The East Carolinian, March 26, 1996






TUE&t?
March 26,1996
Vol 71, No. 48
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
Around the State
)URHAM,N.C.(AP)-A22-
month-old hoy suffered fatal in-
juries in a car accident Sunday,
minutes after being removed
from his child safety seat.
At the moment of impact.
Chuck C. Allen was sitting in the
lap of his mother, Deidre Allen,
in the passenger's seat of a 1989
Ford Aerostar van driven by his
grandmother. Mother and son
were both buckled in with the
mother's seat belt.
The boy apparently was
crushed between the dashboard
and his mother. The force of the
collision caused Deidre Allen's
knees to dent the metal under-
side of the van's dashboard.
RALEIGH (AP)-Taxpayers
who have shelled out $15 million
for an industry-airport project
that is still on the drawing board
should be patient, Gov. Jim Hunt
said.
In the five years since plans
hr the Global TransPark were an-
nounced, the authority formed to
develop it has spent $15 million
in public money, but has little to
show for it.
The TransPark is supposed
to be a 21st-century manufactur-
ing and transportation hub built
around Kinston Regional Jetport
that would give North Carolina
a new industrial magnet. The idea
is to build a complex where cargo
planes could dock next to manu-
facturing plants or warehouses to
unload raw materials and load
finished goods.
Around the Country
LAURENS, S.C. (AP) - A
man drove a van through the
front windows of a new store that
sells Confederate and Ku Klux
Klan paraphernalia, and it was no
accident, police said.
David Prichard Hunter, who
is white, was charged with mali-
cious damage to property and
held in the Laurens city jail.
NKW YORK (APM- Brown
& Williamson tobacco executives
considered buying a nicotine
patch maker, but decided against
it after one warned the company
would be seen as "simply in the
nicotine delivery business "60
Minutes" reported.
The CBS news show said
Sunday that unidentified execu-
tives wanted H&W to buy a patch
company so it could profit from
its customers' attempts to quit
smoking.
Around the World
LONDON (AP) - Con-
founding expectations that it
would order millions of cattle
slaughtered, the British gov-
ernment said Monday that no
new action was required to con-
tain the risks of the deadly mad
cow disease.
Government officials met
with scientific advisers Monday
to agree on new guidelines on
the risks to humans from the
brain disease, which broke out
2MBOIIg British herds 10 years
�go.
Candidates seek SGA presidency
Elections will be
held Wednesday
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) is holding their annual
elections for the new executive board
Wednesday. There are two persons
running for the student body presi-
dency.
Angie Nrx and John Lynch are the
candidates this year
Nix began her college career as
freshman class president and then fol-
lowed as sophomore class president,
taking part in the Rules and Judiciary
Committee and the Student Welfare
Committee of SGA, Other organiza-
tions that she is affiliated with include
the Accounting Society, American
Chemical Society, Order of Omega and
Alpha Phi sorority. She has been jun-
ior Panhellenic president and
Panhellenic executive treasurer. She
also served as an orientation advisor.
"As treasurer this year, I reached
out to many organizations with a fund-
ing packet that I wrote, and learned
about many student concerns Nix
said, "I have successfully worked with
administration and students to get
things done. I want to keep our edu-
cation affordable and improve student
life.
"Next year, I believe we need to
improve the campus parking prob-
lems, extend the library and computer
lab hours, have a book barter system
and even provide a tax service, free
of charge, to students. I hope to im-
prove public relations and increase
participation with SGA
Currently, Nix is a junior major-
ing in accounting. She is the SGA ex-
ecutive treasurer, a member of the
hoard of trustees for the Student
Union and a member of the Home-
coming Steering Committee.
Lynch has been an executive
board member of the ECU Gospel
Choir for two years and is a partici-
pant of the Chancellor's Minority
Leadership Scholarship Program. In
addition, he was a SGA hall represen-
tative for two years and took rjart in
the Aycock Hall Council for one year,
Currently, Lynch is a junior ma-
joring in computer science. He is the
vice president of Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality (ABLE) and
a chairperson for the Student Union
Lecture Committee,
He has also sat in on the student
advisory council, Faculty Senate Cur-
riculum Committee and a search com-
mittee with the assistant director of
public safety and SGA,
Lynch said he has certain goals
and reasons for running for SCA presi-
dent.
"I feel I've done a lot for the uni-
versity and have the experience
Lynch said. "The biggest thing I've
tried to know is every angle of the
campus. There is a lot of diversity and
1 want to make SCA known and less
intimidating to everyone. There are a
lot of smaller organizations that SGA
does not play a part in, and 1 want
everyone to have the opportunity for
funding, I'm here for the students
Tune in to the presidential debate
at 8 p.m. on WZMB, tonight.
Other candidates running for of-
fice are; Eric Rivenbark for vice presi-
dent, Jonathan Phillips for treasurer
and Julie Thompson versus Miles
Layton for secretary.
Students with valid student IDs
can vote at various sites across cam-
pus such as Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter and the Wright Place.
Grass
dancing
w '? ' "
A Native American
dancer in full costume
performed a grass
dance at Saturday's
Pow-Wow. The event
was sponsored by the
East Carolina Native
American Organization
(ECNAO) and drew
tribes from across the
US.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
B-Glad celebrates first
annual pride festival
Marguerite Benjamin
AaaMant Newa Editor
In order to raise awareness and promote student fel-
lowship, ECU's organization of Hisexuals, Cays, Lesbians
and Allies for Diversity (li-CLAD) has announced the cel-
ebration of their first annual Pride Week.
March 25-29 has been designated as a week of infor-
mation, conversation and communication on campus in
an effort to open the minds of the people in our commu-
nity, said Rich Elkins, male co-chair of ECU's B-CI.AD
chapter.
"Other universities have had this sort of thing in the
past Elkins said, adding that the celebration varies from
place to place, depending on the level of involvement o(
btudents. "This will be our first, so we're not doing as
much as other universities
Elkins said N. C. State University had Candace
Cingrich, the much talked- about sister of Newt Gingrich,
to speak at their last Pride Week celebration.
"We don't have any well-known speakers this year, but
hopefully it (our event) will grow Elkins said.
Monday was set aside as a day for speakers bureaus to
visit the residence halls. The organization has a series of
events planned for the remainder of the week.
Today, there will be an information table set up beside
the student stores from 11 a,m. to 1 p.m. Students will be
able to pick up flyers with more information about the week
and the group.
"There will also be a display table of symbols with rain-
bow flags, buttons and magazines, just as another way of
making people aware Elkins said. The symbols on display
will not be for sale.
On Wednesday, the campus will receive a visit from
Down East Pride (DEP), whom students may remember from
the DEP festival back in September. The group will be talk-
ing about their voter registration campaign.
H-C1.AD encourages everyone to wear blue jeans on
Thursday to support equal rights and protection for all people
See B-GLAD page 4
SGA presidential candidates
Angle Nix
junior
accounting
SGA executive
treasurer
member of the board
of trustees for the
Student Union
member of the
Homecoming Steering
Committee
Alpha Phi Sorority
Photo Courtesy of the candidate!
John Lynch
junior
computer science
vice president of Allied
Blacks for Leadership
and Equality (ABLE)
chairperson for
Student Union Lecture
Committee
participant in
Chancellor's Minority
Leadership
Scholarship Program
Trustees announce
new professorship
Shared Visions
fund-raising
campaign
exceeds goal
David Durham
Staff Wrrtar
The announcements of the
Shared Visions fund-raising campaign
exceeding its goal by $15 5 million
and of the establishment of the Rob-
ert L. "Roddy" Jones Distinguished
Professorship stood out among the
usual business of the ECU Board of
Trustees meeting last Friday at 10 am.
in the great room of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center (MSC).
Robert A. Ward, chair of the ECU
Board of Trustees and co-chair of the
Shared Visions campaign, announced
that the campaign raised $65.5 mil-
lion, 30 percent more than its origi-
nal goal of $50 million.
James Lanier, vice chancellor for
institutional advancement, said this
was the tirst campaign that involved
all three of the university's fund-rais-
ing foundation.
According to information distrib-
uted at the meeting, the ECU founda-
tion raised $23 million, the medical
foundation raised $24.5 million and
the Pirate Club raised $18 million.
"Nine point five million dollar
of (the money raised by the Pirate
Club) is for renovation of the Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium Lanier aid.
The remaining funds were used
for the Pirate Club and for port
scholarships, he said.
Lanier said most of the money
raised by the medical foundation is
being used for endowment and it
invested so that the interest can be
used for scholarships, professorship
or specific program.
Over half of the $23 million
raited by the ECU foundation i also
being used for endowments, Lanier
said.
"We added over 310 new merit
scholarships, and we increased the
size of over 200 scholarships he said.
Lanier said the goal is to have
25 major merit scholarship awarded
to incoming freshmen.
He said the money is also allow-
ing five distinguished professorships.
"These allow us to recruit some
of the most talented professors nation-
ally andl internationally Lanier said.
He said these professors will teach
both graduate and undergraduate stu-
dents.
Twelve million dollars went to
specific schools and programs, Lanier
See VISION page 4
Shared Visions Campaign
Money Raised
ECU Foundation
$23 million
Educational Foundation
(Pirate Club) -
$18 million
ECU Medical Foundation
$24.5 million
Purposes
Annual Support -
$10.3 million
Campus Development -
$12.2 million
Program Enhancement
$12 million
Faculty Enrichment -
$5.3 million
Student Development -
$14.7 million
Unrestricted -
$10.9 million
irr . (�&�&�,
A hair-raising movie reviewpage D
Softball hits campus mediapage t)
SPORTjj
Baseball wins three out of fivepage I U
0?tec44t
Tuesday
Cloudy
1
High 62
low 48
Wednesday
Rain

High 64
Low 48
r?W t teocA cm
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
uuTEO�fc(;uvM.(;is.K;uj:iu
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
Landscaping
honors university
Debra Byrne
Staff Witter
This summer, ECU's purple and gold spirit will bloom on a landscape which
was completed here in Greenville in February.
The Greenville Community Appearance Commission was given a grant for
$30,000 last year. The commission is responsible for the appearance around
Greenville roads, sidewalks and buffer yards in business districts. Each year the
N.C. Department of Transportation (NCDOT) gives funding to all counties in the
state. The majority of the funding comes from personalized license plates.
Ivan Brown, an ECU alumnus as well as a member of the Community
Appearance Commission and chairman of the Landscape Subcommittee, tried
to get the commission to do a purple and gold landscape for 15 years. Brown has
gotten his wish.
Sixty Catauba Crete Myrtles were planted in February beginning at the city
limits near Pitt Community College and ending almost a half a mile ahead by the
Carolina East Mall. The trees will bloom a dark purple for three months span-
ning from July to September. The trees have an underplant of gold Day Lilies at
their base.
The trees are planted on the median according to NCDOT standards. The
ECU purple and gold landscape will be in bloom for the first home football game.
Architects drew up blueprints for the landscape, and they were approved at
the commission's meeting last October.
Brown's idea for the landscape had to do with his relationship with former
ECU Chancellor, Dr. Leo Jenkins. Brown said he promised Jenkins that one day
in his honor, he would do a purple and gold landscape.
"This has not been easy Brown said. "It has taken 15 years to talk people
into the idea of a purple and gold landscape, which is hard to believe
Brown said Jenkins was a major figure at ECU back when the university
was called East Carolina College. He
petitioned to get ECU state univer-
sity status and to keep ECU's name
separate and not UNC at Greenville.
Brown said Jenkins was respon-
sible for getting ECU's medical school
and was behind the enlargement of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. He retired in
1978 and passed away Jan 14,1989.
Brown said Jenkins is said to have
been the driving force behind ECU.
After he retired it was said that his
replacement had to bleed purple and
sweat gold. This landscape has the
same meaning to all Pirate fans.
"My debt is now paid to Leo just
as I promised it would be done Brown
said.
�"��"��'�"�� The city's landscapes have always
bloomed colors like red and white in the past Brown said that he does not
understand why the city never went with the theme colors of the university
before.
He said this landscape supports the university, and he hopes that this is a
start of better things to come.
"It has taken 15
years to talk
people into the
idea of a purple
and gold
landscape, which
is hard to believe
� Ivan Brown,
ECU alumnus
Celebrity networks in Hendrix
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
James Burke, an author, educa-
tor, television host, writer and pro-
ducer, will speak at 7:30 p.m. tonight
at ECU's Hendrix Theater in
Mendenhall Student Center (MSC).
Faculty, staff and students are ail
invited, along with the entire
Greenville community. This will be a
non-ticketed event, so people are ad-
vised to arrive early.
Burke s speech is called "Journey
Through Knowledge: Riding the Net-
work This topic will discuss the new
world of opportunities made possible
by today's modern technologies. Fol-
lowing the iecture, there will be a re-
ception where Burke will respond to
questions from the audience.
In the U.S Burke has been noted
for many accomplishments. He is the
creator of the PBS and Learning
Channel TV series Connections and
The Day the Universe Changed. He
has had best-seller books out in the
U.S. and abroad. Burke has also re-
cently developed Connections 2,
which is also aired on The Learning
Channel and will soon be released on
CD-ROM.
Burke was born in Northern Ire-
land and received his education at
Jesus College, Oxford. He has taught
at universities in Italy and worked in
the broadcasting industry since the
1960s. Some of this busy scholar's
many interests include the nature of
human perception
and the workings of
the brain. He has
been a curator of
the Renaissance Art
Collection at the
National Gallery of
Art in Washington,
D.C. Burke has also
been involved with
the production of
the major Italian-
English dictionary.
"Burke has
done nearly every-
thing in terms of
art, communica-
tions and technol-
ogy, which makes
him an ideal
speaker for a topic
such as technol-
ogy said Lorraine
Hale-Robinson, a
lecturer in the de-
partment of En-
glish.
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society will
be sponsoring this event. The Honor
Society sponsors one lecture a year
md chose Burke to speak at their
1996 lecture. The members of the
society, along with Keats Sparrow,
president of the society and dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences,
helped to organize the lecture.
"I think this lecture would be
interesting and beneficial to every-
one said junior Chris Grunden.
"With the network and websites hav-
We'll Bay
You to
Try This.
To re-Introduce ECU to
using a Copier & Vending
Card instead of coins, we're
GIVING a free card with
cash value already
added to 100
students!
Photo Courtesy of Royce Carlton Inc.
ing such a big part in our lives today,
it can help out a lot to gain more in-
formation about what will be up-and-
coming in the future
Junior Sonny Burgess agrees.
"I would enjoy going to the lec-
ture so I can learn different ways to
gain interesting information over the
many websites and networks that are
available today he said. "It is such a
big part of our lives, and everyone
should be informed on what will defi-
nitely affect them in the future
With a Copier &
Vending Card, you may put
any amount of cash value on
your card and use It in place
of coins. The card can be
used in snack machines,
most drink
machines and
in card-reading
copiers on
campus.
Clip the coupon below and
bring it to ECU Central
Printing to receive
your free card
with 40� value
already added!
Additional value
can be added at any
campus Cash-to-Card
machine or at ECU Central
Printing.
Student health offers rape counseling
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
In lieu of two rape cases reported the week before
Spring Break, university officials have clarified students'
options if they are victimized by rape.
Jolene Jernigan, the clinical coordinator for ECU's stu-
dent health center, said that in the case of a rape, the stu-
dent health center is prepared to provide care and free coun-
seling.
"Our goal is to take care of the student first Jernigan
said. "We talk to the student and get all the necessary infor-
mation, provide reassurance and make sure they have coun-
seling. Then we track that person and follow up on them
Heather Zophy, a health educator at the student health
center said that the center tests victims for sexually transmit-
ted diseases and pregnancy but refers students wanting HIV
tests to the Pitt county health department
Jernigan said that a student who is raped has many op-
tions regarding prosecution including filing an anonymous
report
"1 feel that the majority of us (student health center staff)
lay the options on the line Jernigan said. 'If a person is

See HEALTH page 3
FREE
CARD -
PLUS, 40
VALUE ADDED!
Offer valid only for first 100
coupons received. Already have a
debitek, ail card, or CoplServ
Vending Card? Bring it in with this
coupon, and we'll add 40c to it's
present value!
Redeem at ECU Central
Printing, across from
Joyner Library;
Monday - Friday: 8 am - 5 pra
328-6468
Crisp Florida
Celery
Bunch
uy One Get One
FREE!
TysonHolly Fams
Whole Fryers
Pound
49
ULTRA LIQUID LAUNDRY
Arm It Hammer
Detergent
50oz.
Buy One Get One
FREE!
�INTHEDELI'HILLSHIREFARM
Brown Sugar
or Honey Ham
Pound
$999
J
Nabisco
Hllla wafers
12-01
8uy One Get One
FREE!
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Kelloggs
Pop Tarts
Buy Two Get One
FREE!
East Carolina University Recreational Services
Drive-InMovie
Drive up or bring a blanket
to the Hill Commuter Lot & catch these Movies!
Thursday, March 28 at 9:00 p.m.
Free food & free movies ! k
UP THERE WITH THE BEST OF THE BEST.
Indiana Jones-the new hero
from the creators of JAWS and STAR WARS.
aftbmLUisr Kvi
Sponsored by Student Union Films Committee.
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387. '
B, . !wniiiiln�0!PIMB�
1





1-
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, March 26,1996
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
State university sanctions controversial policy
David Durham
Staff Writer
flip�9
if
'Pirates
A Commitment To Excellence!
If you would like to be a member of the 1996 East
Carolina University Marching Pirates, register for
MUSC 1705, or if you would like additional
information on the 1996 season, please do not
hesitate to contact Christopher Knighten,
Director of the Marching Pirates, at (919)328-6982
A recent update in Appalachian
State University's (ASU) search and sei-
zure policy allows campus officials to
search students' rooms without a war-
rant or the student's permission.
The policy was updated in January
in response to an increase in drug use,
said Dr. Gregory Blimling, vice chancel-
lor for student development at ASU.
"We've received a number of com-
plaints (about drug use) from students
and RAs on campus Blimling said.
He said he held meetings with
groups of RA.s on campus to explore
the problem.
"The unanimous concern they had
was that we needed to do something to
address the increased use of drugs on
campus Blimling said. "Our freshman
survey also indicated that the students
coming out of high school now were
using drugs more than ever before
He said there was a four percent
increase in the number of students us-
ing drugs in the year before they enter
college.
Blimling said student response to
the policy update has been mixed.
"Some students have been upset
and they feel it's been an infringement
upon their right to privacy he said.
He said other students have re-
sponded positively, and are glad that the
policy was updated. He said re-applica-
tions for campus housing are up 10 per-
cent following the change.
"I would be very concerned if po-
lice were doing random searches or do-
ing them based on flimsy information,
but that is not the case he said.
Blimling said there have been 18
searches of students' rooms since the
change and drugs have been found in all
but one.
"Many people assume that living (on
campus! is the same as living in the pub-
lic, but it is not" Blimling said.
Blimling said that living on campus
is a voluntary action in which students
sign a contract agreeing to live under
certain rules and regulations. He said all
universities in the University of North
Carolina system have the right to carry
out unwarranted searches of students'
See STATE page 4
HEALTH from page 2
adamant not to report the crime then
we go ahead and provide medical care.
If it is even a possibility to prosecute,
we refer the student to the emergency
room (Pitt County Memorial Hospital)
In the emergency room, medical
staff can administer rape kits which
collect e vidence such as hair and semen
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS
Next Meeting:
Thursday, March 28,1996 in GCB 1019 at 5:00pm.
Interview workshop by Jeff Henley, Career Services
Last Meeting for Spring 1996:
Thursday, April 11, 1996 at 5:00pm in Mendenhall
Great Room 1. New Officer Induction Ceremony and award
Outstanding Member 1995-96.
Upcoming Activities:
Golden Key Social and Barefoot on the Mall
We invite you to be a part of a great organization and have
some FUN! If you have any questions, please call Jacqie
Connole at 328-3302.
floo� times, poo foo��, orsat m?te
Wake up a
lass so
Kl
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Why are all these students going to class? Either they all
have an exam or they must have heard that the Prize Patrol will be on
campus Wednesday, March 27, searching for the lucky winners of the
1996 Housing and Dining Sweepstakes. Don't forget! If you are chosen
as one of the seven sweepstakes winners, the Prize Patrol will be looking
for you. If you snooze and are not in class on March 27, you will lose!
You have to be in class to claim your prize. Remember to wake up and
go to class so you can be a winner.
Of course, all residence hall students are winners when they choose
to live on campus!
university taisirj aitf dir,ir, ssrvicss
QttStHKU? $!328-B45fl
samples. According to Detective D. R.
Best of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment rape kits are crucial in collecting
evidence which aids in prosecution.
"I believe the student health cen-
ter employees have the best interest of
students at heart" Best said. "However,
if a student wants to prosecute they
need to go to the hospital
Jernigan confirmed Detective
Best's statement Jernigan said that the
student health center is not open 24
hours a day and they do not have a gy-
necologist on staff full time to adminis-
ter the rape kits.
"We are a family practice which
looks at the whole person, not just one
organ Jernigan said. "We don't put on
casts here either and we have a lot more
students who break their arms than who
are raped. It is appropriate to refer stu-
dents to specialists when needed
According to Jernigan, the student
health center does provide rides to the
hospital and a nurse to accompany stu-
dents. Jernigan said there is also a
victim's assistance fund which the state
of North Carolina provides. The student
health center can help victims appeal
to the fund to pay hospital bills if they
needed to have a rape kit administered
to them.
UNCChapel Hill's student health
center does administer rape kits on cam-
pus. Sue Gray, the associate director of
student health for health education, said
ON ADULT & CHILDREN'S
EXERCISE & AEROBICS WEAR
EVERYDAY
At Earre,
More Than A Dance Wear Shop!
ARLINGTON VILLAGE 756-6670
1996 Softball
Top Picks
hn n
bicycle
POST
Men's Gold
1. Young Guns
2. FOOTPHI
3. U-Lose
4. 40 oz. Thieves
5. Spleef Chiefs II
Men's Purple
1. Brahmas
2. Nappy Dug-Out
3. Ten Greatest Hits
4. Bomb Squad
5. Death from Above
Women's Gold
HOOPPHI
Little Sluggers
She-Things
Big Hitters
Fraternity Gold
1 Theta Chi A
2. Phi Kappa Tau A
3. Pi Kappa Alpha A
4. Sigma Phi Epsilon A
5. Kappa Alpha A
Fraternity Purple
1. Theta Chi B
Lambda Chi B
Sigma Phi Epsilon B
Phi Kappa Psi
Alpha Sigma Phi B
Co-Rec
1. Gin & Juice
2. Corked Bats
3. RCLS I
4. Just for Kicks
5. HPL
Sorority
1. Alpha Xi Delta
2. Alpha Delta Pi
3. Alpha Phi
4. Chi Omega
5. Pi Delta
Women's Purple
1. Umstead Wings
2. Clueless
3. Aycock All-Stars
4. Pinheads
5. Aycock Hoochies
ymd
Call ECU Recreational Services for program updates 328-6387.
that Chapel Hill has provided the ser-
vice for more than 12 years.
"We have an integrated program
with campus police, university housing
and the community, which provides rape
kits right here on campus so victims do
not have to travel to an area hospital
Gray said.
The UNC-Wilmington's student
health center does not provide rape kits
on campus. Student health Director
Judy Bowers said that because they are
not open 24 hours a day, it is not fea-
sible to provide the service. The univer-
sity does, however, work closely with
the local emergency room and the rape
crisis center to provide the best care for
students.
"We are doing students a favor by
referring them to people who have ex-
pertise in this field Bowers said.
ECU police officer Mike Jordan said
that the official number of rapes occur-
ring on campus for 1995 was one. So
far, the department lists two rapes in
1996. These numbers are rapes which
reportedly occured on the university's
campus. The numbers exclude rapes
occuring to students near or off carp-
pus.
Jernigan said that date rapes and
acquaintance rapes are much more fre-
quent and the victims usually do not
report the crimes. Some students come
to the student health center for after-
care only.
"I think if s (date rape) a problem
Jernigan said. "I'm not sure that stu-
dents think it's a problem. There is still
a mind set that the victim is partially
responsible for date rape
Jernigan said students should leam
to clearly communicate their desires
before they come to school and involve
themselves in dating situations. Accord-
ing to Jernigan, September is the month
when many freshmen come to the stu-
dent health center feeling victimized by
dating situations.
"As far as date rapes are concerned,
practice in your mind how to communi-
cate your decisions concerning sexual
intercourse Jernigan said. "As far as
other types of rape are concerned, don't
put yourself at risk being in dangerous
situations and dangerous areas
A health educator is available to
give presentations to campus organiza-
tions at no cost For a presentation on
rape prevention or to talk with a coun-
selor about rape, call Heather Zophy at
32&6794.
mm
YDUBSHJJ
Expressions magazine invites YOU TO
EXPRESS YOURSELF by reading your poetry
at our POETRY READINGART SHOW on
April 3 from 7-9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center Great Room B.
For more information, call 328-6927
-��
�mmmmmm





Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
VISION from page 1
STATE from page 3 BGLAD from page 1
said.
"Almost everybody in the univer-
sity had some benefit from resources
that came in through the campaign
Lanier said.
Lanier said the campaign was
originally estimated to only raise $30
to $40 million by an outside source.
The fact that it raised 30 percent more
than its $50 million goal says a lot for
ECU. he said.
"This project was a coming of
age for the university Lanier said.
"The people who support this univer-
sity really have a sense of raised hori-
zons
He said the campaign's success
shows that ECU is a force not only in
Eastern North Carolina, but in all of
North Carolina.
The announcement of the new
Robert L. "Roddy" Jones Distin-
guished Professorship in the School
of Music also came Friday at the ECU
Board of Trustees meeting.
According to a press release from
the ECU News Bureau, a major gift
from University of North Carolina
President C. D. Spangler Jr. is provid-
ing for an endowed professorship to
bring world-class performers to cam-
pus in the School of Music. The en-
dowment will be at the level of
$500,000 and will include $167,000
in matching state funds. The profes-
sorship will be filled for the first time
in the fall 1997 semester.
"The new professorship will
permit the university to attract an
� outstanding musician to interact with
and challenge students and faculty to
even greater levels of musical achieve-
ment" said Chancellor Richard Eakin.
Brad Foley, dean of the School
of Music, said the professorship will
� be awarded for fixed, rotating terms
of one to three years, allowing ECU
to bring a number of outstanding per-
formers to campus over the years.
The professor will teach both
undergraduate and graduate students
as well as perform, Foley said.
In other business at the board
meeting, the ways to improve the reg-
istration process and the status of four
property purchases were discussed.
Richard Brown, associate vice
chancellor for business affairs, said the
board is currently in the process of
getting appraisals on four property
purchases.
The Miller-Dickerson property and
the Travathron property are both lo-
cated on Charles Boulevard, bordering
the athletic fields. Brown said. He said
the buildings are currently being leased
by Allied Health and if purchased, will
be used for academic or administrative
purposes.
The Gescorp Capital property is a
building located on the block sur-
rounded by Reade, Cotanche, Third
and Fourth Streets, Brown said. He
said this property, if purchased, will be
used for administrative office space.
The Roberson property, a private
home, is located at the corner of
Lawrence and 10th Streets. Brown
said. He said the purchase of this prop-
erty is being pursued for construction
of Library Drive, a road leading to the
front of the new library.
rooms.
Blimling said that universities have
the right to arrest students, but whether
or not the evidence found in unwarranted
searches can be used in criminal hear-
ings has yet to be decided by the courts.
Manny Amaro, director of univer-
sity housing services at ECU, said ECU
also has the right to search students'
rooms.
"We have the right to entry in our
contract" Amaro said.
Contrary' to Blimling, he said if evi-
dence is found in an unwarranted search
by campus officials, it cannot be used
against a student in criminal court and
the matter must be handled by the uni-
versity.
Amaro said it is a common practice
at ECU to get an official search warrant
before a search. Still, he said it is easier
to let the justice system handle the situ-
ation, especially when the potential seri-
ousness of the situation is unknown.
"I really believe that they (students)
need to go through the court system
Amaro said. "If we suspect drugs, the
university police are automatically noti-
fied J
The police will then get a search
warrant or if possible, the student's per-
mission to search, he said.
"The only time we've entered a
room this year has been with a search
warrant" Amaro said.
"regardless of affectional orientation
This idea was borrowed from other
universities also. Elkins said.
"The main purpose of Blue Jeans
Day is to get people to talk about the
subject" he said. "Many people mis-
understand the concept and say if you
wear blue jeans on this day, then you
must be gay or lesbian but that's not
what it's about It's just a symbol to
show that you are against discrimina-
tion.
"On Friday, we wanted to have a
social event with food and games so
everyone could get together and have
fun
Friday's Pride Picnic on the Mall
will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
For more information about the
group, students can log on to BCLAD's
web page at WWW.ECU.EDU
GROUPSBGUSlDBGLAD.HTML. the
group's email address at
VCBGLAD@ECUVM1 or call Jeff
Gersh at 32&6149.
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA
NEWSTAND
The comic book store
919 Dickinson Ave.
1-919-758-6909
�TV OC Come C1W4
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 1Cth Street
within walking distance from ECl
758-0000
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE
1 Item Mini Sundae
coupon expires 4-30-96
Limit 1 per customer.
Not Valid with any other purchase
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
I- !
:HbJ
RIGGAN SHOE REPAIR
3193-a E. 10th St.
Greenville, NC
758-0204
Shoe Repair At Its Very Beit
Low Cost - High Quality
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Open Monday-Friday
7.30am-6pm, Saturday 8am-2pm
Repairing Shots in GreerwBejor li years
"Moli�re's Classic Comic
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i"
TARTUFFE
March 28, 29, 30, April 1 and 2, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
March 31, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: S 8.00
ECU Students: $5.00
Children:5.00
Mature Themes. Parental Discretion Advised.
Call328-6829
it's the WZMB Lunchtime Cafe! We will broadcast live from the
Student Stores every Wednesday from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
We'll have a plethora of CDs, posters and bumper stickers
to giveaway.
Check us out Friday night as we broadcast live from the
PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out Party in front of Minges Coliseum
during the Retro show from 7 until 10 p.m. Plenty of free
(Yes-FREE) stuff!
m
Ql.J FM'
East Carolina University
o)
, KINTIMATE
N�oNK?AVTNES
Roy Book Binder-Wednesday, March 27-FREE!
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM -The Brickyard-MSC
Rainsite: The Wriqht Place
Women's Intramural Basketball
Championship Standings
HENDRIX
Women's Gold
1st Goof Troop
2nd CSC
3rd Hoopsters
Backstabbed
Women's Purple
1st The Foxy Javiers
2nd Gamma Sigma Sigma
3rd Dazed and Confused
Sorority
1st Alpha Xi Delta
2nd Alpha Delta Pi
3rd Delta Zeta
Alpha Omicron Pi
Friday, March 29
Saturday, March 30
Sunday, March 31
S1
"AWESOME TRULY EPIC.
A MASTERPIECE.
WHOLLY ORIGINAL
RKNUD IMM. TIME
HEAT
The freat College
Drive Movie
The best thing to happen
to movies since popcorn
DRIVE-IN MOVIES!
Indiana Jones-Raiders of the Lost Ark
Top Gun
Thursday. March 28.1996 at 9:00 PM
Commuter Lot - Bottom of College Hill
Co-Sponsored By Rec Services
GOOD-BYE
NICKS.
No soap and water shave helps
protect against nicks and dryness m
Skintimate5 Shave Gel.
SKINT I MATE SHAVE GEL
Could your legs be a little softer?
$K1NTMXII
A DATE WITH QUASIMODO!
April 2.1996- 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room
Contestants Will Be Chosen April 1st in the NISC Multi-Purpose Room - 6:00 - 8:00 PM.
Winners Receive Limo, Dinner at Outback, & Tickets to The Hunchback oi Notre Dame on April 3,1996!
i
THE INSIDE SCOOP
TO
1
At

Fred Lager
Free to StudentsFacultyStaff
1 Guest .
S2.00 for GeneralPublic Available
the Night of the Show
Call 328-6004 for more information.
Tuesday.April 9,1996 � 8:00 PM � Hendrix Theatre
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
Presented by the ECU Student Union
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.





Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
vW?
The East Carolinian
Tambra Hon. Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Our View
Regardless of
who won or who
lost (by a wide
margin), TEC
would ike to
extend sincere
thanks to WZMB
for our softball
match this
weekend
A few dedicated employees of TEC and WZMB took
a little time out of their busy schedules this weekend
to engage in some good old-fashioned fun. They met
on a softball field to renew a rivalry that had almost
been forgotten, and even though they were a few play-
ers short at times, they managed to play five innings.
Some players were definitely not candidates for
the major league (the chief is out of shape), but oth-
ers were just marvelous. It didn't matter though, the
point is they cared enough to step up to the plate for
campus media, and to play their hearts out for their
team.
The score isn't important, but it's safe to say we
creamed WZMB. TEC would like to thank WZMB for
taking the time to set up this match, and we'd like to
give you the chance to even the score sometime. TEC
would also like to thank recreation services for giving
us a field on such short notice and providing us with
the equipment to play.
Constantly working at bringing students the latest
information and sounds can be overwhleming at times
and it was nice to see this softball match actually come
together after only a few weeks of planning.
An ode to softball:
The day was nice and the teams were hot,
Field number two was the spot,
Leftwich gathered his ducks in a row,
Zion had TEC players in tow,
Pond pitched and Ross held third base,
Oldham with that hat, we couldn't see your face,
Paiz was at first and missed just a few,
did the Dillinator have a clue?
We all had fun, despite the score,
Next year let's try to play a little more.
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Kagwood, Staff illustrator
Crlstle Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Xlemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Deanya Lattlmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, all (919)
3284366.
$96 buys hunting license
Once again students at ECU find
themselves as the victims of high
prices and poor service.
Every year parking and traffic
services send the students a flier to
purchase a $96 parking sticker.
For the price a student pays for
a sticker, you would think parking
and traffic services would provide
students with adequate parking and
properly maintained parking lots. Un-
fortunately, students do not receive
any of these benefits.
Freshmen students are provided
three parking lots. The two are lo-
cated downtown and are in sad con-
dition. For $96, one would assume
students would receive a nicely paved
lot Instead students get a gravel lot,
and a grass lot
I remember when I was a fresh-
man praying every time it rained that
my car would not get stuck in the
mud and having to call my friends to
help come and push me out Many
times my prayers were not answered
and my car would get stuck.
I guess freshmen should not
complain about parking downtown
because if they are not fortunate
enough to get into the lot they are
forced to park at Allied Health. Stu-
Stephanle Ann Eaton
Guest Writer
dents must then catch a bus to get
to campus and if the buses are no
longer running, they get to enjoy a
nice long stroll.
Being an upper classmen does
not mean you are treated better by
parking and traffic services.
Residents who live in the cen-
tral and west area of campus have to
fight to get the limited amount of
parking spaces around the residence
halls. Over the years, residents have
watched spaces being taken away by
staff parking. Most residents find
themselves having to walk quite a dis-
tance.
The students of ECU who park
on campus are victims. We are forced
to pay exceedingly high prices for lim-
ited and poorly maintained parking,
traffic and parking services cannot
complain that they do not receive
enough money from the students.
Last year, students witnessed a $26
increase for a parking sticker.
With the money parking and
traffic services receives, they should
offer students paved parking lots and
parking spaces at a relatively close
distance to where they live. Maybe it
is time that the staff at parking and
traffic services learn to budget their
money and do a little better planning
If they cannot provide an improve-
ment in the parking then lower the
price of a sticker.
! know as a student I find $96
to be a little steep for parking. If I
received parking that did not require
me to put on hiking boots every time
that I went to my car, I do not be-
lieve I would have such a problem.
Traffic and parking services
needs to realize that students are a
very important part of their job and
it is about time they stood up and
took notice of the student's needs.
Letters to the Editor
Letters to the Editor
Employee disagrees
Student supports NIX
To the Editor,
Over the past two years I wit-
nessed the evolution of the Student
Government Association from an or-
ganization whose main purpose was
funding student groups to one that
has become a loud voice for the con-
cerns of the student body. SGA today
possesses a large, influential role in
policy making and decisions regard-
ing the future and direction of our
university.
As ECU faces a critical juncture
in its history, we, the student body,
have the opportunity to further ex-
pand our impact university wide. It is
our duty to elect representatives who
will convey direct messages to admin-
istration regarding our goals and pri-
orities and improve the university for
the collective good.
One person who has played an
integral role in projects pursued by
SGA is Angie Nix. Throughout her
entire academic career Angie served
her fellow students in various capaci-
ties including class officer and cur-
rently as student body treasurer. She
created the organization funding
packets and serves as a direct liaison
for student groups in matters regard-
ing student activity fees disseminated
by SGA. Her immense experience as
a student leader and broad knowledge
of East Carolina University render her
capable to be a highly effective leader
in the prevailing campus climate.
Angie will most definitely provide a
rational voice for the welfare of all
students. Bring your student ID and
vote for Angie Nix, SGA president, on
Wednesday, March 27.
Sincerely,
Scarlette K. Gardner
Graduate class president
Candidate speaks out
To the Editor,
A recent opinion column in TEC
suggested that the upcoming student
government elections have failed to
inform the voters of the positions of
those running and what the candi-
dates can do for ECU students. The
election is very important to me. I
want to increase student awareness of
the issues which I believe are impor-
tant to students. I am very willing to
share with anyone where I stand and
what my reasons are for running for
office. This is not, however, the ap-
propriate forum to express or debate
the issues.
I totally agree that the candidates
need to make themselves available to
the electorate through meetings, de-
bates or similar public activities. I, and
those running with me. have met in
formal meetings with members of be-
tween 50 and 75 groups in an effort
to inform them of our positions and
goals. These groups cover the spec-
trum of campus life and include
Fleming Hall Council, the American
Marketing Association, the Graduate
Student Advisory Council, Alpha Ep-
silon Delta (a pre-med group), the
Native American Organization and the
society for Advancement of manage-
ment, to name just a few. We have also
spoken to scores of students on an
individual basis during the 1 12
weeks of campaigning. Finally, we
have agreed to participate in a debate
on WZMB which is scheduled for
Tuesday, March 26 at 8 p.m. I know
that I and those running with me have
put forth a considerable effort to get
our message out, to express our posi-
tions on topics of interest to students,
and to listen to student concerns.
The voting public also has a cer-
tain degree of responsibility if they
wish to cast an informed vote. We
cannot expect each candidate for of-
fice, whether they are running for
Student Government, City Council,
Governor or national office, to make
a personal appearance at our front
door. Each of us has some responsi-
bility to seek out answers to our ques-
tions, to discern the position of the
candidates, and to make a decision
based on the best information we can
obtain.
I urge each and every one of you
to become informed and to vote
Wednesday. We all owe it to ourselves
and to ECU to be informed and to
participate.
Sincerely,
Angie Nix
Candidate for SGA president
To the Editor,
Let's pretend for a minute that
as I was sitting in the park a tiny fairy
would float out of the sky and take
rest upon my unsuspecting shoulder.
This fairy would look over at me and
say You have one wish, what can I
do for you master?" A hypothetical
answer I might reply might be, "oh
fairy, I wish that the column in the
paper entitled " Our View" might be
entitled "My View
I do not mean to say that I agree
with what is in this column; I mean
that it is not my view as a member of
TEC staff. Last Thursday an example
of amazing reasoning and logic was
printed in this column about lower-
ing the drinking age and it was printed
under the supposition that it was the
opinion of TEC and all of those in-
cluded Not
This is a curious column as is.
There is no author listed and I believe
that it is written by a member of TEC
editorial board, whoever that is. I
know I should just ask; this is not the
point The first point is that there
should be a name on this column just
like there is on mine. The authors of
this work should have their name next
to their opinion.
Next I think that it is my duty as
a student of this campus, and a mem-
ber of TEC staff to express my opin-
ion regarding this issue, only in part
reacting to the thing printed in
Thursday's paper.
I would like to say that whatever
tone is received from my words, it
should not be interpreted as hostile.
I sometimes tend to sound mean. I
just want to say that I have the ut-
most respect for those who spend
countless hours putting this paper
together. I simply do not agree with
this one aspect of the paper, and more
importantly this last argument
The drinking age is an issue that
needs a new light The same old argu-
ment that has been used for many
years has been used here again. If I
am old enough to do these things
then it should reason that I would be
permitted to do these other things.
This is not proper log
The article in the paper simply
stated the belief that the drinking laws
that exist now are unconstitutional
and silly. Next, the authors went
through the few things that you are
legally permitted to do at the age of
18 in comparison to not being allowed
to drink. You know: voting, military
service, being tried as an adult at 18
and finally, being of legal age to get
married. This last one I won't even go
into since the divorce rate is like what
50 percent or some insane number
like that Things that make you go
hmmmmm.
Any way the logic goes like this:
If you can get shot you can drink. If
you can legally marry, you can drink,
if you are an adult as a criminal, you
can drink. That's it That is the logic
that has been the foundation behind
this argument for years. The problem
in this equation is that all of the ele-
ments on each side of the equals sign
are not equal.
If A-B, and B-C, then A does
equal C, but if A and B are only sort
of the same then the equation is
wrong.
Society, in its amazing expression
of responsibility and control, has
clearly expressed how well it has done
with not driving when drunk. It is
clear that supposedly, the older you
get the smarter you get This is not
always the case, but being young cer-
tainly does not make you any smarter.
All of this comes down to a few
things. First being married and buy-
ing beer have all of nothing to do with
each other. Being in the Army and
buying beer have all of nothing to do
with each other, and your maturity
as a criminal and buying beer have
all of nothing to do with each other
as well.
The expression "apples and or-
anges" comes to my mind. You can't
compare different things on the same
playing field and expect them to
match up. You can't say that getting
married and drinking beer equal each
other. It is silly.
To lower the drinking age to 18
would not only decrease the physi-
cal attributes necessary to buy that
40, but it would also increase the
death rate. Eighteen-year-old people
should not drink. Not because of sta-
tistics or past history but because
there are better things to do with
time than that They should not drink
because people get hurt either physi-
cally or emotionally when people
drink, especially in excess. Put your
name on the column and rethink
your logic.
Thanks,
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
Wear jeans for diverstiy
To the Editor,
As a part of our celebration of
Pride Week, B-Glad (Bisexuals, Gays,
Lesbians & Allies for Diversity) is pro-
moting Thursday, March 28 as Blue
Jeans Day, a day on which we ask that
people wear blue jeans to show sup-
port for equal rights for all people
regardless of affectional orientation.
This is an event which CayLesbian
BisexualAllies groups at many uni-
versities hold during their Pride
Weeks to promote awareness and dis-
cussion of issues of equal rights.
Blue jeans were chosen as a sym-
bol because they are a common ob-
ject which requires (for most people)
no special effort to wear as almost
everyone has them. Those who choose
not to wear blue jeans on this day
must make a conscious effort not to
do so.
Wearing blue jeans on Thursday
does not mean you are saying "I'm
gay" or "I'm a lesbian All it means
is that you don't believe that discrimi-
nation against anyone because they
happen to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or
even straight is justified.
Wear blue jeans Thursday just to
say "discrimination is wrong
Rich Elkins
co-chair of B-GLAD
"The human mind treats a
new idea the way a body
treats a strange protein; it
rejects it

� Sir Peter Brian Medawar, British zoologist, c. 1970





�auaoaaa
Tuesday, March 26, 1996
The East Carolinian
lttfle
"JfttHAie eviet
Pinhead induces
bloody boredom
Barkerless new
Hell miser movie
fails to frighten
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
I had two choices as to what film
to review. 1 could either see the new
Hellraiser movie, or I could see that
movie where the monkey plays base-
ball. I was for the monkey movie, but
the person I was going to see the film
with wanted to let fate decide. So,
we flipped a coin. As a result, to Hell
we went.
Hell is a popular topic for many
artists. Dante dabbled around with
his visions of Hell, countless paint-
ings have depicted the horrors of Hell
and, of course, film has been a popu-
lar medium for Hell. In 1987. Clive
Barker conjured his unique vision of
Hell when he made the film
Hellraiser. The nasty nature of that
film gave his Hell an edge that un-
settled his audience. As a result,
Barker found a franchise with his
Hellraiser films.
Well, the fourth film in the se-
ries is out, en-
titled
Hellraiser:
Bloodline, and
it does create a
Hell for its audi-
ence, but not in
a good way. Cre-
ator Barker
didn't lend his
hand to this
film at all, and
the result is so
disjointed,
badly acted and
poorly written
that you feel
like you're in
Hell. Worse yet,
the nightmarish
horror that Barker se up in the first
film is becoming derivative of itself.
Without Barker there to guide it,
Hellraiser horror no longer has its
edge.
The film opens, of all places, in
space. It is the future, and the film
Well, the fourth
film in the series is
out, entitled
Hellraiser:
Bloodline and it
does create a Hell
for its audience,
but not in a
good way.
opens with a descendent of the man
who created the Hellraiser series' in-
famous cube that opens a doorway
from Hell onto
�� earth. This descen-
dent attempts to
open the doorway
so he can destroy
it. He is arrested
before he can ac-
complish his goal
and questioned by
the authorities.
During his interro-
gation, he begins
to narrate the his-
tory of his family
and the cube that
has plagued his
bloodline for cen-
turies.
Suddenly,
we're in 18th-cen-
tury France, where the entire
Hellraiser legacy is supposed to be-
gin. Here, we are introduced to a toy
maker who creates the cube for an
evil sorcerer, who in turn uses the
See BLOOD page 9
Noies FfcoM Tiie UNDeRGRouND
Manic action propels Giant Roho
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Imagine a world that is a paradise. Pollution has
been eliminated, people the world over are prosperous,
fulfilled and happy, and everything is really cool and
science-fictiony. It's all perfect, except of course for
those pesky terrorist bombings all over the planet
This is the world of Giant Robo, the most willfully
bizarre Japanese animation (anime) video I've seen in
quite some time. Take the wild creativity of 1960s Mar-
vel Comics and mix it with the strange creative atmo-
sphere of modern anime. Then throw in classic anime
touches like the little boy with the great big robot (see
Gigantor), and you might have some idea what Giant
Robo is like.
Beyond the comparisons, Giant Robo is the story
of young Daisaku Kashami, son of a famous scientist.
Daisaku's dad gave him the control watch that allows
only Daisaku to command Giant Robo, a really huge
robot that looks like a Samurai and lives inside a dis-
used nuclear cooling tower. The orphaned Daisaku is a
member of the Experts of Justice, an elite crime fight-
ing unit attached to an Interpol-like spy organization.
The Experts' opposite number is a group known as the
Magnificent 10, a cartel of criminal masterminds who
sit in control of the terrorist organization Big Fire
(guess who's behind those bombings in paradise).
That's the set-up for the Giant Robo TV series, be-
ing released serially in America on video. Four volumes
are available so far, comprising almost four hours of
animation, and the story isn't over yet!
Unlike many TV anime releases, the animation on
See ROBO page 8
Heaps
of prose
Kevin Fleming, who will
be graduating in May
with a degree in
History, checks out the
merchandise at the
English Graduate
Student Organization
booksale outside the
Wright Place.
Don't
look
down
ECU student Mike
Culligan scales the
dizzying heights of the
rec services climbing
tower, located behind
the Allied Health
Building on Charles
Boulevard.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
VrtlfNEV rHArK 1
V V.
Money Mark
Mark's Keyboard
Repair
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
CD Reviews
"Transitions
Now he's put out his own album
on the Mo Wax label with no less
than 30 tracks, a ton of output for a
brand new solo artist Actually the
album was released over a year ago
in Europe, but with only 20 tracks.
For the domestic release, Mark added
10 new tracks and lowered the price.
How's that for dedication to the fans?
Usually, what happens with
other artists is that their album will
be released domestically first, then a
couple of bonus tracks will be added
when it's released overseas and the
price will shoot up for American con-
sumers. That means that if you're a
dedicated fan, you've got to pay
through the nose to be a completist.
Yet the Beasties and all of their com-
rades have always done the opposite
of this by releasing the import singles
first, then dropping the price and
adding more tracks to the domestic
versions when they come out. That
kind of attention to fans is to be com-
mended.
That said, I have to say that my
expectations for this album were a
little blown. Those Beasties
instrumentals are some of the best
soul-filled jams I've heard since Isaac
Hayes and Curtis Mayfield had their
day back in the '70s. Given that
Nishita was responsible for a large
part of the sound found there, I fig-
ured his solo albuin would blow me
away.
However, even though there are
30 tracks to be found here, most are
just experiments in rhythms, shad-
For those of you who don't
know, Money Mark is actually Mark
Ramos Nishita. Who the hell is that?
Well, have you ever heard any of
those jazzy, funky instrumentals on
the last two Beastie Boys albums,
Check Your Head and Communi-
cation) Basically, any track with key-
boards all over the place on those
albums was co-written by Nishita
(they also tend to be some of the best
tracks). Nishita was at least half the
creative force behind tracks like
"Groove Holmes "In 3's
"Namaste "Futterman's Rule" and
See MARK page 7
US Census considers
multiracial category
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
DURHAM, N.C (AP) - Mitzi Carter
was in the fifth grade when she real-
ized she was expected to live a lie.
Her teacher asked the students to
raise their hands as she called out vari-
ous races: white, black, Asian, Indian,
etc. The daughter of a black man and a
Japanese woman, Carter raised her hand
twice - once for black and once for
Asian.
"She stopped and said, 'Mitzi, you
can't raise your hand for both recalls
Carter, 22, a senior at Duke University.
The class laughed. "I felt like an
idiot Carter says. "It shaped how I iden-
tified myself through middle school and
high school
The identity she assumed in those
years growing up in Houston was black.
More recently, she has begun identify
ing herself as both black and Japanese
- a choice that defies some government
forms, including the U.S. Census.
That idea - that people who have
more than one race in their ancestry
can identify themselves that way -
sounds simple enough. But even people
like Carter, who insist on a multiracial
identification socially, aren't sure when
it comes to the Census.
The Census now offers these ra-
cial choices: white, black, American In-
dian, Asian or Pacific Islander or other.
The Office of Management and Budget,
which decides on race choices on U.S.
government forms, is preparing test
forms for the 2000 Census, some of
which include a multiracial choice.
Supporters of such a choice plan
a July 20 march in Washington, D.C.
A multiracial identification "is a
step toward doing away with the whole
concept of race says march organizer
Charles Michael Byrd of New York City,
the 43-year-old son of a biack woman
and a white man.
Response to march plans has been
good, but not overwhelming, says Byrd,
who has published "Interracial Voice"
on the Internet since September 1995.
Jennifer Calloway of Raleigh, the
mother of three racially mixed children,
wants more information before decid-
ing whether to attend the march. She
adamantly supports the multiracial
choice on the Census because it would
help multiracial children.
"Children in healthy, happy homes
sometimes feel like they're choosing
mom or dad when they choose one
racial identify over another, she says.
"They feel like they're rejecting a par-
ent"
Some blacks and multiracials say
there could be a backlash from a multi-
racial checkoff on Census forms.
For example, if fewer people iden-
tify themselves as black, the government
could use those lower numbers to cut
back on affirmative action and other
See RACE page 7
ADr?P
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Registration is the first run-
ner-up for stressor of the semes-
ter. Aside from exams, this event
is enough to force the most laid-
back of people to pull out hair
in their in utter frustration.
It never really got to me in
prior semesters the way it has
in registering for the coming
months. Before, there were at
least a few back-up classes I
could slide into my schedule to
compensate for any core curricu-
lum courses that were closed out
because someone else in my ma-
jor was faster than I in the reg-
istration process. I guess it's just
being close to graduation and
the feeling that I only have a few
classes left in order to complete
my requirements for commence-
ment.
As is the case for virtually
every other undergraduate, I've
never gotten my schedule how
I've wanted it. There's always
been problems; some big ones
and some small ones, but there
have always been problems.
The grueling aspects of this
process are equally the advising
part and the stand-in-Iine-all-day-
and-still-not-get-your-ciasses
part. There's problems with the
system when you're a senior and
you go to your advisor with a
skeleton schedule for summer
sessions and fall to hear, "I don't
know
This is not a phrase I want
to hear a semester away from
graduation. This time I went to
see my advisor with a few classes
jotted down on a piece of paper
with hopes of finishing out my
requirements. I also sat down
with him to make sure there
were going to be no surprises
come December. I wanted to
make sure there wasn't a fresh-
man political science class or an
art appreciation requirement
that I'd find out about 10 min-
utes before graduation.
(I can almost see it now. A
gorgeous day with not a cloud
in the sky. The birds are chirp-
ing and the world is my oyster.
It has been a long, difficult pro-
cess. I've worked hard for this
and I deserve this
("What?" I ask an older
looking gentleman gently tug-
ging at my shoulder.
("I'm terribly sorry Mr.
Waddell. you never took Euro-
pean Art History prior to 1500
so we cannot allow you to re-
ceive -our Criminal Justice de-
gree. '
See DROP page 9





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, March 26,1996
Plaza Mail, Greenville Only
355-7501
Day Everyday
With Your College ID
2 Cookies,
2 Brownies,
2 Bucks
Hair Designs
We are now taking Trade Ins!
Come in and trade that pale winter complexion for a
H" ot Ifevr tropical tan
from our new 30 Bulb tanning center.
fanning Vackaqe Vriceg
5 viit - 1S
20 viit - 45
First Visit fRtt With Purchase of Package
Other Tanning Specials Available
We also offer the best in men's & women's
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Try our set of acrylic & gel nails $35set
107 Eastbrook Drive 758-7570 Located past Pizza Inn in from of EaslbrookApi
M.Alvlv from page 6
ows of complete ideas. Don't get me
wrong, these are interesting experi-
ments, they just don't fulfill what it
seems Nishita is capable of and that
is disappointing. Perhaps more credit
should be given to the Beastie Boys
themselves for the work on those ear-
lier instrumentals, because they seem
more like complete songs than any-
thing found on Mark's Keyboard Re-
pair.
There are a number of tracks
that stand out above the rest, though.
For instance. "Ba Ba Ba Boom"
sounds like it could have been lifted
straight off the soundtrack for
Superfly the way it moves and
grooves its way around your brain.
And "Poets Walk" is a slice of
pure Gil Scott-Heron jazz from The
Revolution Will Not Be Televised,
complete with a Hubert Laws flute
riff. The sound bites that Nishita
picks out are pure genius, like the
bit of a elementary school film reel
in "Insects Are All Around Us" and
the album's title track, which is
Money Mark's own radio advertise-
ment much like the Beasties' sample
of the "Paul's Boutique" ads.
Despite these stellar moments,
the problems tend to be more than
evident Almost three-fourths of the
tracks begin with a fade in or end
with a fade out, giving the listener a
sense that they are missing some-
thing.
The worst comes when Mark
sings, though. He is passable on some
tracks, like "Got My Hand In Your
Head" and "Sometimes You Gotta
Make It Alone where he sounds like
one of the brothers in Ween. How-
ever, on other songs, like "Cry" and
"Seven, Seven, Seven he does a
pathetic impersonation of Lenny
Kravitz that makes you cringe.
Even though this is an uneven
attempt at best, the kind of musical
snippets that Money Mark puts for-
ward here appeal to me at a gut level.
Despite their brevity, the more and
more I listen to these tracks, the
more and more they grow on me,
making me lounge and groove at the
oddest of times.
As Mark says so well in "Don't
Miss the Boat "This may not be
your type of shit But doubtless,
somebody will like this That some-
body is me, but you're forewarned
that it may not be you.
JVrVvb from page 6
programs that help minorities.
Stephanie Mason, 24. of Chapel
Hill shares those fears. Mason, the
daughter of a white mother and a black
father, considers herself black.
"I'm a little afraid there are people
that could use a shift in those numbers
to make themselves look very gracious
and egalitarian and also to diminish the
voice of black America Mason says.
She says she looks "at race not as
a biological concept, but more as a so-
cial, political, cultural concept 1 iden-
tify in those ways with the African-
American experience
Kelly Brewington of Pelham, N.Y,
sometimes identifies herself as black on
forms "because that seems to make the
most sense politically because blacks are
under-represented
The daughter of a black woman
and a white man. Brewington identifies
socially with both races. Through mar-
riage and remarriage, her own family
includes three black siblings and one
white sibling.
"My parents taught me never to
have to choose, to be what I really am -
both African-American and white she
says.
Still, she's not sure she would
Thirty-two percent of Americans try to lose weight by skipping
meals, 15 attend weight loss clinics, and 3 take diet pills.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
choose multiracial on the 2000 Census.
"I know I won't choose white,
though says Brewington, 19, a sopho-
more at the University of North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill. "First and foremost
I am a person of color
She used to wish very strongly for
a multiracial box on forms but wonders
now about the political consequence for
blacks.
It "would, in effect create a new
race says Jon Michael Spencer, a mu-
sic and American studies professor at
the University of Richmond.
"Once the government creates a
new race, it can create a kind of snow-
ball effect that's not intended says
Spencer, who has written a book com-
paring colored people in South Africa
to multiracial people in the United
States.
Spencer used to advocate that
people with any black heritage iden-
tify themselves as black because that
is how society will treat them. He now
believes they should be able to check
all the boxes that reflect their racial
makeup.
Despite her childhood experience,
even Carter has mixed feelings about
how to describe herself on the Cen-
sus. Carter says she would be inter-
ested in attending the march except
she will be on the West Coast She says
she is worried about the loss of black
political power but with reservations.
Sometimes she feels like "the
black community wants everybody
who's mixed with black to become part
of the black community" for political
reasons. In other situations, "you feel
left out They tell you 'you're not re-
ally black, You're mixed
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8
Tuesday, March 26,1996
This week's topic:
Cartoons
1. Where do Rocket J. Squir-
rel and Bullwinkle J. Moose
live?
2. Name Josie's Pussycats.
3. What show features the
adventures of the Three
Robonic Stooges?
4. What does "SDF-1" stand
for, and what show is it from?
5. How does Hong Kong
Phooey make his car change
shape?
6. Name Dudley Do-Right's
horse.
7. What show features arch-
villain Petey Pate, and what
turned him to a life of crime?
8. Who is Racer X?
9. What is the name of the
Japanese cartoon show that
the American Battle of the
Planets (aka G-Force) is
based on?
10. Who is Underdog's
girlfriend?
11. Name Lion-O's sword,
and the show that features it
12. Who is the leader of the
Gl Joe team?
13. Name the Power Puff
Girls.
14. For what company does
George Jetson work, and who
are their business arch-rivals?
15. What is the chosen
profession of Captain
Harlock?
16. Name Secret Squirrel's
sidekick.
17. On Gargoyles, which
character is Goliath's second-
in-command?
18. Complete this line from
the Flintstones theme song:
"Let's ride with the family
down the street
19. What is the biggest, most
devastating weapon at the
command of the crew of the
Space Battleship Yamato on
Starblazers?
20. What is Underdog's
secret identity?
IvOoO from page 6
this show is top-notch, rivaling the
best the anime field has to offer. High
speed chases are rendered in full,
crushing detail and the dizzying cam-
era angles give all the giant action a
mythic scope.
And this is a story that demands
mythic treatment. Titled "The Night
the Earth Stood Still this story
(hopefully the first of many) is filled
to overflowing with larger-than-life
characters, some pulled from mythol-
ogy from around the world. There's
a seven-foot-tall blue-skinned warrior
woman, an Asian wizard, and a Japa-
nese variation on the Chinese
Drunken Master legend who can take
a swig of saki and breathe fire. Mod-
ern myths include a suave French spy
with super-speed, Giant Robo himself
and (my favorite) an evil German sci-
entist named Franken von Vulgar.
The voice acting in the dubbed
Ame-ican version is okay, no better
or worse than on most anime re-
leases. Early on, the comic relief char-
acters bug their eyes and groan way
too much for my taste, but that
settles down fairly quickly. The big
difference about the acting in Giant
Robo is that, when the action gets
heated, or emotional tension mounts,
everybody shouts and shrieks like
madmen in heat! It's a theater of ex-
cess, where every muscle is strained
and voices rise to wild howls at the
most unexpected moments.
While some may find certain
scenes shrill, these characters scream
and shout and bluster in just the way
I always imagined the Marvel char-
acters doing when I was a kid. When
one of our heroes saves Taiwan by
connecting severed electric cables
with his own body, I'm sent tumbling
back to my childhood, laughing all
the way.
The mythic characters populate
a story that's mythic on a different
level. "The Night the Earth Stood
Still" revolves around the creation of
the Shizuma Drive, the cheap, pollu-
tion-free energy source that's
changed the world into paradise.
But all is not as if seems. Evi-
dently, an entire Balkan nation was
destroyed in the drive's creation, and
other dark secrets lurk in the shad-
ows. Mentioning any of this is, of
course, strictly taboo. The Shizuma
Drive has given mankind Utopia, and
the people are devoted to it with a
near-religious fervor. The "dirty" en-
ergy sources cf the past are loathed,
with nuclear power taking on an al-
most Satanic aspect.
This is what keeps Giant Robo
from degenerating into mindless (if
fun) pandemonium. The creators
have presented us with a fascinating
future society and turned it into a
complex playground on which to tell
a wildly melodramatic and kinetically
frantic adventure story.
While the action keeps the story
moving forward and has its own
charms, it's the increasingly compli-
cated backdrop of science and human
motivations that really engages the
rnd.
The use of dreams, flashbacks
and faulty memory to unravel some
of the series' mysteries is more con-
fusing than it needs to be at first.
All I can say is, stick with it. By vol-
ume three or four, you'll see that
there's a method to the madness and
all will finally be made clear.
Despite its flaws, I can't fault
Giant Robo too much. It's wild,
campy stuff that both thrills me and
lets me laugh at its excess. It won't
be everyone's cup of tea, but if you
ever loved super heroes, give it a
shot. It's screaming good fun.
On a scale of one to 10, Giant
Robo rates a manic nine.
Become a
Zombie
This
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tlt.m SbmmimiKiiimmim
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, March 26,1996
21st Century f

1 V'

Clothing for men and & women
Beside 5th St. Brewery Downtown Greenville
i&wwpto&
BLOUU from page 6
cube for his own nasty purposes. Af-
ter some time in France, the audi-
ence is thrown into modern America,
where another descendent of the toy
maker is haunted by nightmares of
his bloodline's past. Of course, even-
tually some bad things happen and
all Hell breaks loose.
While making a film about a
bloodline that is cursed is intriguing,
it just doesn't work in this film. The
various segments, which aren't done
very well in the first place, don't con-
nect very neatly. Admittedly, 1 was
excited when the film opened in
space. 1 thought I might be treated
to sci-fi horror in the tradition of
Alien. Going back through time not
only disappointed me but also threw
the mood of the film off.
The filmmakers try to squeeze
a large idea into the confines of their
limited imagination. Their concept
could have worked, but their ap-
proach was only typical of many con-
temporary horror films. Instead of
creating horror, the filmmakers sim-
ply try to gross the audience out with
things that Barker has already ex-
posed us to. How many times do I
need to see a man getting his flesh
ripped off with hooked chains before
it loses its appeal? Not many.
Even Pinhead, the head demon
of the Hellraiser fiims, is losing his
touch. While he may have been a
frightening figure in the first film,
he's apparently found a new way to
wreak havoc in this one: boring us
to death.
Througnout Bloodline, he
stands around saying such cool lines
as "I will rip your soul apart" and
"Do I look like someone who cares
what God thinks?" While such lines
are neat, I just grew tired of Pinhead
talking and not acting.
At one point, my viewing com-
panion yelled out to the on-screen
Pinhead. "You don't have any tricks
up your sleeve! You're just stalling
That's exactly what the filmmak-
ers were doing. To place this in aca-
demic terms, have you ever had a fif-
teen-page paper to write, but your
ideas only fill up seven pages? In such
a situation, you tend to ramble, use
a lot of quotes aad repeat ideas just
to fill up pages. That's what the mak-
ers of this movie did. They filled up
pages because they didn't really have
anything new to say.
If Barker's franchise is running
dry, then I say let it die. Barker needs
a new product to work with anyway.
I won't be surprised if another
Hellraiser is made, but you can bet
your lucky banana that I'll see the
monkey movie next time.
On a scale of one to 10,
Hellraiser: Bloodline rates a three.
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plied.
This is not the response I wanted
to hear.
I mean, this man has a Ph.D
he's published in nationally circu-
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level coursework to upperclassmen.
All I want to know is which classes 1
need to sign up for to graduate from
the program. It's not like I'm asking
him to explain someone's doctoral
thesis in astrophysics. "Come back
next week after everything's calmed
down a little and we'll figure it out
he said.
Almost all the classes I need will
be full a few hours after the termi-
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trating.
Then there's the stand-in-line-all-
day part of registration. Like herds
of cattle corraling themselves to be
branded, everyone hurries to wait in
line. You can see it on the faces of
the terminal operators by the end of
the first day. It's not their fault none
of us can get the classes we need,
but we take it out on them anyway.
And we think postal workers are dis-
gruntled.
Maybe I'm over-reacting to the
whole registration deal. Maybe III get
my classes and graduate the way "
had it all planned out. Maybe a few
years from now I'll look back on all
this and laugh. Then again, maybe
I'm just losing my mind.
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i





�.�in'Wi.uimift
10
Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
Baseball team claims
three more victories
Slugger's record
moves to 13-4
overall for season
Dill Olllard
Staff Writer
Last week was a tough week for
the ECU Baseball team. The Pirates
took three out of five through a
tough five-game stretch. With the
Eagles of Georgia Southern as well
as the first conference foe William
and Mary coming to town, the Bucs
knew that this weekend would be
all but peaceful.
The Bucs came into the contest
with an impressive 10-2 record up
against a 16-6 Eagle team led by left-
handed pitcher Julio Ayala (7-0).
Left-hander Chad Newton
would be the Pirate on the hill for
Gary Overton's club, and he would
hold the explosive Eagles scoreless
until the top of the fifth inning. The
Bucs would draw first blood by way
of a Tim Flaherty home run which
came in the bottom of the second.
In the top of the fifth inning,
Antoine Moran of Georgia Southern
got one of his three hits by way of a
double which led to a two-run in-
ning and the lead for the Eagles.
After each club picked up a run in
the sixth, the Pirates made their
surge in the eighth inning. Senior
co-captain Lamont Edwards stepped
up in a big way. Not only did
Edwards go 34 from the plate, he
also stole second and advanced to
third after an Eagle error. Edwards
tied the game off of an Antiane
Jones sacrifice fly into center field
making the score 3-3.
The drama was building as right
fielder Chris Glanz then doubled
only to be sent home off of a Travis
Thompson single which gave ECU
the lead. In the ninth inning, after
pitching eight solid innings of base-
ball, Newton was relieved by sopho-
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Travis Thompson rounds the bases after a home run shot by
Tim Flaherty against the Tribe of William & Mary.
more Patrick Dunham. Dunham
walked his first batter and k'ed the
second, only to set up Eagle second
baseman Donnie Coe with his only
hit of the night. Coe took the
Dunham pitch deep into right field
for a two-run blast. That would prove
to be all the Eagles needed on that
blustery night as they took the first-
class college baseball game 54.
"This was a hard-fought base-
ball game, the efforts of our team,
especially Chad Newton, were out-
standing ' Coach Overton said. "I
felt that both teams attacked the
game, which was indicative in the
two runs we scored in the eighth
and the two that they scored in the
ninth. It was just an excellent col-
lege baseball game
Ayala, one of the top starters
on the Eagles pitching staff, had an
excellent outing, striking out 11 Pi-
rate batters while walking only four,
See BASE page 12
ECU's lacrosse team
completed a two-game sweep
this weekend. The Pirates
were to play UNC G, the de-
fending state champs on Sat-
urday, but UNC-G couldn't
2TL round up enough players for
l&Q(V the trip t0 Creenvillc- ECU
won by default and spent the
day scrimmaging themselves
and preparing for their next
game on Sunday against
UNC-W.
Traditionally the rivalry
between the Seahawks and Pirates has always been
intense and fierce. Greg Maestro, who was sidelined
with an injury on Sunday, said it has been a long
time since the Pirates have beaten UNC-W. But that
is exactly what the Pirates did. They sent the
TUte
Seahawks away with a 134 loss.
"We spanked them on Sunday Maestro said.
Maestro also said that last year when these two
teams matched up a huge fight broke out among
the two teams.
"Last spring there was a bench-clearing brawl
Maestro said. "They are a big time rival
Chris Mitchell, another lacrosse player, believes
the Seahawks tried to make it a more physical game
than necessary.
"We took them out of the game Mitchell said.
"They tried to make it more physical but we stayed
in the game
Both players agree that this year's squad is one
of the best ECU has seen.
The lacrosse team will be on the road this week-
end against Liberty and JMU but will return home
April 13 and 14 against Duke and N.C. State. Both
games will begin at 2 p.m. at the Allied Health fields.
Swing!
Kenny Karby dips down
for a low shot in a
doubles match against
Liberty this past
weekend.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
PurpleGold scrimmage game
highlights upcoming weekend
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Don't make any plans for this
weekend. The only thing you'll want
to be doing is attending the festivi-
ties at this year's 13th annual Great
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out
Party.
The annual spring scrimmage
football game is always a big event in
Greenville. This year the events will
be spread out over three days instead
of two as in years past Traditionally
the Pigskin Pig-Out weekend spanned
Friday and Saturday, but this year on
Sunday some more activities are
planned.
Some of the highlights of this
year's annual event is the cooking of
the pigs, a carnival with rides for all
ages, an autograph session with the
football players and coaches, music
and the spring football scrimmage
Saturday at 2 p.m. in Dowdy-Ficklen.
(See Thursday's paper for a complete
list of times and events for this week-
end.)
The Pigskin Pig-Out weekend has
always drawn a lot of people from the
community but not very' many stu-
dents. Chris Libert an intern with the
Pirate Club, says this years activities
are aimed at involving more of the
students at ECU.
"We are trying to cater this year
to a lot of students Libert says. "We
want to make this a student weekend
as well as a community weekend
This weekend is not only to pro-
vide the community and students with
something fun to do, but also raises
money for the athletic department
and educational foundation.
"We want to get the students in-
volved because it goes right back to
them Libert said.
Events start Friday with the car-
nival opening at 6 p.m. and lasting
until 11:30 p.m. At 8 p.m. Mother
Nature, a band that has played such
places as The Attic downtown, will
take the stage and play for the crowd.
All bands that play will be free to the
public At 9 p.m. fireworks can be seen
throughout the sky, followed by the
Pig Cookin' contest
Some of the highlights for Sat-
urday include the Greenville Home &
Garden Show from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum. At 10 a.m a Base-
ballSports Card Show, and carnival
will be open to the public. The con-
cessions will open at 10:30 a.m. and
at that time the barbecuespring
scrimmage ticket booth will open.
For all you barbecue lovers, bar-
becue plates will be served until they
are sold out Plates can be purchased
for $350 in advance or $4 at the
event ECU's own jazz ensemble will
play from 10:45-11:20 a.m.
See GOLD page 11
Zee Sewtced
Intramural softball swings into action
David Gaskins
Rec Services
Despite a little bit of wet weather
at the beginning of the season, intra-
mural softball has started on the heels
of basketball March Madness with 115
teams vying for championships in
Men's, Women's and Co-Rec divisions.
The season officially began on
Monday, March 18 with a number of
teams in the hunt for titles. In Men's
Gold, the defending all-campus cham-
pions return in the "Young Guns" and
are lead by captain Chris Miles and
pitcherslugger Donnie Peaks. How-
ever, several teams promise to provide
spirited competition. Trey Cox and
Shaun Dillon provide the leadership
for the heavy-hitting "40 oz. Thieves"
while Stephen Lovett and Eddie Coble
begin their 18th season of softball
with "U-Lose
Top new teams in Men's Gold in-
clude "FOOTPHI" with footballers
Scott Richards, Mitchell Galloway and
Sean Richardson; Dave Pond's "Pent-
house Players the only team with a
roster large enough to sponsor a mi-
nor-league franchise; and the legend-
ary "Cavemen" behind the direction
of Mike Norwood and the fielding
skills of Jeff "The Human Vacuum
Cleaner" Watson.
Among the Fraternity Gold
teams, several strong teams look to
challenge "Theta Chi" for top honors.
Bryan Moore hopes to lead "Sigma
Phi Epsilon A" back to prominence
while Wes Crawford supplies superior
offensive skills for Delta Sigma Phi
A.
In Fraternity Purple, the field is
wide open as many roster changes
have caused great uncertainty in se-
lecting the frontrunners. "Phi Kappa
Psi" boasts the bat of Bryan Savage
and the glove of Colin "The Big Hurt"
Mohlmann while "Pi Kappa Alpha B"
will look to Will Sutton to plead for a
few calls from the umpires.
Among the other teams, Russ
Todd's "Theta Chi B" appears to have
quality depth in the organization and
Kyontaek Yim looks to utilize his soc-
cer skills to kick out a few hits for the
offense.
See REC page 11
March and April spring sports home schedule
Sunday I Monday Tuesday
PORTS 111
SID-The ECU men's tennis team
won five of six singles matches and went
on to defeat Liberty by a 6-1 score here
on Saturday.
Freshman Wes Kintner defeated
Brett Clulow at No. 1 singles (60, 6-2),
and sophomore Nils Alomar toppled
Chris Denore at No. 2 singles (62, 60)
to give the Pirates an early lead. At No. 3
singles, freshman Kenny Kirby handled
Barrett Conley (60,61) while sohomore
Josh Campbell won at No. 5 (60, 62).
Freshman Derek Slate also grabbed a
win at No. 6, defeating David Spohn by
a 60,61 score.
The Pirates won the doubles point
by winning all three matches. Kintner
Alomar, KirbyCampbell and SlateKris
Hutton were all victorious.
SID-The ECU women's tennis team
earned victories over American and
Georgetown on Saturday, and they de-
feated George Mason en Sunday.
In Saturday's first match, the Lady
Pirates won five of six singles matches
as well as the doubles point to notch a 6
1 victory over American. Sophomore
Rachel Cohen, seniors Allison
DeBastiani, Chelsea Earnhardt and Lisa
Hadelman, and freshman Catherine
Morgan won at Nos. 2-6 r-spectively. The
Lady Pirates also won the doubles point
with three victories.
In Saturday's secondx match, the
women netters defeated the Georgetown
Lady Hoyas by a 61 score. Freshman
Anne Svae bounced back form a loss
earlier in the day to beat Laura Schoelkoff
62,6-2. The Lady Pirates won five of six
singles matches as Cohen, DeBastiani,
Earnhart and Morgan added victories for
the lady netters.
On Sunday, the lady Pirates won
their fourth consecutive match as they
downed the Lady Patriots of George
Mason by a 7-0 score. The Lady Pirates
move their record to 9-3 overall and 3-1
in the CAA.
The Lady Pirates will be in action
again on March 28, when they travel to
Buies Creek, N.C, to play Campbell.
Match time is slated for 3:00 p.m.
SID-The 19 ECU Lady Pirates
Softball Team split a doubleheader with
UNC Chapel Hill here on Sunday, win-
ning 8-2 in the first game, but falling 9-1
in the second.
ECU'S Jami Bendle handled the
pitching duties for the ladies in the first
game, moving her record to 88 (20 in
the Big South) on the year, while her
counterpart Carolina's Jennifer Shelton
took the loss.
Junior outfielder Tonya Oxendine
(WinstorhSalem, NC) had one hit in three
at-bas. third baseman Rhonda Rost (Rich-
mond, Va) had a double in three at-bats.
and freshman outfielder Amy Hooks (Vir
ginia Beach, Va.) also accrued a double
leading the ECU onslaught
In the second game, ECU commit-
ted eight errors, falling 9-1 on the arm of
Trade Podratsky (8-2, 1-0 in the Big
South), of Centrevilk, Va who suffered
the loss. Senior outfielder Heather Smith
(Glen BumieJM.) went one-for-two, Clark
reached base in two at-bats, and catcher
Mary Dunlap, of Phenix, Va. had a double.
ECU will returr to Greenville today
as the Lady Pirates will play host to the
Kent Golden Flashes in a 2 p.m. double-
header at the ECU Softball Diamond.
I





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, March 26,1996
11
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
Editor, The East Carolinian
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, Rebel
for the 1996-97 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Friday, April 5 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
Bfl
Parking and
Traffic Services
LkV.nI 305 E. Tenth Street
university 328-6294
r Don't let an
unpaid parking
ticket hold up your
registration for summer
session or fall semester!
Students with uncleared parking citations
have a tag placed on their record and
are not permitted to register until
the tag is cleared. Please pay any
outstanding fines so you will not
be delayed during early registration.
Walk in Hours:
Monday - Friday
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Phone inquiries accepted until 5:00 p.m.
Picture This!
Enter our
Amateur Photography Contest
and win up to $250 and a chance to go on to
a 10,000 cash prizel
There's always a 4 going on in eastern North Carolina. From local festivals
to historical preservation projects, residents of the "east" have much to celebrate and
look back on with pride. Capture that spirit of pride in the area in which we live and
you can win up to 250 cash on the local level and win a chance to go on to
international competition! How? Just enter our amateur photography contest!
This contest is open to amateurs only, with local cash prizes of
'250100 and'50!
Plus, if your photo "has what it takes you can go on to
international competition, sponsored by Kodak, and win up to '10,000
All winning local entries will be sent to New York for an international contest
where prizes total over '50,000! Plus, over 250 photos from across the nation will be
selected by Kodak to be displayed at Epcot Center in Florida for a year-round
exhibit at Kodak's "Journey into the Imagination" Pavillion.
One of them could be yours!
Contest requirements:
1 This contest is strictly for amateur photographers. An amateur photographer is defined as anyone who
derives less than 5 of their income from photography. . . . . .
1 Contest theme: 'Reflections of the East Any depiction of life in eastern North Carolina that captures the
3. There'wui rfefpla�"serancfpfa'ce and third place awards at 250, -100 and -SO, respectively. Two hon-
orable mentions will also be named to receive non-cash prizes.
4. To be eligible for international competition, all photographs going on to the next level of the contest
must be taken with Kodak film. Please save negatives for future reference.
5. Entrant must attach the official entry blank below to the back of each photo submitted. All information
6. SmRmmSi MM �id addreses of any recognizable WgjllM MIPgWltB�g� �ub-
mirted and include consent of these persons to have their photo publishedln The Daily Reflector.
7. Winners will be selected on April 29. All decisions
are final. Winners and winning photos will be pub-
lished in The Daily Reflector's Accent section on
Sunday, May 5th, 19. All photos submitted will
be displayed at The Plaza Mall from May 6 - May
16.
8. Any student entries (collegiate) will also be judged
in a separate competition For possible features on
the cover of the June, July and August editions of
Campus Express. Student entries chosen for the
covers (3) wiil each receive '50 cash.
9. Employees of The Daily Reflector and their imme-
diate families are not eligible to enter the contest.
10. Photos must be taken between January 1994 to the
present. Color or black and white entries will be
accepted. There is no limit to the number of entries
submitted or sizes of entries, as long as negatives
can be produced (should questions of authenticity
arise).AU entries must be postmarked no later than
April 25,19. No photos will be returned.
Amateur Photography
Contest Entry Form
Name
Address
City
State
.Zip.
Telephone
GOLD from page 10 RJEC from page 10
Shortly afterwards at 11:30 a.m.
until 1 p.m. there will be an autograph
session with ECU student-athletes
and coaches. The ECU cheerleaders
and our own Pee Dee will sign auto-
graphs beginning at 11:30 a.m.
More music will be heard at 12:25
p.m. from ECU'S Contemporary En-
semble, followed by ECU's Jazz Bones
at 1:15 p.m.
The main event on Saturday, the
annual football spring scrimmage
game is set to kick off at 2 p.m. Tick-
ets for the event are $1.50 in advance
and $3 at the gate. This game gives
the students and community a little
taste of what is to come for the up-
coining football season in the fall.
On Sunday the Home & Garden
Show will open at noon followed by
the carnival opening at 1 p.m. To close
out tht weekend, the Panama Steel
Band will play beginning at 2 p.m.
According to Libert this is a good
weekend full of fun events for people
of all ages.
"It's a long weekend with a lot of
things to do Libert said. "The par-
ents can enjoy the Home & Garden
show, while the kids can take advan-
tage of the carnival
For more information and tick-
ets call 1-800-DIAL ECU or 3284500.
Volunteers are still needed for the
weekend and if you or your organiza-
tion is interested call Lee Workman,
Chip Hutchinson or Chris Libert at
3284540.
Men's Purple is traditionally the
largest and most competitive of all
divisions as anywhere from eight to
10 teams will have a chance to claim
the championship. "The Brahmas" are
fueled by an excellent hitting line-up
lead by Darryl Hinnant and Sean
O'Brien while Lance "Knuckleball"
Ward's pitching is a featured part of
the "No Names" defense.
"Ten Greatest Hits" is lead by
Bobby "The Blaster" Williams' awe-
some hitting and "UKB Posse, Part
III" is seeking a sweep of Purple titles
in flag football, basketball, and soft-
ball. John Whitehead and the men of
the "Economics Society" are expected
to bring power and speed to their of-
fense in preparation for the summer
seasons.
Darkhorse challengers are ex-
pected to include "The Marvelous
Martins" who started pre-season con-
ditioning late due to their amazing
Men's Blue basketball run as the "Tan-
talizing Thompsons the "Elvis Fan
Club" behind the all-around skills of
Chris Wright and the superb fielding
of George "My name is not RONCO"
Rouco, and Rusty Weedman's "Death
From Above
Meanwhile, Mike Cook of the
"BLD's" seeks to win his first intra-
mural game in three years of compe-
tition. However, the entire balance of
power in Men's Purple cou.J be dra-
matically shifted with the potential
signing of top free agent Vu "The
Paradise
Tanning
Crusher" Donie. At press time Donie
remained unsigned due to some un-
reasonable demands and was consid-
ering accepting an offer to play in Ja-
pan.
The Women's Gold division
boasts the return of 1995 champions,
"HOOPPHI" with basketballers
Tracey Kelley, Tomekia Blackmon and
Danielle Charlesworth. However, com-
petition appears to be extremely bal-
anced as Candy Foust, Melissa
Dawson and Zina "The Warrior Prin-
cess" Briley rule the diamond for "The
Little Sluggers" and Wendy Wear fu-
els the offense for "She-Things
In Women's Purple, top teams
include Valerie Hample's "Umstead
Wings Jennifer Mock's "Clueless
and Brandy Peck's "Pinheads
The Co-Rec division has a num-
ber of outstanding teams lead by the
Gold defending champions "Gin &
Juice" and power hitting of Aaron
Thomas' Purple defending champs,
"Corked Bats "RCLS I" includes a
total package with strong hitting
throughout the line-up lead by Randy
Jensen and Laura "Ozzie" Steimle.
"Extenuating Circumstances" is
also expected to be at the top of the
standings behind the devastating
speed of Stephen "The Silent Won-
der" Smith, the glove of Geoufrey
"Little Ditty" Anderson, and the home-
run trot of Charlotte "Grand Slam"
Garner.
For further information on the
softball program or questions related
to any intramural sports activities,
contact David Gaskins or Paulette
Evans with Recreational Services at
328-6387.
I1
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You can also drop photos by our office,
located at 209 Cotanche Street, Greenville.
Call 752-6166 for more information about this contest!
College Student?
?ECU DPCC n Other
I Are you a Daily Reflector subscriber?
� DVes ONo �
Mail entries to: The Daily Reflector Photo Contest
P.O. Box 1967
Greenville, NC. 27835
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I





12
Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
BASE from page 10
in nine innings of play. Ayala got the
win, which gave him his seventh vic-
tory early in the season.
The Bucs would have to brush
off and go back to work against the
same Georgia Southern club the
very next day at Harrington Field.
Senior Jeff Hewitt took the mound
and pitched an
excellent game
allowing only
two runs in 7 2
3 innings. The
efforts of Hewitt
were unrewarded
as the Pirate of-
fense was stalled
by Brian Hall
and the Eagles'
stifling defens.e
and the two runs
given up in the
third inning were
all the Eagles
needed as they
completed the
sweep of the
Bucs 3-0.
"There was a
little disappointment in our perfor-
mance; we felt that the first game
took a lot out of us and good teams
can't allow that to happen and just
put a game like last night's behind
us Overton said. "The previous
game we felt we made ourselves a
better team, but today not so
The Pirates got it done on the
mound with the trio of Hewitt, John
Payne and Bryan Smith. They gave
up a total of three runs off of seven
hits, but the offense couldn't cash
in on scoring opportunities.
"We didn't swing the bats well
today, and we didn't capitalize on
our offensive opportunities, but a lot
of credit to Jeff Hewitt on a fine
pitching job Overton said.
The Pirates didn't have long be-
fore the next challenge which was
posed by the first CAA opponent of
the year, William and Mary.
"We're excited about getting
into the conference season with this
ball club which has a different look
with more speed and more offense
than last year's club Overton said
before the conference opener.
Another blustery day accompa-
nied the Pirates as they got back
on the winning track with a 3-0 win
in the first half of a double header
with the Tribe of William and Mary.
Patrick Dunham would get the
nod for the Pi-
rates, coming in
with a 3-1 record.
Dunham had
trouble simmer-
ing down early in
the contest hit-
ting two batters.
This, however,
wouldn't last as
Dunham regis-
tered 7 k's in his
complete game
as well as his
fourth win of the
season.
Dunham's
performance was
complimented by
three runs, two
�"������������ 0f which came
off of a two-run shot in the second
inning by catcher Tim Flaherty.
Flaherty's merry-go-round act gave
"We didn't swing
the bats well
today, and we
didn't capitalize
on our offensive
opportunities, but
a lot of credit to
Jeff Hewitt on a
fine pitching job"
� Coach Gary Overton
him his third homer of the season.
The sharper Bucs would add one
more in the sixth inning which
proved to be more than enough help
for Dunham's shutout performance
on the mound.
In the second game the Pirates
punched in 8 runs off of 11 hits to
go along with senior Bryan Smith's
one hitter as ECU blanked the Tribe
once again in the second game. Con-
tributing to the Pirates' eight-run
onslaught was senior co-captian
Lamont Edwards with his first
homer of this season. Smith pitched
the complete game striking out only
two batters, but received help from
an errorless defense.
"Wc played excellent baseball
this afternoon Overton said. "We
had two outstanding pitching per-
formances in Dunham's shutout
along with Smith's one hitter. We
also received greater offensive pro-
duction, so we're very proud of our
club
The Pirates would continue the
roll to a 3-0 conference record with
a 6-2 finish to a 3-0 sweep of the
Tribe. Newton got the start and
pitched 5 23 innings to get the win.
The Tribe struck first, scoring one
in the top of the second only to fall
behind in the bottom half for good.
Despite registering only seven hits
along with five errors, the Bucs
managed to get the hits, and the
runs when they needed them.
"Today was a sloppy win, not
like yesterday's errorless outing
Overton said. "Although we didn't
play as crisp as yesterday, but we
had timely hitting and we managed
to sweep a much improved William
and Mary club Overton said.
The Pirates will have a week to
prepare for the upcoming series with
the defending CAA regular season
champs, the James Madison Dukes.
"This should be a challenge for
our club, going up to Madison and
playing an outstanding club, but I
feel our team is ready, and I'm
pleased with the results of this first
series Overton said.
The Pirates will play the three
game affair starting March 30 and
wrapping it up on March 31.
Community $eder
Thursday April 4,1996 6:30pm
Congregation Bayt Shalom
Students $5.00 WID
Reservations must be made by March 28
Call Judi Willis at 355-7374
H
L
J
Home & Brown
ATTORN TVS .VI LAW
Speeding Tickets
Protect Driving Record
Reduce Insurance Costs
758-4333
3Q0 Conlanche St.
Greenville
Driving While Impaired
Driving Privileges
Free Consultation
WASH

.40c lb.
Before
10:30
2511 E. 10th St Greenville
919-752-5222
This Coupon Good For
ONE FREE
WASH
Limit one per customer
Expires
43196
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
� Water � Sewer -Cable �Draperies
� Self-cleaning Oven � Frost-free Refrigerator -WasherDryer Connections �
Utility Room � Patio with Fence � Living Room Ceiling Fan
� Deadbolfr Locks 'Walk-in Closets
featuring
� Swimming Pool � Basketball Court
� Tennis Court � Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
� Yearly Lease � Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE MINUTES
WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"NOW LEASING FOR SUMMER AND FALL 1996"
Bring This Coupon in to receive 12 off security deposit & $50 off rent in May, June, and July.
Applies only to leases beginning in May
752-0277 Equal Housing Oppurtunity
SUED OUT!
A DATE WITH QUASIMODO!
Mm M
� M v M
Mr w W. x W.
MMMM
J. Mm gj b �
MM
KjgWM
Tuesday, April 2,1996 wiwl�
8:00 PM-10:00 PM � � �
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room m jg
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee.
Contestants Will Be Chosen Monday, April 1st in the WISC Multi-Purpose Room � 6:00 � 8:00 PM.
Winners Receive Limo Ride, Dinner at Outback, & Tickets to The Hunchback of Me Dam on April 3,1996!





-fi-

13
Tuesday, March 26,1996
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
Help
Wanted

Greek
Personals
���pi
For Rent
to
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and' Quiet, one bedror
furnished apartments. .$250 a m
6manth lease
i ' UNIIVtR-SlTY ACARfMQ
3 VERY RARE OPPORTUNITIES for rent
One two bedroom 1 12 bath above BW3's.
; For $500.00 a month - One three bedroom 2
; 12 bath above BW3's for $775.00 a month.
One 2 bedroom one bath above Percolator
�Coffeehouse for $450.00 a month. Water,
� sewer included in Rent Contact Yvonne M-
F9-5 @ 758-2616
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING newly
renovated two bedrooms. Unique floor plan.
�;$350.00 month. Call 355-1313 to make an
appointment Managed by Remco East Inc.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE two
�bedroom Townhouse (Georgetown) from
� iMarch until June. $260month plus half utili-
;tiesphone. 754-2465
"ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP TO share 2
bedroom apt in Twin Oaks. 12 rent 12
utilities. Call 752-7352 after 7pm Ask for
; John.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL and need
somewhere to stay? Sub-lease an efficiency
! for $275 a month at Ringgold Towers. No
! furniture needed and move May 1 st Call 413-
; 0629
' ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker, female or male. Twin
! Oaks Apartment $210 per month. Silver Bus
i Line. 2 rooms available. Contact Dave at 754-
3 2866
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP TO share 2
! bedroom, 2 bath condo $225 plus 12 utili-
ties. Call 757-1522
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE. TOTAL
; rent $500 May thru August Four blocks from
' � campus. Own bedroom, full bath, wd. Wa-
� ter, cable included. Call Nelson 7584325
NEED AN APARTMENT FOR the summer?
1 Subleasers wanted for Wilson Acres, 3 bed-
; room. May-Jury 31. 754-2871
� ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; Female
roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom, 2
; bath house. $160 rent, 13 utilities. Fun
J easy-going, studious. Call 757-1467
SINGLE BEDROOM FOR IMMEDIATE
rent $178 per mo. Share 13 utilities with
two other roommates in house. Washer, Dry-
l er available on premises. Near campus. Call
I for interview 758-2147. Leave message for
- Chris or Bill anytime
I DUPLEXES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, hardwood floors, ceiling fans,
� appliances and washerdryer hook-ups. $390
I Call 752-0277
- HUGE KILLER PHAT HOUSE, Need a
- place to crash for the summtr? Check out
Z this five bedroom, already furnished. One
block from campus, three blocks from down-
I town, with a chillin front porch and plenty
: of parking. CALL NOW! 758-FOOT
� TIRED OF NOT HAVING a parking space
I Sublease apartment in Ringgold Towers.
I Male or Female. $225.00 a month. Down-
1 town, on campus, and furnished. Great for
� Summer School. Call 7584794
- NAOS HEAD, NC - get your group together
� early. Two relatively new houses; fully fur-
I nished; washer & dryer; dishwasher; central
IAC; Available Mav 1 through August 31;
� sleeps 6- $1500.00 per month; sleeps 8 -
; $2100.00 per month (804) 850-1532.
1 SUMMER SUBLEASE! EFFICIENCY
: APARTMENT available in Ringgold Towers.
; Rent $275 per month. Furnished and avail-
able May 1st Call 551-3176 for more info.
- CONSIDERATE NC STATE INTERN needs
I-summer sub-lease in Greenville area. Flex-
ible on rent price. Non-smoking female room-
;inates only. No drugs. Call 919-512-7514. Will
- reimburse long distance charges.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT TO sub-
lease for the summer. Close to campus. $450
a month. Call Chad or Matt at 830-5194
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS. PRE-
LEASE now for Summer School and Fall
Semester. Great location across from Chico's
and Downtown. Townhouses with 2 bed-
rooms, 1 12 baths, all appliances, mini
blinds, and washerdryer hook-ups. Cable
included. $520 Call 752-0277
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Duplexes
and Townhouses for rent Many locations to
choose from. Currently Pre-Leasing for the
Fall. Call Wainwright Property Management
7564209
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RESPONSIBLE,
NON-smoker to share rent for summer
months. $167.5012 utilities & 12
phone. Call April 752-7599
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED! FOUR bed-
room house; Clean, Nice; $125 a month
14 utilities; Male or Female; Available Be-
ginning of May; Call 758-8067 and ask for
Jody
NEED 2 ROOMMATES TO share a 3 bed-
room apt in Wilson Acres. Someone who is
outgoing, sociable, picks up after themselves,
gets along wothers. Please call Ashley at
757-2891. Need someone starting in mid
April or early May.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE PERSON to
take over rent for summer. Walking distance
to campus. Three bedroom house. Rent
$208mo. Non-smoker preferred. Call at 830-
2664. Ask for Jody.
ROOMMATE NEEDED STARTING APRIL
04. Great location 1 block from campus. $185
per month plus utilities. 758-9392
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP TO share
large furnished 3 bedroom house May-Au-
gust 1 block from campus, completely reno-
vated, washerdryer available. $222 a month.
Call 757-9310.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE apart-
ment Beginning in August Looking for 1 or
2 neat and responsible females. Call Jenni-
fer at 754-2670
jff
Help
Wanted
Outdoors?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
$5.WHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest, Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCS1
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28323
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
Greenville, Kinston. New Bern
For Sale
TWO CRANKSETS FOR SALE great con-
dition Shimano "95 model with bottom
brackets. $60 negotiable. Also, three pairs
of skis for sale. Call 4134513
KING WATERBED MATTRESSES WITH
individual tubes - 3 years old - excellent con-
dition. Use regular sheets. Fits any King Bed
or frame. 355-2574
PROFESSIONAL SELMER USA MODEL
Alto Sax, excellent condition. Will accept best
offer. Call 3554613 after 6:00pm
MOUNTAIN BIKE $100, WHITE and
green, good condition. Call Aimee at 758-
6649 anytime after 6pm
A PAIR OF ACOUSTIC Linear Systems DJP
Model 520 Series speakers. Brand new! 12"
3-way system, Max. AMP power: 200 watts
program, to many features to list! Retail
$750.00. Must sell $390.00 O.B.0.4134565
�wk for David.
CANNONDALE M800 1994 MODEL many
extras. Must sell immediately. $500 O.B.O.
Call 758-2147. Ask for Chris after 6 or leave
message earlier.
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM, NEW Manitou
shock, bar ends, toe dips, bottle cage,
Cannondale seat post bag U-lock. magic tires.
Oniy $450 Will go very Fast Call Mike 752-
9850
SONY CDX-85 10-disc changer with rem-
ote for car. Great System! Only $275.00. Must
sell! 4134565 ask for David, Won't last long!
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM LIKE NEW WITH
LOCK $600.00 O.B.O. CALL 328-1708.
GREEN TO PURPLE DARK FADE ONLY
RIDDEN TWICE.
10K GOLD HERRINGBONE CHAIN. 18"
long. 6mm wide. Like new. $110. 328-3085
DAY BED WHITE AND brass, also pop up
trundle, two orthopedic mattresses. New
Never used. Cost $750; sell for $325.00. (919)
637-2645
HURRY - TAN while you work. Spring Sum-
mertime Job 12 miles from Greenville. Flexi-
ble Hours. 21 or older. Call for Interview
975-2265 Day 830-9280 Night
LOOKING FOR STUDENT PHOTOGRA-
PHER to take pictures for formal. Must show
portfolio. Call 328-7936. ask for Abby or 328-
3111, ask for Christy for details.
LOOKING FOR AGGRESSIVE ECU stud-
ents who want to earn extra money on a
limited time commitment Call 931-7181
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Caroli-
na (Nags Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800462-2122
CHEERLE ADING INSTRUCTORS NEED-
ED TO teach summer camps in NC & SC.
Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free wee-
kends! College experience not required. For
a great summer job, CALL ESPRIT! CHEER-
LEADING 1-800-280-3223
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give us a
calL Playmates Massage Snow Hill NC - 919-
747-7686
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - make sure your
diploma will work for you! Save $44000.
Gain Resume experience. Call 1400-251-
4000 ext 1576
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WArTSTAFF, HOUSE-
KEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEADERS, FIT-
NESS COUNSELORS, AND MORE. CALL
RESORT EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 1-206-
971-3600 EXT R53622.
HIRING FOR SUMMER SEASON! The
Reef Restaurar' & Bar - Atlantic Beach, NC.
All positions! Including Bartenders. Waitstaff
& Doorpersons. Great working conditions,
with flexible hours. Part-time andor full-
time. On the Atlantic Beach Causeway 919-
726-3500
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
looking for self motivated individuals wish-
ing to gain valuable work experience with a
rapidly growing company. Ideal applicant
would be energetic, efficient, willing to learn.
and have excellent communication skills. We
are currently taking applications for part-
time telephone collectors from the hours of
8am until 9pm Monday thru Friday and Sat-
urday morning from 8am until 12pm. If in-
terested please contact Brian Franey at 757-
2127.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHINC INDUSTRY. EARN UP
TO $3,000-$6,000 PER MONTH. ROOM
AND BOARD! TRANSPORTATION! MALE
OR FEMALE. NO EXPERIENCE NECES-
SARY. CALL(206)971-3510 EXT A53623
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up to
$2,000month working on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies. World travel, Seasonal
& full-time employment available. No experi-
ence necessary. For more information call
1-206-971-3550 ext C53624
FUN SUMMER JOBS! INCLUDES pool,
tennis and golf privileges! Lifeguards, wait-
staff, food service, cashiers and gate attend-
ants. The Village Beach and Tennis Club,
Nags Head. (919) 480-2222
OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS. No inven-
tory, no deliveries, no collections, no pro-
ducts to purchase, no experience necessary.
Call Bruce at 321-7389
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK summer in
Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring Lifeguards and
Beach Concession Workers. Earn Good Mon-
ey while working on the Beach $$ Salary
plus bonuses $$Discounted Housing To
apply or for further information, callfax
North Myrtle Beach Lifeguards at 803-272-
4170.
INTERN POSITION AVAILABLE: GREAT
pay, Internet experience required. Please call
Sherry Worthington 704442-9664
DOES YOUR JOB SUCK? Would you like
to make $6225 this summer working with
SW Co.? Call 1400485-7194 X4681 M-F bet-
ween 9-7 for more info Leave message.
THE KINSTON INDIANS ARE looking for
summer help. Beginning of April through
the end of August Waitresses, Vendors &
Concession stand workers needed. If inter-
ested contact John or Dave at 1400-334-
5467.
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS coor-
dinator of environmental sales. Internation-
al marketing company expanding to Green-
ville seeking part-time team oriented indi-
viduals. Good pay. Call for an appointment
3214250.
CHI OMEGA WE HAD a great time Thurs-
day night at the pre-downtown. Lets do it
again soon. Pikes
GAMMA SIG SUPPORTS NDC for SGA
President Rivenbark for SGA Vice President
Phillips for SGA Treasurer, and Thompson
for SGA Secretary.
Personals
Services
Offered
Research Information
Lareest Lfcrary of information in U.S.
allsubjects
Order Catalog Today with
VisaMastercard or CO
800-351-0222
or 310-477-8226
Or nnh JJ a Uliuidi Information
miakbhoft��.�a(�vA Lot ajh�i��. owns
GAIA CLUB HOPES YOU will vote: Nix for
President Rivenbark for VP, Phillips for
Treasurer, Thompson for Secretary. Vote
with student ID on March 27, 19
THE EAST CAROLINA NATIVE AMERI-
CAN ORGANIZATION would like to wish
Angie Nix, Eric Rivenbark, Jonathan Phil-
lips & Julie Thompson good luck in the up-
coming elections. We thank you for all your
help & concern. Good luck!
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY IS proud to
support Angie Nix and her team for SGA
President. Good Luck. Please bring your
Student ID and vote.
PROFESSIONAL SWM, 44, ISO a charm-
ing young woman, 18-25, to be an adven-
turous and imaginative springtime playmate.
Please respond, with photo, to POB 4144,
Greenville, 27836-2144
THE CROSS CULTURE SUPPORTS Nix
for President, Rivenbark for Vice President
Phillips for Treasurer, and Thompson for
Secretary. Do not forget to vote on Wednes-
day.
SAM SUPPORTS NIX, RIVENBARK,
Phillips, and Thompson in the '96 SGA elec-
tions. Vote with Student ID on Wednesday,
March 27th.
DEAR CRAZY WOMAN OF PARIS:
I know who your daughter is. She's the beau-
tiful gypsy woman that dances in the square
- and she goes by the name of Esmerelda.
-Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are eli-
gible regardless of grades, income, or par-
ent's income. Let us help. Call Student Fi-
nancial Services: 1400-2634495extF53625

Greek
Personals
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week youth
recreationalsports campour 42nd season!
Over 25 activities, including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, Go-karts, artCool Mountain
Climate, EXCELLENT pay and great fun!
Non-smokers. For applicationbrochure: 704-
692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
SELF PROTECTION? We have a wide se-
lection of personal security products such
as keychain sprayers and hand held jogging
weights (with built in sprayers). For a free
catalog write: Successfully Yours, PO Box
2437, WinterviUe, NC 28590 or call 35S3565
KENMORE "PORTABLE" CLOTHES
WASHER $50; Men's Bikes: Trek 500; Ra-
leigh "Record Smith-Corona Correcting
Typewriter $50. All work fine. 752-7947
MACINTOSH LC MONrrERKEYBOARD.
452 $275.00 O.B.O. Must sell! 4134565
Ask for David i
RECREATIONAL SERVICES IS LOOK-
ING for a photographer who will be respon-
sible for shooting, developing and printing
candid and group sport and recreational pho-
tographs. Utilization of video camcorder re-
quired. 35mm slide photography desired.
Special skills include black and white film
developing and printing A fully equipped
dark room is provided.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make up
to $2545hr. teaching basic conversational
English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea. No
teaching background or Asian languages re-
quired. For information call: (206)971-
W"P����l"�i�iB���P���WBBBB�1
ALPHA PHI, THANKS FOR the great so-
cial South of the Border. We're already look-
ing forward to the next one. Delta Sig.
DELTA SIG, YOU REALLY know how to
satisfy a girls sweet tooth! Thanks for a won-
derful time. Love the sisters of Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI SUPPORTS ANGIE Nix for
Student Body President Good luck and we
love you. Don't forget to vote Wednesday,
March 27 and have your valid Student ID.
SIG TAU - - Thanks for a great time at Peas-
ants. Hope we can do it again. Love, Alpha
Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS CHERIE LAMB
AND STEPHANIE STILWELL on your en-
gagements! We wish you both the best We
love you! Your Delta Zeta Sisters.
DELTA SIG, CONGRATULATIONS ON the
best Tunnel party yet A job well done to
Jack Poulos for pulling it off. C - love.
ZETA AND PI DELTA � We're looking for-
ward to getting together soon. Love, Alpha
Omicron Pi.
KAPPA SIGMA - - Thanks for making Sat-
urday night such a blast Hope t� jump on
the train again. Love, Alpha Omicron Pi.
PANHELLENIC SUPPORTS Angie Nix and
Julie Thompson for SGA elections. Don't for-
get to vote March 27 and bring your student
ID. Thanks!
LOOK WHO'S OUR GREEKS of the week:
ADPi-Beth McDonald; AOPi-Jen Klimek, Jen-
ni Sisk; Alpha PhPam Miller, Elevia Ph-male:
AZD-Kim Atwell, Andrea Luther, Chi Ome-
ga-I.insey Perry, Jen Buckly; DZ-Martha
Vaughn; Sigma-Reagan O'Meara; Zeta-Venes-
sa Farmer, Pi Delta-Stephanie Jones.
CHI OMEGA SUPPORTS NDC, Rivenbark,
Phillips, Thompson in the SGA elections.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WISHES Nix,
Rivenbark, Phillips and Thompson Good
Luck in the SGA Elections. Vote tomorrow
with your Student ID.
AZD WE HAD A fun social with you guys
at PB's. We definitely have to do it again
sometime. Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
JILL JOHNSON THANKS FOR everything
you have done for Delta Zeta. We owe it all
to you! We love you! Love, Your Sisters
THANK YOU AOPI FOR the great social at
Peasant's Cafe. We hope you enjoy the T-
shirts. We're looking forward to the next so-
cial. The Brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma.
PI KAPPA PHI - - we had a great time with
you guys Thursday. Let's do it again. Love,
Alpha Omicron Pi.
TORRI FORBES WE ARE so proud of you
j for winning 3rd place in the Bikini Contest
at The Elbo! Love, Your Delta Zeta Sisters.
Announcements
THE SPINAL CORD INJURY Association
of Eastern NC will be sponsoring an over-
night camping trip Saturday and Sunday
April 13-14,1996 for individuals with spinal
cord injuries. Individuals with other disabili-
ties are welcome to join us for the daytime
activities. The weekend will include camp-
ing, cooking, fishing, trail hiking, canoeing,
and other outdoor activities. The campsite
chosen is Goose Creek State Park in Wash-
ington, NC. We will be meeting at Goose
Creek about 10am on Saturday the 13th and
will be leaving at 2pm on Sunday the 14th.
Participants will need to bring a packed
lunch for Saturday. Individuals with access
to sleeping bags, blankets, egg crates, flash-
lights, and other equipment are encouraged
to bring them. We ask that those without
equipment let us know in advance so they
can be provided. The registration deadline
is April 1st and space is limited. There will
be a registration fee that will be determined
at a later date. For registration and any ques-
tions contact Kathy Fletcher at (919) 514-
4806 between 8am-5pm.
RABIES VACCINATION CLINICS IN Pitt
County will be held the last weekend in
March at all veterinarians offices in Pitt
County. Clinics will be held during regular
office hours on Friday, March 29, and on
Saturday, March 30. The fee is $5.00 per cat
or dog vaccinated
Announcements
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL be hav-
ing a meeting Thursday, March 28 at 5:00pm
in Brewster C room 305. We will be discuss-
ing the Walter B. Jones, Jr. visit along with
many other issues. Everyone is welcome to
attend.
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION:
NORTH Johnson, General Manager of the
Kinston Indians, will be speaking at the
American Marketing Association meeting
Wednesday, March 27 at 5:00pm GCB Rm
1026. Ail students and faculty are invited.
Refreshments will be served.
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY SPE
CIAL OLYMPICS Local Spring Games will
be held on Friday, April 19 at J. H. Rose
High School from 9:30am-l:30pm. If you
would like to volunteer to be a Buddy for
our Special Olympians on that day, please
attend our buddy orientation meeting on
Wednesday, April 17 at Mendenhall from
5pm4pm in room 244. All of our volunteers
will receive a Special Olympics Volunteer T-
Shirt and a lunch (hot dog and coke). Please
call the Special Olympics Office at 830-4551
if you have any questions. We here at the
Special Olympics office on behalf of our 769
Special Olympians, Thank you for your sup-
port of our Local Program.
N C STATE REP HENRY ALDRIDCE will
be speaking to the Pitt County Young Re-
publicans on Tuesday, March 26 � River-
side Steak Bar, 7:00pm
HORSEBACK RIDING TRIP: Recreation
al Services Adventure Program is going on
a Sunset Beach Horseback Riding Trip April
11. Be sure to register in 204 Christenbury
by April 3 because this trip fills up fast1 For
more information call Recreational Services
at 3284387.
LINVILLE GORGE: TEST your climbing
skills and take a trip April 12-14 to Linville
Gorge for a weekend of arm-burning, finger-
pumping fun. Register in 204 Christenbury
by April 4. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3284387
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS: Next meeting
is Thursday, March 28, 1996 in GCB 1019
at 5:00pm. Will be an interview workshop
with Jeff Henley of Career Services. We
would also like to encourage everyone to
vote on Wednesday, March 27,1996. Don't
forget you student ID. See you at the meet-
ing. If you have any questions, please call
Jacqie at 3283302.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC events for March
26 through April 2: Held at A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall and free unless otherwise not-
ed. TUES, March 26-GUEST RECITAL,
Elaine Funaro, harpsichord 8:00pm. WED,
March 27-ECU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Stephen Blackwelder, Conductor, Young
People's Concert, Wright Auditorium.
TUESTHUR JAZZ ENSEMBLE, Peter Mills,
Director, 8:00pm. THURS, March 2&CON-
CERT CHOIR, Brett Watson, Conductor,
8:00pm, FRI, March 29SENIOR RECITAL,
Michael Montgomery, piano, 7:00pm, JAZZ
AT NIGHT, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr Director
The Great Room, MSC, 8:00pm SENIOR RE-
CITAL, Adrienne Walter, piano, 9KKpm, SAT,
March 30-JUN1OR RECITAL, Maurice Medley
and David Carpenter, saxophone 7:00pm, JU-
NIOR AND SOPHMORE RECITAL, Russell
Knight saxophone and Jason Barclift, horn,
9:00pm. SUN, March 31-SENlOR RECITAL,
Jason Connoly, string bass, 4:00pm. SENIOR
RECITAL, Candice Clayton, clarinet, 7:00pm.
MON, April 1-PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE.
Mark Ford, Director, 8:00pm. TUES, April 2-
SENIOR RECITAL, Josh White, composition,
7:00pm. SOPHOMORE RECITAL, Angela
Suggs, piano, 9:00pm. For additional infor-
mation, call ECU4851 or the 24-hour ho-
tline at ECU-4370
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL be hav-
ing a meeting Thursday, March 28 at 5:00pm
in Brewster C room 305. We will be discuss-
ing the Walter B. Jones Jr. visit along with
many other issues. Everyone is welcome to
attend.
TENNIS DOUBLES COMPETITION: TEN-
NIS players grab your racquet and register
for Tennis Doubles competition by Wednes-
day, March 27 in 204 Christenbury Gym.
There will be men's and women's divisions.
For more information call Recreational Serv-
ices at 3284387
FREE TAX RETURN PREPARATION: An
honor society of accounting majors in the
Department of Accounting at ECU'S School
of Business will be providing free tax return
preparation assistance on Friday, March 29,
in the General Classroom Building 1028,
from 2-5pm. The accounting student honor
society, Beta Alpha Psi, will be offering free
assistance to anyone who would like help
preparing their Federal and State tax re-
turns. The student honor society is offering
this service under the auspices of the Inter-
nal Revenue Service's (IRS) Volunteer In-
come Tax Assistance Program, know as
"VITA People seeking assistance are en-
couraged to bring W-2 forms. Federal and
state tax return form packets they may have
received in the mail, any "1099" forms re-
ceived from banks, other financial institu-
tions. Social Security, or related to retire-
ment income. Also, bring a copy of last year's
tax return if a copy is available. If in doubt
bring the document along Assistance is avail-
able to the entire community. All ECU staff,
graduate students, and undergraduate stud-
ents are welcome. Any questions can be ad-
dressed to Dr. McCarthy at 3284623 or Dr.
Schneider at 3284161.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB: THERE will be
a meeting today in the General Classroom
Building room 3009 at 5:00. The purpose of
this meeting is to nominate officers for next
year. This is a great chance for members to
become involved and for non-members to
gain some insight about the club. Your at-
tendance is extremely important and much
appreciated.
ENJOY SINGING? UNIVERSITY CHOR-
ALE MUSIC 1635 12:00 M, W, F. ECU
School of Music NO AUDITION REQUIRED
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS WILL
have a regular meeting 7pm at Chico's. New
& Old members welcome. Any ?'s Call Cris-
tie � 3554474 or e-mail ugfarley
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL pres-
ent U.S. Congressman Walter B. Jones, Jr.
as speaker on April 1, 1996 at 4:30 pm in
Jenkins Art Auditorium, Room 1220 on the
campus of East Carolina University.
DRIVE-IN MOVIES: DRIVE over or bring
a blanket to the Drive-in Movies on Thurs-
day, March 28 at 9:00pm in the College Hill
Commuter Parking Lot and see a free show-
ing of Top Cun and Raiders of The Lost Ark.
This activity is sponsored by the Student
Union Films Committee and Recreational
Services. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services 3284387
j
TOUR DE'MALL BIKE RACE: Grab your
bike and come to the Tour De'Mall Bike Race
on Saturday, March 30 at 9:00am on the Cen-
tral Mall. Preregister in 204 Christenbury
Gym. Participants may register on site. For
more information call Angela Baumann at
Recreational Services 3284387.
SWCJ ALLIANCE NEEDS YOU: The SW
CJ Alliance needs volunteers to help with
the First Annual School of Social Work and
Criminal Justice Fish Fry which will take
place Alumni Weekend Friday, March 29th.
Volunteers are needed for set up, clean up,
food servers and more. If you would like to
volunteer your time, any amount, please
contact Deb Young, mailbox 138, Tracy
Beam, Shea Taylor, Neshawn Cox or Gail
Sharpe. Come out and have some fun with
your friends and help support our School.
B-GLAD: OUR NEXT meeting will be on
March 27, 1996 at 7:30pm in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Come check out
our new meeting format which includes ac-
tivities and refreshments. Don't forget to
bring canned food for our ongoing Picasso
food drive. Take care!





- . , .
14
Tuesday, March 26, 1996
The East Carolinian


Tomorrow
Wednesday, March 27th
SGA ELECTIONS




Come out au
l0ut 0-
for
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary


presents

SGA Presidential Debate
Between

Tonight at 8:00pm on WZMB 91.3
Call in at 328-6913 and ask your presidential candidates any question you
want about ECU and SGA





Title
The East Carolinian, March 26, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 26, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1134
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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