The East Carolinian, April 16, 1996






TUE&
April 16,1996
Vol71,No. 54
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
24 pases
bss�s sis- .mss'm
Around the State
MORGANTON, N.C. (AP) - A
Burke County fire that killed two
children has prompted state officials
to encourage social workers to
check for smoke detectors during
home visits in child abuse and ne-
glect cases.
Had social service officials al-
ready been doing such checks, they
might have prevented the deaths of
1-year-old Zacheriah and 3-year-old
Angelica Cooper on March 1, accord-
ing to child advocates and fire offi-
cials.
LITTLETON, N.C. (AP) - A
Halifax County woman remained
missing after an intense search this
weekend gave no clues to her where-
abouts.
Barbara Jeffers, 56, was last
seen Tuesday night attending a
meeting at Littleton Baptist Church,
where she was the part-time secre-
tary, authorities said.
Up to 300 investigators and vol-
unteers searched around the Lake
Gaston area Friday and Saturday but
found no sign of Jeffers, who is over-
weight and suffers from diabetes
and high blood pressure. Her 1993
Mercury Sable also is missing.
Around the Country
SYLAMORE, Ark. (AP) - A tor-
nado bounced through three Arkan-
sas counties, killing seven people as
it ripped r-ofs off houses, uprooted
trees and destroyed a mountain
tourist campground, authorities
said.
At least 30 people were injured
when Sunday night's twister tore
through northern Arkansas' Ozarks,
doing much of the damage on the
first big tourist weekend at the Holi-
day Mountain Resort in Izard
County.
The tornado first hit the town
of Allison in Stone County, bounced
c er the White River into the
Sylamore area of Izard County,
about 80 miles north of Little Rock.
FRENCHTOWN, Mont. (AP) -
The discovery of a body in the
wreckage of a derailed freight train
delayed the unloading of chlorine
from overturned tankers.
Officials believe the unidenti-
fied victim found Sunday was a
homeless person who had been
riding the rails. An autopsy was
scheduled for Monday.
Crews had planned to be-
gin removing chlorine from the first
of three overturned tankers Sunday,
but the work was postponed until
Monday after the body was discov-
ered.
Around the World
EAST LONDON. South Africa
(AP) - A bomb threat interrupted
historic hearings Monday aimed at
digging up the secrets and healing
the wounds of the killings, torture
and disappearances of apartheid-era
South Africa.
An hour after he opened the
hearings with a prayer. Archbishop
Desmond Tutu halted testimony and
informed a packed auditorium at
East London's city hall that a bomb
threat had been phoned in and po-
lice would conduct a security sweep.
Election controversy continues
Some SGA
leaders voice
concern over
rulings
Tambra Zion
Editor
An announcement of review
board decisions from an April 11 hear-
ing evoked questions from the legis-
lative body in last night's Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA) meeting.
A few members of the SGA legis-
lature were concerned about the re-
view board's rulings for several rea-
sons including the allegation by Jus-
tin Conrad that it disrupts the checks
and balances system which exists be-
tween the legislative and judiciary
branches. He said the legislature
should rule on such decisions.
According to election regulations,
however, the Election Committee
(made up of the 19 poll takers and
the election chair and vice chair) re-
tains sole responsibility for the elec-
tions: if a complainant disagrees with
an Election Committee decision, they
can appeal to the review board, which
then makes another ruling.
During the April 10 meeting, the
Elections Committee ruled not to hear
complaints filed after a filing exten-
sion was given during a special meet-
ing called between Election Chair
Penn Crawford, SGA Adviser and
Dean of Students Ron Speier and the
candidates on April 8.
"The (election) rules say com-
plaints are to be heard by poll ten-
ders Crawford said when questioned
about the special meeting on April 8.
"I don't think it's fair for poll tenders
to hear complaints about poll ten-
ders
SGA Speaker of the House Harry
Bray recommended that the Election
Committee not hear the additional
complaints filed by Presidential can-
didates John Lynch and Angie Nix and
Secretarial candidate J. Miles Layton,
because they were not filed within the
48 hours required by election regula-
tions and because the April 8 meet-
ing was not official. The Election Com-
mittee decided to hear only the two
original complaints filed by Nix and
Lynch.
The review board overturned the
Election Committee's ruling in stat-
See ELECTION page 8
Smooth rhythms
Accident leaves
student in coma
Sherri Parrish
Staff Writer
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
The Jazz Band performed in concert Friday evening to a crowd of dvidjazz enthusists.
The performance, which was held at 7 p.m. in Wright Auditorium, was well received.
An ECU .student still lays in a
coma following a head-on collision
that occurred over Spring Break.
Kelly Parker, an 18-year-old fresh-
man majoring in vocal performance,
remains in stable condition in the
Critical Care Unit of the New Hanover
Regional Medical Center in
Wilmington.
"Now Kelly's stable and she's al-
ways been a fighter her mother,
Sandra Parker, said. "But the doctors
can't really tell us anything, not yet"
The accident occurred the
evening of Sunday. March 10. around
5:50 p.m. as Parker, her mother and
grandmother were driving home to
Jacksonville from Myrtle Beach.
The accident happened just 15
minutes from home, in Verona. NC.
According to the accident report
a car Irweling in the south-bound lane
failed to negotiate a curve and trav-
Kelly Parker
eled across the center lane, striking
Parker's car head on.
As a result Parker's grandmother
was killed and her mother, who was
See COMA page 8
Action taken after Multimedia instruction to liven lectures
weekend shooting
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
UNC-Chopel Hill
cancels all
remaining parties
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Last Sunday, a drive-by shooting
occurred on the UNC-Chapel Hill
(UNC) campus. The incident hap-
pened at approximately 1:35 a.m fol-
lowing a dance that had been held
at the Carmichael Gym, according to
the UNC Police Department.
A young man opened fire into
the crowd stand-
ing outside of the
gym, shooting a
man that had
come out of the
building. The two
men had appar-
ently exchanged
words prior to the
incident. Three ar-
rests have been
made, including the man who opened
fire along with the other two men
that accompanied him in the car. The
man who opened fire was arrested
for assault with a deadly weapon with
the intent to kill. The men were visi-
tors on campus that weekend.
The man who was shot is in fair
condition at the present time. He had
been shot in the right leg with a bul-
let, which had to be removed through
surgery. This is the first occurrence
of an incident of this nature at UNC.
As a result of this incident, all
but two late night events that were
to be held on the campus have been
canceled.
"Our primary concern in doing
this is the safety and security of the
students here said Fred Schroeder,
dean of students at UNC.
Schroeder said that the stu-
dents' reaction is one of surprise, not
only because of the actual incident
but also because of the action taken
in canceling the events.
There are a number of commit-
tees that are involved in making a
decision regarding the cancellation
of student events. The Police Depart-
ment, the National PanHellenic
Council Commit-
tee, the Dean of
Students. Caro-
lina Union (UNC
student union), a
Safety Commit-
tee and an Emer-
gencies Commit-
tee were all in-
volved.
Students
here at ECU have complained that
the action taken isn't fair to the other
students at UNC.
"The incident that happened
was just a random act said junior
history major Lucas Berrini. "Why
should all of the other students be
penalized? It is right for them to look
out for the students' safety, but they
should realize that it was just one
incident and hopefully it won't hap-
pen again
See SHOOT page 8
Technological advances at ECU
are now making traditional lecture
classes more interesting.
Computer Information Services
(CIS), along with the Vice Chancel-
lor of Business Affairs Richard
Brown, have teamed up to create the
Multimedia Instruction Initiative
(Mil). This new system will allow fac-
ulty to integrate lessons and experi-
ments with technology and comput-
ers through the use of laptop and
portable computers.
Twelve teams of two faculty
members each are currently working
on the project. The teams were se-
lected from some 80 proposals sub-
mitted by the faculty. Most of them
came from professors that already
had experience with technology in
the classroom.
Mil was originally created in
March 1995, when the 24 faculty pro-
posals were sent out. However, it
wasn't until September and October
of that year when the equipment was
received and CIS began to work with
p ofessors on the project's develop-
ment.
"Many professors started out
feeling very apprehensive about the
whole idea said Ernest Marshburn,
Associate Director of CIS. "It takes
many extra hours of work. But they
have all adapted quickly and are now
enjoying it
The project has continued to
build on its foundation of a $13 mil-
lion fiber optic system to move digi-
See MEDIA page 8
"The incident that
happened was just
a random act"
� Lucas Berrini, junior
history major
�. : � : �
Photo Courtesy of ECU News Bureau
Don Sexauer, center, demonstrates the use of a laptop computer in presenting an art
lecture. Many students will soon become familiar with this new teaching technique.
Thomas Brothers Band set to open Barefootpage I �-
Brace yourself for examspage v7
SPORTJw
Women's swim team wins CAA championshippage I O
'pVUCOAt
& t xeacA ui
Tuesday
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
Sunny
High
Low
80
54
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTECECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





III 11 � II
'
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
Career Expo Checklist
Formhrt
"Making Career Connections"
Register at Career services early in your last academic year.
You will be able to put resumes and three letters of reference on file
in a central location.
Attend workshops on the job search, resume writing, and inter-
viewing These are always announced in TEC announcement section.
You can begin to contact employers on your own during Fall Break.
Use the resource rooms of Career Services to learn more about
companies arid government agencies.
Pirate Club offers free membership to seniors. You can meet em-
ployers through organizations like this, contact local alumni chapters
and attend.
Forjunhn
"Career Exploration
Is there a club or organization in your major? Consider joining the
Law Society, SAM, AMA, SCEC. Consider helping set up a program or
inviting a speaker.
Speak to employers who understand the courses in your major.
The employers or professors might be your references later.
Are there ECU alumni from your department who could speak to
your campus groups? Talk to people doing the type of work in which
you were interested.
Start to list your work experiences, schools attended, honors &
activities, and possible references which will make up your resume.
Co-op and your advisors may help as you search for related experi-
ences.
For sophomores
"Choosing a Major for Your Career"
. Choose a major. Find out from graduates about some of the jobs
you might eventually do.
If you. have not chosen a major
-Review all majors available listed in ECU catalog.
-Visit departmental offices and talk to professors and students
already in �
that major.
-Visit Counseling Center (described in catalog) which can help
you look
at your strengths.
Try for some relevant work experience, looking on your own and
letting people know you appreciate any help offered.
Read about CO-OP (Cooperative education in GCB 2300) in cata-
log. Internships, Semesters of WorkSchool, part-time work, summer
jobs or other options may be available.
For Frtshtntn
"How to Get a Good Career Start"
Future employers state that good performance in school shows "work
habits Perfect attendance almost guarantees good grades.
The common courtesy of letting a professor know in advance when
you must miss a class might develop a better relationship.
Enjoy the opportunity to meet people. Residence halls and classes
provide a place to learn about many ideas. Let positive peer example
help you.
Campus and public libraries or Career Services have much career
information. Try the Occupational Outlook Handbook.
SICI PLUS computer program at Career Services or Counseling
Center can be great to research careers, salaries expected and education
needed.
Fraternity does hard labor for Greenville shelter
Each member to
volunteer 36 hours
a month in fall
Debra Byrne
StmffWHfr
An ECU fraternity has volun-
teered their much needed services to
a local organization.
This past weekend, Phi Kappa
Psi did volunteer work at the
Greenville Community Shelter lo-
cated at 207 Manhattan Ave. The
fraternity's philanthropy is the shel-
ter.
In previous years, Phi Kappa Psi
has put on "Cool Aid" This event is
a three band party which is held at
the downtown Attic. Proceeds col-
lected from this event are given to
the shelter. However, the fraternity
did not think enough money was
being collected to help.
Member Bryan Savage came up
Weekend introduces
students to campus
Rochelle D. Ovvsley
Staff Writw
Minority Visitation Day allows
minorities the opportunity to see
ECU'S campus
up close and to network with other
minorities. They also get the oppor-
tunity to get ad-
minorities hold two percent of
ECU'S population
This year Minority Visitation
Day was held in Mendenhall on the
ECU campus on Saturday, April 13
at 8:30 a.m. by the office of admis-
sions. ECU has held Minority Visi-
tation Day for the past eight years.
Activities included five work-
shops on choos-
with a proposal that their fraternity
do volunteer work for the shelter.
This is the first year which they have
done this.
Volunteers worked from 10 a.m.
until 1 p.m. on Saturday and signed
up for volunteer times on Sunday as
well. The fraternity did various work
such as spreading mulch, painting
poles and doors and yard work.
Savage said the day went really
well.
"We all worked hard for three
hours and got a lot of work done
Savage said. "This is something we
hope to continue doing because we
had a lot of fun doing it
Member Randy Currin said they
want to do this more. In the fall they
plan to have each member of the fra-
ternity volunteer at the shelter for
36 hours a month.
"Volunteer work is badly needed
at the shelter and all around
Greenville Currin said. "It is over-
looked in this city and a lot needs to
be done. Anyone who wants to vol-
unteer should because there is not a
lot of money to build the grounds at
the shelter or around the city
Rommi Drozdov. executive direc-
tor of the shelter said the fraternity
has always volunteered for them, but
this was the first time such a large
group participated. She said the
funds they raise from their "Cool
Aid" band party has helped a great
deal since 80 percent of their fund-
ing comes from community groups.
"It is a tremendous benefit to
have them come out here Drozdov
said. "We are a non-profit organiza-
tion so we are short on funds. We
could not have paid someone to come
out here and do the work that they
did for us
There are plenty of volunteer
opportunities at the shelter
duringdyatime hours andweekends,
inside and outside. Some of the work
needed is ground work, cleaning and
answering the phones.
If arm group or individual is in-
terested in volunteering at the
Greenville Community Shelter, they
can call 752-0829.
"African-
Americans hold
the largest
percentage of the
minorities
currently on
ditional support
services to help
with the transi-
tion from high
school to col-
lege by offering
specialized
workshops. The
annual event
celebrates and
recognizes the
minority stu-
dents who have
been accepted
as freshmen.
Carolina
Association of
College Registrars and Admissions
Officers (CACRAO) recruit minor-
ity students annually.
"CACRAO travels to high
schools in North and South Caro-
lina said Kemal Atkins, admis-
sions counselor.
The term minority applies not
only to African-Americans but also
to Asian-Americans and others.
"African-Americans hold the
largest percentage of the minorities
currently on campus Atkins said.
"They hold ten percent and other
.�
campus
� Kemal Atkins, admissions
counselor
ing a major, cam-
pus life, clubs and
activities and be-
ing a successful
student. A special
parents' work-
shop was also in-
cluded.
Students
got a tour of the
campus that in-
eluded
Mendenhall. The
students were
also told about
meal plans and
annual activities
held on campus. Clubs and organi-
zations then met with some of the
students to promote getting in-
volved in campus activities. Clubs
set up booths and spoke about their
organizations.
Students met and spoke with
other minority students, faculty
and staff. These meetings were held
See WEEKEND page 8
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
Moo-ve it on
over to a job at
The East
Carolinian this
summer.
Call
328-
6366
for more
information!
Student honored with play production
A'
ATTENTION EASTENDERS AND
FANS OF BRISTISH TV!

Dan Abramson, editor of "The Walford
Gazette"and publisher of "British
Television" will be speaking in
Greenville on April 27. For Further
information call Judi Willis at 355-7374.
Jj
is
21st Century f
Young acting
troupe's first
performance on
May 17th
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
A junior majoring in middle
grades education is being rewarded
for his literary skills and contribu-
tion to the arts.
On May 17, a play called The
Civil Outpost will premier at Cra-
ven Community College. The au-
thor of the play is W.A. Tony Spivey,
a non-traditional, vocational reha-
bilitation honor student.
Spivey's play was adopted by a
young acting troupe that had read
some of Spivey's earlier work. The
play has since been published and
is scheduled for production in May.
Spivey said he wrote his first
play in senior high school in 1975.
Later, he joined the Marine Corps
where he said he did not have time
to write. After his release from the
Marines, Spivey said he went to
Carteret Community College and
later transferred to ECU for some
creative writing classes.
Spivey said a new class (Drama
260) was created at Craven Com-
munity College (CCC) because of
his work after the head of the fine
arts division saw the written play
and decided it would be useful as a
graduation exercise.
"They took my play (The Civil
Outpost) and created a class so they
could teach it. produce it and put
it on Spivey said.
Spivey said he entered college
in order to become a writer but has
since decided to pursue a career in
teaching.
"That does not mean I will give
up writing Spivey said. "1 con-
tinue to take all of the English and
creative writing classes I can. Writ-
ing is my passion
Spivey said he has been asked
by several organizations to con-
tinue writing plays, and he plans
to do so. Presently, Spivey is asso-
ciated with Taylor-Spivey Produc-
tions, an agency based in Havelock.
"My goal is to continue to write
until I am noticed he said.
In many ways, Spivey has
reached that goal. He is already a
nationally published poet with his
most recent publication having
been in The Advocate, a literary
journal based in New York.
Spivey said he is now in the
process of co-writing a novel which
is almost complete. Spivey said he
takes every opportunity he receives
to write very seriously.
John Taylor, a literary agent
from Taylor-Spivey Productions
said he is proud of Spivey's accom-
plishments and that they are all
worthy of merit.
"Such talent is sometimes lost
within a university of the size and
stature of ECU Taylor told TEC.
"This is an unfortunate fact, but I
feel (Spivey's) story could serve as
an inspiration to other writers�es-
pecially non-traditional students
who return to college after complet-
ing other careers
Computer science majors top job market
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CPS - For some graduating se-
niors, the job search is fairly painless.
Take for example, Chris
Woolford, a senior economics major
at the University of Chicago, who had
four job offers to choose from this
spring: one from a small merchant
bank in Chicago, two from large in-
vestment banks in New York and even
one from the European Parliament in
Brussels.
Woolford, who will graduate near
the top of his class, credits much of
his success to an early start on the
job search process. Last fall, he got a
stack of resumes together and began
sending them out to investment banks
and consulting firms around the na-
tion.
Then, working through UC's ca-
reer services office, he began lining
up on-campus interviews with poten-
tial employers. By January, he had
scheduled as many as 20 interviews a
week.
"It was a very tiring process, just
going through all the thank you let-
ters he said.
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In the end, Woolford accepted the
job offer with the merchant bank in
Chicago and will be making about
$35,000 a year when he starts work
in August.
For other graduating seniors, the
job search is more frustrating. Paula
Simon, a nursing major at Viterbo
College in LaCrosse. Wis sent her
resume out to hospitals in Arizona,
Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon and
Washington.
So far. there have been no job
offers for Simon. In fact, there have
been no interviews, either - until to-
day. At long last, she has an interview
in April with an Albuquerque hospi-
tal.
"I kind of, like, begged for it she
said.
Frustrating. Tiring. Depressing.
As graduation looms, these are the
words many nervous seniors are us-
ing to describe their job search.
But the outlook for graduating
seniors - and there are 1.2 million in
the Class of 1996 - is optimistic.
New college graduates can look
forward to a friendlier job market
coupled with significant increases in
starting salaries, according to a new
survey by the National Association of
Colleges and Employers, a group that
tracks the job search process.
Overall, 53 percent of 359 career
services offices surveyed said they
expected to see increased recruiting
on their campuses this spring. Recruit-
ing, which includes the number of on-
campus employer visits, interviews
and job postings, is up compared to
last year, the survey found.
Computer science majors con-
Dress To Impress
Arlington Village Greenville
919321 � 1714
tinue to top the list of graduates in
high demand, the,survey revealed.
These grads also can expect to receive
a 2.5 percent higher starting salary
this year - roughly $34,565. The em-
ployers seeking out "techies" are soft-
ware development companies, consult-
ing firms and computer and business
equipment manufacturers.
Engineering grads are also in
demand this year as a result of an in-
crease in manufacturing opportuni-
ties. Electrical, computer, mechanical
and industrial engineers can look for-
ward to a raise in starting salaries, to
about $37,000. the survey said.
Unfortunately, the students who
endeavor in humanities and social
sciences might not fare as well, the
survey found. English grads can ex-
pect an average staring salary of about
$22,000, which is 1.6 percent lower
than last year's salary. Starting sala-
ries are also down 7.5 percent for so-
ciology grads. to about $20,041.
Although the job market has still
not caught up to the hiring levels ex-
perienced by 3989 grads, employment
opportunities for new grads have risen
since the economic recession of the
early 1990s, according to an annual
survey of reci uiting trends by Michi-
Sce MAJORS page 8
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1 l II IIII�� II��T- i
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
Unabomber tied
CPS - F rmer colleagues and
classmates of Unabomber suspect
Theodore John Kaczynski expressed
surprise that the quiet, studious man
they knew could be responsible for
an 18-year deadly bombing spree.
At the same time, many univer-
sity officials also expressed relief that
an arrest had finally been made and
that the attacks may be over.
Even as federal investigators con-
tinued to search for clues that would
link the reclusive former mathemat-
ics professor to the Unabomber at-
tacks, those who knew him or had
been targeted by Unabomber attacks
shared their thoughts to college re-
porters.
The Unabomber's first victim was
Buckely Crist, a Northwestern Univer-
sity engineering professor who was
not injured when a mail-bomb ex-
ploded in 1978. Crist told the Daily
Northwestern reporters that
Kaczynski's arrest all but closed the
case in his eyes.
"I'm delighted the case has been
resolved he told them. "It was a long,
long time ago
Ron Muersch. who graduated
from a suburban Chicago high school
with Kaczynski, told the Daily North-
western he could not remember who
the reclusive teenager's friends were.
"I remember that he was very
quiet Muersch, who is now a police
detective, said.
Northwestern's campus was the
target of the Unabomber's first two
attacks in the course of an 18-year
bombing spree that would kill three
and injure 23 others.
"We were in kind of a special situ-
ation here at Northwestern, because
the story hit so close to home said
Heather Lalley. a junior who is the
assistant managing editor at the Daily
Northwestern.
"It's been on the minds of a lot
of students, because it's gone on so
long Lalley said.
The arrest answered an important
question for many Northwestern stu-
dents, said Dennis Brack, a junior who
is the editor-in-chief of the Daily
Northwestern.
"There's been so much specula-
tion that he went here Brack said.
"That kind of put that all to an end
The opposite was true at Harvard
University and the University of Michi-
gan at Ann Ar-
bor, where stu-
dent reporters
found them-
selves writing
about one of
their own.
Kaczynski re-
ceived a
bachelor's de-
gree in math-
ematics from
Harvard in
1962. and he
completed his
Ph.D. in the same subject at Michi-
gan in 1967.
According to The Harvard Crim-
son. Kaczynski was remembered by
some classmates as a serious student.
although quiet.
"I think he was a pretty good
math major. I knew the name, and 1
"I think he was a
pretty good math
major. I knew the
name, and I knew
of him
� Donald P. Ballovv,
graduate of the class of 1962
� m m
Seven year-old pilot laid to rest
PESCADERO, Calif. (AP) -
Strangers gathered with family
and friends under gloomy skies
Monday to remember Jessica
Dubroff. the 7-year-old girl whose
pursuit of a flying record brought
tragedy and misgivings.
Jessica's funeral was ex-
pected to draw hundreds of
people and possibly include a
flyover by her 9-year-old brother,
Joshua. Joshua takes flying les-
sons, and it was not clear whether
he or his flight instructor would
be piloting the plane that his
mother, Lisa Hathaway, indicated
would make the flyover.
The service was to be held in
the child's hometown on the Cali-
fornia coast nearly 40 miles south
of San Francisco. Burial was
planned in a nearby cemetery where
she used to ride her bike.
Jessica was attempting to be-
come the youngest pilot to cross the
continent when her small plane
crashed in Wyoming on Thursday.
Her father qnd fliglt inst
Oren shouldn't be allowed to fly.
Others have wondered whether the
dream of flying across the country
was Jessica's or her parents
A funeral Mass was said Mon-
day morning for the flight instruc-
tor, Joe Reid. and more than 500
people attended a vigil for him Sun-
day evening. Lloyd Dubroff's fu-
neral was planned for Tuesday.
Jessica took off on Wednesday
from Half Moon Bay, Calif and
was headed to Falmouth, Mass.
Her single-engine plane went
down in Cheyenne shortly after
she took off from that stopover in
an icy rainstorm. Investigators
have said the plane was over-
loaded.
The attempt at the record ap-
parently had already failed on the
first leg, when Reid took the con-
trols several times, according to
Jessica's mother.
See FLY page 7
knew of him said Donald P. Ballow.
a graduate of the class of 1962 and a
fellow mathematics concentrator, to
The Crimson.
Valerie MacMillan. a Harvard
University sopho-
more and news re-
porter at The Crim-
son, said she and
other reporters im-
mediately began call-
ing alumni who
might have know
Kaczynski.
"That wasn't
very fruitful she
said, explaining that
many alumni had
trouble recalling a
quiet classmate they
may have known more than 30 years
ago. Several professors who knew
Kaczynski. such as his adviser, are
dead.
As far as reaction on the Harvard
campus, "people are surprised. People
are talking about it MacMillan said.
But. it would be different if it
was a current student she said. "It
was 1962 - obviously none of us were
here
Several professors at Michigan
did remember Kaczynski. who spent
his graduate years there before accept-
ing a short-lived job teaching math at
the University of California at Berke-
ley.
Michigan mathematics professor
Peter Duren. who worked with
Kaczynski on his doctoral thesis de-
scribed him to The Michigan Daily
as "individualistic and meticulously
neat
"He was very independent, very
serious and very smart Duren said.
"A real analytical mind. When he was
at Michigan. 1 don't think he was po-
litical. If he's the Unabomber. that's a
different person than the one 1 knew
Kaczynski dedicated his life to his
studies while he was at the university.
Duren said.
"At the time he was really
wrapped up in mathematics Duren
said.
Another Michigan professor.
Charles Morris, said he was search-
ing for a link between Kaczynski and
the late James McConnell as leader
in the area of behaviorism, and told
the Daily that "someone could have
been mightily offended" by
McConnell's outspoken approach.
"Behaviorism takes the view
that human beings are largely control-
lable Morris said. "The Unabomber
might have taken that as offense to
his philosophy
However, a UM spokesperson
said there was no known connection
between Kaczynski and the profes-
sor who was a Unabomber victim.
At the University of California at
Berkeley, where the Unabomber
struck twice and Kaczynski taught
for two years in the 1960s, the Daily
Californian?, staff writers stumbled
across an odd connection that they
called "an eerie coincidence
During a search of school
records, they discovered that the
small cottage Kaczynski lived in
while a faculty member was later
rented to Rosebud Abigail Denovo.
She was an activist who was killed
by police four years ago when she
broke into Berkeley Chancellor
Chang-Lin Tien's home wielding a
machete.
And although Berkeley spokes-
person Marie Felde was telling report-
ers that "people don't remember
Kaczynskil the student reporters
managed to find people who did.
"We talked to a couple of pro-
fessors who were here when he
worked here said Erin Allday. a se-
nior and news editor for the Daily
Californian.
The professors described
Kaczynski as "reclusive" and "retir
ing For the most part, their reac
tion was �"wow. 1 can't believe it
Allday said.
"I just remember that he was'
very quiet and withdrawn said Ber
keley math professor Donald
Saranson to the Daily Californian.
"Which is probably why I and others
don't remember him very well
Students also talked to a female
staff member in Berkeley's Cory Hall,
where in 1985, a bomb blasted
through the second floor.
"We're happy the woman said.
"We hope they hang him from the
eyeballs
downtown across from the courthouses
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16,1996
Marines refuse to give up DNA
Men face jail time
and dishonorable
discharge
HONOLULU (AP) - A court-
martial opened Monday for two
Marines who refused to give blood
samples for a DNA registry de-
signed to help the Pentagon iden-
tify servicemen's remains.
' Cpl. John C. Mayfield III. 21,
and Cpl. Joseph Vlacovsky, 25, fear
the "genetic dogtags" could be
used against them in the future,
though they haven't said precisely
how.
They plan to call as an expert
witness the co-author of a study-
that found that many people with
genes linked to certain diseases
have been discriminated against by
insurance companies, employers
and others.
The Marines face six months in
jail and a dishonorable discharge
if convicted of willfully disobeying
an order. The non-jury trial got
under way in front of a military
judge at Kaneohe Marine Base.
The Pentagon has been collect-
ing DNA samples from service mem-
bers for three years and has stored
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more than 1 million specimens in
Gaithersburg, Md.
The plan was to save the
samples for 75 years for use in iden-
tifying remains. But because of the
legal challenge and congressional
pressure, the Pentagon announced
last week it will keep the samples
for only 50 years, strictly limit the
circumstances under which they
can be released, and allow person-
nel to have their specimens de-
stroyed when they leave the service.
Dr. Paul Billings of the
Stanford University School of Medi-
cine, who will testify for the defense
at the court-martial, said that the
Pentagon program still lacks safe-
guards to protect people's privacy.
"This is the very first case of
anybody in the United States be-
ing threatened with jail time and
potentially a fine for not contrib-
uting to a DNA bank Billings said.
Billings was co-authcr of a
study, published in Science and En-
gineering Ethics, that said 455 of
917 people who responded to a
questionnaire reported they had
been discriminated against for ge-
netic reasons. Although not sick,
they lost jobs, insurance, chances
at adoption and educational oppor-
tunities.
Eleven states have passed laws
making it a crime for insurers or
employers to discriminate against
people because of their genetic
makeup. Twenty other states and
Congress are considering such leg-
islation as scientific breakthroughs
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make it easier to identify genes
linked to disease.
In the Hawaii cast, defense at-
torney Eric Seitz has said the or-
der to submit blood samples was
unlawful, and the American Civil
Liberties Union of Hawaii has
agreed, citing the Fourth Amend-
ment protection against unreason-
able searches.
"The law is clear that the
mandatory compulsory taking of
blood and bodily fluid constitutes
a search, and is therefore subject
to scrutiny said Vanessa Chong,
executive director of the ACLU.
Marine spokesman Capt. John
Milliman said the case has nothing
to do with the Constitution: "This
is merely to find out whether or not
these two Marines are guilty of dis-
obeying a lawful order as given by
a superior officer
Seitz said Sunday he had
hoped the Pentagon's softened
stance would lead the Marine Corps
to drop the charges. But Milliman
said the decision was not expected
to affect the trial.
The two Marines have also filed
a class-action lawsuit to stop the
program. The case is pending be-
fore a federal appeals court.
Another service member, Air
Force Sgt. Warren Sinclair, faces a
court-martial April 25 on the same
charge for refusing to give blood
for a DNA sample.
Sinclair, stationed at Scott Air
Force Base in Illinois, told The New
York Times he felt the order vio-
lated his constitutional rights. "I
put a high value on my genes he
said.
Seitz said he expects the corps
will punish his clients.
The Marines "feel the need to
make an example out of my cli-
ents he said. "And I'm not sur-
prised. They are the military
Finding a job with
TheEast
Carolinian is easier
than you think.
Just stop by and
pick up an
application from
our secretary. We
are located on the
second floor of the
Student
Publications
building.
Clinton negotiates
Korean peace talks
CHEU-DO, South Korea (AP) -
President Clinton will propose uncon-
ditional peace talks between North
and South Korea with the United
States and China as participants, U.S.
officials said.
The president was expected to
seek final approval for the initiative
in a meeting with South Korea Presi-
dent Kim Young-sam on this resort
island Tuesday morning, Korean time.
Discussions about the proposal have
been under way quietly for about two
months, an offi-
cial said, speak-
ing on condition
of anonymity.
Until now,
the United States
has insisted that
North and South
Korea negotiate
directly with each
other on a perma-
nent peace ac-
cord to the long-
unsettled Korean
conflict.
North Korea
has tried to force
the United States
into direct nego-
tiations, which
would put South
Korea into a sec-
ondary role.
Clinton's initia-
tive is a new dip-
lomatic formula
for a peace pro-
cess.
Some U.S.
told reporters he was optimistic about
maintaining peace on the Korean Pen-
insula, which was devastated in the
1950-53 war in which the United
States and its U.N. allies backed the
South against the North and its Chi-
nese and Soviet defenders.
The war ended with an armistice'
instead of a formal peace treaty; the
Demilitarized Zone was established to
keep the two sides separated Today,
the DMZ is the most heavily fortified
border area in the world.
"We're work-
We're working on
ways not only to
keep the nuclear
problem under
control and
eventually
eliminate it, but
also to try to do
what we can to
promote an
ultimate
reconciliation and
an end to the
conflict
� Clinton
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officials believe that North Korea
staged military incursions into the
Demilitarized Zone earlier this month
after learning about the initiative.
That way, North Korea could claim the
United States was reacting to its move,
in a form of concession.
Clinton has tried to make peace-
making a hallmark of his presidency,
boasting of efforts in the Mideast,
Haiti, Bosnia and Northern Ireland.
Any movement in the 43-year-old Ko-
rean stalemate would be an election-
year plus for the president
After a 20-hour flight from Wash-
ington, Clinton arrived here before
dawn. Accompanied by his wife,
Hillary, the president was greeted by
Kim and his wife at a seaside hotel.
"We're glad to be here the president
said, complimenting Kim on the
beauty of the island in the early morn-
ing hours.
Kim said he hoped Clinton would
be able to see more of the island at-
tractions and the president replied,
"Time will take care of that"
In their talks at a hotel abutting
the East China Sea, Clinton also was
expected to reaffirm to Kim that the
United States is committed to defend-
ing the South while urging the North
to stop violating the border area.
About 37,000 U.S. troops are sta-
tioned in South Korea.
During a refueling stop in Alaska
en route from Washington, Clinton
ing on ways not'
only to keep the'
nuclear problem
under control and'
eventually elimi
nate it but also to'
try to do what we
can to promote an �
ultimate reconcile
ation and an end
to the conflict
Clinton said. "If
that could hap
pen, then the
world would be V
much safer place �
- the whole jj
world J
The nuclear J
problem to which
Clinton referred
was North Korea's !i
attempts to create
a nuclear weapons j
capability. In Oc- J
tober 1994 the jj
United States ne-
gotiated directly ji
with the North to achieve a deal pro- j
viding new nuclear power reactors to �
the North in exchange for its forswear-
ing any nuclear arms ambitions. ;
Some believe that by dealing di- ;
rectly with North Korea on the J
nuclear issue, the Clinton administra- !
tion may have encouraged the North's
leaders to believe that in creating oth-
ers crises they could eventually force
the United States to negotiate a peace
treaty to replace the armistice. Their
aim is to cut out the South, which
they regard as a puppet of America.
Defense Secretary William Perry,
at a news conference in Tokyo on
Monday, said he told Japanese officials
the administration believes North
Korea's staged troop movements in-
side a sensitive part of the DMZ
known as the Joint Security Area were
more of a political statement than a
sign of impending hostilities.
"I pointed out that I thought this
provocation was political in basis, not
military - not leading to a military
conflict but was intended to try to
force the United States into bilateral
meetings with the North Koreans to
try to reach a final peace agreement
Perry said. "This provocation will not
be successful
After sending heavily armed
troops into the Joint Security Area on
three successive nights, North Korea
See CLINTON page 7
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Tuesday, April 16,1996
The East Carolinian
Post cuts cereal prices State protects seriously ill
r . 11 . I non inn.nrmrt itin.it ipnctii- tpt� availahlp or in the works.
NEW YORK AP) - The soggy
cereal business got some snap and
crackle Monday, as Post Cereal said
it would cut prices an average of 20
percent and issue a new coupon that
will apply to all its cereals.
Post is betting that the price
cuts will give a boost to the business,
which shrank slightly last year and
has been flat so far this year. Post's
own cereal sales have been declining,
analysts said.
"We expect this will reignite
growth in the ready-to-eat cereal mar-
ket said Mark Leckie, executive vice
president and general manager of the
Post Cereal division of Kraft Foods,
Inc.
The price changes are expected
to reach store shelves in two or three
weeks. The company won't say ex-
actly when the new coupons will ap-
pear.
For Irene Cotton of McCook,
Neb 20 percent isn't good enough.
"At times you can get a box of
Post Toasties for 99 cents, and we'll
buy that, but when they get up above
that the best thing to do is just let
them sit on the shelf she said.
Some of Post's biggest competi-
tors said they had already cut prices
in recent years and Post was simply
catching up.
Kellogg spokesman Anthony
Hebron declined to discuss how his
company might respond to Post's
gambit. At General Mills, spokesman
Austin Sullivan said no changes were
planned.
The cut brings Post's suggested
retail price for a 17.2 oz. box of
Spoon Size Shredded Wheat down
to $2.99 from $3.88; while 20 oz. of
Premium Raisin Bran will cost $2.99
instead of $4.13. Actual retail prices
are determined by individual stores.
The move means Post's corpo-
rate parent. Philip Morris Companies
Inc is likely to take a near-term hit
of $50 million to $80 million in op-
erating profits - "Not a big deal for
a company that size said analyst
John M. McMillin at Prudential Se-
curities.
And since Philip Morris just
raised cigarette prices 4 percent,
McMillin said, "to some extent they
can fund these cuts with better to-
bacco earnings
Philip Morris was up 37 12
cents Monday, trading at $89.37 1
2 a share.
Israeli aircraft bombs shake
up Lebanon, Beirut
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - Israeli
-aircraft and artillery bombarded
(Hezbollah targets in Beirut and south-
ern Lebanon on Monday in an effort
io ratchet up pressure on Lebanon
and Syria to cripple the guerrillas.
Israel said it was ready to negoti-
ate an end to its 5-day-old offensive,
but would not initiate talks.
Hezbollah, however, sent more rock-
lets crashing down on northern Israel
and claimed to have dozens of suicide
�bombers ready to attack.
"Our human bomb brigade is
going to concentrate vengeance on
Israel. We'll strike at the United States
when it directly intervenes against
us said Hezbollah's second-in-com-
mand, Sheik Nairn Qassem.
"We have deployed a shield of
suicide bombers in the south ready
to devastate any enemy ground force
that dares to attempt a thrust into
south Lebanon. We'll have them an-
nihilated Qassem told the Lebanese
Broadcasting Corp. in a televised in-
terview.
Hamas, the Palestinian group
whose suicide bombings have Israel
reeling, said it has joined the rocket-
ing of northern Israel from Lebanon.
A spokesman called on Hamas activ-
ists in the West Bank and Gaza Strip
"to carry out their assigned missions
Seven Lebanese civilians were
killed and 20 people were wounded
in the Israeli attacks Monday, Leba-
nese police reported. Eight Israelis
were slightly wounded by Hezbollah
rockets.
All told, 35 people have been
killed and 133 wounded since skir-
mishes between Hezbollah and Israel
ignited into a major Israeli offensive
last week. Apart from one Israeli sol-
dier, the dead have all been Lebanese
civilians.
Despite a rush of diplomatic ac-
tivity, prospects seemed dim for a
cease-fire.
Secretary of State Warren Chris-
topher sought ways to end the blood-
shed in talks with Lebanese leaders
and the foreign ministers of Israel and
Syria, which has 40,000 troops in
Lebanon and controls its government
Israel hopes the air raids and the
hundreds of thousands of fleeing refu-
gees will pressure Lebanon and Syria
to disarm the Iranian-backed
Hezbollah. For years, the Shiite Mus-
lim guerrillas have attacked Israeli
troops and fired rockets at Israel to
drive Israeli troops from southern
Lebanon.
Apache helicopter gunships fired
rockets Monday at the Hezbollah
strongholds of Mraije and Bir Hassan
in Beh at's southern slums. Minutes
later, Israeli fighter-bombers hit the
Bsaleem power station on the hills
overlooking the city, sending flames
and black smoke billowing into the
sky.
In southern Lebanon on Monday.
Israeli jets, helicopter gunships and
artillery battered suspected guerrilla
hideouts in communities that have
been largely abandoned by residents.
Guerrillas have fired rockets on
Israel from the market town of
Nabatiyeh and the southern port city
of Tyre, and those districts have been
heavily hit
Pillars of black smoke shrouded
Nabatiyeh, largely deserted by its
50,000 inhabitants, as buildings
burned Monday. A Hezbollah-run hos-
pital was also hit.
Israel urged the few people still
in Nabatiyeh and 10 villages around
it to flee. Fourteen other villages near
Tyre received similar warnings.
The Israeli offensive has driven
some 400,000 residents of the south
- 10 percent of Lebanon's population
- from their homes.
Hezbollah claims it has suffered
no casualties in the Israeli onslaught
There was no way to verify that claim.
It was clear that the offensive had
failed to curb the attack on northern
Israel: Hezbollah fired 90 Katyusha
rockets Sunday and unleashed inter-
mittent salvos Monday.
The Israeli army said several
Katyusha barrages hit Galilee on Mon-
day, slightly wounding eight people.
One rocket fell outside a synagogue
in the border town of Kiryat Shemona.
Schools and businesses in towns
within Katyusha range were closed,
and dozens of children were bused
from Nahariya, an Israeli resort town
on the Mediterranean Sea, to central
Israel on Monday. Other children had
been evacuated earlier.
In Nahariya, Prime Minister
Shimon Peres said Israel was prepared
to talk peace, but would not set talks
in motion: Truces with Hezbollah that
Israel has initiated have proven frag-
ile, he said.
"We didn't turn and will not turn
to anyone Peres said. "On the other
hand, if requests are being made to
us, we will respond to such requests
and consider them
Asked what kind of agreement
would satisfy Israel, Peres replied:
"Anything that will guarantee secu-
rity in the northern part of
hraeL.provided it will really bring
back the security
The intensity of the campaign
against Hezbollah, while not unprec-
edented, has been colored in part by
Peres' desire to prove to Israeli vot-
ers before May 29 elections that he is
not soft on security.
Prime Minister Rafik Hariri of
Lebanon, who has visited Syria and
Egypt in an attempt to end the blood-
shed, warned in Paris: "If Israel con-
tinues its attacks on Lebanon, we can
say goodbye to the peace process
Bill to reach
General Assembly
in 1997
RALEIGH (AP) - Some North
Carolina doctors and scientists are
asking the state to protect people pre-
disposed to serious illness from dis-
crimination by health insurance com-
panies.
The state advisory committee on
cancer control asked its staff to study
insurance protections in other states
to help craft legislation for North
Carolina. The committee wants to
submit a bill to the General Assem-
bly by early 1997.
"To punish people for something
they can't change is not rational and
it's not fair said Dr. Edison Liu, a
cancer researcher and physician at
the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
So far, at least 15 states have
passed or proposed laws protecting
people from discrimination based on
genetic testing. Some prevent insur-
ance companies from using test re-
sults to justify denying coverage,
charging higher premiums or limit-
ing benefits. Oregon and California
prohibit insurance companies from
even inquiring about genetic tests.
While the state Department of
Insurance has received no complaints
from North Carolinians about genetic
testing leading to higher premiums,
researchers have documented cases
elsewhere.
Opposition
from the insurance
industry is ex-
pected. The News
& Observer of Ra-
leigh reported.
"Insurance
companies need to
be able to assess
risk said Richard
Coorish, spokes-
man for the Health
Insurance Associa-
tion of America.
"Without assessment, premiums for
everyone would be higher
There is some precedent for such
regulation. North Carolina was the
first state during the 1970s to bar
the practice of charging higher pre-
miums to blacks carrying the sickle
cell anemia gene.
So far, scientists have identified
genes that, when mutated, increase
the risk of breast cancer, Alzheimer's
disease and several other disorders.
Tests for the mutations are either
available or in the works.
"We're picking off one gene af-
ter another said Dr. Joseph
Pagano. director of the UNC
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer
Center, where Liu also works.
"Eventually
this is going to
be part of what
patients have
to deal with
The prob-
lem with ge-
netic testing,
scientists say,
is that it
doesn't always
provide a pre-
cise glimpse
into the future.
Some diseases.
"To punish people
for something
they can't change
is not rational and
it's not fair
� Dr. Edison Liu, cancer
researcher and physician
����� .��
such as cystic fibrosis or
Huntington's, are tied to mutations
in single genes - meaning a patient
will get sick.
But in most cases, such as with
many cancers and heart disease, mu-
tations signal only an increased risk,
not absolute certainty.
Still, there are advantages to
' testing. Doctors can more aggres-
sively monitor their patients, and
patients can avoid behaviors that in-
crease the chances they'll get sick.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday,ApriM6, 1996
Bomb threats hinder
South African discov
Brazilians suffer from illiteracy
EAST LONDON, South Africa
(AP) - A bomb threat interrupted
historic hearings Monday aimed at
digging up the secrets and healing
the wounds of the killings, torture
and disappearances of apartheid-era
South Africa.
An hour after he opened the
hearings with a prayer, Archbishop
Desmond Tutu halted testimony and
informed a packed auditorium at
East London's
city hall that a
bomb threat had
been phoned in
and police
would conduct a
security sweep.
"This is one
of the kind of
things we will
have to deal
with Tutu
apologized. "It
makes all of us
aware that there
are some people
who will stop at
nothing to pre-
vent this com-
mission from do-
ing its work
Tutu, who
clearly regarded
the threat as a prank, noted that
police had thoroughly searched the
building before the hearings started
and did not ask spectators to clear
the room. They milled around as po-
lice performed their work.
The nation watched the scene
on live television.
Tutu told police he wanted a 24-
hour guard placed on the building
to ensure security: "Otherwise, we
are going to keep allowing this to
happen. 1 will not allow further in-
terruptions
The hearings recommenced af-
ter a 45-minute delay.
Earlier, the Nobel Peace laure-
ate led the 17-member Truth and
Reconciliation Commission in a
prayer seeking "wisdom and guid-
ance as it commences the important
work of redressing the many wrongs
done
Tutu lit a single candle of re-
membrance that will burn during
four days of hearings here.
Seven wit-
nesses were
scheduled to tes-
tify today, mostly
relatives of anti-
apartheid activ-
ists who went
missing or were
allegedly killed by
the security
forces.
N o h 1 e
Mohapi took the
stand first. She
testified about
the death of her
husband,
Mapetla, whom
police harassed
for his leading
role in a black
students' organi-
zation. He died in
"If we are going to
have national
unity and
reconciliation,
these proceedings
must be
successful. There
are many praying
for us"
� Desmond Tutu,
archbishop
custody 20 years ago - a suicide,
police said at the time.
"1 have never been happy dur-
ing the past 20 years said Mrs.
Mohapi. "After I heard about these
hearings I wanted to come and give
evidence to find out what happened
to him, because he never killed him-
self
After the bomb scare, Mrs.
Mohapi finished testifying in the
same calm voice, recounting how
she herself was tortured, placed in
solitary confinement and threatened
with death by police.
The governing African National
Congress issued a statement urging
all South Africans to support the
commission. But the ANC's chief
black rival, the Zulu nationalist
Inkatha Freedom Party, announced
a boycott of the hearings.
Inkatha leader Mangosuthu
Buthelezi said the commission
would not be impartial in bringing
to light facts of a bloody ANC-
Inkatha struggle that has killed
thousands over the past decade.
President Nelson Mandela says
the hearings are essential to the rec-
onciliation he has preached since
white-minority rule ended in 1994.
Though politically motivated crimes
on both sides are to be examined,
the focus will be on South Africa's
old, white-dominated security forces,
it is a good day for South Af-
rica Tutu told reporters. "If we are
going to have national unity and rec-
onciliation, these proceedings must
be successful. There are many pray-
ing for us
To reward those involved in
rights abuses who make full disclo-
sures, the commission can recom-
mend amnesty - a measure opposed
by families of some prominent mur-
dered anti-apartheid activists, in-
cluding that of Steve Biko.
The families have asked the
country's highest court to declare
the proceedings unconstitutional for
denying them the right to see the
killers of their loved ones punished.
Lawyers for some who face pros-
ecution for gross human rights
abuses have threatened a different
lawsuit, saying their clients could be
slandered without due process.
The commission will hold hear-
ings across the country over the
next two years. The initial hearings
focus on victims. Amnesty hearings
have not yet been scheduled.
BRAZIL (AP) - During a visit by
a reporter, he spoke warily at first, say-
ing he had been told by his employer
to keep quiet But soon he relaxed,
dropped his load of wood and retrieved
a cardboard box with pay stubs.
The stubs, a collection of old en-
velopes, slips of paper and napkins,
showed that in a recent month his fam-
ily earned $112.50 for four truckloads
of 71 cubic yards of charcoal.
The market price for a cubic yard
of charcoal is about $25.
But Souza isn't any good at fig-
ures. He puts his age "around 49 He
can't read or write, and signs his name
with a squiggly line on any receipts his
boss hands him. He doesn't dare ar-
gue.
Other stubs showed he had paid
$17 for a can of cooking oil, $17 for a
bag of sugar, $12 for bag of noodles,
and $20 for a sack of rice. That month,
$340.25 had been deducted for food
and board, leaving an outstanding
negative balance of $227.75.
This left Souza and his family
owing $1,126.45 after 25 months of
work.
How did it happen?
"I can't figure it Souza says,
"when I work every day and don't
barely sleep. And with the kids cutting
trees, and working the ovens and all,
it just doesn't make sense
Several miles up a winding, dirt
track a visitor came upon a dozen boys
wearing only filthy Bermuda shorts.
Cheeks sui en, hair matted in soot
they leaned on pitchforks and axes in
front of piles of charred logs.
None of them had a work contract
or identification, although the law re-
quires it
Behind them, bricks and mud were
strewn about A furnace had exploded
the night before when gases built up
inside. Nobody was hurt this time, but
it gave the boys the jitters.
Adesvaldo da Silva, a doeyed boy
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whose head barely reaches the prongs
of the pitchfork he held, says he has
chopped wood, cleared areas for tree
planting and worked the kilns for six
months without pay.
"I was told I'd get a bonus, but
when I asked when that was, the 'cat'
gave me this says the boy, turning to
show fresh scars that curled across his
back - the work of a chain.
"That boy says Vieira, the pastor,
"is about 10. These children were sepa-
rated from their parents, who probably
work some other charcoal camp far
away. The youngest child I've seen here
was 5 years old
Another boy, Amadeus de Souza,
15, appears from the billowing fumes
of a kiln, hobbling like a sick stork. It
is impossible to tell if he is black or
white, the soot on his parched skin is
so thick.
"My feet are asleep Amadeus
says. "I've walked barefoot so much on
hot coals I can't feel anymore what it
is I'm walking on. The feeling only
comes back when we work the fields
in the planting season
Vieira explains that during the
planting season from May to August
the pubescent girls and boys often are
separated from their families to seed
cleared areas, in part because the work
is lighter.
"That's not the only reason they
go Vieira says. "When out of sight of
their parents, they're often raped and
sodomized in the fields by the 'cats'
or the truckers
The recent explosion in slavery re-
ports appears to reflect two trends: an
increased awareness of forced labor and
the growing disparities between rich
and poor.
A decade after a 21-year military
dictatorship ended in 1985, Brazil's
press has stepped up coverage of the
problem. That coupled with the grow-
ing unionization of rural workers, has
contributed to the jump in denuncia-
tions.
At the same time, income dispari-
ties worsened, making it easier for
Brazil's wealthy to prey on the weak.
A 1995 World Bank study indi-
cated Brazil had the worst income dis-
tribution in the world. The richest 10
percent of Brazilians hold 51.3 percent
of the country's wealth. The poorest
20 percent have just 2.1 percent
"At least here, we are workers
says Maria Geralda de Souza, Manoel
Souza's wife, boiling pequi nuts in an
old Texaco motor oil can on a mud
stove. A handful of nuts would be her
family's lunch that afternoon.
"Imagine if we left here. It would
be worse. We wouldn't be able to do
anything. We'd all starve
Luiz Antonio Chaves, a former
head of the Montes Claros labor de-
partment says the tiny size of the state
agency that monitors slave labor re-
flects the strong ties between planta-
tion owners, steel producers and the
local authorities.
Only nine agents and one car are
in charge of inspecting labor abuses
in the 50 municipalities and 7.5 mil-
lion acres of eucalyptus plantations in
northern Minas Gerais, he says.
Investigating slavery is a thank-
less task. Most workers are afraid to
file complaints, and the targets of im-
pending investigations usually get
tipped off by insiders.
"It's common for plantation own-
ers to move the charcoal camp sites
around regularly, to avoid getting
caught Chaves says.
Chaves was removed from his post
in late 1994, he says, for denouncing
slave labor in the region. The mayor's
office in Montes Claros declined com-
ment
Eucalyptus saps the soil of nutri-
ents and can be grown for two or three
harvests, so landowners buy and clear
vast areas rich in native vegetation to
maintain charcoal production.
it
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CLINTON from page 5
stopped the incursions one week ago.
Last Thursday the U.N. Security Coun-
cil appealed to North Korea to adhere
to the armistice, calling it the oniy
legal instrument keeping the peace on
the Korean Peninsula.
Perry said Clinton would reaffirm
to Kim that "a peace agreement on
the Korean Peninsula has to be made
between the two principal parties -
the North and the South
Clinton also was expected to tell
Kim that in U.S. talks with North
Korea on such issues as the nuclear
power arrangement and efforts to re-
cover remains of Americans killed in
the Korean War there will be no dis-
cussion of a peace treaty.
The founding father of the North
Korean regime, Kim II Song, had said
shortly before his death in July 1994
that he would meet with the South
Korean president But when he was
succeeded by his son, Kim Jong II, the
talks were called off and U.S. officials
say there is no sign of a softening of
positions.
Clinton was flying to Tokyo later
Tuesday for a state visit centering on
reaffirming the U.SJapan defense al-
liance. Clinton and Prime Minister
Ryutaro Hashimoto were to issue a
joint security declaration stating that
the United States will keep 100,000
troops stationed in the Asia-Pacific
area, including 47,000 in Japan.
In his talks in Tokyo on Monday,
Perry announced that Japan had
agreed for the first time to provide
transportation, communications and
other logistical support for U.S. forces
during peacetime operations such as
humanitarian relief or U.N. peacekeep-
ing missions.
Perry also said the U.S. military
was giving back to Okinawa about 20
percent of the land it uses for train-
ing on the southern Japanese island.
jFjLjl from page 4
She said on Sunday that Reid
had flown the plane once while Jes-
sica took a nap. He also landed the
plane in Cheyenne, and government
investigators said his injuries suggest
he was flying when the plane
crashed.
"Jessica would have done the
entire 7.000 miles even if she knew
she wouldn't break the world
record Hathaway said. "She thor-
oughly enjoyed flying
In Cheyenne, hundreds of people
carrying teddy bears, balloons and
flowers remembered Jessica at a me-
morial service on Sunday.
While the child's death was a
tragedy, "an even greater tragedy
would be never to dream at all the
Rev. David Rockwood told mourners.
"Even though her dream ended in
tragedy, it touched our hearts, our
souls
Some who attended the memo-
rial in Cheyenne defended the girl's
quest
"I would ask those people if chil-
dren have to wait until a certain age
to dream said James Steven Smith,
reading from a poem he wrote. "Jes-
sica said to herself, 'I don't care about
the rules. I want to fly across the
United States
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�iliiiii'iiiiiiiii i inii 1" '� ialii
8
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
MAJOR from page 3
WEEKEND from page 2
gan State University.
The 1995 survey predicted that
the most promising fields for the Class
of 1996 would not be computer sci-
ence and engineering, but also busi-
ness (such as marketing and sales),
health and science.
So far. the forecast for graduat-
ing seniors seems to be right on tar-
get, said Vernicka Tyson, director of
career services and placement at
Michigan State.
"It seems to be a pretty good
year Tyson said.
With computer science majors,
"the demand exceeds the supply she
said. Companies also are showing an
interest in management information
systems majors, materials and logis-
tics students and chemical engineers.
Also, "there has been more inter-
est in the liberal-arts major Tyson
said. "That's been a hopeful sign
When it comes to the job search
process, her office advises students to
start early.
"Students in their freshman and
sophomore year should start think-
ing about their career paths she said.
"Internships and cooperative work
experiences are very important. The
need for computer skills is also very
important, regardless of the academic
discipline
Tim Putzier. director of career
advising and planning services at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison,
gives the same advice.
"By the end of your sophomore
year you should be looking for intern-
ships ideally he said.
His office, which primarily
handles the liberal-arts students
graduating from UW's College of Let-
ters and Science, has noticed an in-
crease in campus recruiting as com-
pared to other years.
"It's definitely up in the number
of companies he said. "It's not a dras-
tic leap, but it's definitely climbing
And similar to the national trend,
UW's computer science students are
fielding more job offers than their
peers who dabble in literature and
other liberal-arts courses. About com-
puter science majors, Putzier said, "if
you can talk, you've got a job
Another trend Putzier has no-
ticed is an extended recruiting pe-
riod for employers.
"Usually, it's all wrapped up by
mid-March he said, adding that em-
ployers are still arranging campus vis-
its in April. "That's a good thing for
the students
The competition is tough, how-
ever. One major retailer recently
came to the UW campus with less
than 10 positions available for more
than 400 applicants from various
colleges. Putzier said.
"We have students getting of-
fers, but it's certainly very competi-
tive
But. "it's a better year than oth-
ers he said. "1994. 1995 and 1996
have all been climbing. It's slowly but
surely getting on a roll
in Mendenhall and were provided for
the students' academic and social
growth as freshmen.
"Last year 289 minority stu-
dents attended visitation day said
Elola Moore, office of admissions.
"This year more than 300 minority
students attended Those that par-
ticipated had to be prospective stu-
dents and have been accepted to the
university for the 1996-1997 school
year.
All 16 state schools participate
in some form of minority program
that is similar to Minority Visitation
Day at ECU. Most of these schools
include the program during orien-
tation.
"I'd like to thank the faculty
members and the organizations that
participated in Minority Visitation
Day Moore said. "The visitation
day got a lot of support from the
campus
At the end of the day, evalua-
tions were given in order to gather
ideas to improve next year's Minor-
ity Visitation Day.
"The comments that were made
were very positive ones Moore said.
"These comments ranged anywhere
from how effective the workshops
were to the helpfulness of the cam-
pus tours
Other comments were made
about how lunch needed to be longer
in order for the minority students to
socialize and make friends. Improve-
ments are being made in this area.
C-CJM.A. from page
I
driving, sustained a broken leg.
Parker was originally transported
to New Hanover's Trauma Unit due
to sustaining head injuries.
Now that she's been upgraded
into the critical care unit her family
members can remain by her side.
"When Kelly was in the Trauma
Unit she could only have visitors for
15 minutes at a time, but now we can
stay with her Parker's mother said.
"I can watch over her now and help
take care of her-I can 'mother' her
now
Last Tuesday, Parker underwent
surgery to drain built up spinal fluid
from her brain.
A shunt was put in because the
natural drain in Kelly's brain stem
became clogged due to her injuries.
"Now she's trying to wake up
from surgery Parker's mother said.
Parker first opened her eyes two
weeks after the accident.
However, her mother said that
Kelly is still not focusing and that "she
has a blank stare
According to official police re-
ports, the driver responsible for the
accident, Brady Swartzle, 19. was
charged with misdemeanor death by
vehicle: left of center; and unsafe
movement: exceeding a safe speed.
Parker's mother said he sus-
tained no serious injuries but knocked
out three teeth.
According to Parker's mother, the
young man fell asleep behind the
wheel.
In recounting the events she said
that the car in front of her swerved
to the right and that she then saw a
car come into her lane.
In an attempt to avoid colliding
with the car she then swerved to the
left.
"I think at that point he woke up
and realized he was in the wrong lane
and swerved back into his lane
Parker's mother said. "Then he hit us,
and Kelly's been in a coma ever since
Parker's mother said that to cope
with the situation they have pulled
together and stayed by Kelly's bedside.
Her mother, father or brother are
there at all times.
"It's hard to watch your children
like this Parker's mother said. "I
have trust in God. and I feel that she
will come out of this
SHOOT from page 1
Freshman Stcey Jones agreed.
"I can understand that they are
looking out for the students said
Stacy Jones, an education major.
"But they should take other actions,
such as maybe moving it to a differ-
ent place or changing the time
Other universities across North
Carolina have policies for events such
as dances and parties that may oc-
cur late at night, including ECU. At
UNC-Greensboro, there is a late night
party policy that requires the orga-
nization to follow certain planning
and security guidelines.
"If anything should occur, Stu-
dent Affairs and other committees on
campus will look at the circum-
ELECTION from page 1
ing that, despite the lapse of 48 hours.
Lynch's constitutional right "to peti-
tion the government for a redress of
grievances" was violated and could
therefore be heard.
SGA Attorney General Dawn
Woodard recommended that the re-
view board not allow Lynch's second
complaint which called for a new elec-
tion in order to comply with Article
XI section 7(A) which states that a
new election can only be called if one
of two candidates is disqualified. She
said that despite the numerous rules
already broken in the election process,
the board should not deviate from the
election rules.
The review board ruled that Ar-
ticle XI section 7(A) of the election
rules was unconstitutional.
"The elections rules never state
a procedure to follow if such a case
where a challenge to the election that
does not result in disqualification of
(a) winner were to occur the deci-
sion stated. "The Review Board rec-
ommended the legislature establish
rules and procedures to follow in case
of a challenge to the integrity of the
election itself.
"Second, the review board is
empowered by the constitution and
election rules to call for a new elec-
tion on an appeal from the Elections
Committee who is also empowered to
call for a new election
The board said the second com-
plaints should be heard by the Elec-
tions Committee, which was sched-
uled to meet at 8 p.m. last night.
Lynch said he will decide whether
or not to appeal the Election
Committee's decision based on their
reasoning.
"I feel that it is my right to have
a new election Lynch said. "If the
committee rules against it (a new elec-
tion) their reasoning must not only
be clear and feasible, but it must also
convince me that a new election is an
unreasonable request
Attention
Returning
Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by ananging your utility
service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time and possibly money. The follow-
ing options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick up
a "Request for Utility Service" application
from room 214 in the Off-Campus Housing
Office, Whichard Building; at Greenville
Utilities' Main Office, 200 W. 5th Street; or at
GUC Express, our satellite office located at
509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and mail
it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville, N.C.
27835-1847, att Customer Service.
?Remember to attach a "letter of credit"
from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits are
as follows: witb electric at pwoot electric
�pace bettio�or gas space beating
Electric Only $100$75
Electric & Water $110$85
Electric, Water & Gas $110$85
Electric & Gas $100$75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in
advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut on
and a phone number where we may reach you prior
to your arrival at the service address.
The service charge of $20.00 for electric and
water, andor $30.00 for gas will be on your first bill
GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on While we do not require you to be home when
electric or water service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure that all electrical appliances and water faucets
are OFF during the cut on procedure.
Greenville ff$ Utilities
stances involving the incident and
simply go from there said Jim
Lancaster, assistant vice chancellor
of student affairs at UNC-Greensboro.
Here at ECU. there is a strict
policy regarding the dances and par-
ties held on campus. The policy has
been revised due to recent incidents
involving the discharge of firearms.
The policies and procedures are all
intended to insure the safety and se-
curity of the student body and guests.
"One requirement is that there
must be police officers present at all
times during the danceparty said
Laura Sweet, assistant dean of stu-
dents and the panhellenic council.
This is to ensure the prevention
of problematic behavior at the event.
There is also a policy stating that all
participants will be required to pass
through a metal detector before and
after the event. The sponsoring or-
ganizations that fail to follow the pro-
cedures can have their party privi-
leges revoked.
"Safety is more important than
anything on the college campus
said senior Chris Grunden. a mar-
riage and family counseling major. "I
agree with the policies here on our
campus. They are all done to prevent
an incident such as the one that oc-
curred at Chapel Hill. After the drive-
by shooting, they made the right
decision in canceling those events
MEDIA from page
1
tal signals on and off campus quickly
and efficiently. Altogether. $300,000
has been spent on equipment and
other necessary supplies for the
project.
The system will soon be dis-
persed all throughout campus and
will include the entire university cur-
riculum. As of now, various depart-
ments have experimented with the
system such as the School of Busi-
ness, the School of Art, industrial
technology, philosophy and biology.
The Biology department has
been the most progressive regarding
the use of the system. This new sys-
tem may be able to stimulate certain
experiments, eliminating any risk of
handling certain chemicals.
You may also be able to visual-
ize presentations in a live environ-
ment, other than watching a boring
slide presentation.
"One thing that we'd like to
stress is the purpose of the program
Marshburn said. "It is not to be used
as a replacement in the classroom,
but as an addition
Through the past 10 years, ECU
has marked its place in the field of
communications technology. The
School of Medicine has been nation-
ally recognized for the development
and use of telemedicine. Two years
ago. the campus was one of the first
universities to install fiber optics
cable in order to speed up network-
ing and other forms of visual and
voice communication.
Always Good, Always Fresh, Always Kroger.
Food ck Drug
n

ajls
flOr
Items S Prices Good Thru April 20.1996
Wed. 17 Thurs. 18 Fri. 19 Sat. 20
coca cS& �assic
Copyright 1996 - The Kroger Co. Items S Prices
Good in Greenville, we reserve the right to limit
quantities. None sold to dealers.
Frosted Frosted
MiniWheats MiniWheats
it- �Hi, V
� �-��.yZ ��. i
1 r -r-tftui '
vU price newe
NEW YORK STYLE
Jumbo
, least W
Buy One-
Pastry Shop JSgAjS.
Bagels FREE!
KELLOCCS BITE SIZE
Frosted
Mini Wheats
19-oz.
sms9
CHOPPED HAM. ROAST TURKEY OR BUY One
Oscar Mayer
Ham & Cheese
.16-oz.Pkg.
Get One
FREE!
ASSORTED VARIETIES
CRACKERS OR
Snackwell
Cookies
5-�sk:
29.
z
ASSORTED VARIETIES
RICE & SAUCE OR
Kroger
Noodles & Sauce
4-4.5-oz.
89
(
12-SIZE
Sweet Ripe
Cantaloupes
Each
vankamps
Pork & Beans
�Koz.
5$2
w
Z $Z
ORICINAL OR-NEW-
LEMON PEPPER
Rotisserie
Chicken
Each
$999
ASSORTED VARIETIES PEACHES,
PEARS OR
UbbyFruit
Cocktail
29-1001.
age
30-OUART
Styrofoam
ice Chest
Each
t
49





8
Tuesday, April 16,1996
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
It's exam time
once again so
prepare yourself
for battle
Finally, when the weather looks like it might stay con-
stant and you no longer have to drag yourself out of bed
for that dreaded first class, you are faced with a larger
concern-final exams. It's that hectic time of year when all
of the papers are due and you have to read all of the stuff
you should have been reading on the days marked on your
course outline.
The worst part is that now is also the time of year when
the best parties are scheduled. How will you cope? Should
you bury yourself in your books and fight like hell to get
your GPA up to that parent-pleasing mark, or should you
throw caution to the wind and decide to settle for what-
ever scraps fate might throw your way?
Either way, the decision cannot be made lightly. If you
take the first option and become a book worm, you might
miss your last few days to visit with your friends, not a
small price to pay when some of your best friends might
be graduating soon. On the other hand, if you decide to go
ahead and sell all your books back on the first day (espe-
cially that big one that you know you need but will really
rake in the big bucks at UBE) and try to tell yourself you
can remember the important stuff, there might be some
grave consequences awaiting you the day report cards go
home. Think you can beat your mom to the mailbox? Don't
even try it; she has connections.
Final exam time is when you see the largest number of
people (who usually look pretty good) walking around look-
ing like they haven't slept since December. Their hair isn't
combed and their shoes don't match, and they're making
that mass exodus to the library. It is also the time when
you get caught up in that inevitable event-the Great Extra
Credit Rush. You've never seen so many people interested
in the advancement of psychological research in all your
life.
Some words of advice: DON'T STRESS! Easier said that
done, I know, but you don't have to lose your mind simply
because you might be bordering between two grade levels.
Go to your professor's office and find out exactly where
you stand. A good instructor (we pray you have one) will
tell you what grade you have and how many points you
need to get to the next level. Sometimes, if God is on your
side, you might even get a point or two for taking the time
to visit a professor (especially if this wasn't your first visit).
After you find out where you stand, plan what you have to
do reasonably. Don't say "today I'll read my whole Chemis-
try book and tomorrow I'll cover the Spanish book We
guarantee you won't get anywhere. Plan to give yourself a
break now and then, and study outside when you can. End
your relationship with Vivarin and try to get enough sleep.
Take your Reading Day (April 22) seriously. From here on
out every hour counts. And remember: This is a test. This
is only a test
Line-item veto cuts the fat
On Tuesday, April 9, the sky
opened over our nations capital, the
cherry trees bloomed, the drug deal-
ers stopped selling crack, the Angels
sang, and the President of the United
States signed the most important
piece of legislation of the decade.
Dkay. you got me, none of the above
is true except the part about the leg-
islation (but the rest should have hap-
pened). The President signed some-
thing that has eluded every president
Since 1870 when it was first pursued,
the line-item veto.
For those of you who don't quite
know what this means, let me tell you
a little story. Once upon a time there
was this big bad Senator. He wanted
Something for his state and didn't
ivant to pay for it There was a bill
going through Congress and it was
Sure to pass, so he tacked on his little
Wish on to the raft of the bill know-
ing that once it was on there it
Couldn't be taken off and the only way
for it to die was for the whole bill to
(lie. The bill was so good that they
accepted it anyway and the little wish
got a free ride in becoming true. Soon
others found out about this little con-
gressional magic iamp and started
making little wishes that could get a
free ride as well. Thus, the little wishes
became known as riders.
Today these riders are used to
award government contracts, build
roads, move and open new military
bases, and offer subsidies to groups
as a reward for big time campaign
expenditures. An example of this
would be the following: Bill X is go-
ing through Congress, it is the per-
Chris Arline
Senior Opinion Columnist
Opponents of the
bill claim that it
disrupts the
system of checks
and balances
feet solution to solve the deficit Con-
gressmen Z knows that the plan will
pass, he also knows that his home
state needs a new bridge so he tacks
on a rider that states that as part of
the plan, a bridge will be built in his
state. The rider would have never
made it on its own. This process is
part of what is referred to as pork
barreling and is exactly what the line-
item veto is designed to eliminate.
The bill gives the President the
power to cut out items in bills that
involve government spending, thus
allowing for removal of wasteful
spending.
Opponents of the bill claim that
it disrupts the system of checks and
balances that the federal government
is based upon. The decision of
whether or not the bill is constitu-
tional rests with the Supreme Courts
interpretation of Article One. Section
Seven of the Constitution. In a nut
shell, the section sates that if the presi
dent likes a bill he should sign it, if
not then he should return it.
The bill, according to USA Today,
has already had one suit filed against
it and more can probably be expected.
The suit filed was submitted by the
National Treasury Employees Union.
They claim that fhp hill suhvprte the
Constitution's separation of powers
and it uncostitutionally shifts power
to the executive branch. It sounds like
a somewhat legitimate plea until you
look at their motives. In a quote to
USA Today, the union stated that the
reason for the suit is because "they
fear a hostile president will veto raises
for federal workers 1 think it's fair
to say that they are in no mood to
give up their high fat diet if they can
help it
The truth of the matter is that at
the time of the drafting of the Consti-
tution, there were no such thing as
riders. Article Seven does not state
that he can cut out one part of the
bill. yet. neither does it slate that he
must accept or shoot down the bill in
its entirety.
Congr c?'i still override the
line-item just as it would any other
veto so, thus, the check of power still
exists. This bill is constitutional and
the money it saves will be used to cut
down the national debt.
I wonder if this bill is a result of
the Environmental Protection Agency
and Department of Agriculture's
threats to force Washington to build
run off ponds adjacent to federal build-
ings to curb the pork farm run off
contaminants from getting into the
Potomac River.
FOUNDED 1915 ,
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hag wood. Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Deanya LatUmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For Information, call (919)
328-6366.
SGA needs some work
Dear ECU Student
"As a member of the East Caro-
lina University community, you have
many opportunities to contribute to
the welfare of the university. Your
interest, criticism and support are
needed so that the all important goal-
providing the best educational oppor-
tunities possible-can be achieved.
While student faculty, and em
ployee groups do much of the plan-
ning, programming, and policy mak-
ing, you as an individual can make
significant contributions by being in-
formed about the ECU community;
consulting faculty, administrators, and
students; and actively participating in
student organizations that interest
you
The preceding is from the open-
ing statement of the Campus Commu-
nity Government heading in the back
of your Clue Book. This section con-
tains the Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) Constitution and infor-
mation regarding operating proce-
dures of the various aspects of SGA.
The Preamble of the SGA Constitu-
tion reads:
"We, the students of the East
Carolina University, with resolute de-
termination to preserve the best in
our tradition of responsible student
self-government, assert our goals to
preserve order, to make personal free-
dom secure, to establish justice, and
to maintain a lasting opportunity for
responsible individual and collective
action, and to these ends we ordain
and establish this constitution of the
Student Government Association for
the student body of East Carolina
University
I am writing in favor of the 9 April
"Our View" editorial in The East Caro-
linian. The issues brought to light by
the recent elections are only a symp-
tom of a much larger problem. The
structure of SGA needs to be re-
formed. Perhaps I should qualify my
opinion. I have been a member of the
legislature since 1993. I served as
Screenings and Appointments chair
last year and currently serve as co-
chair tor student welfare. I belong to
a sorority, but I also belong to sev-
eral honor societies. I have heard a
lot of people blaming the scandals and
corruptions on Greeks in general, as
if wearing letters somehow inhibits a
person's ability to reason. People are
quite capable of being corrupt all by
themselves regardless of any affilia-
tions. The problem is much more fun-
damental than that and centers
around three central issues: low stan-
dards, an insufficient system of checks
and balances and a lack of constitu-
ency.
Raising standards is one way to
treat this problem. Currently, the ba-
sic requirements for any SGA office
are 1) having a 2.0 GPA, 2) being a
Lucy Godwin
Guest Columnist
The pote
exists for a
student body
president to
exercise undue
influence over
other student
groups.
full-time ECU student, and 3) being
in good standing with the university.
Raising standards is a hot topic across
campus. SGA should be the initiator
in this move to raise the value and
quality of your education. Do these
requirements represent "the best in
our tradition of student self-govern-
ment" or "responsible individual and
collective action"? I don't think so.
Should someone who fails to manage
their academic affairs in a successful
manner be given this much power?
We are, after all, here to get an edu-
cation. SGA is a way to enhance that
goal, not an end in itself.
People were offended by the
"Beavis Elected Campus President"
article in the April 4 edition of The
East Carolinian satire page. One of
the offended parties was concerned
that a loser like Beavis was associated
with the Recreation and Leisure Sys-
tems Studies program. Was no one
offended that a loser like Beavis was
associated with SGA, especially as stu-
dent body president? Or, does every-
body agree that "only cool people
would be allowed to join the student
government next year" is an accurate
perception of SGA? Well, if Beavis has
managed to keep a 2.0 and is in good
standing with the university, he could
be a legitimate candidate. So could
that kid in the back of your class that
drools all over the desk while he sleeps
through the lecture or the kid in the
next row that reeks of bourbon every
Friday morning, at least when he
shows up. Holding ourselves to higher
standards is our responsibility, not
only as individuals, but as a student
body. Obviously, our current elections
process doesn't guarantee this.
The checks and balances system
in SGA needs some work as well.
While the current process provides
some control, the process is long and
involved. A more expedient way of
keeping our elected officials from
abusing the power entrusted to them
is desperately needed. The potential
exists for a student body president to
exercise undue influence over other
student groups, most easily by means
of vetoing legislation, particularly
appropriations. Most people call this
blackmail rather than good politics.
Point to ponder: seven student orga-
nizations, referred to as "umbrella
organizations hold the student seats
on major committees such as Media
board, Homecoming Steering commit-
tee, etc These boards govern more
aspects of your life as a student than
you may realize. Now, consider, only
two of these seven organizations are
finanically independent of SGA.
Should the SGA president be able to
control the votes of the other five?
Should any one person be given this
much power?
Apart from a number of other
issues, such as the need for timely
processing of constitutions and appro-
priation requests (those of you that
have filed the same appropriation
three of four times in the past year
know what I am talking about), we
need the legislature to actually repre-
sent the student body. If you live on
campus, your hall representative on
SGA is accountable to your hall coun-
cil and should be accessible to you. If
you live off campus, your interests are
represented by approximately 43 day
representatives. These day reps do not
have a distance constituency though
each of them should be responsible
for representing about 350 people.
TEC was justified in suggestion that
each organization or club should have
a representative on SGA. I would sug-
gest that it be taken a step further to
include representation from each
school, if not each department. Some
provision also needs to be made to
guarantee that non-traditional stu-
dents have a greater voice on campus.
This type of organization is re-
ferred to as a student Senate - a four-
letter word to those who like the free-
dom from being held accountable for
their actions. SGA has around 60
people now; a student Senate would
probably have nearer 200. A largej
group would simply have too man
members to be so easily manipulate
and would better represent the intei
ests of all aspects of our student body
Each and every one of you
has the right to fair and adequate repi
resentation, but you must demand a
course of action that guarantees itj
We've all had the American historjl
courses; fair representation is not
gained easily, especially when it cont
cerns the spending of your money. Ye
reader, your money! About $20 a
of your hard-earned money goes
rectly to SGA as student fees. In add
tion, an untold amount is influence
by SGA action on committees arounl
campus. It is not only your right, but
your responsibility to vote and to ej�
press your opinion. If you fail to df
this, don't be surprised to see BeavuJ
walking to class with a fat wad of you
res
yeaj
s di
cash in his pocket
I
m
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
We would like to call attention
to section 15.10 of House Bill 229
passed by the General Assembly in
1995. This required the Board of Gov-
ernors of the University of North Caro-
lina to "study the potential for cost
savings by contracting for various
services with private contractors, in-
cluding housekeeping and mainte-
nance of facilities Housekeepers at
ECU are now understaffed and work-
ing much harder and longer to make
sure ail projects are completed on
time. When contractors come in, take
away their benefits, and lower their
pay. many workers will be forced to
find other employment.
We want you to realize the kind
of people that will be working for $5
an hour doing housekeeping work.
Such contractors, in order to cut their
own costs, disregard proper screening
methods and hire basically anyone.
Many times the temporary work-
ers hired by these contractors are tran-
sients, in town for only a day or two.
Some of whom will have a tougher
time mopping a floor than breaking
into an office. Everyone will need to
put alarms on their cars, lock every-
thing up in dorms and lock offices at
all times. Nobody will feel safe. The
state will obviously save money, but
at the expense of the safety of sti
dents and faculty.
The current staff, at least in our
department do more than our sharj
of work. They are very courteous an$
we are fortunate to have them a
friends. If you have questions or com
plaints about this proposal, pleasj
contact the Vice Chancellor for bus
ness affairs at 328-6975.
Bryon Hutchens
Kami Klemmer
Ryan Moore
Tommy Parsons
Brett Piggott
Eric Terry
Amanda Love






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Tuesday, April 16,1996
The East Carolinian
if
Help
Wanted
fff Help h wonted
Wanted
QUol
For Rent
EBbl
For Rent

E03bl
For Rent
CASH PAID IMMEDIATELY
American Pizza Company Pays
tt
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FBKBIMlMraM
ABBESS
UCfTil NOTTS MM UM
1
ROME MB ft IAMB SUES IN
Pitt Property Management
758 1921
108s Brow'nlea Or.
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, wale, baste cable. 5 stocks
tram campus New ownership $375 deposit
S375montrt.
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BEDROOM
$275. on nver. wa�emww�r mooted, walk-in
closet, spacious bedroom, on-site laundry
FREE RENT IB OFF APRIL
WESLEY COMMONS 1 and 2 bedroom,
rang refrigerator, washer, oryer hookups,
decks and patios m most units, laundry facility,
sand voHevball court. Located 5 blocks from
campus Free water, sewer, cable
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer hookups
patios on 1st floor, located 5 blocks from cam-
pus Free rent 1 o! month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU Dockwde 3
and 2 bedrooms. 2 baths, 4 car carport, cathe-
dral ceilings, fireplace, dmmg room, balcony,
exterior storage room, nothing m the area
compares Reasonably Priced!
NEED A PLACE FOR summer sublease 2
bedroom. 1 bath, furnished, cable water and
parking included, at good location. Contact
Mandv or Erin at 752-9054
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
SPRING semesters of 96-97. Possibly stay-
ing at Park West Tower Village, or White-
bridge Apts. Rent is $197.50 per person.
Washer Dryer Refrigerator included. Con-
tact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
FEMALE TO SHARE TWO bedroom du-
plex near campus $275 mo. 1 2 utilities ?
phone washer dryer. Must not mind animals.
Virginia 756-5340. Available May first
DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed
room, 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling fans,
appliances and washer dryer hook-ups. $390
Call 752-0277
APT. TO SHARE BEGINNING May 1st for
the Summer. Great location. 1 block from
campus. Rent is cheap. $185 per month. 758-
9392. Ask for Brian or Mike
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12 baths,
fireplace, all appliances, very large, quiet
pool, close to park. $585 month. 756-3009
after 6:00pm
2 BDRM, 1 BTH, balcony Fairly New.
$395.00 Near Lowe's. WaterSewer Includ-
ed. Beginning May 6. Call 756-5932
AFFORDABLE, NICE room available now.
Looking for one roommate to share 6 month
or longer lease. Great location near The Pla-
za. With heat air and cable included. ECU
bus line access. $197 a month, plus phone
& utilities. Call Phil today 321-2813
SIJBLET, OWN ROOM in 3 bedroom town-
house, 2 blocks from ECU, 3 blocks from
downtown. Please call Debbie. Dawn, or Jim
at 758-8362
LOOKING FOR A PLACE this summer at
ECU? There will be one bedroom available
at 105-B. East 11th St after final exams.
Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who is
outgoing, sociable, picks up after themselves,
gets along wothers. Please call Ashley at
757-2891. Need someone starting in mid
April or early May.
DUPLEX WYNDHAM CIRCLE 2 bedroom,
2 full oath, cathedral ceilings, quiet, washer
dryer hookup, fireplace, ceiling fans. deck,
almost new. beautifully decorated. $550
month 756-3009 after 6:00pm
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. TWO bedroom
and two baths w cable and across street
from laundry room at Eastbrook Apts. Pay
$380 for Deposit and $380 for rent. Lease
ends in August 752-0009. To take over May
10.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted for early May or Late April for 3 bed
room house. 3 blocks from campus. AC.
washerdryer. Call 752-6999
EASYGOING FEMALE TO SHARE apt or
house Starting in July Smokers Welcome.
For more information call Julie 830969 An-
"V vtimf � . .i mi,
AVAILABLE IN MAY! 2 bed apartment 2
blocks from campus. Hardwood Fl Pets ok,
washer 7dryer hook-ups, rent only $390. Cali
Kelly or Jen 758-9828, leave message.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED A.S.A.P! Sub-
lease May-August Peace and quiet, near cam-
pus, pool, laundry, and ECU bus service. Call
Dave at 7588080
ONE BEDROOM M OR�. two blocks from
campus, washer and dryer present, available
May 1st. Rent $179. Call 758-2147. Ask for
Kelley. No deposit required
SUBLEASE ONE AND TWO bedrooms
available for a female at Players Club Apart-
ments. Swimming Pool and Full workout
room. Rent $250 a month. If interested Call
353-0775
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED, SUMMER
or year lease. Three bedroom house, Two
blocks from campus. Eastern Street $200
Deposit, $200 Rent 13 utilities. AC,
Michelle 757-8704.
SUBLEASE MAY - JUNE. 2 br's available
in Player's Club. Clean, female, nonsmoker
preferred. $250 month, 14 utilities. No se-
curity deposit, option to renew lease in Au-
gust. Call 3554410. ask for Kristi. Sandy, or
Mimi or leave message.
GEORGETOWNE APARTMENTS. PRE
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chico's
and Downtown. Townhouses with 2 bed-
rooms, 1 12 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washer-dryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
TWO BEDROOM APT. TO sublease for
May-August 20 bucks off rent and only 125
dep. Free cable, washerdryer hook-up. near
campus. 757-0843 Noah
3 MONTHS FOR ONLY $500 TOTAL! Own
bedroom and bathroom. Washerdryer and
cable included. Start May 1st - July 31st. Call
Nelson or Staci 758-4325
WANTED FEMALE roommate to share 4
bedroom apt includes w.d microwave and
icemaker. swimming pool, sand volleyball,
basketball, tennis, fitness center and club-
house with giant screen TV call 321-7613
I BEDROOM AT 1301 Dickinson, hard
wood floors, Appliances$195 2 bedroom
duplex at 706 Mills. No appliances � $210 or
707A Mills with Appliances - $290. 2 bed-
room duplex, upstairs, no appliances � $195
Moore Realty 752-2533
ROOMMATE NEEDED. NICE HOUSE
close to campus. Washer Dryer, own room,
and lots of extras. Rent neg. Call 756-1181
PRIVATE ROOMS available for summer and
fall. Walking distance from campus and
downtown. Large room (15x15) Private
phone line cable in room. Washer dryer in-
cluded.175 per monthutilities Call Mike:
day 830-5577. night 752-2879
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments. Duplexes
a"d Townhouses for rent Many locations to
eh ose from. Currently Pre-Leasing for the
Kail. Call Wainwright Property Management
756209
AVAILABLE MAY 1ST! AIR conditioned
fully furnished one bedroom apartment per-
fect for summer school students. Closer to
campus than most dorms. Have your own
kitchen, bathroom, free water, and private
parking! A steal at only $275 per month.
Call Jason at 551-6778 for more information
CHEAP SUMMER APARTMENT TO sub-
lease. Townhouse in Twin Oaks. "$150" a
month. 13 utilities. Washer and dryer. Start-
ing late April or early May. Call 551-1888
ask for Jeff.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Close to eve-
rything. Professional, quiet environment.
Like new one & two bedrooms, with applianc-
es. $285-5350. Moore Realty 752-2533
FULLY FURNISHED SUMMER HOME at
Sheraton Village Townhomcs. 2 BR. 1 12
bath, washer and dryer, dishwasher and gas
grill. Call for more information 353-0176
ROOMMATE NEEDED. RESPONSIBLE
NON-smoker female male Twin Oaks Apts.
1 3 rent & utilities. Fully furnished, washer
dryer. In route of Bus Line. Contact Dave at
754-2866
SOMEONE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
room in 4bdrm apartment W, D. pool, ten-
nis, weightroom included. Available May 1st
Call 321-0166 after 7pm. Ask for Joanne.
WANTED! ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
SUMMER ANDOR FALL. TWO BED
ROOM, 2 12 BATH, FULLY FUR
MSHED. POOL, ECU BUS SERVICE.
KINGSTON CONDOMINIUMS. PLEASE
CALL 752-0813
room for rent from May 1st to August 1st in
a nice 3BR house across from campus. Cheap
rent. Available to Anyone. Call 830-2941.
STUDENTS NEEDED TO share 3 bedroom
apt 1 3 utilities. 13 rent, 18 block from
campus. Walking distance to downtown. Call
Troy. 758-8067
FEMALE(S) NEEDED TO SUBLEASE one
bedroom in three bedroom Duplex May - July.
Rent $165 Max less rent if two friends share
room. 752-8695
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Furnished or
unfurnished one bedroom only five blocks
from campus. Appliances, central heatair.
water included. $270. Moore Realty 752-2533
RESPONSIBLE, CONSIDERATE FE
MALE TO share a 2 bdrm. 1 12 bath Apart
ment Pinebrook $19000 plus 12 utilities
for August nonsmoking serious student.
Please call 328-7570
3 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 2602 Tryon Dr
with dining room, Rec. Room, and Hardwood
floors $600 Moore Realty 752-2511,4
WANTED FEMALE roommate to share
huge 4 bedroom apt. includes fitness center,
basketball, sand volleyba. tennis aud (lub
house wit pool tables; microwave, ice maker
IjW" �JptfiUW
$300 DEPOSIT IS YOURS. Take over lease
at Wilson Acres until July and keep $300
Deposit. 2 BR $505 month with April's rent
paid. Call 355-4511
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL? Sublease
an airconditioned Ringgold Tower's apart
ment. On campus, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, kitch-
en, furnished, carpeted. Free Parking and
more. Call 757-2725
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR THREE bed
room house 1, '3 utilities. 1 '3 rent Bus stop
at corner. Call 752-6886 any time after 6
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE two
bedroom two bath apartment. 2 blocks from
campus Please call 757-0979
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED MAY 1ST! Great
new townhouse within walking distance of
campus. Rent $220. pets ok. smokers wel-
come. Please call ASAP! 413-0957
2 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 204 Meade St
just 3 blocks from ECU Campus. With hard-
wood floors, fenced in yard, and central heat
air � $525 Moore Realty 752-2533
2 B.ROOM APT ABOVE uppercrust now
available 3 Bedroom 2 1 '2 Bath Apt. For
Rent above BW3 s please call Yvonne at 758-
2616
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING newly
renovated two bedrooms. Unique floor plan
$350.00 month. Call 355-1313 to make an
appointment. Managed by Remco East Inc
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2br, 1
12 bath from June forward. Huge living area
and on bus line. Quiet area, but near every-
thing. $205mo.utilities Call Josh at 758-
6002
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO sub
lease Tar River Apartment for May. June, &
Julv. $143 per month 'plus utilities. Call 328-
3878
L
Greenville's Hottest
New Pizza Shop
WML iOthStreet
Variable Hoars
W-0411
Work Now
WANTED TO BUY: GOOD used dorm size
refrigerator. Phone 919-795-5247 and leave
message. Must be cheap.
Personals
CONGRATULATIONS TO WAYNE OVER-
BY for receiving the Brody Scholarship to
the ECI; School of Medicine! Best of luck
the ECU Ambassadors!
Someone needed to keep
children part-time in summer.
Hours: (approx.) 8:30-2:30 for
7 weeks. Experience required.
Call 931-6904 leave message.
r
i
n
LIFEGUARDS WANTED
Summer Positions available
May 24-Sept 9. Certified Red
Cross Lifeguard Training &
CPU required. Pleasant
working conditions in a
recreational environment.
Phone Twin Lakes Resort,
Chocowinity, NC 946-510G.
L,
I
'
Now accepting
applications for all
positions.
No phone calls,
please.
Apply within at:
Golden Corral
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
For Sale
WASHBURN LYON ACOUSTIC GUITAR.
2 years old. $100 firm; Mac Plus Computer,
software, printer, and slow modem includ
ed. $80. Paul. 551-3224
1970 VOLKSWACON BUS, WITH pop-up
top, newer rebuilt engine also for sale old
pop-up camper, good frame, call Jim at 758-
8362
TI 82 GRAPHICS calculator on sale now'
Cheaper than store. $59 cash with batteries
328-3853
GRADUATING: MUST SELL WASHER
and dryer $200. Call Angie or Honor 321-
2186
FURNITURE SALE: DESK & chair $10,
Table & 4 chairs $20, TV stand $5. Coffee
Table $5 Call: 754-2013
SOFA BED $50, CHERRY desk $3s. Cher
ry Chest $35. Good Cond. Just need to sell.
Call 7565932
FURNITURE: ONE COUCH AND match
ing love seat, one Couch and full length ot-
toman. If interested Call 752-5660. Prices
are negotiable.
GIRLS BIKE, 12 SPEED Huffy in good con
dition, $50 or best offer. Call Chris at 830-
0348
�83 CHEV. CAVALIER. Runs. Good tires.
New Brakes. $400.00 O.B.O. 757-1227
WASHBURN KC-40 ELECTRIC guitar with
35 watt Gorilla Amp; $200. Will Separate.
551-6754
DRUM SET, SDC PIECE CB-700. Splash.
Crash, and Ride cymbals. Many extras. In-
cludes stool. Must sell. Call Kevin 752-1955
$850.00.
MONGOOSE THRESHOLD MOUNTAIN
BIKE with Ilock and bar-ends included
Kept inside and in good condition. $200 Call
830-0921
TWIN MATTRESS AND box spring brand
new $125 Tan sofa in good condition $40
Call Mel at 830-0971 anytime after 6 p.m.
IGUANAS: 2 12 FOOT male with custom
cage. $200: 1 Foot female with cage, $75,
both came with all accessories including heat
rocks and lighting. Must Sell 551-6754
SEVEN WOMENS SUITS SIZE M. Each
over $100 New. Will sell for $25 each. Leave
message with Lisa at 830-5462
VACATION AND CRUISE FOR 2 to Florida
and Bahamas. 10 days. Must sell. Pd $400,
asking $200. Please call Pamela at 830-0828
WATER BED QUEEN SIZE $60 Desk and
chair $20. Call Warren at 752-3032
BLUE SLEEPER SOFA $75 Coffee table
$25 Both in good condition. Please call 756-
7250 and leave message. Must sell!
STUDENTS! FALLING ASLEEP ON the
job? Need more energy. Wake up with Na-
tures Herbs 100 safe. 3(Vday money-back
guarantee. (919)792-2131
FOR SALE - EVERYTHING must fo! lm
moving to AZ. and need to sell full size fu-
ton $150. Dresser $15. two desks, anything
that can't fit in the car has a price! Call 754-
2789.
SURFSK! BhAND SKIBOARD, HARDLY
used at all. $100; Huffy 18 Speed Mountain
bike. IMock included. $75: Rope Chain. 18
inch. 14 carat plus nugget cross. $100. Paul.
551-3224
1988 ACURA INTEGRA LS with new
clutch and muffler. In great condition. $4900.
Call 758976
MATTRESS AND OXSPRING FOR sale
Excellent condition. Only $75.00 for Both.
Call Melissa at 758-5309 during the day at
328-1567.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors. In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week youth
recreationalsports campour 42nd season!
Over 25 activities, including water ski. heated
pool, tennis. Go-karts. artCool Mountain
Climate, EXCELLENT pay and great fun!
Non-smokers. For application brochure: 704-
692-6239 or Camp f'inewood.
Hendersonvilie. NC 28792
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS MONEY, FUN,
TRAVEL, EXPERIENCE. Call 1-800-251
4000 exf 1576
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached Greenville. We are looking for
Health Conscious. Neatly Dressed. Career
Oriented Individuals to fill Part and Full
Time Positions. 758-8390
CONSUMER SERVICE REPRESENTS
TTVE: FULL and part time summer posi-
tions Overtime and some Saturdays re-
quired. Must have computer entry experience
and a technical aptitude. Customer service
phone experience and bilingual a plus Send
resume to Human Resources Department
PO Box 4000. Tarboro, NC 27886. Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity.
BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT! Want to stay
cool this summer? Brady's is seeking applic-
ants interested in part time sales opportuni-
ties. Enjoy a cool, friendly, fashion forward
atmosphere and a merchandise discount on
the summer's hottest new merchandise! Our
flexible scheduling options include morn-
ings, evenings and weekends and will work
around most class schedules Great experi-
ence for retail and merchandising majors!
Apply Wednesday. 2pm-5pm. Brody's, The
Plaza.
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is now
hiring due to our expanding business. Earn
up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting in the
Greenville and surrounding areas. You must
be at least 18 years of age. have own phone
and transportation. We are also hiring male
and female dancers for private parties. Call
Diamond Escorts Inc. at 7584)896 or Emer-
ald City Escorts at 75703477 for and inter-
view. Est. 1990
"GRADUATING IN BUSINESS OR Fi
nance in May? We have several entry-level
Management Trainee positions available in
Eastern NC - outstanding career opportun-
ity in your field! Call Nease Personnel for
details - 756-5820 - Interviews are soon,
don't delay
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR PART-time
work with flexible hours5 BCU is looking
for a few good Pirates to contact alumni for
the Annual Fund program. $5.00 per hour.
Contact the Telefund Office at 757-4215
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK Summer in
Myrtle Beach. SC. Hiring lifeguards (class
available) Earn good money while working
on the Beach $$Salary plus bonuses$$
Discounted Housing To apply or for fur-
ther information, callfax North Myrtle
Beach Lifeguard at 803-272-4170.
WANTED: PART TIME WORKER who
mus1 be hardworking with I great personal-
ity. General office duties including filing and
running errands Must have own transpor-
tation. Call 752-1600 ask for Kelly.
COURTYARD TAVERN IS now accepting
applications tor cooks and waitstaff between
2-4. No phone calls please.
HAVE FUN THIS SUMMER and work on
the ocean front. Atlantic Beach. NC Hiring
Kitchen. Bartenders and Waitress staff
NOW' Harper's Ocean Front Dining the lol-
ly Wave Call or apply in person (919) 726-
8222
WAlTSTFFHOSTESS NEEDED AT
THE IVY Room Restaurant in the Ramada
Plaza Hotel. 203 W Greenville Blvd. Apply
in person
MATURE RESPONSIBLE STUDENT FOR
full-time babysitting � 3vr oM �. lulcl Hnspi
tal hours. Evenings and nights I'lcasr call
4ee 931-2999 �
ADVERTISING
SALES REP
Sell advertising this
summer in Greenville.
Must possess good selling
and customer service
skills. Great experience.
Come by our office and
complete an application by
April 25th. Sell for our first
summer edition publishing
on May 22. Join our team!
The East Carolinian
Second Floor
Student Publications Bldg.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $15000 per
month housing allowance Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Caroli-
na (Nags Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800-662-2122
"SUMMER TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT
AVAILABLE for the right people. Must be
able to work full-time hours during the day.
type 45-50 wpm. and have a good working
knowledge of office software (WP. MSW, Lo-
tus, etc.) Call Nease Personnel for appoint-
ment - 756-5820"
ENVIRONMENTAL MKTG.TRAINING
CO. NEW to Greenville area. Looking for
environmentally conscious individuals to
oversee expansion. Call 3534001
CONSERVATIVE. ATHLETIC. SPORTS
ORIENTED modeling fit dedicates, serious
ladies only. Please call (704) 628-3129
CLUB ATLANTA TRAVEL (CAT) allows
you to travel and get paid for it. Call 1-800-
750-8894 to hear the Roar of the CAT. Then
call your local Representative at 531-7272.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give us a
call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC -919-
747-7686
I Enjoy the Outdoor?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
$5.77HR Mileage
Must Be
Honest. Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCS1
P.O. Box 370
Cove City. NC 28523
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM
Greenville, Kinston. New Bern
yT Services
Offered
Why shop in LA
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
EARN CASH AND GO on vacation at the
same time. Club Atlanta Trawl offers ex-
ceptional cash and travel earnings in its
unique Network Program called "CAT Tru-
ly a ground-floor opportunity. Please call I
800-750-8894 then 531-7272(local)
SHAKE THE PAINT OFF the wall with
Bubba Rocks DJ. Services. Rock, Top 40.
Country. Dance. Only $50 per hour. Call
Right Now 321-H44
ECU'S 1 DJ SERVICE! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey service
for vour party or social function. Widest var-
iety of any disc jockey company in Green-
ville. Alternative to Hip Hop. Specializing in
the needs of ECU Organizations and Creeks.
Spring dates are filling fast, so call early.
�sk (or Lee 758-4644
Announcements
CDFR DEPARTMENT will be presenting Dr.
Harriette McAdoo, reknown author and re-
searcher from Michigan State University, will
discuss Families of Color on April 18th at 7
pm in Mendenhall, Great Room. For more
information, please call the Department of
Child Development and Family Relations at
328-6908.
PIE THROW: THE 2ND Annual EGSO Pie
Throw will be on April 18 from 12 to 6pm at
Barefoot on the Mall. Come out and "cream
professors from all departments and schools j
on campus Cost is $2 bucks, and half of our
proceeds will benefit New Directions, the lo- -
cal battered women's shelter.
CONTRA DANCE SATURDAY APRIL 20, J
7:30pm. at Jaycee Park Auditorium. Live, Old-
time music by Elderberry Jam. FREE, Come
alone or bring a friend. Sponsored by Uni-
versity Folk & Country Dance Club.
TREASURE CHEST VIDEO YEARBOOK:
Stop by and get your Treasure Chest Video
Yearbook at Barefoot on the Mall April 18. J
Also available at the Student Store 419 and ;
422 from 10:00am until 2:00pm
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIA
TION MEETING: April 16. Tuesday. Blox-
ton House (across from Mendenhall). Time: J
5pm Topic: Plans for Barefoot on the Mall
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Motor j
and Physical Fitness Competency Test - Test�
will be given Tuesday. April 23, 1996 in Wil
liams Arena at 10:00am. Any questions con-
cerning the test should be directed to Mike ;
McCammon at 328-4688
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS: SOME
positions for officers need to be filled for i
the fall semester. If interested contact Cris
tie 355-6474 or E-Mail ugfarley.
ECNAO WILL BE HAVING a meeting on ;
Tues. April 16 at 7pm in Room 248 MSC. �
All members are encouraged to attend. Also, -
please don't forget our Annual Banquet at.
Golden Corral on Thursday. April 18 at 7pm
We'll see you there! For more information
please contact Nikkii Epps at 752-9042.
THE LAST MEETING of the Student North
Carolina Association of Educators will be on �
Wednesday. April 17th at 4:30 pm in Speight
308. Selma Cherry, the Regional Principal.
of the year, will tell us what she looks for
when hiring new teachers. Come and join �
us for door prizes and refreshments! Remem-
ber to bring teddy bears for Pitt County Com-
munity Hospital
GSAC MEETING: THE LAST GSAC meet
ing will be this Wednesday, April 17 at 5:30
pm in Room 014 Mendenhall. Please attend
because we need a quorum to vote for 1996-
1997 officers and to vote on constitutional
changes
GET INFORMATION AND applications for
Student Recreation Center jobs at the lob
Fair on Wednesday April 17 from 1-6 p.m. in
Gym. Recreation Services will be hiring over
100 students for fun jobs with flexible hours,
great benefits and competitive salaries. For
more information call Recreational Services
at 328387
THE GREENVTLLETITT COUNTY SPE
CIAL OLYMPICS Local Spring Games will
be held on Friday, April 19 at J. H. Rose
High School from 9:30am-1:30pm. If you
would like to volunteer to be a Buddy for
our Special Olympians on that day. please
attend our buddy orientation meeting on
Wednesday. April 17 at Mendenhall from
5pm-6pm in room 244. All of our volunteers
will receive a Special Olympics Volunteer T-
Shirt and a lunch (hot dog and coke). Please
call the Special Olympics Office at 8304551
if you have any questions. We here at the
Special Olympics office on behalf of our 769
Special Olympians. Thank you for your sup-
port of our Local Program
RESUME WRITING AND INTERVIEW
skills workshops: The Career Services staff
will hold a workshop on developing a pro-
fessional resume and cover letter on April
18 at 2:00pm. Tips on writing scannable re-
sumes will be included. A workshop on in-
terview skjlls will be held on April 19 at
2:00pm. Come to the Career Services Build-
ing, 701 E. Fifth St.
THE EAST CAROLINA NATIVE AMERI
CAN ORGANIZATION invites you to visit
our table at Barefoot on the Mall Thursday.
We will have Native crafts & T-shirts to sell
& native music to hear & enjoy. Please drop
hv & enjov Barefoot!
ORIENTATION TO CAREER SERVICES:
Seniors and graduate students graduating
in MaySummer Dec. 1996 are encouraged
to register with the Career Services Office
by attending one of the following Orienta-
tion meetings: April 17 and 22. 4:00pm April
23 10:00am. This overview includes pro-
cedures for employment interviews on cam-
pus, resume referral service and establish-
ing a credentials file with Career Services.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
All Greek organizat. ns must be
spelled out no abbreviations The
East Carolinian reserves the right
to reject any a for libefe
obscenity andor bod taste
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5�
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1





immi i ip � �����in
12
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
Battle names
Barefoot opener
Menage a Trois
Local bands
compete for first
slot at this year's
outdoor festiva
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Musicians, students, family mem-
bers and contest judges: lend me your
ears.
The third annual Battle of the
Bands took place Thursday night and
the winner will open Barefoot on the
Mall. The contestants couldn't have
hoped for better cooperation from
Mother Nature for this year's event as
they began setting up their equipment
around 6 p.m. preparing for the 8 p.m.
kick-off time. Most of the people in at-
tendance were dressed in casual spring
attire, ready to enjoy a night of live
music. There were five finalists invited
to participate in the battle and each
contributed in their own unique way
to make the event successful.
Each band was given 20 minutes
to play their set and there was a 20
minute break in between bands. Four
judges were on hand to make the deci-
sion on who will open Barefoot on the
Mall. The decision of the judges is fi-
nal
The lead-off band was Treading
Evans. The grassroots band featured
Derek T. Hall on acoustic guitar and
lead vocals, everyone's favorite librar-
ian Matt Toth on the congas, Nick C.
on lead guitar and backing vocals,
banging on the drums was Rob Watson
and Chris Brame rounded out the quin-
tet on bass guitar.
"This was only our sixth time play-
ing together and our first in front of
people Hall said. "We're sticking to-
gether though, and we were pleased
with our performance
It seemed like everyone else was
also pleased. Treading Evans won first
runner-up in the Battle.
Treading Evans performed all
original tunes and started off their set
with "Everything in a Box They also
performed "Jack Stone" and "Don't"
A crowd of about 200 formed a
semi-circle in front of the stage and the
audience remained constantly upbeat
during performances. Though many
folks left during set change-overs, ev-
eryone seemed to come back each time
a new band struck up their instru-
ments.
Second up to the plate was the
alternative-sounding quartet Mistaken
Identity. One crowd member com-
plained that they were the strongest
sounding band in Battle of the Bands,
but the judges obviously didn't agree
as the foursome failed to place in the
event.
A local bluesy trio calling them-
selves Off Center was third to hit the
stage. As would be expected from a
blues band, the threesome didn't sound
as polished as the other acts and it
hurt their standing with the judges.
In the clean-up position of the acts
on the roster was the Thomas Broth-
ers Band. Their blues-alternative style
gave them a favorable showing with
the crowd and judges alike. They
started off their set with a bassline
sounding similar to a Red Hot Chili
Peppers' groove but got the most crowd
participation of any of the five bands.
See BARE page 14
Classes offered on net
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
ECU has gone interactive.
For the first time in its history,
ECU undergraduates can take a class
without ever setting foot in a class-
room, thanks to the internet.
The class, ELEC 4505, or
"Hands on the Internet" as it's called,
begins May 13 and is open to any-
one, anywhere. Because it is operated
entirely from the information tech-
nology department, you don't even
have to be an ECU student to sign
up. The only requirements for par-
ticipation are that you have a com-
puter with a 14.4 modem or better
(either at your home or place of busi-
ness) and be connected to the
internet either through a local pro-
vider or through the school.
The class also differs from the
rest of the summer session in that it
will run 12 weeks, not the custom-
ary five weeks.
So what does a class like this
involve? "Hands on the Internet" is
just that: hands
on. This course
stresses interac-
tive learning
and no prior ex-
perience with
the internet is
necessary. Stu-
dents will learn
how to navigate
the World Wide
Web (WWW),
create their
own home
pages, use e-
mail and mail
lists, telnet,
FRPArchie,
Gopher
Veronica and
IRC (internet relay chat). Any class
meetings that do occur will happen
over IRC.
Because it is
operated entirely
from the
information
technology
department, you
don't even have to
be an ECU student
to sign up.
The internet courses (besides
ELEC 4505, four other classes are
offered for graduate students only
this summer) be-
gan as part of the
Technology Rein-
vestment Project
(TRP). Dr. Barry
Duvall, a professor
in the information
technology depart-
ment, is the direc-
tor of the program.
Ken Lewis, the as-
sistant director of
the project, will
teach the class.
At present, the
course is offered
independently
through the Indus-
trial Technology
department at a
student cost of $270. Although the
See CLASS page 17
AOac Tftudic ew
Foo Fighters hoot in Raleigh
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
Last Tuesday
night when most of
Greenville was try-
ing to get into the
surprise Hootie &
the Blowfish show at
the Attic, my lb-year-
old brother and 1
took a trip to
Raleighwood to
catch Foo Fighters
at the Ritz. Man, did
we make the right
choice.
I knew about
the Hootie show
pretty soon after
they showed up in town and several
hours before it was actually announced.
As much as I tend to rag on them in my
music column. I was singularly impressed
that they had set up a tour like this one.
Cracked Near View has reportedly sold
over lfi million copies worldwide. That's
more than Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the
voon, for Cod's sake.
Think abeiut it this way. There are 8
File Photo
Get your mind out of the gutter! These three dogs were just playing around on the
campus mall when our photographer snapped this provocative shot. Really!
CD Reviews
Doug Powell
Ballad of the Tin Men
Doxy's Kitchen
New Age Tmck Stop
ADr?P
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket"
is just what it claims to be: a
very tiny drop in the great
screaming bucket of Ameri-
can media opinion. Take it as
you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
Why is it that most things with a
title that includes the word "tin" are
doomed to be flawed?
For example, David Bowie's short-
lived band Tin Machine was the defini-
tion of wasted talent (although they were
rumored to be a great live act), and writer-
director Barry Levinson's film Tin Men,
a pseudo-sequel to Diner, was pretty-
much a flop with the exception of a few
comedic punches (Of course, the cartoon
hero Tin Tin is magnificent so maybe
the secret for success is to double up).
That brings us to Doug Powell and
his Ballad of the Tin Men. Never heard
of Doug Powell? Me neither. That's prob-
ably why Mercury Records, Powell's la-
bel, is pushing him so hard with their
promotional ad copy. They make com-
parisons between Powell and (get this)
Todd Rundgren, Robyn Hitchcock. John
Lennon, Jackson Browne. KISS. Peter
Frampton. The Cars, David Bowie (aha.
the tin connection), Frank Zappa, Jules
Shear and Charles Dickens (yes, that
Charles Dickens).
Sounds pretty impressive, huh?
Well, let's think about this a little fur-
See DOUG page 14
Are you ready for a mellow groove?
Something perhaps that would ease
your mind in the most confusing times
is no farther than your local CD store.
Doxy's Kitchen, a five piece band
from Chapel Hill, is taking the club
scene by storm. With their latest release,
"New Age Truck Stop the band is turn-
ing heads and turning smiles. The band
itself is composed of lead vocals and
acoustic guitarAndrew Dykers), lead
guitar (Keith Ganz), bass (Doug
Largent), sax (Rob Chaseman), drums
(Justin Harris) and keys to please (Cordy
Franke). Not only does singer Dykers
take the stage these days with sheer con-
fidence, he does it with a laid back style.
The album opens up with a song
called "Over You a song that entails
lyrics that may seem down at times but
offers a huge pick up with the music.
That is the best thing about this band.
They sing about the blues to a jazz for-
mat. It works well indeed!
As the album goes on you'll be
drawn into a series of grooves includ-
ing the title track "New Age Truck
Stop which is probably the best tune
See DOXY page 13
7�ovce IRectcew
Giant Peach lacks
necessary magic
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
million people in New York. That means
to equal the number of records Hootie
has sold, every homeless person, drug
dealer, crack baby, hard-nosed cop, rich
lady and Bryant Gumbel would have, not
one, but two copies of Cracked Hear
View. Considering this level of popular-
ity, it is amazing that they are playing
these club dates.
Even though I have more respect
Photo Courtesy of Roswell Records
for them over this than I ever had be-
fore, 1 can guarantee you that the Foo
Fighters show was better than theirs.
First of all, we didn't have to wait in line.
Secondly, we copped a sweet spot from
which to view the band.s. And finally, we
had plenty of nxim and were really com-
fortable. From what I've heard, the
See FOO page 15
Being a critic gives you a lot of power. As a film critic for TEC, I get
paid to watch movies and voice my own biased opinions on them. Not only
that, but I am also the one who chooses what films get reviewed by the
paper. In a sense. I control the films to which readers of 7"�Care exposed.
I have been too kind lately. I've been giving many glowing reviews to
many movies. So I originally wanted to make this week's movie something
I knew 1 wouldn't like. 1 wanted to slam something hard. Then I backed
out and went to see a film 1 really wanted to enjoy, Disney's James and the
Giant Peach.
This film is the latest animated feat by the creators of The Nightmare
Before Christmas, a film I love more with each viewing. While I firmly
believed that Giant Peach would be a film that I would bestow praise
upon, when I left the theater I realized that 1 had inadvertently seen a film
1 could easily trash.
See PEACH page 14
It's been three weeks now,
and my faith in democracy is
still pretty shaky.
Hmm. Not bad as leads go;
I've certainly written worse.
But it's still not as good as the
simple "I think I've lost my
faith in democracy" that
started this bloated three-part
column off. The mam problem
with this lead is that I'm run-
ning the risk of boring my au-
dience. When you've got read-
ers coming back week after
week, it's important to con-
tinually come up with some-
thing new. Or, more accu-
rately, it's important to create
the illusion of something new.
After all, I've only got two
or three basic arguments. If
you break it down, the only
things I ever really write about
are individuality (sometimes
masquerading as originality)
and stupidity. Even other big
issues I sometimes tackle, like
justice, spring from these
wells. I apply my simple
themes to a variety of topics,
yes, but I seldom say anything
very different.
It all goes back to manipu-
lation (which takes us back to
the first part of this
nightmarishly long argument).
In the individual columns, I
try to hook and misdirect my
audience to get you to read my
work. In the series of colu.nns,
I try to convince you that I'm
saying something new each
time so you'll keep coming
back. But it's really all the
same old crap.
That sounds rather cyni-
cal and sinister, 1 suppose, and
it would give me great joy to
let you believe that I'm some
kind of power-mad lunatic who
hates the world and every-
thing in it. But, much as I'm
loathe to admit it, I'm not the
evil zombie overlord of 7"�C's
Lifestyle section. I'm really
just a loudmouth who (rather
paradoxically) wants little
more than a quiet, scholarly
life.
So you can all rest assured
that you're safe from my Ma-
chiavellian schemes. No, the
only person "A Drop in the
Bucket" puts in danger is its
author. A forum like this one,
you see, is a writer's wet
dream. It's a place to regularly
air my opinions, and for some-
one who is driven to share his
words with others, that's
heaven. Writing these columns
and manipulating my readers
See BUCKETpage 17





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16,1996
13
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Summer
School
NOT65 FfeDM Tlie UNPeRGROUND
Batman stalks in Black and White
-�-�
I

Excellent Jjjyijjgryraj
Over 1200diversecou
Earn extra credits feT With�2-sessfurB
Mark Brett
Ufesiyte Editor
See your advisor
Normally, I try to avoid doing su-
per hero comic book reviews in this col-
umn. "Notes from the Underground" is
usually reserved for stuff that the gen-
eral public isn't aware of. And while su-
per heroes certainly have kind of a mar-
ginal appeal, let's face it: everybody
knows who Batman is. In addition, most
of the people who would care what the
Caped Crusader is up to these days al-
ready know because they're comics fans
and Batman readers. So the super hero
reviews, in general, are out
Until something like Batman: Black
and White comes along, that is. The con-
cept for this four-issue mini-series is
simple: put together an eclectic group of
talented comics creators from the past
and present and have them do Batman
short stories with black and white art
The result of this plan is tar from simple:
the first issue of Black and White con-
tains stories that are ethereal, satirical
and hard-boiled.
And the black and white artwork
isn't just a cost-cutting measure. Black
and white comics art is a different ani-
mal from the color stuff. The black and
white artist can play with shadows more,
creating moods and tones for his story
that color stories can never quite achieve.
The artists in this first issue rise to
1996 Softball (Mid-season)
Top Picks
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1. Sigma Phi Epsilon A
2. Alpha Sigma Phi A
3. Pi Kappa Alpha A
4. Kappa Alpha A
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Fraternity Purple
1. Phi Kappa Psi
2. Sigma Phi Epsilon B
3. Kappa Alpha B
4. Theta Chi B
5. Pi Kappa Alpha B
the challenge. The first story, "Perpetual
Mourning" by alternative comics creator
Ted McKeever, creates a sharp contrast
between the title colors for a story that
is both understated and starkly realistic
It's understated in that it contains
no action and little dialogue, focusing
less on the bombastic side of Batman
and more on the detective side. As
Batman performs an autopsy, we see him
reconstruct the crime that led to his
subject's death from forensic evidence.
McKeever occasionally cuts to silent
panels of a couple dancing as a visual
counterpoint to Batman's autopsy and
subsequent detective work. Both mor-
bid and beautiful. "Perpetual Mourning"
is a hell of a way to kick off this comic.
In striking contrast is the second
story, "Two of a Kind" by Bruce Timm.
producer of the Batman animated se-
ries. Using the cartoony style of the TV
show, Timm tells a story about the vil-
lain Two-Face that's anything but
cartoony.
A plastic surgery breakthrough al-
YVomen's Gold
1. She-Things
2. Little Sluggers
3. HOOPPHI
4. Big Hitters
Women's Purple
l.Pinheads
2. Clueless
3. Aycock All-Stars
4. Aycock Hoochies
5,UmsteadWings
Sorority
1. Alpha Xi Delta
2. Pi Delta
3. Chi Omega
4. Alpha Phi
5. Delta Zeta
Men's Gold
1. Young Guns
2. Brinson's Babes
3. Penthouse Players
4. Cavemen
5. Footphi
Co-Rec
1. A Bunch of People
A Rusty Wallace Fan
2. Women's Lib
3. The Players
4.RCLS
5. Gin & Juice
Men's Purple
l.TPK's
2. Olberman's Heroes
3. Jumanji
4. Elvis Fan Club
5. That Real Smart Team
Men's Residence Hall
& 1. Aycock Thrashers
2. Pickin' Daiseys
3. Garrett Gunners
4. Hazzard Hillbillies
1996 One-on-One Basketball
Divisional Titles
Women's 5'6" and Over
Darlene Boone
Men's 6'0" and Under
James Ray
Women's 5'5" and Under
Emily "Hope" Murray
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.
Men's 6'1" and Over
Brad Thompson
lows Two-Face's disfigurement to be re-
paired and he returns to his civilian life
as Harvey Dent Falling in love with his
beautiful young doctor Marilyn Crane,
Dent seems to be cured of his insanity.
But then his lover's seductive twin sis-
ter enters the picture, and things go
swiftly south.
Timm's deceptively simple artwork
and deft storytelling, combined with
Dent's chilling narration, make this story
a dark and twisted psychological thriller
along the lines of the best noir detective
films. "Two of a Kind" is comics at their
best miles ahead of anything being done
on the Caped Crusader's regular book.
The remaining stories in the first
issue of Batman: Black and White are a
mixed bag at best "The Hunt" by com-
ics veteran Joe Kubert has beautiful art-
work but the story is flat. Howard
Chaykin's "Petty Crimes" is a social sat-
ire about a serial killer who murders only:
people who break society's unwritten
See BATMAN page 16
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
"2$& oAnmua levatioit cf2nce'
astjatoutta
April 18, 19, 20, 22 and 23, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
April 21, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: $8.00 � ECU Students & Children: $5.00
Call-328-6829
STUDENT APPRECIATION DAY SAVINGS
It's y0l� Store for Books and More!
Wednesday, April 17th is Student Appreciation Day!
Were showing our appreciation for your loyal
patronage by giving you 25 off any regular price
purchase of apparel, gift items, and trade books!
No other discounts apply. No coupon necessary.
Store Hours:
Monday-Thursday: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm
Friday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday: 11:00 am � 5:00 pm
regular price
Apparel
TTfc
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� mm M � M .
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Don't Miss our
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.?where your dollars support student scholars!
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Currency Exchange
� , �
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Thursday, April 18th
Remote buyback
locations open
April 23-27 ft April 29-May 1
No one buys back more
textbooks at a better price
than ECU Student Stores!





I. . - i- '� . I
ip Him? �(i �
14
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
VCrWia Quit,
This week's topic:
Leave it to Beaver
1. What was the
address of the Cleaver
house?
2. Other than
"Theodore what did
Eddie Haskell call the
Beaver?
3. Name Beaver's
teacher.
4. What was Whitey's
last name?
5. Who was the
principal of Beaver's
school?
6. Who played Mrs.
Cleaver?
7. What was the name
of Beaver's school?
8. How long did the
series run?
9. What was Lumpy's
last name?
10. Who played Wally?
Answers in
Thursday's issue
PEACH from page 12
James and the Giant Peach is
based on Roald Dahl's children's
book, and segments of the film are
worthy of Dahl's bizarre, twisted,
magical talent. But not enough of
the film carries the magic that el-
evates Dahl's work to a unique level.
The concept is magical enough.
James (Paul Terry) is a pure-hearted
child who loses his parents to a mon-
strous rhinoceros that terrorizes the
skies above. Without his parents,
James is forced to endure the abuses
of his wicked aunts, Spiker and
Sponge (played to evil perfection by
Joanna Lurnley and Miriam
Margolyes respectively).
While James dreams of escap-
ing to New York, the city of dreams,
he is trapped. However. James is
given a chance for escape when a
mysterious man (Pete Postlethwaite)
gives James a bag filled with magic.
When this magic escapes from the
bag, a giant peach grows and James
escapes in the peach with his newly-
discovered giant insect friends.
Admittedly, my synopsis is very
vague and basic, but no matter. The
bulk of the film centers around
James and the magical insects as
they escape across the world to
reach New York. With a concept like
this, you would expect a wonderfully
bizarre adventure filled with magi-
cal moments. What you get is a
script (blandly written by Karey
Kirkpatrick, Jonathan Roberts and
Steve Bloom) that meanders with no
sense of direction or purpose.
Some scenes are somewhat ex-
citing (one features an incredible me-
chanical shark and another thrills
with an underwater skeleton battle),
but most of the film is just filler. The
scriptwriters try to focus on char-
acter development as this mis-
matched team slowly develops into
a family, but their method is lack-
ing.
The repeated attempts to de-
velop characters through musical
numbers would not be so bad if only
the music were better. One musical
number about the joys of eating is
not only mediocre but also a waste
of valuable screen time.
Worse yet. the film's lead is also
lacking. A standard feature of many
children's stories is the goiden child
who is purer and better than any-
one else in the story. As James. Paul
Terry docs well with presenting a
pure soul, but he is simply an an-
noying presence who really doesn't
impress with his singing voice.
But I can't blindly trash this
Tl
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ye Internship i rogram.
America's Top Internships details jusr a pew.
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Mutual Life
rbe Quiet Company'
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(at the Plaza)
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Student Appreciation Day
April 17th
10 off any purchase with
Student ID
film. The stop-motion animation is,
of course, brilliant. It's even up to
the standards .set by The Nightmare
Before Christmas. The insect char-
acters also hold your interest, par-
ticularly a seductive French lady
spider and a gentlemanly grasshop-
per.
The film does start on a solid
note. The opening sequences, which
are filmed in live action, are placed
against fanciful expressionistic sets
that captivate the eye, and the story
is engrossing at the start. Unfortu-
nately, when the magical elements
come into play, the film spirals
down. This is deadly for a story that
should have magic at its very heart.
After succeeding to wondrous
effect with The Nightmare future
Christmas, the makers of James and
the Giant Peach did have much to
live up to. Perhaps it was Tim
Burton's i park that made
Nightmare so special, because some-
thing falls short here. While the very
nature of this story involves the bi-
zarre and the magical. Selick and
company ultimately miss the boat on
this outing. As much as l wanted to
love the film, this giant peach is hol-
low and hard to swallow.
On a scale of one to 10, James
and the Giant Peach rates a five.
Interested in living at
Players Club;
but need roommates?
Come join us on Wednesday, April 17 from 7-9pm for a
roommate Matching Social. There will be food, music, fun
and new friends for you to meet. We'll provide the people,
you make the choice!
Model Apartments will be available for you to visit. And
don't forget to register for our $500 giveaway! -
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
Where weekends last all week long
� a m w . : � �

HERE'S WHAT'S
V: ft
mm
�� -�-
00
at Mendenhall Student Center
Get out of the finals
traffic jam at
the rest area
in Mendenhall
Student Center.
ring vour hooks, notes and comfy slip-
pers and take a finals study break in
Mendenhall! Reserve a study room for your-
self or your group. Enjoy free refreshments.
Take a break in our relaxation room featuring
comedy and assorted relaxation videotapes.
Play a free round of billiards andor bowling.
� i
OPEN UNTIL
MIDNIGHT
Tuesday (23)
Wednesday (24)
Thursday (25)
Sunday (28)
Monday (29)
Tuesday (30)
wfree coffee
and snacks
n Tuesday (23) night, get a jump on
exam week at our READING DAY
RELAX-OFF. We're offering message
therapy (9-11 p.m.) and aroma therapy (9-10
p.m.) in the first floor Cynthia Lounge, in
addition to free refreshments, stressbuster
giveaways and door prizes, We'll draw for a
12 hour massage gift certificate at 11 p.m.
Pirate Ride will be operating to get you safely around campus at night.
KJ
. �'
Country Line Dance Lessons
THE LAST LESSON IS THIS THURSDAY FROM
8-9:30 P.M. IN THE MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center oiActivity"
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Offia � Bowling � Billiards �
� Student Locator Service � ATMs �
� it (iallery �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs 8 a.m. -11
11 p m.





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
15
$&
Student Appreciation Day: April 17
20 Off Menu Entree with
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Prices
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FREE Admission April 17th
Student Appreciation Day!
Weekdays$ 1.00 person
Weekends $ 2.00person
Children 5 and under Free
Waterslide Opening Mav 11
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Open Daily $3.00person for 45 minutes
Private Party Bookings at
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DOX.Y from page 12
on the album.
Although the album has its hit
song plastered all over the cover, don't
be too afraid to listen to what else these
guys have to say. Scratching its way to
the top is "54 a song about the feel-
ing of regret It's hard to understand
just what Dykers is talking about, but
that leaves the listener with the ability
to imagine the other half. That works
sometimes; just ask Eddie Vedder!
Strangely, the album ends with
"Over You" as well. Don't worry, you're
not getting gypped!
The song is on there twice, but the
second time it's an extended jam. Not
only does it take uifferent directions, it
enables the audience to imagine that
not only did they hear a disc that went
from one place to another, they also
heard a disc that never left from where
it started.
Doxy's Kitchen is good, writes well
and has a lot to look forward to in the
future. As long as they have fun doing
what they're doing, their sound will be
consistent What is the future anyway?
Well, at least it's tomorrow, and tomor-
row there's Doxy's Kitchen!
rOO from page 12
Hootie show had none of these things.
That Dog was the opening act The
front members are Rachel and Petra
Haden, the daughters of jazz great
Charlie Haden, and Pat Smear, former
guitarist for Nirvana and now the same
for Foo Fighters, introduced them as his
favorite band. Employing a fiddle added
a nice touch to their otherwise standard
pop alternarock sound.
The best part of this set was that
Dave Grohl, former Nirvana drummer
and lead singersongwriterguitarist for
Foo Fighters, came out to watch That
Dog's set and ended up standing right
in front of us. My brother, Nirvana fan
that he is, went right up to Grohl and
struck up a conversation. He and Dave
talked for a bit shook hands, and re-
turned to watching the set Grohl went
backstage after the set was over, and my
brother went into a state of shock. It was
definitely one of the highlights of hisl6
year life. Grohl was just as personable
with his fans as he had been when I saw
him at the Cat's Cradle on Mike Watt's
last tour, where Foo Fighters debuted as
an opening act - coming out to see open-
ing bands, signing autographs, shaking
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hands, really talking to fans.
Next up were the Amps, Kim Deal's
new band. Deal is a former member of�
the Pixies and the Breeders, both con?S
summate bands in their own right so .
the expectations were high. They did not �
disappoint with a set that was much
louder and harder than anything Deal
had done with the Breeders. My main '
problem with the Breeders was that they ,
had no edge, so it was good to see the ,
Amps go this direction. They also invited,
Rachel Haden to join them for one song �
which was a intriguing combination, con j
sidering how loud that Amps are and how
sweet Rachel sounds. It worked out welL1
Lastly, Foo Fighters took the stagej
and provided what people had expected;
on all counts. Right from the beginning
the band struck up a rapport with the"
crowd that lasted the entire night Keep
ing up his friendly. I'm just an average .
guy attitude, Grohl made the audience-
his by constantly conversing with them
during the breaks between songs. They J
played everything off their album and
quite a number of B-sides and one-off,
tracks, including three new tunes that
will probably be included on their next
album, due February '97.
The encore was the best though,
because they had Petra Haden join them.
for "Floaty" (one of their best songs) and
they played their cover of Gary Neuman's ;
"Down in the Park" which appears now ,
on the X-Files soundtrack.
The encore concluded with a impro .
visational jam that began with Petra -
Haden bringing Dave Grohl a violin bow
which he proceeded to use on his guitar ;
in his best imitation of Jimmy Page This ;
dissolved into a wall of sonic dissonance
that lasted a good 10 minutes before they
brought it right back into the song and
finished for the evening. Always gracious,
Grohl thanked everyone for coming and
wished them a safe trip home.
I got back to Greenville about two
in the morning, had a good night's sleep
and felt pity for all the poor souls I saw
the next day who had gone out drinking
and partying after the Hootie show.
Those that had gotten in were exhausted
and hung over. So were those that didn't
get in, but they were angry on top of
that Me, I was just fine.
By my count that leaves Foo Fight-
ers ahead of Hootie, two to nothing.
Better luck next time, Hootie. "I
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mm mmm






16
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
DOUG from page 12
ther. Suppose you had Peter Frampton.
The Cars and Charles Dickens all m one
band.
(Pause for collective contemplation)
"Eee-yuck" is right 1 find it hard to
believe that Dickens could hang with that
crew, and Frampton wouldn't be able to
control his ego.
Which brings us back again to Doug
Powell. His ego seems to be a little out
of control on this album of semi-acous-
tic power pop. But perhaps that's as it
should be for a singer-songwriter. After
all, Powell wrote all of the songs and
played all of the instruments (except for
drums, strings and one guitar solo), and
he has enough talent to do it well. Maybe
he deserves to be a bit cocky.
The downside is that after hearing
the first track, you actually don't need
to hear any more of the record, because
it all sounds the same. Powell has no
range of emotion and consequently the
record reworks the same groove over and
over again. It becomes boring. Even
songs about the TV show The Prisoner
and the Kinks' lead singer Ray Davies
don't help.
In fact the only truly inspired parts
of the whole album are the guitar lines
from the Kinks songs "You Really Got
Me" and "All Day and All of the Night"
SPEND THE
SUMMER
iELVIS
OK SO ELVIS IS OUR DOG. BUT HE
KNOWS GOOD HELP WHEN HE SEES
rT AND HE WWTS TOU TO COME JOIN
OUR HIGH ADVENTURE STAFF AT
CAMP CAROLINA. YOU'LL GET THE
EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME THIS
SUMMER. MOUNTAIN BIKE
PROSMECHANICS. ROCK CLIMBING
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DRIVERS AND CABIN COUNSELORS
NEEDED. CALL CHA-CHA, ROB. DAN.
ALFRED OR NATH FOR MORE
INFORMATION: 1-800-551-9136.
that Powell samples in "A Prayer for Ray
Davies These chords are so good that
they make everything else on the album
pale in comparison. Here's some advice.
Doug: next time you make a record, don't
lift music directly from musicians that
are better than you. They'll always show
you up. If you're going to do it then at
least change it enough that you make it
you own.
Powell describes Ballad of The Tin
Men as "the story of everyone who is
looking for some type of meaning, any-
one who is looking for a heart in some
way
Pretentious as that may sound, it is
not only an accurate description of the
original Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz,
but also this album. Although Powell is
a proficient musician and a quirky
songwriter, his songs lack heart and
meaning.
BATMAN frontpage 13
laws (like taking 15 items into a super-
market express lane). It's a fun read, but
Chaykin doesn't do much with the black
and white art and the story lacks the
impact of the first two.
The final story is "The Devil's Trum-
pet" by Archie Goodwin and Argentinean
comics art legend Jose Munoz. A story
about jazz, obsession and the devils that
lurk in the minds of men. "Devil's Trum-
pet" is a satisfying ending to one of the
best comics I've read this year.
The three remaining issues of this
mini-series promise more quality work.
It's well worth checking out even if you
hate super heroes.
On a scale of one to 10. Batman:
Black and White rates an eight
BARE from page 12
The fifth and final act to reach the
plate was the Christian sounds of
Crosswork. The sextet became a popu-
lar act with the other bands partici-
pating in the Battle. Crosswork just
recently recorded their first CD in Nash-
ville, Tenn and gave out a few comple-
mentary copies to the members ot
Treading Evans.
When the dust settled, the Tho-
mas Brothers was only band left stand-
ing. Scoring well with the judges, they
won Battle of the Bands, the cool $500
first place prize and the opening slot
at Barefoot on the Mall Dare to
Bare.
The Thomas Brothers are looking
forward to opening Barefoot on Thurs-
day and should take the stage around
noon.
Hopefully the weather will be as
kind to the Brothers for their next sIiC.
as it was for the Battle of the Bands.
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jmSm
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
17
Summer
School
f96
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
BUCKET from page 12
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Attend that popilar, exciting course
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GREENVILLE
and generally mouthing off at the
world is a pure power trip (espe-
cially the manipulation part).
But therein lies the danger. Ex-
pressing myself so forcefully all the
time makes it easy to believe in my
own correctness, my own moral ini-
tiative, my own superiority. In
other words (and here's this week's
manipulative turning point), it
would he easy to become an elitist.
Dennis Miller is a prime ex-
ample of this. Much as I love the
guy, his constant self-expression
has convinced him that he's right
and anybody who doesn't agree
with him (to use his words) is just
some stupid cha-cha.
To do the kind of socialpoliti-
cal comedy he does (or the kind of
stuff I do here), you've got to have
a little of the elitist in you to begin
with. You've got to believe in your
own perspective before you can ef-
fectively express it. The danger is
in embracing that perspective too
completely.
For me, it's a matter of remind-
ing myself that my perspective is
taken in part from other perspec-
tives I've been exposed to. Even my
staunch beliefs in individuality and
originality came from somebody
else in the beginning. My hatred of
the group mentality makes me part
of a group in turn. And I'm cer-
tainly not the first person to rec-
ognize and despise stupidity.
If even the most fiercely inde-
pendent personal philosophy is
shaped by other philosophies, why
shut out different ideas? That kind
of thinking is ultimately stupid, and
that's how elitists think. So if I'm
going to hate stupidity, I can't al-
low myself to be an elitist.
But democracy is still making
me a little queasy.
The problem is, I believe that
some philosophies are inherently
better than others. The philosophy
of the addict, for instance, that
short-term pleasure is better than
long-term health, is self-destructive
and therefore less valid than a phi-
losophy that is more life-affirming.
Likewise, I think some philosophies
(mostly the oppressive or destruc-
tive or hateful ones) are less valid
than the ones I hold, and I fear that
those philosophies will take control
if we let them.
But that's not to say that all
philosophies are inferior to my own.
There are plenty of philosophies I
don't agree with that are every bit
as valid as mine. While I'll argue in
favor of safe and legal abortion un-
til I'm blue in the face, the pro-life
stance makes sense to me and I re-
spect it.
And if I can return for a moment
to the second part of my argument
and the ingenious Mr. James Burke,
even the philosophies of barbarians
can make us all stronger. While
Burke sees the downfall of society
as we know it looming in our not-
too-distant future, he also sees some-
thing new rising out of the destruc-
tion. Even the things 1 hold most
dear can be replaced with something
better. That's the evolution of soci-
ety, and it can't be stopped.
We are all of us surrounded by
an infinitely intricate web of infor-
mation and opinion, and it's up to
each of us to pick out the good stuff
and make up our own minds. This
column is nothing more than one
tiny strand in that great web, a la-
goon in a vast ocean, a drop in the
biggest bucket you ever saw.
I hope you've enjoyed it. I know
I have.
Thank you, and goodnight.
HEROES ARE
TOO
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cost must be paid above and beyond
full-time student tuition, students
successfully completing the course
will receive three credit hours and
the class will count towards compu-
tation of the GPA. With proven stu-
dent interest, the TRP wants to open
the class through the university so
that the class can be included in tu-
ition.
The project already has some in-
teresting things going on in the
world of cyberspace. All lessons will
be posted weekly on the TRP home
page and homework assignments will
be e-mailed to Lewis or posted on
that student's home page. As it stands
right now, there are no actual tests
for the course, but students' perfor-
mance will be evaluated through the
homework assignments and projects.
Although the practice of offer-
ing courses entirely on the internet
is relatively new, ECU is already way
ahead of its time. In May, several ECU
students will graduate with a master
of science degree in industrial tech-
nology without ever setting foot on
the ECU campus. Their entire mas-
ters programs were completed via the
internet.
For information on the masters
program via the internet check out
their home page at http:
www.siLecu.edutrphome.htm. The
four classes offered for graduates this
summer are ITEC 6402 (Applied Su-
pervisory Management), ELEC 5502
(Hands on the Internet Graduate
Level), ITEC 6010 (Readings in Indus-
try) and DESN 5500 (World Wide Web
Publishing).
Students can access an informa-
tional web page at http:
www.sit.ecu.eduitecdeptcourses
first2.htm - and they can register on-
line (with a major credit card) at the
same address. With specific questions,
students are encouraged to send email
to Lewis at itinfo@homer.sitecu.edu.
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mm
mmmmmm
18
Tuesday, April 16,1996
The East Carolinian
New swim recruits
sign for next year
Pirates slug out three
Seahawks
Baseball team
wins two games
and loses one
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
Building on a two game winning
streak, the Pirates would return home
Jo host CAA rival, UNC- Wilmington
for an ever important three game con-
ference series. After a tough road trip,
which included tough games at
George Mason and at Campbell, the
Pirates would split the previous four
games. So for Gary Overton's troops,
there was no place like home.
The Bucs opened the three game
series up with the hated Seahawks by
sweeping the visitors in the series
doubleheader 15-2 and 7-4.
"We feel that every conference
series is important, so we approached
this series just like any other series
with the same intensity and we re-
sponded Overton said.
The Pirates would draw first
jblood in the bottom of the first off of
Jone of Antaine Jones' two triples on
the afternoon which drove in Randy
iRigsby. The Seahawks would tie the
�Bucs in the following inning, but from
�then on it was all Pirates.
After regaining the lead in the
bottom half of the third inning, the
Pirates would once again explode of-
fensively in the middle innings, scor-
ing 13 of the 15 runs total in the
middle innings.
"1 feel we played well all week-
end defensively, but we played to our
optimum level on Saturday offensively
as wel' as defensively Overton said.
The Pirates broke the windows
out on Saturday in the first game,
crashing their 15 runs by way of 19
hits. The Bucs not only got it done at
the plate, but they also got it done on
,the mound as well. The Pirates would
send Patrick Dunham to the hill and
he, with help from Parks Buie in the
ninth, would hold the Seahawks to
only two runs off of five hits. His de-
fense would back him up, committing
no errors.
"We received excellent pitching
from Dunham as well as crisp defense
in the first game to go along with the
excellent hitting Overton said.
Dunham allowed only two hits
and registered six k's in eight innings
of work to up his record to 6-2. The
Bucs would also get five RBI's as well
as a dinger from TEC Athlete of the
Week Randy Rigsby.
The second game proved to be a
little closer as the Pirates had to come
back from a 3-2 deficit to win 7-4.
Bryan Smith would get the nod in the
seven inning second game and would
get some help from senior Jeff Hewitt
"In both games on Saturday we
had excellent defense led by our out-
standing pitching performances -
Dunham in the first game and Smith
in the second game Overton said.
The Pirates jumped out early tak-
ing a 2-1 lead going into the fourth
inning; from there, the Seahawks
would take their first lead of the week-
See BASE page 23
Dave Pond
Senior Writer
Before the 1996 men's track
season, there were many questions
to be answered regarding the
squad's success during the upcom-
ing season.
Enter ECU's version of the Fab
Five, who have more than done their
part in helping the Pirates steamroll
their way into the upcoming CAA
Championships. Damon Davis,
Rashawn Deans, Mike Miller,
Vaughn Monroe and Chris Rey have
blended their talents with the rest
of the team to form a dangerously-
fast squad ready to take on the
CAA's best runners in Harrisonburg,
Va. this Saturday.
"The season has been going
great Rey said. "No one's hurt,
which is the big thing right now.
Everybody's healthy - and going
into the final stretch of the season,
that's what you need
Good team health and solid per-
formances from the Pirate newcom-
ers were me only question marks
surrounding this year's squad,
which seems to get better with ev-
ery meet.
On Saturday, ECU's 4x400-
meter relay team, consisting of fresh-
men Davis and Miller alongside jun-
iors Dwight Henry and Lewis Har-
ris, shattered their previous-best
time by over two seconds, posting a
first-place 3:05.35 at the Duke Invi-
tational. As well as being a new ECU
fast time for '96, the foursome's
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Pictured here are the members of the '9596 ECU women's swim team. For the second
consecutive year, the women claimed top honors at the CAA conference championships.
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
With back-to-back CAA champi-
onships behind them, the ECU
women's swim team is looking to
continue their winning tradition.
Head Swim Coach Rick Kobe
was pleased with the performance
of the Lady Pirates last season, es-
pecially during the final meet that
saw the Lady Pirates walk away with
their second consecutive CAA cham-
pionship.
"We knew we had a good shot
to win, but they won it really hand-
ily, which was fun Kobe said. "The
nice thing about our championship
meet was the 17 girls that we took,
15 of them actually finaled, and the
two girls that didn't final, won a con-
solation event We just had a lot of
depth and that's what won the meet
for us
The unique thing about this
year's women's championship event,
was that ECU didn't win a single
event, but still came away with the
overall victory. According to Kobe,
this was made possible because the
Lady Pirates finaled two to four
swimmers in ev-
ery event.
ECU will
again look to be
a strong con-
tender during
next season, with
the recent sign-
ing of top re-
cruits.
"This next
year we plan on
being even stron-
ger Kobe said, wgmmmmmmmmmmm
"We plan on be-
ing faster than we were last year.
We graduated seven really quality
girls, four of which were on our
championship team. But all seven
played a big part in our success this
year
Kobe says that they tried to fo-
cus on recruiting freestylers for next
season.
"Freestylers were our priority,
because everybody we graduated
was a freestyler and we did that
Kobe said.
But it was
not just
freestylers Kobe
was looking to
add to his roster
next season.
"I would say
freestyle, butter-
fly and diving
was what w�
were really look-
ing at getting af-
ter, and righl
now we have
seven girls com-
mitted to coming to this school.f
Kobe said. "Of the seven, we have
two outstanding divers and five very
excellent freestylers
The signees so far include,
Hollie Butler, a Kinston native and:
a YMCA national qualifier, who will
See SWIM page 21
"We knew we had
a good shot to
win, but they won
it really handily,
which was fun
� Head Swim Coach Rick
Kobe
�'��'�:� .
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Antaine Jones (R) is congratulated by teammate Kevyn
Fulcher (L) after scoring off a Randy Rigsby RBi.
Runners prepare for CAA
Track team to
compete for
bragging rights
The spoKTS STafj: op TEC
senion arhteTes connnued
iaes and The sponrs
warns to conqnaTulare and wish all
success, Rene is a List op senion aih-
They have played while at ECU.
BASEBALL
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Baseball team repays Campbell
Track members (L-R) Chris
Deans, Vaughn Monroe and
mark was good enough to become
the new meet record in Durham.
Also on Saturday, the young
4x100 meter team lowered it's sea-
son-best mark to an outstanding
40.43 seconds, and Chris McKinney,
the 1995 CAA Championships Out-
standing Meet Performer, extended
his team-best triple-jump mark to
14.64 meters.
"The 4xl00-meter relay team is
on the verge right now, we need just
a little more practice and finesse as
far as the handoffs go Rey said.
"The weather has been a big factor
so far during the outdoor season.
When its cold, you cant run as well
- you become scared and afraid to
extend yourself because of the
chance of pulled muscles. Now that
the weather is warmer, we are able
to extend the zone and get it done
Photo Courtesy of CHRIS REY
Rey, Damon Davis, Rashawn
Mike Miller pose at a meet.
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
Deans agrees with Rey.
"I'm looking forward to the
championships, and I hope the
weather's hot he said. "I'm tired
of running in the cold weather. If
we have a warm day, we can perform
to our maximum potential
One thing these young Pirates
have learned already is to set realis-
tic goals towards their successes
both individually and as a team.
"One thing people have to real-
ize, is that we are not going to come
back with a conference champion-
ship after this weekend, simply be-
cause of the limited number of ath-
letes on the squad Rey said. "We
are just going to all go out and rep-
resent East Carolina University the
best that we can.
See RUN page 22
Revenge is not a word coaches like to say, but this
past week the ECU baseball team got their share as they
beat Campbell 84 last week on the road in Buies Creek.
If you don't recall, less than a month ago the Cam-
els stole their first game in Greenville since 1988. Though
it was a hard fought game by both teams, the narrow
loss left a bitter taste in the mouths of the Pirates.
"Despite the varied outcome. I felt we played very
well both times we faced Campbell Coach Gary Overton
said.
Offensively, every Pirate in the order improved their
stats by having at least one hit apiece. Catcher Tim
Flaherty got things started by answering Campbell's one
run lead in the second, by smacking a single to give the
Bucs their first hit of the game.
"Defensively we played excellent baseball both out-
ings, but we had better bats and run production the
second time Overton said.
Flaherty would tie the game after a William McLean
error and the Pirates would eventually take the lead when
freshman Steve Salargo plated Chris Glanz to put the
Bucs up 2-1.
The Pirate lead would not hold up as the Camels looked
steady in the early going, scoring one run for the first three
innings. The Pirates then took control in the fourth, after
trailing 3-2, the Bucs exploded scoring six unanswered runs
in the middle innings to return the favor.
"We had confident hitters that day and utilized all of
our tools which we need to keep doing in order to be suc-
cessful Overton said.
Versatile freshman Travis Thompson banged in a run
off of his fourth inning double which tied it and speedy
freshman AntaineJones registered a single to give the Bucs
the lead. Senior Lamont Edwards rapped a two-run double
of his own to finish the inning, and the Pirates would not
look back. In the fifth and sixth innings Jason Head and
Lance Tigyer got in on the action by plating the final two
runs for the Bucs.
Defensively, the Pirates let only one Camel cross off of
seven hits and committed no errors to hold off any late
game rally.
"We played defensively with intensity in the field and
on the mound Overton said. "I feel that this was a very
important non-conference win against a solid program which
defeated our club earlier in the season. So. it was an im-
portant win Overton said.
The Pirates would ride their payback victory out of
Taylor Field back into Harrington to face conference rival
UNC-Wilmington to wrap up the week.





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16,1996
19

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DONT WANT TO SPEND A LOT?!
W t 4-o't wht to look fa1
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Lots of Aerobicwear Now
Greatly Reduced.
Arlington Village
756-6670
ECU'S
SPORTS INFORMATION D
SID - The 1996 ECU Softball
Team (32-18-1) blanked Hampton
University on Thursday in a non-
conference doubleheader 9-0 and
8-0, both games in five innings.
With the Lady Pirates" home
season finale, the 1996 senior
class was honored for their suc-
cess: First Baseman Joey Clark,
PICK US UP and check us out when we broadcast live all day
long at BAREFOOT ON THE MALL on Thursday. We'll have
plenty of CDs, tapes and other prizes for you!
It's the WZMB Lunchtime Cafe! We'll broadcast live from in front
of Student Stores this Wednesday from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Stop by and give us your music requests.
We'll go off the air for the semester Monday at 12 midnight.
Listen for our summer sign-on.
SI"
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
from Los Angles, Calif Catcher '
Infielder, Mary Dunlap, from
Phoenix, Va and, Center Fielder
Heather Smith, from Glen
Burnie, Md.
ECU'S Jami Bendle, a native
of Amsterdam, Ohio, raised her
record to 13-10 on the year, strik-
ing out six and allowing just two
hits. In the sec-
ond game of the
doubleheader,
the Lady Pirates,
led by Tracie
Podratsky, of
Centerville, Va
(13-4) shutdown
the Hampton
squad notching
one strikeout,
but hitting four
batters.
Outfielder Heather Smith
scored all three times she
stepped up to the plate, and sec-
ond baseman Jolin Eckman,
along with teammate Sharolyn
Strickland drove in two runs
apiece to lead the ladies to vie
tory 9-0.
In the second game, Smith,
again, reached base all three
times she batted, scoring two
runs, while teammates, Clark and
Rhonda Rost drove in two RBI's
apiece for the Lady Pirates.
Hampton University's Tara
Midgett dropped both games of
the doubleheader, falling to 12-7
on the year.
The Lady Pirates would then
travel north to Fairfax to face
George Mason. ECU stole both
games in the doubleheader 3-0
and 8-2.
For the Lady Pirates, who are
on their final road trip of the sea-
son, taking both games from
GMU was not
difficult on
the arms of
pitchers
Bendle and
Podratsky.
Bendle
blanked the
Patriots in the
first game giv-
ing up just
two hits as she
moved to 14-
Outfielder
Heather Smith
scored all three
times she stepped
up to the plate. . .
10 on the year. Podratsky gave
up eight hits and two runs, up-
ping her record to 14-4 on the
season.
Junior Short Stop Sharolyn
Strickland collected two RBI's in
both games leading the ladies.
Senior Outfielder Heather Smith,
reached base twice in both games
while teammate Third Baseman
Rost had three hits in both
games.

SID - The men's tennis team
was defeated by the Richmond
Spiders 6-1 on Friday, but re-
bounded to knock off American
by a 4-3 score on Saturday.
In Friday's match versus
Richmond, the Pirates could only
manage one win in singles.
Sophomore Nils Alomar defeated
UR's Scott Pfeiffer 6-3. 7-5 at No.
3, however, the Pirate netters
dropped the other five single
matches as well as the double
split and lost by a 6-1 score.
The Pirates (10-8 overall, 2-
4 CAA) got off to an early start
in the Saturday match against
American winning the doubles
point behind victories by No. 2
Kenny KirbyJosh Campbell and
No. 3 Derek SlateKris Hutton.
ECU sealed the win with victo-
ries by Wes Kintner at No. 1,
Alomar at No. 2 and Slate at No.
6 singles.

SID-The ECU women's ten-
nis team lost to James Madison
by a 4-0 score on April 14 to fin-
ish 6th place in the CAA women's
tennis tournament.
JMU swept all three doubles
.matches to claim the doubles
point and then won three singles
matches to seal the win. ECU, 12-
5 overall and 4-3 in the CAA, held
leads in the singles matches at
No. 1 and No. 6, but those
matches were suspended because
the match was already clinched.
William & Mary, ranked 22nd
See SID page 20
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN'S
UDE
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R
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20
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
SID
from page 19
U3M!
� iij
il i
MttJ
��an
hi
nationally, defeated VCU by a 4-
0 score to claim its tenth con-
secutive conference title. Rich-
mond grabbed third place in the
conference by defeating Old Do-
minion, 4-0. UNC-Wilmington was
awarded seventh place with a 5-
0 win over American.
The lady Pirates will play
their final match of the season
on Saturday, April 20, when they
host Elon College at 1:00 p.m.
SID-The ECU women's ten-
nis team lost to James Madison
by a 4-0 score on April 14 to fin-
ish 6th place in the CAA women's
tennis tournament.
JMU swept all three doubles
matches to claim the doubles
point and then won three singles
matches to seal the win. ECU, 12-
5 overall and 4-3 in the CAA, held
leads in the singles matches at
No. 1 and No. 6, but those
matches were suspended because
the match was already clinched.
Williar & Mary, ranked 22nd
nationally, defeated VCU by a 4-
0 score to claim its tenth con-
secutive conference title. Rich-
mond grabbed third place in the
conference by defeating Old Do-
minion, 4-0. UNC-Wilmington was
awarded seventh place with a 5-
0 win over American.
The lady Pirates will play
their final match of the season
on Saturday, April 20, when they
host Elon College at 1:00 p.m.
SID-The 1996 ECU golf
team completed the third and fi-
nal round of the CAA Champion-
ships Sunday at the Lane Tree
Golf Club, winding up in seventh
place.
"1 was pleased with our per-
formance today ECU Head
Coach Kevin William said. "We
fought back and had a better
round today than the last two,
but we just couldn't move up
Virginia Commonwealth
swept both the individual title
and the team title as all five team
members .placed in the top!5.
VCU's John Rollins (74-67-
71212) snuck up on second
round Leader Josh Ligi, of James
Madison, to take the individual
title. Rollins' teammate, Donny
Lee, captured second place with
a 216 (70-73-73).
The Pirates finished the
three rounds with a 913 (305-
307-301). ECU'S Brent Padrick,
of Fayetteville, N.C had the
team's best finish, tied at 17 with
a 225 (78-74-73).
The 1996 CAA Coach of the
Year and Player of the Year hon-
ors have been announced. VCU's
Jack Beil got the coaching hon-
ors, while John Rollins won
Player of the Year.
The Pirates' next tournament
will be at the brand new Bradford
Creek Golf Club in Greenville. The
1996 PepsiBradford Creek Clas-
sic will begin on Friday, April 19
and resume Saturday, April 20.
TEC is looking for a
motivated
individual to
become our
Circulation
Manager.
Apply at our office
on the Second floor
of the Student
Publication
Building across
from the library.
Transit Manager Position Available
Applications Now Being
Accepted for ECU Transit
Manager
Interested persons may apply in room 255 of
Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline is Friday, April 19th, 3:00 pm.
You must be a full time student, in good standing with the
University, a minimum 2.0 GPA and have experience in
transit operations. -
Need a
If you wtll.be a returning
student in the fall. University Housing
Services will-be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Full and
part-time positions available. For details and
applications, please come to 214 Whichard.
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COMEDY BLOCK PARTY
�nnpMm
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1996
COLLEGE HILL DRIVE COMMUTER PARKING LOT
6:00-11:00 PM
FEATURING:
DJ - LEE JUDGE
6:00 PM -11:00 PM
COMEDIENNE -
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8:00 PM
Worked Caroline's Comedy Club,
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COMEDIENNE -
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Worked HBO's "Def Comedy Jam
Apollo Comedy Hour, HBO's "Snaps"
FREE FOOD beginning @ 7:00 pm, pizza, soft drinks, popcorn
sponsored by the Student Union Cultural Awarenes Committee
f�f
mi m





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
21
BBHMBBHMOMBHlBHMBHHHHBHHB
momammmammamumtsmmm
SWIM from page 18
be a middle distancedistance
freestlyer for the Lady Pirates.
Another in-state signee from Ra-
leigh is Cindy Clawson. who is a Jun-
ior National qualifier in the 400 In-
dividual Medley and also the 200
butterfly.
U'oodbridge. Va. future Lady Pi-
rate. Adrian Cross will swim the 50
all the way up to the 500 freestyle
for ECU.
Two divers also top the list of
recruits for ECU. Casey Dodge and
Shannon Hoffman, two out-of-state
signess. will provide added depth to
the diving team.
Rachael Pratt, a breaststroker
from Carboro. N.C and Teresa
Hockman. a freestyler sprinter, will
help to round out the '9697 swim
team.
But Kobe expects to sign at
least three to four more women to
the team.
"We expect to sign more kids
with junior national cuts, because
that's where our program is; kids
that are going to national meets
Kobe said. "So we are real happy
with the seven kids already, and I
would say we will probably have a
total of 11 including the divers,
when it's all said and done
Kobe is excited about the new
signees and expects the girls to be
as fast, and in some cases faster.
than some of the girls already on
the team. But is a third champion-
ship in the works for next season?
Kobe thinks so.
They will have the ability to
win another championship, and they
will have to perform Kobe said.
"But on paper, we will look really
strong
With more signess on the way.
Kobe likes what he has so far, and
is thrilled about adding a few more
to the roster.
"We give ourselves an A' for re-
cruiting Kobe said.
Recruiting is an ongoing pro-
cess that takes a lot of dedication
in trying to get the best possible
swimmers for the team. It involves
a lot of phone calls and persistence.
"Every two weeks these kids get
a phone call, we write them a couple
times a month, so we develop a good
relationship with them by way ot
mail and the phone Kobe said.
"Eventually we set up a trip for them
to come down and visit, and spend
a weekend on campus. They meet
the kids, see the facilities and get
in liiie fon
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on a tour. When they leave they have
a pretty good feel of what the uni-
versity has to offer, and the kind of
kids that are on the team
According to Kobe, that is 'he
process that they have always used
in recruiting and he says it works
well for them. Kobe says he does
attend some meets to focus on I
kids he has been recruiting, but mail
an ! phone calls is how they usuiliy
go about recruiting.
Kobe expects to have around 30
members on the women's roster for
next year.
But let's not forget about the
men's swim team. This season, the
men placed fifth in conference cham-
pionships and Kobe says the men
swam well, and he expects to see a
stronger squad for this season.
"Obviously the guys that are
coming back are excited about the
potential for next year Kobe said.
'The guys team for next year will
be much improved
To date, the men's team has
four men committed to coming to
ECU.
Two recruits. Patrick
McGonital. from Jessup, Md and
Mike Gulian. from Stafford. Va who
Kobe says are outstanding distance
freestylers, are both Junior National
qualifiers that will had talent to the
team.
Andrew Burns, from Greens-
boro. N.C is also a Junior National
qualifier, and will swim the sprint
fly and backstroke.
"Those three guys are outstand-
ing swimmers and we are really happy
they decided to join us Kobe said.
The fourth signee is Nathan
Kreel, from Cary. who swims the
breaststroke and is YMCA National
qualifier.
"All our recruits are national
qualifiers at either the YMCA level
or the L'S swimming level, so these
are quality people who are going to
come in here and make a mark
Kobe said.
But look for at least four more
men added to the team when al! is
said and done. Kobe expects to have
at least eight, what he calls, top-notch
freshman to go along with the solid
kids we have coming back.
With only two members 06 the
men's swim team lost to graduation.
Kobe expects next year's team tojcon-
sist of around 20 men. which heton-
siders perfect.
Kobe would like to see 4ach
team come away with the CAAlitie
next season.
"Our goal next year is to wintwo
championships Kobe said. "Ve're
real happy with this year, they both
had winning seasons. The men
ished at 7-3 while the women finished
at 8-2
Kobe anticipates an excellent
season for both the men and women
and expects to see an increase in vic-
tories.
As good as we were this Jear,
we're going to be better next year
Kobe said.
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22
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
JKUIN from page 18
With just twelve talented ath-
letes, it is impossible for the Pirates
to score points in enough events to
garner first place in Harrisonburg
on Saturday- as other conference
schools have a wider range of ath-
letes specializing in field events as
well as sprints.
"Even if we finish first in both
the 4x100 and 4x400-meter relays,
the highest we can possibly finish
is fifth place Monroe said.
Monroe holds the Pirates' 1996
fast times in three different sprints
- the 55 meter-dash, the seldom-run
60-meter and the 100-meter dash.
Fellow frosh Damo.i Davis, a highly-
skilled ECU running back during
the track "offseason holds the
squad's best time in the 'OO-meter
dash.
The 4x400-meter relay's success
in Durham only added fuel to the
fires of determination that have
driven ECU'S freshmen in prepara-
tion for the CAAs.
"They were in lane eight - one
of the worst lanes for a relay - and
they ere still able to run a 3:05
Deans said. "That's all we've been
talking about ever since Saturday.
It sparked the whole team, and we
can't wait to start practicing for
Harrisonburg
To Rey, success at the confer-
ence championships is as necessary
as it seems inevitable to this
optomistic group of sprinters.
"That's are goal - what we
talked about when we got to
Greenville he said. "We wanted to
represent ECU the way it should be
done and keep the tradition going.
We don't want it to go down.
"Coach Larson is known for
building a tradition and for every-
thing that he's done here, so we
want to continue the legacy of track
and field at East Carolina
Under Carson's tutilage. Davis.
Deans, Miller, Monroe and Rey have
all survived the "baptism by fire"
that comes with immediate partici-
pation as a freshman athlete. One
thing is for certain no matter the
outcome of the CAA Championships
- the Fab Five is ready to race into
the ECU record books and continue
the Pirates' legacy of success for
years to come.
Looking
for a
room,
mate
Find one in our
classifieds.
�!
LtB
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Summer
School
96
Become part of the purplecrowd
Accelerate your pace toward frraduatiori
Get the degree that will chatige your
LIFE forever f
See your, advisor to register!
ONE DAY ONLY!
Store wide Sale
ejezYims on spiiB.
onnectiori
The Small Investor's Seminars
May 17,18,19 Greenville, NC
Are you investing, or thinking about it? Are you confused,
worried or just plain bewildered by it all?
210 E. 5th st.
Division of UBE
758-8612
m-s 10-6, surr 1-5
Join us for The Small Investor's seminar,
a basic introductory workshop taught
by Jim Gard, Registered Investment
Advisor. Dr. Gard, Ph. D author of The
Small Investor (Ten Speed Press, June
1996), will advise small, interactive
groups of the unique advantages and
disadvantages facing the small investor
in financial markets today.
The Small
INVESTOR
Seminar topics include:
� Finding and using good information
' Determining a personal investment strategy
� How to work with Brokers and other financial
professionals
� Basics of stocks, bonds, and mutual funds
Attendees will receive a training manual, a
copy of The Small Investor, assorted financial
literature and publications, and complimenta-
ry refreshments.
Choose one of Five sessions:
� Friday, May 17,1100- 430pm; 630 - lOiOOpm
� Saturday, May 18,9100am - 1230pm:
2.00- 530 pm
� Sunday, May 19,2-00 - 530 pm
$75.00 per session; sessions limited to 15 people
each. The seminars will be held at Triangle Bank
Training Room (in the upstairs seminar room), 2310
Charles Street, Greenville, NC. To enroll or receive
more information please call 1-800-826-9340.
The training company does not sell any stocks,
bonds, funds, insurance, annuities or other financial
instruments. No sales pitches will be made for any
products or services
group rates:
school groups, church groups,
family groups, oaycare or daycamp
groups and business group rates
Spring schedule now in progress
m-th 6-9pm
fr 6-10pm
sa 11-10pm
su 2-9pm
gameroom includes:
pool tables, air hockey, skeeball,
basketball, pinball, and more
concession stand includes:
pepsi beverages, popcorn, candy
bars, frito lays chips, hershey's ice
cream and snapple
present student id and receive $1
off go kart ride or golf game
also honor's academic success
discount cards
nightly and evening specials
monday couples evening
all dating or married couples receive 75c off all
go kart tickets and 50c off boats and golf tickets
tuesday church night
present a church bulletin and receive
75c off all tickets
Wednesday ladies night
all female customers receive 50c off go-kart and
bumper boats, and 75c off golf tickets
Thursday family night
all families receive a set of four tickets for go-
karts, bumper boats, and golf for only $24
day passes can only be purchased
and used from 1pm 6pm on
monday - thursday
no other discounts or offers may
be used when purchasing specials
on passes
GREENVILIF, FUN PARK
OLD GREEK ROAD & HIGHWAY 264
1842 Progress road Greenville, NC 27834
Features
� bumper boats � slick track
� miniature golf � kiddie go-karts ?RSSrf
Chris Sutton d&v
ONCSD4V JkPML If
(919) 757 - 1800
on 264 and old creek road Imile north of Pitt County Fair Grounds
birthday parties
party consists of:
unlimited golf for two hours
1 ride per person for either a
go-kart or bumper boat (boats
open: June, July and august)
1 green vide fun park t-shirt for
birthday child
1 souvenir picture of the party
group
8 medium soft drinks
1 birthday cake(serves 8-10)
Use of tables for up to 1 12 hours
minimum of 8 people
monthly specials
april happy birthday to you
all birthday parties receive a 10 discount off
final party pass
may tgi! crazy hour
on frldays 5pm - 7pm during the month of may all
tickets are half price
JUne summers coming
surf and turf special from7pm - 9pm on Sundays
during June, purchase a bumper ticket and
receive a free golf game
JUly summertime blues
come spend the dog days of summer with us on
fridays during the hours of 11am - 1pm and enjoy
50c off go-kart ride
aUgUSt too much fun come have too
much fun, not spending a lot of money, on sun-
days during august between the hours of 1pm -
3pm. you'll receive a free go-kart ticket with the
purchase of four tickets
September gotta go back to
school all students from elementary to college
students receive 75c off a golf game, (college
students must present id)
OCtOber purple and gold klckoff
present a ticket stub from an ecu football game
nd receive a 50 discount
nOVember returning thankr
the fun park staff shows our appreciation of cus-
tomer support at the dose of our 5th season, dur-
ing the month of november on Saturdays from
7pm to 9pm receive $1 off any and all tickets
no other discounts or offers apply when pur-
chasing specials





II lt III ' I
i ii �-n Mmmmmmmmmmam
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
23
East Carolina University Recreational Services
Your Blueprint for Success!
Job Fair
Get information and applications
for Student Recreation Center jobs!
Wednesday, April 17
1:00 p.m6:00 p.m.
in Christenbury Gym.
Over 100 new jobs
Flexible Hours
Great Benefits
Competitive Salaries
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.
BASE from page 18
end 3-2 in the top half of the fourth.
After trading runs with the Seahawks
in the fourth and fifth innings, the
Bucs took control in the fifth scor-
ing four runs to seal the sweep.
"We we're confident at the plate
and we played baseball that we're
very capable of Overton said. "I feel
we played excellent baseball
The final game proved to be an
ECU UNC-W classic. The Pirates put
Chad Newton on the mound to wrap
up the three game series. Newton
would be in an old fashioned pitch-
ers' duel with UNC-W's Jason
Ramsey. Newton and Ramsey would
trade scoreless innings for scoreless
innings, until the Seahawks would
squeeze out a run as well as the vic-
tory in the tenth inning.
"Like I said before, we played ex-
cellent defense the whole weekend
with outstanding offense on Satur-
day, but on Sunday we couldn't gen-
erate any offense Overton said.
The Pirates would only register
four hits on the day along with three
errors which gave the Bucs the loss,
"ft was disappointing that we
couldn't generate any run support
for Newton's outstanding pitching
performance Overton said.
Newton allowed five hits no
runs and registered two k's in eight
innings. Ramsey pitched his best
game of the year allowing only four
hits and sitting down 13 Pirates.
The next task ahead of the Bucs
will be one that the whole city
should be up for. Everybody knows
how the faithful Pirates buzz when
the despised Wolfpack comes to
town. The Pirates will host NC State
tonight for a non-conference match-
up.
"The State game is always a big
game for our fans and players alike
Overton said. "We will have to play
our best baseball to beat this out-
standing club that is coming to town
on Tuesday, so we're excited about
this yearly challenge
Game time is 7 p.m under the
lights of Harrington Field.
WANTED:
Dependable
sports writers for
summer and fall
sessions. Gome in
today and apply
at our offices on
the second floor
of the Student
Publications
Building.
5 readings on reserve at the
library, one chapter from
each of 3 small texts, plus
optional supplementary
readings and a syllabus
One inexpensive
CourseMate�
available at
University Book Exchange
CourseMates
A Division of
Summer & Fall
Orders & Info
Call 758-1531
Parking Regulations During Reading Day and Exams: April 23 � May 1,1998
1. All parking regulations remain in effect on Reading Day and during tfe exam period.
2. Freshmen vehicles andor Unregistered vehicles are not authorized to pa or campus
on Reading Day or during exams. Students without permanent deeals may purchase
$2.00 daily or $5.00 weekly permits from Parking and Traffic Services,
3. Freshmen vehicles being loaded must utilize parking meters available at the residence
halls or other metered locations. Registered Freshmen vehicles will be allowed to park
on campus in student areas beginning Tuesday, April 30 at 12:00 noon.
4. Student vehicles are not authorized to park in staff zones on Reading Day or during
exams. Unauthorized vehicles may not park in either of the private parking lets.
Towing is enforced.
5. On Reading Day, April 23, vehicles with Limited Commuter permits may park in reefer
Commuter spaces on the main campus. This is allowed becausefjQM"tfffl$k0 noj.
provide shuttle service on Reading Day. The shuttle will run durine;feorf,1Ji'
Freshman shuttle will run as usual on Reading Day and during the exam perfect
PARKING AND TRAFFIC SERVICES '? 305 E. 1QTH STREET 919 328 6294
SURF THE'WET FOR ONLY
i Minute! Vw
You Non't ?w More
THrVM Z ?ER Month!
WBh summer break just around the comer,
ECUPorthtemet Access has a great way to send
you surfin' al summer long.
You'll Also Receive:
� Max: or Windows software
- Local access numbers available throughout the country
� Remote access from anywhere in the US. for only 100 a minute
� Access to your campus network
For a one-time fee
of $10, you can sign up
for ECU-Port Internet Access
and surf the "Net from June 1
through August 31 for only 10 a minute
And here's the best part: after you spend just
$12 in any month, your surfing for the rest
of the month is absolutely FREE
Plus, with access to e-mail
ECU-Port Internet Access is an easy
and economical way to stay in touch
with your friends throughout the summer.
ECU-Port Internet Access and s
1-800-200-4339
�1996. MCI Ttlacommiinicatlons Corporation. All Rights Reservtd.





24
Tuesday, April 16, 1996
The East Carolinian
� �����;�����:�-�
Appreciation Sale
Book Buyback Blowout
12 Big Days! Our Biggest
and
Day 1
Wed. April 17th
ENTIRE STOCK
OF UBE
25 OFF
(DOES NOT INCLUDE ART AND GRAPHICS)
FREE UBE CAN HUGGERS
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST
EXCLUDES
TEXTBOOKS & CALCULATORS
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY : WED. APRIL 17,1996
pay 2
Thur. April 18th
lALL CHAMPION
ITEMS
40 OFF
INCLUDES T-SHIRTS, SHORTS,
SWEATSHIRTS, AND JERSEYS
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY :THUR. APRIL 18, 1996
Day 3
Fri. April 19th
ALL GREEK
ITEMS
30 OFF
INCLUDES HATS, PADDLES,
CUPS, GLASSWARE,
KEYCHAINS, &JEWELRY
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY :FRI. APRIL 19,1996
pay 4
iSat. . April 20th
SIDEWALK
SALE
20-70
OFF
SELECTED ITEMS IN OUR
FRONT LOT ACROSS
FROM CHICO'S
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY SAT. APRIL 20,1996
Day 5
Mon. April 22n
ALL POSTERS
40 OFF
INCLUDES PORTAL AND
POSTERSERVICE ITEMS
Day 6
iJTues. April 23rd
ALL
ART SUPPLIES
30 OFF
IN ART AND GRAPHICS
INCLUDES ALL ART SUPPLIES
EXCLUDES ZINC PLATES,
RAPIDOGRAPH PEN SETS
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY : MON. APRIL 22,1996
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY :TUES. APRIL 23,1996
pay 7
Wed. April 24th
ALL SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
30 OFF
INCLUDES BACK PACKS, COM
POSITION BOOKS, PENS, PEN-
CILS, BINDERS, FILLER
PAPER, TYPING SUPPLIES
EXCLUDES CALCULATORS
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY .WED. APRIL24, 1996
Day 8
Thur. April 25th
ANY PURPLE
SPORTSWEAR
ITEM 30 OFF
INCLUDES T-SHIRTS, SWEATS,
SHORTS, CAPS, AND JERSEYS
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY :THOR. APRIL 25,1996
Day 9
Fri. April 26th
ALL STUFFED
ANIMALS AND
SELECTED GIFT
!
I
HALF PRICE
INCLUDES MUGS, PORTAL T-SHIRTS,
FRAMES, GIFT BAGS, FIGURINES, KEY
CHAINS, AND MORE
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY : FRI. APRIL26,1996
Day 10
Sat. April 27th
ALL RUSSELL
ATHLETIC ITEMS
40 OFF
INCLUDES SWEATS, JERSEYS,
SHORTS, T-SHIRTS, AND
JACKETS
Day 11
Mon. April 29th
T-SHIRT
30 OFF
JUST IN TIME FOR THE HEAT!
INCLUDES ALL BRANDS
pay 12
Tues. April 30th
SURPRISE
SALE
MARK DOWNS WILL BE MADE
ON MONDAY NIGHT
APRIL 29TH. HUGE SAVINGS
ON MANY ITEMS IN THIS AD!
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY : SAT. APRIL 27, 1996
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
ONE DAY ONLY: MON. APRIL 29,1996
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY
NO IN HOUSE CHARGES
ALL SALES FINAL
I ONE DAY ONLY : TUES. APRIL 30,1996





Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1140
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58623
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