The East Carolinian, April 2, 1996






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April 2,1996
Vol 71, No. 50
iThe East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pases

Student robbed at gunpoint
Briefs
Around the State
RALEIGH (AP) - Two sexual
assaults in as many weeks at a city-
run housing development for the
elderly and disabled has led officials
to tighten security there.
The latest attack at Glenwood
Towers occurred early Sunday when
police said a woman was sexually
assaulted by a man at her apartment
but struggled free before being
raped. On March 22, an 83-year-old
woman was raped after authorities
said a man forced his way into her
apartment when she answered her
door.
No arrests have been made in
either case.
SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR
FORCE BASE, N.C. (AP) - Four
anti-war protesters were arrested
after they tried to lay palm fronds
at an unauthorized location on
base.
Military policemen handcuffed
demonstrators with the Pilgrimage
for Peace and Justice on Palm Sun-
day following the march through
Goldsboro to Seymour Johnson Air
Force Base.
The protesters were accused by
authorities of trespassing, Raleigh
television station WRAL reported.
Around the Country
NEW YORK (AP) - Starting
Monday, consumers across the na-
tion could be charged an extra fee
to use an automated teller machine
outside of their bank's own system.
The charge is a result of deci-
sions last year by two major ATM
systems operated by Visa Interna-
tional and MasterCard Interna-
tional. Visa did not set a maximum
fee that could be charged but said
it expects banks to charge 25 cents
to $2.50 per transaction for ma-
chines not owned by their bank.
NEW YORK (AP) - In a moth-
erly show of courage, a cat raced I
into a burning building to rescue
her five kittens, one by one.
And then with her eyes blis-
tered shut and her paws burned, she
made a head count of her young
ones, touching each one with her
nose to make sure they were all safe.
The u -iroics of the cat nick-
named Scarlet have turned the
once-homeless feline and her brood
into the most coveted kitties in an
animal shelter. While they recover
from their wounds Sunday, more
than 700 people have called seek-
ing to adopt them.
Around the World
CALCUTTA, India (AP) -
Mother Teresa was hospitalized Mon-
day after falling down at her Mission-
aries of Charity headquarters and
breaking a collar bone.
The 85-year-old Nobel Peace
Prize laureate was admitted to
Calcutta's Woodlands Nursing home,
where a doctor said she was under
observation but there was no concern
about her overall health. The doctor
spoke on condition of anonymity.
KHARTOUM, Sudan (AP) - On
Monday, Sudan accused southern
rebels aided by Ethiopian soldiers of
killing at least 860 civilians while shell-
ing and taking over two southeastern
garrison towns last week.
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
An ECU senior and his close
friend, a graduate student visiting
from NC State, were robbed at gun-
point early Sunday morning. Two sus-
pects have been arrested and identi-
fied by the students.
The ECU student, who asked
that he and his friend's names be
withheld, said he was following a fa-
miliar route down East Fourth Street
toward his apartment when a car
passed them on the corner of Oak
Street and abruptly turned around.
Two young men exited the vehicle
and approached the students.
"We were walking from down-
town like we have a hundred times,
when the car passed, and then one
of the guys ran up and put a gun to
my head the ECU student said. "He
(the suspect) was shaking; I think he
must have been new to this. He said
to give him jewelry, cash, credit
cards, everything. My friend got
searched by the second guy from
head to toe
The ECU student said that after
they were robbed, the suspects told
them to run and fired the gun.
"I heard a shot and my friend
and I made eye contact with each
other to make sure that we were
alright before we continued to run
he said. "I think that it might have
been a warning shot"
According to Greenville Police
Department records, the gun was a
small caliber handgun.
As the students filed reports
with the police, a car matching the
description of the suspects was
pulled over on Highway 43, well past
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. Ac-
companying the police, the students
identified the suspects as the ones
who had robbed them two hours ear-
lier.
"There were two guys who
stayed in the car who were over 20
years old, but the two who robbed
us were about 15 he said.
The ECU senior said that he
fears that because of the suspect's
young ages, they will not get the pros-
ecution he feels they deserve.
He also expressed surprise that
the robbery occurred and offered ad-
vice for other students who walk
home from downtown.
"Call a cab he said "I tried to
save money or avoid driving by walk-
ing home. They (the suspects) saw
two guys walking by themselves who
looked like easy targets
Neither student was physically
harmed in the robbery and, accord-
ing to the student, both men are deal-
ing with the trauma well.
"Unfortunately, my friend said
he was never coming to Greenville
again he said.
President set to give address
University
prepares for 87th
commencement
Tambra Zlon
Editor
Around 2,300 graduates will
crowd the stands of Dowdy-Ficklen at
10 a.m. on May 4th to hear the presi-
dent of the University of North Caro-
lina system's commencement address,
and to receive recognition for climb-
ing the academic ladder.
CD. Spangler has been president
of the University of North Carolina
system for ten years.
"Commencement speakers speak
to a great number of graduating se-
niors each year Spangler said. "A lot
of times they're preoccupied some
people are coming from families
who've had to work very hard to get
them through. They're thinking about
leaving friends they've been with for
four years they're leaving what was
probably a second home
Spangler said he is going to try
to reach through these anxieties to
offer ideas on how students can
handle the pressures of the moment
at hand and the world to come.
"Basically, I'll try to give some
assurance that the graduates will
survive Spangler said.
Spangler said he has spoken to
C. D. Spangler
50 or 60 graduating classes.
"For a commencement speaker to
reach throughfto the students
that's almost impossible Spangler
said.
Before he became president of
the UNC-system, Spangler held a chair
on the North Carolina State Board of
Education. He graduated from UNC-
Chapel Hill and received his MBA from
Harvard.
May's graduating class will be
ECU'S 87th commencement cer-
emony.
In favorable weather conditions,
students are asked to form the aca-
demic procession under the north
stands in order to enter the field
through gate 4A. The band is expected
to begin the festivities at 9:15 a.m
and faculty and students are expected
to file in around 9:45 a.m. The com-
mencement program is expected to
begin at 10 a.m.
If weather is determined to be
unfavorable, the ceremony will be held
twice in Minges Coliseum.
C.C. Rowe, director of commence-
ment activities, said he hopes the
spring weather will hold out better
than it did for those who graduated
last December. He said that while the
problems caused by foul weather don't
pose a serious threat, doing every-
thing twice can be rather hectic.
"When you have two commence-
ments, the speaker (CD. Spangler)
would have to do it twice Rowe said.
The morning commencement will
include doctors of philosophy, doctors
of medicine, educational specialists,
certificates of advanced study,
master's degrees and Baccalaureate
degrees in the College of Arts and
Sciences. The afternoon ceremony will
include Baccalaureate degrees in the
Schools of Allied Health Sciences, Art,
Business, Education Health and Hu-
man Performance, Human Environ-
mental Sciences, Industry and Tech-
nology, Music, Nursing and Social
Work.
General parking will be provided.
The following parking areas are sug-
gested for guests: Minges Coliseum,
Ficklen Drive, Berkeley Road,
Harrington Field, Allied Health Build-
ing, Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and 14th
Street
C52233
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Robert Chapman, a junior recreation and leisure studies
major, was awarded a check for his spring 1997 room
rent from the University Housing and Dining Services
Prize Patrol. Chapman, who is flanked by University
Housing officials, won the grand prize after deciding to
move back to campus.
Choir named best on east coast
Next performance
April 13th in
Mendenhall
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
Weekly practices have paid off for
ECU'S Gospel Choir. The group has
performed at local concerts, at other
universities throughout the state and
as far south as Kissimmee, Fla. Re-
cently they were named the best col-
lege gospel choir in the east
In January, the 75-member choir
was nominated and voted in as the
1996 recipient of the WALJO People's
Choice Award. Choir Vice President
Tara Worrell said the acronym WALJO
stands for the name of the founder of
this particular award, Walter Jones.
The awards ceremony took place in
Winston Salem.
As president of the choir, Stacey
Hargrove said receiving the award was
a real accomplishment, and she was
glad that the group was rewarded for
its dedication.
Hargrove said the process in-
volved in deciding which choir would
receive the award was more like an
election than a contest
"In order to be on the ballot, we
Coach's raise finalized
Salary increases
from $97,300 to
$107,030
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Photo Courtesy of ECU Gospel Choir
Members of the ECU Gospel Choir raise their voices in song
during a recent concert performanace.
Trahan had been voted as the best
female soloist, but they did not know
until the day of the awards ceremony
that the choir had won as well.
had to be nominated by a member of
the community Hargrove said, add-
ing that the group received its nomi-
nation from Milton Sutton, a follower
of the choir.
"Once the nominations were in,
it was up to the general public to de-
cide she said. "There was a question-
naire for the people of the commu-
nity to fill out on which they were
asked who they felt the best choir was,
who the best soloist was and so on
Hargrove said the group was
aware that Director Debra Dixon
Since receiving the award, the
choir has been busy making a name
for themselves in other states. Over
Spring Break, the choir got the
chance to mix work and play as they
traveled to Florida and other places
to sing.
"Every year the choir goes on
See CHOIR page 3
ECU Head Football Coach Steve
Logan received a raise in his salary this
February.
Logan's contract was finalized on
February 23, 1996. The raise was ap-
proved by the Executive Committee of the board of trustees, and the con-
tract was finalized by the chairman of the board. The raise was increased by
10 percent, which makes Logan's previous salary of $97,300 increase to
$107,030.
The raise was decided upon by the athletic director and Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin, based mostly on Logan's performance in the program.
"The chancellor and athletic director were impressed with his outstand-
ing performance said University Attorney Ben Irons.
When raises are given to coaches in the athletic department, the money
comes from the school's athletic department general revenue. Money is re-
ceived from ticket sales and other events that are held by the department.
There is an extensive process that occurs when evaluating a coach for a
raise. Under their contracts, the conditions of their employment are evalu-
ated. If the conditions agree with a good evaluation, the conditions increase,
and he may receive a raise. If the evaluations do not agree, then the contract
remains as is.
Logan was offered the raise effective January 1, 1996.
'Basically, we all feel that Logan has led an excellent team this year
said Mike Hamrick, athletic director of ECU. "The team had a 9-3 record and
See COACH page 3





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Tuesday, April 2,1996
7fte East Carolinian
Plastic bottle bomb explodes at Indiana State University
Two plastic bottle bombs exploded during the St. Patrick's Day week-
end in Cromwell Residence Hall. Police Detective Jeff Bellinger said.
At 2:02 a.m Cromwell Hall staff reported someone had detonated a
plastic bottle bomb on the elevator which had stopped on the eighth floor.
Bellinger said the resident assistant heard a loud noise from the eleva-
tor and went to investigate. The R.A. said that no one was in the area,
leaving the police no suspects.
On Monday at 2:58 a.m police officers responded to a call from an-
other resident assistant in Cromwell. A plastic bottle bomb had exploded in
front of a resident's room. Again, no one was in the area, leaving the police
with no suspects.
Sixty books found marred with swastikas at UNC-Chapel Hill
When senior Rachel Burton went to the Undergraduate Library, March
19, she did not anticipate seeing anti-Semitic epithets and swastikas. How-
ever, that is exactly what she found on the second floor.
About 60 books concerning socialism and communism had been marked
with swastika signs, Burton said. She said the books had been randomly
marked.
Burton said she notified a librarian who was on duty after the discovery.
The librarian reported the incident to David Taylor, head librarian of the
Undergraduate Library.
Taylor said he contacted library administrators and checked to make
sure vandalism had not occurred at other campus libraries.
Bookstore fires employee for theft at University of Tennessee, Knoxville
A UT bookstore student employee was recently fired for stealing approxi-
mately $1,100 of merchandise from the store.
Time Price, a security officer at the bookstore, said the employee had been
stealing items out of the bookstore for some time. The employee has agreed to
make restitution for the merchandise and go before the student conduct board.
Sweatshirts, hats and other clothing items were among the merchandise sto-
len.
The thefts were discovered after officials reviewed video tapes taken after
hours in the store, Price said. They reviewed tapes dating back to Nov. 18,
1995. The employee admitted to the thefts after he was confronted by officials.
He will be arrested if he does not make restitution sometime around April 15.
Compiled by Wendy Rountree from various college newspapers.
Lecturer gives '96
election historical twist
Reception held in
Gray Gallery this
Wednesday
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Dr. William E. Leuchtenberg, a
20th century historian, will be mak-
ing a visit to ECU Wednesday night,
April 3, at 7:30p.m.
Leuchtenberg will be making a
presentation titled "The Presidential
Election of 1996 in Historical Per-
spective He will be speaking in
Speight Auditorium of Jenkins Fine
Arts Center. A reception will be held
in the Gray Gallery following the lec-
ture. Leuchtenberg will then be
available to answer any questions
from the audience.
ECU'S faculty, staff and stu-
dents are all invited to attend, along
with the entire Greenville commu-
nity. This will be a non-ticketed
event.
Originally from Boston, Dr.
Leuchtenberg holds degrees from
Cornell University and Columbia
University, receiving his doctorate
at Columbia in 1951. He has had a
very extensive teaching career, start-
ing out as the DeWitt Clinton Pro-
fessor at Columbia, for over 30
years. Since 1982, he has been the
William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor
at the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill. He has also held vis-
iting professorships at Duke Univer-
sity Law School, Cornell University
and Oxford University.
Leuchtenberg is also well
known outside of teaching and lec-
turing. He has been the author of a
number of books and articles. These
include The Perils of Prosperity,
1914-34; In the Shadow of FDR:
From Harry Truman to Ronald
Reagan (a Main Selection of the His-
tory Book Club); The Supreme
Court Reborn: The Constitutional
Revolution in the Age of Roosevelt
and The FDR Years: On Roosevelt
and His Legacy. One of his
books.Franklin D. Roosevelt and
The New Deal, 19321940 written
in 1963, has received the Bancroft
Prize along with the Francis
Parkman Prize. Both prizes were
given by the Society of American
Historians.
Leuchtenberg's books are not
only read in English-speaking coun-
tries, but are also available in other
languages. They are sold in Italian.
See ELECT page 3
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close to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2
bedroom Townhouses over 000 ec. ft 1 12 baths,
private patios, dishwashers, all electric, water
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The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
Editor, The East Carolinian
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, Rebel
for the 1996-97 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, April 5 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
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Applications may be picked up at the WZMB studios on the ground
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w-
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 2, 1996
21st Century J
Clothing for men and & women
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vJtlvJlJK frontpage 1
tour throughout the east coast
Hargrove said. "We left on Sunday
(March 3) and went to Greensboro
first. Then we traveled to Atlanta. Ga.
and Kissimmee, Fla. Our last stop on
the tour was Columbia, S.C
Recently, the choir became in-
volved with some events a little closer
to home. On Saturday, Mar. 30, the
group performed in Goldsboro for a
youth outreach program. Their next
appearance on campus is scheduled
for April 13 at Mendenhall Student
Center (MSC) during Minority Visi-
tation Day.
Hargrove said she is sure the
choir will continue to excel as it
grows. She said she always welcomes
new members.
"The ECU Gospel Choir is truly
an organization focused on leader-
ship and fellowship Hargrove said.
"We uplift each other and our audi-
ences, and we sing because we enjoy
it"
VyOAiH. from page 1
we won the Liberty Bowl. What more
can you say? The raise is definitely
well deserved
"Our football coach has done
such a great job this year. He de-
serves a reward said freshman
Stephanie Brennan.
However, some students dis-
agree with the raise. Some feel that
teachers deserve raises, more than
coaches.
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"I don't really think that coaches
should make more money than teach-
ers said sophomore Kristen Cocca.
"We come to school for a reason -to
get an education. Athletics are great,
and I support them, but academics
should always come first
Junior Kristie Wade agrees.
"Our money should go towards
other things, such as educational
projects Wade said. "Our tuition
goes up every year, and I think the
money should go to rewarding the
teachers. That is what we are here
for
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A DATE WITH QUASIMODO!
Tuesday, April 2.1996 � 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room
Winners Receive Limo Ride, Dinner at Outback, h Tickets to The Hunchback of Notre Dame on April 3,1996!
Roger Day-Wednesday, April 10-FREE!
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM -The Brickyard-MSC
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the Night of the Show
Call 328-6004 for more intormation.
$VZ�l0
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Tuesday, April 9,1996 � 8:00 PM � Hendrix Theatre
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
Presented by the ECU Student Union
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Xj1a1�V 1 from page 2
Japanese, Chinese, Hebrew, Spanish
and Bengali editions as well.
Leuchtenberg has also served
on editorial boards and was the su-
pervisor of the report for Counsel
John Doar for the impeachment in-
quiry staff investigating charges
against Richard Nixon.
The broadcasting business is an-
other area in which he has had much
experience. He has been an elections
analyst for NBC and PBS and was a
consultant to Florentine Films (Ken
Burns) on the series The Congress
, The Civil War and Baseball.
"He is a distinguished teacher
and historian, which made him an
excellent candidate for this type of
lecture said Roger Biles, depart-
ment chair and professor of the his-
tory department. "He has such a
long list of credential. There really
isn't much that he hasn't done
CUT THE B.S.
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'Chance ol receiving a busy signal Is approximately 5.
What Are You Waiting For?
CALL 1-800-200-4339
Attention
Returning
Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility
service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and possibly money. The follow-
ing options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick up
a "Request for Utility Service" application
from room 214 in the Off-Campus Housing
Office, Wbichard Building; at Greenville
Utilities' Main Office, 200 W. 5th Street; or at
GUC Express, our satellite office located at
509 S.E.Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and mail
it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville, N.C.
27835-1847, att Customer Service.
Remember to attach a "letter of credit"
from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits are
as follows: with uearic or p '� electric
or j� rp�cc heujag
$75
S85
$85
$75
�pace heitim
ElecthcOnly $100
Electric & Water $110
Electric, Water & Gas $110
Electric & Gas $100
You can save time by mailing the deposit in
advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut on
and a phone number where we may reach you prior
to your arrival at the service address.
The service charge of S20.00 for electric and
water, andor $30.00 for gas will be on your first bill
GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on. While we do not require you to be home when
electric or water service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure that all electrical appliances and water faucets
are OFF during the cut on procedure.
Greenville mm Utilities





Tuesday, April 2,1995
The East Carolinian
�0�5
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4STt
OWDEDI925, .
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Our View
Record numbers
voted in student
elections this
year; TEC still
says it's not
enough.
Students often complain that they don't get a voice in our
Student Government Association (SGA), but numbers from last
week's SGA elections show that when students do get a chance
to do something they don't take advantage of it
ECU enrolls over 17,000 students, yet only 2,182 people
voted in the elections. That proves that when people are given
the opportunity to voice their opinions and thoughts of better-
ing ECU, they don't. Who we chose to represent the student
body is crucial to everybody.
A portion of our tuition goes to the SGA and don't you
care about how your money is spent and who is going to spend
it? None of us at TEC would just give our money to a complete
stranger and say do whatever you want with it, and we suspect
none of the student body would either.
Granted the elected members of SGA can't personally know
everybody by name, but getting out there and voting shows
that you do care how your school is run. Talk to them, let
them know what you feel. It's plain and simple - get involved.
This year's election turned out to be the highest turnout
of voters in five years. Only 12 percent of our students voted.
Folks, that is sad. Imagine if only 12 percent of the country
turned out to vote for president of the United States. This
country would be a mess.
True, this kind of election is on a smaller scale, but SGA
directly affects us and everybody should have participated in
voting. At least half of the student body should have gotten
involved. We can't even say that a quarter of the student body
voted.
And you can't use the excuse that you couldn't find any
boxes to cast your ballot All across campus, boxes clearly la-
beled VOTE, were set up for students. They provided the pen-
cil, the bubble sheet and the list of candidates. All you had to
do was stop, show them your ID and take a minute out of your
time to make your selections.
Being involved doesn't have to mean actually running as a
candidate yourself. Voting certainly is being involved. It is im-
portant to elect somebody who you feel will do the kind of job
you think an elected member should do.
So the next time you complain about not being involved,
and you didn't vote, say no more. Being active on this campus
and getting your input is as easy as four marks on a bubble
sheet.
MTV uses the phrase "Choose or Lose" when describing
the presidential elections this year. The same could be said for
ECU's elections too. Ali those that didn't "Choose" did "Lose
So when the elections roll around again next year, don't
pass the box and stare blankly at it Make your selection and
make your opinion count.
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Crlstie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton Copy Editor
Deanya Lattlmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Tax money buys penile implant
I was flipping through the pages
of a recent Reader's Digest and found
an article about a man who received
a penile implant paid for by you and
me, despite the fact that he is a con-
victed child molester. Yes, people like
us who pay taxes to our wondrous gov-
ernment paid for this procedure.
In 1995, Michael Everett Martin,
a convicted child molester, received
his penile implant from taxpayer dol-
lars. Surgeons at the Veterans Affairs
Medical Center in Jackson, Miss, in-
stalled an inflatable prosthesis on the
retired Navy veteran. Martin was con-
victed in 1990 of molesting two girls
ages 5 and 7. He is still on probation
and served only 312 years in prison
before being released in 1994.
How can society justify paying
for this implant? I personally feel that
any person who sexually violates
another person through molestation
or rape should be permanently al-
tered so that they would never be
able to perform sexually again for
pleasure or assault.
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
We need to
speak out loudly
against this form
of injustice.
Veterans Affairs officials knew of
Martin's conviction and were legally
bound to perform the surgery, which
enables an impotent man to have an
erection.
"Now he's better equipped than
ever, and we're paying for it said
Hinds County Assistant District At-
torney Linda Anderson, who was part
of the team that successfully pros-
ecuted Martin.
This man is out on our Ameri-
can streets probably stalking his next
innocent victim. The public needs to
take action against this insane jus-
tice system. A system that allows a
man to take away a child's innocence
and only serve a few years in prison.
We are, in a way, rewarding Martin
by giving him the penile implant A
man who violates children has the
brain capacity of a dog and we are
giving this animal a form of positive
reinforcement. We need to speak out
loudly against this form of injustice.
I hope that Martin learned from
his disgusting acts of violence and
will never harm another person
again; however, this remains unlikely.
Many convicted molesters and rap-
ists do not stop committing crimes;
they are sick individuals and our
country needs to protect its people
by not allowing these criminals back
into society. The two little kids
Martan molested will be scarred for
life and he is a healthy, free man.
E-mail users beware
PH Letters to the Editor
To the Editor,
I am writing in response to the
CD review of Jars of Clay. This tal-
ented band was torn apart, debased,
and given an "F The writer called
them a "Jesus band whereas they are
a band FOR Jesus. The writer posed
some questions that I would like to
answer. First, he asked, "Why did the
band bother to waste their time and
effort crafting this piece of over-pro-
duced, lyrically vapid palbum?" Vapid?
No. Their lyrics are spiritually based
Jars review loses
and filled with the grace of God, and
if the writer were a Christian he might
have comprehended their meaning.
Also, if the word "pablum" was sup-
posed to be "album then I send out
a special "sic" to the critic of this
band. This Christ-inspired four-man
band "wasted their time" creating this
album so that others could enjoy and
learn to love Jesus as much as they do.
The critic also claimed thatJars of Clay
had "no redeeming value Well, pal,
the redeeming value is salvation and
that says it all. Next the critic moves
on to analyze the song "Love Song For
A Savior and interprets it as the
"fluff' that a boy would dedicate to
his girlfriend. Uh, no again. This song
is about a girl who seeks Jesus Christ
and awaits his return, which is a bit
different from the critic's rendition. The
last sentence read: "I just hope for their
sakes that God has a sense of humor
In response I say, "God speed to you,
brother
Aaron Queen
As a last resort he reached into
the trunk of his car and wrapped his
fingers around a 33" Louisville Slug-
ger and closed the trunk. Creeping
up to the door he looked around to
see if anyone was watching him be-
cause he was nervous.
It was three in the morning on a
normal Tuesday night at ECU. The bus
with the flashing green light on top
circled the parking lot and picked up
nobody. Inside the car, a tired student
changes the channel on the radio be-
cause his friend is the DJ. The cam-
pus is quiet and there is no reason
that anybody should be where he is.
A cricket chirped and he jumped
around flinging the drops of sweat
that sat across his brow off into the
cool night air. Quickly he regained his
composure and proceeded to smash
the window in the door to Austin and
reaching into the hole he created he
scraped his hand across the shard of
glass rising from the door frame.
Bleeding and shaking he slid up
the stairs getting progressively louder
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
Every terminal
was filled with
exhausted looking
students slowly
typing into the
screen
as he cleared each step. The closer he
got the less he cared if anyone knew.
Now, at a slow jog he flew open the
doors at the top of the second level
of stairs and turned the corner with
extreme anticipation. Passing each
office door the jog pace became a run
until he was clumsily banging around
the winding hallway into the home
stretch which he raised his bat to in
triumph.
Slamming into the door of the
computer lab all of the lights were off
but the low hum of computer termi-
nals filled the room. All of a sudden
he stopped because he realized that
he was not alone. Every terminal was
filled with exhausted looking students
slowly typing into the screen as if they
had no choice and they were enslaved.
Out of the corner of his eye our des
perate vigilante noticed that one of
the residents of a terminal had just
fallen out of his chair. He jumped over
the table and got into the seat He
typed 'UGADICT and proceeded to
open his mailbox to find, to his sur-
prise, that it was empty. He got up
from his chair, smashed the window,
and jumped out.
Out of the corner of his eye as
he began to fall he saw the beginnings
of a message come onto his screen. It
read: incoming mail from A
scream of complete horror filled the
cold night air as he fell.
It's just e-mail.
Letters to the Editor
Political correctness relies on tolerance
Service desk offers double apology
To the Editor,
I am an employee of the College
Hill Service Desk and would like to
apologize to Jamie Lane who wrote the
letter to you about not being able to
get change to do laundry after 12 mid-
night The Pirates Den Gameroom (in
Aycock) is run by the Service Desk and
they give change up until they close at
12 midnight in case change machines
are out At the Service Desk we only
have a very small amount of money
that we give in case someone loses
their money in the washers and dry-
ers. The policy was designed so we
would hold onto the little money the
laundry vendor provides us for refunds.
We purposefully do not have much
money for security reasons (as we are
open late when most everyone else is
asieep). Most of the time College Hill
residents do not have trouble getting
change because of our gameroom. I
wish Mr. Lane would not move off cam-
pus as we would love for him to stay,
but I am wondering what will he do
after 12 midnight if the change ma-
chine in his apartment complex goes
� out? I know our manager already
talked with Mr. Lane and apologized
to him, but I want to do so also.
Sonia Wall
UHS student employee
To the Editor,
I have a few comments in re-
sponse to the April 1st letter "Consti-
tution Protects Everyone" by Michael
Walker. The issue of gay and lesbian
lifestyles is controversial to say the
least. B-Glad's request for support by
asking students to wear blue jeans was
irksome to those who do not agree
with that lifestyle for whatever rea-
sons.
By default, probably 95 of any
group of university students sports
jeans on any given day. It is similar to
saying, for example, "if you support
heterosexual pride, do not come to
class nude on Thursday
A conscious effort was forced
upon students NOT wanting to sup-
port B-Glad, and not the other way
around. The Constitution also pro-
tects freedom of religion. This may be
the reason that some rushed to the
closet for their khakis, and not for
their jeans or support of those who
are "coming out of the closet
As for changes of intolerance and
differing interpretations of the Con-
stitution, does it mean that if you do
not agree with homosexuality that you
think it should be banned? Political
correctness harps on tolerance, but
where is tolerance for those who hold
conservative values?
Many people note that homosexu-
ality is private and takes place in the
bedroom, but if a group parades
around mainly to get consideration
and respect based on "what you do in
your spare time, or rather, who you
do in your spare time then they
should expect some reactions because
it then becomes public.
Amy Edwards
political science
WyW
"The only way to make sure people you
agree with can speak is to support the
rights of people you don't agree with
� Eleanor Holmes Norton, U.S. congressional delegate, 1970
If you have a complaint or comment write a letter to the
editor. Letters must be typed, 250 words or less and
include name, major, year, and telephone number.Drop
your letters by the Student Publications bldg. across
from Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what you
think. Your voice can be heard!
I





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Tuesday, April 2, 1996
The East Carolinian
Comic Hunchback
comes to Wright
Ttovte ?ecAcetv
Sense and Sensibility
earns Ocsar praise
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Well, the Oscars are about a week
old. which means that films which
should have played in Greenville five
months ago will finally be playing at a
theater near you. Despite major criti-
cal praise. Sense and Sensibility never
played locally during its initial release.
Now that Ang Lee's beautifully crafted
film has received a few Academy
Awards, you don't have to drive to
Raleigh to enjoy it
Based on Jane Austen's classic
novel. Sense and Sensibility captivates
its audience with a subtle sense of
humor, a dooming atmosphere of sor-
row and a rejuvenating spirit of hope �
as it depicts the stringent classist soci-
ety of 19th century England. While
many will argue (and believe me, many
will) that Emma Thompson's script
does not capture the flavor of Austen.
Thompson's script which won an Os-
car, does an exceptional job of making
Austen accessible to a mainstream au-
dience. Let's leave it to the BBC to do
a more literal translation of the novel.
The very basic concept is similar
to other period pieces that have been
"ilmed recently, most notably Howard's
ind and The Age of Innocence. Like
hese films. Sense and Sensibility con-
icts love and class with one another
Let's leave it to the
BBC to do a more
literal translation
of the novel.
while illustrating the limitations a strict
patriarchal society placed on the
choices women could make.
Emma Thompson and Kate
Winslet (both Oscar nominees for their
strong performances here) play Elinor
and Marianne Dashwood, two sisters
who lose their social rank when their
father dies and the family inheritance
goes to the son.
While moving
down in the
class system
causes such in-
conveniences as
less food and
less heat for
their now
smaller house,
the biggest inconvenience for Elinor
and Marianne is how their newly ac-
quired social position affects their love
lives. Within the strict class system of
their England, marriage is for money
and love is a romantic ideal that doesn't
correspond well to logic.
Ang Lee, a Chinese director who
is famous for such films as The Wed-
ding Banquet and Eat Drink Man
Woman, may seem an odd choice for
commanding a film centering on Brit-
ish society, but his visual flair proves
to be the perfect element for Austen's
story. -Ang balances the film between
being claustrophobic and refreshingly
unrestricted. A scene in which Elinor
and Marianne attend a social ball is so
visually packed with tight-lipped, judg-
mental societal hypocrites that one
almost suffocates from its repressive
air.
While Ang and cinematographer
Michael Coulter may be able to per-
fectly capture the confines of such
"good" society, they also allow their
viewers to inhale the
visual splendor of
the British land-
scape. Ar.g has devel-
oped a noble reputa-
tion for his keen vi-
sual style, and this
film only furthers
that reputation.
The director
also has to be applauded for not pull-
ing on the emotional strings too hard.
While Patrick Doyle's heartfelt musi-
cal score is an essential element of the
film, it could have been overused to
bad effect by a lesser director. Many-
scenes worked simply because Ang al-
lowed the actors to do their job at
reaching the audience. It's too easy and
too lame to try to evoke reactions from
an audience by cueing them with a tear-
soaked song.
Along with his mastery over visu-
als. Ang is also an actor s director, and
this shows thi ough a cast full of won-
See SENSE page 7
Photo Courtesy Performing Arts Series
Quasimodo and Esmerelda experience a difference of opinion in a scene from The
Hunchback of Notre Dame, or Bats in the Belfry, to be presented tomorrow night at Wright
Auditorium as part of the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series.
Sarah Wahlert
Senor Writer
If wacky British humor is your
cup of tea. then The Hunchback of
Notre Dame can't be missed. Subtitled
Bats in the Belfry, the show prom-
ises unique, high quality fun at Wright
Auditorium tomorrow night.
The New Vic Theatre of London,
the British troupe that will perform
Hunchback, was formed by Micky
O'Donoughue in 1980. His objective
was to create an ensemble theater
group that would take classics like
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and rec-
reate them in a comic light.
O'Donoughue hoped to bring these
classics back to a popular audience,
and has apparently succeeded.
After beginning with favorites
like The Ballad of Robin Hood and A
Tale of Two Cities, which the troupe
performed for 2 million people all over
the British Isles, they became a big
success. Frequently described as "hi-
larious, inspired lunacy New Vic per-
formances usually involve the audi-
ence actually being invited to mingle
with the actors for refreshments on
stage before the performance and
during intermission.
Micky O'Donoughue himself
stars as Quasimodo in Victor Hugo's
Hunchback, a story of love and ad-
venture set in 15th century Paris.
Written by Joss Buckley, the New Vic's
version follows the original story of
the gypsy dancer Esmerelda, and the
outcast church bell ringer,
Quasimodo. All the other characters
from the novel are there including the
villain. Dom Frollo, Phoebus. Fifi and
a special appearance by Djali the Goat.
Tickets are available for the per-
formance at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student Center, or by
calling 1-800-ECU-ARTS. The tickets
are $10 for students and children and
$20 for the general public and at the
door. The show begins at 8 p.m. at
Wright Auditorium and is sponsored
by the S. Rudolph Alexander Perform-
ing Arts Series. Come out for some
wacky fun!
ADr?P
Bucket
"4 Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great screaming
bucket of American medL opin-
ion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
I think I've lost my faith in
democracy.
There. I've got your attention.
That's a trick we writers use to
get people to listen to us, you see.
We open with what us journalist-
type folks call a lead. The lead is
supposed to catch the eye of the
reader (that's you) and say some-
thing provocative or interesting
enough to keep them (you again)
reading.
It's manipulative as hell, yes.
and I'm proud to say that I think
I'm pretty damn
good at it.
Immodest? I
suppose so. but
that's what any-
kind of writing is
about, at least in
part: manipula-
tion, or if you will,
playing God. Fic-
tion writers get to
create people and
places and have
them do their bid-
ding. Argumenta-
tive non-fiction
writers, like my-
self, get to ma-
nipulate the audi-
ence (you once
again) and try to
get them (you) to see things our
way.
So anyway, that's what I've
spent the better part of the last
two years doing every Tuesday in
this "Drop in the Bucket" column:
manipulating you. my faithful au-
dience. I hope I haven't abused the
CD Reviews
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
James Burke makes our columnist feel insignificant as the British historianTV personality
towers overthe audience in a photo from his lecture last Tuesday night at Hendrix Theatre.
privilege. Of course, any use of this
particular privilege could be consid-
ered abusive, but you get my mean-
ing.
The problem with this whole
manipulative, eye-catching lead thing
is that I've got
to follow up
on it. Audi-
ences (you,
for example)
can only be
manipulated
for so long.
Eventually,
I've got to
give them
(you) some-
thing of sub-
stance. So, for
instance,
when I write
"I think I've
lost my faith
in democ-
racy I'd bet-
ter have some-
thing good to say afterwards.
I think I do. and whether you
realize it or not (another manipula-
tion?), I have in fact already started
saying it. But it may take me a while
to pull it all together, and I may lose
some of you in the process (maybe 1
already have) So I have to give you
"That's what any
kind of writing
is all about, at
least in part:
manipulation,
or if you will,
playing God.
That's what I've
spent the last two
years doing
something, some thread you can hold
onto while I weave all the wild and
disparate thoughts floating through
my head into a coherent some-
thing.
So here goes. I've had a few
mind-expanding experiences in the
past week, and they've caused me to
do a lot of thinking about a lot of
things. The experiences include trav-
eling south down 1-95 into the nether
regions of Florida, attending last
Tuesday's James Burke lecture at
Hendrix, facing imminent and self-
imposed poverty, and listening to
Dennis Miller rant. The thoughts in-
clude a lot of stuff about my favorite
subjects: writing, the media, politics
and cyberpunk prophecy.
I'm afraid that all sounds a bit
epic, and the discussion of it may take
"A Drop in the Bucket" through to
the end of the semester. In other
words. I think we're in for a long haul
on this one. It may be a couple of
weeks before you find out what I
mean when I say "I think I've lost
my faith in democracy
If any of that sounds at ail inter-
esting to you, if you care enough
about what I might have to say, stick
around. If not Well, I'm awfully
sorry. Maybe something else on the
page will suit your tastes better. In
other words, piss off. You're block-
ing the view of somebody who
wants to be here.
And that, dear, gentle audi-
ence, is the democracy of writing
(feel manipulated yet?).
It's much like the democracy
of politics, in that political candi-
dates have to promise the public
enough to put them in office, just
as writers have to give their audi-
ence enough to keep them read-
ing. Once the politicians get into
office, however, they can do any-
thing they want, and the public
be damned. In the same way, I can
tell people who aren't finding this
column very interesting to piss off
because I know I've got some of
you in my pocket right now.
It's all a terribly twisted busi-
ness, but I love it (the writing part
of it, anyway). It's in my blood. I
couldn't stop writing any more
than I could stop breathing. It's
what I do. The periods in my life
when 1 haven't been writing
things I cared about have been the
most miserable times I've ever
suffered through.
Problem is, it's tough to make
a living as a writer. Sure. Stephen
King makes millions off his writ-
ing, but King is the exception, not
See DROP page 6
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
Although the term "singer
songwriter" fits Joe Henry, he is much,
much more than that ,
Sure Henry's voice sounds like a
combination between Bob Dylan and
Tom Waits (when they were young) and
he sing-speaks his songs like they did.
You could say his arrangements are
sparse and acoustic iike Michael Penn
and that the songs evoke a dark and
brooding mood like a Danny Elfman in-
strumental. But all of those compari-
sons won't give you a clear understand-
ing of Henry's music. Why? Because he
is a storyteller, and only by hearing him
can you understand his talent.
Take a song like "Flower Girl
where Henry sings Because there was
no gold mine I freed the dogs and
burned their sled and 1 killed the guide
asleep in bed and pushed him off into
the drink This sounds like one vicious
bastard, doesn't it? But when you hear
the song with its pump organ, choir,
orchestra and Henry's voice doing his
best gravely Waits, you are given to sym-
pathy for the wretched soul portrayed
here.
When Henry closes with "I was go
ing to ho the bride of this whole
godforsaken mountainside instead. I'm
just the flower girl dropping petals all
through this empty world he's got you.
You actually feel sorry for a greedy, mur-
dering son-of-a-bitch. And Henry does it
all with his voice and his creation of mood
- that's a storyteller.
What comes as another ace up
Henry's sleeve is that he has gotten Page
Hamilton of the ultra-heavy band Hel-
met to play electric guitar on five of the
nine tracks on Trampoline. Hamilton's
penchant for staccato, chunky power
chords makes the album take on a hid-
den layer of suppressed energy. It comes
as a pleasant change to hear him pick-
ing his way through this sensitive mate-
rial. The softer, melancholy side of
Hamilton that is shown here serves not
only as a testament to his talent as a
guitarist but also as a reminder that there
is more to Helmet (and other heavy bands
like them) than noise and anger.
Also lending support on the album
are members of the recently-defunct
Jayhawks. namely Carla Azar and Tim
O'Reagan (both adding their talents on
the drums).
. Henry has used the talents of these
musicians to his best advantage on Tram-
poline by allowing them to add layers of
emotion to his songs without letting the
music overpower the lyrics. From goat
bells to a zither to some random sounds
of machinery to Henry's voice, every in-
strument on this record is used to evoke
mood and emotion.
A good example of this is in the song
"Playboy where a trombone and an ar-
rangement oi strings are used in combi-
nation with Henry's voice and his acous-
tic guitar to give the story a nostalgic air
of regret for Jays gone by and chances
lost But ultimately, the lyrics come back
as the center of the piece: "1 was a play-
boy in love with the world I walked
with the angels, t cry stone was a pearl
oh. 1 was a playboy and you just a play-
thing to me Now. I've been here for
hours awake in my bed alone with the
clever, the quick and the dead and all
the misguided who keep me company
Henry has made a few albums be-
fore this, but none of them have had the
overall focus and sincerity that Trampo-
line possesses. If Henry can continue to
make music as solid and refreshing as
this, then his career should be a long
and fruitful one





Tuesday, April 2, 1996
The East Carolinian
DROJl from page 5
the rule. It's a hard field to break
into. In my love for writing, though.
I've made it my focus. I'm not good
at much else. Once I finish school
(which should be any month now.
believe me), I have no earthly idea
what I'm going to do for money.
That's where the self-imposed
poverty comes in. Every week, I con-
template the tremendous debt I'm in
and then think about the yawning
chasm my bank account may soon
become if I don't find a decent job.
pronto. Of course, there's no greater
motivator than impending starvation,
so I'm sure I'll find something. But
will I be writing? I doubt it
See, as confident as I am in my
writing ability (as I mentioned ear-
feer, I write a vicious lead), I know
ihat there are people out there who
ire better at it than me. People like
ijames Burke, the British scientist
historianlecturertelevision person-
ality I mentioned earlier.
Burke can talk and write circles
iround someone like me, and did,
Just one week ago on this very cam-
pus.
Even though he's a self-con-
fessed "superficialist he makes me
look like a piker. I hook the rubes
(that would be you, again) with state-
ments such as the by-now-mantra-like
"I think I've lost my faith in democ-
racy Burke does it by telling us that
the discovery of pure cane sugar led
to the atomic bomb.
And then, to make matters
worse, the bastard proves it
While I'm struggling to make
sense of some obtuse cultural criti-
cism floating half-formed in my head,
he's linking several centuries' worth
of human history! Despite Burkes
penchant for ignoring sweeping his-
torical changes in his work, he makes
the stuff I churn out for "A Drop in
the Bucket" pale to insignificance.
Tiny as I feel in the face of his
intellect, however, he set me to think-
ing on some important stuff involv-
ing the internet and the future of de-
mocracy as we know it. And that ties
into an adventure I had in a little
town called Manning. And that leads
into other things that finally lead me
to think that I just might have lost
my faith in (you guessed it, you crafty
reader, you) democracy.
But. since I find myself on the
verge of shattering a story length
limit I set on my Mighty Zombie Army
of Lifestyle writers (another aspect
of the democracy of writing that I'll
discuss some other time), I suppose
I should hold off on that discussion
until next week.
Hopefully, though, I've manipu-
lated my audience (that is, you) well
enough that they (you) will be right
here with me.
Become a
Zombie
t)is Summer.
'th.e Mighty omhie
rmy of Lifestyle i
hurting. Our legion of
undead writer h.as
been, cut down, to a
mere regiment, and
we -need you to fill
out our ranks.
If you're interested
in music, people "T
campus events, coxae
by the tast Carolinian
office and apply.
Join us
I plus
GRILL
burgers �subs �gyros � salads
E. 10th St
630-9333
Sen inxys
THE INSIDE SCOOP
�VJDEV
lO
Fred Lager
Free to Students Faculty Staii 1 Guest
S2.00 or General Public Available the Night of the Show
Call 328-6004 lor more information.
sj
Tuesday.April 9f 1996 � 8:00 PM � Hendrix Theatre
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
they don't have to be cool
They're clogs they're not supposed to do anything cool
you just wear them when you are not wearing your cool shoes
Simple�Shoes
530 Contanche St. (Inside Bicycle Post)
(919) 757-0713
Hair Designs
We are now taking Trade Ins!
Come in and trade that pale winter complexion for a
VLo If ew "tropical "tan.
from our new 30 Bulb tanning center.
�fanning Vackaqe "Price
5 viit - $1S
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20 viit - $45
First Visit fBtt With Purchase of Package
Other Tanning Specials Available
We also offer the best in men's & women's
cut's perms and color
Try our set of acrylic & gel nails $35set
107 Eastbrook Drive 758-7570 Located past Pia Inn in front of Eablbrook Apis.
The Boys of
Summer
are f2ack
AND SO ARE THIRSTY THURSDAYS!
Spend the first WRNS Thirsty
Thursdays of 1996 with ECU taking on
the Carolina League Champion Kinston
Indians - 7pm at Grainger Stadium
Thursday, April 4th.
Students get in for $2.00 with ID
Drinks are just 75$ oy Thursdays!
Call 800) 334-5467 for info
J
by reading your
poetry or enjoy the
poetry of others at our
POETRY READING
ART SHOW
on Wednesday, April 3
from 7-9 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student
Center Great Room B.
For more information, call 328-6927






�)�-
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 2,1996
RKJPF
downtown, across from the courthouses
On the corner of Evans and Third Streets
Lunch Specials
Like Mama's, home cooked specials every day
only $4.25
includes an entree, 2 veggies and hush puppies or rolls
We also have a complete sandwich menu,
including burgers, patty melts and turkey cheesesteaks
No fat cheese available upon request
Come m for your Frequent Diner Cord end let us treat uou to a free meol.
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Paradise
Tanning
SENSE from page
derful performances. Thompson and
Winslet more than earn their Oscar
nominations as the love-sick sisters; Alan
Rickman carries a regal presence as
Colonel Brandon, a man with his own
tortured past; and Hugh Grant uses his
stiff persona to good effect as Edward
Ferrars, a man torn between love and
loyalty. Other outstanding performances
are turned in by such supporting ac-
tors as Gemma Jones, who plays the
mother of Elinor and Marianne, and
Harriet Walter, who plays the distaste-
ful sister-in-law of Elinor and Marianne.
The entire cast is too large to comment
fully on, but it is enough to say that
each performance is totally suitable and
INFORMATION
effective, no matter how annoying many
of these characters may be.
Admittedly, hardcore fans of Jane
Austen may be disappointed with
Thompson's take on this particular
story. Still, everyone involved in the
making of Sense and Sensibility does
a wonderful job of making the sensibil-
ity of 19th century England easy to
swallow.
Now that Greenville finally got hold
of this critically-praised film, I can only
hope that films like Dead Man Walk-
ing and Fargo aren't far behind. But I
won't hold my breath.
On a scale of one to 10, Sense and
Sensibility rates a nine.
EXCHANGE DAY
This week's topic:
Action TV
1. Name Robert Conrad's
sidekick in A Man Called
Sloane.
2. Who owned the estate on
which Thomas Magnum lived in
Magnum, PI?
3. What popular soap opera
actor had a recurring role as a
Nazi officer on Rat Patrol, and
what soap is he currently
featured on?
4. Name the creator of bionic
technology from The Six Million
Dollar Man.
5. Who was the voice of Charlie
on Charlie's Angels, and did we
ever see him in the role?
6. What kind of bird did Baretta
own?
7. Name the replacement Duke
boys from the later seasons of
The Dukes of Hazzard.
8. Who was the main street
contact for Starskey and
Hutch?
9. Name the members of the A-
Team.
10. Who played pilot Jake
Cutter on Tales of the Gold
Monke?
(9 9) 551 -3(948
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s

8
Tuesday, April 2, 1996
The East Carolinian
Purple squad wins
Defense looks to rebuild
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirate defense has some big
shoes to fill.
With the loss of such impact play-
ers as Morris Foreman, Mark Libiano,
Walter Scott, Aaron Black and
Emmanuel McDaniel, defensive coor-
dinator Paul Jette is now presented
with the task of rebuilding.
He won't have to look far, how-
ever. Linebackers Marvin Burke, BJ.
Crane and Carlos Brown will all be
back. Each of these Pirate standouts
were ranked in the top seven on the
ECU leading tacklers list Burke was
third on the team in stops with 91
while Brown added 61 and Crane 59.
Crane is slated to take over Foreman's
spot at outside linebacker.
Sophomore Roderick Coleman is
expected to be the next great line-
backer at ECU. He lead the team in
quarterback pressures last year with
20.
Another linebacker, sophomore
Brian Bentley, will get a look from
Coach Jette this year. In the scrim-
mage on Saturday, Bentley blocked an
extra point by the Purple squad,
scooped it up and took it all the way
for the score. The Gold team was only
awarded two points, however, since it
was during the conversion attempt
On the defensive line, the Pirates
wili rely on senior tackle Lorenzo
West At 6-3, 245, West is undersized
against many of his opponents, but
was among the best in the nation in
sacks last year with nine, and was in
on 56 tackles.
Nose guard Travis Darden started
all 12 games last year as a true fresh-
man, and will be a force again this
year for ECU.
Other linemen Terell Williams,
Mondell Corbett and Tomha McMillian
will have to step up and take on in-
creased roles as well.
The secondary will be lead by
senior twins David and Daren Hart
Daren was second on the team in tack-
les last year with 92, and scored the
team's only touchdown in the Liberty
Bowl on a 39-yard interception return.
Cornerback Dwight Henry is one
of the fastest players on the team and
has std 30 games in three seasons.
Other players who have limited
playing experience, but will have to
contribute next year are Deeone
McKeithan, Tavares Taylor, E.J.
Gunthrope, Tabari Wallace and
Kendrick Phillips. All should see duty
this fall.
With these key players coming
back, the future of the Pirate defense
does not look bleak and will be once
again be instrumental in victories in
1996.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Defensive back Kevin Monroe makes the stop for the Gold team against tight end Sean
Richardson. The Purple team was victorious in the Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout.
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Bagging for better health
JJ " �,��;�� r,A .��iUuinj Rrintf vour brown bad lunch an
David Gaskins
Rec Services
Brown Bag your way to better health. The Lifestyle
Enhancement Program sponsored bv the department
of recreational services, is providing a Brown Bag Lunch
Series.
This event offers nutrition, exercise goal setting learn-
ing styles and rest and relaxation informational sessions.
The series takes place April 8,10 and 12 from 12:10 p.m.
to 1 p.m. in room 14 of Mendenhall. The series is free of
charge and pre-registration is not required. One can at-
tend all three sessions or pick and choose the session or
sessions that one is most interested in.
Instructors of these sessions include Kari Brown, di-
rector of fitness, and Donna Walsh, the director of health
promotion and well-being. Bring your brown bag lunch and
enjoy learning new information.
The first session in the series is nutrition, exercise ad-
herence and fitness goal setting. This session will be of-
fered on Monday, April 8. The program will feature tech-
niques to help you develop and stick to a well-rounded,
effective exercise program.
In addition, facts about nutrition, cardiovascular exer-
cise and motivation will be shared.
The session on learning styles will be discussed on
Wednesday, April 10. This series concentrates on how the
ability to learn is affected by learning patterns.
Instructors will help determine what kind of learning
pattern is best for you. The class will then follow up on how
to utilize and strengthen your goals by effectively using
See BAG page 9
Breakfast of Champions Honorees
from Pigskin-Pigout Weekend
Outstanding Male and Female Athletes of the Year
Despite the occasional rain and
chilly temperatures, Pirate football fans
eager for the 1996 season came out
this weekend to enjoy the annual
PurpleGold game.
After filling up on barbeque and
then losing it on the rides that deco-
rated "stadium midway fans kicked
back for a casual afternoon of ECU
pigskin and watched the Purple offense
defeat the Gold defense 20-14.
The highlight of the pseudogame
was the halftime award presentation.
Legendary football coach Bill Dooley
presented the 1995 Pirate seniors with
the Alka Seltzer Award for the Come-
back of the Year for their come-from-
behind win over Syracuse last fall. ECU
rallied from a 21-point deficit to beat
the Orangemen 27-24.
Dedicated football fans will re-
member that Dooley coached most re-
cently with the Wake Forest Demon
Deacons and took them to an Indepen-
dence Bowl Championship in 1992.
Dooley has also had the opportunity
to coach such NFL greats as Lawrence
Taylor (at UNCChapel Hill) and Bruce
Smith (at Virginia Tech).
"You've got a great situation here
at East Carolina" Dooley said. "You've
got great players, great coaches and
great fans. That's all you need to be
successful
The highly pass-oriented offense
is not what Dooley
preferred in his
coaching career. His
offense carried the
"five yards and a
cloud of dust"
theme, prompting
the media to dubb
him "the old trench
fighter Passing the
ball was rarely an
option. Dooley said
that he believes it
will work here at
ECU, however.
"When you've
got a great defense,
it doesn't matter
what kind of offense
you run Dooley
said. "Defense wins
football games
The defense al-
most pulled it off
Saturday, but the of-
fense knew if that happened they
would never hear the end of it
It was the Sean Richardson show
from the start The senior tight end
was a favorite receiver across the
middle for quarterbacks Dan Gonzalez
and Earnest Tinnen.
At 6-5,232 pounds, Richardson is
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Perez Mattison gets a defense sandwich
from Kevin Monroe and Forrest Foster.
See SPRING page 9
Lance Tigyer Cindy Szymanski
Pat Draughon Post Graduate Scholarship honoree
David Crumbie
Walter and Marie Williams "Spirit of the East" recipients
Kevin Wiggins
Chelsea Earnhardt
SID - The ECU Softball team
moved to 6-0 in the Big South (25-15-
1) on Saturday at the ECU Softball
Diamond as the Lady Pirates swept
Winthrop's Lady Eagles 16-1 and 2-0.
Consistent fielding errors hurt
WU's chances of staying in the first
game. ECU led off the first inning by
scoring four runs before Winthrop was
able to retire the first out the number
six batter.
ECU scored seven runs off WU's
Karen Sadler (6-3) in the first two in-
nings before she gave way to Courtney
McDaniel who was able to get a single
out before rendering her duties to
Chris Paul. ECU's Jami Bendle, from
Amsterdam, Ohio, picked ud her 10th
victory of the year (10-8, 3-0 Big
South).
ECU'S shortstop Sharolyn
Strickland, from Chesapeake, Va, led
the Lady Pirates' attack with three hits
in three at bats as she scored three
runs. Junior third baseman Rhonda
Rost (Richmond, Va.) led all ECU hit-
ters with four RBI's on two hits.
In the second game, Tracie
Podratsky (9-3, 2-0 Big South) led the
Lady Pirates shutting down Winthrop
2-0 on two hits and three strikeouts.
WU's Tara Gilmore (6-6) took the loss
as Winthrop dropped to 17-19 on the
year.
ECU jumped out to a 2-0 lead in
the bottom half of the first inning as
leadoff hitters Tonya Oxendine (Win-
ston-Salem, N.C.) and Heather Smith
(Glen Burnie, Md.) scored on Joey
Clark's single to right-center field. The
Lady Eagles had a few scoring oppor-
tunities, but fell short as base running
mistakes proved costly for WU.
"I feel we attacked them in the
first game ECU Head Softball Coach
Sue Manahan said. "We attacked them
so well that I think we were at a men-
tal advantage in the second game, and
that was all we needed
On Sunday, the Lady Pirates (25-
17-1) headed to Greensboro to take on
the UNC Greensboro Lady Spartans

(18-22) in a Big South Conference
doubleheader, losing a twin bill in 10
innings 4-3 and a heartbreaker in the
bottom of the seventh 3-2.
Starting the first game for ECU,
Bendle (10-9) went nine and one-third
innings before rendering the deciding
run in the bottom of the tenth.
The Spartans scored three runs
in the bottom of the third. ECU an-
swered with three runs in the fifth in-
ning, but subse-
quently the Lady
Pirates lost the
game. Strickland
accumulated
three hits in four at bats to lead the
ladies.
The double deuce, Podratsky (9-
4, 2-1 in the Big South) went the dis-
tance but fell to UNCG 3-2 after record-
ing six strikeouts and one earned run.
The Spartans capitalized on the
three ECU errors to claim the victory.
Strickland and Clark collected two hits
in three at bats apiece to lead the Pi-
rate attack.
The
Lady Pirates'
next stop will
be in
Radford, Va
on April 4
and
Lynchburg,
Va, on April
5. ECU will
take on the
Radford Uni-
qualifying matches. ECU began the day
with a 3-1 win over the same Pembroke
State team that would oust them in
the finals. Junior Kevin Johnson begad
the scoring with a goal at the 3:00
mark. Pembroke responded with a goal
off a penalty kick at the 20:00 mark.
The Pirates scored again when sopho-
more John Swagert booted in a goal
in the 27th minute. Junior Chris
Padgett added a goal one minute later
versity Highlanders and the Liberty
University Flames in Big South Con-
ference doubleheaders.
SID - The ECU men's soccer team
advanced to the championship game
of the N.C. Wesleyan Invitational be-
fore losing to Pembroke State in over-
time.
The Pirates, 7-3 in the spring sea-
son, qualified for the semifinals after
defeating Pembroke State, Christopher
Newport and Barton College in the
to give the Pirates a 3-1 victory-
In the second game of the day,
ECU was pitted against Christopher
Newport ECU got on the board first
when Junior Darrec Jones scored off
an assist from Padgett Sophomore
goalkeeper Jay Davis did the rest shut-
ting out the Christopher Newport at-
tack and giving the Pirates their sec-
ond win of the day, 1-0.
The final qualifying game for the
Pirates was a battle with the host
school, N.C. Wesleyan. Padgett scored
at the 2:00 mark, but Wesleyan knot-
ted the score at 1-1 with a goal at the
4:00 mark. Swagart scored off an as-
sist from Padgett at 5:00 and then
added another goal in the 15th minute,
off an assist from freshman Josh Sklar.
With the Pirates up 3-1, Wesleyan
added another goal but it was not
enough as the Pirates held on to post
a 3-2 victory. The win also gave them
the top seed from their pool for the
semifinals.
Barton College was the next foe
for the Pirates. ECU scored first with
a goal by senior Joel Lenk and a goal
by junior Andy Mills. However, Barton
rebounded with goals at the 23:20
mark and the 25:00 mark. Thirty sec-
onds after the Barton goal, Padgett
took a pass from Swagart and put it in
goal, giving the Pirates a 3-2 win and
See SID page 9





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, April 2, 1996
Home & Brown
Speeding Tickets
Protect Driving Record
Reduce Insurance Costs
Driving While Impaired
Driving Privileges
758-4333 pree Consultation
3Q0 Contanche St
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SPRING from page 8
a big target. The Durham, N.C. native
backed up Scott Richards last season,
but has started to make a name for
himself. He caught six passes for 60
yards last season, including catching
three for 18 yards against Central
Michigan. Against Memphis,
Richardson had two snags for 35 yards,
including a season-long 20-yard recep-
tion.
In 1994. he played in all 11 games,
starting the last seven. He ended up
with 156 yards and two touchdowns
that vear.
AJT in line for.
Save $400 on a new Pontiac Sunfire
(actually, any new Pontiac) if you just graduated or are about to graduate.
Call 1-800-643-6733 for more information.
Fold-down rear seats - g
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100,000-mile spark plugs'
- were talking a long-
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ride tuning - is this a real
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Roadside Assistance - for
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vi
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always wear those safety
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PASSLock� theft-deterrent
system - means you
might save some $$$ on
insurance () V
v
Daytime running lamps in
96 - they re a safety
feature, but hey, they look
good too
Clear coat paint - paint
you can't see keeps the
paint you can see looking
good (see?)
Single-key locking - one key
locks & unlocks doors, trunk
and all the fun of Sunfire
High-rewing, 120-horse-
power, fuel-injected
engine (hey, this car's for
driving, not just looking at)
AMFM stereo radio -
standard? heck yeah! &
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A HUGE glove box - some
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Available remote keyless
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PONTIAC
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Other Pirate receivers having a
great showing were junior Linwood
Hebrew. Greenville native Troy Smith,
and sophomore Mike Sellars.
Debrew accounted for one of three
Purple touchdowns. He saw action in
nine games last year, catching four
passes for 48 yards. He runs a 4.7 sec-
ond 40-yard dash, has a 32.5 inch ver-
tical leap and has great hands, making
him a prototype ECU receiver and giv-
ing the Pirates even more depth at wide
receiver.
Hometown split end Troy Smith
was highly heralded coming out of
Rose High School, and has so far lived
up to everyone's expectations. Smith
played in every game last year, start-
ing against Southern Miss and Army.
He was on the receiving end of 15
passes for 242 yards and one touch-
down, and led all ECU receivers in
yards per catch with an average of 16.1
yards per catch.
Mike Sellars has been plagued
with shoulder injuries for the past year,
but is another young talent for the
Pirates. Sellars got into the end zone
last year on a seven-yard reception
against Tennessee. He got playing time
in nine games last year.
In the battle for the backfield be-
tween Daryl Jones. Scott Harley. and
Raymond Mabry. Jones and Mabry rose
to the forefront, each getting a TD for
the Purple squad.
Another young player to keep
your eye on is Damon Davis, a redshirt
freshman from Orangeburg, S.C. He
has limited size (5-7. 165). but has su-
perior speed and quickness. Does any-
one remember Junior Smith?
BAG
from page 8
your learning pattern.
The session on rest and relaxation
will be offered on Friday, April 12. This
series will consist of stretching and
relaxation techniques to de-stress your-
self. You can learn stress management
techniques by participating in stretch-
ing, deep breathing, massage and ten-
sion and relaxation exercises. We will
be lying on the floor so please bring a
towel, sleeping bag or exercise mat and
wear comfortable clothing.
The Lifestyle Enhancement Pro-
gram Series provides educational and
activity clinics that promote skills to
assist one in maintaining a healthy,
well-rounded lifestyle.
To find out more information
about this program or any programs
offered by the Department of Recre-
ational Services call 326387 or stop
by 204 Christenbury Gym.
SID
from page 8
a place in the championship game ver-
sus the Pembroke State squad they
defeated earlier.
The championship game was a
display in good defense as neither team
could score a goal in regulation. In the
eighth minute of sudden death over-
time, Pembroke State scored a goal,
giving them the championship. ECU
Head Coach Will Wiberg was disap-
pointed that his team lost but was also
pleased with his team's effort
"Getting to the championship
game was a total team effort" Wiberg
said. "A lot of people stepped up for us
today. Obviously we are disappointed
not to win, but our guys know now
that they can compete with quality
teams. Hopefully this weekend will
carry over to our next tournament"
SID - The 1996 ECU Golf Team
completed the third and final round of
the Johnny Owens Invitational Tour-
nament in Lexington. Ky. on Saturday,
finishing in eighth place.
ECU senior. Josh Dickinson, from
Kinston. N.C, lead the Pirates with a
sixth place finish after a three round
six over par 222 (71-73-78). Sophomore
Kevin Miller kept ECU close with a 228
(74-75-79). which was good enough to
qualify for 22nd place.
Purdue's Rob Johnson won med-
alist honors by shooting five under par
211 (73-70-68). Duke's Jason Buha.
who lead after the first two rounds,
finished second with a three under 213
(73-69-71).
Duke clinched the team title with
a better fifth-place score on Saturday
than Purdue. Duke's Chris Schmid fin-
ished the third round with an 80. while
Purdue s Bert Jones had an 81.
'We shot ourselves in the foot
today ECU Head Golf Coach Kevin
Williams said. "We just had to play a
lot better, hut it didn't happen
Next up for the Pirates will be the
CAA Tournament set for April 12-14
at the Lane Tree Country Club in
Goldsboro, N C





nab.
HT.
10
Tuesday, April 2,1996
The East Carolinian
Help
Wanted

Greek
Personals
T� For Rent "
nS�
For Rent
ifcS
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Pitt Property Management
758-1921
108a Brownlea Dr.
IANGSTON PARK! BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375 deposit
$375month.
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1
BEDROOM, $275, on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF MARCH
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facili-
ty, sand volleyball court. Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer cable.
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor, located 5
blocks from campus. Free rent 12 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockside 3 and 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths, 4 car
carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room, balcony, exterior storage room, noth-
ing in the area compares.Reasonabry
Priced!
GRADUATE FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share a three bedroom apL
in Twin Oaks. Non-smoker and Studious.
Please call 830-9587 and ask for Patricia
DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed
room, 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling
fans, appliances and washerdryer hook-
ups. $390 Call 752-0277
SUMMER SUBLEASE! EFFICIENCY
APARTMENT available in Ringgold Tow-
ers. Rent $275 per month. Furnished and
available May 1st Call 551-3176 for more
info.
SINGLE BEDROOM FOR IMMEDIATE
rent $178 per mo. Share 13 utilities with
two other roommates in house. Washer,
Dryer available on premises. Near campus.
Call for interview 758-2147. Leave mes-
sage for Chris or Bill anytime
2 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 204 Meade St
just 3 blocks from ECU Campus. With
hardwood floors, fenced in yard, and cen-
tral heatair � $525 Moore Realty 752-
2533
RESPONSIBLE. CONSIDERATE FE-
MALE TO share a 2 bdrm, 1 12 bath
Apartment Pinebrook $190.00 plus 12
utilities for August Non-smoking serious
student Please call 328-7570
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed-
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who
is outgoing, sociable, picks up after them-
selves, gets along wothers. Please call
Ashley at 757-2891. Need someone start-
ing in mid April or early May.
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS. PRE-
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chi-
co's and Downtown. Townhouses with 2
bedrooms, 1 12 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washerdryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
MALEFEMALE TO SHARE 3BR house.
$243month plus 13 bills. Call Scott
Mueller at 830-2143 or 714-3358. Avail-
able immediately.
EASYGOING FEMALE TO SHARE apt
or house Starting in July. Smokers Wel-
come. For more information call Julie 830-
8969 Anytime.
SOMEONE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
room in 4bdrm apartment WD, pool, ten-
nis, weightroom included. Available May
1st. Call 321-0166 after 7pm. Ask for
Joanne.
TWIN OAKS 3BR, 2 12 bath town-
house. Available April 1st $585mo. Call
Mike at 756-3009 after 5pm
DISCOUNT ATTRACTIVE TOWN-
HOUSE AT Twin Oaks. Available for Sum-
mer School. $590 month Discounted to
$550 month through July. Lease and De-
posit required. 3 Bedrooms, 2 12 Baths,
Pool, Patio, Fireplace. No pets. Call 752-
2851. Thanks.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker to share rent for sum-
mer months. $167.5012 utilities & 1
2 phone. Call April 752-7599
LOOKING FOR A PLACE this summer
at ECU? There will be one bedroom avail-
able at 105-B, East 11th St after final ex-
ams. Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-
1198
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 month. Call 355-1313
to make an appointment. Managed by
Remco East Inc
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
apartment beginning in August Looking
for 1 or 2 neat and responsible females.
Call Jennifer at 754-2670
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12 baths,
fireplace, all appliances, very large, quiet
pool, dose to park. $585 month. 756-3009
after 6:00pm
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756209
CONSIDERATE NC STATE INTERN
needs summer sub-lease in Greenville area.
Tlexible on rent price. Non-smoking female
roommates only. No drugs. Call 919-512-
7514. Will reimburse long distance
charges.
HUGE KILLER PHAT HOUSE. Need a
place to crash for the summer? Check out
this five bedroom, already furnished. One
block from campus, three blocks from
downtown, with a chiiiin front porch and
plenty of parking. CALL NOW! 758-FOOT
CAPTAINS QUARTERS APART-
MENTS. BIG enough for two. New car-
petingflooring; dishwasher, free cable,
walking distance to campus. $310month.
Call 355-8731 ask about unit 11.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Close to eve-
rything. Professional, quiet environment
Like new one & two bedrooms, with ap-
pliances. $285-$350. Moore Realty 752-
2533
THREE BEDROOM APT. IN Tar River
Estates. Take over lease and get 12 off
June and Jury rent Large Bedrooms, wash-
erdryer hook-up, cablewater included.
Large enough for 4-5 people. Available
May 1st Call 758-3474
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give
us a call. Playmates Massage. Snow Hill,
NC - 919-747 7686
LERNER IS SEEKING QUALIFIED As-
sistant Managers for Rocky MtWilson
area. To arrange immediate interview:
Contact Michelle Smith at 972-6882 or
Mary Williams at 291-9887
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - MONEY,
FUN, TRAVEL, EXPERIENCE. Call 1-
800-2514000 ext 1576
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF,
HOUSEKEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEAD-
ERS, FITNESS COUNSELORS, AND
MORE. CALL RESORT EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES 1-206-971-3600 EXT R53622.
FUN SUMMER JOBS! INCLUDES pool,
tennis and golf privileges! Lifeguards, wait-
staff, food service, cashiers and gate at-
tendants. The Village Beach and Tennis
Club, Nags Head. (919) 480-2222
CLUB ATLANTA TRAVEL (CAT) allows
you to travel and get paid for it Call 1-
800-750894 to hear the Roar of the CAT.
Then call your local Representative at 531-
7272.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el, Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53624
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN
UP TO $3,000-$6,000 PER MONTH.
ROOM AND BOARD! TRANSPORTA-
TION! MALE OR FEMALE. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NECESSARY. CALL(206)971-3510
EXT A53623
CONGRATS JOY FOR BEING elected
president of Gamma Beta Phi. Your Al-
pha Omicron Pi sisters are proud of you
SAE: THANKS SO MUCH for the great
nite at Splash. Let's get together soon!
Love, Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO NIX,
RrVENBARK, Phillips and Thompson on
your elections, Pika.
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
For Sale
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached Greenville. We are looking
for Health Conscious, Neatly Dressed, Ca-
reer Oriented Individuals to fill Part and
Full Time Positions. Creat Pay 758-8390
1 BEDROOM AT 1301 Dickinson, hard-
wood floors, Appliances$195 2 bedroom
duplex at 706 Mills. No appliances - $210
or 707A Mills with Appliances - $290. 2
bedroom duplex, upstairs, no appliances -
$195. Moore Realty 752-2533
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. Furnished
or unfurnished one bedroom only five
blocks from campus. Appliances, central
heatair, water included. $270. Moore Re-
alty 752-2533
WANTED TO RENT: LAW FIRM needs
One fully furnished apartment suitable for
married couple from May 25 - Aug 3 and
Two fully furnished apartments for June
28 - Aug 3, One must be suitable for mar-
ried couple. Contact Bert Speicher 355-
3030
SUBLEASE MAY - JUNE. 2 br's available
in Player's Club. Clean, female, nonsmok-
er preferred. $250 month, 14 utilities.
No security deposit option to renew lease
in August Call 3554410, ask for Kristi,
Sandy or Mimi or leave message.
1994 NISSAN SENTRA, 4 door, Black,
Loaded, 20,000 miles. Must sell! $9,500
call 7584450
1985 HONDA ATC 250R rebuilt engine
in 1989. Runs great needs little work.
$ 1,000 O.B.O. Must sell. Call Justin at 752-
1321
A MATCHING SET OF chair, couch,
loveseat plus gray recliner all in good
shape all for $100. Call 758-7700 ask for
Joe
2 KICKER 10" SPEAKERS in a carpet-
ed box for sale, I paid $200, will sell for
$100. Call 754-2948 and ask for Rodney.
MOTORIZED TREADMILL, EXCEL-
LENT RUNNING condition bought only
five months ago $125.00. Trundle with
support board and mattress bought only
eight months ago. Call 752-8695
CUTE PUPPIES, HALF REGISTERED
Golden Retriever, Half Black Lab: 5 weeks.
Asking $50.00 or best offer. Call Perry at
3554947
MOUNTAIN BHCE $100, WHITE and
green, good condition. Call Aimee at 758
6649 anytime after 6pm
SELF PROTECTION? We have a wide
selection of personal security products
such as keychain sprayers and hand held
jogging weights (with built in sprayers).
For a free catalog write: Successfully
Yours, PO Box 2437, Winterville, NC
28590 or call 355-3565
1988 ACURA INTEGRA LS with new
clutch and muffler. In great condition.
$4900. Call 7586976
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO HELP in
office. Hours between 8an6pm (hours can
be flexible). Duties: Answering phone, Typ-
ing, Daily schedule planning, Transporta-
tion needed. Call 3554111. Ask for Jeff
Walker.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week
youth recreationalsports campour 42nd
season! Over 25 activities, including wa-
ter ski, heated pool, tennis, Go-karts,
artCool Mountain Climate, EXCEL-
LENT pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For
applicationbrochure: 704-692-6239 or
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792.
WANTED: PART-TIME WAREHOUSE
and delivery. License required. Apply in
person at Larry's Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th
Street Greenville, NC
PART TIME CLERICAL HELP needed.
Typists, file clerks, receptionists. Nease
Personnel 756-5820
Al i tNTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7580896 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
Enjoy the Outdoor?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
$5.TVHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest, Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCSI
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
Greenville, Kinston. New Bern
THANKS FOR THE PRE-downtown last
Thursday, Sig Ep, let's do it again. Love,
Chi Omega
1 Announcements
CANOE THE TAR RIVER: Get out of
your room for a sunny April afternoon
April 15. The registration deadline is April
10 in 204 Christenbury Gym. For more
information call Recreational Services at
3286387
BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES: Bring
your lunch and enjoy learning new infor-
mation during Recreational Services
Brown Bag Lunch Series. On April 8 at
12:10pm in MSC 14 learn about Nutrition,
Exercise, Adherence and Fitness Goal Set-
ting. April 10, at 12:10pm in MSC 14
Learning Styles and the most effective
ways people can use their strengths in
learning will be discussed. On April 12 at
12:10pm in MSC 14 there will be a stretch-
ing and relaxation session to de-stress
yourself while you leam stress manage-
ment techniques. For more information
call Recreational Services at 3286387
Services
Offered
TYPING SERVICES CAMPUS SECRE-
TARY will provide campus pick-up and de-
livery for typing resumes, documents, re-
search papers, etc. at a reasonable rate!
Call Susan at 7464504 after 6:00pm
EARN CASH AND GO on vacation at the
same time. Club Atlanta Travel offers ex-
ceptional cash and travel earnings in its
unique Network Program called "CAT.
Truly a ground-floor opportunity. Please
call 1-800-7504894 then 531-7272(local)
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53625
MOVING! LET ME DO your cleaning
offer affordable rates for ECU students.
Call Stephanie for more information 353-
0830
MANAGER TRAINEE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE with major finance compa-
ny. Business background a plus. Fantas-
tic career opportunity! Call Nease Person-
nel 756-5820
Personals
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED! FOUR
bedroom house; Clean, Nice; $125 a
month 14 utilities; Male or Female;
Available Beginning of May; Call 7588067
and ask for Jody
DUPLEX WYNDHAM CIRCLE 2 bed
room, 2 full bath, cathedral ceilings, quiet
washer dryer hookup, fireplace, ceiling
fans, deck, almost new, beautifully deco-
rated. $550 month 7583009 after 6:00pm
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; Female
roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom, 2
bath house. $160 rent 13 utilities. Fun,
easy-going, studious. Call 757-1467
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR THREE
bedroom house 13 utilities, 13 rent Bus
stop at corner. Call 752-6886 any time
after 6
3 BEDROOM HOUSE AT 2602 Tryon
Dr. with dining room, Rec. Room, and
Hardwood floors - $600 Moore Realty 752-
2533
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
SPRING semesters of 96-97. Possibly stay-
ing at Park West Tower Village, or White-
bridge Apts. Rent is $197.50 per person.
WasherDryerRefrigerator included.
Contact Will Strickland at (919) 830-1198
TWO FEMALES LOOKING FOR a 2 bed
room apartment to sublease for the sum-
mer. Preferably close to campus. If inter-
ested please call 3283793
CANNONDALE DELTA V600 WITH
front suspension, onza bar ends, Shmano
STX special edition components and clip-
less pedals with cleats; Trek seat bag and
cyclocomputer. $750. Rhode Gear Spare
tire bike shuttle $55. 6'4" Rusty and Lin-
den Surfboards good condition $200 each.
Reef Surf rack $75. 757-9337
HOTLINE SHORTY WETSUIT FOR
sale. Brand new. 2mm men's medium.
$100 call 757-2579
PAIR OF ACOUSTIC LINEAR Systems
DJP Model 520 speakers. Brand new! Liq-
uid cooled 12" 3-way Awesome speakers
200 watts each. Must sell! $320.00 Retail
$750.00. Ask for David 531-7272 OBO
CANNONDALE M800 1994 MODEL
many extras. Must sell immediately. $500
O.B.O. Call 7582147. Ask for Chris after
6 or leave message earlier.
KENMORE 15,000 BTU WINDOW AC
$350, Apple Personal LaserWriter 300
$300, Technics Speakers $100, Technics
Tapedeck EQ & Realistic CD player $50
each. Call 830-9585
SOLOFLEX WITH ALL ATTACH-
MENTS. $750 or best offer. 830-2143 or
714-3358.
ENTIRE BASEBALL AND SPORTS card
collection 20 of Book Value. Must Sell
$1500 522-5620
A FOUR PIECE BEDROOM suit In great
condition and fairly new. $500 negotiable.
Call Catherine or Wanda at 7589412
SINGLE DAD NEEDS CHILD care help,
6:00am til 7:30am mornings, 3:00pm un-
til. Will consider one person for either shift
or one person for both shifts. Must have
car willing to carry son to afterschool ac-
tivities. Pay Neg. Call 8304981 or leave
message.
ATTENTION! KEITH KIMBLE
EARNED $15,284 last Summer working
80hrswk last summer. If you'd like to
hear how call 1400485-7194 X4681 M-F
between 9-7 for more info, leave message.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 800462-2122
ENTRY-LEVEL SALES POSITIONS
available for highly motivated individuals.
Nease Personnel 7585820
HURRY - TAN while you work. Spring
Summertime Job 12 miles from Greenville.
Flexible Hours. 21 or older. Call for Inter-
view 975-2265 Day; 830-9280 Night
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206)971-3570exU53624
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS co-
ordinator of environmental sales. Interna-
tional marketing company expanding to
Greenville seeking part-time team orient-
ed individuals. Good pay. Call for an ap-
pointment 3214250.
JOHN: I'M DEFINITELY UP to a night
of laughs. Let's go see Hunchback of Notre
Dame. I heard that we get to go on stage
and get free food during intermission. I
also heard that we get to participate in a
battle scene and throw stytro-rocks at the
actors. Tickets are only $10 if we get them
in advance, so I'll drop by the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall and get them
today. - Heather
PROFESSIONAL SWM, 44, ISO a
charming young woman, 1825, to be an
adventurous and imaginative springtime
playmate. Please respond, with photo, to
POB 4144, Greenville, 278382144
THANKS TO ALL THOSE who sup
ported and voted in the SGA Elections.
Love, Nix, Rivenbark, Phillips. Thompson.
We look forward to working for you!
HEATHER: CLASSES ARE GETTING
to me. I need a comedy break. You want
to go with me to see the Hunchback of
Notre Dame on April 3? It's supposed to
be hysterical. - John
INTRAMURAL SPORTS GOLF DOU-
BLES: Don't miss the chance to play.
There will be men's, women's, and co-rec
divisions. The registration deadline is April
9 in 204 Christenbury Gym. For more in-
formation call Recreational Services at
3284387
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS:
April 2 through April 9. A. J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall and free. TUES April 2-SENIOR
RECITAL. Josh White, composition,
7:00pm SOPHOMORE RECITAL, Angela
Suggs, piano 9:00pm. THURS April 4-ECU
GUITAR ENSEMBLE, Elliot Frank, Direc-
tor 8:00pm. MON April 8ECU TROM-
BONE CHOIR AND JAZZ 'BONES, George
Broussard, Director 8:00pm. For addition-
al information, call ECU- 685 lor the 24-
hour hotline at ECU4370
ECU LAW SOCIETY: ELECTIONS for
the 199897 year will be held on Wednes-
day, April 3rd at 5:15pm in Ragsdale room
218A. The society is open to all majors so
come and vote or run for an office.
OVERCOMING GRIEF AND LOSS: An-
yone can experience the loss of a signifi-
cant person and often the grieving per-
son can benefit from the support of oth-
ers who have had a similar experience.
This continuing group will bring people
together under the direction of a skilled
counselor for mutual support and to learn
healthy ways of grieving. Tuesdays at
3:30pm. Counseling Center. Call 3286661
to register.
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB MASSAGE
CLINIC: Thursday, April 11 89pm in Belk
Building. Tickets from PT Students or
Back & Limb Clinic $3.00 in advance or
$3.50 at the door.
&
Greek
Personals
COMPUTER DESK FOR SALE! Excel
lent condition. Paid $199 selling for $100.
Must see! Call Stephanie for more info at
353-0830
EVENING APPOINTMENT SETTER
NEEDED. Great student job, good tele-
phone voice required. Call Nease Person-
nel Voo-5820
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to congratu
late the new SGA Officers: Nix, Rivenbark.
Phillips and Thompson!
CONGRATULATIONS ANGIE NTX FOR
SGA President. We knew you could do it
You've got our support the whole way
through it Love, your Alpha Phi Sisters!
CHI OMEGA WANTS TO thank every-
one for participating in Gamma Week!
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to thank
Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Delta Pi, and
Kappa Alpha for the great social Tuesday
night!
LEARN BASIC CANOE TECHNIQUES:
Take a wet and wild trip to James River,
Virginia April 19-21 or 22-24 and learn
basic canoe techniques for two days. Be-
ginner and intermediate paddlers will love
this trip. The registration deadline is April
8 in 204 Christenbury Gym. For more in-
formation call Recreational Services at
3284387
ALCOHOL SUPPORT GROUP: Have you
been affected by alcohol at some point in
your life? Abusive families, poor relation-
ship skills, difficulty with self-management
skills, difficulty formulating and reaching
academic and personal goals, as well as
poor academic and employment perfor-
mance can all be related to trouble with
alcohol. This group examines the issues
surrounding the use of alcohol and the
consequences of drinking behaviors. Find
out what to do before things get out of
hand. Mondays 3:30pm-5:00pm. Counsel-
ing Center. Call 3284661 to register.
G L B SUPPORT GROUP: ECU isn't the
easiest place to be gay. lesbian or bisexu-
al. This confidential group is designed for
those people who do not feel comfortable
facing the community in a more public
way at this time. Meet with us to discuss
your successes and frustrations and to
share coping mechanisms that work for
you. Wednesdays 3:30pm-5:00pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 3284661 for a confi-
dential interview.
Our classifieds can hetp
you compute success.






Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1136
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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