The East Carolinian, April 4, 1996






�" The East Carolinian
Vol71, No. 51 �
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
SGA vice president resigns

Around the State
GREENSBORO (AP)- One
in seven teenagers has a sexu-
ally transmitted disease and 40
percent of North Carolina's
middle-school students are sexu-
allv active, t! ! State Board of
Education was told this week.
The hoard of education's
program committee rejected
three proposed abstinence-until-
marriage curricula Monday. The
committee decided the Depart-
ment ol Public Instruction staff
would develop its own absti-
nence program. The staff's plan
will address the need for com-
prehensive sex education.
RALEIGH. N.C. tAP) -
James O'Connor said that two
weeks before he was fired at age
56 he was told he was too old to
travel around making sure vend-
ing machines worked properly.
lite company's official line,
i CConnoi said, was that it was
eliminating his job. but Consoli-
dated Com Caterers Corp. soon
replaced him with a 40-year-old
man. The company later said
O'Connor lost his job in part be-
cause oi poor job performance.
t I'Connor filed two age-dis-
crimination lawsuits, which
courts refused to hear because
his replacement was 40 and not
39 oi younger, the standard for
such suits.
Appropriations
funding closes
for semester
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
Executive officer election results
are final, however due to unforeseen
circumstances, the current vice presi-
dent of the Student Government As-
sociation (SGA) resigned and turne t
his position over to the newly elected
vice president of SGA two weeks early.
Eric Rivenbark was approved and
sworn in as the vice president of SGA
by Dale Emery, the previous vice presi-
dent, Monday.
Due to extreme monetary fac-
tors resulting from circumstances. I,
Gregory Dale Emery, do hereby regret
the resign of the office of vice presi-
dent of the Student Government As-
sociation of East Carolina University
Emery said. "Nobody pushed me to
make this decision. This is something
that I felt bad about, especially re-
cently. Angie (Nix) and Ian (Eastman)
have both had to cover my absences
on many occasions. It has just gotten
to the point where my integrity was
kind of being tugged on
Emery said that resigning is what
he felt was the best decision to do.
and he was given sound advice from
Dr. Ronald Speier. dean of students,
and Eastman. SGA president.
"I've tried to be a good example,
and lately I haven't been Emery said.
"So. I'm just going to step out of the
way and let someone else who is as
well qualified and will do a better job
for East Carolina. Eric (Rivenbark) has
my utmost respect and all my best
wishes
Jonathan Phillips. SGA rules and
regulations chair, announced a reso-
lution to begin President-elect Nix's
platform for later football games. How-
ever, he does not want the resolution
to effect the televised games. The later
games will be effective for non-tele-
vised games. The legislature passed
the resolution by acclamation.
A motion was called to fund
$2,500 for student football tickets,
which will provide for the upcom-
ing N.C. State game in November,
with the SGA funding available now.
This will leave a remaining $500
worth of freshman tickets to be pur-
chased next semester.
Eastman asked the legislative
body to vote on having a booth at
Barefoot on the Mall. The booth will
cost approximately $700. The vote
passed.
"This is a chance for us to be-
come visible and get in the public
eye Eastman said.
The New Life Christian
Fellowship's constitution was ap-
proved to be appropriated for the
fall semester.
SGA is accepting no more ap-
plications for screening applicants.
In addition, there will be no more
constitutions or appropriations ac-
cepted.
The last meeting for the aca-
demic year will be Monday. April 15
at 5 p.m.
Penny warriors
Around the
Country
LOS ANGELES (AP)-With
,i crush ot reporters pressing her
tor answers, Leticia Gonzalez
held her head and wept quietly,
saving little about the video-
taped heating she and another
Mexican got from two sheriff's
di puties.
Gonzalez, 32, of Xocheca,
Mexico, and a man were beaten
Monday after a high-speed high-
way chase in a pickup that was
crammed with other Mexicans
led ot sneaking over the
border.
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - In
a fight over the future of a giant
class-action lawsuit against ciga-
rette makers, plaintiffs portrayed
jl as a simple fraud case while
. ompanu s sought to
snult it on' i - ton unwieldy.
5th Circuit Court of
a- expected to take
decide whether the
ss action in judicial
involving millions of
is manageable
forward.
The case accuses the indus-
i aiing knowledge that
� addictive and nia-
nipulating nicotine levels to keep
Mill ei hooked. If the case goes
ahead as a class action, tobacco
companies could face billions ot
m liability claims.
SGA candidate
files complaint
Polling sites open
late, close early
among allegations
Tambra Zion
Editor
Photo Courtesy of Jill Bergeron
The fraternity Alpha Sigma Phi won the lota pledge class of Gamma Sigma Sign-la's
event Penny Wars, whfch was held March 25-27 outside of the student stores. A the
money raised will go to benefit Oakhaven Senior Village. The fraternity earned a total
of 746 points and was one of 18 on-campus organizations to partic.pate.
Alleged poor polling practices
during the Student Government
Association's (SGA) election on March
27 prompted a presidential candidate
to file a complaint.
Presidential Candidate John
Lynch made several allegations
against the election process which
included the late opening and early
closing of polling sites, unmarked IDs
and an inability to gain access to elec-
tion information.
"Todd Dining Hall closed several
minutes early due to the fact that they
were out of bubble sheets Lynch
said. "That's a critical time, at least
voting-wise, for students coming in for
dinner - that's basically prime time
Lynch said he had reports that
several IDs were marked incorrectly.
including his own which was left com-
pletely unmarked.
"Having 12 (polling) sites spreads
us too thin said Dean of Students
and SGA Adviser Ron Speier. "It be-
gins to wear on the credibility of the
election
Speier said that an electronic
device may be used for scanning IDs
in next year's elections in order to
reduce the risk of fraud. He said that
because the number of scanners
would be limited, the number of poll-
ing sites may have to be limited.
Election Chair and SGA Chief-of-
Staff Penn Crawford said that each
poll taker was given a copy of regula-
tions, and the regulations were read
aloud twice.
"Each of the poll tenders received
a set of direction to mark the upper-
most 15 Ion IDs) Crawford said.
Included in the poll takers' list
of responsibilities are checking each
voter's ID card, marking the desig-
nated upper-15 on each ID. "Follow-
ing the Election Rules exactly to
report any violations to the elections
See POLL page 4
Students exchange
career information
Alumna sworn in Secretary of State
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
Appeals
montl
history -
smoker:
Around the World
SEOUL, South Korea (AP)
A bus packed with school chil-
dren .mi! fanners plunged into
day, reportedly
ki
and injuring
iboul 'i"
Students were given the oppor-
tunity Wednesday to increase their
awareness about career options, and
the advances
and demands of
the professional
job market.
ECU's stu-
dent chapter of
the Society for
Technical Com-
munication
(STC) and the
department of
English spon-
sored an Infor-
mation Ex-
change Dav. al-
lowing students to meet with repre-
sentatives of over 50 business and
industry companies.
STC is an international organi-
zation for technical and professional
writers. Nationwide, there are over
18,000 members.
Dr. Sherry Southard, co-director
for SIC, told TEC how the univer-
sity became involved with the orga-
nization.
'STC consists of many smaller
units-chapters-throughout the US"
she said. "We became involved
around 1985 when Dr. Jo Allen be-
gan our student chapter
Southard said there are cur-
rently 25 to 30
students who are
formal
Serves as first
woman on
Council of State
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
"We became
involved around
1985 when Dr. Jo
Allen began our
student chapter
� Dr. Sherry Southard,
co-director for ST
members of
the university's
STC chapter.
Other potential
members include
the 100 to 125
undergraduates
who are now writing majors.
"The students who are not for-
mally members still participate in our
events Southard said, adding that
the only requisite (or membership
was completing an application form.
Students and non-students can
apply for membership, and student
See STC page 4
A longtime ECU associate has
been selected by Governor Jim Hunt
to serve as North Carolina's Secretary
of State.
Former Revenue Secretary Janice
Kaulkner. who .vas sworn in on Mon-
day, became the first woman to serve
on the Council of State.
'I've looked hard - inside and out
of stare government - tor a strong
leader and manager who can do what
it takes to fix the problems at hand
Hunt said Janice Kaulkner is good.
and she's tough
Faulkner replaced Rufus
Edminston. who resigned the office
under allegations of poor managerial
practices.
She (Faulkner) can make this
department work, and she can restore
the public's confidence in the Secre-
tary of State's Office Hunt said.
"That's what the taxpayers deserve
None of this surprises Dr. Jim
Smith, executive assistant to the chan-
cellor, who has known the new secre
tary for 25 years of her service to ECU.
"I can't think of a better person
to re-institute integrity in that office
than Janice Faulkner Smith said.
Faulkner began her 38 year as-
sociation with the university as a stu-
dent. She earned a B.S. and M.A. from
ECU and after further graduate stud-
ies at Breadloaf School of English in
Vermont, she returned to this campus
and spent 25 years as an English pro-
fessor.
She also served as director of
alumni affairs, director of the regional
development institute and associate
vice chancellor for regional develop-
ment
"While at the regional develop-
ment office, she brought many
projects to fruition for eastern North
Carolina Smith said. "She always
cares about economic development
and quality of life wherever she goes
In 1993, Hunt appointed
Faulkner to his cabinet as Secretary
of the North Carolina Department of
Revenue.
Under Faulkner's leadership, ac-
cording to government documents,
the department of revenue has been
able to collect more taxes, more
quickly, with fewer employees, and is
now the most cost-efficient depart
ment of revenue in the nation
The revenue department has
been nominated for a national
Janice Faulkner
Smithsonian Award for use of tech-
nology for public service, and won a
quality management award from
Anderson Consulting, an independent
consulting firm.
�Janice Faulkner has shown that
good management serves North Caro-
lina taxpayers well Hunt said
Faulkner's official biography
states that her loyalty to her birth-
place in eastern North Carolina has
led hei to he a Strong ami ettective
advocate tor regional economic devel
opment in th.it area
See ECU page 4
-Wfrfte
m&iale
Kick off those shoes and run to Barefoot '96page
7
"Logans rolling in cash"
5
Precast
Thursday Weekend
Partly sunny
SPO" &jcc4daty j j
" ��ll llo �hrnnh I
Baseball pulls through
High 72
low 48
Partly cloudy
High 75
Low 38
The Fast Carolinian
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTKX"F:UVM.( IS.lt I I DC
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pub Building;
,nross from lovner





Hum in i" ii i' i'
Thursday, ApriU, 1996
The East Carolinian
Friends raise money for library


March 28
Concerned student - A student telephoned the ECU Police Depart-
ment and stated another student had left a suicidal message on his an-
swering machine. The student was contacted and stated she did not
threaten suicide nor did she intend to do so. The residence hall coordina-
tor was notified and he checked on the situation.
Possession of stolen propertySchedule VI controlled substance
Drug paraphernalia � Two students were issued campus appearance tick-
ets for being in possession of an ECU Transit sign. One of those students,
a Scott Hall resident was charged with simple possession of drug para-
phernalia and possession of stolen property.
March 29
Communicating threats - A studentstaff member reported that a
subject threatened him with bodily harm. The studentstaff member was
in the process of issuing a parking ticket when he was threatened. The
subject apologized and prosecution was declined.
Missing person � At 11 a.m. the mother of a resident of Fleming Hall
reported her daughter missing. At approximately 4:42 p.m. the missing
person was located in her room.
Disruptive person � A staff member reported that an intoxicated per-
son was being disruptive during a performance at Messick. The subject
was asked to leave the performance.
March 30
Possession of stolen property � A Greenville resident was charged
with possession of stolen property (license plate) and no operator's li-
cense after being stopped for possibly driving while impaired.
Larceny - A non-student reported the larceny of four Ford, five star
center caps from his vehicle parked in the Fifth and Reade Street parking
lot The chrome rims were damaged when the hubcap centers were taken.
Solicitation � Two non-students were asked to leave campus and ad-
vised of the solicitation policy after a concerned citizen reported they
were attempting to sell perfume. Upon making contact outside of White
Hall, they said they were offering vehicle maintenance deals to students.
Fund raisers set
goal in effort to
help complete
renovation
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
While ECU'S Joyner Library is in
the process of being renovated and re-
constructed, a new project has been
created by the Friends of the ECU Li-
brary to aid in its completion.
This fund-raising project titled
Friends Foundation Endowment Fund,
has been established to raise money
that will enable new and exciting re-
sources to be added to the finished li-
brary. The goal of the project is to raise
$250,000.
The project was just recently
started. Materials and brochures have
just been printed. The project will go
on until the goal is reached, which is
expected to be sometime in the next
year and a half.
"Our budget just isn't what it
ought to be said Kenneth Marks, di-
rector of academic library services.
The new Joyner Library, to be
completely finished in 1998, will in-
crease the university's academic library
services and the surrounding region
that it serves. The building will seat
2,000 people, provide 36 group study
rooms, 75 faculty studies and 102
graduate student carrels. It will also
provide space for 1.5 million volumes
and will be set up to produce and dis-
tribute television programming. This
will help with distance learning
through TV for the citizens of eastern
North Carolina.
The library's computer network
will enable students and the commu-
nity to gain access to data, images,
voice and video resources across the
world.
Former University Attorney Dr.
David Stevens is heading the commit-
tee for the fund. He is the president-
elect of the ECU Friends of the Library.
Anyone can show their support for
the university and the library by con-
tributing to this fund. The Friends wel-
come any individuals, families, clubs
and organizations to participate by con-
tributing at least $1,000 to the Friends
Foundation Endowment Fund. Donors
of the project will be honored on the
Patrons' Wall. This will be a plaque that
is displayed inside the building's new
entrance. However, only the first 250
donors will be honored due to space
limitations.
"For example, an organization
such as a sorority can contribute
Stevens said. "Collectively, they can
contribute $1,000 by fund raising and
conducting other events. The gradu-
ating classes of this year and next year
might also contribute. It is just a great
way to become a part of the greatest
event in our library's history
There are currently four levels of
giving. Donors contributing $1,000 are
to be displayed on the Patrons' Wall;
those contributing $2,000-3,000 will
have a Graduate Student Carrel named
after them; those giving $3,500-5,000
will get a Faculty Study Room; donors
contributing $5,000 will have a Group
Study Room named in their honor.
Donors may have their name displayed
on the plaque or choose to have a loved
one's name on the plaque.
With these contributions, the li-
brary should be completed in three
phases. Phase One, which includes the
whole new structure of the building,
should be finished by Jury 1,1996. Ma-
terials will be moved by August 5 of this
year. Phase Two, including renovations
of everything to the left of the front
entrance, should be completed by July
of 1997. Six to eight months from then,
Phase Three, which will include reno-
vations of everything to the right of the
front entrance, should be completed.
To contribute, obtain a brochure
titled "Friends of the ECU Library" and
fill out the Statement of Intent form.
The brochure can be obtained from the
Manuscript Collections Room in the li-
brary. You may pay in full or in install-
ments. All contributions must be paid
in full by December 31,1997.
For more information, contact
David B. Stevens at 756-2690 or the
Friends of the ECU Library at 3286671.
Doctoral student wins cystic fibrosis fellowship
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
April 2
Assist rescue - A resident of Tyler Hall was transported to PCMH by
Greenville Rescue after she was found unconscious in her room.
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of money and checks
from an office in the General Classroom Building. The checks were recov-
ered by Housekeeping Staff and turned in to the Police Department
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from official ECU police reports.
A doctoral student in the depart-
ment of physiology at ECU's School
of Medicine has been awarded a fel-
lowship from the Cystic Fibrosis Foun-
dation.
Chris Penland will conduct his
fellowship at Stanford University af-
ter receiving his Ph.D. from ECU in
May. The fellowship award will pro-
vide Penland with $78,000 for two
years of salary and supplies. The fel-
lowship is renewable for a third year.
Penland sent his grant applica-
tion to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
last September. He competed with
people all across the nation and was
granted the fellowship Jan 16, 1996.
While at Stanford, Penland's re-
search will focus on describing ion
transport in simian airways. These
airways are the airways of monkeys.
He will also investigate therapeutic
approaches to cystic fibrosis.
Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease
where chloride ions are unable to
move into the passages of the lungs,
therefore fluids such as water are
unable to foilow.
Penland will use Rhesus monkeys
in order to research a therapeutic
method to alleviate cystic fibrosis and
gene therapy to correct it
Penland said if monkeys are like
humans, they can be used as a model
to compare therapeutic methodology.
One form of therapeutic method-
ology is gene therapy which places the
correct gene into epithelial cells that
line the airways. Another form is pro-
tein therapy where the correct pro-
tein is placed into the cell. Protein
therapy is a contrast to gene therapy.
Penland said this fellowship will
allow him to get advanced training
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Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.
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'efully before you invent or eml money-
and gain the opportunity to work
with additional researchers in the
area. He said the award has a posi-
tive effect on the medical school's
reputation.
"The award recognizes the train-
ing that the basic science department
can provide to the graduate stu-
dents Penland said. "Since the ap-
plication went in for a national com-
petition it also speaks well for devel-
oping the thought processes needed
to investigate basic biological prob-
lems and determining the underly-
ing mechanisms which effect those
problems
Dr. Michael Van Scott is an as-
sociate professor of physiology at the
medical school. He is also Penland's
advisor.
"Stanford is a prestigious univer-
sity and Chris won a nationally com-
petitive award to attend Stanford for
advanced training Van Scott said.
"It is indicative of the high quality
of students coming out of the pro-
grams here at ECU
Van Scott said Chris is one of
many graduates who have been made
fellows or faculty members after com-
ing out of the medical school. Gradu-
ates have gone to John Hopkins Uni-
versity, Harvard, Boston University
and other high powered schools.
Penland received his bachelor
degree at Pfeiffer College in sports
medicine. He received his masters
degree at Appalachian State in exer-
cise science. At ECU, his doctoral re-
search focused on anion movement
from the blood compartment into the
airspace.
Canoe Adventures
. Water Canoe Weekend-
James River, Virginia
Registration Deadline: April 8
Program Dates: April 19-21,22-24
Pretrip meeting is April 17,6:00 p.m. at the ROC.
Cost: $62 student; $67 nonstudent
(includes transportation, equipment, five meals,
and trip leaders)
Afternoon Canoe on the Tar
Registration Deadline: April 10
Program Date: Monday, April 15
3:00 p.m6:00 p.m.
Cost: $5 student; $7 nonstudent
(includes transportation, equipment, and guides)
Jk
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.





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The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 4, 1996
Bikers pedal for Cytic Fibrosis Foundation
Sherri Parrish
Staff Writer
As warm weather and spring fe-
ver approaches, students find them-
selves distracted from the books as
play-time takes priority. But no need
to feel guilty because there is a way
to have fun in the sun while raising
money for a good cause.
The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
(CFF) is currently planning the Crys-
tal Coast Bike Tour, and early regis-
tration is now in progress.
The outdoor event will be held
DONT KNOW WHAT TO WEAR?
DONT WANT TO SPEND A LOT?!
W4h't wtoZ to look fa7
At Earre
Mow � jllX JctMtto 6of.
Lots of Aerobicwear Now
Greatly Reduced.
Arlington Village
756-6670
in Atlantic Beach and is scheduled
for May 11, rain or shine.
According to the coordinator of
the Crystal Coast Bike Tour, Carolyn
Lamm, this fund-raiser is a first for
the CF Foundation and promises to
be a fun weekend at the beach.
"This is a new event for us and
the idea is to have a good time while
raising money for cystic fibrosis
Lamm said. "We chose the Atlantic
Beach area because we felt it would
attract a lot of people from other
parts of the state
Participants may choose be-
tween four scenic routes - a 100K,
a 50K, a 25K and a fun ride at 17K,
each clearly marked and with fully
supplied rest areas.
Each tour offers a variety of
sites and scenic beauty along the
way.
"For example one route takes
you down to the NC Aquarium and
coast guard station, and another
takes you through Fort Macon and
the surrounding beach Lamm said.
"So you have a chance to experience
the beauty of the Crystal Coast
Though the bike tour offers an
opportunity for people to come to-
gether and enjoy themselves, the
tour's main purpose is to raise funds
for continuing cystic fibrosis re-
search.
Therefore an early registration
of $15 dollars is required by April 4
and each rider must raise at least
$50 in donations.
Lamm said that presently there
are not enough riders registered.
"We need to raise $20,000 but
we don't have that many people yet
Lamm said. "It's still early though,
we need about another 100 people
Lamm also said that people
shouldn't be discouraged if they're
not long distance riders. There will
be support vans and rest stops along
every route.
Of the money raised by CF fund-
raisers, the sponsoring foundation
in Wilson's annual report stated that
over 90 percent of its proceeds went
to funding its research programs.
The amount left over is what's
used for fund-raising activities and
to pay management.
"Compared to other charities
we're real proud of the percentage
that goes to our programs Lamm
said. "Only around 3 percent goes
to management
According to a CF brochure, the
foundation's intense focus on re-
search has resulted in many break-
throughs against the genetic born
disease.
Unfortunately, there is no cure
for the fatal disease, which also hap-
pens to be the most common fatal
genetic disease.
CF causes a salt imbalance in
the body and primarily afflicts the
lungs, sweat glands and pancreas.
The CF brochure states' that 'it
causes the body to producela thick,
sticky mucus which clogs the lungs,
leading to infection and lung dam-
age. The mucus buildup also makes
digestion difficult
Because CF affects 30.Q00 chil-
dren and adults and occurs once in
every 2,000 births, it is a growing
problem.
"People should know their par-
ticipation in fund-raisers is very im-
portant Lamm said. "We'rejvery ex-
cited about the Crystal Cost Bike
Tour and feel it will be a vry suc-
cessful fund-raiser
For more information land an
application contact Carolyn Lamm
at the CFF, 1-800-682-6858
I
Residents train in rural areas
Sen � Jennys
THE INSIDE SCOOP
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
The Rural Family Medicine Resi-
dency Program of the ECU School
of Medicine is stretching out and
helping communities in need.
On July 1. two residents will be-
gin their family practice training at
Sampson Memorial Hospital in
Clinton.
"This program allows the resi-
dents to have a lot better under-
standing of rural settings said Tho-
mas N. Fortner, director of the medi-
cal center news and information. "It
will let residents view the challenges
asdea
Fred Lager
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WTfc Men's Hair Styling ShopfrB
�Y Barter Style
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Free to Students Faculty Stafi � 1 Guest
S2.00 for General Public Available the Night ot the Show
Call 328-6004 lor more information.
2800 E. 10th Si.
IiMg.ik' Shopping Center
Across, From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Man. -Fri. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
7S2-3318
Say PIRATES it
Get Hair Cut for
f7 Everytime
Pit-ate Special
S7.00
Haircut
Tuesday .April 9,1996 � 8:00 PM � Hendrix Theatre
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
KillS M? mil 15 Wf fcff 5 Wf fc:H5 Ml fc:f f S !&
HERE'S WHAT'S I
Cam age House Apartments
South Charles Street acroee from Athletic Club,
cloee to the Plaza and ECU Bue Service, large 2
bedroom Jownhoueee over 1000 ec. ft 1 12 baths,
private patios, dishwashers, all electric, water
furnished, swimming pool, volleyball court, cable TV
available and on site laundry, (no pete)
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
and the benefits
The hospital plans to have four
residents in Sampson Membrial by
the summer of 1997. Sampion Me-
morial joins Roanoke-Chowan Hos-
pital in Ahoskie and Martin fceneral
Hospital in Williamston as la train-
ing site for care givers.
"The reason we are training
residents in these location is be-
cause it makes the experience more
realistic because they receive expo-
sure to a rural area Fortnfcr said.
The rural residency program al-
lows residents to spend their first
year at Pitt County Memorial Hos-
pital and the remaining two years
at one of the three participating
rural hospitals. Officials at Ijhe hos-
pitals hope that at the end pf their
training residents will want! to stay
in those towns to practice medicine.
Fortner said residents will also
get to experience a telemedioine pro-
gram, which was featured on ABC
News Tuesday night.
"The telemedicine program is
where residents can talk to'faculty
and participate in seminars tjirough
two-contact television Fortner
said.
See MED page 4
31 at Mendenhall Student Center
:
H
m
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT
RECOLLECTIONS:
H Lumbee Heritage
, in the Mendenhall Gallery
Co-sponsored by the ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee and the
East Carolina Native American Organization
� �
Ml
m
g
m
ft'
WE CAN HELP
with end-of-the-semester
papers and class projects.
MSC General-Use Computer Lab is staffed
with trained assistants who are waiting to
help you. The lab is open Monday-Friday
from 8 a.m. until 10p.m. and on weekends
from 1 until 10 p.m.
m
s
e3
� ��
m
s
���
Mi
1
Picture ThisI
Enter our
Amateur Photography Contest
and win up to 250 and a chance to go on to
a '10,000 cash prize!
There's always a lot going on in eastern North Carolina. From local festivals
to historical preservation projects, residents of the "east" have much to celebrate and
look back on with pride. Capture that spirit of pride in the area in which we live and
you can win up to 250 cash on the local level and win a chance to go on to
international competition! How? Just enter our amateur photography contest!
This contest is open to amateurs only, with local cash prizes of
'750, '100 and '50! Plus, if your photo "has what it takes you can go on to
international competition, sponsored by Kodak, and win up to '10,0001
All winning local entries will be sent to New York for an international contest
where prizes total over '50,000! Plus, over 250 photos from across the nation will be
selected by Kodak to be displayed at Epcot Center in Florida
for a year-round exhibit. One of them could be yours
Special Subscription Offer
Start a new three month sub-
scription at "27" and get a
FREE roll of 12 exposure, 35
mm film to enter our con-
test!
PLUS
from now until May 31st, all
new subscribers can take
their FREE roll of film to
ASAP Photo in Bells Fork for
12 price processing!
Photography Contest Entry Form
Name
Address ,
City
ASAP
Mi
;
S
pi

Zke staff at hendenhatt Student d enter wishes you
and youts mn joys and Uessln$s duin$ the upcoming
assove? and �Lastei celebrations, e safe!
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
SFRVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Centrai Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Ttiurs. 8 a.ml 1 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1 p.m.
I 5 Mlfcf F5 MfK-ff 5 5�!E:l
�MM
or if you prefer, start a
three month subscription
for 27.50 and get a fourth
month for just MOO! It's
your choice!
Mil! entnn to:
The Daily Reflector Pho-o Contest
P O. Box 17
Greenville, N.C 27835
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Expiration Date
I
State
Zip
Telephone
1 I'd like to take advantage of the special subscription offer! Please
send me my FREE roll of film and processing coupon with my
first home delivery! I will be charged '27 .50 for this service.
Il I'd like to subscribe for three months at 27.50 and get the fourth
month for only '1.00 more, with a total cost of �28.501 �
Psymentby dVlsa Mastercard Bill me )
Credit Card Number
College Student? DeCU PCC D Other
Are you already a Daily Reflector subscriber? Yes CDNo
Ofte t (rood to new �ubaonben only. New iubscrlber u one who ha. notubscribed �o
The DSily Reflector tor the past todays. Offer good through May -1.1W6
Look for contest rules in The Daily Reflector and
East Magazine and in the April edition of Campus Express!
NEWS
YOU NEED
TOME
You con also drop photos by our offia,
batted at 209 Cotanche Street, Greniotlle.
Caii 752-616 for more contest information!
�jn IP'





Thursday, April 4, 1996
The East Carolinian
MED from page 3 ECU from page 1
The staff at Sampson Memorial
hope their in ve I paysoff They
hope students completing theii resi-
dene) '
the I
thri .
lospital will remain at
fter their residency is
pitais
relati
Samp
train t
t of other hos-
� -Ima
Butlei ' i of public
and marketing for
rial. "Residents tend
m in the area they
u�h his or her family and
the community. We hope our in-
volvement will aid in physician re
cruitment in the near future
Butler sees this program to be
a major answer to the problems of
finding doctors in rural areas. She
said she feels that this will provide
much i.eeded care to people who
have a limited amount or caregivers.
STC
from page 1
meinbe'� are iven a reduced mem-
bership fee. Southard said. Students
are required to pay $40, whereas non-
students pay $110.
Wednesday's event marked ECU'S
third annual Information Exchange
Day, Southard said.
�The first two years, we had
about 20 to 25 representatives from
different companies come in and talk
with students about the different tasks
involved with writing careers
Southard said. "This year we had
about 50 to 60 representatives on our
register. One of the interesting things
is that about 45 percent of these rep-
resentatives are ECU graduates who
have decided to do something to give
back to the university
Southard said some of the repre-
sentative who were scheduled to ap-
pear could not make it. but some un-
expected representatives from other
companies did attend.
I 'uring the exchange which took
place on the first floor of the General
Classroom Building, there was also a
special presentation on the second
floor.
"Speaker Mike McPherson gave
a mini session entitled That 01' Cor-
porate America Ain't What It Used to
Be a commentary on corporate
down-sizing Southard said "Down-
sizing seems to be a fact of corporate
life now. and it is best to prepare stu-
dents for some of the things they
might encounter. In my classes, I con-
tinually push my students to be flex-
ible and capable of functioning on
more than one level
- :thard said another main fo-
cus of the exchange was to let stu-
dents know more about the competi-
tion involved with careers in techni-
cal and professional writing. For stu-
dents who are interested in more in-
formation. STC has a number of on-
line sei � . iudmg the society
office - home page: http:
wwuxiark.net pub stc www . Also,
students can contact Southard at 328-
637-1.
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
1 fnder the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment.
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
amount is greater, up to a
� 000 limit. The oiler
applies to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
ef is jusl one ot the
many benefits you 11 earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
�ndei fu! i
EC ngtime ad-
N irth Carolina
: Born on a farm in M u
ty, she has said that she
ast as her avenue to
s re's anyone who's purple
i. it's Janice Faulkner
u.
.urrently serves as a mem-
- rsity foundation and
le university's hoard oi visi-
university recognized her

kvisdom

Yarl
job
tarv ol
as S
Jam I
ment
ind
PO LjL from page 1
'
. �
nain-
-

Vice Chain�
irs Dr TiiNineteen i
did a wonderfullected 1
ful iob as Se r�MS.
�tainlyI don t liki
i her woi kgroups b(
;e We need moregroup- give
in state govern-�
minuti - �
ng i.l ad-
� -
Crawford wi .lease the
EC. but has
agreed to comply with a written request
tor the information. This information
was not release!
The Election Committee is r
sible tor providing materials t
polling sit re � one site
the prop Js. Crawford
asked for I
-
latest by Fr
suspicioi
changed by i

v& .H
in li
Save $400 on a new Pontiac Sun fire
(actually, any new Pontiac) if you just graduated or are about to graduate.
Call 1-800-643-6733 for more information.
Fold-down rear seats -
means you can go
places and take lots of
stuff with ya
100,000-mile spark plugs'
- we're talking a long-
term relationship here A
5-speed transmission and
tubular rear axle with
spring-over shock sport
suspension and progressive
ride tuning - is this a real
set of wheels or what?
PONTIAC CARES - call
an 800 number, get free
Roadside Assistance - for
flat tiresf dead battery, even
if you run out of gas or
lock yourself out (Pontiac"
wants to see you and your
Sun fire' out driving) A
Oh, Courtesy Transportation
- that's part of PONTIAC
CARES too (see? we really
do care)
Driving
fr md Spw �i the 19 US. Olympic Team
if
v
fc
rfiMffi,
BH�
fr
Your choice of a great-
looking coupe (shown),
sporty four-door sedan (not
shown) or a hot, new
convertible (hey we told
ya this was a cool car)
Dual air bags and anti- y
lock brakes - two things
you don't need until you
really need em (and
always wear those safety
belts, even with air bags)
PASSLock� theft-deterrent
system - means you
might save some $$$ on
insurance ()

r.y
Daytime running lamps in
'96 - they're a safety feature,
but hey, they look good too
AMFM stereo radio -
standard? heck yeah! (what's
driving without a little
driving music?) For a little
more, you can get a
CD player with equalizer
Single-key locking - one key
locks & unlocks doors, trunk
and all the fun of Sun fire
Clearcoat paint - paint
you can't see keeps the
paint you can see looking
good (see?)
High-revving, 120-horse-
power, fuel-injected &
engine (hey, this car's for
driving, not just looking at)
A HUGE glove box - some
glove boxes are merely
mouse-sized; this one holds
a whole laptop computer
Available remote keyless
entry - press a button,
doors unlock; it's like
having a third hand when
your other'two are full
igp O N T I A C
IsU N F I R E
WE ARE DRIVING EXCITEMENT.
for around $13,ZOO:
Ca� 1-800-643-6733,
or check out our site on the World Wide Web
at http:wrwvK.pontiac.com.





IB.
Hf �
Thursday, April 4,1996
The East Carolinian

vis
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zton, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
M�
Our View
��-�
:
. t
���:
� �

The bottom line is economics.
Coach Logan received a $10,000 per year raise in salary
on February 23,1996. The increase means his paycheck goes
from $97,000 a year to $107,000 a year.
There's a lot that goes on in the football program we don't
see as outsiders. But, basically Coach Logan is the bottom
line. That's why his title is head coach.
If the team loses a game, it's his fault If the team should
have a losing season, it's his fault If there are recruiting prob-
lems, it's his fault If certain star players never make it to the
field because of grades or other reasons, yes, again his fault
� Many factors completely out of his control are his responsibil-
Logan Carries the ity � wen. But that's not any new revelation. That's the way it
weiaht of ECU'S is everywhere in collegiate and professional athletics.
f I II " L For every game one team wins, the opposing team loses.
TOOtball team, but Many head coaches who faced Logan this year won't be enjoy-
rWs that mean ing the support of their school's chancellor and athletic direc-
, l , ' , tor. Most coaches don't last long at all. The first time they have
he SnOUld make pr0blems or heaven forbid, a losing season, they're fired.
When ECU got Steve Logan, we got a winner. But in this
game, winners are compensated or they leave. If Logan is not
paid what he's worth, or what another school would pay him,
he'll probably leave.
We, at TEC, are certainly not trying to contend that Logan
is more important than any certain professor teaching on cam-
pus. We're not saying the football program is more important
than any academic concentration. Many folks could really care
less about our football program.
But when we have a winning football team, the program's
revenue increases. More people buy game tickets, sponsors
pay more for sponsorship, games are televised, merchandise
sales increase and so on.
It's all about economics.
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralo Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Ragweed, Staff Illustrator
CrisrJe Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Cnimpton, Copy Editor
Deanya LattJmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Senrino the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies eve Tuesday and Thursday. The mS����
SZTEdtrial Board. The East Carolinian weicomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edrted
aTammmTavSta Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building. ECU, Greenvule, NC 27854353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
all that dough?
Legislature lacks biblical history
mmammmammmmtmammm �co�(0h an pntirplv new deDarti
By promoting the Ten Com-
mandments the Tennessee legisla-
ture is 190 years behind the times
of biblical scholarship. W.M.L. de
Wette observed in 1806 that the
laws, which according to the
Pentateuch God promulgated
through Moses, appear to be un-
known in later history recorded in
Judges, Samuel and most of Kings.
Those books show a complete
ignorance of Mosaic stipulations.
There is no suggestion that Yahweh
is to be worshipped only at one cen-
tral sanctuary, no precise regulations
about how sacrifices are to be offered,
and no established priesthood to
regulate worship. Chronicles expands
Samuel and Kings so as to include
laws conspicuously absent in them
and contrary to the behavior of early
Hebrew Monarchs. De Wette argues
that the laws were framed after, and
as a corrective to, the ungodly be-
Jim Senyszyn
Guest Columnist
havior of the early kings.
Kings only makes occasional ref-
erence to Mosaic laws until it tells
the discovery of the "book of law" in
the reign'of Josiah in 621 B.C.E 400
years after David (2 Kings 22).
Josiah's knowledge of the book rep-
resented an entirely new departure
in the religious life of Israel. Josiah
commanded the keeper of passover
(23:21 ff.) which hitherto had not
been observed. De Wette suggests
accordingly that a written book of
law may not have existed before
Josiah, in whose reign it was, accord-
ing to Kings, discovered.
Even Jeremiah, who was active
after the discovery, deemed the law
book of little account and repudiated
its authority (Jeremiah 7:22).
The inconsistency between the
starting point of Israeli history, as
stated in the opening books of the
Bible, and that history itself suggests
that the book of laws may have been
a priestly fabrication introduced long
after Israel's Golden Age under David
and Solomon. A good reference is Ri-
chard E. Friedman's Who Wrote the
Bible? published in New York by
Harper Row in 1989.
If s horrible, how could the fed-
eral do such a thing? They are trying
to put hard working people out of
work and destroy the economy of
South Florida.
These are some of the arguments
put forth by South Florida sugar cane
growers in response to a recent sug-
gestion by Vice President Al Gore. His
suggestion was that the Federal Gov-
ernment take away one penny per
pound in subsidies to South Florida
Sugar producers and put it toward
protection of the Everglades.
People should be disturbed to say
the least No, not at the fact that the
government is considering a cut but
because they are giving domestic
sugar growers 18 cents per pound of
sugar they produce as a means of
keeping their prices low so they can
compete with foreign countries.
The aforementioned paragraph is
just one illustration of how Federal
tax supported subsidies are being
wrongfully used. Unfortunately, there
are other products that receive the
same sort of tax payer backing as well.
For example, the government pays the
Campbell Soup Corporation $1 mil-
lion plus annually for product promo-
tion overseas. Don't worry, Uncle Ben
gets a few million as well to promote
his rice sales in Poland, Turkey and
Saudi Arabia. Of course this is just a
drop in the bucket compared to the

Chris Ariine
Senior Opinion
$110 million the Department of Agri-
culture spent last year to promote
American made foodstuffs.
The unnecessary subsidizing is
not limited to just food products. The
Federal Government still pays up to
$3 million to the owners of new Ameri-
can made cargo ships if they are made
so that they can be made available for
government use in war time. This be-
ing the case despite the fact that the
defense department no longer wants
or needs this service even if there is a
war.
Texas Instruments gets $13 mil-
lion a year to convert military tech-
nology into something that civilians
can use. Their revenues are $10.3 bil-
lion and at the end of the last fiscal
taxpayersr
year they ended with a net income of
$691 million. I would be willing to go
out on a limb and venture a guess tha k
they wouldn't have finished with a loss ,
without government subsidizing. , n,
The reason for this subsidizing
is simple. Politics is more or less about, -
money. It takes money to get into andn
stay in public office. The average lay
person can't afford the kind of influ
ence or campaign support that the big
industries can. For example we can. �
look at both industry and agriculture
Maritime unions and shipping busV
ness have contributed over $17 mil
lion to congressional campaigns oves
the past ten years. The domestic sugar
industry has the second largest lok
byist group in the agriculture business ,
(second only to tobacco, which is also, �
federally subsidized, go figure). It also
gives millions annually to congrev .
sional campaigns. v
The fact of the matter is that the
government corporate welfare is not u
in the best public interest It merely
protects a few high paying jobs that h
would otherwise not make it for a, .
short while longer allowing the indus
try to fall farther and farther behind
It is not in line with the ideas of capi
talism that America was founded on
By distorting pure competition, the.
consumer pays the price twice; once
by paying the taxes and again by geta
ting a lesser product
Letters
Faculty; staff need space
To the Editor,
The students, faculty and staff
at East Carolina University are
finding parking space to be a prob-
lem. With the upcoming of new
buildings and renovation on cam-
pus, it has created more of a prob-
lem for employees to find a park-
ing space on and around campus.
The Parking and Planning
Committee should look into a des-
ignated area for parking and have
a shuttle bus to pick the employ-
ees up and carry them to their of-
fices. It's getting more and more
frustrating to buy a parking per-
mit for $96, just to hunt for a park-
ing space. It gets more humiliat-
ing when you have to leave for
lunch, to return 15 minutes early;
to ook for a parking space. I do
hope someone will look into this
matter on behalf of the faculty and'
staff. y
Sincerely,
Odesser Holley
concerned employee
Satire degrades major
'��?'
fe W& TOSSES, BUT AittTfe
To the Editor,
I was reading the March 28th
edition of The East Carolinian (April
Fools Edition) and I was very upset
when I read your article titled
"Beavis elected campus president" I
realize that the article was written
to be witty but when you make fun
of someone's major, it tends to strike
a nerve. 1 am a recreation and lei-
sure studies major and I know for a
fact that we work just as hard as any
other major on campus. We felt it was
rude and degrading to associate
Beavis to recreation and leisure ma-
jors. Would you want someone like
Beavis running your campus recre-
ation department working with the
disabled or as the editor of The East
Carolinian! I don't think so. My
point is that we work really hard at
our major and we are proud of what
we want to do as our profession.
When you associate a loser such as
Beavis with our major, you should-
be aware that we are offended. i"
I just wanted to make it cleaL.
that what you write, whether it be a�
story, just for fun or something seri-r
ous, it should be looked at a little-
more carefully. What comes out of-
the newspaper goes to many students
and its your credibility on the line. A
joke should be something that every
one gets a laugh out of! ��
Melissa Dawson �
HmHmHhMhH
ATTENTION STUDENTS
Poetry is a subconscious conversation; i
is as nuch the work of those who under-
stand it as those who make it
it
� Sonia Sanchez, poet, 1984
If you have a complaint or comment write a
letter to the editor. Letters must be typed, 250
words or less and include name, major, year,
and telephone number.Drop your letters by
the Student Publications bldg. across from
Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what
you think. Your voice can be heard!
ji
ifl!
�g m





Thursday, April 4,1996
Jhe East Carolinian
SPARE TIME Sjftfrto
BY ANDY FARKAS
All w� M� r� p�s soM'
Codys Nightmares
By Rhys
KEEPERS OF THE DARK
BY: Matthew Childers
Krm Fu Po
THemAS Q�Uftes -t-RRANbot &,svt?u
TARAWA SHA?�S WITH "0OM
AMD VCITT FoFO THC DARKTGOTfc
ABOUT WRQ�J Fu.
i Rewcu&eR
VAVlNfr UP TO LAOVIN.
IT VA& 0WUU.T LOOKED
AND SAVJ A SHADDOVft
FIG-UKE CUASf ET-
wesAiD
"you wiu. t6 (nweyeves Moo-nAHA'
I WILL SHAW W BftSrtCfe A THINfe CKTUO?
V0O,TATVANA THE QWUOFUl, RUSSIAN)
jAiUX, WILL BE HIS UUDOitf. (A 601N6
�renORfje VOU TO WLL HIWV AMD HS
FANtVFUU FRQKJDS
NW-HAHAHA
AND IF YOU
FAlti IlLMU,
YOU'ALL l�)
NExrweEK7s
By WAY of rw
L�&(01 0
CVBCR-NiMJAs
iTftOatfter�
BY HAGWOOD
INFANTICIDE
BY DM and BA
THE Crossword
ACROSS
1 Tiller
5 Fastener
9 Old English poet
13 Quickly: abbr.
14 Fairytale starter
15 US patriot
Thomas
16 Woody Allen
movie
18 Veep Spiro
19 Take to court
20 Puts to weight
21 Large rodents
22 Musical Clapton
23 Teheran native
25 Derby
28 "Pal �" (Sinatra
tilm)
29 Numerals: abbr.
32 Wipe the board
33 Tolstoy heroine
34 Pecan, e.g.
35 Urn
36 Distort
38 Satisfy
39 Addis Ababa's
land: abbr.
40 Actress Arlene
41 � Dame
42 Welcoming
wreath
43 Love god
44 Depended
45 Christened
47 Caron film
48Saxon
50 Common prac-
tice
52 Clairvoyance let-
ters
Reveal
Robert Altman
movie
Presses out
wrinkles
� a man
with
60 Sleep like �
61 Musical sound
62 � Trueheart
63 Old horses
DOWN
1 Corny perform-
ers
2 Isaac's son
55
56
58
59
123' I1567 I�9101112
13;1415
161718
192021
22�2324��
25262728293031
3233"
35Li� 3637� 3fi
3914041
424344
4849"46�47
IjsoS1� 525354
55r57
5859160
61�rI63
) 1996 Tribune Media Services. Inc.
All rights reserved.
3 Freeway part
4 Speed: abbr.
5 Empty talk
6 Caper
7 Flip through
8 Retirement
funds
9 Astronomer Carl
10 The �Kid"
11 Draft status
12 Church seats
15 Tropical fruit
17 Think alike
22 Different
24 Lease
25 Slant
26 Sound off
27 "Mr. Smith Goes
to�"
28 Prisons
30 Bizarre
31 Horse
36 Biblical weed
37 Mystery novel
38 Anas
ANSWERS
s0VN�Vs.ai 3NOil
3onv�3 ftiSINOd1
3"1 i 1 1 AlHSVNNiO131
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40 Evil spirits
41 Section of Israel
44 Kin of privileges
46 Unaided
47 Argcn and neon
48 Descended
49 Pianist Peter
51 Identical
52 A Fitzgerald
53 Plod
54 Pins
57 Author Fleming





Thursday, April 4,1996
The East Carolinian
�" "�&&
The creature lives
Annual
�vent kicks off
Committee prepares for this
lyear's Barefoot festivities
randon Waddell
latent Lifestyle Editor
In two short weeks, the big one lands on ECU.
"Barefoot is the last day during the spring semester
to let off some steam contends Rene Smallwood, stu-
dent unionBarefoot committee chair. "It's the only big
outdoor music event we have on cam-
pus
The 17th annual Barefoot on the
Mall is ready to roll. The bands have
been signed, student organizations are
registered to participate, tents are on
the way and tables and chairs are
ready to move outside.
But Santa's elves don't come
down from the North Pole to orga-
nize ECU's legendary outdoor festi-
val. It's not thrown together at the
last minute and it doesn't go off with- mammaBwrnBawmaam
out a hitch because they are given an
enormous budget
In November, Smallwood applied for and received
the job of committee chair. Then came the task of screen-
ing in the committee. "We strove to get a diverse commit-
tee Smallwood said. "Of the 15 members on the Bare-
foot committee, I feel all students are represented
Once the committee was formed, they met once a
yeek to speak with booking agents, brainstorm new ac-
tivities, organize giveaways and of course, praying April
18th will be a clear, no rain day. They also have worked
closely with the Popular Entertainment Committee on
the Battle of the Bands program.
Santa's elves don't
come down from
the North Pole to
organize ECU's
legendary outdoor
festival.
day, April 11. There are five local and student bands vying
to open Barefoot This year's finalists are Derek T. Hall,
Crossworks, Offcenter, The Thomas Brothers Band and
Mistaken Identity. The winner of the contest wins a cool
$500 and is chosen as the opening act for Barefoot
Barefoot's popularity with the student body is rooted
in the bands who perform. In the past, such diverse acts
as GWAR, Ocean Blue, Colonel Bruce Hampton and Wide-
spread Panic have headlined Barefoot Five bands are set
to perform in the festival this time.
This year Barefoot welcomes soloist Keller Williams.
Williams is a veteran musician currently supporting his
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm album Freek. He is a one-man-band
who has paid his dues playing all over
the east coast and locally at Peasant's
Cafe, at the Attic and as a featured
performer in ECU's Noon Day Tunes
program. Williams will perform during
set change-overs throughout the event
to keep the music going all day long.
The featured bands coming to in-
vade Barefoot are: Mystic Vibrations,
Knocked Down Smilin' and Edwin
McCain. Music is set to begin at noon
aaaaaaaaaaaaaam anci continue virtually non-stop until
after dark.
Over 30 student organizations are participating in
Barefoot '96, Dare to Bare. All kinds of activities are avail-
able for student enjoyment Favorites from years past such
as the Velcro Olympics and the human gyroscope are set
for action again this year. New activities like the gladiator
pedestal joust and interactive games will make their de-
but showing this year.
All Barefoot is lacking is you. Come out early and
stay all day. The Barefoot Committee has worked hard,
ironing out every detail to make Dare to Bare daring
enough. But don't dare to bare coolers, alcohol or glass
bottles because once again, these items are forbidden at
'
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
This strange creature was spotted outside Jenkins Art Building earlier this week by
a member of our intrepid photo staff. It seems to be lying in ambush for passing
squirrels, but we can't be sure. Authorities are examining the situation even now.
73&we
Malibu Shores
enjoys recycling
The Battle will take place on the mall next Thurs- Barefoot.
2m?4 IReoceca
Sandman says goodnight
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Comic book fans across the coun-
try went into mourning last week,
when the final issue of Vertigo Com-
ics' Sandman went on sale. Yes, after
eight years and 75 issues, this dark
fantasy comic ceased publication in
an unusual, if not unique, move for
the comics industry: it ended because
the story was over.
Comic book series are much like
TV series, you see; the company starts
them running and they keep going
until sales (or ratings) are too low to
make them profitable anymore. With
relatively few exceptions, this is the
lot of series fiction. It gets milked and
milked until the public is sick to death
of it then they take it behind the barn
and shoot it in the head.
Luckily, that's not the case with
Sandman. Writer Neil Caiman started
a story that began in issue one and
ended in issue 75, and that's all the
Sandman we get But it was a good
run, and I thought I'd take a little
space to publicly appreciate it
Revipving a 75-issue comic book
series is a difficult task at best but
here goes.
The big Sandman story is bro-
ken up into several smaller stories,
with overarching themes tying every-
thing together. The main character is
Morpheus, the lord of dreams, an aloof
and distantly sad figure. As the series
progresses we learn more about
Morpheus' psychological make-up, but
I'll try to avoid revealing too much of
that. One of the great joys of reading
Sandman is the slow realization of
Every paper has a TV critic,
but our critic is no normal couch
potato, no mere TV junkie. No, our
man will watch anything, anytime,
regardless of quality or good taste.
Truly, he has no shame, ancfthat
is why we call him "The TV
Whore
Kevin Chaisson
Senior Writer
Dear Mr. Spelling:
First, I would like to say that I
am a great fan of all of the shows
that you have been involved with. I
grew up with Dynasty, T.J. Hooker,
Fantasy Island, The Love Boat and
with Charlie's Angels most of all. I
have followed your productions
into the '90s - I'm a bit of a
Melrose Place fanatic, I admit.
However, it is not these shows that
I am interested in discussing with
you here. Instead, my interest lies
with your newest show, the high
school drama Malibu Shores, air-
ing Saturdays on NBC.
I believe you should hire me to
write for Shores.
Now, I understand that I have
no real experience writing for TV,
but God knows I've watched
enough of it to compensate for that.
At first, I fancied an acting role on
the show, but since my teeth aren't
perfect and I'm not related to you
in any way, I decided you might not
go for that. Anyway, I'm sure you
have enough problems with your
son Randy's incredibly bad acting
that you don't want to risk another
non-professional. So, may I write
for you instead?
Obviously, I don't want you to
hire me cold. I understand that writ-
ing for TV is an oft-times compli-
cated process, full of both highs
and lows. So, to give you a taste of
my script-writing machine, here are
some of my ideas:
First, you should have a nice
girl on the show - someone like
Brenda or Donna on 90210. Nice,
but still with an amazing body that
they get to show off (hey, this does
take place at the beach after all).
This nice girl role should be the
show's anchor, a girl that other
high school girls across America
can emulate and starve themselves
to look like. Make sure her fashions
are trendy and just short of being
See MALIBU page 10
Illustration by Charles Vess
The Lord of Dreams pays a visit to a famous author in the last
issue of the award-winning Sandman comic book series.
iggy Pop
Naughty Little
Doggie
where certain characters and situa-
tions are headed.
Besides, I'm sure that many
Sandman readers would disagree
with my assessment of such things,
anyway. This is literature, folks. Come
up with your own interpretations.
Anyway, the initial storyline fol-
lows Morpheus (also called Dream)
through his escape from a magical
prison and subsequent quest for his
items of power. Later stories involve
a serial killers" convention, Dream
being given the keys to Hell when
Satan closes up shop, a woman's child-
hood dreams coming back to haunt
See SANDMAN page 9
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
CD Reviews
other album. Dressed in nothing but a
World War II combat helmet it looks
like Iggy is on a mission. Whatever that
mission may be, his loyal fans are sure
to pay tribute to the new album
Naughty Little Doggie.
The album starts off with a rock
groove entitled "I Wanna Live Why
not? Who doesn't? At least 95 of the
population with be able to cope with
that title. Good choice Iggy! You
couldn't have gone wrong there. Now
the second song, "Pussy Walk could
prove to be a little offensive. Can you
guess why? Well, he ain't talkin' about
no cat that's for sure!
Not only does Iggy's style come
through in his music and on his album
covers, it appears it has also influenced
every member of his band. For in-
stance: on drums, please welcome
Larry Contrary! On guitar it's Eric
Mesmerize, and on bass it's Hal Won-
derful. I haven't seen names like that
since the days of Bobby Dall and Rikki
Rockett
So be it! Who cares what their
names are? It doesn't effect the way
See POP page 10
Oh Yeah! Heavy metal punkers
beware! The Pop is back with yet an-
Lcmine
ttracticii
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement-
Thursday, April 4
Conehead Buddha
at Peasant's Cafe
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Guitar Ensemble
at Fletcher
Saturday, April 6
Michael W. Smith
with Jars of Clay
at Dean Dome
in Chapel Hill
Monday, April 8
TravelAdventure Series
Yellowstone to Sun Valley
at Hendrix
Tuesday, April 9
'80s Retro Dance Party
at the Attic
Planet 9
at Peasant's Cafe
Wednesday, April 10
Noon Day Tunes
Roger Day
at Mendenhall
Symphonic Wind Ensemble
at Fletcher Recital Hall
Comedy Zone
Madhatter
at the Attic
Fuego del Alma
at Peasant's Cafe
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like listed
in our Coming Attractions
column? If so, please send
us information (a schedule
would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858





8
Thursday, April 4,1996
The East Carolinian
CD Reviews
-3-
This week's topic:
ACTION TV
1. Robert Conrad's
sidekick in A Man
Called Sloane was
named Torque. He was
the big guy with the
metal hand.
2. Millionaire Robin
Masters owned the
estate on which
Thomas Magnum lived
in Magnum, PI.
3. The Young and the
Restless' Eric Braeden
(Victor Newman) had a
recurring Nazi role on
Rat Patrol.
4. Dr. Rudy Wells was
the creator of bionic
technology from The
Six Million Dollar Man.
5. Jonathan Forsythe
was the voice of
Charlie on Charlie's
Angels, and he was
never shown.
6. Baretta had a
cockatoo.
7. The replacement
Duke boys from the
later seasons of The
Dukes of Hazzard were
named Coy and Vance.
8. Street pimp Huggy
Bear, the cuddliest
pimp in the world, was
the main street
contact for Starskey
and Hutch.
9. The members of the
A-Team were Hannibai
(George Peppard),
Face Man (Dirk
Benedict), Bad
Attitude (BA) Barracas
(Mr. T) and Howling
Mad Murdoch (Dwight
Schultz).
10. Stephen Collins
played pilot Jake
Cutter on Tales of the
Gold Monkey.
5ty
ti f
W' ia QH lb�tr4ts fiut"?
Pee Shy
Who Let All the
Monkeys Out?
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
In the CD review business,
people are always sending you free
stuff. Up-and-coming bands (and
their high-powered record labels) are
desperate for publicity in this age
overflowing with new music from all
over the world.
Most of what we get is deriva-
tive. As bands bite and claw for ra-
dio air time and a shrinking con-
sumer dollar, everybody's trying to
sound like Hootie or Pearl Jam or
whatever rock and roll sensation is
burning up the charts this month.
A lot of it is pretty lame (believe it
or not, TEC readers often see the
cream of our promo CD crop), with
bands playing riffs that were worn
out in 1975 and singing lyrics that
sounded cliche before rock was even
born.
A lot of young bands just leave
their influences dangling like so
many flaccid penises poking out
through carelessly open zippers. The
shamelessness of this kind of musi-
cal name-dropping is just as obscene
and. lo me, offensive as those ex-
posed members would be to a blue-
haired grandmother.
Pee Shy is a refreshing change
from all that This four-piece outfit
from Tampa, FL, while not exactly
going where no one has gone before,
at least takes their varied influences
and does something with them.
So while I can hear some Sonic
Youth guitar progressions on Pee
Shy's debut album, Who Let All the
Monkeys Out?, they mix it up with
cello, piano and subtle accordion.
And while the lyrics and vocal har-
monies sometimes remind me of Liz
Phair and Jill Solbule, Pee Shy is
angrier and more poetic than both
of them.
This is feminist pop at its best:
it doesn't make an issue of feminism,
it simply exudes feminine power. If
you can't deal with strong women,
that's your problem. Pee Shy seems
aware that they're subverting some-
thing, but doesn't let it control their
creative process.
And speaking of subversion,
let's look at my favorite Pee Shy
tune, "Little Dudes On this one,
vocalists Cindy Wheeler and Jenny
Juristo sweetly harmonize about the
joys of seducing young men. How
young? "Well I ain't old enough to
be your mom they sing, "but you
were six years old when I went to
the prom
While molesting teenagers is
part of the proud rock and roll tra-
dition, the male rock icons of the
70s were never quite so blunt What
they romanticized, this song makes
both ridiculous and sleazy. With
"Little Dudes Pee Shy has sub-
verted a sexist stereotype, shocked
one group of people, made another
laugh, and come off looking like
creepy perverts, all in the space of
one song!
These women mean business!
They get down to that business
less successfully in "Dance
Motherfucker The track ends with
Wheeler going off on a power fan-
tasy rant in which she takes a gun
to all those sexist bastards out there.
While this kind of thing still has
power, I've seen it before. The subtle
approach of "Little Dudes" is more
original and ultimately works bet-
ter. Still, with its obscene title and
bleakly angry tone, this is one of the
most memorable songs on the al-
bum.
Other highlights include "Ode
to Nic a song about the joys of vari-
ous legal addictions (nicotine, alco-
hol, love, pain). Then there's the.
awe-inspiring dichotomy of the won-
derfully poetic "Red Ink" (which fea-
tures the gorgeous line, "In unspeak-
able flowery language, my hands
cramp with my fingers bent") and
the bluntly-titled "There's No Room
for Your God-Forsaken Baby
And finally, there's "Fossil
Fuel a spoken word piece about
getting trapped in a cave on the set
of Land of the Lost and having
messy sex just minutes before the
rescue party arrives.
Forget roots rock and all its con-
nected styles. With the male rock
world becoming so constipated and
derivative, feminist rock is the way
to go. Female artists like Liz Phair,
Jill Solbule, PJ Harvey, Tori Amos,
Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon and even
Courtney Love seem to be the only
people really saying anything worth
paying attention to.
Them, and Pee Shy.
21st Century
Clothing for men and & women
Beside 5 St. Brewery Downtown Greenville
btipttyfc&
kr
downtown, across from the courthouses
On the comer of Evans and Third Streets
Breakfast
before or after class, plan to Join us for a
complete breakfast (under $S.��)
served in a cafe setting
8am to 10:30 am
Come m for your Frequent Diner Cord and let us treat uou to a free meal.
757-1716
BRING YOUR
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Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
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� Deadbolt Locks -Walk-in Closets
featuring
� Swimming Pool -Basketball Court
� Tennis Court � Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
� Yearly Lease � Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE MINUTES
WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"NOW LEASING FOR SUMMER AND FALL 1996"
Bring This Coupon in to receive 12 off security deposit & $50 off rent in May, June, and July.
Applies only to leases beginning in May
752-0277 Equal Housing Oppurtunity
Attention
Returning
Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility
service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time and possibly money. The follow-
ing options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parent request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Justpickup
a "Request for Utility Service" application
from loom 214 in the Off-Campus Housing
Office, Whichard Building; at Greenville
Utilities' Main Office, 200 W. 5m Street; or at
GUC Express, our satellite office located at
509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and mail
it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville, N.C.
27835-1847, att Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of credit"
from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits are
as follows: � �j�tc p �'�� ��
$75
S85
$85
$75
�P -d"
Electric Only
Electric & Water
Electric Water & Gas
Electric & Gas
$100
$110
$110
$100
You can save time by mailing the deposit in
advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut on
and a phone number where we may reach you prior
to your arrival at the service address.
77k service charge of S20.00 for electric and
water, andor HO.OO for gat will be on your first MIL
���Gt7C requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on. While we do not require you to be home when
electric or water service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure that all electrical appliances and water faucets
are OFF during the cut on procedure.
Greenville & Utilities






5"
The East Carolinian
Thursday, April 4, 1996
Harris Teeter
SToit Store For Easter Savings
SPiClAU i,
i:ti;h
't
PEPPERO
"Stock Up And Save
Harris Teeter
Pizza
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freshly Sliced lb Order
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Decorated For Easter"
Zombie Army
Needs You!
Would you
like to write
for The
East Carolinian?
Do you want to
be sn honorary
staff zombie?
SANDMAN frontpage
Then stop by our
office and fill out
an application.
The East Carolinain is located
in front of Joyner library, on
the second floor of the
Student Publication Building.
her adult life, and the quest for Dream's
brother Destruction. Tne last stories
have dealt with the final fate of
Morpheus and its aftermath.
Along the way, Gaiman and a ro-
tating staff of artists have given us sto-
ries that would turn your stomach and
stories that warm the cockles of your
heart (wherever those are).
In the stomadvchurning category
is the infamous issue six, dubbed by
many the "Diner of the Damned" is-
sue. In this story, a madman with the
power to make people act on their
slightest dreams and desires takes over
a diner. The ghastly results include a
woman (the lover of a major character
in a later storyline) who has her eyes
gouged out, a man who nails his hand
to a table, and all sorts of strange and
violent sexual acts.
What makes all this mutilation
and depravity more than mere sensa-
tion and gore is the horrifying revela-
tion that everything came out of the
victims' own heads. Idle curiosity
makes us think about things we would
never actually do unless we were
under the influence of some outside
power.
The heart-warming stuff generally
comes in the form of small moments
in the midst of a bunch of harrowing
events. In the final issue, for example,
the story focuses on William
Shakespeare as he writes The Temped,
his final play. While he struggles with
his desire to be done with it, and with
writing itself, we get some very real
moments with his flighty daughter and
practical wife.
And all that is wrapped around
epic stories and strange storytelling
devices and a sense of something truly
ancient
If that all sounds like a big mess,
I suppose it is in places. But over the
course of eight years, it all made sense
somehow. And the thread that con-
nects it all is Gaiman's study of myth
and its place in the modern world.
The Sandman is a wonderful read-
ing experience. Now that it's over, most
of the run is collected in affordable
paperback editions, easily found and
read by any interested parties. What
I've discussed here barely scratches the
surface of this series' true depth, so
give it a shot if you really want to un-
derstand.
On a scale of one to 10, The Sand-
man rates a 10.
Natural life I
;�Ar
Raw vegetables require more chewing and stimulate your
brain, making you feel fuller.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (April 4): 7:30pm at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15pm - Stations of the Cross at
St. Peter's �
� 7:30pm - Good Friday Liturgy Service at
St. Peter's
Saturday Easter Vigil Service (April 6): 7:30pm at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses: 11:30am & 8:30pm - Newman Center,
953 E. 10th St.
( St. Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th St.)
For further information, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
Looking for
a SUMMER
JOB?
Cupcakes
Scti
Harris Teeter Extra Strength
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Regular Or Super
Naturals
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
following postions:
Tampax
27 ct
s In This Ad EftectiveApril 3 through April 9,1996 in Our Greenville Stores
Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept
- Federal Food Stamps.
C-1
News Editor
Asst. News Editor
Lifestyle Editor
Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Ad Rep.
Stop by our office on the second
floor of the Student Publications
Building across from Joyner and fill
out an application.
�����.
�� Jig�Wesw�m�tm





10
Thursday, April 4,1996
The East Carolinian
MALIBU from page 7
affordable to ordinary teenage girls.
All of these things we can discuss
in time.
Also, let's make sure we put
her into some interesting situa-
tions. Dramatic situations. How
about featuring a sexpot co-star
that wants to steal her buff bod
boyfriend? That idea always riles
th feathers of your target audi-
ence. Or maybe do a story with a
high school teacher that has more
on his mind when he asks our hero-
ine to "stay after school Let's give
our lead chick another nice girl
friend who desperately wants to
have sex with her beau, but can't
quite decide whether or not she
wants to go all the way. Great
ideas, huh? Please write me back
and let me know what you think.
I'm eagerly awaiting your re-
sponsescomments. Your newest
screenwriter, Kevin.
Dear Mr. Spelling:
Got your letter today and I'm
stunned. You've already done all of
those things with the show? It's
only been on three times! And the
nice girl you got for the lead is Keri
Russell? Didn't she used to be on
the Mickey Mouse Club, as well as
assorted acne medicine commer-
cials? Man, Walt Disney must be
bobsledding in his grave about that.
And you did give your son Randy a
role? A lead role? Hey, I was kid-
ding when I wrote that he should
be acting. Randy? Ugh.
Okay, okay. I can adapt There's
really nothing I can do about the
acting talent on your show, but I
do apologize for the show sugges-
tions. I should have known that
those ideas sounded familiar, but I
thought it was because they were
all used on 90210. I never realized
that they were already popping up
on Shores. My mistake.
But a good writer is never
daunted. I mean, Joe Eszterhaus (of
Jade and Showgirls fame) has been
writing noxious crap for years now,
but he persevered until the movie-
going public brought their tastes
down to his level. I got a million
ideas! Wait, here are some more:
How about one of the charac-
ters having a conflict with their es-
tranged, no-good dad? Maybe we
can beef up the alcoholic idea and
have someone drink and drive, get
into a wreck, and almost die. What
a season finale, huh?
Oh, and how about a guest ap-
pearance from one of the popular
actors from one of your other
shows? Jason Priestly playing a
young surgical resident that has to
save our drunken teen's life, while
the other cast members stand
around in the waiting room reflect-
ing back (through the use of nu-
merous clips from previous shows)
on their wounded friend's misad-
ventures.
Jennie Garth as an Alcoholics
Anonymous caseworker? Guaran-
teed ratings! Throw in someone
who's a little depressed and sui-
cidal, and you got the makings of
good drama, not to mention a pull
for sweeps week! Get back to me
jPOjjr from page 7
please! Sincerely, Kevin.
Dear Mr. Spelling:
Sorry, I goofed again. I didn't
realize that your main nice girl's
dad was estranged from the family,
and you already have those
storylines planned out for the sea-
son. Also didn't catch Brian Aus-
tin Greene's guest spot. He didn't
play a surgical resident, did he? I
had always envisioned that part for
Jason Priestly. And to have a guest
appearance planned for Tori, too?
Man!
Well, I'm afraid I have to ad-
mit something. I got those ideas
from 90210 also. Except the hospi-
tal show. That idea came from when
Jaclyn Smith was shot by some cop
killer bullets on Charlie s Angels.
In fact, all of these ideas were
pulled together from a mishmash
of TV shows ranging from ABC
Afterschool Specials to Saved By
the Bell. You see, I simply flipped
through old issues of TV Guide and
read the plot summaries of your
past shows, even the really bad one
with Drew Barrymore and Jennifer
Beals. There was absolutely noth-
ing there fresh or original (and still
isn't). All of it was derivative and
silly.
But I see you've already de-
cided to go that same route with
Malibu Shores, so I suppose you
don't need my help. Your writers
can do what I did: go through TV
Guide. Oh well. That's show biz.
You can get your other hack writ-
ers to come up with stuff. I am very
sorry to bother you. Say "Hi" to
Tori for me. Sincerely, Kevin.
P.S. One last idea pitch. Un-
wantedunexpected pregnancy?
How about that? My people will get
in touch with your people.
P.P.S. On a scale of one to ten,
Malibu Shores rates an unoriginal,
clap-trappy 2, even though I can't
for the life of me even figure out
why. Must be something I ate.
that they play. The fact of the matter
is that this album is not much of a
change. It's the same stuff that Iggy's
been doing on all his albums in recent
years. That's good, but change is bet-
ter in this day and age.
But can you blame him for stay-
ing where he is? He's spent his career
making money off of writing the mu-
sic and lyrics that he is comfortable
with and saying screw the rest That is
the one thing about Iggy Pop that I
think we all can admire, his ability to
be himself no matter what circum-
stances may stand in his way.
As far as the lyrics go, Iggy is
pretty much straightforward in his
message. In "To belong" Iggy says, "A
bird is sitting on the pavement, some-
one broke his wing Now that bird is
going nowhere, and he's suffering
True, the lyrics themselves are very
simple and straight to the point; how-
ever, could Iggy be reflecting back on
his past? Maybe he has felt like that
bird before, feeling like he was going
nowhere, a feeling that none of us are
strangers to. We just don't like to talk
about it or think about Iggy does!
That's what makes him Iggy!
Believe it or not Iggy Pop is and
always will be a true revolutionary
musician who has, is, and will continue
to influence artists that bless our air-
waves today.
Overall, I would have to say that I
am pretty impressed with Iggy and his
music. Not for the fact that after all
these years he can still sell records, but
for the mind behind the man. In a time
when we didn't need to hear it he sung
it and it was heard! Maybe he's not at
the peak of his career, but even in this
downward spiral, he's still Iggy.
Moo-ve ft on owtr to a
Job at
The East Carolinian
summer.
Call 328-6366 tor
more information!
Home & Brown
7584333
300 Contanche St.
Greenville
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The East Carolinian got
you quick results. Well
sounds like a sure bet to
me. Guess you better let
me go then, Peg. I've got
to make a call to
The East Carolinian.
Maybe now I can
finally get rid of that
old hound dog of
Ed's. ))
The East
Carolinian
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11
Thursday, April 4, 1996
The East Carolinian
Baseball team tops
CAA conference
Diil Dillard
Staff Writer
It was a wild weekend for the
ECU baseball team as they hit the
road for the first time in this young
CAA season. The Pirates would sneak
out of Harrisonburg with two wins in
the three game series with the defend-
ing regular season champion James
Madison Dukes.
The Pirates were coming off a
three game tear after sweeping con-
ference opponent William and Mary
ito open up the season, but the Bucs
knew going in that this was a totally
different type of situation that they
�would be facing. Instead of facing an
improving squad at home the Bucs
;would face a proven squad on the
road.
"Not only is Madison a tough ball
club, but playing on a turf infield, you
Iget a different look when it comes to
Score by innings:
Campbell
East Carolina
hard grounders and
so forth Coach
Gary Overton said.
That's right
folks, the infield at
Harrisonburg is
astroturf, which
speeds play up con-
siderably.
"When most clubs , like our-
selves, come in and play on this artifi-
cial surface, and are not used to see-
ing the surface, they are caught off
guard Overton said.
This was not the case however
as the Bucs rung up the Dukes 5-3 in
the first half of the series opening
doubleheader. Overton's troops knew
going in that this would be a challenge
at the plate getting runs across.
"No doubt this is one of the best,
if not the best pitching staffs in the
conference, so we had to go in and
make some noise early from the
plate Overton said.
RHE
000 001 031 - 5 12 1
010 000 200-3 9 0
The pitching staff was no joke
with the dukes denying the Pirates a
run until the eighth inning. Trailing
3-0 in the top of the eighth, the Pi-
rate offense had seen enough, explod-
ing for the five runs needed to open
the series with a win.
"Gordon, for JMU, pitched a fine
game with a shutout up to seven in-
nings, our club once again with timely
hitting and getting the hard fought
win Overton said.
In the eighth inning explosion,
the junior right fielder Chris Glanz
set off the fuse by knotting up the
Sec BASE page 12
Who's
next?
Quarterback Marcus
Crandell signs auto-
graphs for adoring fans
at last weekend's Pig-
skin Pigout Weekend.
'�
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Swing!
Here a Lady Pirate soft-
ball team member
slugs one out in a re-
cent home game. ECU
will be on the road to-
day against Radford.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Women's lacrosse
building for season
Will Sutton
Staff Writer
Women's lacrosse may only be a
few years old at ECU, but the core of
this team shows strong determination
and leadership that results in a posi-
tive outlook for the future.
These young ladies barely have
enough players to field a team, but so
far this spring season they have played
well together and are currently unde-
feated.
"We did not have any official
matches during the fall defensive
wing Kelly Miller said. "A lot of prac-
tices and scrimmages were played
during 'Fall Ball We have a solid
group of players that play together as
a team. Also, you will never hear any-
one whine about playing time
This team is filled with key play-
ers. A good mixture of newcomers and
savvy veterans. Miller and Kelly
Wehman are key defensive newcom-
ers that hold off opponents at defen-
sive wings. Stacy Jones, played goalie
in their recent victory and Addy
Fitzsimmons runs the show at cover
point Julie Bourgiouse is a top goal-
scoring threat at the center position
while Laura Stockett is in the point
position.
"Our victory at Appalachian State
was the result of some good play by
many of the girls Wehmann said.
"We basically ran them off of their
own field. The score only read an 8-5
final score, but we really dominated.
Stacy had some incredible saves in
goal, Julie scored four goals and Britt
and Joyce added two apiece. Kelly,
also, had a huge game on defense
Practices are a must for any ath-
letic team, because it builds stamina,
skill-level and helps the players play
together as a team. ECU'S practices
are held from 4-5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays on the fields behind
the Allied Health Building. These
practices require a strenuous workout
on the field and a nice "cool-down"
type of team gathering after to relax
and discuss strategies.
ECU'S next game will be after the
Easter break on April 20th here
against arch-rival UNC-W. This should
be a pivotal game in the women's sea-
son as they try to remain unbeaten.
"We have been looking forward
to this match all season Jones said.
"They are our number one foe and
they are supposed to have a fairly
poised team. I think we will be just
fine if we stick to our game plan, take
control early and do not let the oppo-
nent back in it This tactic seems to
work, so why change it?"
Because the women's lacrosse
See ECU page 12
infobmjwion vtmmmm
Bowlers strike up victories
j 3avid Gaskins
� lac Service
I
The teams of "Silent Attack" once
r igain dominated the intramural bowl-
l ng playoffs, which recently concluded
jy capturing titles in the Men's and
Women's Independent divisions.
"Silent Attack I" won the women's
� itle for the third consecutive year de-
eating 'Silent Attack II" in the finals
is Lisa Greene and Tonya Schmitt
leaded the charge, while "Silent At-
ack I" also won their third consecu-
ive men's title by besting "DB's" by a
t nere 16 pins in the championship
t natch.
t The men's team was composed of
; ongtime participant Peter "The Split"
ume, Scott "Doctor" Smith, Stephen
� smith and Tom Richardson, while the
DC s" David Hart, Daren Hart Tabari
Valiace and Dwight Henry fell just
.hort of stopping the silent ones from
oiling to the title.
k A new champion was unveiled in
e Co-Rec division as "Strike Me" de-
Kted "Silent Attack I" in tht finals
Kereby preventing a sweep of the in-
lependent titles. Members of the win-
ling team included Bruce Joyner,
ulietteGunther, Lisa Klein and David
Ac Daniel.
The Residence Hall division was
offered for the first time this year and
"Spleefs IV" coasted to victory by up-
ending the "King Pins" in the divisional
title match. Steve Roberts, Judd Price,
Todd Lambdin and Clay Craven sup-
plied the strikes, spares and enthusi-
asm to carry the "Spleefs" to the crown.
"Delta Zeta" won the sorority di-
vision in a one-night flurry accumulat-
ing the most pins among the opposi-
tion.
Among the Fraternities, "Alpha
Sigma Phi B" continued their rise to
the elite intramural competition by
knocking off "Sigma Nu A" in the
championship.
Brian "Cutter Washer" Jones,
Damean Albright Robby Brogdon and
Damian Corbit comprised the wining
"Alpha Sigma Phi B" team.
In addition to the conclusion of
the bowling playoffs, several individu-
als distinguished themselves by win-
ning divisional titles in the basketball
One-on-One tournament in
Christenbury Gym. Among the women,
Emily "Hope" Murray's outside shoot-
ing and slashing drives proved too
much for "CSC" teammate Tomeiko
Morris as she won the 5'5" and under
division while Darlene Boone captured
the 5 and over division over Allison
Kemp.
In the Men's 61" and over, Brad
Thompson's quickness and leaping abil-
ity proved to be the undoing of Jay
"Million Moves" Flowe as he captured
the prized t-shirt
Thompson got off to a slow start
in the finals due to the absence of offi-
cials to yell at but recovered in time to
display smooth offensive skills and off-
set Flowe's flashy dribbling and power
moves.
Semi-finalists in this division were
David Ehrmann and Eddie Kemp. In
the Men's 6'0" and under division,
which featured the largest numbers of
players, James Ray bested William
Seavey in the final in a hard-fought
match.
Semi-finalists for this division were
Mario Re and Tee Kemp. Strangely ab-
sent from the title contest was Vu "Ra-
dar Range" Donie who was forced to
fly out and forfeit his first round match
in order to fulfill a 10 day contract with
the NBA's Vancouver Grizzlies.
A basketball One-on-One tourney
will be offered again during the sec-
ond summer session and will be open
to any currently enrolled students, fac-
ulty and staff.
For further information on the in-
tramural sports program, please con-
tact David Gaskins or Paulette Evans
at Rec Services at 328387.
SID - The ECU women's tennis
team won all six singles matches and
also won the doubles point to post 7-
0 victory over the Campbell Lady Cam-
els on Tuesday.
Freshman Anne Svae was victo-
rious at No. 1 singles for ECU (10-3),
earning a 6-2,6-1 win over Campbell's
Megan Cannon. Sophomore Rachel
Cohen moved her spring record to 11-
1 with a 6-0, 6-1 win over Jennifer
weathers at No. 2.
Seniors Allison DeBastiani,
Chelsea Earnhardt and Lisa Hadelman
didn't lose a game en route to post-
ing victories at Nos. 3-5 singles, re-
spectively. At. No. 6, freshman
Catherine Morgan outlasted Buffy
Taldonio in three sets, 6-1, 0-6, 64.
In doubles, the No. 1 team of
SvaeCohen earned an 8-1 decision
over the lady camels' top team. The
No. 2 combination of Earnhardt
DeBastiani and the No. 3 duo of
HadelmanMorgan were also victori-
ous.
Deron Rippey
Chuck Jones
SID - The ECU men's basketball team will be without two players as the
Pirates look ahead to the 1996-1997 season, according to Head Coach Joe
Dooley.
Dooley said Monday that &6 forward Chuck Jones, who was a junior this
season has been dismissed from the squad for violation of team rules. At the
same time, the Pirate coach announced that 6-2 guard Deron Rippey has left
school for personal reasons.
Jones, from Kinston, N.C averaged 1.5 points and 1.7 rebounds while
playing 8.6 minutes per game Rippey, a junior this season also, played his first
season at ECU after transferring from Garden City (Kan.) College. The native
of Brooklyn, N.Y. averaged 6.8 points and 2.9 rebounds last season.
Death brings concern about weight
AP - The last time Eric Gregg saw John McSherry,
the two umpires made light of their weight problems.
"How's your diet going, big guy?" McSherry asked
in spring training.
"Terrible Gregg answered.
"Keep up the good work
McSherry smiled.
It was a moment Gregg recalled
Tuesday, a day after his friend died
following a collapse on the field dur-
ing the Montreal-Cincinnati opener.
And it came on a day when base-
ball was forced to turn its attention
to a familiar issue: Should more be
done to make sure its umpires are
physically fit?
"The health and weight of our
umpires is always a concern Na-
tional League vice president Katy
Feeney said.
"We can require that they take
physicals, and we do she said. "We can recommend
and encourage that they try to keep themselves in the
best shape possible. But as for weight restrictions or
limits, there's nothing we can do legally
Certainly, an umpire's lifestyle is not a healthy one.
Umpires are on the road almost the whole season,
rarely in a city for more than three days. They stay up
late, often eat their biggest meals
around midnight and then go to
sleep.
They get no breaks during
games, standing on the field for all
nine innings. They get yelled at much
of that time.
"They have irregular eating hab-
its, they have irregular sleeping hab-
its. They're in and out of airports and
hotels all the time umpires union
head Richie Phillips said Tuesday.
"What I'd like to see is workout
facilities for the umpires in every city
and a trainer in every city to check
their weight, their blood pressure
and their stress levels he said.
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
"These are things we ve asked for
and will continue to ask for
Sometimes, their size is their only defense against
"We can
recommend and
encourage that
they try to keep
themselves in the
best shape
possible
� Katy Feeney, National
League vice president
See DEATH page 12
'





i ill i
ammimmmuimmmimmm
12
Thursday, April 4, 1996
The East Carolinian
DEATH from page 11
the constant bombardment from
players, managers and fans.
McSherry. 51. was listed at 328
pounds, but weighed nearly 400 at
times.
The coroner's office in
Hamilton County. Ohio, ruled Tues-
day that McSherry died of severe
heart disease, including an irregu-
lar heartbeat. He also had an en-
larged heart and a blocked right
coronary artery.
McSherry had been scheduled
to see his doctor Tuesday. He was
to have had the appointment earlier,
but didn't want to miss opening day.
Phillips said he talked with NL
president Len Coleman in the last
few nonths about McSherry's
weight. McSherry. friends said, had
knee problems that had made it in-
creasingly difficult for him to work
out and stay in shape.
The average weight of the NL's
32 umpires is 214 pounds, with
Gregg (325). Joe West (275), Jerry
Layne (249). Harry Wendelstedt
(248) and Bruce Froemming (238)
the heaviest.
The average in the AL is 204
pounds, with Ken Kaiser (288),
Greg Kosc (255) and Tim
McClevland (250) weighing the
most.
NL umpires, for the first time,
were required to take their annual
physical exams before the start of
this season, Feeney said. McSherry,
who was forced to leave four games
in five years because of dizziness
ECU
from page 11
or dehydration, was checked in Feb-
ruary.
"John admittedly has struggled
with his weight over the years, but
there was no indication in his Feb-
ruary physical that he shouldn't go
back on the field Feeney said. "Ev-
ery time he's had a problem, he's
been thoroughly examined and
cleared to resume umpiring
Throughout its history, base-
ball has had umpires who have been
overweight. Of the officials in the
four major sports, umpires are the
least active during games.
"Obviously, if they had to run
up and down a court for an hour
like a basketball referee, that would
be different Feeney said.
McSherry was once sent by the
league to Duke University's weight-
loss clinic, and he made at least one
follow-up visit on his own. AL um-
pire Tim Tschida said McSherry
worked with Duke's nutritionists
for a half-dozen years to improve
his diet.
Other umpires, such as Gregg,
who has also gone to Duke's pro-
gram, have been told by the league
to lose weight. Froemming, after
one annual checkup, underwent an
angioplasty the same week.
"We all knew that John was
overweight NL umpire Paul
Runge said. "John knew he was
overweight. We all hoped that John
would have helped himself more,
but we never think it's going to
happen to one of us
!K
Sports Writers
Needed
Applications are now being
accepted for sports writers for
summer sessions and fall session.
Interested? Come by TEC today
and fill out an application.
program at ECU is so young, there
has not been a post-season established
yet. Hopefully, as the team grows in
numbers and popularity among the
public, a tournament of some sort will
be established in the near future.
The future looks bright for these
players, but there is now a problem
that could hinder that future. Cur-
rently, ECU plays all its home games
behind Allied Health. The fields are
going to be destroyed to install new
parking lots. For a team that is trying
to build a popular reputation so it may
attract more players, this is not going
to help since they will have no field
to play home games on.
"Everyone is worried about what
to do for next season Wehmann said.
"I am not stressing too hard, because
our school would not take away our
playing field and not replace it with
something else. If all else fails, we
could possibly see about playing at a
local middle or high school. We need
an official home field if we continue
to grow in the college club sport
scene
Almost everyone will be return-
ing for play next fall for "Fall Ball
The future is on the rise for these ECU
women. A new playing field is what
the players would like to see for next
season since the club teams will be
without playing fields next season.
"1 agree with Kelly, I do believe
we will have a field to play on Jones
said. "We are only about 12 or 13
strong now, but I have talked to some
girls who are eager to give lacrosse a
try. I am really excited about our fu-
ture and hope we roll on through the
rest of this season with nothing but
victories
JB ASE from page 11
score with an RBI single followed by
catcher Tim Flaherty's two run single
to give the Bucs the lead for good.
Sophomore pitcher Patrick
Dunham hung tough for nine innings
holding the Dukes to only three runs
off of seven hits. Dunham also regis-
tered 11 k's with only two walks.
"The first ballgame of the series
really set the tone for the whole week-
end, I thought for our club Overton
said.
The Bucs would fall victim to a
man in the "zone" in the second half
of the doubleheader. Senior right
hander Jeff Hafer threw his first ca-
reer one hitter en route to a 4-0 shut-
out over the Pirates. Bryan Smith
took the mound for the Pirates, pitch-
ing a solid game allowing only five
JMU hits in six innings of play.
"Although, we were shut out in
the second game I still feel our over-
all performance set the tone for Sun-
day Overton said.
ECU was feeling good about their
chances on taking over the top spot
in the standings going into the final
game of the series. Overton would
throw junior pitcher Chad Newton at
the Dukes in what proved to be a good
ole fashioned slug fest.
The Pirate offense would regis-
ter 18 runs off of 18 hits to come out
of Harrisonburg with a 2 games to 1
series victory over JMU.
"That was the first series Madison
has lost at home since 1991. so we're
very pleased with our performance and
pleased at gaining the top spot in the
CAA Overton said.
The Pirates would move to 5-1 in
CAA play which puts the Bucs in the
top slot in the CAA going into a series
with George Mason.
"Going into the Madison series,
we knew if we won the series that we
would take the top spot so we had a
lot to play for Overton said.
The Pirates would ride a high go-
ing into a one game series with
Campbell, but would fall short as they
dropped a heartbreaker to in-state ri-
val Campbell 5-3.
"It was a hard fought game. I felt
that we really wanted it. but we just
got beat Overton said.
The Pirates took the early lead
after Matt Buckley of Campbell walked
a Pirate run in. That lead would hold
until Willy Kingsbury knotted things
up with a solo shot After the seventh
inning stretch the Bucs would get some
much missed offense, registering two
runs off of a Lamont Edwards double
followed by a Glanz RBI single to in-
crease the lead to 3-1.
"Our bull pen just couldn't hold
the lead late in the game, but it was a
hard fought contest" Overton said.
Things fell apart for the Pirates
when the Camels scored three runs
capped off by a Brent Wyso blast into
left field to give the Camels their first
win at Harrington Field since 1988.
"I felt we played with a lot of in-
tensity, but we just couldn't hold the
lead late in the ballgame Overton
said.
The Pirates will have to brush off
and get back to work as they-will travel
north to Fairfax, Virginia to face
George Mason. The three game series
following the exhibition in Kinston
against the Indians, will start Saturday
at high noon only to finish the three
game affair on Sunday at high noon
as well.
Don't forget
to s�t your
clocks forward
am hour on
Sunday
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atalog Mon Sat. 10-6
Jonrufction �S&
D.v�wnO� EliUS
since last spring when The East Carolinian held it's first Student
Appreciation Day. Well, we're doing it again. Here's your chance to
save on this special day. Sometimes as much as 50. Here's a list
of the advertisers who are signed on so far:
Catalog Connection Coggins Car Care
Wilson Acres Peking Palace
Student Stores Tar River Estates
El Toro Ov Whichards Beach
m
SILVER
tfreenollLe's only
6xeUcViqhlcliib J tfouth o� C&3LSS
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam jr
CASH PRIZt
Mu-
ni! &. register in advance.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers WantedS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN'S
i We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
rTaEiasaiakaHi�1
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon ,
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Ecu1 Call 756-6278
(Behinii John's Gnvnienl Mart) JO
miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
ILMlllJ Ml
NT
afafttecfatfott day
WEDNESDAY APRIL 17,1996 :





-
w �'
13
Thursday, April 4,1996
The East Carolinian
SIFI
ff-HSp
Wanted
if
For Rent
fits.
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Pitt Property Management
758-1921
1083 Brownlea Dr.
1ANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375 deposit
$375month.
A VERY STREET APARTMENTS 1
BEDROOM, S27S, on river, watersewer
included walk-in closet, spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF MARCH
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facili-
ty, sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer cable.
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor, located 5
blocks from campus. Free rent 12 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockside 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 4 car
carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room, balcony, exterior storage room, noth-
ing in the area comparesReasonably
Priced!
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Furnished or
unfurnished one bedroom only five blocks
from campus. Appliances, central heatair,
water included. $270. Moore Realty 752-2533
MALEFEMALE TO SHARE 3BR house.
$243month plus 13 bills. Call Scott Muell-
er at 830-2143 or 714-3358. Available imme-
diately.
THREE BEDROOM APT. IN Tar River Es-
tates. Take over lease and get 12 off June
and Jury renL Large Bedrooms, washerdry-
er hook-up, cablewater included. Large
enough for 4-5 people. Available May 1st
Call 7583474
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED! FOUR bed-
room house; Clean, Nice; $125 a month
14 utilities; Male or Female; Available Be-
ginning of May; Call 758067 and ask for
Jody
2 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 204 Meade St,
just 3 blocks from ECU Campus. With hard-
- wood floors, fenced in yard, and central heat
air - $525 Moore Realty 752-2533
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12 baths,
fireplace, all appliances, very large, quiet
pool, close to park. $585 month. 756-3009
after 6:00pm
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Duplexes
and Townhouses for rent Many locations to
choose from. Currently Pre-Leasing for the
Fall. Call Wainwright Property Management
7563209
SINGLE BEDROOM FOR IMMEDIATE
rent $178 per mo. Share 13 utilities with
two other roommates in house. Washer, Dry-
er available on premises. Near campus. Call
" -for interview 758-2147. Leave message for
' Chris or Bill anytime
AFFORDABLE, NICE ROOM AVAILABLE
now. Looking for one roommate to share 6
month or longer lease. Great location near
The Plaza. With heat air and cable included.
ECU bus line access. $197 a month, plus
phone & utilities. Call Phil today 321-2813
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Close to eve-
rything. Professional, quiet environment
Like new one & two bedrooms, with applianc-
es. $285-$350. Moore Realty 752-2533
CONSIDERATE NC STATE INTERN needs
summer sub-lease in Greenville area. Flex-
ible on rent price. Non-smoking female room-
mates only. No drugs. Call 919-512-7514. Will
reimburse long distance charges.
LOOKING FOR A PLACE this summer at
ECU? There will be one bedroom available
at 105-B, East 11th St after final exams.
Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
SOMEONE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
room in 4bdrm apartment WD, pool ten-
nis, weightroom included. Available May 1st
Call 321-0166 after 7pm. Ask for Joanne.
RESPONSIBLE, CONSIDERATE FE-
MALE TO share a 2 bdrm, 112 bath Apart-
ment Pinebrook $190.00 plus 12 utilities
for August non-smoking serious student
Please call 328-7570
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed-
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who is
outgoing, sociable, picks up after themselves,
gets along wothers. Please call Ashley at
757-2891. Need someone starting in mid
April or early May.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT AT Langston
Park for Summer. Looking for female room-
mate $180 a month. Phone Number 551-
6776
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR THREE bed-
room house 13 utilities, 13 rent Bus stop
at corner. Call 752-6886 any time after 6
TWIN OAKS 3BR, 2 12 bath townhouse.
Available April 1st $585mo. Call Mike at
756-3009 after 5pm
EASYGOING FEMALE TO SHARE apt or
house Starting in July. Smokers Welcome.
For more information call Julie 8303969 An-
ytime.
1 BEDROOM AT 1301 Dickinson, hard-
wood floors, Appliances$195 2 bedroom
duplex at 706 Mills. No appliances - $210 or
707A Mills with Appliances - $290. 2 bed-
room duplex, upstairs, no appliances - $195.
Moore Realty 752-2533
CAPTAINS QUARTERS APARTMENTS.
BIG enough for two. New carpetingfloor-
ing; dishwasher, free cable, walking distance
to campus. $310month. Call 355-8731 ask
about unit 11.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
SPRING semesters of 96-97. Possibly stay-
ing at Park West Tower Village, or White-
bridge Apts. Rent is $19750 per person.
WasherDryerRefrigerator included. Con-
tact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
TWO FEMALES LOOKING FOR a 2 bed-
room apartment to sublease for the summer.
Preferably close to campus. If interested
please call 328-3793
SUBLEASE MAY - JUNE. 2 br's available
in Player's Club. Clean, female, nonsmoker
preferred. $250 month, 14 utilities. No se-
curity deposit option to renew lease in Au-
gust Call 3554410, ask for Kristi, Sandy, or
Mimi or leave message.
DUPLEX WYNDHAM CIRCLE 2 bedroom,
2 full bath, cathedral ceilings, quiet washer
dryer hookup, fireplace, ceiling fans, deck,
almost new, beautifully decorated. $550
month 756-3009 after 6:00pm
GRADUATE OR UPPER CLASS FEMALE
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a three bed-
room apt in Twin Oaks. Non-smoker and
Studious. Please call 830-9587 and ask for
Patricia. Lease starts in May.
NeeJCASH???
We Buy CDS,
Cassette, and Lp�
Well pay up to $5 cask for
CDs
� t
VI � i
Why shop in L. A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
WEDDING GOWN: SIZE 10, Raw Silk,
Pearl Trim, crinoline petticoat matching veil
worn once & beautiful! Asking 12 of its
$1200 cost 7564084
MOUNTAIN BIKE $100, WHITE and
green, good condition. Call Aimee at 758-
6649 anytime after 6pm
CANNONDALE M800 1994 MODEL many
extras. Must sell immediately $500 O.B.O.
Call 758-2147. Ask for Chris after 6 or leave
message earlier.
1985 HONDA ATC 250R rebuilt engine in
1989. Runs great needs little work. $1,000
O.B.O. Must selL Call Justin at 752-1321
1988 ACURA INTEGRA LS with new
clutch and muffler. In great condition. $4900.
Call 7586976
2 KICKER 10" SPEAKERS in a carpeted
box for sale, I paid $200, will sell for $100.
Call 754-2948 and ask for Rodney.
1994JS NISSAN SENTRA, 4 door, Black,
Loaded, 20,000 miles. Must sell! $9,500 call
752-7422
KENMORE 15,000 BTU WINDOW AC
$350, Apple Personal LaserWriter 300 $300,
Technics Speakers $100, Technics Tapedeck
EQ & Realistic CD player $50 each. Call 830-
9585
TECHNICS HOME SPEAKERS NICE 12"
floor speakers with 200 watts per speaker.
Only months old. Asking $200. Call 4130573
ask for Josh.
SOLOFLEX WITH ALL ATTACHMENTS.
$750 or best offer. 830-2143 or 7143358.
Earn $5$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
SSVHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To.
MCSI
P.O. Box 370
Cove Chy,NC 28523
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
GreeniUc, Kinston, New Bern
Help
11 Wanted
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN UP
TO $3,000-$6,000 PER MONTH. ROOM
AND BOARD! TRANSPORTATION! MALE
OR FEMALE. NO EXPERIENCE NECES-
SARY. CALL(206)9713510 EXT A53623
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached Greenville. We are looking for
Health Conscious, Neatly Dressed, Career
Oriented Individuals to fill Part and Full
Time Positions. Great Pay 7583390
HURRY � TAN while you work. Spring Sum-
mertime Job 12 miles from Greenville. Flexi-
ble Hours. 21 or older. Call for Interview
975-2265 Day 830-9280 Night
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - MONEY, FUN,
TRAVEL, EXPERIENCE. Call 1300-251-
4000 ext 1576
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS coor-
dinator of environmental sales. Internation-
al marketing company expanding to Green-
ville seeking part-time team oriented indi-
viduals. Good pay. Call for an appointment
3213250.
� Services
Offered
II ii lAin
11 Wanted
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give us a
call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC - 919-
747-7686
WANTED TO RENT: LAW FIRM needs One
fully furnished apartment suitable for mar-
ried couple from May 25 - Aug 3 and Two
fully furnished apartments for June 28 - Aug
3, One must be suitable for married couple.
Contact Bert Speicher 355-3030
1 BLOCK-FROM CAMPUS on Lewis Street
3BR house for Rent starting in May. A fabu-
lous location and house for $700month.
Call 752-2965
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS. PRE-
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chico's
and Downtown. Townhouses with 2 bed-
rooms, 1 12 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washerdryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed
room, 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling fans,
appliances and washerdryer hook-ups. $390
Call 752-0277
3 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 2602 Tryon Dr.
with dining room, Rec. Room, and Hardwood
floors - $600 Moore Realty 752-2533
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING newly
renovated two bedrooms. Unique floor plan.
$350.00 month. Call 355-1313 to make an
appointment Managed by Remco East Inc.
PART TIME SALES HELP needed. Seek
ing individuals with neat appearance and a
positive attitude. Training provided. Full
Time Advancement Potential. Call 321-6727
9am-5pm for an appointment
THE GREENVILLE HILTON INN is seek-
ing qualified individuals for full-time posi-
tions as Guest Service Representatives. Ho-
tel experience preferred, but not required.
Please apply in person at The Greenville Hil-
ton Inn.
ATTENTION! KEITH KIMBLE EARNED
$ 15,284 last Summer working 80hrswk last
summer. If you'd like to hear how call 1300-
685-7194 X4681 M-F between 9-7 for more
info, leave message.
CLUB ATLANTA TRAVEL (CAT) allows
you to travel and get paid for it Call 1-800-
7503894 to hear the Roar of the CAT. Then
call your local Representative at 531-7272.
EVENING APPOINTMENT SETTER
NEEDED. Great student job, good telephone
voice required. Call Nease Personnel 756-
5820
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - earn up to
$2.000rnonth working on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies. World travel, Seasonal
& full-time employment available. No ekperi-
ence necessary. For more information call
1-206-971-3550 ext C53624
SINGLE DAD NEEDS CHILD care help,
6:00am til 7:30am mornings, 3:00pm until.
Will consider one person for either shift or
one person for both shifts. Must have car
willing to carry son to afterschool activities.
Pay Neg. Call 8303981 or leave message.
MANAGER TRAINEE POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE with major finance company. Business
background a plus. Fantastic career oppor-
tunity! Call Nease Personnel 756-5820
Angel Hair Design
Easter Special
All styles $3.�� off
Blow dry
Bring a friend and get your
style 12 Price
Relaxers & Curls $5.00 off
Walk in or Make appointment
today Ask for Marie or
Carmalesha
514 E. 14th Street
near King Sandwich
752-9706 or 752-9707
EARN CASH AND CO on vacation at the
same time. Club Atlanta Travel offers ex-
ceptional cash and travel earnings in its
unique Network Program called "CAT Tru-
ly a ground-floor opportunity. Please call 1-
800-7503894 then 531-7272(local)
Announcements
be held on Friday, April 19 at J. H. Rose
High School from 9:30am-1:30pm. If you
would like to volunteer to be a Buddy for
our Special Olympians on that day, please
attend our buddy orientation meeting on
Wednesday, April 17 at Mendenhall from
5pm3pm in room 244. All of our volunteers
will receive a Special Olympics Volunteer T-
Shirt and a lunch (hot dog and coke). Please
call the Special Olympics Office at 830-4551
if you have any questions. We here at the
Special Olympics office on behalf of our 769
Special Olympians, Thank you for your sup-
port of our Local Program.
CLIMBING I WORKSHOP: LEARN how to
rock climb with Recreational Services There
will be a Climbing I Workshop on April 9
from 33pm at the Climbing Tower. Interest-
ed individuals will need to register in 204
Christenbury by April 8. For more informa-
tion call Recreational Services at 3283387
AFTERNOON CANOE ON THE TAR: Get
out of your room and get on the river. Re-
creational Services wants to take you out
for an Afternoon Canoe on the Tar April 15th
from 33pm. Interested individuals will need
to register in 204 Christenbury Gym before
April 10th. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3283387
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA: The Theta Alpha
Chapter is sponsoring Apollo Night on Thurs-
day, April 11 at 7:00pm. If there is anyone
interested in displaying your talent sign up
in front of the Student Store Monday, April
8th-Thursday April 11th between 11 & 1.
For more information call 353-0624.
DURING THE WEEK OF APRIL 8, 1996 -
APRIL 12, 1996, a survey of student opin-
ion of instruction will be conducted at ECU.
Questionnaires will be distributed in classes
with enrollments greater than five. All stud-
ents will have the opportunity to express
opinions on the teaching effectiveness of
their instructors. The survey will be conduct-
ed during class time and will take approx-
imately 15 minutes to complete. Student par-
ticipation is voluntary and no identities are
requested. Instructors have been requested
to leave the classroom while the question-
naires are being completed. Results of the
survey will be distributed to instructors af-
ter final grades have been posted.
For Sale
FORMAL OAK FINISHED DINING table
with leaf and four solid hardwood pressback
chairs! $225 Rockford Fosgate dual 15-inch
sealed subwoofer box! $200 Call 8303934
CUTE PUPPIES, HALF REGISTERED
Golden Retriever, Half Black Lab: 5 weeks.
Asking $50.00 or best offer. Call Perry at
3553947
500 DIFFERENT HOW-TO reports with
full re-print rights. These incredible reports
practically sell themselves! Amazing record-
ing! 1300-732-2863 Ext 9187, 24hrs.
A FOUR PIECE BEDROOM suit. In great
condition and fairly new. $500 negotiable.
Call Catherine or Wanda at 758-9412
SLEEPER SOFA AND MATCHING
loveseat Excellent Condition. Sell for $400
O.B.O. Call 752-2965 Ask for Todd.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make up
to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversational
English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea. No
teaching background or Asian languages re-
quired. For information call: (206)971-
3570exU53624
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF, HOUSE-
KEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEADERS, FIT-
NESS COUNSELORS, AND MORE. CALL
RESORT EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 1-206-
971-3600 EXT R53622.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO HELP in of-
fice. Hours between 8am-6pm (hours can be
flexible). Duties: Answering phone, Typing,
Daily schedule planning, Transportation
needed. Call 3553111. Ask for Jeff Walker.
PART TIME CLERICAL HELP needed. Typ-
ists, file clerks, receptionists. Nease Person-
nel 756-5820
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Caroli-
na (Nags Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800362-2122
ATTN a MAJORS INDUSTRIAL Secur-
ity officers needed for site in Greenville. Earn
$6.50 per hr. while obtaining experience in
career field. Apply in person to: Guardsmark
Inc. 3219 Landmark St, Suite 9-B Green-
ville NC
ENTRY-LEVEL SALES POSITIONS avail-
able for highly motivated individuals. Nease
Personnel 756-5820
FUN SUMMER JOBS! INCLUDES pool,
tennis and golf privileges! Lifeguards, wait-
staff, food service, cashiers and gate attend-
ants. The Village Beach and Tennis Club,
Nags Head. (919) 480-2222
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week youth
recreationalsports camp�.our 42nd season!
Over 25 activities, including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, Go-karts, artCool Mountain
Climate, EXCELLENT pay and great fun!
Non-smokers. For applicationbrochure: 704-
692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
LERNER IS SEEKING QUALIFIED Assis-
tant Managers for Rocky MtWilson area.
To arrange immediate interview: Contact
Michelle Smith at 9723882 or Mary Williams
at 291-9887
WANTED: PART-TIME WAREHOUSE and
delivery. License required. Apply in person
at Larry's Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is now
hiring due to our expanding business. Earn
up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting in the
Greenville and surrounding areas. You must
be at least 18 years of age, have own phone
and transportation. We are also hiring male
and female dancers for private parties. Call
Diamond Escorts Inc. at 7583896 or Emer-
ald City Escorts at 75703477 for and inter-
view. Est. 1990.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are eli
gible regardless of grades, income, or par-
ent's income. Let us help. Call Student Fi-
nancial Services: 1300-2633495extF53625
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 3553611.
ECU'S 1 DJ SERVICE! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey service
for your party or social function. Widest var-
iety of any disc jockey company in Green-
ville. Alternative to Hip Hop. Specializing in
the needs of ECU Organizations and Greeks.
Spring dates are filling fast so call early.
Ask for Lee 7584644.
MOVING! LET ME DO your cleaning off-
er affordable rates for ECU students. Call
Stephanie for more information 353-0830
WANT TO BE ON THE WEB? I'll design
your very own home page for you. Basic
page, including your picture, resume, short
voice clip, general information - just $15.
Custom artwork and design also available
(for example see: www.ecu.edu-bcheade
matthtml). Limited to ECU Faculty, Staff and
students only. Call Matt at 3553041 or e-
mail bcheatle@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu.
M
Greek
Personals
CHI OMEGA, LAMBDA CHI AND KA - It
was great to hang out Tuesday night at the
Quad Social. Hope you had as much fun as
we did. Love, Alpha Delta Phi
THETA CHI, WE HOPE you had as much
fun as we did this weekend with all the
"Hoochie Mammas Love the Alpha Phis
OVERCOMING GRIEF AND LOSS: An-
yone can experience the loss of a significant
person and often the grieving person can
benefit from the support of others who have
had a similar experience. This continuing
group will bring people together under the
direction of a skilled counselor for mutual
support and to learn healthy ways of griev-
ing. Tuesdays at 3:30pm. Counseling Cen-
ter. Call 3283661 to register.
ALCOHOL SUPPORT GROUP: Have you
been affected by alcohol at some point in
your life? Abusive families, poor relationship
skills, difficulty with self-management skills,
difficulty formulating and reaching acade-
mic and personal goals, as well as poor aca-
demic and employment performance can all
be related to trouble with alcohol. This group
examines the issues surrounding the use of
alcohol and the consequences of drinking
behaviors. Find out what to do before things
get out of hand. Mondays 3:30pm-5:00pm.
Counseling Center. Call 3283661 to register.
GOLF DOUBLES: SWINGING IN the rain!
Recreational Services Golf Doubles entry
deadline is Tuesday, April 9 at 5pm in 204
Christenbury Gym. For more information call
Recreational Services at 3283387
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB MASSAGE
CLINIC: Thursday, April 11 6-9pm in Belk
Building. Tickets from PT Students or Back
& Limb Clinic. $3.00 in advance or $3.50 at
the door.
LEARN BASIC CANOE TECHNIQUES:
Take a wet and wild trip to James River, Vir-
ginia April 19-2? or 22-24 and learn basic
canop techniques for two days. Beginner and
intermediate paddlers will love this trip. The
registration deadline is April 8 in 204 Chris
tenbury Gym. For more information call Re-
creational Services at 3283387
INTRAMURAL SPORTS GOLF DOU-
BLES: Don't miss the chance to play. There
will be men's, women's, and co-rec divisions.
The registration deadline is April 9 in 204
Christenbury Gym. For more information call
Recreational Services at 3283387
SIGMA WISHES EVERYONE A safe and
happy Easter break.
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GREEKS
of the week: ADPi-Carlyn Lupton, Kara
Buttermore; AOPl-Nikki Blackstock, Jenny
Gorka; AZD-Holly Black; Alpha Phi-Angie
Nbc Chi Omega-Gayle Mohler, Anne Marie
Garring; DZ-Torri Forbes; Sigma-Susan Laird;
ZTA-Meg Watson; Pi Delta-Renee Hester
PHI TAU, WE HAD a great time Friday
night Love, the Alpha Phis.
no YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD, SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
r Swap Shop
Announcements
BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES: Bring your
lunch and enjoy learning new information
during Recreational Services Brown Bag
Lunch Series. On April 8 at 12:10pm in MSC
14 learn about Nutrition, Exercise, Ad-
herence and Fitness Goal Setting. April 10,
at 12:10pm in MSC 14 Learning Styles and
the most effective ways people can use their
strengths in learning will be discussed. On
April 12 at 12:10pm in MSC 14 there will be
a stretching and relaxation session to de-
stress yourself while you learn stress man-
agement techniques. For more information
call Recreational Services at 3283387
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY SPE-
CIAL OLYMPICS Local Spring Games will
CELEBRATE HOLY WEEK AND Easter
Services with the Newman Catholic Stud-
ent Center. For dates and times please see
Ad in today's paper.
SCIENCE CAREER DAY: ATTENTION all
science majors and minors! You are invited
to a Science Career Day at Flanagan on
Thursday, April 11th from 12-2pm. Repre-
sentatives from various science oriented com-
panies in the surrounding areas will be pres-
ent to offer information about their compa-
nies. This event may offer the chance for you
to learn what prospective employers are look-
ing for in science majors. A brief presenta-
tion by each representative will begin in Fla-
nagan 201 promptly at 12:00.
ECNAO WILL BE HAVING a meeting April
9 at 7pm in MSC room 248. All members
are encouraged to attend. For more infor-
mation please call Nikki Epps at 752-9042
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGANIZA-
TION. The next meeting of ECHO will be
held Tuesday, April 9th in GCB 1003. Schol-
arship applications are due into the Honors
Office no later than Monday, April 8th at
5:00pm. The annual Spring Cookout will be
held Sunday, April 14th at Elm Street Park.
Activities begin at 4:00pm. All Honors Stud-
ents are invited to attend. Nominations for
officers will be taken at the April 9th meet-
ing. For more information Call Joseph @ 756-
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 4, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 04, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1137
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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