The East Carolinian, March 28, 1996






1HURS?
March 28,1996
Vol71,No. 49
clearly labeled - '
The Least Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pages
rids
Around the State
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Duke
Power Co. meter readers have
traded pepper spray for stun batons
as protection against vicious ani-
mals, and the weapons are 10 times
more powerful than the jolt from
"invisible" fences.
Duke Power literature de-
scribes the 2-foot Super Baton as
packing a punch similar to that of
the system of collars and under-
ground wires used to condition
dogs to stay in their yards.
RALEIGH (AP) - North Caro-
lina taxpayers would spend nearly
$2.5 billion over the next decade
to build and renovate schools if the
General Assembly approves a study
committee's recommendation.
The committee voted Tuesday
to recommend a two-part plan that
includes borrowing $950 million
that would go to local districts by
1999. Voters would have to approve
a bond issue, possibly in a special
statewide election as soon as Sep-
tember.
Around the Country
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) - An ex-
plosion ripped apart part of a 5-
year-old steel mill Wednesday, kill-
ing at least one person and injur-
ing four others. Two workers were
reported missing.
The explosion happened in the
southwest corner of the Beta Steel
mill, said Bill Fritchley. director of
planning and development for the
Indiana Port Commission.
The blast partially collapsed
part of the roof of a Beta office
complex about 50 feet away.
Fritchley said from Indianapolis.
TOMS RIVER, NJ. (AP) - Au-
thorities have discovered that a
woman who secretly recorded her
conversation with the man accused
of killing her managed to turn over
the tape and preserve even more
of their talk, newspapers reported
Wednesday.
The dramatic 24 minutes of
conversation that were first re-
vealed on the tape hidden in
Kathleen Weinstein's pocket led
investigators to arrest Michael
LaSane, 17, of Berkeley Township.
Around the World
PARIS (AP) - A young person
died in France Wednesday of
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the rare
but fatal malady that British doc-
tors suspect may in some cases be
caused by a similar affliction in
cows.
Tests were under way to de-
termine if the patient, who was not
identified, came down with the dis-
ease as a result of eating meat
tainted with mad cow disease, the
French newspaper Le Monde re-
ported.
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - A hi-
jacker seized an Egypt Air jetliner
with 145 passengers aboard
Wednesday and forced the pilot to
fly to Libya, airport officials and
police said.
The plane landed in Tobruk, a
Libyan city on the Mediterranean
70 miles west of the Egyptian bor-
der.
New policy prohibits amorous
facultystudent relationships
Name
Design derived
from six UNC-
system universities
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
A new state policy prohibits
amorous relationships between fac-
ulty members and students under
their supervision and evaluation.
The UNC Board of Governors
(BOG) unanimously passed a policy
on March 18, prohibiting amorous
relationships between faculty mem-
Pirates
on tfte
Street
Photos by PATRICK IREIAN
bers and the students under their
supervision.
Appendix A of the policy de-
fines an amorous relationship as
follows: An amorous relationship
exists when, without the benefit of
marriage, two persons as consent-
ing partners (a) have a sexual union
or (b) engage in a romantic
partnering or courtship that may or
may not have been consummated
sexually.
"Evaluate" or "supervise" is de-
fined in the document to mean:
A. To assess, determine or in-
fluence (1) one's academic perfor-
mance, progress or potential (2)
one's entitlement to or eligibility for
any institutionally conferred right,
benefit or opportunity, or
B. To oversee, manage or direct
one's academic or other institution-
ally prescribed activities.
Any amorous relations involv-
ing faculty and students under 18
years of age, are prohibited.
When designing their policy,
the board drew upon the existing
policies of six of their schools, a
1995 statement by the American As-
sociation of University Professors
and recommendations from all 16
chancellors.
The BOG cited the following ex-
See BAN page 4
SGA election results
Angie Nix
John Lynch
Eric Rivenbark
Jonathan Phillips
Julie Thompson
Miles Layton
Position votes
president
president
v. president
treasurer
secretary
secretary
1,568
605
1,572
565
votes
71.9
28.1
unopposed
unopposed
73.3
26.7
According to Penn Crawford, SGA chief of staff, 2,182
students voted. This was the largest number of voters in a
SGA election in five years. These results are on a raw scale.
Do you think the
Student
Government
Association
SGA) is ig�lly
stive
Choose or lose!
�"�
Patrick Brinson, senior
"I think SGA is effective
because it supports
extracurricular activities,
as well as academic
relations
Shaun Dillon, sophomore
"I think it is effective
because it helps make
decisions for the student
body that no one else
cares to make
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Michael White, a junior finance major, votes in Wednesday's SGA elections as poll
watcher Michael Doherty looks on. The election drew 2,182 student voters.
Jenny Pilch, sophomore
"Do thay really do stuff?'
University dining earns As
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Marsha Mllllgan, junior
"I feel it is effective in
some ways, but not
effective in others
Two of ECU's campus dining facilities recently re-
ceived a "Golden A" Award for their exceptional food sani-
tation and handling scores in 1995.
The Wright Soda Shop, the Croatan and ECU's
School of Home Economics Dining Room all were recipi-
ents of the award. They claimed three out of the 23 awards
that were given.
"This is an outstanding accomplishment said Frank
J. Salamon, director of University Dining Services. "We
work very hard to maintain high standards in the dining
halls, and it has paid off
The Golden A Award is given by the Pitt County Di-
vision of Environmental Health. Every meat market, school
lunchroom, food stand and restaurant in Pitt County is
inspected. The inspections occur four times a year and
the facilities receive a grade from A to C. They are evalu-
ated on their food handling and sanitation procedures.
An A includes scores from 90-100, a B includes scores
from 80-89.5 and a grade of C includes scores from 70-
79.5. A facility receiving a grade below a C results in an
immediate shutdown.
The Golden A Award is given to recipients that have
maintained a score of 95 or higher on all four inspec-
tions.
The facilities are evaluated by a panel of judges from
the food and lodging staff of the department The judges
are led by Chief Paul Andrews, who works closely with
the judges to evaluate each food handling and sanita-
tion procedure.
This past year was the first year that Pitt County
has given an award for outstanding scores. However,
the employees of dining services have always worked to
improve all food handling procedures.
"Safe food handling is critical Salamon said. "It
takes a lot of time and effort to plan and carry out these
procedures Dining Services works closely with Pitt
County officials, along with going through a series of
development courses to learn how to handle food in a
clean and safe way.
The Golden A Award is an outstanding accomplish-
ment However, it does not mean that other dining halls
are unsanitary. Other dining facilities on ECU's campus
have all received the standard "A which means that
they have scored a 90 or better on their inspections.
"The Wright Place and the Croatan deserved their
award said freshman Renee Minton. "Overall, I think
the food handling seems very clean and satisfactory
Department encourages teens to enjoy history
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
ECU's department of history
hosted National History Day 1996,
for Education District I on Wednes-
day. The theme of the day was "Tak-
ing a Stand
More than 200 high school and
middle school students from north-
eastern NC gathered to participate
in the competition.
District I consists of public and
private schools in Beaufort, Bertie,
Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare,
Gates, Hertford, Hyde. Martin,
Pasquotank, Perquimans. Pitt,
Tyrrell and Washington counties.
History Day is an annual event
which ECU has hosted for more
than ten years.
Students competed in the ar-
eas of papers, projects, perfor-
mance and media presentations.
There were group as well as indi-
vidual entries.
Judges for the competition
were professors as well as histori-
ans on and off campus with exper-
tise in various areas.
The competition followed na-
tional rules and guidelines. There
were two groups of competitors.
The junior division consisted of
grades six through eight and the
senior division consisted of grades
nine through twelve.
See HISTORY page 4
LIFfcye
)t&Ccte
Friends reviwers disagreepage
Can basketball save the world?page
Golf team looking uppage
11
Thursday
Cloudy
0p6tec4t
Jk
High 64
Low 48
Weekend
Cloudy
High 66
Low 50
Phone
eoe6
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28, 1996
v
Organization eases last-minute tax headaches
March 20
Larceny - A faculty member reported the larceny of a VCR from
a room in Flanagan.
Worthless check - A resident of Tyler Hall was served a criminal
summons for a worthless check.
Larceny � a staff member reported the larceny of her wallet from
her coat pocket in the Dining Services Office at Mendenhall.
Possession of drug paraphernalia - A staff member reported a
possible drug violation in Tyler Hall. A Tyler resident was issued a
state citation and campus appearance ticket for possession of drug
paraphernalia. Two pipes used to smoke marijuana, a pack of rolling
paper and a small pair of scissors with marijuana residue on the tips
were found in her room after she gave consent to search the room.
March 21
Harassing phone calls - A resident of Fletcher Hall reported
receiving harassing and threatening telephone calls.
Assist faculty - A faculty member requested assistance with a
disgruntled student in his office in the Austin building.
Intoxicated and disruptive - A Greenville resident was charged
with being intoxicated and disruptive after being stopped for drink-
ing a beer. The subject became disruptive and would not leave cam-
pus.
March 22

Assist Rescue - A non-student reported a resident of Tyler Hall
was attempting suicide. Officers, rescue personnel and the coordina-
tor of Tyler responded. The resident was transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital for treatment.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of his bookbag from
Fletcher Music at 9:12 a. m. Another student reported the larceny of
his bookbag from Fletcher Music Hall at 9:45 a.m.
Assault on female - A non-student drew warrants on a resident
of Aycock Hall after he allegedly slapped her in the face during an
argument. The incident occurred in Tyler Hall.
March 25
Injured student - A studentstaff member reported a student
had fallen southwest of the General Classroom Building, the student
advised she did not need medical attention. A officer transported
her to her vehicle, south of Mendenhall.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of his locked bicycle
from north of Rawl.
March 26
Attempting to burn a dwelling - A resident of Belk Hall reported
a fire on the east porch of Cotten Hall. The newspaper stand had
been set on fire. The fire was extinguished by the responding offic-
ers. The back of the stand had melted and soot was on the ceiling of
the porch.
Larceny - A resident of Cotten Hall reported the larceny of a
video game form her room.
Compiled by MargeuriteBeniamin. Taken from official ECU police.
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
The accounting honor society,
Beta Alpha Psi, will be offering tax
relief for ECU students, the Greenville
community and staff.
Beta Alpha Psi will be offering
free help to anyone who would like to
prepare their Federal and state tax re-
turns.
"We encourage people to come
to us for tax assistance said Dr. Dou-
glas Schneider, one of the faculty ad-
visors for Beta Alpha Psi. "We pre-
pare students' and staff's taxes for
free. This will prevent people from
having to pay a CPA or tax services
People who are in need of assis-
tance are asked to bring their W-2
forms, Federal and state tax return
form packets that they received in the
mail, any" 1099" forms received from
banks or other financial institutions,
Social Security and other material
that is related to retirement income.
"People are intimidated by taxes
said Dr. Mark G. McCarthy, co-fac-
ulty advisor of Beta Alpha Psi. "This
allows accounting students to branch
out and help the community, and help
those who are intimidated make fil-
ing their taxes a little less frighten-
ing
McCarthy said some people's
taxes are not hard to file. This service
will help the community file their taxes
without having to pay for tax services.
Graduate and undergraduate ac-
counting majors along with account-
ing faculty will be in charge of work-
ing on the tax information.
People who just wish to ask ques-
tions are strongly encouraged to at-
tend.
"I think this would be a great ser-
vice to students" said Chip Heal, a jun-
ior applied sociology major. "Any help
would be an asset, especially when it
is free
Heal said he participated in giv-
ing free tax advice to people in years
past and said his services were very
well received by the people he helped.
This is the last time that this ser-
vice will be offered this year.
The tax prep service will be held
in the General Classroom building in
room 1028 on Friday from 2pm-5pm.
Any questions concerning this
program can be addressed to Dr.
McCarthy at 32S6623 or Dr. Schneider
at 328-6161.
Student's background leads to global career
lived in Japan for 11 years, Ander
son discovered that her years in Ja-
pan were an important commodity
in Greenville. Soon after she enrolled,
a large Japanese automotive electric
motor manufacturer, Automotive
Small Motors (ASMO), announced
plans to build a park at the local in-
dustrial park. Before she knew it,
Anderson had landed a part-time job
interpreting for U.S. and Japanese
employees at the site.
Her association with the com-
pany helped introduce her to area de-
velopers and to the people in charge
of directing the plans for the Global
TransPark in Thailand.
She starts a one-year internship
in June at the Kenan Institute of Pri-
vate Enterprise Southeast Regional
Office in Bangkok. Her work will in-
clude helping in the development of
promotional materials to attract Japa-
nese companies to the blossoming
Asian Global TransPark in Thailand.
See JAPAN page 3
Miwa Anderson
Stephanie Eaton
Senior Writer
A Japanese-American student at
ECU has found that the key to find-
ing a good job means being at the
right place at the right time.
For the last three years, Miwa
Anderson has lived in Greenville and
has found several opportunities for
her career goals.
A senior geography major who
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����MHHHMi
JAPAN from page 2
The internship will include gather-
Mr the Japanese
5S foi i! Thai Embassy in
Tokyo about the Global TransPark
��'i in Japan. Her
motl � d her father is
American. W en she was three
months old. she moved with her par-
land, (He. Three years
later, she and her family moved to
Chicago and lived the U.S. four years
ago. She lived in Raleigh with rela-
tives and completed her senior year
at Broughton High School.
After graduation, she was ac-
cepted into the Honors Program at
ECU. She will complete her
bachelor's degree in three years and
has had a near-perfect academic
record.
"ECU has had a lot of classes
that I've really enjoyed" Anderson
said.
Her extracurricular activities in-
clude being a member of four honor
societies and an officer with the In-
ternational Student Association. She
also worked as a resident adviser in
1994-1995, and before her position
at ASMO, lie worked as an intern
with the Pitt County Development
Commission.
"Those students who say ECU
sucks must realize that anyone go-
ing to a state school has a chance at
a fine quality education Anderson
-aid. "You must tap into your re-
sources. A college career is what you
make of it
Anderson said she hopes that
her internship in Thailand will allow
her to experience other opportuni-
ties to work at an international level
involving the U.S Japan and South-
east Asia. She said she is particularly
interested in industrial recruiting and
in airport management and develop-
ment.
Her interest in airports and a
course in economic geography led
her to a meeting with an official for
the Global TransPark Authority in
North Carolina. Through this project,
she learned the connections between
the Kinston. NC. project and another
TransPark being developed in Thai-
land.
She later met planners and ad-
ministrators at the Kenan Institute
of Private Enterprise in Chapel Hill,
who awarded her the internship to
work at the Institute's Southeast Asia
office. The office is coordinating the
Thai effort in starting a Global
TransPark there.
Anderson said she is thankful for
the chance to work for ASMO and
for the internship with the Kenan In-
stitute.
Dr. David Sanders, director of
ECU'S Honors Program had strong
words of praise for Anderson.
"Miwa is very bright and very
focused Sanders said. "She doesn't
let go when she wants something
Thursday, March 28, 1996
ott't
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tonight!
The East Carolinian
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3142-A Mosely Dr. A
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-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28,1996
'
ECU HONORS PROGRAM
According to our records, the following people are
graduating with either General Education
(24 hrs3.3 GPA) or University Honors
(30 hrs3.5 GPA) Spring 1996.
I
MIWA
PATRICIA
MARY
S. GREG
KRISHNA
JENNIFER
KENNETH D.
ROBB
PAULA
KENDRICK
JOSEPH
LISA
CHRYSTIN
CARLA
ASHLEE
JENNY
JOSEPH
CHELLE
HELEN
MATTHEW
TARA
DAVID
LAURA
ANGELIA
HEATHER
LAURIE
KERRY
JOSEPH
MATTHEW
ANGELA
DAVID WAYNE
JENNIFER
ELIZABETH
JAMIE
JOSEPH
KATHRYN
TAMARA
BRYAN
CHANDRA
EMILY
MISTY
RAE
RACHAEL
DENNIS
MATTHEW
LYNETTE
ANDERSON
ARNOLD
BOWERS
BOYD
BRYAN
CALFEE
CAMPBELL
CAVANAUGH
CREECH
DUNHAM
ELDER
EZZELL
FARRY
FRITZSCHE
GAHAGAN
GARNER
GARRIS
HARDISON
HARPER
HEATLEY
HENKE
HILLMAN
HINES
HOPE
HUGHES
JOHNSON
LYNCH
MARTE
MORRISON
MOSS
OVERBY
PATTERSON
PETTY
PRESLAR
RACKLEY
RICKERT
RIVENS
SHAW
SPEIGHT
TITUS
TRIPLETT
TROIANO
TUNICK
WATSON
WEAVER
WILLIAMS
IE
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
G.E.
U.H. (GEOG)
U.H.(PHIL)
U.H. (BIOL)
U.H. (ENGL)
U.H.(AMID)
HIvjI-OlvY from page
Activities took place in
Mendenhall Student Center and be-
gan with a convocation at 9:30 a.m.
The viewing and judging of the en-
tries took place from 10 a.m. until
1 p.m. History Day ended with an
awards ceremony in Hendrix The-
ater.
Dr. Claire Pittman of the ECU
history department was the District
I coordinator.
"The day stimulates the stu-
dents' interests, and they do draw
a great deal from it. Students learn
how to research and develop cre-
ativity from building their projects
around a theme
Pittman said the theme, "Tak-
ing a Stand" is broad with plenty
of room for interpretation, Pittman
said. The judges also talked with
the students about what they have
learned from their projects.
Pittman said if a student is not
really interested in history, this is
something to get them excited
about history, and she said she
hopes they can carry this over to
the classroom.
Graduate students in the his-
tory department volunteered their
services by working at the student
information booth, monitoring stu-
dents and teachers and working as
ushers in Hendrix Theater.
One of the schools that com-
peted was St. Peter's in Greenville.
Sixth grader Will Corbitt fol-
lowed the theme and did his project
on the Negro Baseball League and
how the league took a stand to
break the barrier between separate
Negro and white leagues.
Bryan Bunn, another sixth
grader did a slide presentation on
N.C. during the Civil War.
Two other sixth graders from
St. Peter's did a project entitled,
"Grandpa versus Baskin-Robbins
Jerome McMillen worked with Chris
Diaz-Cobo on this project.
McMillen's grandfather actually
took Baskin-Robbins to court in the
mid-1980s because the company was
contaminating the air and water. He
won and in result Baskin-Robbins
had to ship their toxins elsewhere.
Diaz-Cobo said he enjoyed His-
tory Day.
"It allows kids to compete and
get a chance to move on to a higher
level Diaz-Cobo said. "It gives us
something to shoot for
Student winners received a rib-
bon and a certificate with their rat-
ing seal. Each year the Pitt County
Historical Society presents engraved
plaques to each school having a first
place winner in any category.
The winners will now advance
to a statewide competition on April
27 at UNC-Ashville. State winners
will then move on to the national
competition.at the University of
Maryland in June.
BAN
from page 1
U.H. (CSD1)
U.H. (HIST)
U.H. (NURS)
U.H. (HIST)
U.H. (POLS)
U.H. (CSDI)
U.H. (POLS)
STUDENTS MUST ADVISE THE HONORS
OMISSIONS BY THURSDAY, MARCH 28.
U.H.(CSDI)
PROGRAM (328-6373) OF ERRORS OR
cerpt from the University Professors'
policy as providing helpful guidance
in defining what constitutes a con-
sensual relationship.
Sexual relations between stu-
dents and faculty members with
whom they also have an academic
or evaluative relationship are
fraught with potential for exploita-
tion. The respect and trust accorded
a professor by a student, as well as
the power exercised by the profes-
sor in an academic or evaluative
role, make voluntary consent by the
student suspect. Even when both
parties initially have consented, the
development of a sexual relationship
renders both the faculty member
and the institution vulnerable to
possible later allegat ms of sexual
harassment in light of the significant
power differential that exists be-
tween faculty members and stu-
dents.
Most of the 16 schools in the
university system, including ECU,
have relied on sexual harassment
policies in the past to deal with
these issues.
Section C-5 of ECU's sexual ha-
rassment policy reads: "It is against
the policies of East Carolina Univer-
sity for any employee of the univer-
sity to engage in consensual, amo-
rous relationships with students or
other university employees whom
the employee is or will be supervis-
ing or evaluating
Dr. MaryAnn Rose, assistant to
the chancellor and EEO officer, said
the old and new policies vary in sev-
eral ways.
The new policy addresses stu-
dentfaculty relationships but does
east coast
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PHONE
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THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS MILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, you
could get out from under
with a three-year enlistment
Each year you serve on
active duty reduces your
indebtedness by one-third
or $1,500, whichever
amount is greater, up to a
$55,000 limit. The offer
applies to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
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Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE!
not set guidelines for staff and those
employees under their supervision.
It also does not prohibit relations,
at this time, between students em-
ployed by the university and their
supervisors who may or may not be
faculty members.
The new policy, unlike the old,
does provide for sanctions against
faculty members found in violation
of the guidelines. This will require
stricter rules of proof of misconduct
and must be clarified before penal-
ties can be assigned.
"We have not yet worked out
the details of the way the policy will
be administered Rose said.
Rose said she wants to make
sure the faculty is well aware of the
rule changes before they, are imple-
mented.
"We must publicize Rose said.
"To make it fair, we must fi.st de-
cide how it is to be administered
Students in agreement with the
ban, cite issues of conflict of inter-
est as their prime concern.
"If a student is in class with a
professor and they have a relation-
ship, it's a conflict of interest said
Steve Carpenter, a senior majoring
in industrial technology. "Even
though the student may be evalu-
ated objectively, it gives the appear-
ance of conflict
Some instructors welcome a
clearly defined policy.
"We need certain guidelines for
facultystudent relationships said
Shannon Griffin, graduate teaching
assistant in heath education. "I think
all faculty will welcome that. Where
you have ambiguity, problems exist"
The EEO office also welcomes
the new policy.
"The university has for some
time, prohibited those kinds of rela-
tionships Rose said. "This new
policy from the board of governors
is good in that it reaffirms our com-
mitment and strengthens our own
policy
Other schools in the university
system are pleased to have a unified
statement.
"I welcome any well-thought out
policy said Marsha McLean, interim
director of university relations at
Elizabeth City State University. "It's
comprehensive and inclusive of all po-
tential issues when done at the BOG
level, and it's good that it's being
implemented through all campuses
equally
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Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
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Thursday, March 28,1996
The East Carolinian
SdH 192
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Our View
Love it or hate it,
basketball is a
staple of
American life.
With the final four fast approaching, March Madness
is at a fever pitch. Sports-crazed basketball fans will not
leave their sofas, except of course to get more beer or use
the bathroom. Nacho and salsa sales will be at their high-
est since the Super Bowl. After the games, there will not
be an empty basketball court in the nation. College star
wannabes will be shooting jumpshots until they can no
longer lift their arms. Sports bars will be packed with
fans rooting for the underdogs or jumping on the band-
wagon of the team favored to take it all.
But, there are some who care not to wear a basketball
jersey to class every day, or go to work with a rainbow
wig on their head. These people may have watched a few
games during the first two rounds, but are now probably
sick of the whole concept of the game at this point in the
month. They're tired of the constant bombardment of com-
mercials. They're tired of the pre-empting of their favorite
programming. They just want everything to be normal
again.
Here at TEC, we are split just like the rest of America.
It all cdmes down to whether you love March Madness or
you hate it.
Of course, it's easy to hate something that's greatly
overexposed, but that's just the baggage of commercial-
ism that accompanies anything popular.
But, then again, organized sports is a stitch in the
fabric of America.
There are so many basketball programs that have
started in the U.S. that have successfully gotten kids off
of the streets and out of trouble.
There are also countless stories of kids from low-in-
come families that excel in sports and go on to be finan-
cially able to provide for their parents' every need.
Organized sports teach discipline, sportsmanship,
good-will, determination and leadership skills to young
people.
This may sound cheesy, like sports can solve the prob-
lems of the world, but even the smallest pebble dropped
in a pond will cause ripples that will travel to the shore.
So, if you love March Madness, that's great, but don't
let it rule your life. If you hate it, hate commercialism, but
don't hate basketball.
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Deanya Lattimore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Apathy reflects paralyzed souls
An old adage states that "He who
stands for nothing is nothing This
statement may not have been con-
ceived during our generation but has
unfortunately come to represent it
Generation X, as it has come to
be called, has no underlying cause.
Because it has no central cause, it has
no central movement to follow in any
direction. This lack of cause is one of
the reasons why the biggest problem
our generation is facing is not lack of
family values, gun control or censor-
ship. Our biggest problem is apathy.
Apathy has two similar defini-
tions. The first definition says that it
is the lack of feeling or emotion. The
second definition states that it is the
lack of interest or concern. To show
the best example of how this problem
is exhibited, we need only to look at
the name our generation has received:
X. The title X is the ultimate symbol
of apathy. It is neither here nor there,
it is singular (not part of a group),
and it is generic (without identity of
its own).
Leadership is one of the biggest
problems facing our generation. Gen-
eration X is a group that everyone can
admit exists, but no person can claim
to lead. When someone tries to lead
it we quickly strike them down not
for real issues affecting the overall
domestic good, but out of self inter-
Chris Arline
Senior Opinion Columnist
Think of it as a
ship without a
rudder. It doesn't
sink but it doesn't
get to pick which
direction it goes
in either.
est (i.e. What are they doing for me
personally.)
The apathy dilemma is not just a
national problem, but one that we see
here on campus as well. In reading
some of the writings of my colleagues
I see that they feel left out because
they have not had a candidate come
up and speak to them personally. The
popular solution is to just not partici-
pate in the campus elections. This is
obvious on ECU'S campus by the num-
ber of students who show up at de-
bates, call in to the radio station de-
bates and even vote (average turnout
is less than 1,500.)
Through running for office my-
self and managing the campaigns of
others I know, it is tough to believe
that any one person can avoid being
spoken to. It is not uncommon for a
candidate to speak to 1,000 different
people in a three day period. This is
where the apathy becomes apparent.
A person does not join a group or club
because they don't have a common
goal or something they want to get
accomplished. They are not willing to
be part of a group and fail to get their
issues addressed as a result. Its hard
to change the world if you're not will-
ing to get off the fence and go one
way or the other. By not actively prac-
ticing and supporting your beliefs,
nothing gets done.
The other extreme of apathy is
complaining but not working on the
solution. Anyone can gripe about the �
fact that groups should be allowed to JJ
paint their logos on the street in front I
of student store, but if no one is will
ing to get off that fence and take 5
around the petition then nothing gets 5
done.
It is a shame that students allow
themselves to be paralyzed into such I
a subjective mode. By doing this they �
lose control of their own directions 5
and get nothing accomplished. Think J
of it as a ship without a rudder. It 5
doesn't sink but it doesn't get to pick 5
which direction it goes in either.
Letters to the Editor
Memories keep ECU alive
Discrimation letter missed mark

r
i
i
Well, one month from now ex-
ams will be halfway over and then
summer arrives. I can't believe that
summer has come so quickly. So
much has happened this semester
and yet it seems like it only just be-
gan.
For some, this is their last
month here in the Emerald City. For
Others, it was supposed to be, but
perhaps now, next December is the
exit out. Either way. most of us usu-
ally do graduate and then what? The
world awaits and yet a single yearn-
ing desire still burns in your heart.
Many people such as myself,
never went down to the Keys or to
the Bahamas for Spring Break. I al-
ways had to work and raise some
capital to help pay those wonderful
bills and debt that most of us accu-
mulate over the years. Yet, that
burning desire still needs to be freed
from the soul and released into the
atmosphere.
OK, so you're wondering what
is this guy talking about? Simple, a
final brief moment of glory, or in
this case, a great time in the sun.
Does this answer your question?
Well then, perhaps this will - Purple
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
The Purple and
Gold weekend is
the last chance
for some of us to
see the Pirates for
one last time as a
student here.
and Gold weekend.
The Purple and Gold weekend
is the last chance for some of us to
see the Pirates play for one last time
as a student here. It is definitely a
game worth seeing. In the past,
there have been rides, games, food
and yes, fun. That's the whole key
to the weekend, FUN!
I want you to be able to look
back in a few years and say. "I re-
ally had a good time there It will
happen. I know that I'm sentimen-
tal about these things, and when I
go to my high school reunion this
year, I'll be able to tell my high
school semi-friends (if that is what
you call those interactions within
the confinements of the school
walls), all that happened here and
all my experiences. Just as they will
with theirs. Of course in my high
school, less than half the senior
class actually continued their edu-
cation.
So, when you go this weekend
and watch the purple team play the
gold team, think of all the fond
memories that ECU has brought you
and of all the friends that you made
while you were here. After which, as
I am sure most of the students will
do. there are many parties that await
patrons and there are numerous bars
downtown where you can celebrate.
Whatever you do when you leave
this institution, don't leave your
memories. Even if we don't have a
yearbook that we can sit down with
our friends and look at. Even if we
do have a video that is used much
like a matchbook in leveling off the
end of my table. We can still carry
the memories of all we did here with
us.
To the Editor,
I am writing In regard to the sub-
ject of the B-Glad celebration brought
up in Tuesday's edition of TEC. I have
no problem with the article, but con-
cern did arise when I read "Wear
jeans for diversity" on the Opinion
Page.
I am a student here at East Caro-
lina and am totally aware of the wide
range of diversity we have on cam-
pus. Being a political science major
I adamantly support equal rights for
everyone. Just because my affectional
orientation may not be the same I
would in no way encourage any dis-
crimination of someone different
than myself.
When reading the article I found
that the author tried very hard to
establish the fact that if you wore
blue jeans it in no way said that you
were gay or lesbian. I was taken back
when I read the sentence, "Those
who choose not to wear blue jeans
on this day must make a conscious
effort not to do so This is where
my problem lies. My clothing prefer-
ence may be different. When I walk
by your table or just you and a group
of friends not wearing "jeans" are you
going to sit back and judge me as an
individual who does not support
"nondiscrimination"? What bothers
me is it was by chance that I got a
hold of Tuesday's edition of TEC, and
I probably would have never seen the
article otherwise. I was not planning
on wearing jeans on Thursday and
my plans have not changed.
I hear you asking for change and
requesting not to be judged, but I
see you doing the same things that
you dread from your oppressors. I am
making a statement now, "DISCRIMI-
NATION IS WRONG I challenge you
to not stereotype those Thursday that
you see not wearing jeans. Who
knows, the most prejudiced person
in the world may have just passed
you wearing jeans not having a clue
as you cheered him on.
Sincerely,
Rachel Lawson
Bravo to housing employees
To the Editor,
In the past year, I have been
treated in a rude and unprofes-
sional manner by the majority of
the Administrative organizations
on this campus. This is both unpro-
ductive and a bad example for stu-
dents who are supposed to be learn-
ing how to behave in the business
world. After this short treatment, I
found the personnel at the Univer-
sity Housing Services office to be
a refreshing change. They were
polite, courteous and went out of
their way to help me. They took the
time to answer all of my questions,
and did not show the slightest sign
of impatience or exasperation. It
was not only one person either; it
was the whole office. After my deal-
ings with the other departments on
campus, I am pleased to say that
there was at least a few people who
know what customer service means,
and remember who pays their sala-
ries.
Brian Day
Community service desk fails to serve
Letters to the Editor
Constitution protects everyone
To the Editor:
I was sitting in class when 1 heard
th. first rumblings. "So are you wear-
ing jeans tomorrow?" asked a girl. "My
khakis are being pressed as we speak
replied a guy trying to look as manly
as possible. Then another girl joined
in the building wave of discontent as
she commanded the class saying,
"don't wear jeans tomorrow All I
could do was sit in my chair and qui-
etly think of how incredibly ridiculous
all of this was.
The subject of this letter is, of
course, B-Glad's request of the uni-
versity to wear jeans to show support
for equal rights regardless of sexual
orientation. This sounds simple
enough, right? After all, under that
wonderful document known as the
Constitution, all of us have inalienable
equal rights. This is, of course,
America. But based on the opinions
overheard in one small class on cam-
pus, not everyone interprets the Con-
stitution the same.
Can we, as a nation, ever get over
this issue? Who cares what you do in
your spare time, or rather, who you
do in your spare time, as long as it
only involves consenting adults. It's
very scary to witness people willing
to compromise the Constitution just
because they don't like someone's
sexual tastes.
Individual liberties, one of the
finest aspects of Jeffersonian Democ-
racy, makes America great. But what
makes us greater is our ability to hold
together as a nation and respect each
other. Besides, I can think of at least
100 more important issues to worry
about right now.
Michael Walker
political science
To the Editor,
I m a student here at ECU, and
I feel cheated by our Community
Service Desk up on the "Hill About
three weeks ago, I was trying to get
some laundry done when I noticed
the change machine was empty.
Having put all of my clothes and my
only pair of shoes in and applied
detergent to them already, I was in
a jam.
It was about 12 a.m. and my
only hope was the service desk. So
I walked over from Scott in nothing
but a pair of shorts and a T-shirt in
15-degree weather. I explained to
the clerk my situation and asked if
I could have change for my $5. She
said that she had change but it was
against "policy" to give students
change. It was there for refunds only
and 1 should go around and check
the other halls' change machines. So
off I went in 15-degree weather to
every hall on the hill, barefoot. Well,
they were empty too!
So I went back to the desk for
help. She still said that it was against
"policy" and refused. I told her that
I had an 8 a.m. class tomorrow and
I would come back and get them
their change from the Galley so she
wouldn't have to lift a finger. She
refused. I lost my temper and said
some things I probably shouldn't
have and stormed out.
I realized that she has policies
to go by, but I think she should have
given me the change. It was a ques-
tion of morals. There I was, barefoot
and cold yet I was still denied. Alter
all, she was getting paid by my
$2,800 a semester to help me. Yet I
was refused the one time 1 needed t
it the most. It's not like the dean;
was going to fire her for giving mej
change! Next year I'll be living offj
campus thanks to the College Hill!
Community Service Desk. N(
A concerned student,
Jamie Lane
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Thursday, March 28, 1996
The East Carolinian
RATE.
PRIMATIV. MAN
BY Karl Trolenberg
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Thursday, March 28,1996
The East Carolinian
-E
Travel to
OUTH OF THE D ORDER
B
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
If you ever find yourself driving
down 1-95 south of Greenville, keep
an eye out when you cross the South
Carolina border for the most offen-
sive, unusual and ridiculous highway
attraction you could ever conceive of.
Anyone who's been down this
stretch of road knows exactly wht
I'm talking about. You can't escape
it Billboards advertising it plague the
highway for at least a hundred miles
in either direction. You know it's lu-
dicrous. You know it's a big waste of
money. You know it's a tourist trap.
But you can't resist its appealing
power. I'm talking about the infamous
South of the Border!
What is South of the Border, you
ask? Let me try to explain.
South of the Border is a tourist
attraction for weary travelers who
need a break from the road and a little
something to do while they rest. But
this is no simple rest area. South of
the Border was built with a Mexican
motif, and the Micky Mouse of this
Disneyland is Pedro the happy little
Mexican.
Whoever created this place must
have been insane. I can only imagine
that he wanted to offend everyone
with his racist concept, and believe
me when I say that South of the Bor-
der is offensive. But there's something
so tacky about it that it's almoot okay
(almost). So either he was insane or
he was a genius who knew that people
could not resist anything this laugh-
able.
Curiosity usually gets the best of
you by the time you reach South of
the Border because you've suffered
through countless billboards with such
magnificent slogans as "You never sau-
sage a thing as South of the Border"
(with a giant plaster sausage attached)
and "Crf e Today, Hot Tamale When
you finally reach this oasis, you may
think it's some kind of amusement park
because ortf of the first things you see
is a giant sofebrero tower hovering over
the highway" However, when you en-
ter into the realm of Pedro, you don't
find rides (not many, anyway). What
you find is every useless, cliched tour-
ist trap on Earth rolled up into one
neat little package.
At South of the Border, you find
the typical gift shop that sells such
disposable items as wind-up plastic
toys, towels with sex jokes plastered
on them and key chains printed with
your very own name(!).
Overall it's pretty lame, but I do
have to give this gift shop a few points
for having a brilliant addition for its
customers. In the very back of the shop
is a wonderful adult entertainment sec-
tion, featuring such tasteful items as
hardcore porn and various rubber sex
toys and fake organs. At Pedro's
Dirty Old Man Shop, you're sure to
find a special gift for that special
someone (of course, that someone
may leave you when they see these
particular gifts).
Other notable aspects of South
of the Border include the lame ar-
cade, the disappointing candy store
(which doesn't really have that much
candy) and the drug store that's
open at 2 a.m.
Unfortunately, I didn't get a
chance to sample any of the food.
But judging from the smiling stat-
ues of Pedro that were displayed
throughout the place, it must also
be very special.
Speaking of statues, wait until
you see how Pedro decorates his
place. There are painted statues of
zebras, dinosaurs, anatomically-cor-
rect bulls, a gargantuan Indian, and
a giant ape wearing an orange
South of the Border t-shirt Pedro
must be a design genius to have in-
cluded this stuff on the grounds. It's
authentic Mexican attractions such
See SOUTH page 10
Mulching
Willie Hollis, Willie
Warren and Dan
Santino, hardworking
employees of ECU
Facilities Services,
spread wood chips near
the fountain at Wright
Circle.
Photo by CHRIS GOYDOSH
deceit? &Utcci,
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up
I
Friends is funny Friends ain't funny
Kevin Chaisson
TV Whore
Mark Brett
TV Bastard
CD Reviews
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
tplUgga
npui�gedntt unplugged
tWtu3ffi&Ki�ui
KISS
MTV Unplugged
That's right fans! Once again it
looks as if those long-tongued devils
are back on the scene, acoustic style.
Yes, it's KISS, and they've dropped
the distortion and wa-wa for MTV.
Does it add up? You decide!
The band opens up with "Comin
Home a song with a title to please.
What better way to return to a live
recording than to do it the Stanley-
way, with style.
All four current KISS members
were on hand, including their origi-
nal guitarist and drummer Ace
Frehley and Peter Criss. A six-man
acoustic jam. Could you believe it?
KISS goes Allman Brothers. Who
would have thought?
Despite their pretty-boy flashy
style, tHeir make-up and blood pills,
and their thrill to kill, KISS is back
up in the promos. It's hard to believe
that a band whose last single was
titled "Let's Put the X in Sex" is back
on MTV and is receiving even more
for their accomplishments than in the
late 70s and early '80s.
What is it about KISS? Is it their
black and white onslaught? Is it
Simmons' tongue? What is it? What-
ever it is, or was, it worked. People
have to remember that no matter
how mucj) respect the band is given
now, at one point this band con-
quered the world with album sales
and T-shirts. Then again, so did their
descendants.
The album itself sounds great.
Not only does the band control the
audiences attention, it gains a bit of
respect due to Paul Stanley's voice,
which has never failed, liked or
See KISS page 10
Nature
studies
I have tried to escape the Friends
merchandisingpublicity animal. It
seems as if it hunts you everywhere,
lurking through TV screens, peering
at you off of magazine covers, always
ready to strike in the form of an in-
nocuous little ditty on your popular
radio station.
That is what I truly hate about
Friends - the marketing of style over
substance. Still, I enjoy the show and,
hey, I'll even go out on a limb to say I
really like the show, making an effort
to see it whenever a new episode is
on. I am part of the throngs helping
to make Friends so popular, getting
Matt LeBlanc movie deals with fake
monkeys and so on. I have nothing to
do with that haircut, however.
Well, just in case you've been liv-
ing on the sun, Friends (Can I say
the word one more time?!? Jeez!) is
the pole position of NBC's Thursday
night TV line-up. It's a comedy on the
lives and tribulations of six friends in
their mid-20s living in New York, be-
ing hip and drinking copious amounts
of coffee. That said, let's get to the
meat of it.
One thing that I have enjoyed as
of late is the whole RossRachel
MonicaRichard thing that has been
the focus of recent shows. Ever since
Rachel became aware of Ross' attrac-
tion (and then losing that attraction),
See UP page 8
Friends is kind of the TV equiva-
lent of Hootie and the Blowfish: ev-
erybody loves it and I can't fathom
why.
But there it is. Most of my friends
find the show hysterical. They're
heavily involved with the continuing
plotlines (the whole RossRachel
thing), they gather to watch it every
week and laugh heartily all the way
through. I just don't get it
Friends is a mediocre show at
best Top to bottom, it's a collection of
cliches and stock characters. Only oc-
casionally will a glimmer of originality
shine through to brighten its otherwise
dull existence. Every episode has a
been-there, done-that quality that as-
tounds me.
You want examples? Let's look at
the show's premise: a bunch of friends
hang out together in an urban setting.
Sounds like the bastard child of
Seinfeld and Cheers to me. The only
difference is that those earlier shows
were funnier. Even the fact that these
friends are young and (supposedly) hip
only brings an embarrassing Mod
Squad quality to the proceedings that
makes it all that much more lame.
And the characters? Basically,
Friends gives us a collection of stan-
dard TV stereotypes. Ross is the nice
guy. Joey is the dumb jock. Rachel is
the vapid rich girl. Phoebe is the wacky
See DOWN page 9
I1III1S!
Uli�H ti n
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement-
Thursday, March 28
Fendel and Antheneum
Hawaiian Tropic Bikini Contest
at the Attic
Seconds Flat with Homebrew
at Peasant's Cafe"
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Drive In Movie
at College Hill
Free
Concert Choir
at Fletcher Recital Hall
Friday, March 29
The Breakfast Club
at the Attic
('80s retro)
Doxy's Kitchen
at Peasant's Cafe
Jazz at Night
at Mendenhall
8 p.m.
Saturday, March 30
Plow
at the Attic
Satchelfoot
at Peasant's Cafe
Freshman Lori
McMahon works on an
English paper while
sitting out under the
newly-blossomed trees
around Joyner Library.
CD Reviews
Sepulture
Roots
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Ladies and gentlemen, please make
sure your seats are in the fully upright
position, your meal trays are fastened
to the seat in front of you and your seat
belts are securely fastened. We're pre-
paring for take off.
The listener hears engines ignite
and begins to feel shaken all the way to
his inner core. But there's one instruc-
tion the flight attendant forgot as we
prepared for take off. She forgot to tell
us to fasten our crash helmets and force
our backs into our seats. The G-forces
of Sepultura were soon to take over our
voluntary bodily functions.
Ahh the soothing sounds of the
outdoors, crickets chirping and a man
chopping wood in the background. I
know these therapeutic sounds won't
last very long, but they ease my mind
and make me feel happy.
Blast off!
The bottom end just blew out of
my stereo. My insides feverishly shake.
We're experiencing turbulence. "Roots
Bloody Roots exclaims frontmangui-
tarist Max Cavalera on the first and title
track of the CD.
Roots is Sepultura's sixth and most
adventurous release to date for the quar-
tet formed in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in
1984. It's so daring because, unlike any
of their past efforts, Sepultura started
this project with a definite concept in
mind. In early 1995, the band embraced
the idea of a back-to-basics foundation
for Roots. The band wanted to pursue
their Brazilian roots and incorporate it
into their newest project
Many times thrash and metal bands
are lumped into a single, all-encompass-
ing category. You either like it all or
you hate it all. There's no middle ground
and no individuality for the bands who
play this type of music Such statements
can only be considered as farce.
Disagree? You don't have to go far
to either support or refute such an idea.
Go see Unsound, then Henry Acrobat,
then Organ Grinder and come by and
tell me you think they all sound alike. I
think not
Through years of trial and error,
Sepultura has apparently learned that
heavy doesn't equal fast and the sec-
ond track, "Attitude is proof. From the
opening notes played by the berimbau
(a Brasilian one-stringed instrument
See ROOTS page 10
��





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28,1996
8
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COGGINS CAR CARE
320 W. Greenville Blvd. Greenville, NCWtoPargos)
Phone 756-5244
Hours: 8am-5:30pm Monday-Friday 8am-1:00pm Saturday
from page 7
Jennifer Aniston's portrayal of her has
become funnier, as well as more touch-
ing. Listen, every single one of us has
had to deal with that unrequited love
crap, so we were all right there in the
emotional trenches with Ross, but
Rachel? Rachel's story was different -
not only unrequited love, but also that
nagging "Why didn't I notice
blank?" pain, too.
That combination makes for the
mustard gas in the trenches of love.
Also, I think Aniston is a very capable
comedic actress and watching the pur-
sued becoming the pursuer did won-
ders for the character. Before this,
Rachel was all stereotype, no sub-
stance, and it's nice to see her slowly
develop into a likable person.
Ross (David Schwimmer) has also
developed past his hang-dog, nice guy
stereotype - in fact, he has become a
bit of a penis. And I love it Let's look
at some facts here. Now that Ross has
Rachel, we've discovered in recent epi-
sodes that he damn near tortured
Monica while they were children and
gets completely bent out of shape over
Rachel's ex-lovers.
The torture? Understandable;
brothers and sisters do that but most
grow out of it The ex-lovers thing? If
there was some sort of question of dis-
eases 1 could see it but not in this case.
No, this is pretty much just dumbass
male insecurity rearing its ugly head
(no pun intended). And why do 1 love
this dark-side Ross? It proves he's more
human, silly! Hey, I can be a penis too.
In fact some of us may go through life
consciously trying not to be penises �
it's part of the human condition. And
as long as he is made to realize he's
acting this way, Ross will head toward
this journey, too.
As for Monica (Courtney Cox) and
Richard (Tom Selleck)? There's just
something cool about seeing an older
manyounger woman relationship that
doesn't seem sleazy. Getting Selleck
as Richard does help (he is just so damn
nice), but the best thing about this re-
lationship has been the way it was
handled so amusingly.
For all of you folks out of the loop,
Richard is one of Monica's parents' best
friends - and her former dentist Well,
Richard, 46, is a widower and begins
to go out with Monica, prompting her
parents to wonder about the identity
of the 26-year-old cupcake Richard has
in the city. A funny outcome that was
made even more so by Elliot Gould as
Monica's dad, who, minutes before the
revelation of the cupcake's identity, was
asking some pretty explicit questions
about certain body parts and the like.
I look forward to other shows dealing
with this awkward relationship.
Friends did, and does, still have
its problems. For a while, it seemed to
turn into the Ross and Rachel show,
while the other characters took the
developmental low-road. Come to think
of it Joey (LeBlanc), Chandler (Mat-
thew Perry), and Phoebe (Lisa Kudrow)
are still pretty much more character-
izations than characters. They haven't
managed (or the writers haven't man-
aged) to shake the stereotypes that
created them: the dumb jock-stud, the
wiseacre pretty boy, the spacey Earth-
mother (even though Kudrow is con-
sistently the funniest actor on the
show).
Lately, there have been running
gags about Joey and Chandler's friend-
ship being akin to a homosexual one,
right down to a subtly funny parody of
Ross and Rachel's pining: Chandler sits
in a bathrobe peering dejectedly out
of his window into the rainy night sky,
while on the other side of the city, Joey
peers into his artificial rain-on-windows
machine in his new pad. It's a nice
touch, but would work so much better
if the characters had begun to develop
more.
Give Chandler a steady girl (or
guy, for that matter) for a few episodes
and let us see how that changes him.
Show Joey as a competent actor win-
ning a small, but quality, role that ig-
nites his acting passion. Or is this too
much to ask from a comedy? I don't
think so.
There are some people in this
world that don't like the NBC show
Friends. I realize that may come as a
shock to you die-hard fans with your
T-shirts, big-ass coffee cups and post-
ers, but it's true. In fact there even
may be one such Friends-hatter lurk-
ing nearby, so let's just talk quietly so
as not to attract attention. Now, I don't
own one piece of merchandise, nor try
to save any of them on tape (unlike
Mad About You), but I do empathize
with you. Yes, there are people who
don't like Friends, but I am not one of
them. In fact I think it is, at times,
pretty damn funny. They do need to
tread lightly, however. I'm sure Carter
Country had their own coffee cups,
too, resplendent with a little sheriffs
star on it
On a scale of one to 10, Friends
rates an eight and a half.
"Official ECU Ring Event"
March 28, 29 (Thurs - Fri) .
Ojrty
I
1RTCIRVED
V. COLLEGE JEWELRY
9:00am - 4:00pm
March 30 (Sat)
9:00am - 1:00pm
ECU Student Stores Deposit $25.00
"Officially licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
ijgfjjl :g5 jjffi
Special Payment Plans Available
A RTQi RV ED
COLLEGE JEWLLRY
NOW OPEN
March Schedule
Fri 6-10, Sat 11-11, Sun2-9
Spring Schedule Beginning April 15
Mon-Th 6-9, Fri 6-10, Sat 11-11, Sun 2-9
Also Open April 8-11,11-9
S�
The S. Rudolph
Alexander
Performing
Arts Series

It'll ring
your bells.
Student Discount:
Present Student ID & Receive $1 off a $3-50 Go Kart Ride
Valid Friday-Sunday
Chris Sutton (919)757-1800
Greenville Fun Park
1842 Progress Rd
Greenville, NC 27858
Go Kart Rides � Game Room
Features
Bumper Boats, Slick Track, Miniature Golf, Kiddie Go-Karts
On 264 & Old Creek Road 1 Mile North of Pitt County Fair Grounds
Thursday Night is LADIES NIGHT
ALL LADIES RECEIVE 50c OFF GO KARTS AND 75t
OFF MINI GOLF IN ADDITION TO STUDENT
DISCOUNT
S fir. �� 1
Wednesday,
April 3,1996
8:00 p.m.
Wright �w
Auditorium j
?-
Discount student tickets
$10 in advance at the
Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student
Center, Monday-Friday
8:30 a.m6:00 p.m.
with a valid ECU ID.
All tickets $20 at the door.
But there's no tragedy in this play.
This play is a riotous comedy�a kind
of Bart SimpsonMonty Python version
of the classic, complete with audience
participation. So don't miss your chance
to throw 5tyrorocks and eat on stage
in Wright Auditorium.
V
flatV 6.
ff
Hmmmmmmmfmm






Thursday, March 28,1996
The East Carolinian
�i
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
Editor, The East Carolinian
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, Rebel
for the 1996-97 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, April 5 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
HENDRIX FILMS
'HEAT HAS GOT IT ALL! THE STARS.
THE EXCITEMENT AND THE ACCLAIM.
TIME
"AWESOME. TRULY EPIC
A MASTERPIECE. WHOLLY ORIGINAL
ftCHAKO ScmCMl
NEWSWEEK
"A STUNNING CRIME DRAMA.
MANNS SPRAWLING SAGA HAS THE
MOST IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION OF
ACTORS IN ONE MOVIE THIS YEAR.
PACINO AND nE NIRO ARE GREAT
THIS ONE STICKS TO YOUR GUT
OmbAmcn
PACINO DE NIRO
KILMER
HEAT
��
MBMBBBWWMBMEM�rai�l�tfl�B�M0MT8BWj
�����ew�w)miwwiw
J�g� �W5 K!9iWK�S Tie M �MMN
No Film Thursday!
Fridayn March 2T
Saturdayt March 3D
Sundayi March 31
For More Information Coll the
Student Union Hotine
at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise
noted and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
DOWN frompe7
chick. Chandler is the witty cynic The
only character I can't find a stock de-
scription for is Courtney Cox's Monica,
although her out-of-work chef persona
reminds me a bit of Jack Tripper from
Three's Company.
Even the plots of individual epi-
sodes have been done before. One re-
cent story involves Joey bringing Chan-
dler an expensive and gaudy bracelet
Chandler hates it and loses it. forcing
him to buy another one to salvage his
friendship with Joey.
How many times have we seen
this? Caroline in the City (another hip
urban comedy) did a nearly-identical
er ode at around the same time I saw
the Friends version. Seinfeld does it
at least once a season. Hell, I've seen
this story on every sitcom ever broad-
cast, going all the way back to Andy
Griffith, Leave It to Beaver and Love
Lucy.
But these are all problems that
fans are aware of, I'm told. The inter-
esting thing, apparently, is to watch
how they twist these conventions,
breathing new life into an old formula.
Okay. In the bracelet episode (a
perfect example of the problems with
Friends), the original bracelet is found
and Chandler is caught red-handed
with two of the things. He gives one
to Joey, telling his pal that he bought
it as a token of friendship and thus
mending their broken relationship.
So, really, what Chandler has done
(however accidentally) is buy Joey's
friendship in the most insincere man-
ner possible, and Joey is dumb enough
to fall for it That's certainly a twist on
the theme, alright Unfortunately, it's
a cruel twist that makes both Chan-
dler and Joey kind of unappealing
Which brings us to another prob-
lem with Friends: the characters. Their
faults aren't the problem; without char-
acter flaws there's no drama, and com-
edy is really just drama turned on s
ear.
In fact flaws make characters more
real, and these characters' flaws, I must
admit do sometimes raise them above
the stereotypes they so easily fall into.
Granted, the Friends characters are
pretty firmly entrenched in their stereo-
types a good 90 percent of the time,
but those occasional glimpses of some-
thing deeper do help flesh them out
It's not really the cruelty, either.
As George Carlin once said, comedy
derives from pain. Cruel humor has a
long tradition, and I enjoy quite a lot of
it If a show is essentially a farce (like,
say, The Simpsons), cruelty plays fine.
But if you make your characters more
real (as the creators of Friends have
apparently tried to do), their cruelty
stops being funny and very swiftly be-
comes mean. If you're supposed to like
this "real" character, he can't be too
cruel.
And that's the problem with the
Friends cast They're not real enough
to succeed as real characters, but they're
too real to succeed as farcical charac-
ters. The show is screwed from both
ends.
So when people ask me why I hate
Friends, this is the kind of thing I tell
them I'm not saying that the show's
awful. Ifs not Awful is a word! reserve
for real crap, like that Urkle show or
Saved by the Bell. Given a choice, I'd
watch Friends over those shows any
day.
I can even understand some of its
appeal. The cast is attractive, the writ-
ing is competent and the acting is very
self-confident (something most sitcoms
are sadly lacking). The problem is,
Friends isn't even half as funny as it
seems to think, and that self-confidence
comes off smug
Basically, ifs the same kind of hu-
mor sitcoms have given us since the
heyday of Cheers. Friends does that
kind of humor fairly well, but we've seen
it all before. And besides, both Frasier
and News Radio do it better, with char-
acters that are at once more bizarre and
more real than anybody on Friends and
humor that actually bites every once in
awhile.
While Friends may be one of the
10 best sitcoms on television, that still
doesn't make it good, nor does it ex-
plain its wild success. But mediocrity
always attracts fans, just like garbage
attracts flies.
On a scale of one to 10, Friends
rates a derivative five.
This week's topic:
Cartoons
1. Rocket J. Squirrel and
Bullwinkle J. Moose live in
Frostbite Falls, Minnesota.
2. The Pussycats, other than
Josie, are Melody and Valerie.
3. The Three Robonic Stooges
ran on The Skatebirds Show.
4. "SDF-1" stands for Super
Dimension Fortress One, and
it's from Robotech (called
Super Dimension Fortress
Macross in Japan).
5. Hong Kong Phooey makes
his car change shape by
hitting a gong.
6. Horse.
7. Petey Pate appeared on
Ralph Bakshi's Mighty Mouse
show, and he turned to a life
of crime because everyone
laughed at his bald head.
8. Racer X is Speed Racer's
older brother.
9. Gatchamen.
10. Sweet Polly Purebread.
11. Lion-O's sword is called
the Sword of Omens, and it
appeared on Thundercats.
12. Duke is the leader of the
Gl Joe team.
13. The Power Puff Girls are
Blossom, Bubbles and Butter-
cup.
14. George Jetson works for
Spacely Space Sprockets, and
their business arch-rival is
Cogswell Cogs.
15. The chosen profession of
Captain Hariock is space
pirate.
16. Secret Squirrel's sidekick
is Morocco Mole.
17. Goliath's second-in-
command is Brooklyn.
18. "Through the courtesy of
Fred's two feet
19. The Wave-Motion Gun.
20. Humble, Lovable
Shoeshine Boy.
In this newspaper, it's a serene scene
of a gazelle grazing in the brush.
For more information visit us on the internet at
bOpjhed.mfo.appe.(iom
How's a great time to pack a Mac.
Student Stores
WrigJitBuilding � 328-6731
Hours: M-fli &�, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
In your room, it's a serene scene of
a gazelle grazing in the brush suddenly
caught off-guard by a 500-pound lion
that chases the fleeing gazelle down and
rips out its jugular. Hyenas soon follow.
Okay, so maybe the newspaper isn't the best piace to demonstrate the breathtaking multi-
media capabilities of a Macintosh computer. But with the special campus savings were now
offering on selected Macintosh computers and Apple'printers, you can easily take one home
and experience it where it was meant to be: on your desk. With built-in stereo sound, video
graphics and animation, Macintosh is an easy way to bring yourwork to life. So
visit us today, and look into the power of Macintosh. The power to be your best
jnu.viueo

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Pm-er Mac are tmjtmarts of Apple Computer. Inc All Macintosh computers are designed to h accessible to mdirutuals um disability � learn more (U.i only), call HO0-6O0-7SOH or TT) 800-755-0601.

- "
m





V
The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28, 1996
10
JKvJOJL J from page 7
played by Cavaiera). an uneasy, heart-
beat sounding percussion backbone
helps "Attitude" reach its climax. The
track explodes after 30 seconds as
Cavalera's drained voice expels. "Live
your life Not the way they taught you
Do what you feel Give me pain
Give me blood 'I i. se scars won't heal
Ladies and gentlemen, we've
reached our cruising altitude. Please feel
free to move about the cabin. The flight
attendant will be coming through the
cabin shortly, serving complimentary
beverages and peanuts.
Sounding a tad industrial,
"Lookaway" obviously has a different
feel to it than any other track on Roots.
Sepultura received help from several
different places on this one. House of
Pain's DJ Lethal handles drum program-
ming while Mike Patton (Faith No More)
and Jonathan Davis (Korn) help
Cavalera with the vocals. The song goes
back and forth, eerie to aggressive.
Sepultura doesn't let down their
true long-term fans either. "Dusted" is
the one that peaks the monitors, cracks
the amps, and breaks all the drum
heads. This one rips through your ears
impossible to stand still I think we're
losing cabin pressure.
Passengers, this is the captain
speaking. Brace yourself for crash land-
ing. We're losing altitude.
The tribal chants and percussion
groves are the distinguishable features
on 'Itsari The band went to Brazil and
recorded this one with the help of a real
tribe. They traveled deep into the Am
zon jungle where they set up their re-
corder and spent two days recording and
living with the Xavantes tribe. Sepultura
assimilated quickly with the tribe, paint-
ing their bodies and learning the cus-
toms and rituals of the Indians. The
chant Itsari, is from an ancient Xavantes
healing ritual which means roots in their
language.
The feel is crash-landing in un-
charted regions of South America.
Roots is not in any way typical heavy
metal. Throughout the album, the band
uses 15 different types of percussion
instruments, including a rusted propane
tank. Sepultura grabs and shakes the
listener, like turbulence or an earth-
quake. You're unsure if you'll be all right
when it's all over.
SOUTH from page 7
as these that make South of the Bor-
der so appealing.
In fact, South of the Border is so
very appealing that, on our last south-
ern journey, my friends and I stopped
not once, but twice. The first time we
visited early in the morning, the sec-
ond time late at night. If you have the
choice, I suggest planning your trip
so you can bathe in the glorious night
life of South of the Border. That's
when Pedro's Pleasure Dome (a mini-
Epcot right here in the Carolinas) re-
ally kicks into high gear.
Plus, placed against a black hori-
zon, the colorful neon lights of South
of the Border transform an already-
tacky creation into an even tackier
slice of Americana.
And Americana is the word for
South of the Border. The motif may
be Mexican and the mascot may be
Pedro, but South of the Border is a
monstrosity that only America could
produce. So don't miss out. Hop in
your car and head south. God bless
America!
On a scale of one to 10, South of
the Border rates a tacky 10.
KISS
from page 7
unliked.
It is always good to see friends
settle their differences and put the
rest aside to do something they love
to do together. With hits like
"Domino" and "Beth listeners are
sure and confident of what they are
getting themselves into.
Melodic solos from Frehley and
Kulick remind us that even though
times are different now. we will al-
ways have their music to remind us
of who we were back then. Whether
good or bad, almost everyone has
some type of emotional tie to this
band or the bands that were formed
due to their influence.
The message is strong. The only
question is, why did this project hap-
pen? Was it to prove that they've still
got it? Was it for money? Was it for
the simple love of music? I'd hope
for the third but I would expect, as I
have seen in many cases, that this
band has ulterior motives that they'll
use to follow this disc up.
The word is out! KISS is planning
a full make-up tour for this summer.
So watch out! With Simmons and the
gang on the loose again, no one is
safe! So if you have the time, catch
KISS on tour this summer, coming to
a dungeon near you!
Home & Brown
758-4333
300 Contanche St.
Greenville
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Driving Privileges
Free Consultation
East Carolina University Recreational Services
Drive-In Movie
Drive up or bring a blanket
to the Hill Commuter Lot & catch these Movies!
Sunday, March 31 at 9:00p.m.
Free food & free movies!
UP THERE WITH THE BEST OF THE BEST.
Indiana Jones-the new hero
from the creators of JAWS and STAR WARS.
at:theLOiET In7CA
Sponsored by Student Union Films Committee.
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.
13-20 Oz Selected Varieties
Harvest Ridge
1 Gallon Crystal Springs
Drinking Water
46 Oz. Cafes
Kosher Dills
5.5-6 Oz. Selected Varieties
Wise Potato Chips
8 Oz. Harris Teeter
Sour Cream BBQ Sauce
16 Oz. Harris Teeter 97
Fat Free Ham
16 Oz Oscar Mayer Meat Or Beef
Light Bologna
14.5-155 Oz. Reg. orUnsattedSnyder's
Hard Pretzels
3.7-4.3 Oz Selected Varieties
Totino's For One
5 Lb. Bag Premier Selection
Potatoes
3 Lb. Bag
Yellow Onions
Limit 2
64 Oz Selected Varieties
Sunny Delight
6 Pk. 12 Oz. Cans Canfield
Chocolate Soda
10 Oz Tyson Mexican
Fajita Tortilla
16 Oz. Hormel Light & Lean Jumbo
Meat Franks
10-11 Oz. Stauffer's 7 Lb. AcU-Scent or No-Track
Animal Crackers Scoop Away
Prices I. his Ad EffectiveMarch 27 through April2,1996 In Our Gfnv.lle Stores
Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept
Federal Food Stamps.
�iiiiiiijgpif .�Mim�i f tn





11
Thursday, March 28, 1996
The East Carolinian
Football team
ready to rumble
Pirates march
into JMU territory
Baseball team
packs up and hits
the road
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
After a seven game home
stand, the ECU Baseball team will
load up the ole bus and hit the trail
for their first conference road
swing. The destination will be
Harrisonburg Va home of the de-
fending regular season champion
James Madison.
The Pirates are coming off of
a huge sweep of the Tribe of Will-
iam and Mary to open the confer-
ence season at 3-0.
"We're very happy to get the
conference season started with a
sweep, especially against a much
improved William and Mary club
Coach Gary Overton said.
The Pirates swept the Tribe 3-
0, 8-0, 6-2 after being swept earlier
in the week against a tough Geor-
gia Southern ball club.
"Against the Tribe we put to-
gether the winning ingredients for
a sweep, which included superb
pitching and defense as well as
timely hitting Overton said.
The Pirates wilt face a pitching
staff this weekend best described by
one wordheat.
"James Madison is a club with
an excellent pitching staff, and when
I sary that 1 mean a staff that has
good velocity Overton said.
After a 3-0 start in the CAA,
Overton's troops are excited about
the challenge that the up coming
schedule poses for the Pirates.
"1 feel that our club is not only
up to the challenge that lies ahead,
but we're excited about getting on
the road here in the conference sea-
son Overton said.
The Dukes, preseason picked as
one of the top teams in the CAA,
gave ECU their share of troubles
when they rolled into town last sea-
son. The Bucs will have to put runs
up on the board to go along with
the superb pitching performances
produced by the ECU pitching staff
this season.
"Our hitters will have to make
some noise this weekend as well as
continue to play good defense in or-
der for us to win Overton said.
The Pirates will have to stick
to those winning ingredients in the
days to come. The up-coming sched-
ule not only has this weekend's date
with the Dukes of JMU, Overton's
troops will have to deal with George
Mason in Fairfax as well. The Patri-
ots, that can be described as a steady-
hitting team, were also picked as a
preseason favorite in the CAA.
"Both clubs are excellent clubs
and both expected to do well this
season, it will be a great challenge
to face both teams on the road, but
'we'll have to stick to playing tough
aggressive baseball Overton said.
Throw in two games with a
streaky Campbell team and an exhi-
bition with the Carolina League
Champion Kinston Indians, and you
have a tall order coming up.
The Pirates will return home for
a single game with in-state rival
Campbell April 2 before finishing
the road swing.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium will be filled with anxious fans this Saturday watching the defending
Liberty Bowl Champs during the annual PurpleGold scrimmage. Kickoff is set for 2 p.m.
Ernest Tinnen take the helm. ECU, knows what it's like to be a
Gonzalez saw action in only two young player striving to get to the
games last fall, but has plenty of top of the depth chart. The first and
Weekend
scrimmage to
showcase skills
Golfers swing into action
Will Sutton
Staff Writer
ECU men's golf team may be in a
rebuilding stage, but these Pirates are
not to be taken lightly. They have
proven they can get on a roll and
knock off much of the competition.
The golf team has a blend of
young and old talent for this season.
They have faired well in tournaments
dating back to the fall season, when
they won a tournament down in
Charleston, S.C.
According to Head Coach Kevin
Williams, everything just seemed to
click for the Pirates down in Charles-
ton.
"We really played together as a
team Williams said. "The team chem-
istry was definitely there for the
Charleston tournament. Each indi-
vidual player fed off the other
"When Brent (Padrick) scored
well on a hole, it psyched up Josh
(Dickinson) and so on. I will admit our
talent level is not what it may have
been in years past, but we got guys
with heart and determination who
want to win. Seniors Dickinson and
Padrick have provided tremendous
leadership this year for many of the
new guys to see and learn from for
the future
Williams is a 1985 graduate of
ECU and is in his first year as head
coach of the golf team. He worked in
Kinston, N.C. for many years. He was
appointed head professional of the
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The 1995 Liberty Bowl Cham-
pion ECU football team will take on
themselves this Saturday at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
That's right, the annual Purple
Gold intrasquad scrimmage is upon
us. The game, which is scheduled
for a 2:00 p.m. kick-off, is the high-
light of the Great Pirate Purple
Gold Pigskin Pigout Party. Fans will
be able to get a glimpse of the fu-
ture of Pirate football during this
culmination of spring football prac-
tice.
You won't see Marcus Crundell
throw a 62-yard pass to Larry Shan-
non, or Lorenzo West get a sack for
a 9-yard loss. The first string play-
ers will be watching this one just
like the fans, giving some of the
younger guys and back-up players a
chance to shine.
At QB, Marcus Crandell will
step aside and let back-ups Dan
Gonzalez and redshirt freshman
spring game experience. In three
spring scrimmages, he has com-
pleted 40 of 70 passes for 387 yards
with four touchdowns and two in-
terceptions. In 1995, he was three
of five passes for 36 yards in games
against Tennessee and Central
Michigan.
Ernest Tinnen, from
Burlington, NC, is said by some to
be the next great signal-caller for the
Pirates due to his great potential.
The left-hander was the Offensive
MVP of last year's PurpleGold
game, completing seven of nine
passes for 105 yards and two TD's.
Tinnen played in one game this fall,
attempting one pass against Central
Michigan. He power cleans 275
pounds, the best ever recorded by
an ECU quarterback. Tinnen said
that he believes he has come a long
way since his record-setting high
school days at Burlington-
Cummings.
"My record setting days at
Cummings are over Tinnen said.
"I've come to college now. College
is a different level. It's much better
competition and much better tal-
ent"
Tinnen, in his second year at
second year players don't usually get
as much exposure as their older
counterparts, so they have to make
the most of the time they have.
"The younger guys are progress-
ing, getting better Tinnen said
"They really have come together and
gelled in such a short time. They're
going to show what they can do to
the coaches
One thing that makes Tinnen a
good quarterback is his drive and
determination. He and the rest of
the team are on a mission to get na-
tional attention.
"Getting to a bowl and winning
it, we did all that he said. "Now
it's time to break into the Top 25,
and that's all we talk about. When
we workout in the weight room,
we're thinking 'Top 25 When we
go out on the field, we're thinking
'Top 25 When we're out talking,
we're thinking 'Top 25 We're striv-
ing to get ECU respect
At running back, all eyes are on
the redshirt freshmen trio of Daryl
Jones, Scott Harley and Raymond
Mabry.
Jones saw action in all 11 games
See FOOTBALL page 14
Intramurals crown champs
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
The 1995-1996 golf team is looking to steadily improve over
the spring season. Above are the members of the squad.
David Gaskins
Rec Services
Kinston Country Club in 1987. Will-
iams was later named head coach of
the Kinston High School golf team.
With time, many feel ECU will
regain its superior reign of league foes
that resulted in the Conference Cham-
pionship seven out of the last nine
years.
"All we need is a little time Wil-
liams said. "We have an excellent crop
of new freshmen coming to play for
ECU in the fall. We have a kid from
Wilson, N.C. who is a heck of a player
and should make an immediate impact
on the college scene if he can adjust
to a bigger and more challenging at-
mosphere
Williams will add additional play-
ers for next year's team.
"Besides this kid, Stephen
Satterly, we have five more new play-
ers. We hope to utilize about four of
these new guys for play next year. Six
freshmen is a big recruiting load con-
sidering there is normally only about
two or three are normally taken
Tournaments are a must for ECU
as they build character and compo-
sure for post-season play. The spring
tournaments, so far, have not been as
kind as the fall, when the Pirates got
there win in Charleston.
The first spring semester tourna-
ment came on Feb. 23-25 at the Uni-
versity of South Florida where the
Pirates hacked there way to a disap-
pointing 14th place finish out of a
field of 21. But after weeks of good
See GOLF page 14
The spring intramural basketball
season ended recently with divisional
and all-campus champions being
crowned at a variety of levels and di-
visions.
Headlining the champions were
the Men's Gold winners "Cash Money
Hoops" who defeated "Lambda Chi
Alpha A" 5148 in the all-campus Gold
final. JJ. McQueen lead the offense
down the stretch with four clutch free
throws and a powerful slam dunk
which ignited a late comeback. Other
key players for "Cash Money" included
the ball handling and passing of Troy
Smith and all-around play of Brian
Johnson.
However, McQueen's late heroics
almost went for naught as Brad and
Barnes Harris bombed away from
NBA range consistently raining in
long three point shots to pace the
"Lambda Chi Alpha" attack. Yet, in
the final minutes the Fraternity cham-
pions only con-
verted on two of
their final ten
free throws and
allowed "Cash
Money" to get
back into the
game.
"Cash
Money Hoops"
reached the all-
campus game
by defeating
"Da Monster
Squad" 41-32 in
the Men's Inde-
pendent Gold
title game de-
spite the slashing drives of Brian
Murphy and the inside power game
of Brian Levering. In the semi-finals,
"Da Monster Squad" ended the two-
year reign of "Total Package" with a
stunning 4342 win.
Ryan Wickline
and Justin Conrad
lead the offense
for "Pi Kappa Phi
B" who reached
the all-campus
game in the most
exciting fashion.
"Lambda Chi Alpha A" took a dif-
ferent route to the all-campus final by
knocking off a
tough "Alpha
Sigma Phi A" chal-
lenger 63-59 in the
Fraternity Gold fi-
nals. The Harris
twins bombed away
in this game as well
and were comple-
mented by the
heady point guard
play of Mike West
and the versatile all-
around game of
Chad Reynolds and
Steve Bartley.
"Alpha Sigma
Phi" matched the
three point accuracy of their oppo-
nents for much of the game behind
Cale Banks, Kelly Snipes and Brian
Jones but came up short in the end.
See CHAMPS page 14
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JJW
mmiumm mmm mm
T
K�� EVENTJ
Thursday, March 28
Saturday, March 30
7p.m.
Golf Classic Social & Auction
Friday, March 29
6-
11:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
8-11:30
p.m.
8:30p.m.
9 p.m.
10 p.m.
11:45 p.m.
Carnival Opens
Pig-Out Awards Dinner
Live Radio Shows
Public Invited to walk stadium midway
Mother Nature Band
Parade of Pigs
Fireworks
Pig Cookin" Contest Begins
Activities area closes
7-9 a.m.
9-
10:30a.m.
9a.m
6p.m.
10a.m
6p.m.
10-10:30
a.m.
10:30a.m.
10:30-all
day
10:45-
11:20a.m.
Judging of pigs
PCS Phosphate Breakfast of Champions
($10)
Greenville Home & Garden Show($2$l)
BaseballSports Card Show
Craft Show
Carnival
Newport Line Dancers
11:30a.m
12:15p.m.
11:30a. m
1p.m.
12-1 p.m.
12:25-
lp.m.
1-1:30p.m.
1:15-
1:45p.m.
2 p.m.
BarbecueSpring Game booth open 3:30-6p.m
Pig Cookin' Contest winners announced
Concessions open
Barbeque plates served until sold out($3.50
advance-$4 event)
Kids finger printing - Greenville Police
ECU Jazz Ensemble
Carolina Beach Club
ECU Student-Athlete & Coaches sign
autographs
ECU CheerleadersPee Dee autographs
ECU Contemporary Ensemble
Toyota Kiddie Games
ECU Jazz Bones
Annual spring scrimmage kickoff ($1.50
advance-$3 at gate)
Fantastic Shakers live stage show
Sunday, March 31
l2-5p.m.
l-5p.m.
2-4p.m.
Greenville Home & Garden Show ($2$l)
Carnival open
Panama Steel Band
��' m





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28,1996
12
(yocktcril
ICU's
SPORTS INFORMATION DEMRTMENT
Dress To Impress
Arlington Village
Greenville
919321 � 1714
SID - The ECU department of
athletics will honor its outstanding
student-athletes at the annual
Breakfast of Champions to be held
this Saturday as part of the Great
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout
Party.
The annual event will feature
guest speaker NFL Hall of Famer
Raymond Berry.
Berry had an outstanding play-
ing and coaching career in the NFL
and his accomplishments set the
standard displayed by ECU student-
athletes honored at the Breakfast
of Champions.
Three awards will be presented
at the event as well as the honor-
ing of the PCS Phosphate All-Aca-
demic Team.
Included in the awards are the
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water � Sewer -Cable 'Draperies
� Self-cleaning Oven � Frost-free Refrigerator -WasherDryer Connections �
Utility Room � Patio with Fence � Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks -Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool 'Basketball Court
�Tennis Court -Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease 'Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE MINUTES
WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"NOW LEASING FOR SUMMER AND FALL 1996"
Bring This Coupon in to receive 12 off security deposit & $50 off rent in May, June, and July.
Applies only to leases beginning in May
752-0277 Equal Housing Oppurtunity
Outstanding Male and Female
Scholar-Athletes. The award for the
female and male
scholar-athletes
of the year in-
clude an athletic
grant-in-aid, spon-
sored by PCS
Phosphate,
through the Pi-
rate Club in the
name of the win-
ners. Student-
Athletes are se-
lected to recog-
nize academic
achievement,
qualities of leadership and service
to the university and community.
This year's honorees are senior
Lance Tigyer, a member of the ECU
baseball team and junior Cindy
Szymanski of ECU'S cross country
and women's track teams.
A biology major from
Thornville, Ohio. Tigyer maintains
a 3.66 GPA and
has been active
in the ECU
Speakers Bu-
reau, served as
a resident advi-
sor, a "Big
Brother" and a
volunteer at
Pitt Co. Memo-
rial Hospital
and Greenville
Pediatric clinic.
An occupa-
tional therapy
major from Pitman, N.J Szymanski
maintains a 3.9 GPA and has been
active in East Carolina's Honor's
Organization and SABRE Leader-
ship organization a well as serving
as a Special Olympics track coach
and organizing drives for needy
Three awards will
be presented at the
event as well as the
honoring of the
PCS Phosphate
All-Academic
Team.
Carriage House Apartments
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club,
close to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2
bedroom Jownhouses over GOO e. ft 1 12 baths,
' � private patios, dishwashers, all electric, water �
furnished, swimming pool, volleyball court, cable TV
available and on site laundry, no pete)
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further Information.
families.
Also honored at the Breakfast
of Champions is the recipient of the
Pat Draughon Postgraduate Schol-
arship. David Crumbie, a member
of the Liberty Bowl Champion Pi-
rates, is this year's winner. A senior
biochemistry major from Tallahas-
see, Fla Crumbie plans to attend
medical school.
New to this year's agenda is the
awarding of the newly formed
Walter and Marie William's "Spirit
of the East" post eligibility schol-
arship. This year's scholarship will
be awarded to senior offensive line-
man Kevin Williams of Pink Hill,
N.C. and senior women's tennis
player. Chelsea Earnhardt of Inde-
pendence, Va.
For the sixth year, the PCS
Phosphate All-Academic Team will
be recognized. Members of the
1996 represent their respective
sports by having the highest cumu-
lative grade point average. The
1996 team includes: Justine
Allpress (women's basketball).
Gwynn Baber (volleyball), Robert
Campbell (men's track), Chelsea
Earnhardt (women's tennis), Lisa
Frederick (women's swimming),
Dan Gonzales (football), Erik Grif-
fin (men's swimming), Kris Hutton
(men's tennis), Megan McGruder
(women's track), Kevin Miller (golf).
Andrew Mills (men's soccer), Tracy
Podratsky (softball), Rod Reeves
(men's cross country), Cindy
Szymanski (women's cross coun-
try). Lance Tigyer (baseball) and
Kristin Tomesetti (women's soccer).
The Breakfast of Champions
will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday
at the Greenville Country Club.
Tickets for the event are $10 and
can be purchased by calling the
ECU Educational Foundation at
919-328-4540.
El II5 tom-IIZ Wf K:f IZt Wf fef 5 WIV.IIZ r4i
I HtPC'S WHAT'S 1
S at Mendenhall Student Center aft
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT
RECOLLECTIONS:
B Lumbee Heritage s
25 in the Mendenhall Gallery k
:
m
���
m
Co-sponsored by the ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee and the
East Carolina Native American Organization
N
o
w
H
O
vv
N
HEAT
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
March 29-31
8 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU I.D. card. One guest per I.D.
���
m
m

is
g FREE Country Line Dance Lessons
Thursday nights at 8 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Centerot Activity
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m-11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m1 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. a
SMI :H5 Mf till 5 Wmill Ml fc:H5 M! tS
Summer Sessions
Session I, May 21 June 20
Session n, June 25-Jufy 26
UNC Wilmington .
601 South College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
d

&
For more information,
call (910) 350-7181 or
(800)589-2829.
&
&
UNCW
rc
ft
r"
Be sure to
check out our
W3 home page ate
http:www.uncwU.edu
Z.
�' m





13
Thursday, March 28,1996
The East Carolinian
Scenes
from last
year's
sarrimage
21st Century g
1
Clothing for men and & women
Beside 5 St. Brewery Downtown Greenville
Photos by PATRICK IRELAN
Above, members of the 1995 ECU football team scrim-
mage each other at the annual PurpleGold Pigskin
Pigout. The Purple offense defeated the Gold defense last
year; fans are excited to see who wins this year's compe-
tition. Left, although enemies on the field, players still
know they are all teammates by showing sportsmanship
after the game.
Carver Music
Top quality merchandise at low prices with
great service
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2800 E. 10th St.
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Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Slain Glass
Mon. -Fri. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
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$7 Everytime
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SUED OUT!
A DATE WITH QUASIMODO!


� �

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Contestants
Winners Receive
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X
M,
X
� �
X
X
X
X
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Tuesday, April 2,1996
8:00 PM-10:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee.
Be Chosen Monday, April 1st in the MSC Multi-Purpose Room - 6:00 - 8:00 PM.
Limo Ride, Dinner at Outback, & Tickets to The Hunchback of Notre Dame on April 3,1996!
jl I ��mi ��II.MIlin I il i,liliBiBI!l!liilgffB!P�





'3p-
The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 28,1996
14
FOOTBALL frompage
11
CHAMPS frompage 11
last season, rushing for 127 yards on
35 carries and catching eight passes
for 65 yards. His high point was a 16
carry, 63-yard performance in the sea-
son finale against Memphis.
Many fans will remember Scott
Harley's record-setting performance
against Temple whtn starter Jerris
McPhail was out with an arm injury.
In his first start, Harley netted 175
yards on the ground, setting ECU
freshman single-game records for
yards and carries (38). He got one TD
against the Owls, and was second on
the team in rushing with 263 yards.
Harley also set records for Pirate run-
ning backs in the weight room. He
squats 650 pounds and cleans 305.
The native of Neptune, NJ also runs a
4.6 40-yard dash.
Raymond Mabry, out of West Cra-
ven high school, is another running
back who gives depth to the Pirates'
roster. Mabry saw action in five games
last year, carrying the ball nine times
for 33 yards.
These three ball carriers will com-
pete for the starting position this fall.
"At the end of our five years,
we're all going to be good, but one of
us is going to be very good because
he will have competed against the
other two Jones said.
On defense, keep an eye on safety
E.J. Gunthrope, linebacker Matt
Semenza, defensive tackles Tomha
McMillan and Mondell Corbett, and
nose guard Terrell Williams. Also at
safety, redshirt freshmen Deeone
McKeithan and Tavares Taylor should
see action.
All of the young players on the
team, just like the older ones, realize
the current conference situation. They
know that every conference is afraid
of ECU, but they want to do their part
to insure the program's success.
"ECU is a sleeper team Tinnen
said. "You can't wake the gentle gi-
ant. When you wake the giant, he
comes out to play. People don't want
us in a conference because of the
simple fact that they're scared of us
To see why the nation is scared
of the Pirates, come out and view
them in action this weekend.
In Men's Purple, the all-campus
final was captured by the Independent
winners, the "UKB Posse" 7449 over
the Fraternity winners of "Pi Kappa
Phi B Jay Corby dazzled the fans
with his waterbug quickness, penetra-
tion and passing by consistently feed-
ing teammates Tom Corby, Jim
Sawicki and Vinnie Brown for easy
baskets.
Ryan Wickline and Justin Conrad
lead the offense for "Pi Kappa Phi B"
who reached the all-campus game in
the most exciting fashion.
V
In the Fraternity Purple final,
with the score tied and only seconds
remaining, Patrick Doherty drained
a runner from just inside the half-
court line to cap off a mad celebra-
tion and escape with a 35-32 win over
"Sigma Phi Epsilon B
The men of "UKB" worked their
way to the finals through a 64-team
bracket and earned their path with a
65-56 win over "Ah! Pure Butter
Baby" in the Independent Purple title
game despite strong games from Mike
Edgerton, Bill Seavey and Chris
Stevenson.
The Residence Hall finals ended
in surprising fashion as "Going Down
Swinging" unveiled a relentless fast
break attack behind Derek Atwood.
David Edgerton and Jason Hicks to
pound the "Garrett Fighting Pirates"
in the title tilt.
The "Tantalizing Thompsons"
won Men's Blue 38-15 over "Sigma
Phi Epsilon D" bthind the smooth
moves of Andrew Minigutti and the
defensive efforts of Mike Franklin. The
"Thompsons" received their toughest
test in the Blue Independent finals as
they weathered the full-court trapping
pressure of the "Cavemen" to escape
with a 36-33 win. Daniel Finn's shoot-
ing and the defense of Brian "The
Human Eraser" Wilkins lead the
"Cavemen" attack.
In Women's Gold, Candy Foust
had a driving shot with seconds re-
maining to cap a furious rally as the
"Goof Troop" pulled off a 36-35 win
over "CSC" in the final game. Allison
Kemp and Zina "Remote Control"
Briley lead the "Troop" while Hope
Murray, Tomeika Morris and Tiffany
Thompson fueled the offense for
"CSC
The Sorority final also came
down to the final minutes as Andrea
Luther, Marcie Shelton and Megan
Hopkins made the plays down the
stretch to carry "Alpha Xi Delta" to a
32-26 victory over "Alpha Delta Pi"
before a large crowd. Ashley Danner
and Nicole Willi'ord lead the offense
and defense respectively for "Alpha
Delta Pi
A summer 5-on-5 Basketball
league will be offered during the first
summer session and 3-on-3 will be
offered in the second session for fac-
ulty, staff, and enrolled students.
For further information concern-
ing the Intramural Sports Program,
please contact David Gaskins or
Paulette Evans at Recreational Ser-
vices at 328-6387.
CjrOLF from page 11
practice, the Pirates bounced back
with a sixth place finish out of a field
of 20 teams up in Williamsburg, Va.
The Furman Intercollegiate Tour-
nament proved to be another difficult
task for the Pirates as they rolled up
a 19th place finish in big field of
teams. Next up for the Pirates is a
weekend tournament in Lexington,
Ky. at the University of Kentucky.
"This tournament is very crucial
for us because it is the last tourna-
ment before the Conference Tourna-
ment in two weeks Williams said.
"We are counting on continued con-
sistent, good play from Josh and Brent
Lately, Kevin Miller, a sophomore, has
really stepped up his game in tourna-
ment play
"We need someone to rise to the
challenge and cover the number four
spot because four scores are ac-
counted for a team in tournament
play. Freshman, Daniel Griffis, has
that ability to be this guy and we are
going to need him and other young
guys to play tough as the season
moves on
The CAA Conference Tourna-
ment is being held down in Goldsboro,
N.C. this year. Newcomer to the con-
ference, VCU. is the early favorite to
win it all in only their first year in the
CAA.
"VCU has a strong team Will-
iams said. "We would really have to
play at the next level to knock off
these guys. But. whatever happens 1
just hope we keep a positive outlook
for the tournaments following the
CAA. If we can finish strong this sea-
son, it should set the stage for next
season and all the talented new faces
Interested in
writing
sports? Come
by TEC and
apply.





�Jki

115
Thursday, March 28,1996
The East Carolinian
Help
wanted
RINGGOLD TOW LRS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AZALEA GARDENS
: Clean and Quielone bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 a month
6m"onth lease .
'also university apartments
go iqqj pa .t Mh Mrprt.
.� � ��' Mea E-GU
�i CU'Blr �� � .
' -O" sue i .wHir i . ;
"SpeoaiStudent 1 MvC-V ;
. MOBIL r HOKi RL'N 1ALS .
I 1 O' 1orrvn vV ii.i'T
Pitt Property Management
758-1921
108a Brownlea Dr.
IANGSTON PAKKZ BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 btocKs
from campus. New ownership $375 deposit,
$375month
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS I
BEDROOM, $275. on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bedroom.
on-site laundry
FREE RENT 12 OFF MARCH
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
ranqe refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios In most units, laurrfry facili-
ty sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus Free water, sewer cable
WYNDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor. I�a�d5
blocks from campus Free rent 10 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockside 3 and 2 bedrooms. 2 baths 4 car
Icarport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room balcony, exterior storage room noth-
ing in the area compares Reasonably
Priced!
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED! FOUR
bedroom house; Clean. Nice: $125 a
month14 utilities; Male or Female;
Available Beginning of May; Call 7583067
and ask for Jody
CAPTAINS QUARTERS APART-
MENTS. BIG enough for two. New car-
petingflooring; dishwasher, free cable,
walking distance to campus. $310month.
Call 355-8731 ask about unit 11.
CONSIDERATE NC STATE INTERN
needs summer sub-lease in Greenville area.
Flexible on rent price. Non-smoking female
roommates only. No drugs. Call 919-512-
7514. Will reimburse long distance
charges.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT TO sub-
lease for the summer. Close to c-jnpus.
$450 a month. Call Chad or Matt at 830-
5194
- ROOMMATE NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker to share rent for sum-
mer months. $167.50 12 utilities & 1
2 phone. Call April 752-7599
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
N�J CASHm
We Ray CDS,
Cassettes jmi Lp �
Well pay �p to $5 eJ� for
CD
� t)
II I I
j Enjoy the Outdoor?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
S5.77HR Mileage
Musi Be
Honest. Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Fuil-Tinie Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCS1
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
GreenviUe, Kinston. New Bern
f'jN Help
" � wanted
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS co-
ordinator of environmental sales, lnterna
tional marketing company expanding to
Greenville seeking part-time team orient-
ed individuals. Good pay. Call for an ap-
pointment 321-6250.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
looking for self motivated individuals wish-
ing to gain valuable work experience with
a rapidly growing company. Ideal appli
cant would be energetic, efficient, willing
to learn, and have excellent communica-
tion skills. We are currently taking appli
cations for part-time telephone collectors
from the hours of Sam until 9pm Monday
thru Friday and Saturday morning from
8am until 12pm. If interested please con-
tact Brian Franey at 757-2127.
T�
Greek
Personals
TIRED OF NOT HAVING a parking
space. Sublease apartment in Ringgold
Towers. Male or Female. $225.00 a month.
Downtown, on campus, and furnished.
Great for Summer School. Call 758-0794
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE. TOTAL
rent $500 May thru August. Four blocks
from campus. Own bedroom, full bath, m
d. Water, cable included. Call Nelson 758-
4325
3 VERY RARE OPPORTUNITIES for
rent. One two bedroom 112 bath above
BW3s. For $500.00 a month - One three
bedroom 2 12 bath above BW3s for
$775.00 a month. One 2 bedroom one
bath above Percolator Coffeehouse for
$450.00 a month. Water, sewer included
in Rent Contact Yvonne M-F9-5 @ 758-
2616
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments. Du-
plexes, and Townhouses for rent. Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756-6209
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP TO share
2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. $225 plus 12
utilities. Call 757-1522
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP TO share
large furnished 3 bedroom house May-Au-
gusL 1 block from campus, completely ren-
ovated, washerdryer available. $222 a
month. Call 757-9310.
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed-
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who
is outgoing, sociable, picks up after them-
selves, gets along wothers. Please call
Ashley at 757-2891. Need someone start-
ing in mid April or early May.
SUMMER SUBLEASE! EFFICIENCY
APARTMENT available in Ringgold Tow-
ers Rent $275 per month. Furnished and
available May 1st. Call 551-3176 for more
info.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR THREE
bedroom house 13 utilities, 13 rent Bus
stop at corner. Call 752-6886 any time
after 6
DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed
room. 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling
fans, appliances and washerdryer hook-
ups. $390 Call 752-0277
DISCOUNT ATTRACTIVE TOWN
HOUSE AT Twin Oaks. Available for Sum-
mer School. $590 month through July.
Lease and Deposit required. 3 Bedrooms,
2 12 Baths, Pool, Patio, Fireplace. No
pets. Call 752-2851. Thanks.
MALEFEMALE TO SHARE 3BR house.
$243month plus 13 bills. Call Scott
Mueller at 830-2143 or 714-3358. Avail-
able immediately.
NEED AN APARTMENT FOR the sum
mer? Subleasers wanted for Wilson Acres,
3 bedroom. May-July 31. 754-2871
ROOMMATE NEEDED STARTING
APRIL 04. Great location 1 block from
campus. $185 per month plus utilities.
758-9392
� mini�ii .Jwi ���� �J II, � i II�����Jl
RESPONSIBLE, CONSIDERATE FE-
MALE TO share a 2 bdrm. 1 12 bath
Apartment Pinebrook $190.00 plus 12
utilities for August non-smoking serious
student Please call 328-7570
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS. PRE-
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chi-
co's and Downtown. Townhouses with 2
bedrooms, 1 12 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washerdryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP TO share
2 bedroom apt in Twin Oaks. 12 rent,
12 utilities. Call 752-7352 after 7pm Ask
for John.
HUGE KILLER PHAT HOUSE. Need a
place to crash for the summer? Check out
this five bedroom, already furnished. One
block from campus, three blocks from
downtown, with a chillin front porch and
plenty of parking. CALL NOW! 758-FOOT
AFFORDABLE, NICE ROOM AVAIL-
ABLE now. Looking for one roommate
to share 6 month or longer lease. Great
location near The Plaza. With heat air
and cable included. ECU bus line access.
$197 a month, plus phone & utilities. Call
Phil today 321-2813
TWO CRANKSETS FOR SALE great
condition Shimano "95 model with bot-
tom brackets. $60 negotiable. Also, three
pairs of skis for sale. Call 413-0513
PAIR OF ACOUSTIC LINEAR Systems
DJP Model 520 speakers. Brand new! Liq-
uid cooled 12- 3-way Awesome speakers
200 watts each. Must sell! $320.00 Retail
$750.00. Ask for David 413-0565 OBO
KING WATERBED MATTRESSES
WITH individual tubes - 3 years old - ex-
cellent condition. Use regular sheets. Fits
any King Bed or frame. 355-2574
CANNONDALE M800 1994 MODEL
many extras. Must sell immediately. $500
O.B.O. Call 758-2147. Ask for Chris after
6 or leave message earlier.
FREE TO GOOD HOME six month old
kitten. Very special little lady. Litter
trained, indoor pet Please call nights or
weekends 975-1980
A MATCHING SET OF chair, couch,
loveseat plus gray recliner all in good
shape all for $100. Call 758-7700 ask for
Joe
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up
to $2.000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53624
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dar ;rs for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758-0896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give
us a call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill
NC 919-747-7686
SOLOFLEX WITH ALL ATTACH-
MENTS. $750 or best offer. 830-2143 or
714-3358.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL and need
somewhere to stay? Sub-lease an efficiency
for $275 a month at Ringgold Towers. No
furniture needed and move May 1st Call
413-0629
GRADUATE FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share a three bedroom apt
in Twin Oaks. Non-smoker and Studious.
Please call 830-9587 and ask for Patricia
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 month. Call 355-1313
to make an appointment Managed by
Remco East Inc
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker, female or male. Twin
Oaks Apartment $210 per month. Silver
Bus Line. 2 rooms available. Contact Dave
at 754-2866
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM LIKE NEW
WITH LOCK $600.00 O.B.O. CALL 328-
1708. GREEN TO PURPLE DARK FADE
ONLY RIDDEN TWICE.
MOUNTAIN BIKE S100, WHITE and
green, good condition. Call Aimee at 753-
6649 anytime after 6pm
CANNONDALE DELTA V600 WITH
front suspension, onza bar ends, Shmano
STX special edition components and clip-
iess pedals with cleats; Trek seat bag and
cyclocomputer. $750. Rhode Gear Spare
tire bike shuttle $55. 6'4" Rusty and Lin-
den Surfboards good condition $200 each.
Reef Surf rack $75. 757-9337
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM, NEW Manitou
shock, bar ends, toe clips, bottle cage.
Cannondale seat post bag U-lock. magic
tires. Only $450 Will go very Fast Call
Mike 752-9850
SONY CDX-65 10-DISC changer with
remote control for car. Great system! Only
$250.00. Must sell! 413-0565. Ask for Da-
vid won't last long!
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK summer
in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring Lifeguards and
Beach Concession Workers. Earn Good
Money while working on the Beach $$
Salary plus bonuses $$ Discounted
Housing To apply or for further infor-
mation, callfax North Myrtle Beach Life-
guards at 803-272-4170.
ATTENTION! KEITH K1MBLE
EARNED $15,284 last Summer working
80hrswk last summer. If you'd like to
hear how call 1-800-685-7194 X4681 M-F
between 9-7 for more info, leave message.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Cali 1-800-
2514000 ext 1576
HURRY � TAN while you work. Spring
Summertime Job 12 miles from Greenville.
Flexible Hours. 21 or older. Call for Inter-
view 975-2265, Day. 830-9280, Night
$?.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 800-662-2122
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN
UP TO $3.000-$6.000 PER MONTH.
ROOM AND BOARD! TRANSPORTA-
TION" MALE OR FEMALE. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NECESSARY. CALL(206)971-3510
EXT A53623
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached CreenviHe. We are looking
for Health Conscious, Neath Dressed. Ca-
reer Oriented Individuals to fill Part and
Full Time Positions. Great Pay 758-8390
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206)97 l-3570exU53624
JOANNA SAWYER. YOU HAVE DONE
IT AGAINyou stole our hearts and won
another Bikini Contest. You looked more
beautiful than ever! Thank-you once again
Ms. "Bikini" Pi Lam. Love, the Brothers
of Pi Lambda Phi.
THE BROTHERS OF LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA thank the sisters of Sigma Sigma
Sigma for the social on Thursday we hope
you all had a great time
SIGMA CONGRATULATES OUR 1996
Rho Chi's. You all will do a great job! Love.
Your Sigma Sisters
KAPPA ALPHA - thanks so much for the
social Thursday night! We all had a great
time! Love, AZD
PI DELTA PLEDGES: YOU know your
scavenger hunt will be fun, but what you
will find remains a mystery! Love, the Sis-
ters.
KAPPA S1G � thanks for a wonderful time
at the cookout Friday night Hope to hang
out again soon! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi.
PART TIME SALES HELP needed. Seek
ing individuals with neat appearance and
a positive attitude. Training provided. Full
Time Advancement Potential. Call 321-
6727 9am-5pm for an appointment
fi
CHI OMEGA - We had a great time with
you all during our "quad weekend" Till
next time Tri Sigma
GIRLS, THIS WEEKEND WAS so much
fun. 1 hope we all got a lot out of it. Never
forget the wooden fish! Love, your sisters
of Alpha Phi
DELTA SIG, THF TUNNEL party rocked
on! You guys did a great job! Love the
Alpha Phi's.
DELTA ZETA - Tuesday night was great!
We look forward to next time! Love, Tri
Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW Of
ficers of Delta Zeta! President- Jessica
Theobold: Vice President (Rush)- Jenne
Sevilla: Vice President (NMED)- Stacey Ro-
demer Recording Secretary- Amy Volatile.
Corresponding Secretary- Sue Clark:
Treasurer- Lisa Waterf ield: House Manag-
er- Lucinda Autry
Services
Offered
FUN SUMMER JOBS! iNCLUDES pool
tennis and golf privileges! Lifeguards, wait-
staff, food service, cashiers and gate at-
tendants. The Village Beach and Tennis
Club. Nags Head. (919) 480-2222
THE KINSTON INDIANS ARE looking
for summer help. Beginning of April
through the end of August Waitresses,
Vendors & Concession stand workers
needed. If interested contact John or Dave
at 1-800-334-5467.
MACINTOSH LC COLOR MONITOR
KEYBOARD 452 $240.00 OBO. Must
sell! 413-0565 Ask for David.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE two
bedroom Townhouse (Georgetown) from
March until June. $260month plus half
utilitiesphone. 754-2465
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
apartment Beginning in August Looking
for 1 or 2 neat and responsible females.
Call Jennifer at 754-2670
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; Female
roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom, 2
bath house. $160 rent 13 utilities. Fun
easy-going, studious. Call 757-1467
SINGLE BEDROOM FOR IMMEDIATE
rent. $178 per mo. Share 13 utilities with
two other roommates in house. Washer,
Dryer available on premises. Near campus.
Call for interview 758-2147. Leave mes-
sage for Chris or Bill anytime
IfflTTteip
" H wanted
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED TO teach summer camps in NC
& SC. Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free
weekends! College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job, CALL ES-
PRIT! CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-3223
RECREATIONAL SERVICES IS LOOK-
ING for a photographer who will be re-
sponsible for shooting, developing and
printing candid and group sport and re-
creational photographs. Utilization of vid-
eo camcorder required. 35mm slide pho-
tography desired. Special skills include
black and white fiim developing and print-
ing. A fully equipped dark room is provid-
ed.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week
youth recreationalsports campour 42nd
season! Over 25 activities, including wa-
ter ski, heated pool, tennis, Go-karts,
artCool Mountain Climate, EXCEL-
LENT pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For
applicationbrochure: 704-692-6239 or
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF,
HOUSEKEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEAD-
ERS, FITNESS COUNSELORS, AND
MORE. CALL RESORT EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES 1-206-971-3600 EXT R53622.
LOOKING FOR OUTGOING PERSONS
to start work right away! Travel and get
paid for it Become a C.A.T. Rep. call Da-
vid at 413-0565
HIRING FOR SUMMER SEASON! The
Reef Restaurant & Bar � Atlantic Beach,
NC. All positions! Including Bartenders,
Waitstaff & Doorpersons. Great working
conditions, with flexible hours. Part-time
andor full-time. On the Atlantic Beach
Causeway 919-726-3500
COMPUTER WOES!?! WONDER WHY
you never seem to have enough memory?
Wish your computer would behave? Need
help with buying a new computer, upgrad-
ing, or installing new hardware or soft-
ware? I solve computer problems. Cali me
at 355-8041, ask for Matt or e-mail me at
bcheatle@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53625
WANT TO BE ON THE WEB? I'll design
your very own home page for you. Basic
page, including your picture, resume, short
voice clip, general information -just $15.
Custom artwork and design also available
(for example see: www.ecu.edu-bchea-
tlematthtml). Limited to ECU Faculty.
Staff and students only. Call Matt at 355-
8041 or e-mail: bchea-
tle@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu.
BETA TAU'S WOULD LIKE to thank the
Beta Up's for a great Surprise social. We
don't remember a thing! Libos!
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA XI DELTA
would like to thank Sigma Pi and the Beta
Chi's for the great party Friday night! It
was a blast!
PI DELTA: CONGRATS TO the Softball
team on your win last Monday! Keep up
the good work.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA THANKS every
one who supported the blood drive on
Monday.
Research Information
Larsest Library of information � Us.
6 all subjects
Order Catalog Today with
VisaMastercard or CO
800-351-0222
10-477-3226
Or n�h $2 to ���� I�?
11 m KM� v�. �2-A Lot yl��. CA �I.
I

Personals
QUASIMODO: You definitely ring my
bellsEsmerelda, the gypsy
PROFESSIONAL SWM, 44, ISO a
charming young woman, 18-25, to be an
adventurous and imaginative springtime
playmate. Please respond, with photo, to
FOB 4144, CreenviHe, 27836-2144
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA GAMMA
RHO, my sorors and my best friends for
winning first place in the Spring 96 Step
Show Competition. We deserve it Love
Divinity
ESMERELDA: I've got a HUNCH that we
could be good together. Get BACK to me-
Quasimodo
Announcement
LINVILLE GORGE: TEST your climbing
skills and take a trip April 12-14 to Lin-
ville Gorge for a weekend of arm-burning,
finger-pumping fun. Register in 204 Chris-
tenbury by April 4. For more information
call Recreational Services at 326387
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL be
having a meeting Thursday, March 28 at
5:00pm in Brewster C room 305. We will
be discussing the Walter B. Jones, Jr. visit
along with many other issues. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: IS THERE a
TAG on your record that will prevent you
from registering for classes? Effective im-
mediately you can use the ECU home page
on the World Wide Web to search your
registration records for hold tags, i.e park-
ing fines, overdue book fines, etc that
can prevent you from registering for cours-
es. You can do this search on computers
in many campus student computer labo-
ratories. Remember, any hold tags on your
record will prevent registration. Please re-
move those tags before attempting to reg-
ister for classes.
" DO YOU NEED M
WE WILL PAY YOU.
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USF.D
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
Skto& 10-12 130 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
KS SJ&Ttot in front of wachovia downtown, dnve
to back door & ring buzzer
TV D F N 1 S W A P S H O P
Greek
Personals
ALPHA DELTA PI WOULD like to thank
all girls who attended the Garden Party
last Thursday.
PI LAMBDA PHI, OUR birthday has
come and gone. We are now 101, but don't
worry there are more memories to come.
Pi Urn weekend was great but now we
wait for 102!
TKE & SIGMA PI - We had lots of fun
with you guys last weekend. Thanks for
everything. Love, The Sigmas
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL pres-
ent U S. Congressman Walter B. Jones, Jr.
as speaker on April 1.1996 at 4:30 pm in
Jenkins Art Auditorium, Room 1220 on
the campus of East Carolina University.
ENJOY SINGING? UNIVERSITY CHOR-
ALE MUSIC 1635 12:00 M, W. F. ECU
School of Music. NO AUDITION RE-
QUIRED
WORKSHOP: CAREER RESOURCES
ON the INTERNET, Jeff Henley, Assistant
Director of Career Services, will guide you
through a job search on the Internet and
demonstrate the use of the Career Serv-
ices homepage in making this process eas-
ier The workshop will be hands-on, Mon.
April 1 and Wed. April 17 3:00-5:00pm.
Please sign up in advance at Career Serv-
ices to reserve a space in the computer
lab, Austin 206. Seating is limited to 20
people.
RESUME WRITING WORKSHOP: THE
CAREER Services Staff will hold work-
shops on developing a professional resume
and cover letter on Wed. April 3 at 4:00
and Thur April 11 at 3:00. Tips on writing
scannable resumes will be included. Come
to the Career Services Building. 701 E.
Fifth St
i
k iHPilMWWPl





Title
The East Carolinian, March 28, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 28, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2805
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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