The East Carolinian, March 21, 1996






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THUHS
March 21,1996
Vol71,No. 47
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
Board finds funding
lacks fair share
14 pases
Around the State
MORGANTON,N.C.(AP)-It
is unlikely that anyone will be
charged in connection with the
deaths of two children in a fire
earlier this month, a prosecutor
said.
A report released by fire in-
vestigators Tuesday said the par-
ents and adult relatives of
Zacheriah and Angelica Cooper
routinely left lighters in easy reach
even though some of the family's
five children had a history of play-
ing with fire.
Zacheriah, 1, and Angelica, 3,
died of smoke inhalation after a
sibling ignited bedding with a
cigarette lighter March 1.
HIGH POINT (AP) - A police
officer offered $500 of his own
money for information that leads
to an arrest of people involved in
a dog fighting ring that dumped
brutalized dogs by the side of the
road.
Nelson Moxley announced
his offer Monday on television. He
had received more than $2,400 by
Tuesday afternoon from people
wanting to help the cause.
Officers discovered the four
dead and two injured dogs Mon-
day morning.
Around the Country
DENVER (AP) - Police hunt-
ing for the driver in the 100 mph
hit-and-run death of a newspaper
columnist tracked down the sus-
pect through a piece of the car -
a "cosmos black" $56,000 BMW
so rare there are only three in all
of Colorado.
But when police went to his
home to arrest him, the suspect
- a fast-driving scion of one of the
West's richest families - was
found dead, an apparent suicide.
Breeden, 36, owned a BMW.
CHICAGO (AP) - Prosecu-
tors today dropped all charges
against a man they had said re-
peatedly raped his children, in-
jected them with drugs and fed
them rats and roaches.
The move comes six weeks
after a spectacular 1,200-count
assault, abuse and battery indict-
ment was revealed against Gerald
Hill. Family members applauded
as his case was discharged.
In court today, prosecutor
Mark Cavins said the state could
not sustain its burden of proof
after three of the four children
recanted their stories.
Around the World
BEIJING (AP) - A powerful
earthquake has leveled remote
towns in northwestern China, kill-
ing at least 24 people and leaving
10,000 homeless.
The magnitude 6.9 earth-
quake late Tuesday struck settle-
ments along the centuries-old
trade route known as the Silk
Road in China's Xinjiang region.
The quake and 68 after-
shocks of up to magnitude 5.1
caused 50,000 buildings to col-
lapse and cracked a dike, govern-
ment seismologists said Wednes-
day. At least 78 people were in-
jured, nine of them serious.
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
A preliminary study requested by
the state legislature found that five
of the 15 schools in the university
system, including ECU, have been
under-funded, but there is no infor-
mation yet on
whether or
how this ineq-
uity will be ad-
dressed.
The legis-
lature re-
quested the In-
equity of Ex-
pe n ditu re
Funding Study
to determine if
any schools in
the system had
received less
than their fair
share of fund-
ing in the past
The study ��mi����,������
used four basis of comparison. These
included a campus to campus compari-
son within the university system, a
comparison of system campuses with
"We are pleased
that our analysis
of under-funding
have been
confirmed by an
independent and
objective
consultant"
� Richard Brown, vice
chancellor of business affairs
similar campuses in the south and a
comparison of comparable campuses
in the nation, and they picked four
states and ran UNC- system data
through their budgeting formulas.
Results showed that ECU has
been under-funded by $4.8 million
dollars, or $306 dollars per full-time
student
"We are pleased
that our analysis of
under-funding have
been confirmed by
art independent and
objective consult-
ant said Richard
Brown, vice chancel-
lor of business af-
fairs. "ECU faces
many challenges that
this type of addi-
tional funding would
go a long ways to sat-
isfy
The study infor-
mation was just one
of many topics dis-
Mmmbmmb cussed at a regional
meeting of the UNC Board of Gover-
nors held Tuesday afternoon at
Mendenhall Student Center.
The meeting was one of six re-
gional meetings the board sponsored
across the state to familiarize area
legislators with the university system's
concerns for the General Assembry's
summer session.
Seventy or more legislators are
expected to attend one of the work-
shops.
"Don't go anywhere without the
support of your bankers said C. A
Spangler, president of the UNC-system
schools. "You, the legislature, are our
bankers
The board of governors' humber-
one priority is a significant salary in-
crease for faculty and other EPA em-
ployees, according to their informa-
tion packet
The board seeks a five percent
increase for all EPA employees and
an additional two percent increase for
faculty and certain others with direct
student contact such as librarians.
Salary increases are expected to
cost $53.3 million.
"All increases will be judged on
merit Chancellor Richard Eakin said.
"Give it to the people who deserve it
the most"
The failure of salaries to keep up
See BOARD page 4
ITwo rapes occur before break
Student presses
charges against
employer
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
Two ECU students, ages 18 and
21, were victims of unrelated rapes
the week before spring break.
According to police reports from
the Greenville Police Department the
first assault occurred on Feb. 27 in a
Sheraton Village townhouse. Detec-
tive D. R. Best of the Greenville Po-
lice Department said that the victim,
age 18 worked as an employee of the
assailant in a local restaurant
"The victim accepted an invita-
tion for a drink at his residence Best
said.
The victim was sexually as-
saulted later in the evening. Best said
the victim did not give consent for
the sexual activity and had not previ-
ously dated the suspect
The victim went to ECU's stu-
dent health center following the
crime. Later, the victim filed a report
with the Greenville Police Depart-
ment The suspectwas questioned by
the police department and released.
To date, the victim has not de-
cided to prosecute the case. Detective
Best commended the victim for report-
ing the incident
"Prosecution is a very personal
decision the victim must make Best
said. "The victim must decide if the
outcome is worth the exposure. I
think any rape victim is very brave to
come forward and report the crime
Police reports also show a simi-
lar crime which occurred on Feb. 29
in the parking lot behind the Univer-
sity Book Exchange (UBE), at 543
Evans St A student age 21, was leav-
ing the downtown area at 1:15 am
when an unknown man entered her
vehicle on the passenger side.
Reports stated that the suspect
drove the victim to a dirt road north
of Greenville where he attempted to
rape her. Two vehicles followed them
and five men stood outside her vehicle
as the crime occurred.
Following a struggle, the victim
fled in her car and was forced off
the road by the other vehicles. She
ran to a nearby house and contacted
the Pitt County Sheriffs Depart-
ment
Greenville police reports de-
scribe the suspect in the kidnapping
and rape as being, "a black male,
510' and 175 Ibs 22-25 years old,
with black hair and a mustache
Detective Best said, that in any
rape case, immediately contacting
the police is imperative.
"The sooner you report a sexual
assault, the better the chance of pros-
ecution you have Best said. "Head
hair, pubic hair, pictures and fibers
from the crime scene can be re-
trieved
Detective Best recommends that
students take any preventative steps
possible.
"Make sure that your doors are
locked at all times and the window
shades are pulled Best said. "Don't
undress in front of the windows and
never accept rides from strangers
Anyone with in.ormation should
contact the Greenville Police Depart-
ment at 8304315.
On-line class schedules ease registration
CIS plans to update classes
daily throughout week
Tara Conrad
Staff Writer
Ever stop to think about what a hassle registra-
tion is? Especially after standing for hours in one line,
only to find out that your class is already full? Worry
no more.
ECU's Department of Computing and Information
Systems (CIS) has developed a new program on the
World Wide Web (WWW) System that will solve all of
students' pre-registration worries.
Now, with access to the WWW, it is easy to find
out if certain classes are going to be open once it comes
time for registration. If you do not have access to the
WWW on a personal home computer, access to the
system is available on one of the many computers at
the various labs across campus, along with those lo-
cated in the library.
This system was developed only two weeks ago. It
wili give students listings of the latest updates on classes
categorized by the different schools, such as the School
of Art or the School of Business. As of now, the listings
will include the classes for both summer sessions and
next fall semester.
"This is a big step forward for us in the depart-
ment said Freda Pollard, a development manager for
CIS. "It gives students a chance to gain access to real
live data that is just a couple of hours old in order to
complete the hard part of registration, right on their
own
The system was developed by a group of people at
CIS who started by taking snapshots of the various
data. A programming group then went on to put these
snapshots together, which took a couple of weeks to
complete. As registration proceeds, there will be people
within the CIS office providing the new data day by
day.
"We will try to update the new data as quickly as
possible said Blake Price, director of CIS. "The size
of the classes will change as each new student regis-
ters, which is a fast-moving process
See ON-LINE page 3
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
New attorney general Dawn Woodward is sworn in by SGA
Speaker Harry Bray during Monday night's meeting.
SGA swears in new
attorney general
Adviser appointed
from downtown
courthouse
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) has found an outside
adviser, appointed a new attorney
general and suspended rules to fund
a Student Volunteer Program dur-
ing the past two legislative meetings.
Angie Nix, SGA treasurer, an-
nounced Glen Perry as the SQA ad-
viser. Perry is an assistant district
attorney in downtown Greenville. In
addition, he is an alumnus at ECU
and took part in SGA. He spoke
briefly about commitment
"Remember goals of improving
East Carolina Perry said, "you must
have the desire to improve East Caro-
lina through student government
Don't let doubters get you down, ful-
fill your potential Use opportunity
to the fullest"
Dawn Woodwanl was sworn in
under oath as the new attorney gen-
eral to finish out the year, after the
previous attorney general David
McDaniel resigned. Woodward held
a position on the honor board and
was recommended by Karen Boyd.
associate dean of students and the
dean of students' office.
There will continue to be an in-
vestigation of the honor board and
its procedures pertaining to the rep-
resentation of students on campus.
"The constitution calls for a spe-
cial procedure for review of the
honor board said Jonathan Phillips,
SGA rules and judiciary chair, "it
consists of eight people: two ap-
pointed by the student body presi-
dent (Ian Eastman), two appointed
by the speaker of legislation (Harry
Bray), two appointed by the honor
board itself and two appointed by
the faculty. The president and the
speaker have called for that meet-
ing to be convened
There was debate about fund-
ing the ECU Student Volunteer Pro-
gram. The appropriations committee
originally asked to suspend the rules
so that the program could receive
immed.ate funding. Their allotted
budget allows volunteering students
to be covered by insurance.
"The most active volunteer time
is in the spring said Dale Emery,
SGA vice president "The insurance
covers 125 students volunteering at
one time
The main concern expressed by
Eastman was the fact that SGA is to
fund student organizations with con-
stitutions. He warned the legislature
to be careful with funding programs.
"Procedur'ally funding is
sound Bray said.
The bill passed.
Also, Eastman announced that
all student organizations need to have
their annual appropriations budgets
turned in to the SGA office at
Mendenhall 255, by April 1.
"I am willing to assist any groups
that have questions Nix said.
Registration concerns
voiced by students
Chancellor seeks improvements
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Senior Writer
As the sounds of spring echoes around the ECU campus, students are prepar-
ing themselves for the heartache of registration.
Long lines, meeting with their advisers, not getting the classes they wanted
and an abundance of other problems are just a few of the things students have to
look forward to.
Die hard students who are determined to camp out in front of Whichard so
they will be able to get to a terminal that is open before eight o'clock will no longer
have that luxury. All terminals will open at 8 am mis semester.
"The problems with registration is not being able to get the classes you need
for your major said Crystal Davis, a sophomore music therapy major.
Other students are angry that certain classes are not every semester.
"ECU does not offer the classes you need every semester said Vikki Barkley,
a freshman pre-pharmacy major.
Students feel that by not offering classes every semester they cannot get the
classes they need to graduate.
"You cannot get all the classes you want, "said Eddie Lee. a junior history
major. "I know of a few classes that are only offered once every two or three semes-
ters
See REG page 3
Lumbee heritage displayedpage f
Call for a new drinking agepage O
Women's softball succeedspage 1 1
Thursday
Partly cloudy
jjk
High 45
Low 35
Weekend
Fair and warmer
High 62
Low 38
�W e ee4 eu
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328-6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM�IS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Thursday, March 21, 1996
The East Carolinian
Pow-Wow set
for weekend
BICYttC
March 13
Communicating threats - A student reported that a resident of Scott
Hall threatened to shoot her and her famify. Warrants were obtained and
the suspect was arrested in his room at Scott Hall.
Harassing phone call - A resident of Greene Hall reported receiving a
sexually explicit telephone call in her room by an unknown male.
Trespassing - A non-student was arrested for trespassing after she was
found in a room in Scott Hall. The student had been previously banned
from campus. The resident of the room was issued a campus appearance
ticket for aiding and abetting a trespasser and possession of a malt bever-
age underage.
Possession of marijuana - A resident of Scott Hail was issued a cam-
pus appearance ticket and a state citation for possession of drug parapher-
nalia. Another Scott Hall resident was issued a campus appearance ticket
for the use of marijuana.
March 14
Harassing phone calls - A resident of Cotten Hall reported receiving
harassing phone calls from a person in the homeless shelter. The victim
does not wish to press charges.
Ticket Scalping - Two non-students were charged with selling tickets
to the high school basketball tournament at prices higher than the face
value of the ticket One of the violators was also charged with resist and
obstructing an officer.
March 15
Driving after drinking, Seat belt violation, Oneway street violation
& Failure to carry operator license - A non-student was stopped for back-
ing down Dowell Way the wrong way and was charged with the offenses
listed above.
March 16
Damage to property - An officer discovered a large stone and cement
ash tray were broken south of the Student Store.
Breaking and entering a motor vehicle - A non-student reported the
breaking and entering of her vehicle parked in the Fifth and Reade Streets
parking lot A camera was taken from the vehicle.
Fraudulent use of a credit card - A resident of Aycock Hafl �ported
her credit card had been taken to make purchases.
March 17
Damage to coin operated machine & Larceny from snack vending
machine - A staff member reported the breaking and entering of a snack
machine and the larceny of snack items from the snack machine in the
basement of Aycock Hall.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Debra Byrne
Staff Wrttor
The East Carolina Native Ameri-
can Organization (ECNAO) has already
and will participate in a number of
activities thia week.
A Pow- Wow will be held at the
bottom of College Hill on Saturday
from 12-6 p.m. This is a gathering of
Native American tribes from all over
the U.S. primarily from the east coast
The Pow-Wow is open to the public in
order to open the group and their cul-
ture to the community.
There will be Native American
dancing, drumming, singing and trad-
ers will be there selling Native Ameri-
can crafts.
Nikki Epps, president of ECNAO
said a Pow-Wow is a way to carry on
traditions and renew friendships as well
as meet others.
"A Pow-Wow is a celebration of
Native American culture in order to
honor our culture and carry on tradi-
tions Epps said. "It is spiritual, reli-
gious and social. There is a lot of mean-
ing behind a Pow-Wow and you should
be there to experience it"
Also, because ECNAO is the only
Native American organization at ECU,
the student union visual arts commit-
tee asked the organization to host the
reception for the Lumbee Heritage Art
Ehibit that is currently being shown
in Mendendall Student Center.
This traveling exhibit is of the
Lumbee heritage and was sent to ECU
by the Mint Museum in Charlotte.
Information concerning this ex-
hibit came to the student union. Since
there had not been an exhibit in awhile,
the visual arts committee decided to
have the exhibit at ECU as a co-pro-
gram with other groups.
This 40 piece photo exhibit dis-
plays Native American family and daily
life. The majority of photographs were
taken by David Oxendine.
Tyler Dokery, the chairperson of
the visual arts committee which is run
through the student union, said this
See CAMPUS page 3
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Correction: TECs March 19, article "Disorder degree
offered this fall" was in error. Only a few students will be
accepted this fall; eventually nine or ten students will be
taken, and the program will officially begin fall '97.
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The East
Carolinian.
R
The S. Rudolph
Alexander
Performing
Arts Series

IL ' J" Jl
Qu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
your bells. �3as
It'll ring
Register:
May 13
1st Session:
May 14-Ju
Register:
June 19
2nd Session
June 2
u0 reOr
Division of
Continuing Studies
Office of Summer School
Schedule of
Summer School Classes
Available Prior to Early Registration
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university, which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilines
Ur
Wednesday,
April 3,1996
8:00 p.m.
Wright
Auditorium �
Discount student tickets
$10 in advance at the
Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhali Student
Center, Monday-Friday
8:30 a.m6:00 p.m.
with a valid ECU ID.
All tickets $20 at the door.
But mere's no tragedy in this play.
This play is a riotous comedy�a kind
of Bart SimpsonMonty Python version
of the classic, complete with audience
participation. So don't miss your chance
to throw styrorocks and eat on stage
in Wright Auditorium.
'JUtVe ft.
6. n
wmmmmmm





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 21,1996
Redefining
higher
educati
Come spend part of your evening with repre-
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and enjoy an adventure with new friends in the
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March 25, 7 p.m.
Outpost Trailshop
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V
ON-LINE from
page 1
REG
Pollard agrees.
"There is stil! no guarantee that
you will get into this class, because
the information changes every
minute Pollard said. "But it is good
to browse the night before register-
ing as a last minute check
Once gaining access to a com-
puter, the process is simple. Go to
the ECU Home Page and press the
academics button. On the Academic
Affairs home page, press the button
for course schedule. Here, you will
select one of the summer sessions
or the fall semester by pressing the
corresponding button. A list of the
various academic departments will
come up on the screen. Select the
department of your choice, then
press the button for the specific
course. Now you will see information
about the sections of your class,
which will include the number of
orSen seats left.
Students especially like this new
development.
Sophomore John Moch said, "I
have access to America Online, and
now I can put it to an even better use
Junior Lucas Berrini said he
thinks that it will save a lot of time
and hassle. "Getting up at five in the
morning to wait in line, only to find
out that I didn't get into my class is
not my ideal morning
Freshman Kelly Miller said she
is looking forward to using the sys-
tem. "Once I learn how to use it, I
will definitely take advantage of it
Miller said.
CIS is currently working on pro-
grams where students can privately
check school records. In the future,
students may be able to gain access
to their financial aid records or even
their grades, all by using the WWW.
from page 1
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Some students do not have a prob-
lem with registration because they feel
they are competent and can figure things
out themselves.
"I do not have a problem register-
ing said Stacie Haymes, a sophomore.
"I know what I am doing
Chancellor Richard Eakin said there
will be improvements made in registra-
tion this semester. He said the changes
were made because of results of a study
conducted by the Registration Focus
Group, which he appointed last fall.
The changes that have been intro-
duced to help students relieve stress are
vast Eakin would like to see informa-
tion about the registration process be
communicated more effectively by offer-
ing information on the World Wide Web.
Eakin also asked that academic vice chan-
cellors, deans, chairs and faculty senate
officers review the "special permissions"
required to register. He would like to put
an end to the majority of "special per-
missions" needed for classes. In the fu-
ture, Eakin would like to investigate the
possibility of registering through on-line
computerized registration that students
could use themselves.
Eakin asked students to be patient
while registering. He said he recognizes
registration is a stressful time. He said
the best way for students to handle reg-
istration is to see your advisor before
registration week, have your schedule
planned out before you see your advisor
and have an alternate plan just in case
you do not get all the classes you need.
"When I was a freshman or sopho-
more registration was a real pain in the
(butt) said Desmond Marks, a senior
computer science major. "I don't really
have a problem now that 1 am a senior
and I don't know if there is much they
can do about the problems of registra-
tion because of the school's budget
John Durham, director of the New
Bureau said list cf where available regis-
tration terminals will be located can be
found in the financial aid office, the cash
iers office, the student center, lobby and
at the cash registers of the student stores,
the graduate student office and the bul-
letin boards of all residence halls.
CAMPUS from page 2
exhibit is a good opportunity for oth-
ers who are uninformed about the
Native American culture here in North
Carolina.
"This gives us a chance to see their
heritage and how their life has been
Dokery said. "This photo exhibit is not
a substitute for actually talking to Na-
tive Americans and learning about
their life and heritage first hand
A reception was given Monday to
introduce this exhibit by the East Caro-
lina Native American Organization
(ECNAO), an organisation here on cam-
pus. There was food, drumming by the
ECNAO drum team. Eastern Bull and
dancing by members of ECNAO's Four
Winds dance team.
Carver Music
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PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT R
RECOLLECTIONS: f
m Lumbee Heritage �
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Co-sponsored by the ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee and the
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Awards Party
Monday, March 25
9 p.m. in the TV Lounge
Prizes and free refreshments. Come and cheer
on your favorite film personalities, up close and
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Thursday nights at 8 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room 5:
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
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Thursday, March 21, 1996
The East Carolinian
BOARD from page 1
with the cost o! living resulted in uni-
versity system wages to tall from the
first quintile nationally to the third
quintile.
That is below the salary levels of
4O60 percent of institutions with com-
parable missions When benefits are
factored in, UNC ranks even lower.
��Our faculty and staff are good
soldiers Eakin said. "1 knew it's on
their mind that their salaries aren't
keeping up with the rate of inflation
tlier states are making aggres-
sive moves to overtake UNC. The state
of Georgia raised faculty salaries by 6
percent last year and has committed
to percent annual raises through 1998.
"If this erosion continues, we're
going to have trouble Spangler said.
It we let Georgia get ahead of us, we're
dead ducks.
Legislators expressed concerned
about long term effects on retaining
staff.
"We have to compete with private
institutions, out-of-state public institu-
tions and corporations Spangler said.
�It's especially difficult to get corpo-
rate finance and computer science
people because of competition with
triangle park industry
"This is disgraceful ninth district
Representative Henry Aldridge said. "I
hope we can do something about it
The board also expressed strong
support for salary increases for univer-
sity SPA employees.
Legislators raised questions con-
cerning the possibility of an engineer-
ing school as requested by the Global
Transpark.
"It's obvious that ECU would like
an engineering school as all the other
campuses would Spangler said. "1
don't know how it's going to turn out"
Citing the many letters and phone
calls received by the board from
easterners favoring an engineering
school for their area, Eakin said an
official request should have come via
proper channels.
"This engineering school didn't
come through the university at all
Eakin said. "This is so far out of the
normal cycle that nobody knows what
to do with it Whatever programs are
developed, we need to work with and
support the global TransPark
The board is also seeking $11.8
million in funding to improve compen-
sation and benefits for graduate stu-
dents who serve as teaching or re-
search assistants.
According to the board's informa-
tion packet, virtually all other public
institutions offer graduate students
either a free education or in-state tu-
ition rates in return for their services
as teachers and researchers. The net
cost to graduate students is so low that
a N. C. student could attend many ex-
cellent public institutions as an out-of-
state graduate student at a lower cost
than the resident tuition and fees re-
quired at N. C. state or UNC-Chapel
Hill.
A benefits package tha wouW
include health insurance, a prerequi-
site offered free by many competing
institutions, would account for $8.5
million of the requested increase.
In conjunction with providing
more equitable compensation for teach-
ing assistants, the board said it would
like to strengthen the programs avail-
able to ensure that foreign-bom gradu
ate students who teach are proficient
in spoken English.
The board is requesting $12 mil-
lion to fund technology initiatives. This
will be used for equipment and the
training required for faculty to use the
fiber optic networks between libraries,
academic buildings and student's
rooms.
"This is our biggest need
Spangler said. "We have the ability to
get ahead in this area. Faculty mem-
bers are beginning to understand the
teaching possibilities
"This is the wave of the future.
No doubt about it Spangler said.
"This is real
Some campuses have made signifi
cant inroads in this costly endeavor,
the board said, but others lag far be-
hind for lack of funds.
"ECU is ahead of the curve
Eakin said. "We have installed a sys-
tem that allows us to connect any fac-
ulty office and student's rooms. Even
as I say this though, not all are on it
because we can't afford to make the
connections
The board is requesting $3 mil-
lion for services to the public school
svstem.
"We have 60,000 school teachers
who don't know how to use a com-
puter Spangler said. "We put those
teachers out there and it's our respon-
sibility to support them through their
career
The successes of ECU 's Model
Clinical Teaching Program have con-
vinced the deans of the system's 15
teaching programs to put similar pro-
grams into practice, Spangler said.
The board requested that tuition
be kept as low as possible. They said
that N.Cs practice of investing heavily
in the university, which has kept tu-
ition low. reflects the philosophy em-
bedded in our constitution that every-
one pay for the university because ev-
eryone benefits.
"They don't get a free education
Spangler said. "They pay for it continu-
ously over the course of their lives.
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"��'�TOT
Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
&&&�&zctfy

Our View
Our
intentions for
raising the
drinking age
didn't work,
so maybe its
time to
rethink a
decision that
didn't make
much sense
to begin with.
Most of ECU's student body has probabiy never per-
sonally experienced a time when 18-year-olds could le-
gally suck down alcoholic beverages. But it wasn't too
long ago that turning 18 meant, along with the right to
vote and die for the good old US of A, all the alcohol you
could drink. But if more states follow the lead of the
great state of Louisiana, that privilege could be returned.
Yes, it seems that Louisiana has declared the 21 drink-
ing age unconstitutional. We here at TEC applaud this
decision. While we certainly don't endorse alcohol abuse,
we find the whole 21 drinking age idea a bit ridiculous
and inherently unfair.
In America, citizens are officially considered adults
at the age of 18, with all the benefits and penalties that
adult status brings with it At 18, we are allowed to vote
in local and national elections. We are considered ma-
ture enough to have a say in the way the country will be
run, but we aren't mature enough to drink a Budweiser?
Another glorious part of being an adult is military
service. At 18, all men are required to register for the
Selective Service under threat of financial penalty. If
America goes to war, those same 18-year-old men can be
drafted and sent off to fight and die. But they can't have
alcohol.
Also, 18-year-olds who commit crimes are tried as
adults. They are old enough to know right from wrong,
the state reasons. They are mature enough to control
their own fate and make their own decisions regarding
the breaking of the law. If convicted of a serious enough
crime, they can serve hard prison time or, in some states,
get the death penalty. But they can't buy a beer.
If they want, people can get married at 18. They can
hold a job, buy a house and a car, pay taxes, buy pornog-
raphy and raise a family. That's right, people can create
and guide a new human being through life, shaping their
own little piece of the world's future at the tender age of
18. But if they have a mixed drink, they might do some-
thing crazy.
The original intent of the 21 drinking age was to
keep alcohol out of the hands of high school kids. A
high school student, it was reasoned, might have 18-year-
old friends who could buy them beer. But those same
kids would be less likely to have 21-year-old friends, and
so the raising of the drinking age was instated.
It was the '80s, the age of Reagan and "Just say no
and America was willing to sacrifice the rights of its new
adults in the name of saving its youth from the evils of
alcohol.
Unfortunately, anybody who's been in or around a
high school in the years since the drinking age went up
knows that it didn't work. High school kids drink just as
much as they ever did. Somebody's always got an older
sibling, or maybe there's this old drunk who'll buy stuff
for the kids in return for a share of the loot.
Whatever the case, the plan didn't work. It was ill-
advised and unfair to begin with, and it's time we cor-
rected this mistake. Several other states are considering
legislation similar to Louisiana's, so maybe the days of
the 21 drinking age are numbered.
We can only pray.
UM7TD STATES
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Mexico
The East Carolinian
Timbre Zlon, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
�n Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perron, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Deanya LatUmore, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 192S, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edltton is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
tZZT � P'n!0n Edit�r' " " Carollnian- Pollutions Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
Adviser evaluations reap benefits
Well campers, everyone's favor-
ite time of the semester is just around
the corner. It is registration time. A
time when students frantically
scramble around trying to find out
who the best teachers are for the
classes that they'll be taking, what
section numbers their friends will be
in and when all the cute little fresh-
men camp outside Whichard.
The most important part of the
whole process is going to see your
adviser. This is where you go for guid-
ance. They are the faculty member
that helps a student to select classes,
plans their academic futures and
keeps track of your progress.
I have always been very fortunate.
My adviser has always been there for
me. He had, or made the time, to keep
me focused, ask me where I want to
go and show me how to get there.
When I was much newer to the Uni-
versity, he painstakingly took the time
to show me the ins and outs and in-
form me of my responsibilities. I feel
blessed and know that this has en-
riched my ECU experience immeasur-
ably.
Unfortunately, others have not
been so blessed. I often hear horror
stories from friends about dilemmas
with their advisers. Common com-
plaints heard around campus are that
advisers don't keep meetings well,
aren't around during theii isted of-
fice hours, and even more importantly,
they are not knowledgeable about the
programs they are supposed to be
guiding the students through.
I don't believe that these poor
advising practices are due to a com-
plete lack of responsibility or out of
sheer neglect It is out of being un-
aware of what is wrong with the way
they perform their duties. The fact of
the matter is that oftentimes advis-
ers, especially ones that are new to
the university themselves, are ill-in-
Chris Arline
Senior Opinion Columnist
The mosl &; -
important part of
the (registration)
process is going
to see your
adviser.
formed of what their duties are.
The good news is that those hard
working people over at the office of
undergraduate studies have come to
bat for both the students and the ad-
visers. They have compiled a survey
to help work out the problems. The
survey is entitled the AdviserAdvisee
Evaluation Survey. The survey posts
six statements which are to be re-
sponded to with one or two word an-
swers. The advisers are asked to par-
ticipate by handing out the surveys
during the student's visit for pre-reg-
istration and advising.
There will also be a table out in
front of the student stores March 18-
22 and the 25-29 between the hours
of 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Office assis-
tants from the academic support cen-
ter will be volunteering their time to
work the table.
Advisers have the option of
whether or not they wish to take part
in the survey by allowing themselves
to be evaluated. Since it is an option,
some may choo.se not to participate. I
consider this to be dropping the ball
and undoubtedly not fulfilling an ob-
ligation. When I take a test, I am ful-
filling an obligation that I have to
show my knowledge in the subject I
am being tested in. My professor then
evaluates my performance and returns
his judgment. If I don't get that evalu-
ation back, then I don't know what
my strengths and weaknesses (which
you'll never find on any of my tests)
are and therefore can't better myself
for the next time, thus not fulfilling
an obligation to be the best I can.
It is crucial that more students
take part in pre-registration. In recent
history, there has been a downward
trend of students taking part in this
process. Instead, they choose to wait
until right before the next semester
or during the first week of it. This is a
bad thing because it does not allow
the departments to schedule enough
classes. If only X number of students
sign up for a class early, then there
vail not be enough sections set aside
to accommodate the actual number
of students, Y, who need to take the
course. This means that since Y can-
not be accommodated, some students
will be graduating in four and a half
years instead of four because they
couldn't get all the classes they
needed in time. Remember this the
next time you can't get into a speech
class.
In conclusion, let me again stress
the importance of completing the
AdviserAdvisee Evaluation Survey. It
is the best way to ensure yourself that
your adviser knows what their
strengths and weaknesses are, and
how they can better themselves and
you the student.
No freshmen, I wasn't making fun
of you for being freshmen, that's noth-
ing to be ashamed of. When you get
older you realize that it makes a lot
more sense to just go to a department
that doesn't have much trafficking,
register just as quickly, and sleep in
your own bed. Some day you'll get all
your classes. But until then, make that
alternate list nice and long.
Elections fail to inform
Life is one big popularity race.
It's true! For instance, when we go
to vote for who we want to be the
president of the United States, how
much do we really know about the
candidates? Mainly how well they can
impress the people with their deceit
and cover-ups.
The great thing about this is that
we have the very same occurrence
going on right here at ECU. The elec-
tions are coming up and what do we
know about our own candidates?
Since there does not seem to be a
debate, how do we, the students,
know what these candidates can do
for us? Let's face it, that's why we
vote for these people, so they can
help us out.
I've seen tons of banners all tell-
ing me who to vote for. How can I
make a conscious decision as to
whom to vote for when I have no idea
who these people are or what they
stand for? It's quite logical to feel this
way, don't be so shy about it. Voice
your opinion and ask these candi-
dates what they can do to improve
ECU and to try and help the students
out If that candidate cannot give you
a concise answer to your question,
do they really need to be in office?
I wonder sometimes what life
would be like without all these poli-
ticians. Perhaps quieter and less pol-
luted. When election time comes
around, I make sure my boots are
pulled way up, because it sure begins
to pile up!
My point is that the candidates
at ECU have to hold important posi-
tions and we have no idea what they
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
We always
complain that our
fees go to waste
and that wfe need
more input ii
spending.
can do to help the campus. So, how
do we vote for them? Simple, popu-
larity. When it is time to vote, there
are tons of people running around
trying to slap a sticker on your chest
that announces to the world who you
should vote for. Sometimes if you're
real lucky, you can meet the actual
candidate. Don't expect these people
to be shaking hands or kissing ba-
bies though.
How can we stand to vote for
these people if they are just a name
on a piece of paper? Oh, there are
some beautiful banners out there, I
have to tell you. Yet, 1 wonder how
much time was spent on those ban-
ners. Surely that time could have
been better spent speaking to the
student and finding out what the stu-
dents feel are the problems here at
ECU. No, that time was spent mak-
ing those wonderful banners that we
can now see hanging up all over cam-
pus.
I have to hand it to this crowd,
they truly deserve to be politicians.
Imagine, running an entire campaign
without ever having to make an ap-
pearance or give any speeches, or for
that matter, announce your position
on certain issues. They do however,
have a small coverage in TEC. This
enables them to craft their image so
that the students believe they are the
best candidate for the job. To be able
to do that and win an election truly
is the work of a mastermind politi-
cian.
I'm sorry, but if we go out there
on election day and vote for certain
candidates because they dress well
or because they have nice smiles,
what does that say about us? Are we
so apathetic that we can't take the
effort to find out about these people?
I know that it takes effort, but if you
want your student fees spent prop-
erly and not wasted, you need to do
this.
We always complain that our
fees go to waste and that we need
more input into how our money is
spent; well then, do something about
it. This is our chance to decide who
can control our money. Once the
voting is over and the new candidate
is in office, the time for complaints
is over. Nothing more can be done.
We must live with the decisions we
make.
Remember, make this election
one that is concerned with issues and
what the candidates can do for us.
We pay to go here so let's make sure
our funds are not wasted by a deceit-
ful and corrupt politician.
"If you don't say anything, you won't be
.on to repeat it
� Calvin Coolidge, 30th U.S. president, c. 1920





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Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
LAKE IMP U.S.A.
BY JOHN MURPHY
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ARIES
March 21-April 20
Check out a heavily discounted
item. If looks aren't too important,
you could have found a real
bargain. A relationship takes a
turn for the better�keep working
to improve it.
TAURUS
April 21-May 21
Go for security rather than
extravagance�it's the wiser course
in the long run. Wrap up a project
with a flourish by giving it the
thoughtful, enthusiastic presenta-
tion it deserves. Then, treat yourself
to a special evening.
LIBRA
September 23-October 23
The impulse to spend is running
high, so lock up your credit cards
and stick to your grocery list. 3e
sure to include small indulgences
so you don't feel deprived. Entertain
this weekend to add extra pizzazz to
your social life.
SCORPIO
October 24-November 22
Your "full-speed-ahead" approach to
life could have you on the edge of
burnout. Take a few steps back and
enjoy some of the simpler things.
Focus on concrete issues when it
comes to an old dispute.
GEMINI
May 22-June 21
The more tightly you focus
your efforts, the greater your
accomplishments will be' Pay close
attention to details�they will help
you discover the reality behind an
appearance.
CANCER
June 22-July 22
You're in a mood for a new thrill.
but your routine won't allow you to
travel far. The excitement coiild
even lead to a burst of creativity-
make the most of it.
SAGITTARIUS
November 23-December 21
Devote all your energy to a project
that needs extra attention. Other
things will wait if you manage your
time effectively. Increase your
savings by devaluating your
spending patterns.
CAPRICORN
December 22-January 20
Make an extra effort to stav in the
good graces of someone who could
pull strings for you. You could nmi
their influence in the near future.
Don't be afraid to make a bold
career move. It could be just the
change you've been looking for.
LEO
July 23-August 23
A walk in the outdoors allows you
to both appreciate the season and
get to know someone better than
you ever thought possible. One
day holds the possibility for an
unexpected development in an old
drama.
VIRGO
August 24-September 22
Changes at work could offer you a
unique chance to get ahead. Don't
waste it by sabotaging someone �
it's better to make a positive effort.
Look for the diamonds in the rough,
whether people or objects, and
you'll be well on your way to being
more content with your life.
AQUARIUS
January 21-February 18
Be sure that you have all the
information you need before
attempting to make a life-altering
decision. Then, once you make your
choice, stick to it. In love, build on
a relationship with someone who
shares your values and interests.
PISCES
February 19-March 20
An old connection offers a new
opportunity. Be sure that any group
propositions you make have an
incentive for everyone. Romance
nourishes when you devote extra
time and attention to another.
I





Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
Lumbee heritage
put on display
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
In an effort to revive forgotten
histories of America, the Mint Mu-
seum of Art has gathered a collec-
tion that celebrates Native American
history. Entitled "Recollections:
Lumbee Heritage this exhibit fea-
tures photographs depicting the lives
and traditions of the Lumbee people
of North Carolina, and ECU is fortu-
nate enough to be able to showcase
this exhibit for the next few weeks
on the second floor of Mendenhall
Student Center.
Even though the Lumbee Indi-
ans have had to adapt themselves to
the white culture, they have not al-
lowed this to destroy their sense of
history and proud heritage. They re-
main as a tight community, centrally
located in Pembroke, N.C and their
42,000-member tribe keeps many tra-
ditional social activities alive. Such
social functions include hog killings,
quilting parties, annual Lumbee
Homecomings and annual Pow-
Wows.
Acknowledging that there is a
significant Native American popula-
tion here at ECU, Tyler Dockery, the
visual arts chairperson for
Mendenhall, feels that an exhibit such
as this is appropriate. "We hadn't had
a photo exhibit in some time
Dockery says, "and there is a local in-
terest in Native American history
The photographs, which feature
works from Lumbee photographer
David Oxendine, Robert West and
many anonymous photographers, il-
lustrate a pre-1945 history of the
Lumbee people.
"It is a photo exhibit of how the
Lumbee Indians lived their lives
It's an overview of their family and
community life notes Dockery.
Notable photographs include per-
sonal portrait shots of individuals and
families, photos depicting Lumbee
Comfy
Tree
ECU student Christina
Pulizzi relaxes under a
tree on the campus
mall, courtesy one of
the brief flashes of
warm weather we've
recently experienced.
Pneumonia weather,
the old wives call it
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Opera singer tells all
Hilda Harris
discusses her life
and work
Sarah Wahlert
Senior Writer
Metropolitan Opera singer Hilda
Harris was welcomed with open arms
by the ECU School of Music this past
Sunday and Monday. On Sunday she
gave a recital featuring arias by
Handel and songs by Brahms and
Faure. The second half featured po-
ems by African Americans set to mu-
sic and songs by African American
composers such as Camille Nickerson
and Florence Price.
Ms. Harris was delighted to di-
rect a master class for ECU voice stu-
dents on Monday, since teaching is a
big part of her life. She enjoys teach-
ing at the Manhattan School of Mu-
sic and Sarah Lawrence College and
considers it very rewarding. "At some
point in my career, I found it impor-
tant to pass on the information and
&M&1�eviet�
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
This photo, showing a Lumbee farmer walking through head-
high tobacco, is on display on the second floor of Mendenhall
as part of the Lumbee Heritage Photo Exhibit.
See Europe on a
poor man's budget
help people develop their vocal instru-
ment she said. "If a career in voice
is the goal, then I help them as much
as possible and try to encourage
them
The human voice fascinates Har-
ris. "There is something very special
about the human voice she empha-
sized. "No two voices are alike. You
might hear someone sing and think
of the beauty of the voice, but might
also take it for granted without think-
ing of it as a part of the human spirit
See HILDA page 10
nuns
lti �i tl m
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
tribal traditions, examples of Lumbee
food and pictures that illustrate the
role the Lumbee people have played
within American history.
Each photograph features text
indicating something about the his-
tory of the photo. Many of the photo-
graphs incorporate prose by Lumbee
author and storyteller Barbara
Braveboy-Locklear. Ms. Braveboy-
Locklear's expressive prose proves to
be an essential element to the photo-
graphs as it clarifies the significance
of each picture.
"Recollections: Lumbee Heri-
tage" is co-sponsored by the ECU Stu-
dent Union Visual Arts Committee
and the East Carolina Native Ameri-
can Organization and will be on dis-
play through April 19. So, the next
time you're in Mendenhall buying a
Coke or checking to see what movie
is playing, take a few minutes to go
upstairs and witness the history and
tradition of a proud people who
should not be forgotten.
Rortda Cranford
Senior Writer
7&6e
rfir z
Shatner celebrates birthday
Every so often, our beloved TV
Whore is inspired to go off on a flight
of fancy. His love for Star Trek's Wil-
liam Shatner, whose birthday is to-
morrow, has filled him with a sick,
twisted desire to pen the following trib-
ute in Shatner's honor.
Kevin Chaisson
Staff Writer
Whore's Log: Personal. Stardate
96318.11
I am preparing for the big birth-
day celebration at Starfleet Headquar-
ters in honor of one William Shatner,
the mirror-universe alter-ego of our
own Captain James Tiberius Kirk. We
have had the pleasure of Mr. Shatner's
amusing, if not
long-winded,
tales ever since
the Enterprise
was caught in
the mysterious
space anomaly
(see log entry
96115.42) that
transported Mr.
Shatner from
his dimension
into ours.
It has been
over three months and neither Mr.
Spock nor Scotty has discovered a way
to send him back. So in the meantime,
Shatner has busied himself about the
ship in other ways, all the while telling
us some great stories about him as
"captain" of the Enterprise.
"I had problems
believing Shatner
could have acted
as Kirk, what
with the toupee
and girdle
�� � mm � maw a 11 �hmmbi l
William Shatner
Heh! I remember something he
was telling me on an away mission to
Norom IV, right before I got shot by
that Noromvian tribesman (that re-
minds me -1 need to make sure I wear
the red uniform shirt
without the gaping
gash in the chest to
the party). He was
telling us about how
playing this charac-
ter based on our
dimension's Capt.
Kirk had made him
a fortune in royalties
and licensing, above
and beyond a salary.
Ensign Mutton (God
rest his soul, poor
guy! He didn't make it off of Norom)
and I laughed and laughed, because
we really have no idea what he's talk-
ing about But that doesn't stop Mr.
Shatner.
He's told us about his rise through
the ranks of the entertainment busi- See SHATNER page 8
ness, how he was once a young, hun-
gry, poor Canadian actor in Hollywood.
Mr. Shatner just scoffs it away, smiling
a winning, twinkly smile. He practically
beams when discussing some TV show
called Star Trek, in which he starred
as our beloved captain.
At first glance, I had problems be-
lieving that Shatner could have ever
acted as Kirk, what with the toupee
and girdle he has to wear to fit into
the clothing we gave him. However, he
assured me over Saurian brandies (he
paid!) that in his youth, he could've
fought Mr. Spock to a standstill dur-
ing the pon farr ritual.
"Or let the stuntman do it he
laughs heartily, punching me in the
arm. I smile, though I have no clue
what he's referring to. When I related
this story to Mr. Spock in passing, the
Vulcan raised an eyebrow and looked
perturbed (even though I know that
wasn't possible - he is a Vulcan).
If you ask other officers whether
they like having Mr. Shatner on the
ship, as 1 did, you'll find a variety of
answers. Mr. Scott seems to enjoy
Shatner's company - the two go drink-
ing and carousing almost every night
Dr. McCoy's response was a gruff,
"Wonderful! Now there's TWO of 'em
to deal with I couldn't tell if he was
kidding or not Lt Uhura seemed very
happy with Shatner's company until
he asked her if he could play with her
Tribbles. I wasn't there, but I don't see
why she got angry with him - how
could he have known that we had to
This is the time of year when
people often begin thinking about
what to do with the upcoming sum-
mer vacation. For those of you who
are considering travel as an option,
Europe on 84 Cents a Day" by Gil
White might bear looking into. Since
students often aren't able to travel
with the luxury of ample funding, this
is a good resource for them.
On the whole, traveling as a poor
per&n may be the best way to do it;
the poor traveler often finds more op-
portunities to become acquainted
with native peoples because of the
freedom heshe has in not being in-
sulated from real people and day-to-
day life by deluxe hotel room walls.
White includes stories of his own
and others' colorful travel experi-
ences, and these serve to excite and
encourage the reader. However, he
also devotes a couple of pages to ex-
plain that a successful traveler must
have a good attitude and be resource-
ful. Traveling the White way is not for
sissies. If you don't like camping, can't
deal with the stress of living hand-to-
mouth and don't have much physical
stamina, this book will be a waste of
your money. Maybe you should start
saving and go on a cruise instead.
However, I'm sure that traveling the
White way would provide you with
more interesting stories to tell when
you get home.
Hitch-hiking advice is given, as
well as accounts of the author's per-
sonal experiences with this subject
White provides a graph chart which
rates countries by the hospitality of
drivers. Information about good
places to crash for cheap and free is
also given; for example, old bams and
See EUROPE page 9
CD Reviews
ShovelJerk
Swarm
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
From a small town in Idaho
comes an explosive band in the
form of ShovelJerk and their big
major-label debut, Swarm. The
quartet believes that their alterna-
tive sound is a reflection of their
environment. Whatever the label,
it's a sound we've heard before.
Swarm starts off with an up-
beat groove called "Easy Target
In this song, vocalistguitarist Paul
Hemenway talks of how ashamed
he is of this world. His lyrics claim
that no one cares. Maybe what this
guy needs is a pat on the back.
There's nothing we need more than
another cynic to fill up the air-
waves, right?
Judging by Hemenway's lyrics
in "Summer it seems he may also
be a bit sacrilegious. "What you sell
me he sings, "as long as I can
blame the cross I'm not respon-
sible for my loss I've cheapened
something that is so taboo
Huh? Not only are these lyrics
bad, but they'll manage to piss off
a lot of ShovelJerk's audience!
Maybe if the lyrics were better it
would be okay, but this just sounds
like somebody trying to be "dar-
ing I guess there's no such a thing
as bad publicity, right guys? .
Although their lyrics may not
be up to par, their tight groove will
take them a long way. And just what
groove may that be? Well, it should
come as no surprise that a lot of
their tunes sound like they were
lifted from the '70s, but disguised
to fit a '90s sound. Sad, but true.
This has become such a corn-
See SHOVEL page 9
Thursday, March 21
Toast
at the Attic
(reggae)
What It Is
at Peasant's Cafe
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe" and Grille
Mendenhall Movie:
Dangerous Minds
8 p.m.
Free
Friday, March 22
Performing Arts Series
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic
at Wright Auditorium
Everything
with Angie Aparo
at the Attic
Donna The Buffalo
at Peasant's Cafe
Mendenhall Movie:
Dangerous Minds
8 p.m.
Free
Saturday, March 23
Guest Recital
Vincent D. Martino, trumpet
at Fletcher Recital Hall
The Backdoors
at the Attic
(Doors tribute)
Melanie Sparks Band
at Peasant's Cafe
Purple Schoolbus
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Mendenhall Movie:
Dangerous Minds
8 p m.
Free
Sunday, March 24
Family Fare: Tom Sawyer
at Wright Auditorium
Kevin Beale
classical piano and
original compositions
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
-��





rrir'i "iti"
8
Thursday, March 21, 1996
The East Carolinian
SHATNER from page
beam all of the Tribbles back aboard
that Klingon ship?
Mr. Sulu has been keeping to him-
self, practicing his fencing no doubt,
so I don't know his opinions. As for
Mr. Chekov? He, Yeoman Rand, and a
few of the other junior officers have
taken to following Shatner around the
ship like devoted puppies, making him
relate story after story to them. At one
point or so I heard, Shatner wheeled
around to face them, shouting "Get a
life, would you people?!?" He then
started laughing and clapped Chekov
on the back. No one is sure what this
means.
As for the captain and Shatner -
what a pair those two are! They try to
keep their "escapades" a secret, but
most of the Enterprise's crew knows
about the captain's libido. For a guy in
his mid60s, Mr. Shatner can still keep
up with Kirk, which is really scary. I
wonder how long it takes him to get
out of that truss and girdle. Anyway,
Capt Kirk seems to love Shatner's little
stories, and is constantly trying to
match them with some of his own.
Whew! The one about the Orion slave
girls is too racy for me to feel comfort-
able entering it into this log.
There are some of Shatner's sto-
ries that don't quite ring true, and
those make me wonder. I don't believe
that he was a world-famous music star,
with such hits as "Lucy in the Sky With
Diamonds" or "Mr. Tamborine Man I
have a real problem believing a movie
called "Kingdom of the Spiders" won
nine Academy Awards, including Best
Actor and Director for Mr. Shatner. I
can't believe that people would pay
money to hear him tell these stories
we are getting for free. Mr. Spock says
to indulge him, however, since he is a
guest on board and it's his birthday.
1 have to cut this log entry short
Mr. Shatner's birthday party is start-
ing soon, and I'd like to get to the
Officer's Club in time for Yeoman
Rand's interpretation of the Marilyn
Monroe classic, "Happy Birthday
Maybe we can all get Shatner to tell us
the one about how he played a hooker
cop in Los Angeles and won eleven
Emmy awards. That would be fun.
Whore out
Natural lifel I
;�&r
Each year, "college beer cans" could litter every Federally
assisted highway in the U.S. at a rate of one can per foot.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
ssSagsagssa1'
a
East Carolina Univeristy
'ilNEnTATI
ofm
SSISTANTS
Orientation & The First - Year Experience - 203 Erwin - 328-4173
The office of Orientation & The First-Year Experience proudly announces the
1996-97 Orientation Staff:
Sonia Alcala Marcus Goodie
Patti Arnold Ryan Henne
Michelle Carter April McKinney
Stephanie Eaton Hattie Pink
Jon Evans John Reeves
Hugh Finch F. Tyler Ross
J. Grant Gale
Twla Sauls
Megan Simpson
Jocelyn Smith
Joseph Warling
Danielle Willard
Prudence Woo
&
&
(ZAis Meek 4t


IT'S NOT JUST FOR SARDINES ANYMORE
Thiir. What it is
�� � a f. jnkv nrnove thina th
Sat.
A funky groove thing that you'll love, (we promise)
Donna the Buffalo
(ZY0EC0)
Melanie Sparks Band
Home Grown band
Donna Yeaw
Congratulations & Good Luck!
TUES. MUONITE Bring in onu mug and well fill it with
Bass, Bud, or Killians.
(Next mugnite is a special one: Customer Appreciation,
FREE MEMBERSHIPS, NO COVER, A GREAT BAND,
CHEAP GOOD BEER & MORE!)
rasa&ggs
I
The 1996
East Carolina University
MARCHING PIRATES
You are invited to be part of one of the most rewarding and spirited activites our university has to offer: the 1996 East Carolina University Marching Pirates!
Fellow students, alumni, fans, and athletes all feel the excitement when our powerful sound, precision,and confidence combine in challenging musical and visual pre-
sentations.
This Fall promises to be a great season for the ECU Marching Pirates with performances at each home game, two nationally-televised ESPN games, exhibition
performances in Virginia and North Carolina, a chance to attend the Liberty Bowl in Memphis,Tennessee for the third year in a row, and the highlight of the season:
the ECU vs. North Carolina State University game in Panther Stadium in Charlotte, NC.
Whatever your band instrument of section, whatever your college major, we have a place for you! Our membership of over 200 musicians and color guard mem-
bers makes us the largest student organization on campus, yet the Marching Pirates offer new members the chance to quickly become a part of a community of
friends within our large university. Among band members, shared times and shared challenges forge lifetime friendships. Upperclassmen and band staff offer advice
and encouragement you'll appreciate.
Participation in a university marching band is much different than most high school bands. Students of all ability levels from many different backgrounds partici-
pate. Since it is mot necessary to be a music major to be in the band, this diverse group of students represents a wide variety of degree plans from throughout the
University. Regardless of your major, you will receive one hour of academic credit for participation in band.
During the semester the band rehearses Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 4:00 to 6:00 p.mand there are no extra required rehearsals or sectionals. As a mem-
ber of the Marching Pirates you will still have plenty of time to study, and you can still participate in other student organizations such as academic honor societies,
intramural sports, ROTC, fraternities and sororities, and many others.
In recent years the band has travelled to games at Duke, South Carolina, and Virginia Tech, and has also performed at the 1994 and 1995 Liberty Bowls in
Memphis, TN on New Year's Eve. All of this travel was expense paid! There is no funding, and when the band travels transportation, meals and lodging are provid-
ed.
The 1996 season will begin with "band camp All percussionists and color guard members will audition and begin sectionals Thursday, August 15. Brass and
woodwind players will audition for part placement and begin rehearsals Friday, August 16. Auditions are very casual, and the audition materials are mailed in mid
June. Students living in the dormitories on campus will be able to move into their rooms upon arrival for band camp, and meais will be available for a fee through
University Dining Services in the new Todd Dining Hall, Adjacent to the Marching Pirates' Practice Faculty.
If you would like to be a member of the 1996 East Carolina University Marching Pirates, register for MUSC 1705, or if you would like additional information on
the 1996 season, please
yta
ECU Marching Pirates Color Guard
The Excellent ECU Marching Pirates Color Guard is comprised of 32 women
who perform traditional and contemporary color guard styles during Marching
Pirates pregame and halftime shows. This section of the band is chosen through
auditions at the beginning of band camp. This years auditions will take place
Thursday August 15, at the AJ Fletcher School of Music, Room 101. TBA.
At these auditions, the color guard instructor teaches a flag routine to those
auditioning, who then perform the routine as a group before a panel of judges.
Membership is open to all qualified women enrolled as full-time students at ECU
At least one year of previous color guard experience is required.
When you join th ECU Marching Pirates, you will
ECU Marching Pirates Percussion
The ECU Marching Pirates have enjoyed a strong tradition of excellence in per-
cussion for many years. This years section will feature 8 snares. 4 quint toms, 6
bass drums, 4 cymbals, and 6 members of the sideline ensemble. Members of the
ECU Marching Pirates percussion section are selected through auditions at the
beginning of band camp in August. Membership is open to all full-time students
at ECU. Those interested in the percussion section should contact the band office
by July 1 to obtain audition materials.
Marching
Pirates
A Commitment To Excellence!
be part of ECU's largest student organization, making lifetime friendships
enjoy expense paid trips to selected away games, exhibition performances,
and bowl games including the ECU vs. NC State game in Panther Stadium in
Charlotte, NC
earn academic credit for your participation
continue the Marching Pirates' tradition of musical excellence
pay no uniform or instrument fees
generate the excitement of the crowd at football games
If music, excitement, friendship and respect are things that matter to
you, the ECU Marching Pirates experience is something you'll values!





�mt
The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 21, 1996
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
"Moli�re's Classic Comic
Masterpiece!
r
TARTUFFE
March 28, 29, 30, April 1 and 2, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
March 31, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public:8.00
ECU Students:5.00
Children:5.00
Mature Themes. Parental Discretion Advised.
Call-328-6829
SHOV EL. from page 7
mon practice today that it's actu-
ally a style itself. But is that neces-
sarily a bad thing? Really,
ShoveUerk has done nothing out
of the ordinary.
Can you name an artist who
has not been inspired by another?
1 can't! Even Hendrix had influ-
ences that turned him onto differ-
ent directions.
Influence and change are good
things, and my advice to this band
would be to change their direction.
Although I am very impressed with
their talent thus far, I just feel that
they could be so much more. Their
music is good, and it will sell
records. Selling record: of course,
is the whole point of recording
them.
But how many musiciaps get to
record something that they love
and make money off it, too? Maybe
this is the music that they love and
are very proud doing it. But some-
how, 1 don t think so. This stuff
sounds too pre-packaged. It's like
they designed it to make the most
money possible.
Whatever the case may be, the
band has potential. With hard work
and a good following, you could be
seeing a lot of ShoveUerk in the
days to come. Capricorn Records
must have seen a good investment
in this band.
The only question is, can any-
body else?
I st Summer Session
ANTH 1000 General Anthropology
ANTH 2010 Societies Around the World
ANTH 3175ANTH SI75 Archaeology Field Training
Second Summer Session
ANTH 1000 General Anthropology
Anth 2000 Archaeology Around the World
EXPLORE
OTHER CULTURES, OTHER PLACES
Department of Anthropology
Fall 1996
ANTH 1000 General Anthropology
ANTH 2000 Archaeology Around the World
ANTH 2010 Societies Around the World
ANTH 2020 Contemporary Human Problems & Global Issues
ANTH 2025 Sexual Behavior from an Anthropological
Perspective
ANTH 3009 Motherhood of God
ANTH 3018 Cultures of South and Central American
ANTH 3027 Human Health and Disease Ecology
ANTH 3111 North American Archaeology
ANTH 4001 Art & Culture
ANTH 4025 Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 6101 Core Course: Archaeology
ANTH 6102 Core Course: Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 61045 Research Design
EUROPE from page 7
youth hostels are listed.
Tips on how to shmooz your way
onto the couch in somebody's house
are also provided. White also stresses
that hospitality should always be re-
paid, however, and he offers advice on
that as well.
Money and exchange rates are
dealt with, and this chapter has been
newly revised and would be essential
to any traveler concerned with mak-
ing hisher American dollar go as far
as possible. Also, White provides spe-
cific information on the kind of pa-
perwork travelers need to have, such
as passports and visas.
White deals with each country
(including European, Middle Eastern,
and North African countries) individu-
ally, recommending tourist sights and
dealing with such topics as work and
native customs. Foreign embassy ad-
dresses are included. He also lists
youth hostel locations and gives ad-
vice on the best way to travel in each
country. A list of phrases in
languages which would be essenti.
to communicating the need foi
food or shelter is provided.
The only thing White has not ii
eluded in this book is a guarai I
your trip abroad won't be a nig
His information is specif
evant. as well as being realist:
this book would be an invah
source in planning tor and man; .
your trip to Europe, the author is
careful to point out that the big)
resource you have and the �. �
thing you have to depend on is v
self.
JO'MUS!
kreResreo in api. Must b
campus eveNis? 8W9�a f r
your vote tj e neaRP? Nee-
Sowe MONev, aNc doni ase
how you o& ft? APrt-V as a TB-
LjFeSiYLe wRtteR! Join me
MlCjHTY 70MBie ARv m
tfeenoilU's only
6xeucVi6huub tj 3Toueli OJj C
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam i fi
CASH PRIZE A '
'Contestants need to call &. register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
ECU
I
McDonald7"
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756 6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
X. Dickinson Ave.
i (Behind John's Convenient Mart)
cosv.
MART
� MM, Wi
Apply for an Apple Computer Loan. Get a Mac. Pay later.
Student Stores
Wright Building � 328-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
I m alanale based on a Mai loan amount c! S2 ;�(�) U t
total loan am :��
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Hi MMHMMMMMB





. �'
10
Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
HILDA
from page 7
I tell my students and everyone to let
it come through and express the gift
you have
Harris's appearance was also a
part of the Minority Presence Initia-
tive and she feels strongly about the
message she wants to send. "There
are lots of African American compos-
ers with something to say and it's said
beautifully. The music needs to be
heard and I feel that it's important
for me to present this because I am
an African American she said.
Hilda Harris grew up in nearby
Warrenton, N.C. Although she sang a
lot when she was young and always
involved herself with music, she didn't
know of the technical aspects to voice.
"After college I was encouraged to go
to New York and I realized that my
voice wasn't ready to sing profession-
airy she said. "I studied privately with
a woman who was so encouraging,
simply an angel, who helped me de-
fine my voice. I then realized that I
was a mezzo-soprano
After lots of hard work, Harris
reached Broadway and performed in
shows like Mame and Golden Boy.
Although she learned stamina per-
forming eight shows a week, her goal
was to be a classical singsr.
"I think the highlight of my ca-
reer would've been making a debut
at the Metropolitan Opera House she
remembered. "I felt very comfortable
on stage and the opera, Lulu, was one
I had sung before, although in Ital-
ian. Music schools require the study
of Italian, German and French
Harris does believe that the arts
have been suffering in America, espe-
cially lately. "The Europeans seem to
have more knowledge of opera and
are more familiar with it. Because
opera is usually performed in a for-
eign language, American students
don't always believe it's a part of their
culture. But now that there are trans-
lations in the opera houses, hopefully
that will change she said.
Now that her 25-year career is
calming down, Harris is striving to be
a better teacher, always helping as
much as possible. "I still take a voice
lesson every now and then because I
demonstrate a lot in my classes and
there's always something else to be
learned.
"The voice goes through every
emotion Harris said. "If it's your goal
to be a singer, go for it It does take a
lot of work and sacrifice, so it has to
be a burning desire. You are con-
stantly reinvesting in your craft and
even after you're a professional, al-
ways remember that you never stop
learning
$up�r-CJVciire
Trivia Quix
This week's topic:
Sci - Fi Movie Names
l.Pete, Georgie and Dim.
2. Robert DeNiro.
3. Trick question! The lead
cave man in the opening of
2001: A Space Odyssey
doesn't have a name!
4. Brett (played by Harry
Dean Stanton).
5. David Prowse. He was
Darth Vader in Star Wars
and Julian the bodyguard in
A Clockwork Orange.
6. Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen.
7. In The Empire Strikes
Back, the Emperor is played
by Alec Guiness, who also
played Obi-Wan Kenobi.
Guiness had to back out
from the role in Return of
the Jedi because of an
allergy to the make up.
8. The Ymir.
9. James Arness, Marshall
Dillon of Gunsmoke fame.
10. Lou Gosset, Jr.
YoiA m liAcd
to
cpM Sorority information
Open JJouse
r Don't let an
unpaid parking
ticket hold up your
registration for summer
session or fall semester! wa
qimrsday, JJarcb 14, 1996
Thursday, Sflarch 21, 1996
Jfonday, pril, 15, 1996
Students with uncleared parking citations
have a tag placed on their record and
are not permitted to register until
the tag is cleared. Please pay any
outstanding fines so you will not
be delayed during early registration.
Walk in Hours:
Monday Friday
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The 1996 Elections
Are Coming!
The Political Science Department is offering courses
designed around the presidential and congressional
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and the strategies.
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noted and are FREE to Students, Foculty, and Staff (one
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-






wfi ii i�t MBM
11
Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
Softball undefeated
in new conference
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU softball team keeps roll-
ing.
The Lady Pirates won big against
Charleston Southern on Tuesday, win-
ning 10-0 and 8-0 in the double
header. This puts ECU at 4-0 in the
Big South Conference (19-12-1 over-
all), keeping their unbeaten mark in-
tact
"We hit the ball well Head
Coach Sue Manahan said. "We played
to our potential today
ECU jumped out to a 1-0 lead in
the bottom of the first inning in the
first game as outfielder Amy Hooks
(Virginia Beach, Va.), who drew a walk,
scored on a Rhonda Rost (Richmond,
Va.) bunt The ladies would later capi-
talize on two errors in the third in-
ning, scoring three more runs.
Jami Bendle, 7-7 on the year (2-0
in the Big South), threw five innings,
giving up two hits and striking out
two. Rost went two-for-two with a
double in the contest driving in four
RBI's.
In the second game, ECU shut
out the Lady Bucs after going six in-
nings. Trade Podratsky (Centerville,
Va.), upped her record to 6-1 (1-0 in
the Big South) giving up only two
hits. Senior catcher Mary Dunlap
(Phenix, Va.) got on base three times
in three at-bats while teammate
Heather Smith (Glen Bumie, Md.)
reached base twice in three at-bats,
scoring both times.
ECU was coming off of a heart-
breaking loss to Ball State in the fi-
nals of the 1996 Hampton InnLady
Pirate Classic which took place last
weekend. Ball State (12-6) beat the
Lady Pirates 4-2 in the championship
game.
"Overall, we did really well
sophomore pitcher Christi Da- s said.
"It was a tough game. Ball State is a
tough team, but we stayed strong and
focused
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Sophomore Christi Davis, last season's second leading
pitcher, throws a pitch out against Charleston Southern.
ECU won easily over Kent Uni-
versity in the first round game 6-3,
and went on to beat the Golden Grif-
fins of Canisius 4-2 before falling to
Ball State.
The loss left a sour taste in the
mouths of the Lady Pirates, who took
out their frustrations on Charleston
Southern.
"Wt're on the right road Davis
said. "I feel we're doing great and
we're really strong
Davis was voted honorable men-
tion for Conference Pitcher of the
Week for the week of March 5, and
pitched a no-hitter earlier this year
against Eastern Michigan.
Junior outfielder Tonya Oxendine
and freshman outfield sensation Amy
Hooks were named to the All-Tourna-
ment Team for their performances in
the Lady Pirate Classic, which in-
cluded two home runs from each of
them.
The team is loaded with talent
and leadership, having lost only two
seniors from last year's squad.
"Experience has brought this
team together Davis said. 'We are a
lot more confident"
See SOFTBALL page 13
Ruggers pull down fourth place
Steve Flippin
Guest Writer
After suffering a humbling loss
to the Universitv of Tennessee, the
ECU Rugby
from 15 yards out.
Mike Myers, a two year mem-
ber of the ECU team, has been play-
ing rugby for a total of eight years.
While in the army he was on the
All-Army team and the U.S. Com-
� bine Service
"We have been
doing pretty well,
and we did well in
the tournament"
� Mike Myers
team went on to
dominate the
rest of its divi-
sion in the 18th
Annual St.
Patrick's Day
Rugby Tourna-
ment in Savan-
nah, Georgia.
The first mmmm���
match which began at 9 a.m. Fri-
day, March 15, saw ECU lose to UT
10-14. ECU came out sluggish al-
lowing UT to score on a throw in
from five meters out during the
first three minutes of the match.
The Pirates awoke from this,
dominating the play during the rest
of the match. Sloppy play in the
back line, missed kicks and penal-
ties allowed the Vols to convert
three penalty kicks giving them the
win. ECU missed its first chance to
score by missing a penalty kick
Team that plays
other teams
around the
world. Myers
knows good
teams and tough
competition
when he sees it.
"We have
mtimmemmi!mmx eeri doing
pretty well, and we did well in the
tournament Myers said.
Byron Sullivan, a four year
member of the team, noted that
ECU had got off the van shortly
before their first game, not giving
them much time to -ecover from a
long trip.
"We had just stepped off the
van Sullivan said. "I'm not using
that as an excuse, but if you look
at the other games we played, that
was real ECU rugby
Kevin Loftus later scored the
Coming through
'
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
It's that time of the year agian. The annual GoldPurple football game is scheduled
for next weekend. Here, the players continue practicing to sharpen their skills.
Men's track team finds
success in Jamaica
Dave Pond
Senior Writer
ruggers' first try by picking up a
loose ball and carrying it in from
two yards out. The conversion kick
was missed, leaving the Pirates
trailing 5-11 at the end of the first
half.
The second half saw the same
ECU dominance as they remained
on UT's side of the field, but the
same mistakes lingered with the
team. Rookie, Morgan Gwynn-Will-
iams, scored across the try line, but
against the conversion was missed.
As time ran out ECU could not get
the ball across the try line.
This loss allowed the team to
finish no better than fourth place
because they were put in losing
brackets for their next two games.
"We just weren't up to par
Sullivan said.
In their next match, Allan
Tarczynski, who had not played in
the first match, set the tone by mak-
ing a 50-yd. penalty kick. Aggres-
sive tacking, rucking and a more
controlled game gave the Pirates
the easy victory over the University
of Tennessee - Chattanooga, 48-0.
See RUGBY page 12
Most ECU students spent last
weekend dodging the wind and cold
in Greenville. However, the members
of the 19 Pirate men's track team
spent it basking in the glow of the
warm Kingston, Jamaica sunshine and
their success at the 19-team Jamaica
Relays.
The 4 x 100-meter relay squad, in
its first race of the 1996 outdoor sea-
son, posted a time of 40:43, ranking
third behind the University of Okla-
homa (40:12) and Clemson University
(40:35). Juniors Lewis Harris and Brian
Johnson, as well as freshmen Chris Rey
and Damon Davis comprised tire ECU
100-meter relay squad.
"We got off and ran well, but we
drew lane eight ECU men's track
Coach Bill Carson said. "The third leg
of the relay is greatly hindered in that
lane
"Clemson and Oklahoma were in
lanes three and four and could run off
of each other. 1 really feel that if we
were right up against them we could
have done even better
In the 4 x 400-meter relay, the
Pirates (3:08.46) finished fourth behind
Oklahpma (3:03.76), Clemson (3:06.70)
and the University of Miami (3:07.76).
However, Johnson, Davis, freshman
Michael Miller and junior Dwight
Henry combined to post ECU's best
time of the season, shaving over two
seconds off the squad's previous low
time of 3:10.60, set in Kentucky on Feb.
3.
"Brian didn't lead off as well as
we would have liked Carson said.
"Damon and Mike ran well - but ran
out of gas
"Dwight ran a 46.4 (in the anchor
leg), but when you have a bad ladoff
you are going to get beat"
In the individual events, freshmen
Vaughn Monroe, a former TEC Athlete
of the Week, and Chris Rey finished
back-to-back in the 100-meter dash,
earning fifth and sixth place, respec-
tively. Monroe posted a 1996 team and
individual best time of 10.89 seconds,
edging out Rey, who came in at 10.90.
"Vaughn got out really good but
started to fade away near the end
Carson said. "Chris got out slow but
ran back into the race
Also on Saturday, other members
of the ECU track team competed in
the UNC-W Invitational in Wilmington,
N.C.
The 1995 CAA Most Valuable Ath-
lete Chris McKinney (47'06.50") led the
Pirates with a third-place finish in the
triple jump. Junior Artee Franklin
(51.90) finished 27th in the men's 400-
meter dash, while Chris Pressley took
18th in the 100-meter dash with a time
of 11.42.
Throughout the outdoor season,
ECU will continue to rely on their
strengths in both relays and the indi-
vidual short sprints. To find further
success in 19, the Pirates will have
Chris Rey
to avoid the injury bug and continue
to mature as a team.
"Lewis Harris and Ar'tee are two
of our most experienced athletes ECU
assistant track Coach Kemal Atkins
said. "If they can stay healthy we
should do very well
All in all, Saturday's meets marked
a positive beginning to the 19 out-
door season. ECU returns to the track
on Saturday, March 23, when the Pi-
rates will participate in the UNC Five-
Team Meet, along with ML St Mary's,
Appalachian State, North Carolina
A&T and the Tarheels.
"It was a great experience and the
kids enjoyed themselves Carson said.
"It was a good meet and a good way to
kick off the outdoor season
Don't Forget
TENNIS DOUBLES ENTRY DEADLINE- Wednesday, March 27 at 5 p.m. in CG-204
GOLF DOUBLES DEADLINE- Tuesday April 9 at 5 p.m. in CG-204
DRIVE IN MOVIES- Come see Top Gun and Raiders of the Lost Ark starting at 9 p.m. across from the
college hill field on March.
GOOSE CREEK CANOE TRIP on March 27th. Join us on the waters of Goose Creek State Park where
you'll explore the hidden marshes and canoe the open waters of this beautiful aea outside of Washing-
ton. Register in CG-204 by March 21 st.
BURGERS BUNS AND THIGHS REGISTRATION in CG-204 March 14-25. Beat the fast food blues, and
learn about the nutrients of fast food and healthy choices you can make on the go. This cost is $5 and
will meet March 26 7-9 p.m. in CG-102108.
SID - The ECU men's soccer
program has signed 14 new recruits,
Head Coach Will Wiberg an-
nounced Tuesday. The list of new
Pirates includes 12 players from
N.C. and features five all-state se-
lections.
"The new recruits are very fast
and very strong Wiberg said.
"They will have an immediate effect
on this team. We will be a more
competitive team next year
The 1996 Pirate recruiting
class features six midfielders, four
forwards and four defenders. Lead-
ing the way is Robbie Schwartz, a
defender form East Mecklenburg
HS in Charlotte. In 19, Schwartz
was named to the all-state first team
and was also the Southwestern Con-
ference Player-of-the-year.
Bryan Howard a forward from
Apex HS in Apex, N.C, was also
named to the all-state team (third
team). Howard was the 1995 Tri-
Six Conference Player-of-the-year
and also led the conference in scor-
ing. Wiberg describes him as a
proven finisher and a goal scorer.
Two midfielders from the
fourth team all-state squad will also
wear the purple and gold in the
19 seasoa Robert Hyatt (Jackson-
ville,) and Ben Schnurr (Raleigh)
come to ECU possessing quickness
and strength. Hyatt was a 1995 All-
Mideastern Conference sellction,
while Schnurr garnered first team All-
Cap 7 Conference honors,
Brian Denoo, a fifth team all-state
choice, is one of two members from
Swansboro, to sign with the Pirates.
The Swansboro HS squad led by Denoo
(midfielder and Sean Hawley (stopper),
won the state 1A2A championships
in 19. Wiberg describes Hawley as
an "offensive minded defenseman
Despite never playing a collegiate
soccer game, this year's Pirate recruit-
ing class is certainly not without play-
ing experience. Five newcomers played
on the Raleigh Green Caps squad, an
8-1-77 select team. Along with Howard
and Schnurr, Rodney Jones. Brian Tay-
lor and Danny Vitale, also played on
the select team.
Jones, a midfielder from
Sanderson HS in Raleigh is described
by Wiberg as a "real catalyst who is an
impact player Taylor also hails from
Raleigh (Broughton HS), and is ex-
pected to fill a number of needs for
the Pirates in 19. Vitale, a forward
from Leesville Road HS. is a goal scorer
and also a strong defender. Wiberg
notes that "he can play anywhere on
the field and be productive
Jones' teammate, Joe Matijow, also
signed with the Pirates. Matijow, a
midfielder, was named to the second
team All-Cap 7 squad. He possesses
great composure with the ball. Wiberg
noted that even if four players sur-
round him, he has the ability to keep
the ball out of trouble without los-
ing his cool.
The Pirates will also welcome
two out-of-state players to Greenville
next season that will add size and
speed to the Pirate lineup. Ben
Brand, a defender from Cherry HiH,
NJ. is a talented players who mea-
sures 6"1' and weighs 180. Brand
was an All-South Jersey fist team
selection. Also signing with ECU is
Brett Waxer. a sweeperdefender
from East Meadow, NY comes to
Greenville at6"l' and 175 pounds.
Waxer played on the Empire State
squad and was also named all-
county in Long Island.
Another Raleigh product is for-
ward Andy Crawford. Crawford was
the MVP in the 1994 state charapir
onship game for Millbrook HS and
helped them reach the finals in
1995. He is a "proven scorer wilh
tremendous speed according to
Wiberg. Crawford is also a first team
All-cap 7 member.
A J. Gray, a forward from Jack-
sonville, has also decided to make
ECU his soccer home. Gray under-
went major ligament knee surgery
in November, but his recovery has
been successful. He has a hard and
accurate shot with either foot and
is a goal scorer.
. Wiberg is very excited about
See SID page 12
� j





12
Thursday, March 21, 1996
The East Carolinian
SID from page 11
the prospects that surround this year's
recruiting class. He expects the Pirates
to be much more competitive and
hopes he has planted the seeds that
will help the Pirate soccer program
prosper.
SID - The ECU Lady Pirates ten-
nis team earned their first conference
victory of the 1996 season with a 5-2
victory over UNC-W on Tuesday.
ECU (6-3, 1-1) began the day by
capturing the doubles point with wins
at No. 1 and No. 2 double. At No. 1,
Ann SvaeRachel Cohen downed Jill
MontgomeryWendy Kirp 8-1, and No.
2 seeded Allison DeBastianiChelsea
Earnhardt defeated Jillian PertchKatie
Brinkman 84.
In singles, the Lady Pirates earned
wins at the top four positions to seal
the victory. At No. 1, Svae defeated
Pertch 64, 6-1, while No. 2 seeded
Cohen defeated Montgomery in straight
sets 6-0,6-2. Senior De Bastiani defeated
Brinkman 7-5,6-1 at No. 3, while fellow
senior Earnhardt posted a win at No. 4
by edging Kirp 6-1,6-7, 7-6
The Lady Pirates will return to ac-
tion on March 23, when they play Ameri-
can at 9 a.m. in Washington D.C. and
Georgetown at 1 p.m.
RUBGY from page 11
Tarczynski led all scorers with two
tries, five conversions and a pen-
alty kick for 23 points.
Other tires scored were by
Sullivan, Stephen Flippin, Casey
Branningan, Kevin Sellers and Matt
Stewart. The pack play dominated
the match and rookies contributed
to helping earn this victory.
Since no games were scheduled
for Saturday, the team had a little
free time to enjoy the sights of Sa-
vannah.
"The extracurricular activities
such as the parade and River St.
were something to behold player
Steven Smith said.
In their final match on Sunday,
ECU once again shut out their op-
ponent and went on to take home
the fourth place trophy. ECU was
pitted against the University of Wis-
consin Madison and cruised to a 19-
0 victory.
In the opening minutes of the
match, Kendall Jones scored on a
ball kicked ahead by John
Hansborough. The conversion kick
was made by Flippin and the Pi-
rates led 7-0.
Later on in the match, the
dominating pack play allowed John
Hogan to find himself alone in the
try zone for another score. During
the second half, a flamboyant aerial
display allowed Mike Myers to score
for ECU.
ECU ended up with the highest
total points (77) of any of the 48
teams in the tournament.
The players were not pleased
with the format of the tournament
that allowed a team with no wins to
play for third and for a team that
only beat UTC 12-3 to play for the
championship against UT. The Vols
eventually went on to win the tour-
nament.
Their next match is this week-
end in Columbia, S.C. against USC
in the first round of the National
Rugby Tournament. If they win this
game, they will move on the Final
Four NCAA Rugby Tournament in
Charlotte in the south bracket. If
they win the south bracket they will
move onto the east bracket and con-
tinue their quest for a national title.
. � � �
Dress tip like your favorite actor or actress or just be yourself and
join the ECU Student 1 nion in celebrating the
68th Annual Academy Awards
Monday, March 25th at 9:00 PM
� Mcndenhall Student Center - TV Lounge
FOOD! FUN! CONTESTS!
�Prizes for the Three Best Dressed
Pick-em Contest:
Best Actor, Actress, Director, Film
Prizes Courtesy of Dr. 1 fauna Jnbran and F.Cl School of Art
(socktail
ill
Food for Your Brain
s Lectures
12:00 Noon -1:00 PM
r Mendenhatl Underground
Monday, March 25
Carnival in Rio De Janeiro
Presented by Palmyra Leahy
Associate Professor - ECU Geography
Department
Dress To Impress
Arlington Village
Greenville
919321 � 1714
Bring Your Lunch
FREE Drinks and Courmet Dessert
For More information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
y
mournwawnu wfijtmmmti m;jown
EVERYTHING
This Friday Afternoon From 4 to 6
At Blockbuster Music, in front of The Plaza
f'Btt e: tf-shirt, Vo$ter$, and
Stickers will he given away a$
well a$ ticket to the show that
night at the ftttic. 'fiverything$
latest CD, IjLBKfi&GR will he
marked down to $11.99.
WZMB 91.3
will have a live
remote broadcast of
he event. Check out
BRAD OLDHAM'S
LAST INTERVIEW s
WITH THE BAN a.
a
� - fc.
iTll






jmmm
The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 21,1996
13
Harris Teeter
SOFTBALL from page 11
Louis Rich
Carving
Meats
Coach Manahan agrees with
Davis.
"We get strong leadership from
Joey Clark, Heather Smith, Jolin
Eckman, Mary Dunlap and Tracie
Podratsky she said.
Podratsky was instrumental in
the Pirates' tournament victories over
St Peter's and Deleware last week.
It is the ECU softball program's
first year in the Big South Conference,
and their first year in any conference
for that matter.
All other Pirate athletic teams,
with the exception of football, partici-
pate in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion. The CAA does not field enough
teams to have a conference; George
Mason, UNC-W and ECU are the only
CAA schools with softball programs.
ECU and UNC-W joined the Big South
this year in search of competition,
while George Mason remained inde-
pendent as ECU had been in the past
The 1995-96 season marks the
beginning of the Big South's 12th
r'
Selected
Varieties
Community $eder
Thursday April 4,1996 6:30pm
Congregation Bayt Shalom
Students $5.00 WAD
Reservations must be made by March 28
Call Judi Willis at 355-7374
1
l
J
5.5 oz.
Gwaltney
Thick Sliced
Bologna
16 oz.
1
Tyson
Pot
Pie
9-9.5 oz.
1
Juicy, Ripe
Jumbo
antaloupe
rJ2i
r CD
8
-I
ft
Expressions magazine
invites YOU to express
YOURSELF by reading
your poetry at our
Poetry Reading
Art Show
on April 3 from 7-9 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student
Center Great Room B.
year of existence. Since its onset the
conference has grown steadily, achiev-
ing a RPI Ranking of 22 among the
33 Division-1 schools in the nation.
"I think we can be very competi-
tive in this conference Manahan said.
"We're happy to be undefeated in the
conference and we're happy to be play-
ing better competition
The conference consists of eight
member institutions in four eastern
states witch span the eastern seaboard
of the U.S. from Baltimore, Md. to
Charleston, S.C
Big South members in softball
include: ECU, UNC-W, UNC-Creens-
boro, Liberty, Radford, Coastal Caro-
lina, Winthrop, Charleston Southern
and the Universtiy of Maryland, Balti-
more County.
The Lady Pirates wiil be in ac-
tion agam on Friday when they travel
to Buies Creek to take on the
Campbell Camels in a double-header
"Campbell has always been a
great competitor Davis said.
Game time is scheduled for 2 p.m.
Are you going to
be here this
summer and want
to write for
sports? Gome by
TEC and fill out
an application.
Fresh
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each
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Prices In This Ad EffectiveMarch 20through March26,1996 In Our Greenville Stores
Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps





14
Thursday, March 21,1996
The East Carolinian
IT
Help
Wanted
$jf Services
Offered
iiiipn
For Rent
mpn
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1 U1 I oriv. Mnvt M.)Vttns.
Sn Uin NM'O IVl 1pntlV o 1-t
in I 12th g-i-i-t HK i -
Ivil'h spvi' Ho.ii vi't'i IV
M.MllK c 1VK I IM-
s� it v 11 I Vpiv-it f?�Uit1 ln �
!�� Putins R.ilt liv
1 ,ind 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartment '$250 a month
6month tease
M'ARTMfNflS
Hi �i

e'HmsNV-
NEED A NEW PAD? Roommate wanted
to share 2br, 2 bath Duplex. Walking dis-
tance from campus. Lots of Extras. Non-
Smoking student requested. $275 mo. plus
12 utilities. 758-2232
ROOMMATE NEEDED MAY August for
furnished 2 bdrm. apt with wd. No pets.
Nonsmoker preferred. Must like cats.
$300mo pays all but phone. Call Susan
at 355-3145
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOO L and need
somewhere to stay? Sub-leaie an efficiency
for $275 a month at Ringgold Towers. No
furniture needed and move May 1st Call
413-0629
TIRED OF NOT HAVING a parking
space. Sublease apartment in Ringgold
Towers. Male or Female. $225.00 a month.
Downtown, on campus, and furnished.
Great for Summer School. Call 758-0794
SUBLEASE APARTMENT OFF CAM-
PUS. Two bedroom with washerdryer
hookup for $335 a month plus deposit
Available April 28th. Call Ashley for de-
tails at 355-6354
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP TO share
2 bedroom apt in Twin Oaks. 12 rent,
12 utilities. Call 752-7352 after 7pm Ask
for John.
ONE BEDROOM APT, $225.00 a
month, includes utilities, no lease, but a
deposit is required, available now, near 5th
Street and City Market. Call 752-2535
1 BEDROOM APART. TO sublet for sum-
mer in Ringgold Towers. Rent only
$250.00 per month. Start May 1st Call
754-2596
MF NEEDED FOR APRIL 1 to share a
3 bedroom house. $150 a month plus de-
posit. Smoker Okay. Must like animals.
Also - would like someone to take over
lease. Call 7524462
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker. female or male. Twin
Oaks Apartment $210 per month. Silver
Bus Line. 2 rooms available. Contact Dave
at 754-2866
DUPLEX FOR RENT, TWO bedrooms. 1
12 bath, extra large closets, balcony off
of 2nd floor, masters bedroom. 114 S.
Woodlawn Ave 3 blocks from campus.
$500.00 month, 1 year lease Pets ok, W
D hookups. 752-6833
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT TO sub-
lease for the summer. Close to campus.
$45u a month. Call Chad or Matt at 830-
5194
3 VERY RARE OPPORTUNITIES for
rent One two bedroom 1 12 bath above
BW3's For $500.00 a month - One three
bedroom 2 12 bath above BW3's for
$775.00 a month. One 2 bedroom one
bath above Percolator Coffeehouse for
$450.00 a month. Water, sewer included
in Rent. Contact Yvonne M-F9-5 @ 758-
2616
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments. Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent. Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756-6209
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RESPONSI
BLE, NON-smoker to share rent for sum-
mer months. $167.50 12 utilities & 1
2 phone. Call April 752-7599
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses:
fully furnished: washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC: Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month: sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE PERSO N
to take over rent for summer. Walking dis-
tance to campus. Three bedroom house.
Rent $208mo. Non-smoker preferred.
Call at 830-2664. Ask for Jody.
DAY BED WHITE AND brass, also pop
up trundle, two orthopedic mattresses.
New Never used. Cost $750; sell for
$325.00.(919)637-2645
BMX 20" BIKE, LIKE new. Sell for $100.
Call Neill 328-3853
GREAT PRICES ON GREAT selection
of Tradeins. Used Bikes by Trek, Giant
GT, Schwin, and more. Cycle Center 355-
8050
SONY CDX-65 10-disc changer with rem-
ote for car. Great System! Only $275.00.
Must sell! 413-0565 ask for David, Won't
last long!
DESKCHAIR $150, BOOKCASE $30,
TV and stand $250, Screen $60, 3-pc of
Chest set $60, Computer $200. Call 754-
2887
A PAIR OF ACOUSTIC Linear Systems
DJP Model 520 Series speakers. Brand
new! 12" 3-way system, Max. AMP power:
200 watts program, to many features to
list! Retail $750.00. Must sell $390.00
O.B.O. 413-0565 ask for David.
TO Help
I !f !l wanted
For Sale
N�glCASHm
We Bar CDS,
CMwttt�,iaw Lp�
Well pay op to $5 cask tor
cm
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vt :� �
. ),�tvM, r.vs :�v
DOES YOUR JOB SUCK? Would you like
to make $6225 this summer working with
SW Co.? Call 1-800-685-7194 X4681 M-F
between 9-7 for more info Leave message.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF,
HOUSEKEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEAD
ERS, FITNESS COUNSELORS, AND
MORE. CALL RESORT EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES 1-206-971-3600 EXT R53622.
THE KINSTON INDIANS ARE looking
for summer help. Beginning of April
through the end of August Waitresses,
Vendors & Concession stand workers
needed. If interested contact John or Dave
at 1-800-334-5467.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time emplo yment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53624
OUTER BANKS LARGEST WATER-
SPORTS center hiring reliable, enthusi-
astic sailingwindsurfing instructors, res-
en -tionists, and watersports rental per-
sonnel for '96 season. Contact Bill Miles,
North Beach Sailing, PO Bo x 8279: Duck,
NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
FUNDRAISER - MOTD7ATED groups
needed to earn $500 promoting AT&T,
Discover, gas and retail cards. Since 1969,
we've helped thousands of groups raise
the money they need. Call Gina at (800)
592-2121 ext. 198. Free CD to qualified
callers.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES. IF you are
looking for an excellent paying job give
us a call. Playmates Massage Snow Hill,
NC-919-747-7686
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN
UP TO $3.000-$6,000 PER MONTH.
ROOM AND BOARD! TRANSPORTA-
TION! MALE OR FEMALE. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NECESSARY. CALL(206)971-3510
EXT A53623
Research Information
Largest Library of information in U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with
VisaMastercard or CO
800-351-0222
or 310-477-8226
Or rush $2 to Research Information
11322 Idaho Are. 8206-A lot Anpta, CA W025
Enfoy the Outdoors?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitoring Cotton Fields!
$5.7VHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCSI
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Or FAX:
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
Greenvitte, Kinston, New Bern
ECITS 1DJ SERVICE! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey serv-
ice for your party or social function. Wid-
est variety of any disc jockey company in
Greenville. Alternative to Hip Hop. Spe-
cializing in the needs of ECU Organiza-
tions and Greeks. Spring dates are filling
fast so call early. Ask for Lee 758-4644.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53625
ESTABLISHED ADVENTURE OUTFIT
TERS ON the Outer Banks hiring enthu-
siastic, reliable, experienced rental help for
'96 season. Excellent working conditions.
Contact Bill Miles, North Beach Sailing
and Outfitters. PO Box 8279; Duck, NC
27949. (919) 261-6262
FOR RENT WYNDAM COURT duplex
es 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths dishwasher,
washerdryer hookup. Call Elke or Jen
752-7465
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; Female
roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom. 2
bath house. $160 rent, 13 utilities. Fun
easy-going, studious. Call 757-1467
APTS SUBLEASE 1 BEDROOM UNIV.
Apt.s convenient, available April 1st Call
754-2887
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 month. Call 3551313
to make an appointment. Managed by
Remco East Inc
FULL SIZE BED. MATTRESS, BOXS-
PRING, and frame. $60.00. Call 757-0406
ZAP THE FAT, LOSE Weight & Feel great
100 Natural, Dr. Recommended, 30 day
money back guarantee. 16 years of
Healthy. Fit & Content Customers. Call
(919)633-9840.
IF PEOPLE CAN'T SEE the real you be-
neath all the excess weight then let us
show you how easily you can recapture
your own shape permanently without go-
ing hungry, giving up your favorite foods,
or exercising on special eq uipment For the
figure you always wanted, try our interna-
tionally known company with 15 years ex-
perience for the weight control program
your looking for. Dr Recommended! 100
Natural. Call Now! 321-5659
KEG COOLER! THREE KEGS refriger-
ated! Three taps! Just like the ones you
see in the bars! No pump! Pours automat-
ic! Make yourself some money at your next
keg party! Asking $1,100. Call 758-3058
Ask for John
MACINTOSH LC MONITERKEY-
BOARD. 452 $275.00 O.B.O. Must sell!
413-0565 Ask for David
TWO CRANKSETS FOR SALE great con
dition Shimano "95 model with bottom
brackets. $60 negotiable. Also, three pairs
of skis for sale. Call 413-0513
SUPER SINGLE WATERBED, SIX draw
ers, storage space, semi-waveless. dark-
wood, heater included. 2 yrs old. Will help
move. $250 O.B.O. PaulJennifer 355;6507
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM LIKE NEW
WITH LOCK $600.00 O.B.O C ALL 328-
1708. GREEN TO PURPLE DARK FADE
ONLY RIDDEN TWICE.
QUEEN SIZE WATER BED nice! for $75
and a washer for $125. Please contact
Ashley at 355-6354
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 800-662-2122
LOOKING FOR AGGRESSIVE ECU
students who want to earn extra money
on a limited time commitment Call 931-
7181
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week
youth recreationalsports camp.our 42nd
season! Over 25 activities, including wa-
ter ski, heated pool, tennis, Go-karts,
artCool Mountain Climate, EXCEL
LENT pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For
applicationbrochure: 704-692-6239 or
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792.
WARM, CARING INDIVIDUAL NEED-
ED to care for 5-year-old in our home in
the mornings during both summer ses-
sions. Need own transportation. Experi-
ence and references a must. If interested
call 321-3204 and leave a message.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Call 1-800-
251-4000 ext 1576
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK summer
in Myrtle Beach. SC. Hiring Lifeguards and
Beach Concession Workers. Earn Good
Money while working on the Beach $$
Salary plus bonuses $tDiscounted
Housing To apply or for further infor-
mation, callfax North Myrtle Beach Life-
guards at 803-272-4170.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED TO t each summer camps in NC
& SC. Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free
weekends! College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job, C ALL ES-
PRIT! CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-3223
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC
Relations. Please call Bill Fleming 355-
7700
HURRY - TAN while you work. Spring
Summertime Job 12 miles from Greenville.
Flexible Hours. 21 or older. Call for Inter-
view 975-2265 Day 830-9280 Night
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH $$ SEEK-
ING five motivatied individuals for PT
FT Sales and management positions. Com-
munication skills and positive attitude a
must 321-7496
HIRING FOR SUMMER SEASON! The
Reef Restaurant & Bar - Atlantic Beach,
NC. All positions! Including Bartenders,
Waitstaff & Doorpersons. Great working
conditions, with flexible hours. Part-time
andor full-time. On the Atlantic Beach
Causeway 919-726-3500
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206)971-3570extJ53624
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee Recreation
and Wellness Department Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Laurie Woolard between 8am-4:30pm at
(919) 816-5590. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital EOEAA.
m
Greek
Personols
TO ANYONE: HAVE YOU seen my
daughter? She was Kidnapped by gypsies
when she was but a babe in my arms. If
you have any information on her where-
abouts please meet me on the square
The Crazy Woman of Paris
PROFESSIONAL SWM, 44, ISO a
charming young woman, 18-25, to be an
adventurous and imaginative springtime
playmate. Please respond, with photo, to
POB 4144, Greenville, 27836-2144
Announcements
"PENNY WARS ARE COMING The
Gamma Sigma Sigma lot a Pledge class
wiil be having Penny Wars March 25-27.
All campus organizations are asked to
participate to help benefit Oakhaven Se-
nior Village. Call Jennifer @328-7411 or
Kristen @754-2579 for more info.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL STUD-
ENT: Learn Time Management, Study
Strategies, Note-taking Strategies, Test
Preparation, Test-taking Strategies, and
how to relieve Test Anxiety in this five
part program. Mondays at 9:00am begin-
ning March 25. Counseling Center. Call
3286661 to register.
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL be
having a meeting Thursday, March 28 at
5:00pm in Brewster C room 305. We will
be discussing the Walter B. Jones Jr. visit
along with many other issues. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
THE ECU HONOR BOARD is now ac-
cepting applications for Attorney General
and Public Defender Positions. Please
come by room 210 Whichard to pick up
an application. Applications are due March
21, Before Five.
SWCJ ALLIANCE NEEDS YOU: The
SWCJ Alliance needs volunteers to help
with the First Annual School of Social
Work and Criminal Justice Fish Fry which
will take place Alumni Weekend Friday.
March 29th. Volunteers are needed for set
up, clean up, food servers and more. If
you would like to volunteer your time, any
amount, please contact Deb Young, mail-
box 138. Tracy Beam, Shea Taylor,
Neshawn Cox or Gail Sharpe. Come out
and have some fun with your friends and
help support our School.
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY
SPECIAL OLYMPICS Local Spring Games
will be held on Friday, April 19 at J. H.
Rose High School from 9:30am-l :30pm.
If you would like to volunteer to be a
Buddy for our Special Olympians on that
day, please attend our buddy orientation
meeting on Wednesday, April 17 at
Mendenhall from 5pm-6pm in room 244.
All of our volunteers will receive a Spe-
cial Olympics Volunteer T-Shirt and a
lunch (hot dog and coke). Please call the
Special Olympics Office at 8304551 if you
have any questions. We here at the Spe-
cial Olympics office on behalf of our 769
Special Olympians, Thank you for your
support of our Local Program.
.
t
Greek
Personals
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy GOLD , SILVER, Jewelry-Abo Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD plavers
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN, J. CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
GUESS,LEVI,ETC.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10-12, 1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door & ring buzzer
Iudent Swat Shop
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI would
like to thank all of those who supported
the week of GAMMA!
CHI OMEGA SUPPORTS NIX,
Rivenbark, Phillips, Thompson in t he SGA
Elections.
PI KAPP, THANKS FOR this past Friday
you guys really know how to get the wee-
kend started. Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi.
PHI SIGMA PI - congratulations to the
new 1996 1997 officers: President Jan
Wood, Vice-President Kara Abbott Pledge
Advisor Robin Speaks, Historian Jill Har-
gett, Secretary Donna Yeaw, Treasurer
Becky Geier, and Social Coordinator Dan-
ielle Danzi. Good Luck!
LAMBDA CHI THANK YOU for sponsor
ing the Ides of March. Come rain or come
shine we always have a great time! Love,
the Alpha Phi's
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA THANKS every
one who braved the rain to come to our
band party, we hope everyone had a good
time.
Announcements
POW-WOW: The East Carolina Native
American Organization will be holding it s
third annual POWWOW on Saturday.
March 23,19. It will be held at t he bot-
tom of College Hill from 12-6pm. There
will be Native American dancing, drum-
ming, singing, demonstrations and crafts.
No admission fee. The public is invit ed to
attend. For more info call Nikki Epps at
752-9042, or Belinda Jacobs at 756-7013.
ECNAO: THE EAST CAROLINA NA-
TIVE AMERICAN ORGANIZATION will
be holding a meeting March 21 in Room
14 of MSC at 7pm. It is imperat ive that all
members attend as this week is the last
one before our Festival. For more info call
Nikki Epps at 752-9042
ATTENTION ALL CRIMINAL JUSTICE
students: Declared and Intended. There
wili be an information session for Crimi-
nal Justice students on Thursday, March
21 at 5:00pm in GCB 3006.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MARSHALS:
STUDENTS interested in serving as a Uni-
versity Marshal for the 1996 Spring Com-
mencement may obtain an application
from Room A-16 Minges. Student must be
classified as a Junior by the end of Fall
semester 1995 and have a 3.0 GPA to be
eligible. Return completed application to
Carol-Ann Tucker, Advisor, A-16 Minges
by March 22,1996. For more information
call 328-4661
DON'T LET OVERDUE FINES or books
hold up your registration for summer &
fall! Students with overdue fines or books
have a tag placed on their record and are
not permitted to register until tag is
cleared. Please return any overdue books
so you will not be delayed during regis-
tration.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM will meet
on Thursday, March 21st in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room 248, at 8pm. Open
to the general public, the Forum is a free
workshop. Those planning to at tend and
wanting critical feedback on their work
should bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
ALL INCLUSIVE CHURCH: GOOD
Shepherd Anglican Church is open to eve
ryone, especially those who are struggling
with coming out living an alternate life-
style or family and friends of someone who
is lesbian, gay or bisexual. We offer sup-
port unconditional acceptance and a safe
place to worship. We meet every Sunday
night at 6:00pm for Sunday School and
at 7:00pm for church. Bible Study is held
on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday each
month. We also have a pot luck dinner on
the 5th Sunday. Come as you are, casual
dress is okay. For information please call
Thomas at 321-6752 or Deb at 752-7674
TENNIS DOUBLES COMPETITION:
TENNIS players grab your racquet and
register for Tennis Doubles competition
by Wednesday, March 27 in 204 Christen-
bury Gym. There will be men's and wom-
en's divisions. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328-6387
B GLAD: OUR NEXT meeting will be on
March 27,1996 at 7:30pm in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Come check
out our new meeting format which in-
cludes activities and refreshments. Don't
forget to bring canned food for our ongo-
ing Picasso food drive. Take care!
Forms for Classifieds and
Announcements can be picked up in
Mendenhall and dropped off in the
Student Publication building.
me
-mjk Lost and
Found
$100 REWARD1 FOR THE safe return
of Gracie the lost black cat - shorthaired,
black leather studded collar - from ECU
area. 1 miss her! Please call with Info. 757-
0511 leave message.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
All Greek organizations must be
spelled out - no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reserves the fight
to reject any ad for libel,
obscenity nndor bad taste
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 54
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
addU
��





Title
The East Carolinian, March 21, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 21, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1133
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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