Campbell is an in-
spiration.
"She is an inspiration to other
teachers Wheatley said. "She ap-
proaches life the same way she ap-
proaches teaching, with gusto
I1jW from page 1
"A greater emphasis on re-
search-moving toward doctoral pro-
grams-is on everyone's mind
Ringeisen said. "I'm interested in
those possibilities, in helping ECU
become a doctoral institution
The selection process to fill the
position of vice chancellor for aca-
demic affairs began with the review
of applications, received nationwide,
by a search committee chaired by
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough.
Yarbrough is currently the in-
terim vice chancellor and a profes-
sor of political science.
According to University Attor-
ney Ben Irons, the committee then
made recommendations to Chancel-
lor Eakin.
"The Chancellor then an-
nounced the selection after consult-
ing with the Board of Trustees and
receiving approval of the Board of
Governors Irons said.
Ringeisen has been at ODU
since 1993. At 52, he is an estab-
lished researcher with over 50 pub-
lished articles in scientific journals.
He holds a BA degree as weli
as a masters and doctorate degree.
He received his masters and doctor-
ate from Michigan State University.
Ringeisen's position at ECU is
succeeded by Dr. Marlene Springer,
who is currently the president of the
College of Staten Island. Dr.
Yarbrough has since served as in-
terim for the position.
HMHNHMMMNM
Summer
School
96
Over 1200 diverse com
Earnextte Credits M5T Wllli 2i
mm mm
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water -Sewer 'Cable -Draperies
�Self-cieaning Oven -Frost-free Refrigerator -WasherDryer Connections �
Utility Room � Patio with Fence � Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks -Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool -Basketball Court
�Tennis Court � Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease -Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE MINUTES
WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"NOW LEASING FOR SUMMER AND FALL 1996"
� m m m m m m m m m a m � � m m m m � � � - m m m m � � m m m m m
Bring This Coupon in to receive 12 off security deposit & $50 off rent in May, June, and July. J
Applies only to leases beginning in May �
752-0277 Equal Housing Oppurtunity
5 readings on reserve at the
library, one chapter from
each of 3 small texts, plus
optional supplementary
readings and a syllabus
VS.
CourseMates�
A Division of
One inexpensive
CourseMate�
available at
University Book Exchange
Summer & Fall
Orders & Info
Call 758-1531
KHBUIKOTBfctlESHBHIKillSUIEW&fci
i HERE'S WHAT'S I
31
e!
m
���
m
m
;
:
at Mendenhall Student Center m
Get out of the finals &
traffic jam at
the rest area
in mendenhall
Student Center. -2
FINALS
AREA
i
OPEN UNTIL
MIDNIGHT
Tuesday (28)
Wednesday (24)
Thursday (25)
Sunday (28)
Monday (28)
Tuesday (30)
wfree coffee
and snacks
Bring your books, notes and comfy slip-
pers and take a finals study break in
Mendenhall! Reserve a study room for your-
self or your group. Enjoy free refreshments.
Take a break in our relaxation room featuring
comedy and assorted relaxation videotapes.
Play a free round of billiards andor bowling.
On Tuesday (23) night, get a jump on
exam week at our READING DAY
RELAX-OFF. We're offering message
therapy (9-11 p.m.) and aroma therapy (9-10
p.m.) in the first floor Cynthia Lounge, in
addition to free refreshments, stressbuster
giveaways and door prizes, We'll draw for a
12 hour massage gift certificate at 11 p.m.
A
���
m
Pirate Ride will be operating to get you safely around campus at night. km
Country Line Dance Lessons
THE LAST LESSON IS THIS THURSDAY FROM
8-9:30 P.M. IN THE MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games ft
JJJ � Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board 1
rS � Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand � v
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1 p.m. JJ
gaiftiff S UlfcOTfi 5�fcff5 �W:ff5 UU&
W i� mm�Bfe





-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18,1996
EleCtiOIl from page 1
not a new election, but a fair elec-
tion Lynch said. f we do not look
into this, we're doing something
wrong. We're creating a bigger dis-
trust.
"I'd like to see a new election,
but more than that, I want to see
justice served
Lynch asked the committee to
maintain a standard of excellence
at this university in addressing his
complaint.
"I think this new election is
about justice and the integrity of
the Student Government Associa-
tion Lynch said.
President Angie Nix voiced her
complaint which did not call for a
new election on the grounds that
her rights would be violated.
"There's not due reason (for a
new election) Nix said. "It's not
as simple as 'OK, I'll do it all over
again
She said that she put an incred-
ible amount of time and effort into
the coalition (of Nix, Rivenbark, Th-
ompson and Phillips), and that she
couldn't recreate the effect of the
past five months of campaigning in
a new election. Nix said she could
never be repaid for the time she
spent speaking to numerous groups
in���w� i ii i i �n i i � ii ���ww��mmm�m��amm
?
ALLIED BLACKS FOR
LEADERSHIP & EQUALITY
A. B. L. E. !
ELECTIONS
for the 1996 - 97 academic year during our weekly meeting
MONDAY, APRIL 22,1996
5:00 p.m
BLOXTON HOUSE
Candidates should be prepared with platform statement.
Minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 required for all candidates.
COME 3E A PART OF AN ORGANIZATION PLANNING A
NEW BEGINNING FOR A NEW YEAR
around campus while marketing
her campaign. She said she believed
she would no longer stand the same
chances in a new election.
"This year I really believed the
student body came out and spoke,
and they spoke overwhelmingly
Nix said. "Let's look at the big pic-
ture. How do you manufacture a 72
percent majority? It doesn't hap-
pen
Treasurer-elect Jonathan
Phillips voiced concern that his po-
sition was alluded to in Layton's
complaint. He said he has never
been involved with any scandalous
activity and that a new election
would violate his rights for several
reasons including those mentioned
by Nix.
The committee's decided not to
call for a new election stating that
the candidates couldn't prove that
anyone benefited from fraudulent
voting, and that deviations in the
results would not have made a dif-
ference in the outcome. Crawford
said he did understand the
candidate's concerns about
fraudulence.
"It isn't consoling saying that
something should be done to fix
the problem Crawford said. He
said too much attention had been
given to prosecution, and not in
mending current deficiencies.
Lynch had originally fiied a
complaint against the polling pro-
cedures. The Elections Committee
chose not to hear two additional
complaints filed by Lynch and
Layton which called for a new elec-
tion during their first meeting on
April 10 because they were not filed
within the 48-hour deadline.
Sixteen committee members
were present during the April 15th
meeting including Crawford and
Vice Chair John Nichols. A com-
pleted list of the reported 19 poll
W�������� I I
MMWV
asas
mSSm
nwiiww�www.
MAKE
TOR
BOOKS
Lincoln
Hamilton
Jackson
Big Books Equal Big Bucks At
UBE's Buy Back.
9&
516 S. Cotunche Street, 758-2616
Open 9:00-6:00 Monday-Friday, 10:00-5:00 Saturday
One day only! Thursday April 18th. All Champion items 40 off!
The original
comfort shoe.
Arizona
BIRKENSTOCK
takers hired was never made avail-
able. However, of the 17 members
present at the first Elections Com-
mittee meeting, six members be-
long to the same fraternity as the
election chair.
The review board overruled the
Election Committee's original de-
cision to not hear the appeals for a
new election and sent the second
round of complaints back to the
Elections Committee where they
were heard during Monday night's
meeting. None of the complainants
appealed the committee's decision,
thus a scheduled review board ses-
sion was not necessary.
"I understood the Elections
Committee's decision Lynch said.
"Their decision was one of many
factors which influenced my deci-
sion not to appeal
Lynch said plans to be in SGA
next year, and that he would like
to be a part of a committee desig-
nated to review the election proce-
dures.
"The SGA president-elect has
already made plans to appoint an
elections review committee Dean
of Students and SGA Adviser Ron
Speier said. "All of the questions
raised will be addressed in future
elections
In the SGA meeting at 5 p.m.
Monday, the legislature was told a
committee had already been
formed. -
EXPERIENCETHE
'96 "GAMES!
ATLANTA. GEORGIA
3 NIGHT CAMPING PACKAGES!
AT OUR ALL-INCLUSIVE CAMPSITE!
530 Cotanche St I
Inside Bicycle Post
757-0713 !
FROM ONLY
$299
PER PERSON
ALL PACKAGES INCLUDE:
� Gteat campsite only '9 mites 'fom
downtown Atlanta1
Continental BteaHasts and Omnet
Bullets at Campsite
� 2 TiektU ti tin Sinui!
� Much Motel Can lot details'
Join Earthbound tor a oncwra lifetime
experience in Atlanta this summer!
Spaces are van Kmitad!
Sites going fast! Call Now!
earthboundadventures
800-5134986
Parking Regulations During Reading Day and Exams: Apri
1. All parking regulations remain in effect on Reading Day and during the exam L' ffed.
2. Freshmen vehicles andor Unregistered vehicles are not authorized to park
on Reading Day or during exams. Students without permanent decals may
$2.00 daily or $5.00 weekly permits from Parking and Traffic Services.
3. Freshmen vehicles being loaded must utilize parking meters available at I
halls or other metered locations. Registered Freshmen vehicles will be aft
on campus in student areas beginning Tuesday, April 30 at 12:00 rtoott.
4. Pjdent vehicles are not authorized to park in staff zones on Reading Day �
exams. Unauthorized vehicles may npt park in either of the private aariBftttiiOta.
Towing is enforced.
5. On Reading Day, April 23, vehicles with Limited Commuter perroJls may park in regular
Commuter spaces on the main campus. This is allowed because fi5?y IfaawJ IIQi
provide shuttle service on Reading Dav. The shuttle will run during the exam period. The
Freshman shuttle will run as usual on Reading Day and during the exompefJOd,
PARKING AND TRAFFIC SERVICES 305 E. 10TH STREET 919 328 6294
i m
ft
The Small Investor's Seminars
May 17,18,19 Greenvtiue,NC
Are you investing, or thinking about it? Are you confused,
worried or just plain bewildered by it all?
U.S.A.
Join us for The Small Investor's seminar,
a basic introductoiy workshop taught
by Jim Gard, Registered Investment
Advisor. Dr. Gard, Ph. D author of The
Small Investor (Ien Speed Press, June
1996), will advise small, mteractrve
groups of the unique advantages and
disadvantages facing the small investor
in financial markets today.
TheSmall
INVESTOR
Seminar topics include:
� Finding and using good information
� Determining a personal investment strategy
� How to work wVk Brokers and omerfinancial
professionals
� Basks of stocks, bonds, and mutualfunds
Attendees will receive a training manual, a
copy of The Small Investor, assorted financial
literature and publications, and complimenta-
ry refreshments.
Choose one of Five sessions:
� Friday, May 17,100- 430pm; 630 - 10100pm
� Saturday, May 18,9100am - 1230pm;
2100- 530 pm
� Sunday, May 19,2100 � 530 pm
$75.00 per session; sessions limited to 15 people
each. The seminars will be held at Triangle Bank
Training Room (In the upstairs seminar room), 2310
Charles Street, Greenville, NC To enroll or receive
more Information please call 1-800426-9340.
The training company does not sell any stocks,
bonds, funds, insurance, annuities or other financial
instruments. No sales pitches will be made for any
products or services
�����mmm





8
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
Our View
8,
Oh, how the '9596 school year has provided memories for
students and faculty all across campus. Some have been good
and some bad. Here is a recap of some of the highlights of this
year.
Walk across campus and you'll notice that the library and
student recreation center are still, and we stress still, under con-
struction. Both projects have been delayed and hopefully the
projects will be finished in the near future.
As always, there was the usual amount of crime on and
around campus. From a computer being stolen from the En-
glish annex building to a student and his visiting friend being
robbed at gunpoint Then the abduction and shooting of a man
at our beloved Krispy Kreme and a university housing employed
being arrested for taking indecent liberties with a minor.
While reading this paper and looking out at the lush spring
foliage popping up, one is reminded of the crazy weather we all
experienced in Greenville this winter.
Remember back in January, when we saw the ice and snow
and wished, with everything we had, that classes would be can-
celed? Well, the university saw no need to cancel classes so all
we got was a delay. At least it was something. All the kids and
some adults found icy hiils to sled down for hours. Yes, old man
winter brought us some excitement this year.
ECU received a new staff member when the university an-
nounced that Richard Ringeisen would be the new vice chancel-
lor of academic affairs, to fill the void left by Marlene Springer
who left for another job.
Now we get down to the good stuff, the review of sports.
Of course the big event was the spanking Stanford got in
the Liberty Bowl by our Pirates who were trying to avenge last
year's blowout they received at the hands of Illinois. The Pirates
brought home a 19-13 victory.
Along the same lines as football, ECU and N.C. State inked
a four year deal that would rekindle the PirateWolfpack ri-
valry. The first game will be played this year on neutral ground
in Charlotte on Nov. 30. Gee,why would they want to play on
neutral ground? Beats us.
Men's basketball provided one of the most exciting plays of
the year when a buzzer beating shot by Othello Meadows lifted
ECU past UNGW. The shot was nationally recognized as CNN's
and ESPN's plays of the day.
While this is not everything that happened over the last
nine months, and we at TEC are sure you'll think of more items,
we hope you have enjoyed the little stroll down memory lane.
This certainly was an interesting year and next year is sure
to provide more lasting memories. But for now, we at TEC want
to wish all the graduating seniors good luck, and everyone a
safe and happy summer.
We've been
through a lot
this year, and
most of us
have
managed to
survive.
s�?A
GA needs reform

. What do you do with an organi-
zation that can't even keep a Chris-
tian group working for them? Reform.
Don't get me wrong, SGA works
well. The majority of the legislature
sincerely has students' interests at
heart and they love working for SGA
just as much as I love working here.
But that doesn't solve the problem.
Maybe the rules should be bent at
times, maybe not: nobody claims to
know all of the election rules by heart
and the general belief is that they were
never really followed anyway. So why
was John Lynch stopped at every cor-
ner with unreasonable rules that ab-
solutely couldn't be broken? How can
you disqualify someone for not meet-
ing a deadline of some sort and then
fail to provide the information you do
have? And while you're making all
jhese changes, why not enforce a little
tnore security (and issue fewer keys)
in order to keep records that every-
one should have access to from dis-
appearing?
SGA appears to be all inclusive
- when you're in the system, you
know how it works. Otherwise, tough
luck. Mind you, this is an outside ob-
servation and not meant to offend, but
merely to inform.
The Greek community has held
a majority in the executive council for
quite some time. That's not to say SGA
(doesn't encourage diversity, Greeks
may simply choose to get involved
where others do not Considering that
SCA is gaining a bad rep for this fact,
,may be a signal to push harder.
Whatever the case, there is defi-
nite need for change. Forming a com-
mittee to investigate is a step in the
(right direction, but make sure those
(committee members are a diverse
jgroup and not just the first few people
to raise their hands; get some outside
Tambra Zion
Editor
If people wen
crying injustice
10 years ago,
why hasn't
something been
done before?
advice. If people were crying injustice
10 years ago, why hasn't something
been done before? .
The winning coalition channeled
a great deal of time and energy into
their campaign this year (heck, they
even came to visit us). Let's see more
of that energy focused toward encour-
aging a greater representation of the
student body. Who are the constitu-
ents for day reps anyway? No one.
Let's talk about representation
for a moment: In Monday's meeting
SGA received a bili entitled "Approval
of Annual Appropriations for the '96-
'97 Fiscal Year for Various SGA Rec-
ognized Organizations And the top
three money makers were the Student
Homecoming Committee with
$12,692, the Honor Board got $3,039,
1FC got $7,840 and Panhellenic got
$2,750. The next appropriation that
even comes close is to the occupa-
tional therapy club for $1,425 - think
about it And why do they have to slice
through pounds of paperwork in or-
der to be "SGA recognized"? Does that
mean only the few who have the time
to form a constitution can be eligible
for all students' fees? Does that seem
sail
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crlssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Wadded, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Deanya Lattimore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
It's hard to say goodbye
I have too much to say, always
have.
I came to ECU to learn how to
be a journalist - accomplished. I also
learned a lot about people, commu-
nity and politics. I learned that one
of the largest keys to success is to stay
positive and never let anything stand
in your way. I'm ready to close this
chapter in my life and start making
money in the "real world Luckily 1
have a job, but nobody walked up to
me with offers, I had to make an ef-
fort
My advice to students: go to class
and make that effort GET INVOLVED,
in some way shape or form you have
to stay active if you expect to get any-
where. Know your rights and don't
let anybody push you around.
My advice to administration: ECU
has made great strides toward mak-
ing this campus an interactive envi-
ronment but so much more needs to
be done. Our present capabilities are
tremendous (three TV channels), get
them on the air. Get the equipment
cameras, lights, computers, whatever
and make ECU a communications role
model for the country. We have the
potential to be the best so why not
start now? I know these things take
time and money, but are well worth
the effort Also, be careful when put-
ting student's records on-line, too
many cracks in the system could spell
disaster.
I'm going to miss this place a
great deal and not because my name
Tambra Zion
Editor
I' Wk
M ���� HUUUUUl
This tram stands
together and1
honestly believe
we can't be
is at the top of the masthead. I am
truly blessed with employees 1 call my
friends. This team stands together and
I honestly believe we can't be beat.
Wendy Rountree is amazing. Celeste
Wilson is awesome. Amanda Ross is a
team player and Mark Brett is well. I
haven't figured that one out yet These
descriptions ate not generic, these
people fill every definition. I respect
them with every atom of my being and
wish the best for this staff who has
shown a great deal of dedication and
endurance by producing this paper
twice a week (I can't begin to men-
tion the support from our staff). Best
of luck to my predecessor Brandon
Waddell, stay cool and keep growing
because you have some mighty big
shoes to fill.
I can't see this paper going any-
where but up in the future. I didn't
meet my campaign promises of get-
ting us on-line and ordering new
stands. The process is in motion, but
I was sidetracked by a rigged election
and too much bureaucracy. I say prom-
ises because I was elected to office by
the media board - I know the pres-
sure t being elected.
1 won't miss the stress, but I'm
going to miss football games Go Pi-
rates!) and all the free stuff that comes
with being a student Hopefully, I'll be
back again. I'll miss Barefoot unlim-
ited computer access, our new rec cen-
ter and the numerous plays put out by
ECU's Playhouse among the hundreds
of activities and priviledges students
can enjoy. Alas, I'm ready to close this
chapter in my life and start a new one.
Arizona will be quite an experience,
but I'm sure I'll never forget my roots.
By working and being a student
at ECU, I met many people; these in-
teractions changed my life in ways so
subtle I haven't begun to realize the
impact It has been a long strange trip
and to those I leave behind, I offer The
Irish Blessing:
May the road rise up to meet you
May the wind be always at your
back
May the sun shine warm upon
your face
The rains fall soft upon your
fields
And until we meet again
May the God that loves us all
Hold you in the palm of his hand.
Amen.
Don't take friendship for granted
fair? Go out and grab your garden
variety computer nuts, sports geeks,
poli sci majors and anyone else you
can find to take part in this crucial
organization.
Most importantly, when you say
you're going to do something, do it
Only one of SGA's executive officers
posted the mandatory office hours
enacted during last year's legislature,
and the secretary never seems to
know when anyone will be around the
office. I'll try to get off my soap box
here, but the point is action, not
words. When SGA made the an-
nouncement that they would investi-
gate John Lynch's complaffit, it
amused me. I'd almost be willing to
bet everything I owned that no one
would have thought about it again
after that meeting. "It wasn't done in
the past they think, "it's normal to
have complaints but again, change
rarely occurs. Hopefully, somebody
listened this time.
I know the members of SGA work
hard, and I'm not "bashing" anyone.
Just take a step back and look where
I'm coming from: things were very
wrong with this year's election (trust
me problems like these look much sim-
pler in two stories with two charts).
The strange thing is, 1 even feel
cheated, and I'm pretty apathetic
about government of any kind. Did it
turn into a game of percentage? There
was no need for tampering with this
year's election in the first place, the
candidates were clear.
Yes SGA saves money, yes SGA
voices students' concerns to the pow-
ers that be and yes, joining the orga-
nization is a good lesson in politics;
but when you look at the numbers,
when you talk to the members, SGA
does not appear to be representative
of the student body.
This is usually my favorite time
of the semester. This is the one time
when I don't write on a political sub-
ject or a big issue that society is fac-
ing. Those are my favorite things to
write on but it is a pleasant change
to write on something different. The
past three times I have written this
article it has been on something per-
sonal and funny (at least to me, no
one ever gets my jokes anyway.) To-
day my topic is the most important
thing that East Carolina has to of-
fer, friendships.
Friendship is something that all
institutions of higher learning claim
to offer. It is not a class or some-
thing that you can prove on a pa-
per. Here at East Carolina it is some-
thing that students graduate with
more of than other places. I have
talked with many people that gradu-
ated from here and many other in-
stitutions as well. I have asked them
what they miss most about college.
Kids from other schools most often
state that they will miss the good
times most of all. That is understand-
able, we are not the only school that
knows how to have a good time, oth-
erwise we wouldn't take road trips.
The thing that separates an ECU
graduate is their response, they are
more specific. They say they will
miss their friends.
When I first came here, I knew
almost no one. I had to start out
fresh and meet new people. It was
an indescribable feeling meeting
people for the first time that you
would get to become close friends
with over the next four years and
never lose touch with for the rest of
your life. From that point on it was
you and them, they didn't see what
you did in high school and you had
nothing more to offer than who you
were. I have always been apprecia-
tive of the friends I have made here
and the special type of students and
faculty that I have been surrounded
by. However, I sort of took it for
granted. I forgot that time is pre-
cious and that things don't always
go the way we would like for them
Chris Ariine
Senior Opinion Columnist
Acquaintances
are common but
friendships are
sacred.
to.
Last fall my father was diag-
nosed with cancer of the liver and
pancreas. He was a doctor and had
always been far more healthy than
most of my friends' parents so it was
kind of a surprise. His condition
worsened quickly and he passed
away while holding my hand on
Wednesday, January 24. Death is
something that I had never had to
deal with quite so closely. I had
saved lots of people's lives while
working at the beach and even
helped to bring a child back to life
after they had drowned but some-
how none of it seemed the same.
Cancer is a very ugly thing and it is
hard to see someone that you have
always looked up to and tried to be
like wither away.
It was only natural that the first
people 1 called were my fraternity
brothers. I notified them of what
had happened and stated that the
services would be on Saturday. That
is all there was to it. There is a kind
of love that happens in a group like
that is sort of tough to describe.
There is a lot that doesn't have to
be said, when you're that close you
just know. Many wanted to come up
that day but I didn't want their stud-
ies to suffer and told them to wait
until the weekend. A group came up
Friday to help out the family and
said that there would be more com-
ing up the next day. Saturday was
kind of busy and I didn't have time
to see who had come.
The church was very crowded,
my father had touched a lot of lives.
The family came in through a side
door so I didn't get to see who was
there. We were seated then it hit me.
Another one of my fraternity
brother's had passed the previous
year and we had all skipped class to
attend the service. I was amazed at
how calm he was and how much he
smiled. 1 have never spoken to him
about this but while sitting there I
felt what I think he did at the time.
Although I could not see them I felt
the presence of the nine or ten car-
loads of fraternity brothers that
made the two and a half hour drive
through the rain to be there for me.
After the se. Ace as I was walking
to the social hall I saw them all lined
up and to this day it still makes my
eyes water.
It was tough coming back to
school the next day but some of
them stayed and rode with me. It
was tough to leave my family and
friends from home but I knew I was
in good company. A girl who I have
known since junior high gave me a
carrV It had the cast from Winnie
the Pooh and the character of Chris-
topher Robin stated "Friendship is
a comforting sort of thing It is.
Upon returning I received sup-
port like nothing I could ever have
imagined. I got letters and flowers
from friends, faculty and groups all
over campus. I had all the support I
could from all of my professors and
they really went out of their way for
me. To all of you who were there
for me, I can't thank you enough.
Sometimes there just isn't a way to
put all you want into words.
I think that the greatest thing I
have ever experienced is the friend-
ship I found here at East Carolina.
There can be no other place like it
and I will never again take it for
granted.
Acquaintances are common but
friendships are sacred.
P






GENERAL FRUSTRATIONS
BY Trevor VanMeter
Thursday;April181996
The East Carolinian
wfmv&Ati'
J
m. .





MH
10
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
jfOm
For Rent
Sn.
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WINTERWUfKINISTSUfiE
FENCES MIUMTEI. 24 HOUR
ACCESS
LOCATED KEITH F00IU8N
MWMTEHIiiE
f LEXIBLE UTES & LM6EI SIZES EM
COMMERCIAL JICCMKTS
WH�75Mllt
Pitt Property Management
7581921
108a Brownlea Dr.
LANQSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 Mocks
from campus New ownership. $375 deposit.
$375month.
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BEDROOM,
$275, on river, watersewer included, walk-in
closet, spacious bedroom, on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF APRIL
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facility,
sand volleyball court. Located 5 blocks from
campus. Free water, sewer, cable.
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer hookups,
patios on 1 st floor, located 5 blocks from cam-
pus. Free rent 1 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU Dockside 3
and 2 bedrooms. 2 baths, 4 car carport cathe-
dral ceilings, fireplace, dining room, balcony,
exterior storage room, nothing in the area
compares. Reasonably Priced!
I It iu.sts It n Kent
I Ins I nibt's sinvt U!Kt21i.vHis. ��
( I'lltl.ll I lf.lt .V ll Vin it
S it-Ml Slilttl. I Vl MiilWlln 1VN
if u izihiVi. ; UK1. -1 L -
ll.rlhst ls Sjvinl li.lt.Mlfl IV1
Sit.nth, v I't4- I mmS;
Set in it I Vpoit- Ki'iinrt'tlhx
Both DuffuvRcaltv, liit.
i;i ii, r 2ir
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED, SUM-
MER or year lease. Three bedroom house,
) Two blocks from campus, Eastern Street
$200 Deposit, $200 Rent 13 utilities, A
C, Michelle 757-8704.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Furnished
� -or unfurnished one bedroom only five
blocks from campus. Appliances, central
heatair, water included. $270. Moore Re-
alty 752-2533
AVAILABLE NOW OR AFTER exams.
Male Roommate to sublease May - July
31st At Wyndham Apts. close to campus.
$400 Total. 12 ttilities 754-2362 Tim.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED MAY 1ST!
Great new townhouse within walking dis-
tance of campus. Rent $220, pets ok,
smokers welcome. Please call ASAP! 413-
0957
AVAILABLE MAY 1ST! AIR conditioned
fully furnished one bedroom apartment
perfect for summer school students. Closer
to campus than most dorms. Have your
own kitchen, bathroom, free water, and
private parking! A steal at only $275 per
month. Call Jason at 551-6778 for more
information
EASYGOING FEMALE TO SHARE apt
or house Starting in July. Smokers Wel-
come. For more information call Julie 830-
8969 Anytime.
2 BDRM, 1 BTH, balcony. Fairly New.
$395.00. Near Lowe's. WaterSewer In-
cluded. Beginning May 6. Call 756-5932
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who
is outgoing, sociable, picks up after them-
selves, gets along wothers. Please call
Ashley at 757-2891. Need someone start-
ing in mid April or early May.
WANTED MALE ROOMMATE TO share
huge 4 bedroom apt. includes fitness cen-
ter, basketball, sand volleyball, tennis and
clubhouse with pool tables; microwave, ice-
maker & washerdryer in apt Call 321-
7613
SOMEONE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
room in 4bdrm apartment WD, pool, ten-
nis, weightroom included. Available May
1st. Call 321-0166 after 7pm. Ask for
Joanne.
SUBLEASE FOR THE SUMMER. Two
bedrooms, one bath in Wesley Commons.
Close to campus. If interested please call
830-0934
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2br,
1 12 bath from June forward. Huge liv-
ing area and on bus line. Quiet area, but
near everything. $205mo. utilities. Call
Josh at 758-6002
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX ONLY 4 blocks
from campus. Spacious and in very good
condition. Rent only $450.00 month.
Ready for May. Call 757-0999
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. TWO bed
room and two baths wcable and across
street from laundry room at Eastbrook
Apts. Pay $380 for Deposit and $380 for
rent. Lease ends in August 752-0009. To
take over May 10.
DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed
room, 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling
fans, appliances and washerdryer hook-
ups. $390 Call 752-0277
NEED A PLACE FOR the summer. Play-
ers Club, Close to Pool, Only $200 rent &
utilities. Washerdryer, WT room. Call
Nick 353-0634
FULLY FURNISHED SUMMER HOME
at Sheraton Village Townhomes. 2 BR, 1
12 bath, washer and dryer, dishwasher
and gas grill. Call for more information
353-0176
3 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 2602 Tryon
Dr with dining room, Rec. Room, and
Hardwood floors - $6o6 Moore Realty 752-
2533
3 MONTHS FOR ONLY $500 TOTAL!
Own bedroom and bathroom. Washerdry-
er and cable included. Start May 1st - July
31st Call Nelson or Staci 7584325
LOOKING FOR A PLACE this summer
at ECU? There will be one bedroom avail-
able at 105-B, East 11th St after final ex-
ams. Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-
1198
FEMALE(S) NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
one bedroom in three bedroom Duplex
May -July. Rent $165 Max less rent if two
friends share room. 752-8695
STUDENTS NEEDED TO share 3 bed
room apt 13 utilities, 13 rent 12 block
from campus. Walking distance to down-
town. Call Troy. 758067
ONE BEDROOM MORE, two blocks
from campus, washer and dryer present
available May 1st Rent $179, Call 758-
2147, Ask for Kelley, No deposit required
GEORGETOWNE APARTMENTS. PRE-
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chi-
co's and Downtown. Townhouses with 2
bedrooms, 112 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washerdryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Close to eve
rything. Professional, quiet environment.
Like new one & two bedrooms, with ap-
pliances. $285-$350. Moore Realty 752-
2533
QUIET AREA 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath Du
plex near ECU. $350 month. No Pets! 756-
7677 before 9:00pm
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RESPONSIBLE
NON-smoker femalemale. Twin Oaks
Apts. 13 rent & utilities. Fully furnished,
washerdryer. In route of Bus Line. Con-
tact Dave at 754-2866
SUBLET, OWN ROOM in 3 bedroom
townhouse, 2 blocks from ECU, 3 blocks
from downtown, Please cali Debbie, Dawn,
or Jim at 758-8362
ROOM FOR $200 a month plus $200
deposit plus 13 other bills. One person
to share three bedroom house corner of
First and Warren. Call 931-0940 ASAP.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED A.S.A.P!
Sublease May-August Peace and quiet,
near campus, pool, laundry, and ECU bus
service. Call Dave at 758-8080
flfim
For Rent
NEED A PLACE FOR summer sublease
2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, cable water
and parking included, at good location.
Contact Mandy or Erin at 752-9054
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE two
bedroom two bath apartment 2 blocks
from campus. Please call 757-0979
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted for early May or Late April for 3
bedroom house. 3 blocks from campus.
AC, washerdryer. Call 752-6999
2 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 204 Meade St
just 3 blocks from ECU Campus. With
hardwood floors, fenced in yard, and cen-
tral heatair - $525 Moore Realty 752-
2533
PRIVATE ROOMS available for summer
and fall. Walking distance from campus
and downtown. Large room (15x15) Pri-
vate phone linecable in room. Washer
dryer included. $175 per month utili-
ties Call Mike: day 830-5577, night 752-
2879
ROOM FOR RENT from May 1st to Au-
gust 1st in a nice 3BR house across from
campus. Cheap rent. Available to Anyone.
Call 830-2941.
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 month. Call 355-1313
to make an appointment. Managed by
Remco East Inc
FOR RENT 2 BDRM, 1 bath, fenced yard,
AC, near College Hill $475 - Extra Pet De-
posit Call 756-2364
DUPLEX WYNDHAM CIRCLE 2 bed
room, 2 full bath, cathedral ceilings, quiet
washer dryer hookup, fireplace, ceiling
fans, deck, almost new, beautifully deco-
rated. $550 month 756-3009 after 6:00pm
ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW FOR 2
bedroom, 112 bath. Student desired with
6 months or longer lease. Deposit special
before May 1st Call Phil for details 321-
2813
AFFORDABLE, NICE room available
now. Looking for one roommate to share
6 month or longer lease. Great location
near The Plaza. With heat air and cable
included. ECU bus line access. $197 a
month, plus phone & utilities. Call Phil
today 321-2813
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
SPRING semesters of 96-97. Possibly stay-
ing at Park West Tower Village, or White-
bridge Apts. Rent is $197.50 per person.
WasherDryerRefrigerator included.
Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12 baths,
fireplace, all appliances, very large, quiet
pool, close to park. $585 month. 756-3009
after 6:00pm
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756209
1 BEDROOM AT 1301 Dickinson, hard-
wood floors, Appliances$195 2 bedroom
duplex at 706 Mills. No appliances - $210
or 707A Mills with Appliances - $290. 2
bedroom duplex, upstairs, no appliances -
$195. Moore Realty 752-2533
SUBLEASE MAY THRU JUNE with pos-
sibility of month to month. 1, 2, or 3 to
share Player's Club Apt Excellent sum-
mer environment $250 neg. 321-0231
FEMALE TO SHARE TWO bedroom du
plex near campus $275 mo. 12 utilities
? phone washerdryer. Must not mind an-
imals. Virginia 756-5340. Available May
first
ROOMMATE NEEDED. NICE HOUSE
close to campus. WasherDryer, own
room, and lots of extras. Rent neg. Call
756-1181
WANTED! ROOMMATES NEEDED
FOR SUMMER ANDOR FALL. TWO
BEDROOM, 2 12 BATH, FULLY FUR-
NISHED, POOL, ECU BUS SERVICE.
KINGSTON CONDOMINIUMS.
PLEASE CALL 752-0813
FEMALE WANTED TO SUBLEASE for
May, June & July. Rent $177.50. 14 util-
ities. 14 phone. Washer and Dryer. Tar
River. Call 757-0406
YOUNG PROFESSIONAL OR SERIOUS
LAID BACK FEMALE STUDENT to share
3 bedroom duplex in friendly neighbor-
hood. Rent $177.50 plus security depos-
it. Fenced in back yard. Call 758607.107
Stancil Dr
ffimFo
For Rent
WANTED FEMALE roommate to share
huge 4 bedroom apt includes fitness cen-
ter, basketball, sand volleyball, tennis and
clubhouse with pool tables; microwave, ice
maker and washerdryer in apt Call 321-
7613
SUBLEASE ONE AND TWO bedrooms
available for a female at Players Club
Apartments. Swimming Pool and Full
workout room. Rent $250 a month. If in-
terested Call 353775
APT. TO SHARE BEGINNING May 1st
for the Summer. Great location, 1 block
from campus. Rent is cheap, $185 per
month. 758-9392, Ask for Brian or Mike.
For Sale
Ne�JCASHm
We Bay CDS,
CaMette, and Lp'�
Well pay up to $5 cash tor
CD
C K
.i li
COUCH AND RUG IN good condition.
Must sell. $50.00 or best offer. 81 Toyota
Corolla needs transmission work. $100.00
O.B.O. for more info cali 328-3808
TREK 7000 95 MODEL, New Condition,
RC Components, Aluminum frame, color
purple to green dark. Good deal at $600.
Call 328-1708
1988 ACURA INTEGRA LS with new
clutch and muffler. In great condition.
$4900. Call 758976
FOR SALE - LXI stereo w tower speak-
ers, awesome sound ($150) CDdual cas-
sette. Brass vanity $30 and black iron with
ivey pattern kitchen table with glass top
beautiful, a must see $300 firm. Call 754-
2789.
WEDDING GOWN: SIZE 10, Raw Silk,
Pearl Trim, crinoline petticoat matching
veil, worn once & beautiful! Asking 12
of its $1200 cost 7564084
FOR SALE KENMORE ALL in one
stackable washing machine and dryer. Per-
fect for small apartment Graduating and
must sell! $175. Call Erika at 321-2762
WATER BED QUEEN SIZE $60. Desk
and chair $20. Call Warren at 752-3032
VACATION AND CRUISE FOR 2 to
Florida and Bahamas. 10 days. Must sell.
Paid $400, asking $200. Please call
Pamela at 830828
MUST SELLGRAD student moving
and all furniture must go! Washer$35,
Dryer $35, Couch2 chairs$75, End
Table$15, Lazy boy$25, Lamp$10.
Call Kelly @758-1753
STUDENTS! FALLING ASLEEP ON the
job? Need more energy. Wake up with
Natures Herbs 100 safe. 30-day money-
back guarantee. (919) 792-2131
BLUE SLEEPER SOFA $75 Coffee table
$25 Both in good condition. Please call
756-7250 and leave message. Must sell!
DRUM SET, SLX PIECE CB-700. Splash,
Crash, and Ride cymbals. Many extras.
Includes stool. Must sell. Call Kevin 752-
1955 $850.00.
MATTRESS AND BOXSPRING FOR
sale. Excellent condition. Only $75.00 for
Both. Call Melissa at 758-5309 during the
day at 328-1567.
TREK 7000 95 MODEL, new condition,
RC Components, Aluminum frame, color
purple to green dark. Good Deal at
$600.00. Call 328-1708
I"M MOVING. 6 DRAWER dresser
(chest) with mirror, microwave cart & 2
drawer file cabinet for sale. Best offers.
Call Lisa at 830-9516
FURNITURE SALE: DESK & chair $10,
Table & 4 chairs $20, TV stand $5, Coffee
Table $5 Call: 754-2013
SEVEN WOMEN'S SUITS SIZE 6-8.
Each over $100 New. Will sell for $25
each. Leave message with Lisa at 830-5462
For Sale
GRADUATING: MUST SELL WASHER
and dryer $200. Call Angie or Honor 321-
2186
1970 VOLKSWACON BUS, WITH pop-
up top, newer rebuilt engine: also for sale
old pop-up camper, good frame, call Jim
at 758362.
IT
Help
Wanted
r
i
1 LIFEGUARDS WANTED
� Summer Positions available ;
! May 24-Sept 9. Certified Red
I Cross Lifeguard Training &
CPR required. Pleasant
working conditions in a
recreational environment.
I Phone Twin Lakes Reson,
Chocowini.NC 946-5700,
1
J
Now accepting
applications for all
positions.
No phone calls,
please.
Apply within at:
Golden Corral
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
WAITSTAFFHOSTESS NEEDED AT
THE IVY Room Restaurant in the Rama-
da Plaza Hotel. 203 W Greenville Blvd. Ap-
ply in person.
MATURE RESPONSIBLE STUDENT
FOR full-time babysitting a 3yr old child.
Hospital hours, Evenings and nights.
Please call Dee 931-2999
CONSERVATIVE, ATHLETIC, SPORTS
ORIENTED modeling fit dedicates, seri-
ous ladies only. Please call (704) 628-3129
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 80062-2122
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paving job give us
a call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC -
919-747-7686
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached Greenville. We are looking
for Health Conscious, Neatly Dressed, Ca-
reer Oriented Individuals to fill Part and
Full Time Positions. 758390
"GRADUATING IN BUSINESS OR Fi-
nance in May? We have several entry-level
Management Trainee positions available in
Eastern NC - outstanding career oppor-
tunity in your field! Call Nease Personnel
for details - 756-5820 - Interviews are
soon, don't delay
ENVIRONMENTAL MKTG.TRAINING
CO. NEW to Greenville area. Looking for
environmentally conscious individuals to
oversee expansion. Call 3534001
HAVE FUN THIS SUMMER and work on
the ocean front. Atlantic Beach, NC! Hir-
ing Kitchen, Bartenders and Waitress staff.
NOW! Harper's Ocean Front Diningthe
Jolly Wave. Call or apply in person (919)
726222
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK Summer
in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring lifeguards
(class available) Earn good money while
working on the Beach $$Salary plus bo-
nuses$$Discounted Housing To apply
or for further information, callfax North
Myrtle Beach Lifeguard at 803-2724170.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
tudent Swap Shop
if
Help
Wanted
ADVERTISING
SALES REP
Sell advertising this
summer in Greenville.
Must possess good selling
and customer service
skills. Great experience.
Come by our office and
complete an application by
April 25th. Sell for our first
summer edition publishing
on May 22. Join our team!
The East Carolinian
Second Floor
Student Publications BWg.
COURIER: TO WORK PARTTIME for
busy medical practice. Make deliveries, run
errands, do filing. Applicants must be able
to work 9am-Ipm Monday through Friday
and have a good driving record along with
reliable transportation Interested applic-
ants should send their resume or applica-
tion to Pitt Surgical, PA. 905 Johns Hop-
kins Drive, Greenville, NC 27834
CLUB ATLANTA TRAVEL (CAT) allows
you to travel and get paid for it Call 1-
800-750894 to hear the Roar of the CAT.
Then call your local Representative at 531-
7272.
WFXI FOX 814 HAS an exciting sum-
mer intern position available in it's Green-
ville Sales Office. The intern will gain ex-
perience in television marketing, promo-
tions and sales. The internship will require
a minimum of 20 hours per week. All in-
terested parties should send a resume to:
WFXI attn Deon Levingston, 211 Com-
merce St, Suite E, Greenville, NC 27858.
Gocom Broadcasting. EOE
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR PART-time
work with flexible hours? ECU is looking
for a few good Pirates to contact alumni
for the Annual Fund program. $5.00 per
hour. Contact the Telefund Office at 757-
4215
ATTENTION LADIES: GREEN VILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758896 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
WANTED: PARTTIME WORKER who
must be hardworking with a great person-
ality. General office duties including fil-
ing and running errands. Must have own
transportation Call 752-1600 ask for Kel-
ly.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - MONEY,
FUN, TRAVEL, EXPERIENCE. Call 1-
800-2514000 ext 1576
COURTYARD TAVERN IS now accept-
ing applications for cooks and waitstaff
between 24. No phone calls please.
"SUMMER TEMPORARY EMPLOY-
MENT AVAILABLE for the right people.
Must be able to work full-time hours dur-
ing the day, type 45-50 wpm, and have a
good working knowledge of office soft-
ware (WP, MSW, Lotus, etc.) Call Nease
Personnel for appointment - 756-5820"
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week
youth recreationalsports campour 42nd
season! Over 25 activities, including wa-
ter ski, heated pool, tennis, Go-karts,
artCool Mountain Climate, EXCEL-
LENT pay and great fun! Norvsrnokers. For
applicationbrochure: 70492239 or
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792.
CONSUMER SERVICE REPRESENTA-
TIVE: FULL and part time summer posi-
tions. Overtime and some Saturdays re-
quired. Must have computer entry experi-
ence and a technical aptitude. Customer
service phone experience and bilingual a
plus. Send resume to Human Resources
Department PO Box 4000, Tarboro, NC
27886. Equal Employment Opportunity.
W& Lost and
Found
FOUND FEMALE SHEPHERD PUPPY
APPROX. 4 to 5 months old. Contact 413-
0615 for more information.
Wanted
WANTED TO BUY: GOOD used dorm
size refrigerator. Phone 919-795-5247 and
leave message. Must be cheap.
SUMMER WORK MAKE THE most of
your summer efforts! Fun, light work with
cool folks. Call now for an appointment
321250





11
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
Services
Offered
Services
Offered
rn-r Personals
ATTEfsITIOlNI
Juniors and Seniors
Great Paying Summer Inter
Work in the financial services
field in Eastern NC
Make $200 per week salary
plus commissions
Average earnings in program
is over $6,000
Program lasts 10 weeks
Ea�rjr the Outdoors?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
$5.7VHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest, Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCSI
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
1 Or FAX:
.1 (919) 637-2125
1 LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
1 Greenville, Kinstnn. New Bern
SHANEICE LANE: CONGRATULA-
TIONS ON your acceptance to Pharmacy
School at UNC-CH! 1m really going to
miss you next semester.
Good luck! Always Friends, Lisa.
ECU'S 1BJ SERVICE! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey serv-
ice for your party or social function. Wid-
est variety of any disc jockey company in
Creenville. Alternative to Hip Hop. Spe-
cializing in the needs of ECU Organiza-
tions and GreeksSpring dates are filling
fast, so call early. Ask for Lee 75S4644.
EARN CASH AND GO on vacation at the
same time. Club Atlanta Travel offers ex-
ceptional cash and travel earnings in its
unique Network Program called "CAT
Truly a ground-floor opportunity. Please
call 1-800-750S894 then 531-7272(local)
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF the wall with
Bubba Rocks DJ. Services. Rock, Top 40,
Country, Dance. Only $50 per hour. Call
Right Now 321-1144
&
Greek
Personals
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to wish every-
one good luck on their exams and a safe
and fun summer!
CHI OMEGA - good luck on exams girls
and have a great summer!
DOING A LITTLE DANCE and well, you
know, gettin down Melissa and kerri
thanks for all your hard work! Pledges,
the song rocked! Pi Delta Semi-Formal,
oh what a night
ALPHA XI DELTA HOPES everyone
does well on exams. Good Luck!
SAE - THANKS for a great Prwiowntown
Saturday nite. Let's get together again real
soon! Love, Zeta
SIG TAU - thanks for having us over last
Thursday. We'll have to do it again soon!
Love the sisters and pledges of Pi Delta.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON - thanks for the
social Saturday night We all had a blast!
It was good to get together again! Love,
the AZD's
AOPI AND PI DELTA - we are looking
forward to getting together soon! Love,
Zeta
TO ADPI SENIORS: WE'RE looking for
ward to the banquet Monday night.
Thanks for everything you've done. We're
going to miss you! Love ya, your sisters.
THANKS RENE SMALLWOOD FOR all
your hard work arranging BAREFOOT.
You did a great job! Love, your ADPi sis-
ters.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI would
like to thank everyone who came out and
partied with us at our Crush Party. We
hope you had as much fun as we did!
SIGMA TAU, THANKS FOR an awesome
night It was a "wonderland Love the
Alpha Phi's.
CONGRATS CHI OMEGA SENIORS:
Michelle Baritell, Beau Beauchemin, Lisa
Carwile, Stephanie Cholewinski, Tricia
Crofts, Lucy Goodwin, Chelle Hardison,
Chris Hulsey. Laurie Johnson, Holly Ker-
ney, Jenny Lipe, Debra Nagele, Joy New-
man, Beth Powell, Ashley Prevatte, Kathy
Sare, Jenn Thompson, Sydney Timmer-
man. Laura Uhelig, Bonnie Graves. Good
luck girls! We'll miss you!
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
GREEKS of the week ADPi Lee Beeby
AOPi Ashley Ratliff AZD Allison Ross Al-
pha Phi Lori Wall Chi Omega Renee Silber
Marianda Elkyson DZ Tina Black Sigma
Lori Tew J J Thompson Zeta Dena Perish
Pi Delta Jennifer Keller Jen Scarborough
JESSICA MIDGETT THANKS FOR mak
ing last weekend terrific! Your hard work
really paid off! We'd like to do it again
next year. We love you! Your Delta Zeta
Sisters.
CONGRATS DR EAMON FOR being
nominated Professor of the Month!
Thanks for your support! Love The Sis-
ters of Chi Omega
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS having a yard
sale at the house April 20th from 5:30am
until 1:00pm for a fundraiser.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD like
to congratulate Aaron Givens on his
Lavalere of Julie Smith, Phi Alpha brother.
THANK YOU TO Miranda Ellixson and
Renee Silber, Chi Omega's Greeks of the
week! We appreciate all your hard work!
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD like
to thank our dates for the great time at
our True Gentlemen's Ball. It is a formal
that we will never forget
ALPHA XI DELTA WOULD like to con-
gratulate all of our graduating seniors. We
are so proud of you all and wish you the
best of luck in your future pursuits! Libos!
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS having a yard
sale at the house April 20th from 5:30am
until 1:00pm for a fundraiser.
PI DELTA THANKS FOR a great social
last Wednesday. Who were those girls
dancing with those rabbits. Too bad Eas-
ter is once a year. Love Phi Psi.
Personals
BEST OF LUCK TO the ECU Ambassa-
dor Seniors! Rich Boustead, Carolyn
Grear, Randy Harris, Holly Karas, Kristen
Oliver, Wayne Overby. Heather Mackie,
Jenai Stern & Michelle Streath! We wish
you the best! ECU Ambassadors
Announcements
TREASURE CHEST VIDEO YEAR-
BOOK: Stop by and get your Treasure
Chest Video Yearbook at Barefoot en the
Mall April 18. Also available at the Stu-
dent Store 419 and 422 from 10:00am
until 2:00pm
THE EAST CAROLINA NATIVE AMER-
ICAN ORGANIZATION invites you to vis-
it our table at Barefoot on the Mall Thurs-
day. We will have Native crafts & T-shirts
to sell & native music to hear & enjoy.
Please drop by & enjoy Barefoot!
ABLE WILL BE HOLDING elections for
the coming year this Monday, 22 April
1996, at the Leodonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center. All interested
persons should attend. This is EXTREME-
LY important Meeting time is 5pm For
more information contact Olayta Rigsby
at 328-3688
BAKE SALE: LOWE'S Psychology
Graduate Student Association: Saturday.
April 20,104pm, Sunday, April 21,14pm.
Come get some great goodies for a study
break and support PGSA!
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Mo
tor and Physical Fitness Competency Test
- Test will be given Tuesday, April 23,1996
in Williams Arena at 10:00am. Any ques-
tions concerning the test should be direct-
ed to Mike McCammon at 328-4688
PIE THROW: THE 2ND Annual EGSO
Pie Throw will be on April 18 from 12 to
6pm at Barefoot on the Mall. Come out
and "cream professors from all depart-
ments and schools on campus. Cost is $2
bucks, and half of our proceeds will bene-
fit New Directions, the local battered wom-
en's shelter.
CONTRA DANCE SATURDAY APRIL
20, 7:30pm, at Jaycee Park Auditorium.
Live, Old-time music by Elderberry Jam.
FREE, Come alone or bring a friend. Spon-
sored by University Folk & Country Dance
Club.
MIRACLES HAPPEN WORK ONE today.
Bloodmobile Mendenhall Student Center
Monday April 22, 1996 12:00pm-6:00pm
Sponsored by: Army ROTC "Give Blood,
Give Life" American Red Cross.
WEEKEND OF SONG AND JEWISH
CULTURE: Come and join Congregation
Bayt Shalom Sisterhood in celebration of
Sisterhood Shabbat - April 26,27 and 28!
Congregation Bayt Shalom is located 2
miles east of Hwy 264 on Hwy 33 (10th
St extension).Friday evening, April 26.
8pm The Temple Beth Or Choir from Ra-
leigh will again enhance our service with
their song. Saturday evening, April 27,
7:45pm Dan Abramson, editor of the
"Walford Gazette" and publisher of "Brit-
ish Television" will speak on the Jewish
presence in British television, with videos
of London's East End. Sunday afternoon,
April 28, 2pm Barbara Rush, folklorist
storyteller, speaking on "Tales Jewish
Women's Tell" from her book "Jewish
Women's Tales Books and publications
from both Ms. Rush and Mr. Abramson
will be available for purchase and signing.
An exhibit of art and crafts for display and
sale will be held after Ms. Rush's lecture,
and our own sisterhood gift shop will be
open. Cost: $6 covers both lectures (What
a Bargain) $3 for college students, with
ID. Mail your check by April 22 to: Lori
Troger, 919 Charlton Place, Greenville, NC
27858. For further information call Judi
Willis, 355-7374
GRAFFITI'S PRESENTS - THURSDAY
NIGHT WET BOXER CONTEST. LADIES
$1 BEFORE 11:00PM. FRIDAY NIGHT
WET T-SHIRT CONTEST. $1 DRINK SPE-
CIALS BOTH NIGHTS. $50 PRIZE FOR
WINNERS.
THANKS Brian, Heather, Kristen, Mike,
Jennifer, Mike, Karen, Mike, Michelle, Rich
and Tami! You have made this year the
best! I'll miss you! With Pirate Pride, Je-
nai
GOOD LUCK TO THE new ECU Ambas-
sador Executive Council! Do your best and
do it with Pirate Pride! See you back in
the Fall! Ambassadors
LookTngfora
place to stay
Having trouble
finding where to
dropoff
Classifieds and
Announcements?
Forms for
Classifieds and
Announcements
can be picked up
in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the
Student
Publication
building.
Line Classified Rate
(25 words or less)
Students $2.00
Non-students $3.00
:h additional word $.05
FALL
Fall and Spring
Friday at 4:00 p.m.
for Tuesday's issue
Monday at 4:00 p.m.
for Thursday's issue
4
ING
Tuesday and Thursday
12,000 copies per Issue
FALL AND SPRING
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
For more information, call ECU-6366
DC ads may be cancelled
before 10:00 a.m. the day
before publication. However,
no refunds will be given.
Terms are subject to change without notice.
$5.50
All DC ads will not
exceed two column
inches in width or five
column inches in depth.
Find one irv-our
classifieds.
2f
SUBSCRIBE TO
The East Carolinian
vWr
Support student-run media by
subscribing:
To receive The East Carolinian,
check the length of subscription
desired, complete your name address,
and send a check or money order to
Circulation Dept The East
Carolinian, Student Pubs Bldg ECU,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
$110 for first class
I $40 for bulk rate
Name.
Address
i"
-�-
���'





12
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
The Gamma
Beta Phi
Society
Congratulations to New Members
Carly Rae Ackerman
Christina Michelle Allen
Robbie Curtis Allen
Margery Lee Ambrose
Aleshia Amos
Christina Marie Anderson
Liza Eileen Arboit
Kelly Austin
Wafa Badawan
Dave Bachstetter
Rebecca Baker
Rachel Leigh Barkey
Clyde Allen Barrow
BlANKA BATY
Dawn Marie Beam
Melissa Ann Beaman
Jennifer Beard
Justin Matthew Beaver
Sarah M. Best
Katherine Blare
Melissa Dawn Bonelli
Dori Brain
Charlene Denise Bright
Robert Mark Bordreaux
Wendy J. Boulanger
Jenny Boyd
Jaime Renee Bradley
Leslie M. Brewer
Amie Nicole Briley
Jerri Lynn Brock
G. Paul Browske
Amanda Cain
Mary Ann Caproni
David A. Cardoso
JoAnna Leigh Carman
Allison Ann Carstens
Amy K. Catania
Melissa Bratcher Chagaris
Leah W. Chapin
James P. Chappell
Penni Rene Coates
Robert Bruce Coltrain
Amanda Hilton Constock
Brooke Michell Conway
Jennifer Lyn Cooper
Rebecca Ullman Cooper
Stacey Couey
Susan Amanda Cox
Michael Travis Crawford
Cori Crider
David Anthony Crumbie, Jr.
Jeremy James Cummo
Emily Anne Cunningham
Cachelle Lynn Curtis
Jennifer Dianne Daniels
Tiffin Daniels
Shomari Mashama Davidson
Christy A. Davis
Jennifer Marie Davis
Alford B. Dew
Joanna DiBari
Nash Dreyer
Tracey Lynn Dudley
Tonya Renee Earp
T. Mance Edmondson
Mary Elizabeth Egbert
Patrick James Enderle
Dushun Nakeysha Evans
Brenda Joyce Everett
Elizabeth A. Everson
John Richard Faison
Sherry D. Figgs
Chad M. Fishburne
Terry S. Ford
Stacy Michelle Freeze
Jenny L. Freitas
Stephanie Lee Fritz
John Anthony Gagan
Pamela Vonda Gant
Ann-Marie Gehring
Christopher L. Gray
Rebecca M. Geier
Jerri Ashley Gibson
Pamela L. Godfrey
Jennifer Gjerulff
Susan Ann Gregg
Christy L. Hamilton
Kristen Lynn Harkey
Breigh Hickman
Stephani Haven Hight
Brandy Layne Harper
Melissa Amy Heit
Rachel Hill
Tracie Ann Hertel
Tracie D. Hobbs
William Forrest Holder
Shannon Joy Hooks
Jeanna Lee Huff
Kellie Lynn Icard
Jennifer L. Inlow
Jennifer Ann Inman
Jonathon Brett Ivey
Jill Jackson
Laurie Ann Jackson
Ellen Lynn Jamison
Ann M. Jividen
Christiana Joy Johnson
Jennifer M. Johnson
Angela C. Jones
Deidre Lavonne Jones
LaShona Angelic Jones
Michael B. Jones
Sandra Leigha Jordan
Christie Lynn Joyner
Cristin Payne Joyner
Kimberly Gail Joyner
David Keller
Kimberly Ketchum
Bonnie Lynn Keys
Alexa King
Alexandria Kinney
Jennifer Kneisly
Linda Marie Korpusik
Anna Waltson Lane
Stephanie Langer
Chrisitana M. La Rania
Cara Doreen Larocca
Tina Marie Lewis
Rachel Lindsey
Courtney Lorimer
Cherity Marie Loudermelt
Melanie Lowe
Tracy Michelle Lowry
Emily Carolyn Mabry
Danusia MacManus
Christina M. Maday
Margaret Jean Mann
Jennifer Erin Mantyla
Emily Marco
Jennifer Michelle Massey
Krishna McCloe
Jeremy Kenneth McDonald
Amy Helen McGrath
Jennifer E. McKellar
Jennifer McKeon
Shelly Lynn McCutcheon
Melody F. Meares
Brandon Lloyd Metcalf
Jonathan Miles
Courtney E. Mills
Kevin Miles Mobley
Allison Nicole Morgan
Christine E. Moritz
Carl W. Mothes III
Heather Ann Newsome
Nicole Lynn Norfleet
Tiffany Taylor Norton
Nathaniel James Novak
Sara Elizabeth Nutt
Angela Marie Oakley
Christine Olenick
Jennifer S. Olschner
Amanda Marie Oosting
Amy Lee Paramore
Kelley Denise Parker
Chavonda Martee Perkins
Kathy Lynn Perry
Carrie Lynne Peters
Chad B. Pike
Mary Estelle Pollock
Denise Renea Pope
Ashley Renee Poplin
Ryan Powers
Tim Pyle
Benjamin Munden Quick
Dawn Marie Ragonese
Joseph Jasper Ramsey, Jr.
Jessica Leigh Raupach
Kimberly Ann Rawls
Thomas P. Reid
Dawn Michelle Richard
Shannon Christine Riley
Carrie Luanne Rogers
Jody Rogers
Mary Morris Rogers
Rebecca Lynn Roys
Rebecca Ann Rutkowski
Catherine P. Sanders
Ellice LaRae Sanders
Pamela J. Sanders
Emily Schoen
Kristi Sealey
Jon Sellars
Sabina Sengal
April Lee Sestito
Janet Sharpe
Emily D. Sherrod
Charlotte Jane Simpson
Megan Simpson
Angela J. Smith
Deborah M. Smith
Heather Dawn Smith
Michelle Leigh Smith
Scarlett Leigh Smith
Tamara Smith
Jeffrey M. Snyder
Aaron C. Spivey
Kimberly Renee Stallings
David Ryan starling
Melissa Stevens
Renee Denise Stevens
Kelly Stone
Amanda Kay Swanson
John Sweeney
Jennifer L. Swink
William H. Teel, Jr.
Katherine N. Templeton
Carolyn Tesoriero
Laurie Lee Thompson
Leah Christina Timm
Carla Ellen Timmerberg
Jason Walker Tindal
Shannon Elizabeth Tinsley
Eric L. Tirnauer
Giai Tran
Necia Tripp
Stacey Lynn Tuck
JoshJ. VanEpps
Jason Joseph Van Eyk
Angela Volpe
Kimberly Anne Wagoner
Wendy S. Wallace
Jodi C. Warden
Joseph Ryan Warling
Michelle Marie Washburn
Kati Marie Washburn
Stephanie L. Watson
Mandy Allison Weaver
Robert H. Weber III
Jill Wells
Kristin Suzanne Wheeler
Christopher Brandon White
Jason Whitman
Rhonda A. Williams
Terry Franklin Willis
Angie Winborne
Kelly Suzanne Winter
Sean R. Woehrle
Stacey Marie Woloschon
Carlotta K. Wood all
Tara L. Wooten
Wayne Wright
Kevin B. Youngs
Thanks to Dr. Ken MacLeod





13
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
Tradition of poetry
resides at Upper Crust
Student devotes
life to music
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Well, the spring semester is fi-
nally coming to a close, signaling
the end of classes, the beginning
of final exams, and the last Upper
Crust Bakery poetry reading (at
least for now). After enjoying a suc-
cessful semester filled with read-
ings from many local writers and
performers, the Upper Crust read-
ings hope to close out with the
same success.
Starting in 1992 under the su-
pervision of Adam Schonbrun, the
Upper Crust Bakery Reading series,
which is co-sponsored by the ECU
English Department, has grown
into an ongoing event with its own
tradition. This small coffee shop
bakery, run and owned by Greg
Hayes, has developed into a creative
release for many local talents and
a nice alternative for those who
desire something other than beer,
smoke, and pool. While coffee
houses pop up al! over Greenville
and surrounding areas, downtown
Greenville's original coffee house
continues in the tradition of the
coffee houses that Jack Kerouac
once inhabited by offering writers
and their works a comfortable
home.
In the last few years, Greenville
residents have heard such accom-
plished creative voices as ECU En-
glish professors William Hallberg,
whose novel The Rub of the Green
has earned high praise, and Peter
Makuck, who has published two
books of poetry and has a third one
entitled Blue Frontiers on the way.
But the Upper Crust is not only
for those who have seen their work
in print. These readings have been
an oasis for aspiring local writers,
See POETRY page 18
ECU senior
operates his own
record label
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
"I could die tomorrow, and I'd
have done everything I want to do
with my life
Who could make such a state-
ment? One of ECU's own seniors,
that's who.
Bryan Boggs, who graduates
this May with a degree in Electronic
Media Studies and a minor in The-
atre Arts, is the epitome of a youth-
ful entrepreneur. At 25, he already
owns his own record label, has two
CD's out, DJ's all across the south-
east and mixes his own music - all
of this before graduating college.
In a dance mix, the DJ usually
takes someone else's song and adds
See MUSIC page 17
nhoto Courtesy of Hoodwink Records
Electronic Media Studies major Bryan Boggs relaxes be-
tween DJ gigs and recording sessions for Hoodwink Records.
Barefoot '96
Cr& Cr Cr 6& c Cr 6 Cr
k& 0 t2J
Annual event set to
rock campus mall
again this afternoon
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Today is the big day.
All kinds of different people are de-
scending upon ECU for the biggest festi-
val of the year - Barefoot on the Mall.
The 17th annual event is ready to roll. As
the student body picks up this paper, tents
are set up, student organization booths
are manned and the bands are set for
today's performances.
Headlining this year's festival is the
Edwin McCain Band.
McCain's collegiate experience is
somewhat limited. He was kicked out of
the University of South Carolina after one
half of one semester. He was dismissed
from the university for several reasons,
one of those being that he ran naked
across the busiest part of the campus as
a Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) pledge.
With little to no interest in returning
to school, McCain ventured off on his own,
trying his hand
at playing solo
acoustic music.
He began
booking his
own shows and
found happi-
ness. But he
couldn't ad-
vance to the
next level of
making music
without a
band. McCain
formed his
band and sacri-
ficed the finan-
cial indepen-
dence he en-
joyed a solo
musician.
Casually
lumped to-
gether with the other big band from Co-
lumbia, SC, McCain has struggled for inde-
pendence; and being Hootie's label mate
Keller Williams
wrfMHn 1
H Bssmsssmsw 5JH(FrfL '
-MM� m: uk A Lwa7 &Bk !
Knocked Down Smilin'
didn't help any either. "Solitude" was the
first single released from the Edwin McCain
Band with guest vocals compliments of
Hootie frontman Darius
Rucker.
Hearing McCain play
live is the only way to
truly enjoy his music. The
band made its major la-
bel debut last year on At-
lantic Records with
Honor Among Thieves.
Some contend that
Honor was overpro-
duced. Perhaps this is
true, perhaps not. But a
difficult task would be to
try to find someone who
didn't thoroughly enjoy
McCain's live show. His
unique style of combin-
ing music with
storytelling is evident
only through live perfor-
mances. The Edwin
McCain Band should hit
the stage at about 6 p.m performing a set
lasting around one and a half hours.
Don't come out to the mall late, though.
You'll miss all the other events the Bare-
foot committee has in store.
Knocked Down Smilin' (KDS) stole
the show last summer at the
HomeGrown Music Festival at the Attic.
They were the first band to perform, but
their show was the most difficult for any
of the other bands to follow. Their sound
is a funky combination of rhythm riffs
and basslines. KDS hails from the
Chapel Hill area and are a familiar band
to many Green-villians.
The savvy quartet labels its own mu-
sic as "Southern fried Seattle And lis-
tening to their 1994 debut, Natural Was
The Static, that's a perfect description.
KDS is also a member of the HomeGrown
Music Network, a collection of indepen-
dent bands working together to promote
themselves to national prominence. Their
single "Good Look" also appears on the
HomeGrown Compilation CD alongside
cuts from Purple
Schoolbus, Gibb Droll and
another Barefoot artist,
Keller Williams.
Williams is a solo
acoustic musician who
will play throughout the
day, between set changes.
He is supporti' 4 his debut
CD Freek. He is a one-
man-band who has paid
his dues playing all over
the east coast and locally
at Peasant's Cafe, at the
Attic and by being a fea-
tured performer in ECU's
Noon Day Tunes program.
Rounding out
Barefoot's music festivi-
ties are the roots reggae
sounds of Mystic Vibra-
tions. Like our headliners,
Mystic Vibrations also hail
from Columbia, SC. They
have also paid their dues
playing any college, bar or park who would
have them perform. Mystic Vibrations plays
a combination of original tunes and a couple
of covers from Bob Marley and Marcia
Griffith.
Over 30 student organizations are par-
Edwin McCain
ticipating in Barefoot '96: Dare to Bare.
All kinds of activities are available for stu-
dent enjoyment. Favorites from years past
such as the Velcro Olympics and the hu-
man gyroscope are set for action again this
year. New activities such as gladiator ped-
estal joust and interac-
tive games will make
their debut showing
this year.
Go to class if you
must, but don't get left
out of Barefoot. It's
the last big blowout
before exams. The
Barefoot Committee
has worked hard, iron-
ing out every detail to
make Dare to Bare
daring enough.
But don't dare to
bare coolers, alcohol
or glass bottles be-
cause once again,
these items are forbid-
den at Barefoot.
Mystic Vibrations
'71706oie
re
First (and final) John Award winners announced
Editor's note: (or the past year,
TEC has been blessed with the work
of a critic so devoted to his job that
he's made the rest of the Zombie
Army blush with shame. He watched
QVC for a week. He sat through
Malibu Shores so we woldn't have to.
He is our beloved TV Whore, and now
he is leaving us. We salute you, TV
Whore! Television won't be the same
without you.
Kevin Chaisson
Senior Writer
Ahem. Excuse me. May I have
your attention, please? I have an
announcement to make.
This will be the last TV Whore
column. Ever.
I'm not leaving because I'm
growing tired of all of this. Nor be-
cause I've been offered a lucrative
movie deal to ply my trade else-
where. I hate this, because there
was so much left to do (Boston
Common needs to be railed on in
a very bad way - damn Southern
stereotypes - there, I did it). But I
must go and try to start a new life
somewhere away from the ivy-cov-
ered (?) halls of this university. I
need to go be an adult now. I need
to be in a higher tax bracket.
So, for my final column, I have
decided to throw my own awards
show bash, honoring the excellence
of that crazy, one-eyed monster
called television. And get in some
pot shots at the crap that's out
there, too. Take all of these offer-
ings with a grain of salt, however,
because if I had a Nielsen box
strapped to my TV, Tales Of The
Gold Monkey and Buck Rogers
would still be on the air. So, if ev-
eryone will find their place settings
and fill that champagne glass, we
will begin.
LIVE! FROM AN
INDESCRIMINANT LOCATION,
IT'S THE FIRST ANNUAL TV
WHORE "JOHN" AWARDS FOR
1996!
(Applause)
Let's begin with comedy, shall
we? Since we've done away with all
of the awards chaff (long speeches,
dance numbers, etc.), we can jump
right to the nitty gritty.
Best Lead Actor and Actress,
Comedy: The Johns go to Kelsey
Grammar for Fraiser and Helen
Hunt for Mad About You. Note that
I went for laugh quality rather than
quantity. Grammar and Hunt are on
a par of comedy (timing, facial
ticks, the 'slow burn" gaze, etc.)
that make the competition jealous.
Candice Bergen confessed at the
Emmys that Hunt deserved the
award more than she in front of mil-
lions! Grammar honed his skills on
Cheers and is now a veritable Ginsu
knife of funny. I'm sure they'd like
to thank me if they could. On to
Supporting Roles.
Best Supporting ActorAc-
tress, Comedy: I'm afraid the
Fraiser gang racks this one up. I'm
giving a John each to David Hyde-
Pierce and Jane Leeves, both of
Fraiser. Hyde-Pierce is the only guy
on TV that can steal a funny scene
from Grammar and Leeves com-
bines quirkiness and funny sexual-
ity that makes a guy laugh and
sweat heavily simultaneously.
With those out of the way, I'd
now like to introduce my new cat-
egories before we get to the big one
(Best Comedy).
Best Ensemble Cast:
NewsRadio. Please watch this
show! You will not regret it.
:
Best New Comedy: a tie be-
tween NewsRadio and 3rd Rock
From the Sun. Both are equally
hysterical, but worlds apart in
comic stylings.
Best New Comedic Star:
Kristin Johnston from 3rd Rock.
Johnston pulls off physical comedy
so well you almost forget how
stupifyingly gorgeous she is. Wow!
And now, the one you've been
waiting for
The "John" for Best Comedy
goes to The Simpsons. Yes, that's
right. An animated show beat out
all of the other fine comedies men-
tioned above. Why? Because it is
See WHORE page 18





14
Thursday, April 18, 1996
The East Carolinian

&&& evieuA
Cowboy Wally rides again
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
I remember the first time I ever
saw Cowboy Wally. It was 1974; I
was just a little tyke, and Wally was
at the beginning of his illustrious
career. I settled down in front of
the TV in my Spider-Man pajamas
(the kind with the feet), a huge
bowl of Count Chocula clutched in
my tiny hands.
I was just in time to see the
first episode of
i that great kidvid
classic, Cowboy
Wally's Shoot
Em Up Laugh
Riot. It changed
my young life
forever. I re-
member that my
mom got a little
upset when he
told that dirty
joke about the
blind dog and
the armored
midget. I mean,
I didn't understand it at the time
(come to think of it, I don't much
understand it now), but boy was it
ever funny.
Then, when he did his famous
beer-drinking trick and my mom got
all angry and called the station to
complain Man. I laughed so hard
that tiny chocolate sugar marshmal-
lows came out my nose. It's a shame
that show got canceled in two
weeks
What's that? You have no idea
what I'm talking about? Well, see.
Count Chocula has these little hard
sugar blocks they call marshmal-
lows, and �
What? You know about the
crappy Count Chocula marshmal-
lows? Then I don't
What do you mean you've
never heard of Cowboy Wally? How
could you have missed Cowboy
Wally? He's a big star!
You mean to tell me you never
saw his TV classics like Cowboy
� ��� Wally and the
West Pecos
Mounted Ar-
mada? Or what
about Murphy
and Leeds: Hair-
Trigger Blues
with Wally and
Cleavon Little as
on-the-edge cops
who always get
the job done? I
mean, I realize
those shows got
canceled in two
weeks as vell,
I laughed so hard
that tiny chocolate
marshmllows
came out my nose.
It's a shame that
show got cancelled
in two weeks
eign Legion? It's the one with the
battalion of charmingly heart-bro-
ken soldiers who find meaning and
pick up lines in the heat of battle.
You know, that one? No? Well, I re-
alize the studio pulled it from the-
aters after two weeks to correct the
historical inaccuracies (something
about the Hur.s. I heard), but No,
huh?
Well, there's no way you could
have missed The Making of Ham-
let. I am shocked. That one was
Cowboy Wally's magnum opus! The
drunken script meeting? The pub-
lic urination and crimes against na-
ture? The twenty-minute version of
Hamlet filmed entirely on location
but
You must have seen his mov-
ies! You know, stuff like Ed Smith,
Lizard of Doom? The one with the
evil giant lizard from space who de-
stroys pasteboard cities? No? Well,
that one didn't do too well at the
box office, so maybe I can under-
stand.
But you must have seen Sands
of Bloodl Oh, come on! Wally's
hard-bitten tale of the French For-
ITALIAN
GARDEN
jjk,
3005 E. 10th St. � 757-1215
757-1052
FINE ITALIAN RESTAURANT
All ABC Permiis � Private Parties Welcome � Take-Out
M-F 11 AM-10 PM Sat. 5-10 PM Sun. 5-9 PM
A Social "Event
for you and us!
graduation 96
May 3rd and 4th Starting at 4:00pm
rtfu "Italian QardcnRestaurant
QreenvilCe's Premier Italian
'Dining 'Experience. Invites you to an unfor-
gettahie evening to celebrate
your honored achievement
Menu Samples
JZntipasti Caldi
'Hot Appetizers)
Ccdamari fritti
Calamari that is fCoured anddeep fried
(Pasta
Capellini CMonterosa
Angel hair pasta with shrimp in a pink
brandy cream sauce.
Manzo ('Beef)
'Jiletto Tortofino
for the discriminating palate. The finest cut
of' steakjnarvelous filet mignon that is mouth
watering tenderloins then smothered with
succulent shrimp. Topped-with a garlic
wine sauce.
Vitdio (Vtal)
Osso 'Buco 9dilane.se.
Tender veal shanks braided to mouth
watering perfection, served saffron riscoto.
Pesce (seafood)
(Pesce spada ahamarechiro
grilled swordfish with diced tomatoes,
peppers, onions, caper sandocrues.
Reservation Required 757-1215
in a prison cell with only four ac-
tors? Well. 1 guess it was really just
a tormented poet, Wally and two
inmate?, but come on! Doesn't that
even ring a bell?
Well, what about his talk show,
Cowboy Wally's Late .Xight Celeb
rity Showdown? Where his former
sidekick put a gun to Wally's head
and an old singing cowboy star
tried to commit suicide? No? I just
can't understand how
Oh, wait! Silly me! 1 know why
you've never heard of him! He's a
fictional character in The Cowboy
Wally Show, the new graphic novel
SeeWALLYpagel7
Illustration by Kyle Baker
Heroic French Foreign Legionnaire Stanley is comforted by
a female admirer in Kyle Baker's The Cowboy Wally Show.
?, � �' A
No one buys back more textbooks at a
better price than ECU Student Stores!
errfeaaBR
V Vii;
26891
�P
'� ��! �?��:���!�
t$k
Currency Exchange
Bring us your textbooks and
we'll exchange them for cash!
Remote Buyback Locations Open: 8am - 5 pm
April 23 - 27 & April 29 � May 1
I
(9am - 3 pm)
S On the Hill
CB On the Mall
Speight Bus Stop
Mendenhall Bus Stop
Plus, Wright Building Buyback Hours:
Monday-Thursday: 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
"su
Ronald E. Dowdy
I - 6���
w
Student Stores
?where your dollars support student scholars!
Wrisht Buildins 328-6731 http:www.studcntstorcs.ecu.edu
� Sidewalk Sale TODAY!
5iu� ecu Student Stores, in front of Wrisht tMHsS
Sweats
Gift Items
Posters
And More!





The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18,1996
15
CD Reviews
Vertical Horizon
Running On Ice
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
"ZZZ Celtic pride! I wonder if that's
�hy this Boston duo has so much
H�o offer. After playing in dorm rooms
Tand jamming out with anyone who
- could feel the groove, Vertical Hori-
zon is on the scene with an album
gfrilt of vocal harmonies and acous-
tic riffs that could please even the
most closed-minded fool.
The album, Running On Ice,
sets a mellow tone. If you're look-
ing for an album that can keep those
spirits up, this is the one. From the
moment it starts with "Heart in
Hand" to the moment it finishes
with "Goodnight My Friend the
sound prevails and the message
comes through.
The band is composed of two
members, Keith Kane (guitar, vocals)
and Matthew Scannel (guitar, vo-
cals). No, this is not an acoustic duo
album. Don't worry! The album has
good drum riffs too. Is Carter
Beauford of the Dave Matthews
Band talented enough for you?
That's right! Carter jams out on nine
of the 14 tracks on the album. You
know it's tight!
Pointing out the strongest track
on this album is very hard to do.
Running on Ice has enough vari-
ety to please different listeners.
However, if it was a matter of life or
death and I had to single out the
best moves the band made on this
album, I would have to say "Heart
in Hand a song about just how
great it is to do what they are do-
ing, is one of the strong points. They
have everything they've always
wanted.
Another track that seems to be
hinting at success is "Wash Away
a song that reminds us to live while
we can. Don't depend on tomorrow.
It may never come.
"Famous the fourth song on
the album, is without a doubt a hit
single. The song flows like no other
on the disc. This track is not about
being famous in the public eye. It is
about a wish to only be famous in
one person's heart.
Vertical Horizon has one of the
most positive messages that I have
had the pleasure of critiquing. Ru-
mor has it that these guys are go-
ing to be playing at the Attic next
week. It will be a show worth see-
ing. So if you're looking for a few
smiles and a great time, come check
out the band next week and look
for them at the record store. You
won't regret it.
Home & Brown
7584333
300 Contanche St.
Greenville
Speeding Tickets
Protect Driving Record
Reduce Insurance Costs
Driving While impaired
Driving Privileges
Free Consultation
things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise with
us in
The East
Carolinian.
This week's topic:
Leave it to Beaver
1. A trick question to
start this year-ending
quiz off! The Cleaver
address was never
revealed, but they lived
in the town of Mayfield.
2. Eddie called the
Beaver "squirt
3. Beaver's teacher was
named Miss Landers.
4. Whitey's last name
was Whitney (Whitey
Whitney?).
5. The principal of
Beaver's school was
Mrs. Rayburn (yes, a
female principal in the
'50s).
6. June Cleaver was
played by Barbara
Billingsly.
7. Beaver attended Grant
Avenue Grammar School.
8. Leave it to Beaver ran
for six seasons and
produced 234 episodes.
9. Lumpy's last name
was Rutherford.
10. Wally was played by
Tony Dow.
A'
ATTENTION EASTENDERS AND
FANS OF BRISTISH TV!
'A
Dan Abramson, editor of "The Walford
Gazette"and publisher of "British
Television" will be speaking in
Greenville on April 27. For Further
information call Judi Willis at 355-7374.
Jj
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement
Thursday, April 18
Dare to Bare
Barefoot on the Mail '96
High Noon
Mike Meaner "Eyes"
at the Attic
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Biscuit
at Wrong Way Corrigwr
Movie: 12 Monkeys
at Mendenhall
FREEH
Saturday, April 20
Cravin' Melon
at the Attic
Knocked Down Smilin'
at Peasant's Cafe ,
Big Bump and the Stun Gunz .
at Wrong Way Corrigan's
Movie: 12 Monkeys
at Mendenhall
FREEH
Girls Against Boys ,
with Salt
andEdsel
at the Cafs Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Monday, April 22
Golden SmogJupiter Coyote
with Geraldine Fibbersat the Attic
at the Cafs Cradle,
in Chapel HillMelanie Sparks
at Peasant's Cafe
Friday, April 19!
Dr. Zaius
Pulsewith Testostertones
at the Atticat the Lizard & Snake Cafe .
(Pink Floyd Tribute)i
Laser Show!SEND US INFO!
The Pondering
at Peasant's CafeDo you have an upcoming event,
that you'd like listed m our Coming
Fuego Del AlmaAttractions column? If so, please
at Wrong Way Corrigan'ssend us information (a schedule'
would be nice) at
Doxy's Kitchenr
with Jump little ChildrenComing Attractions
at the Cafs CradleThe East Carobnian
in Chapel HillEast Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Movie: 12 MonkeysGreenville, NC
at Mendenhall27858
FREEH
w.
Summer Jobs
Due To Recent Expansion We Have Opportunities
For 100 Summer Interns.
Jobs Available In These University Markets:
Arkansas State University
Ball State University
Baylor University
Boston College
Boston University
Brown University
University of California, Berkeley
University of California at Davis
University of California, Santa Barbara
Colorado State University
Cornell University
DePauw University
Duke University
East Carolina University
Eastern Kentucky University
Eton College
Emory University
University of Evansvilk
University of Florida
Furman University
University of Georgia
Georgia State University
Georgia Institute of Technology
Harvard University
(Jonesboro, AR)
(Muncie.IN)
(Waco,TX)
(Chestnut HilL MA)
(Boson. MA)
(Providence, RI)
(Berkeley, CA)
(Davis. CA)
(Santa Barbara.CA)
(Fort Collins, CO)
Jtnaca.NY)
(Greencastk. IN)
(Durham. NO
(GreenviBe, NO
(Rictanond, KY)
(Eton College, NQ
(Atlanta, GA)
(Evansville, IN)
(Gainesville, FL)
(Greenville, SO
(Athens, GA)
(Atlanta, GA)
(Atlanta, GA)
(Cambridge, MA)
Idaho State University
University of Idaho
Indiana University
University of Iowa
James Madison University
University of Kentucky
Louisiana State University
Marquette University
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Mercer University
University of Miehigar
University of Minnesota
University of Mississippi
University of Mississippi
Mississippi State University
New Mexico State University
University of North Carolina
University of North Carolina
University of North Carolina
University of North Carolina
North Carolina A&T State University
North Carolina State University
University of Northern Colorado
(Pocatelto,rD)
(Moscow, ID)
(Btoomington, IN)
(Iowa City, I A)
(Harrisonburg,VA)
(Lexington, KY)
(Baton Rouge, LA)
(Milwaukee, WI)
(Cambridge, MA)
(Amherst, MA)
(Macon,GA)
(Ann Arbor, MI)
(Minneapolis, MN)
(Oxford, MS)
(Oxford, MS)
(Starkville, MS)
(LasCruces,NM)
(Chapel HilL NO
(Charlotte, NO
(Greensboro, NO
(Wilmington, NO
(Greensboro, NO
(Raleigh, NO
(GredeyCO)
University of Northern fowa
Northern Michigan University
Northwestern University
University of Notre Dame
Ohio University
The Onto State University
�Oregon State University
University of Richmond
University of South Carolina
University of South Florida
Southeastern Louisiana University
University of Southern Mississippi
Southwest Missouri State
University of Tennessee, Chattanooga
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Tubne University
University of Utah
Vanderbik University
wake Forest University
Western Michigan University
The College of William and Mary
University of Wisconsin-Madison
University of Weconsin-Whitewater
University of Wyoming
(Cedar Falls, I A)
(Marquette. MI)
(Evanston, IL)
(South Bend, IN)
(Athens, OH)
(Columbus, OH)
(Corvallis, OR)
(Richmond, VA)
(Columbia, SO
(Tampa, FL)
(Hammond, LA)
(Hattiesburg, MS)
(Springfield, MO)
(Chattanooga, TN)
(Knoxville, TN)
(New Orleans, LA)
(Sak Lake City, UT)
(Nashville, TN)
(Winston-Satem, NO
(Kalamazoo, MI)
(WiUiamsburg,VA)
(Macfeon, WD
(Whitewater, WI)
OLaramie.WY)
University Directories, the nation's largest publisher of campus directories, is hiring
advertising account executive interns. The 10 week positions offer training, travel & team
incentives. Top interns have earned $15,000. Average earnings of $3,900 for ten weeks.
Training includes a career seminar with recruiters from Fortune 500 companies. Call Scott
Strassner at 1-800-743-5556 weekdays.
B University Directories
The Nation's Largest Publisher Of Campus Telephone Directories






16
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
The art
of
nature
Jansen Bonds takes
advantage of the
warm Spring weather
to draw under one of
the trees on the lawn
outside Jenkins art
building.
Harris Teeter
Ybxxr Neighborhood Food Market!
Red, Ripe & Juicy
California
Strawberries
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Waldensian Quality
Dessert
Cups
6ct
Sara Lee
Pound
Cake
2
107Sii7S oz
3
Books sent to Croatia
RALEIGH (AP) - Five years later,
Ivan and Edita Stefanic say they can
still see the crumbling piles of burned
and waterlogged books.
The troops at the Yugoslav army
garrison in their hometown of Osijek
in northeast Croatia had laid siege to
the town, shelling and looting even
homes and hospitals.
Then, just before being driven out
of town by the Croats, the troops went
to the local university and destroyed
its brand new library with tank fire
and grenades.
"I can't tell you how much that
hurt all of us Edita says. "They de-
stroyed the building, the books, ev-
erything. There was nothing left"
5" Now the Stefanics, who have
jpent the last year studying at N.C.
itate University as Fulbright scholars,
"fiave found a way to fight back.
The couple, both of whom taught
$t Josip Juraj Strossmayer University,
Jire collecting educational books and
Journals to help rebuild the destroyed
library when they return.
They say the response so far has
leen overwhelming.
They've already collected several
thousand volumes - mostly scientific
Journals in their specialties, agricul-
ture and botany -� and they will con-
tinue collecting until June, when they
plan to return to Croatia.
"One of the professors here at
N.C. State helped me put together a
message and post it on the Internet
says Ivan. "We can't believe the num-
ber of people who have contacted us
wanting to help
Dale Hoover, who recently retired
from teaching at NCSU, gave the
couple several years of The American
Journal of Agricultural Economics
that he had collected during his ca-
reer.
"I was so happy to be able to do
it Hoover says. "They are wonder-
ful people who are trying to do what-
See CROATIA page 19
?9
21st Century f
Selected Varieties
Cool Whip
Topping
j&c
�"
Pictsweet
Sliced
Strawberries iooz
Belgian
C& VV&ffles
8oz.
2
7AQOZ.
Clothing for men and & women
�JZ, Beside 5lh St. Brewery Downtown Greenville
TfiS-
SURPRIZE!l
No Fiesta Could
All Natural
Hunter
Ice Cream
Vanilla
Very Strawberry-
French Vanilla
12 gal.
Stock Up And Save!
Q.0&0
Than
f
Birthdays, Going-Aways, Welcome
Backs, Bridal Showers, Engagements,
Girls-Nite-Out, Guys-Nite-Out. Find a
reason to party, then grab your Amigos
and head for
Chico's!
Open 7 Days
for Lunch,
Dinner &
Fiestas!
alas.
St
JflJ"
f
Downtown Greenville? J
16 Oz. Kraft
American
Singles
Soft Drink Feature
DRINK PePSI
757-1666
0j6o S
1
1
2C!
for
Mountain Dew, Piet Pepsi Or
2 Liter
109
Hot, Lean Or
Croissant
Pockets
lOPack
Hi-C
Drinks
3$
9oz
5
Harris Teeter
Homestyle
Waffles
Tropicana
11 oz.
ms oz.
IQQ Premium Orange
Juice
64 oz
09f
1
Prices In This Ad Effective April 17 through April 23,1996 In Our Greenville Stores
Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal
Food Stamps.
�����





JSB
The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18,1996
17
Cocktail
Dress To Impress
Arlington Village
Greenville
919-321 � 1714
MUSIC from page 13
his own "flavor" to it, as Boggs puts
it Boggs leans towards dance music
constructed around the piano, and
can electronically generate drum-
beats and arrange the music that's
already there to produce a new
sound.
In his years here at ECU, Boggs
has done it all. He served as Assis-
tant Creative Ad Director of The East
Carolinian, and as Production Man-
ager at WZMB, in addition to acting
as a DJ at most of the local clubs. He
is able to design all of his own al-
bum covers using the skills he
learned at these jobs. He has also
attended the Carolina School of
Broadcasting.
Boggs remembers sitting in class
during high school, drawing pictures
of his future album covers instead of
paying attention in class. "It's what
I've wanted to do all my life he said.
Boggs got his start as a disc
jockey, and that is still his first love.
HENDRIX FILMS
THURSDAY, APRIL 18
FRIDAY, APRIL 1 9
SATURDAY, APRIL 20
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
He travels nearly every weekend to
places as far away as Tampa Bay,
Florida, where he will DJ this Satur-
day with Keoki at a record release
party. He describes his mixes as "any-
thing from piano dance to techno
funk to rave music What is piano
dance?
"The term comes from the
1930's when inner-cities had their
own clubs in apartment buildings
Boggs explained. "The focus was on
singing and dancing alongside the
piano it projected a whole 'love-
happy' feeling
Although he still DJ's at private
parties, his first love is definitely the
club scene. "We don't talk he said.
"The music does it all At clubs, he
just lets the music do everything, not
having to rely on "chatter" to keep
the people on the dance floor.
In 1992 an apartment fire de-
stroyed all of his equipment and sev-
eral of his recorded songs. It took him
almost two years to recover from that
disaster. In 1995, with most of the
equipment replaced, he formed Hood-
wink Records with his partner, Rich
Green, a graduate of Elon College.
Boggs met Green in 1991, working
for AM! (American Multimedia Inc.),
a production nouse for CD manufac-
turing and tape duplication.
Hoodwink Records is based in
Wilmington. NC, and already has sev-
eral names on its label. Pianists Rune
and Michael Mozart are signed with
the company, as well as The Wonder
Project (of which Green is a member),
DJ Sploo and Boggs himself, who
records under the name Bryan House.
Boggs gets anywhere from $300-
$500 a night for his work, consist-
ing of usually two hours of mixing.
When he travels, and he does often,
his room and board are paid for,
along with travel to and from the job.
He has performed in Tampa, Charles-
ton, Greensboro, Charlotte, Chapel
Hill. Raleigh, Winston-Salem and
Myrtle Beach, where the company
will relocate to when he graduates.
In addition, Hoodwink Records has
several merchandising ideas in the
works. T-shirts, CDs and the like all
bring in extra revenue, but Boggs
puts the majority of it back into the
company.
When asked why he chose to
open his own business rather than
work for another company to begin
WAJLJ-jY from page 14
from legendary comics artist Kyle
Baker!
l.okay, so you've obviously
never heard of Kyle Baker before
either. Well, as 1 said, he's a cartoon-
ist. He's done two graphic novels
(Cowboy Wally and Why I Hate
with, Boggs replied "I guess !
thought that if I did it on my own
well, I don't know. I wouldn't know
any other way to do it I wouldn't
know who to ask this way I just
knew what to do
With such an early start on his j
career, Boggs hopes to accomplish
everything he sets out to do. Some
of his future goals include getting his
record company picked up by a larger
label, making a gold album, and per i
forming soundtracks for movies. A
World Wide Web page is in the works
as well as another CD. Already six of �
his songs can be heard in the 1996
Treasure Chest, the ECU Video yeaj
book.
These songs are the ones rk-
leased on his two 12-inch singles:
"The 2 o'clock Jam "Babylon,1" !
"Dust in the Wind "Until Tomorrow !
Comes "Do It and a remix of "Do �
It" by D-Love of Outlandz Records
in Oriando. Boggs' third release is :
scheduled for August ; J
For more information about
Hoodwink Records, any of the musi-
cians represented by them, or to i !
quire about DJ services, call 7584253
or 910-227-8530.
i t
i :
Saturn) and a bunch of funky one-
page comics for shiny magazines like
Spy, Details and Esquire. He's also
done some comic book artwork on
characters like Batman. Some Baker
spot illustrations of the Joker also
keep popping up on toys. I have no
doubt that my Kyle Baker Joker yo-
yo will one day be worth its weight
in gold. Or maybe not I just don't
know anymore
On a scale of one to ten, Kyle
Baker's The Cowboy Wally Show,
rates an eight
Natural life I �
�Ar
Americans discard 4 million tons of office paper every year�enough
to build a 12 foot high wall of paper from New York to California!
�NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
SENIORS
Last Time This Semester To Flash Your
Purple Pirate Pass

AlumAde
Barefoot on the Mall
12 until
Thursday, April 18, 1996
Grand Prize
Dinners Provided by
Ragazzi's Boli's Darryl's Chico's Pargo's
Gift Certificates provided by Belk's at Carolina East Mall
Brody's at the Plaza and Various Items from the ECU Pirate Club
Sponsored by ECU Ambassadors and Alumni Association





18
Thursday, April 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
Family Matters
Isn't there an
island leper
colony somewhere
out there to
which we can
send all the fans of
this show?
WHORE from page 13
the single most consistently funny
TV show on the air. I have never
seen a Simpsons episode I didn't
like. I can watch them again and
again � they never get stale. How
many of you other current come-
dic offerings can say that?
Cast of Sister, Sister, sit the
Hell down before I throw your un-
funny butts out in the street!
And now for the Drama cat-
egory
Best Actor and Actress, Drama:
This prestigious award has to go to
Andre Braugher of Homicide and
Gillian Anderson of The X-Files.
Braugher is like an force of nature
whenever he's on screen. He man-
ages to be angry, concerned, sym-
pathetic, apathetic, irritable, en-
raged and coura-
geous all with-
out uttering a
single line of dia-
logue. The fact
that he hasn't
won any other
awards is a crock
Of guano.
The same
goes for Ander-
son. If you guys
missed the
"Christmas" epi-
sode of The X-
Piles, featuring
Anderson's char-
acter Agent
Scully engaged in a battle with her
&ith in Cod (as well as her own
psyche), well then friends, you
missed something amazing. I have
rarely seen a better portrayal of a
person's private war with their God.
Wow.
Best Supporting ActorAc-
tress, Drama: I may be going out
on a limb here, but I'm going with
Andrew Robinson of Star Trek:
Deep Space Nine and Julianna
Marguiles of ER. Marguiles, I'm
sure you understand, so I'll move
to Robinson.
1 I really don't care if any of you
snoot your noses up at a science
fiction TV show as a drama because
i(:you do, you're wrong, wrong,
wrong. Robinson's portrayal of
Garek, the "retired" Cardassian se-
cret service operative turned tailor
(a-nice nod to the novels of John
Le. Carre), is, at times, both touch-
ing and startling.
Garek is a character of many
levels and nuances (some more sin-
ister than others) and Robinson
makes you aware of them all at all
times. A magnificent performance.
Best Ensemble, Drama: this
one goes to ER, for obvious rea-
sons. I feel guilty about letting
them escape with just an award for
Margulies. I should note, however,
that Homicide comes in a close
second.
Perhaps now you're wondering
about my picks for Best New Drama
and Rising Star Drama. I know
there are quite a few supporters of
Party of Five out there, but hon-
estly, I haven't seen a single epi-
sode of it. Sorry. I feel I have failed
you in some way with this. I do
apologize. Other than possibly
Party, there haven't been any good
new dramas this year.
For that reason alone, I'm
afraid that I have to leave these two
categories blank for this year. Fill
in your fave. What? You think I'm
going to say Savannah? Or Malibu
Shores? You've got to be out of
your minds!
Lifetime Achievement Award
for Advancement
of Masculinity:
who else could
receive this one
but your friend
and mine, Rob-
ert Conrad! The
epitome of '60s
cool, Conrad has
been a TV star
for not one, not
two, not three,
but four big de-
cades.
Tough as
nails, but always
with a soft spot
for the ladies,
Bob Conrad has been TV's ambas-
sador of macho for the better part
of my life, and I love the guy. In a
manly, rough-and-tumble sort of
way, of course.
That said, let's move on to the
fun stuff: The John Hall of Shame
Awards. The Hall of Shame is ex-
actly what you think it is - the
worst of the worst, for they need
to be recognized also, if only so that
they can be avoided at all costs.
Hold on to your place settings,
'cause this will go by fast.
Worst Comedy (New) - This
honor is shared by Fox's Ned and
Stacey and every single flipping
one of the comedies on the Warner
Brothers (WB) network. These
shows are perfect reasons for giv-
ing money to fund Public Televi-
sion.
Worst Comedy (Lifetime
Achievement) - Family Matters.
Isn't there an island leper colony
somewhere to which we can send
all of the fans of this show?
Worst Comedic Actor Actress:
The Wayans Brothers share the ac-
tor award (proof that funny isn't ge-
netic) and Ricki Lake takes the
John for Actress. What? You say
Lake's show isn't a comedy? Think
again, my friend.
Worst Supporting nods go to
the nerdy guy friend on NBC's The
75c
WASH
Essussa �DF
.40c lb.
Before
10:30
2511 E. 10th St Greenville
919-752-5222
I
; This Coupon Good For
! ONE FREE
WASH
! Limit one per customer
(Expires
43196
Single Guy and the Christina
Applegate clone on the WB's Hap-
pily Ever After. That's right.
They're so bad even I don't know
their names. On to Drama.
Worst Drama (New) � Nothing
this season can top NBC's Malibu
Shores, which actually featured
Tori Spelling in a cameo as a slutty
older woman out to swipe our lead
chick's beau. Hey, she's not that
old!
(Rim shot, please!)
Worst Drama (Old) goes to
Fox's Medicine Ball, a show so bad
I still wake up with the cold sweats.
Remember Medicine Ball? No?
Good. It's better that way.
Worst ActorActress, Drama:
Randy Spelling (also of Shores) and
Shannon Sturges of Savannah,
proof again that nepotism and
looks outweigh talent in the Holly-
wood mindset.
Supporting Shame awards go
to Chuck Norris in Walker, Texas
Ranger (you say he's the lead ac-
tor? No, the fight scenes are the
real stars of the show) and any non-
lead female cast member from
Malibu Shores, because you have
no idea how bad it really is.
Special Award for the Biggest
Downfall: this one goes to shows
that began wonderfully and were
screwed beyond belief by the net-
work brass. This dubious honor
goes to the David E. Kelly-produced
dramas, Picket Fences and Chicago
Hope. Kelly left to write films for
wife Michelle Pfieffer, and with him
went all of the good things about
those two shows. For many fans,
Picket Fences (once a contender for
Best Drama) died a horrible death
last year instead of the sickly, pro-
longed exit it's forced to take the
end of this season. Both will be
sorely missed.
Special Award for Could'a
Been Contenders: the last award of
the evening will be given to shows
that will probably end up an entry
in some treatise on TV history -
and nothing more. These include
Michael Moore's hysterical TV Na-
tion, Fox's Partners, and the CBS
series Bonnie and American
Gothic. All of these shows were
worthy of an audience and good rat-
ings, but were knocked by the way-
side to make room for offensive of-
ferings like Boston Common and
more TV News shows you can shake
a stick at. A crime to say the least.
There. I've said my piece, and
as it is with all good things, this
one must come to an end. Yes, I'm
going to the Elysium Fields of
Whoredom to take my rest. Don't
cry for me, though. Don't be sad.
Just head outside, shade your light-
starved eyes from the sun. and
settle down somewhere with a good
book for a change.
Thus endeth the lesson.
POETRY from page 13
such as Laura Wright, Wayne
Robbins, Todd Lovett and Frank
Hawkins. An essential feature of the
Upper Crust Readings is the Open
Mic segment, where anyone who
wants to read or perform anything
is given his or her chance to be
heard. This combination of feature
speakers and open mic readings
have allowed for dialogues where
writers can give one another help-
ful feedback and advice.
Before you run away scream-
ing, "I'm not good enough to read
in front of a crowd remember that
organizers stress the relaxed atmo-
sphere these readings provide. No
one is out to hurt anyone. While
your writing may not always be
praised as being brilliant, it is al-
ways welcomed.
Even though poetry and prose
have been the dominant forms at
the Upper Crust, other types of per-
formances have made their appear-
ances in the past. Some poetry has
used musical accompaniment to
help enhance particular moods and
emotions, others have combined
poetry with the visual arts, such as
video production. Performers like
Will Mahn and the Nitty Gritty
Breakdancers, Chris Rowland, Mike
Hamer and Johnny Dale have
helped make the Upper Crust a
truly unique Greenville event.
On Monday, the featured
speakers will be Debbie Morrison
and Janeen Taylor Lee. However,
anyone who has something to
read, even if it's not your own, feel
free to join the group and finish
the semester on a positive note.
The show starts at 8 p.m. and will
end when the last reader has spo-
ken.
But don't worry. If all goes ac-
cording to plan, the Upper Crust
Bakery Readings will be alive and
well next semester. So all you fu-
ture Sylvia Plaths and Toni
Morrisons get to writing and have
something to show this town next
semester.
Summer
School
�96
Breakfast
in a cafe setting, we sreve a complete break-
fast under S5Serving pancakes, French toast,
egg plates and breakfast sandwiches
from 8am - 10:30 am
Come favor us aiith your companu.
757-1716
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Project that dedicated "student image
Attend that popfilar, exciting course
Access tliat otherwise
impossible-to-gfet required class
Without delay, check wifh your advisor!
Do you need cash for Summer Break?
BUD
LIGHT
KING OF BEERS
'IIGHT
Jeffreys Beer & Wine will buy back
EMPTY A-B KEGS!
Jeffreys Beer& Wine, 1997 N. Greene St. Greenville, NC,
758-1515. Please bring your empty A-B kegs to the
warehouse, Monday- Friday, 8:30 - 11:30am
and 1:30 - 4:30pm
"Official ECU Ring Event"
e
e�
April 22-26
Vr�
��'
s
�i
�h
���
(Mon - Fri)
' 10:00am - 3:00pm
ECU Student Stores Deposit $25.00
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
1RTC4RVED St�� S"res
X. coll? rr j e wi lrv
pS Q& .Sj 'Special Pa
ment Plans Available
1RTCIRVED
:
' 1
!�t
.�;

�,�
� �
:
; :
1 5
J
��mmmmm





The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18, 1996
19
CROATIA from page 16
ever they can to make things better in
their country
Several other NCSU faculty mem-
bers have made contributions, and
donations have also begun to flow in
from outside the university.
The agriculture department at the
University of Kentucky recently called
Ivan to say it would donate complete
volumes of several scientific journals
it no longer needs.
One recent afternoon, Edita lov-
ingly fingered their latest acquisition
- a stack of slick-looking botany books
donated by a publisher.
"I can't believe this she said as
she flipped through the thick, hand-
some volumes. "The publisher said
they were samples and they were glad
to help
Boxes of donated books are al-
ready stacked up in Ivan's small office
at NCSU and throughout the couple's
apartment
"The storage - that is not a prob-
lem says a smiling Ivan. "We will find
a place to store whatever we receive
The big challenge they face is find-
ing a way to get all those books and
magazines shipped back to Croatia.
"We have already gotten some
small donations to help with the ship-
ping, but we are probably going to need
some more help on that" says Ivan.
"We hope we will find a way to get it
all done
While the books will help, the
Stefanics know they will have lots of
work to do when they get back to
Osijek. The city has donated an old
military command building to serve as
a library for the university, which, al-
though founded in 1735, is the young-
est of Croatia's four universities.
Most of the buildings destroyed
� in Osijek during the war haven't been
rebuilt including several at the univer-
sity. Many things remain in short sup-
ply, even though most of the fighting
has stopped.
"We have five microscopes to
teach 400 botany students because so
much equipment was destroyed dur-
ing the war says Edita. "The students
spend a large amount of their time
standing in line to look at something
through the microscope. We do the
best we can with what we have left"
Because of its strategic location
on the Drava River near the Serbian
border, Osijek has seen more than its
share of fighting. Ivan says more than
1.000 of the city's 100,000 residents
have died since the fighting began.
"At the worst times, the snipers
would shoot anyone who poked their
head out in the street" says Edita. "It
was terrifying
The university found itself in a
precarious position, situated along the
city's eastern edge, just across the river
from a so-called "demilitarized zone"
between the warring Serbian and
Croatian factions. "It is a demilitarized
zone in name only says Ivan.
The war has also taken a heavy
personal toll on the Stefanics.
Edita lost two cousins when the
Serbs overran the nearby city of
Vukovar. She said the Serbs killed one
of them by forcing him to walk into a
minefield. The other is still missing.
The couple delayed their wedding
two years because of the war. and when
they did get married, many relatives
couldn't come because they were still
afraid to travel in Croatia.
They also have postponed start-
ing a family.
"Osijek wasn't the place for chil-
dren says Ivan. "We hope it will be
one day soon
Despite all that, neither Ivan, 31,
nor Edita, 33, has ever thought of not
going back to Croatia after their
NCSU studies are complete. Both plan
to pursue their doctorates while teach-
ing in Osijek, he in agricultural eco-
nomics and she in botany.
"We have half a million farmers
in Croatia and many of them have
been devastated by the war Ivan
says. "These books will be priceless
to us
0?
tfP
V
atf-
American Pizza Company
,
'h

.
r"
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i.
r-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
L.
coupon
Extra Large 16" Pizza (Takeout)
unlimited Toppings
$6.99
expires 4 -21 -96
" COupbrT
2 Extra Large 16" Pizzas
unlimited Toppings
(Takeout)
$13.98
expires 4-21-96
"I
I
I
I
J
T
I
I
I
I
I
I
f
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L.
r
i
i
i
i
i
Pf
I I
coupon
1 Extra Large 16" Pizza
unlimited Toppings
2 liter soda, I order Breadstix (Takeout)
$12.49
expires 4-21-96
coupon
American Pizza Company
Any 12" sub wchips
only $3.99 (pick up)
(Takeout)
expires 4-21-96
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
.J
refers to number; double portions extra
HOME OF UNLIMITED TOPPING PIZZA 3010-A E. 10TH ST
931-0411
The Student Mind During a Final Exam
The prof vtvtr
covered thlsl
WUkVU, AA0e
Actual �
knowledge
oia, subject.
Traueyz fey
a miracle
flood, fire
oy iOYvMdo.
pfliuc zovte.
TheTAs
Viida cute.
f leiA.ew i should have
read the boole.
i hope the curve
"Soovv. this will .all
be beWad me" .
Here's, fcrst-actiig relief
from, the pressure of sc.
seniors fliu cAraci s udeiA-ts
cask bflcte oia. the purchase or lease of flf.y
� r uatiag
;fliv act dj -
tool iA-evv Fcrd oy Mercury.
This Includes the hlgh-perfori.aiA,ce Mustcnupj!
call i-Soo-321-153 or visit our web site
at http:xvvww.fprd.coyK for the full story.
Because Your Brain Doesn't Have Wheels.
'UueetiQibie fOjfTwflQ'j
� aufWWschool between itHWaxMrtfl? y�jmutipurer �s�ww �� �
XiW mO UtttA W-Ofrlity rMUion ap(Kf ' your � tor tt,K
Chess master
goes to Vegas
North Carolinian
competes in
tournament
DURHAM (AP) - Don Jackson
may be 90 years old, but he has a
few good moves left in him.
Jackson, a retired jack-of-all-
trades, is planning a trip to Las Ve-
gas on April 24 .to compete in the
U.S. Chess Federation's National
Open Tournament. He's "only"
been playing the game for 55 years,
taking it up in 1941.
"I was a licensed used car
dealer, running a railroad and sell-
ing Mobil gas on the side he re-
called, as he waited at his home in
North Durham for a friend to show
up for their weekly match. "The
Mobil distributor and I needed
something to pass the time
The time
He was a built-in dishwasher" for
his mother, who ran a boarding
house. But she died, "from a bro-
ken heart. She missed my father
and he was off to the Texas oil
fields with a new bride, Alice.
"I was 19 and 1 thought 1 knew
everything he said. "I didn't see
any reason to go to college
The Great Depression slowed
Jackson's career in oil productions.
He wasn't sure if he was a chess
man or a checker piece.
"1 jumped around from one
company to anther. My father-in-law
had 80 acres of land in Michigan
and we moved up there to make our
fortune
It didn't take long for him to
regret the move. But Michigan
earned a stalemate.
"Two days after 1 got there, I
started saving money to go back to
Texas he said with a laugh.
He did make
was in the early
years of World
War II, and
while Jackson
was not in jeop-
ardy from the
Germans or
Japanese, he
was nearly
checkmated by
the U.S. govern-
ment.
"I almost
got arrested for
selling gas to a
car with a truck
stamp, he
said. "But rationing ended before
we went to court
Jackson and his friend were
pawns in search of kings and
queens.
"We read books and we bought
our chess sets at a variety store and
they came with instructions on how
to play the game
Jackson, who was born in
Craig, Mo on Oct. 23, 1905, has
been involved with the game ever
since.
He has his weekly match with
Mark Tamoshunas, a Duke senior
in Public Policy and Economics.
Tamoshunas. a native of Hartsdale.
N.Y is "a little better than I am
Jackson said, smiling the whole
time.
"We play three games and I
only won all three once in the last
year. The last time we played it was
1-1-1, so when we play I have hopes,
anyway
Tamoshunas. who will be pur-
suing a law degree next year, said
he was a sophomore when he met
Jackson through "an elder neigh-
bors project
Living to be 90 is just a matter
of luck, according to Jackson, who
thinks he got a lucky start in life.
His parents were farmers, raising
pigs and growing corn. Then they
made a trip to the 1904 World's
Fair in St. Louis.
"I was born nine months
later he said. "I think I'm lucky.
I guess there was a good crop that
year
His father died and he moved
to Eldorado, Kan where his older
"I was 19 and I
thought I knew
everything. I
didn't see any
reason to go to
college
� Don Jackson,
competitor in U.S. Chess
Federation National Open
it back, more
than 30 years
later, on vacation.
He and his wife
visited California,
Texas. Las Vegas,
Alabama and
Florida to get
away from the
Michigan winters.
But for 33 years,
he was a farmer
and a logger and
a mechanic and
he worked on a
short-line rail1
��������� r0ad. The
Ludington and Northern, where he
was a "gandi dancer working on
the tracks, a brakeman and finally
an engineer.
"Engineers were called
hoggers he said. "The fireman
worked hard to build up the steam
and the engineer would put the
throttle down and hog all the
steam
Alice died in 1969 and Jackson
remarried. It was on a trip back
from Myrtle Beach with his second
wife, Nola, that Jackson landed in
Whiteville and they stayed there for
five years.
"I started a chess club there
he said.
He came to Durham when one
of his 17 grandchildren moved here
and he has been here seven years.
Nola died last year.
Jackson, who has 14 great-
grandchildren, has a love for chess
which is greater than his skill. His
rating is 1198. which means "I'm
a poor chess player. A good player
would be 1800 or 1900 and the
world champion is 3200.
"The rating is done by com-
puter he explained. "It's not how
you win or lose, but the strategy
you use in a game, how much think-
ing you do. I'm a lazy thinker
But the game is in his blood
and he spreads the word when he
can.
"When I was in Michigan, the
Optimist Club was looking for a
project and I dreamed up Chess for
Children. We had 185 children
learn in the program.
"That's my biggest accomplish-
brother had a job in the oil fields, ment in chess
SILVER
�jteenoUUs only
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers llpm-lamiJI
CASH PRIZE
�Contestants need to call 6k rcgistet in advance.
Mint arrive by � 00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
r'
i
I
i
I ecTj
l
We do Birthdays. Bachelor Parties, BridaTj
Showers, Corporate Parties. & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Gall 756-6278
) McPoimM'
I
I
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
(Behind John's Convenient M�0 I �NR I





mmmmmmmmmmmmm
Mmummm!immmmi
rlrtwiiiinwaiiiiM
20
Thursday, April 18,1996
The East Carolinian
Wolfpack pounces
on baseball team
Dill Dlllard
Staff Writer
Idham's
ast word
Brad Oldham
Senior Writer
It was a hot summer day in
August, 1993 when I, a clueless
and confused 18-year old youth,
walked into the dusty halls of the
Student Publications Building to
fill out an application to write for
the sports department of The
East Carolinian.
I filled out the application
and just a few hours later re-
ceived a call from then editor,
Robert Todd. He wanted me to
go cover The King of the Hill,
which was taking place later that
afternoon up on College Hill. I
guess it was his way of interview-
ing me for the job, and I agreed.
It was 90 degrees that day,
and I wore a tie and a long-sleeve
shirt to cover the event. I had a
lot to learn.
I wrote up the article and it
came out the next morning, co-
incidentally the same morning I
headed over to the college radio
station, WZMB. I was to do my
very first sportscast after being
hired earlier that week by then
Sports Director, Kevin Hall.
My sportscast was set for
9:30 a.m I showed up at 8 a.m
i had a lot to learn.
It didn't take long to realize
that sports journalism was for me
that semester. After paying my
dues at the paper by covering vol-
leyball and swimming as a beat
writer, I was soon allowed to
cover some away football games,
which meant receiving spending
money from the university, fly-
ing with the football team to dif-
ferent places in the country, stay-
ing at expensive hotels and hob-
nobbing with media twice my age
in lush press boxes with all-you-
can-eat buffets. I was beginning
to learn.
Things also picked up at the
radio station, where the follow-
ing semester I began to do play-
by-play for ECU baseball games,
something that to this day I love
doing more than just about any-
thing else.
I worked hard at both medi-
ums throughout my college ca-
reer and the two places of em-
ployment began to become my
home-away-from-home, but I was
doing something I knew I wanted
to do the rest of my life with re-
ally great people; and that's not
something you can say about a
lot of college jobs.
But I would have never got-
ten so much out of college me-
dia here at ECU if I hadn't started
from the bottom, which meant
taking the initiative to get in-
volved.
I know that this my sound
like an article that you'd read in
the orientation issue of this pa-
per, but I know fellow seniors of
mine who are graduating in a
couple of weeks with me with re-
grets about how little they par-
ticipated in activities in college.
Take it from me, you don't real-
ize how quickly your college ca-
reer goes by until you can begin
to count the number of days un-
til you walk down the aisles of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on your
fingers.
And without getting into the
old story of this school fighting
off aliegaions of being a slack
institution, a party school and
what-not, ECU has a hell of a lot
going for it.
Without even getting into
the accolades of the each depart-
ment, because I'm bound to leave
something out, the environment
of this campus itself is one of the
tightest and warmest that I've
ever been around. Granted, I'm
See LAST page 23
Tennis teams
wrap up season
Cralg Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The men's and women's tennis
season is winding down.
The women (12-5,4-3 CAA) fin-
ished in sixth place in last
weekend's CAA
Tournament,
being elimi-
nated by the
Lady Dukes of
James Madison
4-0. ECU
started out with
a loss against
Richmond in
the first round,
but bounced
back to beat in-
state rival UNC-
W 4-0 to earn a atmmmmmtmmitmm
spot in the fifth
place match against James Madison.
William & Mary continued
their winning tradition by captur-
ing the CAA title for the tenth con-
secutive year.
"Everyone played well senior
Chelsea Earnhardt said. "We had a
good tournament
JMU swept all three doubles
matches to claim the doubles point
and then won three singles matches
to steal the win. ECU held leads in
the singles matches at No. 1 and
No. 6, but those matches were sus-
pended because the match was al-
ready clinched.
"We usually finish
fifth, but since
VCU came in this
year, they knocked
everybody down a
notch
� Chelsea Earnhardt
Earnhardt
believes that the
addition of Vir-
ginia Common-
wealth to the
CAA this year
definitely had an
impact on the
tournament
standings.
"We usually
finish fifth, but
since VCU came
in this year, they
knocked every-
body down a notch Earnhardt
said.
The women's tennis program at
ECU has steadily improved over the
past couple of years, and will only
See TEAMS page 23
��mttm, mrngm
The ECU baseball team's los-
ing streak is now at two in a row
after Tuesday night's 9-1 loss to the
visiting Wolfpack of N.C. State. The
ACC powerhouse came into the
ballgame with a 32-10 record which
helped place them among
America's 25 best college baseball
teams.
As always, it was a near capac-
ity crowd at Harrington Field for
the old rivalry, despite the threat-
ening skies. State delighted the
faithful that traveled from Raleigh,
when center fielder Tom Sergio set
the tone of this one by leading off
with a solo homer.
"Sergio's solo homer to start
the game really set the tone for this
the game Coach Garv Overton
said. "We really came out tentative
and trailing early did not help that
one bit
The Pirates were shelled early
in the contest, giving up six runs
in the first two innings of play. Not
only were the State bats alive, but
they got a lot of help from starter
Mike Rambusch.
"We came out tentative and
showed our youth early, and that
is not good to do that especially
against a pitcher like Rambusch
who pitched an excellent game
Overton said.
Rambusch pitched seven in-
nings and was stingy while on the
hill giving up only one hit, no runs
and three walks to go along with
his five recorded strikeouts.
"They are an outstanding ball
What's
next?
Coaches Sue Manahan
and Tracey Kee, talk
during a recent Softball
game. The softball
team goes into the Big
South Conference
Championships this
weekend holding onto
second place.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
SPORTS INFORMATION
ECU will celebrate its first ever home golf tourna-
ment as the Pirates play host to the 1996 Pepsi Bradford
Creek Classic. Teams from all over the southeast and
the midwest will participate in the two day, three round
tourney. The CAA will boast VCU, Richmond, Old Do-
minion, UNC-W and American at the Bradford Creek as
well as South Carolina Aiken, Akron, Kentucky, Coastal
Carolina and Liberty.
Greenville and the Pirates are happy to host the
tournament which had been located in New Bern for
the last six years. The Sheraton-Emerald Intercollegiate
moved closer to home this spring, exciting not only
Coach Kevin Williams, but the Bradford Creek Golf
Club.
ECU INDIVIDUAL STANDINGS FROM CAA
TOURNAMENTLAST WEEKEND)
BRENT PADRICK 78-74-73-225 (T-17TH)
KEVIN MILLER 75-76-78-229 (22ND)
JOSH DICKINSON 77-80-74-231 (27TH)
NATHAN LASH 78-77-77- 232 (T-28TH)
DANIEL GRIFFIS 75-81-77-233 (T-31ST)
Remaining home baseball schedule-
April20 VCU vs ECU (cjh)
April21 VCU vs4 p.m. .ECU
May3 ODU vs.2 p.m. ECU (dh)
May4 ODU vs.6 p.m. ECU 7 p.m.
Don't
The Big South Conference recognized ECU
player, Joey Clark, as their player of the week for
the week ending April 15. With a .583 batting
average for the week, and blasting off against
Liberty pitching (she collected RBI's every time
she stepped up to the plate in the second game
of the doubleheader, and had two home runs)
Clark was honored for her accomplishments.
Teammate Tracie Podratsky was an honorable
mention selection for pitcher of the week.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Randy Rigsby takes a swing agianst UNC-W last weekend.
ECU had trouble swinging the bats against State, Tuesday.
club, but I feel that it should have
been a one or two run game, but
with the early deficit it made it aw-
fully hard to rally Overton said.
Starter Jeff Hewitt had his
troubles early giving up six runs off
of five hits in only one inning of
work. Hewitt loaded the bases for
reliever John Payne who would get
the Bucs out of the nightmarish
second inning.
"We showed our youth tonight
and that is something that we
haven't done all year and I don't
know why we did it now Overton
said.
The game would be interrupted
for four minutes due to a huge gust
of wind and threatening skies but
it was only a passing cloud and play
resumed.
"With all of the tornado activ-
ity in the past few days the umpires
were reluctant to continue, but it
was just a false alarm Overton
said.
The Pirates would finish the
game after the four minute wind de-
lay, and they would eventually give
up nine runs off of 13 hits and com-
mit one error.
"It could have been a lot closer
than the score indicates, but it just
got out of hand in the second wnen
See PACK page 22
s4t6lete lt&e ovee&
Dana Hulings
Will Sutton
Staff Writer
ECU women's softball catcher,
Dana Hulings, may be a bit shy and
soft-spoken, but do not be fooled.
She gets things done in fierce
fashion on the field. She is a hard-
nosed competitor with a deep desire
to help the Lady Pirates be the best.
This young lady comes from
Corry High School in Corry, Pa
where she was a standout performer.
She has played organized softball
since she was 13 years old. Even be-
fore she began to play softball, she
was a hard-hitting �
baseball player as
well. Playing with
the guys in her
younger years
may have helped
her in the years to
come.
"I recall play-
ing baseball when
I was younger and
it was different than softball
Hulings said. "It tended to be a little
more aggressive and physical, but I
did not mind at the time. I just
wanted to go out there and play, no
matter who was on the field
When it came time to play soft-
ball at the next the level beyond high
school, it was ECU that was her call-
ing. She liked the players and
coaches and feit it was her place to
play her college career. Hulings has
been a huge addition to the Lady
Pirates since coming here in 1994.
"I definitely enjoy playing de-
fense more so than I do offense
Hulings said. "I feel my hitting could
stand for some improvement. I feel
confident with defensive perfor-
mance so far. Overall, the coaching
staff here has helped me improve on
my hitting as well as my defense
more and more each season. I hope
this will continue
Hulings has started at catcher
for almost two seasons now. She is
also a two-time letter winner and
even played some women's baseball
over the summer of 1995. Recently,
she has had to make some adjust-
ments to new positions due to in-
jury.
Shortstop Sharolyn Strickland
broke a finger recently and has had
to sit out some games. Coach Sue
Manahan had to make a move. She
put Hulings at shortstop for last
weekend's two games with Univer-
sity of Maryland-Baltimore County
Hulings, though claiming to be a bit
rusty from not playing this position
for a while, showed off her flexible
athletic ability.
"Dana had a heck of a week-
end Coach Manahan said. "She
adjusted very well on defense and
had a tremendous bat at the plate.
She has shown how a true athlete
can adjust to almost anything. She
has now hit safely in five of the last
eight games. This is a big boost for
down the stretch run of the season
as we roll into tournament play
In the weekend stint with
UMBC, Hulings batted well in both
games. In game one she was two-
for-two with an RBI. Game two,
which she proclaims as her best
game of the sea-
son by far, she
went three-for-
four at the plate
with a home
run and three
RBI's. She still
leads the Lady
Pirates in home
runs for the
mm�-��� 1996 season.
Though the regular season is
now over and the post-season is only
a day away, Hulings can still reflect
back on a season that has been filled
with many tough opponents, includ-
ing some familiar big name foes.
"We have played a lot of tough
teams this season Hulings said.
"We have gone up against and usu-
ally have performed pretty well
against popular teams like North
Carolina and Florida State from the
ACC. Pehn State and the University
of South Florida are a couple oth-
ers. Since I have been here, I feel
our biggest rival would have to be
Campbell
The Lady Pirates will be head-
ing into the tournament as the num-
ber two seed out of the Big South
See WEEK page 22
"I definitely enjoy
playing defense
more so than I do
offense
� Dana Hulings
?�





day,
21
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
NOW LEASING
Swimming Pool, Tennis, Sand Volleyball, Basketbal
Fully Equipped Fitness Center
Clubhouse with giant screen TV
Pool Tables, MicrowavesIce Makers
Planned Social Events
'WasherDryer in each apartment
�Roommate Matching Service available V
Where weekends last
all week long!
1526 Charles BM
Across from Ficklen Stadium
Call Today 321-7613
Come in Today to
register for our $500
Giveaway1.
To be eligible to register,
come in for a five minute
tour of our facilities and
mention this ad. Drawing to
be held April 23,1996
NFL prepares for draft
ises might
appear during
Saturday's picks
'This isn't an
exact science"
MARK A. WARD
Attorne at Law
WI, l : ; i si
Bar c
�AV
24 l lot i Ml
TsT 752-7529
� n
See NFL page 22
April 22
HOOTIE AND THE BLOWFISH 9.98CD 7.98Cassette
Fairweather Johnson fr.T- n
BAREFOOT BANDS
I lTIIUI iw
Edwin McCain Band 13.98CD ! April 22 !
Midnight
Knocked Down Smilin
13.98CD
1 April 22 1
j$20FFj
New Drive Thru Hot Line
Call Ahead For Your Movies 758-9999
LI
exp 43096
II
TJootie & tl owlish
;t
?
'
1
On Sale Monday





22
Thursday, April 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
WANTED:
A qualified
candidate to put
TEC on-line this
fall. Must be
computer saw;
and have a
willingness to
fill all the
requirements
of the
electronic
editor's
position. Call
328-6366, or
stop by today
for more
information.
NFL from page 21
last two times the Saints picked
11th they took Shawn Knight (1987)
and Russell Erxleben (1979), who
make anyone's list of all-time worst
No. Is.
The Kansas City Chiefs has had
little luck with running backs.
In 1985, the Chiefs took Ethan
Horton in the first round.
Horton wasn't the answer and
finally became a decent tight end
with the Raiders, who love to resur-
rect other teams' busted No. Is. So
two years later, the Chiefs drafted
Paul Palmer, who was last seen try-
ing a comeback in the World
League.
More recently, they've taken
Harvey Williams (1991) and Greg
Hill (1994). Williams finally found
his niche with the Raiders (who
else?) and Hill has shown only
flashes.
Some teams look for insurance
with saturation drafts.
The Giants, in need of a run-
ning back, used their first pick in
1982 on Butch Woolfolk, then chose
Joe Morris in the second round.
Woolfolk had an undistinguished
career, but Morris ended up gaining
over 1,516 yards and scoring 22
touchdowns for New York's 1986
Super Bowl winner.
In 1988, seeking offensive line-
men, they used the 10th overall pick
on Eric Moore, just before Dallas
took wide'receiver Michael Irvin
with the 11th. In the second round.
New York grabbed left tackle Jumbo
Elliott, whose work on Bruce Smith
helped them win the 1991 Super
Bowl.
Bobby Beathard, one of the
most accomplished drafters ever,
hates first round picks and he's had
his share of second round busts, like
Tory Nixon and Walter Murray when
he was in Washington. But he still
prefers to trade out of the first
round - last year, he traded away
the San Diego Chargers' first-
rounder to move up in the second
round and take running back Terrell
Fletcher.
Typical Beathard?
In 1990, he arrived in San Di-
ego to find himself with the fifth
overall pick ui the draft.
"I don't think I know what to
do with a pick this high he said.
He took Junior Seau.
WEEK from page 20
Conference behind UNC-G. Hulings
admits the Lady Pirates easily
could have been a number one seed,
but that regardless of their seed-
ing, they will be a team to be reck-
oned with.
"Though UNC-G is the top
seed, we feel the winner of the tour-
nament this weekend will be the
true champion Hulings said. "We
look forward to the challenge and
cannot wait to play. We just hope
that everyone will be healthy for
the tournament
As for Hulings' future with the
Lady Pirates and beyond, there is
much to be said. She feels her par-
ents have always inspired her to
strive for excellence and never
settle for anything less. She claims
this has always kept her in a posi-
tive frame of mind.
"My parents have pushed me
my whole life, and I am glad they
did it Hulings said. "They would
like for me to continue to play ball
after college is over next year.
Maybe I will, who knows. Right now
I am concentrating on the present
task at hand, winning the confer-
ence championship. I feel this ac-
complishment at the end of my jun-
ior year will build my confidence
for next year as I will expected to
step up and become one the senior
leaders on the team
a AVIV from page 20
our club went down 6-0 Overton
said.
The Pack would allow the Bucs
only one run off of two hits which
came late in the ballgame.
"We really don't have to re-
group as much as we need to get
back to playing the baseball we're
capable of Overton said.
The next challenge will come
this weekend for the Bucs when the
Rams of Virginia Commonwealth
roll in for a three game CAA series.
This is a VCU dub that split with
N.C. State earlier in the year. The
Saturday doubleheader will start at
4pm and the two clubs will wrap it
up on Sunday at 2 p.m.
&y&)caiaoqdofaMqjof MM wo wen
fatalOg Mon- Sat. 10-6
me5ction 210�
Division Of
FREE
PREGNANCY
TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
� m. Jrk Jk T frL
I G M A
Presents the 15th annua
Band Party and Bikini Contest
The Headstone Ci
The Bottom Lion
Saturday April 20, 1996 12:00pm
700 East 10th Street (beside Darryl's Restaurant)
L
For Info about tickets or the bikini contest call 752-5543 Or 757-1005
or check out our web site � http:www.creative -designs.comkappa





The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 18, 1996
23
LA5 1 from page 20
from the north where some people
think hospitality is a condition sick
people are in, but this school for the
most part is a really cool place to
be.
And there's something for ev-
erybody. From intramural and rec-
reational activities, which by the
way, in my opinion is highly un-
derrated at this school consider-
ing we have one of the top pro-
grams in the country with far less
facilities to work with than other
schools in this state, to clubs and
organizations. There's no excuse
for being bored at ECU.
Need a

this
SUlHinci
It's a shame that some think
college is all about going down-
town and getting plastered, but its
really your last true chance to de-
fine the kind of individual you
want to be before entering that
ugly civilization they call "the real
world
I know for me. college is
about going to see live music, tak-
ing road trips to Atlantic Beach,
taking interesting classes and get-
ting to know my professors as
more than just the person at the
front of the lecture hall.
It's about staying up all night
with someone you think you love;
its about playing Dave Matthews
until you know the words of every
song not already on a CD.
Its about gossiping about
Barefoot, scoping babes at the Stu-
dent Store between classes, going
to Alfredo's at 2 a.m and riding
your bike to the Town Commons.
Most of all, its about meeting
and hanging out with people your
age and with your interests, being
friends with the kinds of people
you might have never talked to in
high school; and smiling a lot.
So as my college career in
both mediums began the same day,
they will aiso end the same day,
as I sit here and write my final
article for today's paper. Tonight
at 8 p.m 1 will host my last show.
You live. You learn. You gradu-
ate. You become Alumni.
Good-bye ECU.
If you will be a returning
student in the fall. University Housing
Services will be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Full and
part-time positions available. For details and
applications, please come to 214 Whichard.
E
DU
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Summer
School
'96
Become part of the purplecrowd
Accelerate your pace toward graduation
Get the degree that will change your
LIFE forever �"
See your advisor t
la
OH
i win mim
TEAMS from page 20
get better in the future due to the
talent that keeps coming in.
"The program has definitely
progressed, especially in the four
years I've been here Earnhardt
said. "We have better players com-
ing in every year
A new No. 1 position player
from Norway will come in next year
to help out the Lady Pirates.
Earnhardt came in as a fresh-
man with Allison DeBastiani, and
the two have made a formidable
combination for the past four years.
Senior Lisa Hadelman has also
been an outstanding player for the
Lady Pirates.
Sophomore Rachel Cohen will
carry the ECU women into the fu-
ture. The young talent is 13-1 (30-
4 in her career) and has played No.
2 singles for the majority of the
year.
The women will wrap things up
here on Saturday, when Ihey will
host Eton College at 1 p.m.
"I am only one, but I am one;
I cannot do everything. But I can do something.
�Canon Frederic William Farrar
For 35 years, Peace Corps volunteers around the world have been helping people to help
themselves. And for all they put in, they come back with something even greater:
a commitment to service and solving problems right here at home.
Peace Corps, for 35 years, changing America and changing the world.
To learn more about joining the Peace Corps, call or visit our web site:
1-800-424-8580
http:www.peacecorps.gov
PEACE CORPS
L
the toughest job you'l! ever love. f
The men's team (11-8. 3-4 CAA)
will head to Williamsburg, Va. this
weekend to play in the men's CAA
Tournament. The Pirates hope to
improve on their eighth place fin-
ish from last year, and will probably
be seeded fifth or sixth.
"We're looking to do a lot of
damage this weekend and finish the
season with a bang freshman
Derek Slate said.
ECU is loaded with young tal-
ent, especially Mallorca, Spain na-
tive Nils Alomar who boasts a
record of 11-2, playing at No. 2
singles as a sophomore.
Other notable players are jun-
ior Jason Freeman, sophomores
Kris Hutton and Josh Campbell and
freshmen Wes Kintner, Kenny Kirby
and Slate.
Slate believes each player
complements the others.
"We have taken each other to
another level Slate said.
The impact of the young play-
ers has already been felt, as they
have taken the Pirates from a los-
ing record to a winning one in just
a year's time.
"We've accomplished a lot for
such a young team Slate said.
The freshman have contributed
early as expected (Slate, Kintner,
and Kirby combined for 250 wins
in high school), and have learned a
lot this season.
The team has a tremendous
amount of depth and is expected
to play well for years to come as
their experience increases. The ho-
rizon looks good for the Pirate
netters.
SPEND THE
SUMMER
i ELVIS
OK, SO ELVIS IS OUR DOG, BUT HE
KNOWS GOOD HELP WHEN HE SEES
rf AND HE WANTS VOUTO COME JOIN
OUR HIGH ADVENTURE STAFF AT
CAMP CAROLINA. YOU'LL GET THE
EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME THIS
SUMMER. MOUNTAIN BIKE
PROSMECHANICS, ROCK CLIMBING
GUIDES, TENNIS INSTRUCTORS, ARTS
AND CRAFTS INSTRUCTORS,
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATORS, CDL
DRIVERS AND CABIN COUNSELORS
NEEDED. CALL CHA-CHA, ROB, DAN,
ALFRED OR NATH FOR MORE
INFORMATION: 1-800-5K-9136
CAMP CABOUWA BACKCIXWTRY
PjO. BOX 919, BREARD, NC 28712
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
amount is greater, up to a
$55,000 limit. The offer
applies to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
75605
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
B
to





rnji-if� i-jtti
24
Thursday, April 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
CON-GRAD-ULATIONS
How about a new car or truck - you've earned one,
now your gonna need one!
Your degree and job Guarantee you loan
a D D TO Va I ! Even if you have no, good or slow credit
HI

��
t
Mr
V
��
� I

Si
IU
� II
� II
� II
� I
9�
���
JKHI
���
Special College Graduate Rebates in Addition to regular
rebates!
ALSO, WE HAVE A HUGE
SELECTION OF
DEPENDABLE USED
VEHICLES WITH WAR-
RANTIES FROM $4,000
If you need a ride, call us,
we'll come get you!
NEW BERN pontiac
HWY 70 EAST - NEW BERN
800-849-3025
MAZDA
GREENVILLE
HWY 70 EAST
NEW BERN
PONTIAC MAZDA
-5"
m i miii.i.npwpMHiB





Title
The East Carolinian, April 18, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 18, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1141
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58624
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy