The East Carolinian, March 14, 1996






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March 14,1996
Vol 71, No. 45
The East Carolinian
'
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Briefs
Around the State
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) - A
jury decided on life in prison for
one man convicted of murdering
Michael Jordan's father, and a jury-
will decide the fate of his co-defen-
dant, a judge ruled Wednesday.
Larry Martin Demery, 20, had
asked Superior Court Judge Gre-
gory Weeks to sentence him to life
in prison - the same punishment
a jury meted out Tuesday to co-
defendant Daniel Andre Green for
the 1993 slaying of James R. Jor-
dan.
NEW LONDON, N.C. (AP) -
A Stanly County teenager who
shot himself in the head during
algebra class did not give any indi-
cation that he was about to com-
mit suicide, his classmates said.
Jamie Hurley, a 15-year-old
sophomore, took a 9-mm pistol
from his coat pocket Monday in the
middle of his fourth-period algebra
class and shot himself, Sheriff Joe
Lowder said Tuesday.
Around the Country
DAYTON, Ohio (AP) - A
school bus overturned after collid-
ing with a dump truck Wednesday,
injuring 11 children, police said.
None of the injuries were life-
threatening, authorities said.
The bus was en route to
Hickorydale Elementary School,
said Jill Moberley, spokeswoman
for Dayton public schools. The bus
had reportedly been carrying 20
to 25 children.
DENVER, Colo. (AP) - Ail sea-
son long, while his Denver Nuggets
teammates lined up to face the flag
during the national anthem, star
guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf has
sat off by himself in silent show of
allegiance to his faith.
On Tuesday, the National Bas-
ketball Association suspended
Abdul-Rauf indefinitely without
pay, saying his refusal to stand vio-
lates a league rule requiring all
players to "line up in a dignified
posture" for the anthem.
Around the World
DUNBLANE, Scotland (AP) -
A man burst into a Scottish el-
ementary school with four hand-
guns Wednesday and opened fire
on a class of kindergarteners, mas-
sacring 16 children and one
teacher in "a slaughter of the in-
nocents The gunman then shot
and killed himself.
Thirteen of the 29 children in
the class were killed instantly in
the attack in Dublane, a 13th-cen-
tury cathedral town on the edge
of the Scottish Highlands. Three
more died later in a hospital, po-
lice said.
BEIJING (AP) - A strong
earthquake hit a remote area in the
Altai mountains in northwestern
Xinjiang province early Wednesday.
The magnitude 6.1 earth-
quake was powerful enough to
crack the walls of some houses in
Altai, the city closest to the quake's
epicenter, but there were no re-
ports of injuries or more serious
damage, said Shu Naiqing of the
Xinjiang Earthquake Bureau.
Physician's assistant
program formed
Program set to
begin next spring
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
Editor's Note: This is the first
of a two part series profiling two
new degree programs.
The School of Allied Health Sci-
ences announced the addition of two
new degree programs earlier this
year.
The first students in the new
bachelor's program in physician's as-
sistant (PAs) studies will begin
classes in May of 1997. The first ap-
plications are in development now
and will be available in October or
November.
The program requires 136 se-
mester hours. Sixty six of those are
prerequisite hours which includes the
42 required for general college.
The traditional student will ap-
ply in the latter part of the fall se-
mester of his or her sophomore year.
The applications will be due by Jan.
5th of each year. Students will be
notified of their acceptance by Spring
Break, so they can take advantage
of early registration in March for
their classes. Classes will begin with
summer session in May and run for
27 continuous months.
Program Director, Jim Kellor,
clinical instructor and acting chair
of the department of physician's as-
sistant studies, has received over
2,200 inquiries about the program
already.
Though many of those inquiries
come from students at ECU, Kellor
has heard from all 50 states as well
as Korea, Germany and India.
Those who have already ex-
pressed an interest in enrollment will
be notified by mail when the appli-
cations are available.
Students interested in applying
should have an overall GPA of 2.75
with a 3.0 in the math and science
prerequisites.
Kellor talked to the chairs of 20
similar programs throughout the na-
tion to get an idea of what require-
ments would best ensure an
applicant's success in the program.
"This is a academically strenu-
ous program, similar to medical
school Kellor said. "I was advised
that these grades were needed to be
competitive
According to Kellor, the mean
average for acceptance nationwide is
a 3.2 GPA.
Personal interviews of the most
qualified applicants will determine
the final acceptance.
The interviewers will be inter-
ested in prior experience in a health
care field. Many nurses and military
corpsmen have expressed interest.
For the younger student without
work experience, Kellor recommends
volunteering in a medical setting dur-
ing the first two years of college.
"Working in a doctor's office or
long term care facility will give a stu-
dent an idea of the sights, sounds
and smells of what sickness is like
Kellor said.
There are only two physician's
assistant programs available in North
Carolina.
Duke University began the first
See ALLIED page 4
Housing sweepstakes
draws students to campus
Amy L Royster
Staff Writer
University housing plans to pro-
vide students with a second chance
to participate in their residence hall
sweepstakes and to sign up for rooms
next year.
Shelly Garafolo, who works with
the selection and training of resi-
dence hall staff, .aid that during the
week of March 18, students have a
second chance to reserve a place in
the residence halls while entering the
sweepstakes.
Contracts for the fall semester
Some summer Renovations
? New furniture in Cotten Hall
? Landscaping for Slay and
Umstead
� Security screen and new
paint for Fletcher Hall
1996 were distributed to all students
currently living in the residence halls
as part of a sweepstakes package. The
sweepstakes, sponsored by university'
housing, offers a free room for the
1997 spring semester as its grand
prize. Other prizes include a meal
plan, a color television and a moun-
tain bike. After a drawing, winning
students will be notified in their
classes on March 18. Students not
in class forfeit their prize.
Currently there are 4 1070 stu-
dents living in residence halls at ECU.
The cost for a double occupancy
room without air conditioning is
$1,616.00. Doubles with air condi-
tioning are
$2,000.00.
Single occu-
pancy rooms
are available in
White hall and
Jones Hall for
$2,490.00 with-
out air condi-
tioning and
$3,000.00 with
air.
Garafolo said many students
leave the residence halls after their
sophomore year for off campus op-
tions.
"Students might live in frater-
nity and sorority houses for a sense
of belonging Garafolo said. "We
know that we can build that same
thing in the residence halls. For many
students, their lifelong friends come
from the residence halls
Garafolo said that university
housing continually seeks to improve
the quality of life for dormitory resi-
dents.
"We really like to hear from stu-
dents Garafolo said.
Manny Amaro, director of uni-
versity housing, said there is a high
demand for single occupancy rooms
among upper classmen.
"There's a desire now to build
suite-style residences for students
Amaro said. "If we had apartments
or suites, I think there wound be a
See HOUSE page 3
University seeks to improve registration
Phone registration,
other options
investigated
Sherrl Parrish
Staff Writer
Editor's Note: Due to techni-
cal error, this article, which ran
in the Feb. 28th edition of TEC,
was not in its entirety, so it is be-
ing run again.
As registration approaches,
students and their advisers must
prepare for the process once again.
Although the whole ordeal may
not be an easy one, the university
is working on improving the sys-
tem.
According to Dean of Under-
graduate Studies Dorothy Muller,
a Registration Review Committee
is currently
seeking input
from students
on ways to make
advising and the
registration pro-
cess a more
positive experi-
ence.
"We are
working
through focus
groups to get
student input
for improving
the registration
process Muller
said. "If stu-
dents want to share their views on
advising and the registration pro-
cess, they can send it to the Com-
mittee Chairman Dr. Dave Watkins
"We are working
through focus
groups to get
student input for
improving the
registration
process
� Dorothy Muller,
Dean of Undergraduate
via e-mail, or to the office of un-
dergraduate studies
Although
these insights
will provide the
committee with
areas to focus on
for the future,
Muller said one
of the biggest
problems has al-
ready been re-
moved.
Improve-
ments made to
the university's
computer regis-
tration terminals
have sped up
transaction time.
"Last year, transactions on the
terminals took a longer amount of
See REG page 4
Pirates
on the
Street
pPNaMNM
Who will you
fsuDMnlP
M
1996
Prtpilentiaf
Election!
Jill Smith, freshman
"I support Clinton because
he can relate to our
generation
Dell Alan, sophomore
"President Clinton is the
best bet once again,
because Dole is too old
Eric Couch, freshman
"Clinton has done a fine
job so far, and if I vote, I
will most likely support
him
Fewer women than men
gain professorship
Full and Part-time faculty by rank and gender
Rank of women of men
Professor34221
Assoc. Prof.88216
Assistant Prof.179245
Instructor3432
Lecturer5038
Other51
Total390753
� Latest data compiler1 by the university of fice cf planning & research in fall
1994
Sherri Parrish
Staff Writer
sor.
It may seem as no surprise, but
in terms of gender, ECU's faculty
is predominantly male.
According to the Fact Book,
published by ECU's office of plan-
ning and institutional research,
only 34.1 percent (about 13) of the
university's faculty are women. Fac-
ulty is comprised of professors, as-
sociate professors, assistant profes-
sors, instructors, lecturers and oth-
ers.
Consequently, the number of
profv ors being women is drasti-
cally lower than that of males.
"Only 13.3 percent of women
professors on this campus said
Sherry Pernell, Co-Chair of the
Committee on the Status of Women
and Director of Risk Management.
"Most of the women in the faculty
are assistant professors
To reach the status of profes-
sor, a faculty member must achieve
tenure, usually resulting in promo-
tion. For example, if an associate
professor achieves tenure, the as-
sociate will likely become a profes-
The time period involved in
achieving tenure varies for univer-
sities ECU's is five years. These
five years consist of conducting ex-
tensive research and providing ser-
vice in the community, in addition
to teaching.
Pernell said that the time pe-
riod involved in tenure may be a
contributing factor for why there
are less women on the tenure track.
"It suggests the old-fashioned
ideas that women are not the bread-
winners and of the 'trailing spouse'
- the idea that women must pick
up and move wherever the
husband's job requires Pernell
said. She said this is a reality for
some women and thus they are not
in one place long enough to bother
with getting on the tenure track.
One area of faculty in which
women do out-number men is as
lecturers and instructors, who are
hired from year to year and are not
tenured.
Again, Pernell said tenure's
time consumption and intense
workload may shed reason for this.
See GENDER page 4
TV Whore gets zapped by technologypage 9
Student supports dictatorpage O
S PO jjjjwjgKMjgy
Baseball sees victorypage 1 3
Thursday
Sunny
High 75
Low 59
Weekend
Cloudy w chance of rain
High 74
Low 62
N
&64V fa teaci ec&
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg,
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
'�,





m
Thursday, March 14,1996
The East Carolinian
Departmental program bridges language gap for
international students through special courses
Drunken woman falls from fraternity house
A 22- year-old Columbia resident is in critical condition after
she fell two stories early Friday morning from a window at the Phi
Kappa Psi fraternity house located near University of Missouri-Co-
jumbia.
Karrie Lambeth was taken to University Hospital shortly after
2 a.m. on Feb. 23. According to a friend of the family, Lambeth
sustained a broken neck and two broken legs from the fall. She
underwent surgery last Monday.
According to university police reports, one witness said Lambeth
drank at least seven beers before the incident. But her friends make
it sound as if she was pushed out of the window, police said.
NC State football players go from starting line-up to
police line-up
The college football careers of three defense-playing Wolf Pack-
ers were sacked after the students were caught red-handed break-
ing into cars by Raleigh Police Department officers on Mar. 1- just
weeks after two of the players were arrested for swiping textbooks.
Defensive tackle Brian Eugene Brooks, 19, outside linebacker,
Steven McKnight, 20, and defensive end Christopher McNeil, 19,
were arrested and charged with two felony accounts of breaking
and entering automobiles after allegedly attempting to steal car ste-
reos from a theater parking lot.
In response to the charges, Coach Mike Okain kicked the three
players off the team.
U of South Florida police arrest man for sexual bat-
tery
Jose Antonio Blair, 34, was found by University Police Sun
Feb. 25, with a 14-year-old girl and was subsequently arrested and
charged with sexual battery and resisting arrest without violence.
When the two were found engaged in a sexual activity, police
questioned Blair about why the girl, and he said she was there with
him by choice. At the time she agreed with him, but later when
Blair had been sent home and she remained in police custody, she
told a different story.
Blair and the girl had been at the party of a mutual friend, and
afterwards Blair drove her home. The victim said Blair had given
her a drink which caused her to fall asleep on the drive home. He
then drove her to a wooded area where he undressed her and began
various sexual acts with her while she was asleep.
Police then arrested and charged Blair with taking indecent
liberties with a minor.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from various
campus newspapers and the College Press Service.
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
One of the major issues of con-
cern facing students from other
countries is the language barrier
they face when they come to study
in the U. S. ECU'S department of
English realizes that a mastery of
English is crucial to the success of
these students and has become the
center of a program dedicated en-
tirely to improving their chance at
success.
Debra O'Neal, director of ECU's
English Language Academy (ELA)
said the program was implemented
about three years ago and has been
rejuvenated as of May 1995.
O'Neal said each program ses-
sion is five weeks in length, and stu-
dents take three sessions during a
regular semester. Students are
tested in various areas including
grammar skills before they are
placed in their appropriate classes.
"Now the Academy is handled
specifically by the English depart-
ment and the department of continu-
ing education O'Neal said, adding
that this type of program exists in
universities al over the state. "UNC
Charlotte has a program similar to
ours, and N.C. State offers one in
the summer, but we're the only uni-
versity in this part of the state to
offer this type of intensive concen-
tration in English instruction
O'Neal said there are currently
eight students enrolled in the En-
glish Language Academy. The
classes are usually small to allow
one-on-one instruction time.
"We had nine Japanese students
leave the program recently O'Neal
said. "Now we have students from
Venezuela, Costa Rica, Guatemala
and Kuwait"
Manuel Zarco, a student from
See GAP page 4
Up and coming philosopher speaks in Brewster
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
An associate professor of philoso-
phy from the University of Michigan
at Ann Arbor will speak at ECU on
Friday March 15.
The department of philosophy
will sponsor the visit by Dr. Stephen
Yablo from 3-5 p.m. in Brewster B-203.
Yablo received his Ph.D. in Phi-
losophy from the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley in 1986. Since then
he has been at the University of Michi-
gan.
He is a Fellow at the National
Humanities Center in Research Tri-
angle Park for the 1995-96 academic
year.
Yablo is the author of 17 articles
in prestigious philosophical journals.
Two of his articles have been selected
for the Philosopher's Annual, which
reprints the 10 best articles in phi-
losophy annually.
His areas of specialization include
metaphysics, philosophy of the mind
and philosophical logic.
Yablo is a well known writer who
has published in the areas of philo-
sophical logic. This type of logic at-
tempts to understand how natural lan-
guages have meaning.
Whiie at ECU, Yablo will present
a talk entitled "Possibility This talk
will analyze and help us understand
such words as possibility, necessarily
and validity.
The talk is aimed at a primarily
philosophical audience, but is open to
anyone interested. The talk may also
be of interest to liguists, computer sci-
entists and others interested in for-
mal semantics for natural language.
Dr. John Bickle, associate profes-
sor of philosophy coordinated the
visit He said this talk is important
for several reasons.
"It will cover areas of contempo-
rary research and debate, philosophy
of language and understanding the
precise way how words have mean-
ings
Dr. Umit Yalcin, a visiting associ-
ate professor of philosophy, attended
graduate school at the University of
California at Berkeley with Yablo.
"Yablo is a promising, well known
philosopher Yaicin said. "This is a
good opportunity for ECU
Referring to Yablo's talk, "Possi-
bility Yalcin said that there are dif-
ferent kinds of possibilities just as
there are different kinds of apples or
dogs. Something that is not possible
now, may be possible later if the cir-
cumstances were different
Yalcin said that this is not just
about words, but about reality.
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Recreational Services
Indoor Soccer
Kick this around!
Registration Meeting
Tuesday, March 19 at 5 p.m. in
Biology 103.
Open to all ECU students, faculty, and staff!
Summer Sessions
Session I, May 21-June 20
Session n, June 25-July 26
UNC Wilmington A
601 South College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
Burgers, Buns and Thighs
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Beat the Fast Food Blues!
Registration is March 14-25
Program starts Tuesday, March 26
7:00 p.m9:00 p.m. in CG 102 & 108
Cost is $5 for students & $1 Ofor nonstudents.
St. Pat's Aerobic Bash
Find your pot of Gold!
Friday, March 15 at 4:00 p.m.
in Christenbury Gym.
Come meet the instructors &
try free Hip Hop, Circuit
& Interval class styles.
Free food and prizes!
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.
I
' J�?�
4MPMMW





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 14,1996
CHICO'S,
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-lt
house f�m p.�e i Course requires new
science laboratory
a
market for them
Jarvis Hall will be closed for at
least two years while undergoing
complete renovations. Amaro said
that suite-style rooms are a possibil-
ity for Jarvis Hall, but no plans have
been made yet.
Other renovations planned for
this summer include new furniture
for Cotten Hall, two new roofs, land-
scaping for Slay and Umstead, emer-
gency power for three buildings, and
security screens and new paint for
Fletcher Hall.
Sophomore Artriel Askew who
is majoring in social work, chose to
live in a single occupancy room af-
ter considering living off campus.
"The dorms were cheaper and
closer to campus Askew said. "I got
to meet a lot of new people
Sophomore and Criminal Justice
Major Stacey Whitehead recom-
mends that students turn in their
contracts for next year.
"Living in the dorms helps you
meet people and get to know the
area Whitehead said. "There are a
lot of perks like free cable
Garafolo encourages students
to turn in their contracts during the
week of March 18 in order to enter
the sweepstakes, but said students
may turn in contracts throughout the
spring semester and summer.
"If you live on campus you ben-
efit from things that others do not
Garafolo said.
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
A new science laboratory is be-
ing assembled in the biology depart-
ment that will help students receive
the training they need to keep up in
the rapidly growing field of biotech-
nology.
Dr. James Smith, a protein bio-
chemist in ECU'S biology department,
was awarded a $89,000 grant from the
North Carolina Biotechnology Center.
The grant is being used to purchase
the necessary equipment needed to
run a Protein Purification Lab.
Dr. Cindy Putnam-Evans and Dr.
Mary Farwell are co-directors for the
project and also are protein biochem-
ists.
"The process of protein purifica-
tion involves isolating protein mol-
ecules from living tissues Smith said.
"Protein purification is an essential
part of genetic engineering which we
are hearing so much about today
Protein purification is used in
the study of DNA and gene function,
Smith said. The injection of DNA into
a cell produces a protein that must
be isolated before it can be examined.
The process of isolating the protein
is what is known as protein purifica-
tion.
"What people fail to realize
sometimes is that genetic engineer-
ing mainly deals with proteins he
said.
Smith said most schools that try
to teach courses in biotechnology
overlook teaching how to correctly
handle proteins in the lab. While the
new course will serve as model for
biochemistry programs at other uni-
versities, the new lab will serve as a
site for workshops to train or retrain
people who are already working in
the biotechnology industry.
"We're trying to provide our stu-
dents with a different approach
Smith said. "We will be presenting
students with some very valuable
skills. We want to teach them to be
proficient in the handling of proteins
since that is suca a vital part of bio-
technology.
"Right now, we're in the process
of ordering the necessary materials
to be used in the lab. The grant we
received is enabling die department
to start our students using the same
equipment they will be seeing when
they find jobs in biotechnology
The department plans to offer
the first class in protein purification
on a trial basis during the second
summer session.
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EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Register:
May 13
1st Session:
May 14-Jun
Register:
June 19
2nd Session;
June 2
Division of
Continuing Studies
Office of Summer School
Schedule of
Summer School Classes
Available Prior to Early Registration
An equal opportunity'aflirmalive action university, which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
K
Tiu nmmmmv9mm





Thursday, March 14, 1996
The East Carolinian
GENDER from page 1 GAP from page 2 REG from page 1
"Women tend to have more
problems with tenure because
sometimes their additional family
life and pregnancies present some
obstacles. Since they are often the
primary caretakers, they may not
have as much time for the amounts
of research involved she said.
According to Cindy Putnam-
Evans who is currently in her third
year on the tenure track and chair
of the Sub-Committee on the Sta-
tus of Women, the research aspect
of tenure is the most difficult.
Not meeting the demands and
quality of the research aspect is of-
ten the reason why individuals are
not granted tenure.
"Probably when people fail at
tenure, they've failed at the re-
search activity Putman-Evans
said. "What is expected is quality
work as well as evidence of that
quality, like publication in a re-
. spected journal
Another area of drastic differ-
ence in the number of men and
women in the university is in de-
partment heads.
Currently 14 are chaired by
women, compared to 78 by men.
However the university is
aware of such differences. One goal
� of the university is to increase the
number of women and other mi-
norities on the tenure track.
To reach this goal, the univer-
sity is currently involved in a stra-
tegic plan in which each depart-
ment is a piece of the puzzle.
Goal six of the University Stra-
tegic Plan states: "Enhance pro-
grams aimed at the recruitment,
hiring, development and retention
of a diverse faculty and staff
In another effort to help rem-
edy difficulties involved in tenure,
the Committee on the Status of
Women recently sponsored a ten-
ure workshop.
The workshop was designed to
offer help and guidance for those
on the tenure track by faculty mem-
bers who have been through and
received tenure.
An organized survey reinforced
the workshop as a success.
"On a scale of one to 10 the
overall average for the workshop
was an 8.77 Pernell said. "Those
on tenure found it helpful and gave
us great feedback. It was a success
Guatemala, is enrolled in the acad-
emy and is taking classes designed
to increase his proficiency in the
English language this semester.
Zarco said students in the program
spend a lot of time talking and lis-
tening to other people talk.
"What we usually do in class is
talk about our country and customs
and learn about the customs of
other students Zarco said. "Right
now, we are working on writing our
first big paper of the semester. We
have to write about what we felt the
first day we came here
Manuel and his classmates are
nearing the end of their second
spring session. According to O'Neal,
the academy has several events lined
up for the students enrolled, includ-
ing a series of field trips and a week-
end visit to the coast.
Students can obtain more infor-
mation about the ELA by contact-
ing O'Neal at 328-6413.
time Muller said. "With the new
computers, that transaction time is
now faster and speeds up the regis-
tration process
Not only is the time involved in
registering known to be one of the
biggest concerns of students, but
also the problem of closed classes.
Closed classes can often throw
off a student's plans.
"1 get angry when I have to
settle for a class instead of taking
one I really want senior Commu-
nications Major Myra Ross said.
"Sure I could wait for another op-
portunity but I want to graduate as
planned
Muller said the problem of
closed classes is hard to solve. It in-
volves having enough seats at rea-
sonable times in ratio to the faculty.
"Getting what you want, when
you want - we're working on that
Muller said.
Some universities, like UNC-W,
ELTORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
Pirate Special
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Hignwav Patrol
Behind Stain Grass
Mon -Fit 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
S.n PIRATES &
Get Hair Cut for
$ Fvervtirne
S7.00
Haircut
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
"Molire's Classic Comic
Masterpiece!
I"
TARTUFFE
March 28, 29, 30, April 1 and 2, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
March 31, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public:8.00
ECU Students:5.00
Children:5.00
Mature Themes. Parental Discretion Advised.
Gall-328-6829
. .��. Mill
AIN KILLER.
� �
Fior last relief from the nagging ache of taxes, we
recommend TIAA-CREF SRAs. SRAs are tax-
delerred annuities designed to help build additional
assets �money that can help make the difference
between living and living urafter your working
years are over.
Contributions to your SRAs are deducted from your
soiry on a pretax basis. That lowers your current
taxable income, so you start saving on federal and,
in most cases, state and local income taxes right away.
What's more, any earnings on your SRAs are also
tax deferred until vou receive them as income. That
can make a big difference in how painful your tax
bill is every vear.
As the nation's largest retirement system, based
on assets under management, we oiler a wide range
of allocation choices �Irom the TIAA Traditional
Annuity, which guarantees principal and interest
(backed by the company's claims-paying ability),
to TIAA-CREKs diversified variable annuity
accounts. And our expenses are very low which
means more of your money goes toward improving
your future financial health.
To find out more, call 1 800 82888AVe'll send
you a complete SRA information kit. plus a free
slide calculator that shows you liow much SRAs
can lower vour taxes.
Call todav � it couldn't hurl.
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.
L-
Tr�liftn'l 'I'll I ' fii II il li- fTiHlnjl 1-irrj- IMS Uwl Analytical Soviet. In. LiffK I
CRKK.criil"iiie�arrH.voui�dbv'FIAA CREf ln.livi.lual an.) Ininuil Sovicea In F.
�mlnlinn!I nil I 806 842-2731� 1589. Ianew CREf �,� iu� KI it proape.
have installed a telephonic registra-
tion system to lessen some of the
burdens of registration.
The Registration Review Com-
mittee has recommended the change
for ECU, but it may not fit into the
university's budget.
"The chancellor has agreed to
look at it if funds are available
Muller said. "The budgetary process
is the deciding factor
Although registration is being
improved, changes will not happen
overnight.
To make the experience as
pleasant as possible, students
should plan ahead and meet with
their advisers as soon as possible.
Early registration for summer and
fall is the week of March 25th.
"Advising is a dual responsibil-
ity between the student and the ad-
visor Muller said. "If both work in
concert, then we can achieve suc-
cessful advising for registration
ALL!ED from page 1
program in the nation in 1965; Wake
Forest also offers this degree.
ECU will have the only state sup-
ported program. This is important,
because the affordibility will expand
opportunities to a wider range of stu-
dents, said Kellor.
"We will give preference to ECU
students and others from N.C
Kellor said. "We will look especially
hard at those from rural areas who
want to work in those areas after
graduation
"Ideally, students will work in
clinics near their homes during the
second year, the clinical year of study,
and then return to those clinics af-
ter graduation Kellor said. "There's
a great need here in eastern N.C. to
improve patient's access to health
care. RAs working in teams with
doctors can ultimately improve the
health of rural populations
Director Jim Kellor applied for
the job of planning and developing
this program in 1993 when he dis-
covered that Dr. Harold Jones, dean
of the school of allied health sciences
was interested in offering a
physician's assistant degree at ECU.
"I've had good support form the
chancellor on down Kellor said. "
The other departments in allied
health and the School of Medicine
have also been very supportive
Kellor said this program adds
another feather in the cap for ECU'S
rural medicine programs, which were
recently ranked fourth in the nation
according to USA Today, and he is
very happy to be a part of it.
Attention
Editors!
Editorial Board
Meeting Today at
4:30. Be there.
fJAtsfOexkk
11:00 J tChCljZL
IT'S NOT UUST fOR SARDINES ANYMORI
752-5855
iurs.
R0SC0
Sunday Bloody Sunday $1.50 Bloody Marys $1.00 Dom beer
Tues. M U C N IT E Bring a mug. o smile, & a dollar and receive a beerj
fioo) tiinss, poo too arsa? frisks
still ha
nee to wtnl
uu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Man, I am SO relieved I forgot to reserve a room for next year.
I called University Housing Services to explain my situation and those kind
folks told me I could have a SECOND CHANCE! All I have to do is drop
by 214 Whichard Building on Monday through Wednesday, March 18-20
between 8:30 AM and 4:30 PM.They will have the paperwork I need to fill
in all I have to do is bring100. Wow I am so lucky. I can live on
campus and not be stuck with the hassles of living in an apartment. If
you forgot to reserve a room for next year, you can do the same thing!
If you don't believe that they will give you a second chance, just
call them at 328-6450.
J
ur.ivsrsit y bousir.� ar, �dir.ir.i ssrvicss
�J9Sta? ca" 32E-M50
�� lull





V
�9te W0 ,
�mnoHi �
Thursday, March 14,1996
The East Carolinian
opjmm
ITie East Carolinian
Tanbra Zl��, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
&

Our View

Before you pull
those green
sweaters out of
the closet or
flock to the mall
for some green
attire, take a
moment to
remember why
we celebrate St.
Patrick's Day.


If you see a guy walking around this coming up Sun-
day not wearing green, don't pinch him. Chances are he's
not Irish.
The funny thing is many people plan ahead for St.
Patrick's Day every year, rummaging through their clos-
ets and department store clothing racks, searching for any-
thing and everything green. These people wake up early
on March 17 (year after year), eat their Lucky Charms,
and don themselves from head to toe in various shades of
green. If you were to ask these clueless but enthusiastic
people why they are running around looking like lepre-
chauns, they would simply say, "So I don't get pinched
Believe it or not, some people still have no idea that
St. Patrick's Day is a religious holiday originally set aside
as a feast day to honor the patroned saint of Ireland, St.
Patrick (of course), who converted the Irish to Christian-
ity. The first St. Patrick's Day celebration held in the U. S.
was in Boston in the 1700s. The celebration consisted of
parades and parties organized by proud Irish descendants.
Today, the largest St. Patrick's Day parade can be found in
New York where the streets are crowded with a few truly
Irish people and hundreds of others who just like to wear
green.
The most respectful thing people can do for the Irish
is to at least know why they are walking around with sham-
rocks pinned to their clothes. Speaking of shamrocks
Remember when you were in primary school and your
teacher made you trace and cut "clovers" out of green con-
struction paper to make hats and name tags? Did she ever
tell you why you were doing this? Chances are you still
don't know. According to an old Irish legend, St. Patrick
used a shamrock to explain to the Irish the concept of the
Holy Trinity (you know, "the Father, the Son and the Holy
Spirit, these three are one)
So, you see, St. Patrick's Day, like Christmas and Eas-
ter, is a religious holiday meant to celebrate Christianity.
Now there's no longer any excuse for walking around pinch-
ing people who decide to wear blue on the holiday. Not
everyone wants to celebrate an Irish-Christian holiday, just
like not everyone feels the need to "ho, ho, ho" at Christ-
mas time. However, if you still feel like celebrating, you
GO AHEAD WITH YO' GREEN SELF!
Wendy Reuntree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
I Wadded, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
i Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perratt, Assistant Sports Editor
Panl Kagwood, Staff illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Hyde, Copy Editor
rumpton Copy Editor
Panl D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Resness, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For Information, all (919)
326366.
Students addicted to TV
The day was Thursday, Feb.
29th. The time was 1:30 p.m. The
place was Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter in the TV room. What was so
unusual about this scene was the
arrangement of students. All of them,
about a dozen and mostly female,
were sitting separately by themselves
glued to the TV, watching a soap
opera. None of them were talking or
conversing and it was so silent you
could almost hear a pin drop. I have
never seen so many students gath-
ered and not talking to one another
in such a casual situation. Surely
when the commercials came on they
would talk I thought But no, even
when they came on and the show
Nelll Dalberg
Opinion Columnist
ended and a new one began, there
still was no talking. This was alarm-
ing to me. What was happening? Was
it that they all were addicted to the
soaps, or was it something more?
Let us assume that they are ad-
dicted to soaps. What kind of lessons
can be learned from soaps? Ah, les-
sons in life? Some say this is as close
to true life as it gets and it's fun to
watch. I might agree that it is fun to
watch soaps and there are important
lessons to learn, but I do not agree
that it is fun to watch commercials.
How could it be fun to watch com-
mercials for $30,000 cars that you
can't buy? That's not fun, that's frus-
trating and insane!
Letters to the Editor
Everyone gets lonely
To the Editor,
J am writing in response to an
article called "Christian Vinds Com-
fort Overall, I thought it was mis-
leading. Feeling like an outsider is
especially common at this age. All
humans go through stages of devel-
opment and adolescence is a time of
exploration and uncertainties. It is
also a time to start handling your
problems maturely. If Ware was so
unhappy with his roommate, why
didn't he speak up and demand some
compromise?
This "phenomenon as referred
to by Ware, is common among Chris-
tians, Jews, Muslims and everyone else
in this world. Does God comfort them
as well? If a Christian homosexual
seeks guidance, will God take care of
he or she also? What about olher "sin-
ners" like myself; is God going to carry
out His "almighty plan" for me even
though I haven't seen the inside of a
church in years? I believe God watches
over me, but I don't mink He's molded
me or my life. I make the decisions
and God helps me carry them
through. Ware seems to believe if s
the other way around.
If God has led my life and that of
all Christians, then He's left a few dis-
appointed. What kind of destiny has
he planned for the many homeless'
people, victims of AIDS, or MIA sol-
diers?
For those who find comfort and
security in a similar way, perhaps if a
stronger effort was made to fit in, a
source of "comfort" would not be nec-
essary. To me, it sounds like God is
being held responsible for your ac-
tions. Instead, why not take control
of your own life? After all, God has an
entire religion of people to control,
right?
Sincerely,
Geanelle Sartango
Castro critics are wrong
A few months ago the world
paid witness as the last of the true
remaining dictators of the Cold War
visited the United Nation's 50th
birthday party. It was the first time
anyone has seen the Cuban leader
out of his traditional olive green
military fatigues in quite some time.
The question presented was "Is he
coming out his shell and contemplat-
ing reform?" Well, if the events that
occurred Feb. 24 are any indication,
then in the words of John Wayne
(the greatest actor who ever lived),
while playing th� role of Jacob
McCandles in the movie Big Jake,
"Not one bit This was after his fe-
male counterpart pointed out that
he had not changed in the past 20
years.
Castro has been trying to open
markets in recent times. He has al-
ways known that his island nation
cannot operate entirely on its own.
The demise of the former Soviet
Union has left Cuba without valu-
able markets. Castro has been
merely trying to open trade barri-
ers to bolster his struggling
economy. This does not mean that
he is willing to loosen his grasp.
Castro has been in charge of
Cuba for 37 years and the last thing
he is going to do is allow his people
and the rest of the world to think
that he is soft. On Feb. 24 he rein-
forced that notion by shooting down
two unarmed American planes kill-
ing the four people on board.
The planes involved belonged to
an American group called Brothers
to the Rescue. The group was
formed in 1991 by Cuban-Americans
to help Cuban boat refugees. In the
past two years, however, their focus
had turned from the notion of sim-
ply helping refugees to safety to the
goal of overthrowing the Cuban gov-
ernment. In the past two years, the
group has repeatedly dropped leaf-
lets all over Cuba, particularly in the
capital city of Havana, that encour-
aged Cubans to overthrow Castro
and revolt.
Chris Ariine
Sonlor Opinion Columnist
concept
nfsm as
ny other
his
The questions at hand are "did
Castro act appropriately, was he act-
ing within his right and should the
United States take action against
this event?"
In response to the first part of
the question, Castro did act appro-
priately, he is a dictator, and that
being the case, must crush all oppo-
sition. He had been warning the
United States since 1994 that the
flights must be stopped or he will
be forced to take action. They did
nothing other than review whether
or not to suspend one of the pilots'
licenses. He gave fair warning.
The second part of the question
refers to whether or not he was act-
ing within his right. He was acting
within his right. International law
makes him sovereign over his own
airspace. This sovereignty is the
same reason why we had to ask the
French if they minded if we flew over
their country when we raided Libya
in the 1980s.
The third part of the question
is should the U.S. take action
against Cuba for this event? The
answer is no. The pilots knew the
risks they were taking when they
broke the law. They should have
been smart enough to realize that a
man with a reputation for being one
of the most notorious human rights
abusers in the world would be less
than patient Especially when you're
saying he ought to be done away
with in his own back yard. The fact
of the matter is that the U.S. has
already acted. Clinto'n was quick to
approve the Helms-Burton bill. The
bill stiffens the already existing em-
bargo and also imposes sanctions
against nations who do commerce
with Cuba. Needless to say, this has
not gone over well with the rest of
the world, especially Mexico.
In an interview with Time,
Castro said "It was humiliating. The
U.S. would not have tolerated it if
Washington's airspace had been vio-
lated by small airplanes. We have
been patient but there are limits
This makes sense and is true.
In America, you go to jail for
threatening the president If a for-
eign group was to come to America
and threaten that they were going
to overthrow our government by vio-
lent means we would have them
strung up faster than Michael Jack-
son accepting an invitation to visit
an elementary school.
Castro was acting within his
rights. I hate the concept of com-
munism as much as any other Ameri-
can, but I agree with his actions on
this incident He took the necessary
preventative measures and waited
long enough.
If a person wants to speak
against me in a public place and they
do so in a truthful organized man-
ner, then they are welcome to do so
because it is within their freedom
of speech. However, if they unlaw-
fully come into my house and pro-
ceed to tell my roommates and my-
self how horrible I am, and how I
. should be done away with, then I
will ask them to leave. If they do
not leave I will ask the authorities
to have them leave. If the authori-
ties do nothing and I have given
them fair warning and still feel my
well-being is threatened, then I have
the legal right to take matters into
my own hands. Castro used this
right and was right in doing so.
AIDS testing is necessary
To the Editor,
I found the article entitied, "Stu-
dent health ponders HIV testing" that
appeared in the February 27, 1996
issue of The East Carolinian to be
very good news. AIDS testing on cam-
pus has not been a major issue but it
is greatly needed. The AIDS virus is
spreading very quickly and the num-
ber of cases of 15 to 20-year-olds is
also rapidly increasing. Students at
ECU need this service considering the
fact that Pitt County has one of the
highest rates of HIV in North Caro-
lina. Students should have easy access
to testing, especially the ones who live
on campus and do not have cars to
get to the health clinic. This service
would be a great blessing because I'm
sure and without doubt that there are
students on campus who wonder
about HIV for different reasons such
as unprotected sex with an unfaith-
ful boyfriend or girlfriend, one night
stands and past sexual activities. HIV
testing on campus could be the key
to peace of mind for many of the stu-
dents here. Access to HIV testing
should be as easy as walking down to
student health services because col-
lege is already stressful enough with-
out having to worry and wonder about
other problems. Even though we do
not have the space, the time or the
money to provide HIV testing right
now, it would be of great benefit to
all students here at ECU if it were
provided in the very near future.
Tomeka Jordan
It is impossible to defeat an
ignorant man in an argument
William Gibbs McAdoo, U.S. Senator, 1915
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Circulation Dept The East Carolinian, Student
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Address






Thursday, March 14,1996
The East Carolinian
if
i
- Help
11 Wanted
iff
l1!
For Rent
nM.
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom .
rnrshed apartments. S2S0 a month
6month lease
I SO UNlV'f RSITY APART MfNTS
CALL TODAY IF YOU NEED A ROOM!
My Apt is near the Plaza & Minges Coli-
seum. There is a rent and deposit special
w cable incl. See why the off campus life-
style is far superior. On ECU busline. Call
today for details @ 321-2813 Phil
$505 DEPOSIT IS YOURS, if you take
over my 2BR Wilson Acres Apt $505 Rent
thru July 14. WMarch Rent Already Paid.
Call 3554511
DUPLEX FOR RENT, TWO bedrooms, 1
12 bath, extra large closets, balcony off
of 2nd floor, masters bedroom. 114 S.
Woodlawn Ave 3 blocks from campus.
$500.00 month, 1 year lease. Pets ok, W
D hookups. 752-6833
Pitt Property Management
758-192)
108a Brownlea Or.
1ANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 Dloctcs
from campus. New ownership $375 deposit,
$375month.
AVERV STREET APARTMENTS 1
BEDROOM, $275, on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF MARCH
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facili-
ty sand volleyball court. Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer cable.
WYMDHAM CT: 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor, located 5
blocks from campus. Free rent 12 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockskte 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 4 car
carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room, balcony, exterior storage room, noth-
ing in the area comparesReasonably
Priced!
For Sale
FOR RENT: VERY NICE newly decorat-
ed 2 bedroom apartment at Twin Oaks.
Complex has a pool. Close to campus. Call
Day-753-7393 or Night-753-5589.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT OFF CAM-
PUS. Two bedroom with washerdryer
hookup for $335 a month plus deposit
Available April 28th. Call Ashley for de-
tails at 355-6354
NEAR ECU ON THE PURPLE BUS
LINE. 1 bedroom apart ment with new car-
pet and vinyl. $240.00 monthly. Call Po-
tomac Properties 752-9722
SUBLEASE 1 BEDROOM APT in
Ringgold Towers. No Deposit. Call 754-
2633
ONE - TWO bedroom Apartments $285-
$340. Water-Sewage Free, Washer-Dryer
Hookups. Quiet location near malls and
restaurants. Call 355-4499 Brasswood
Apartments - near Lowe's
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: RESPONSI-
BLE, NON-smoker, female or male. Twin
Oaks Apartment $210 per month. Silver
Bus Line. 2 rooms available. Contact Dave
at 754-2866
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 month. Call 355-1313
to make an appointment. Managed by
Remco East Inc
1 AND 2 BEDROOM Apartments, Du-
plexes and Townhouses for rent. Many
locations to choose from. Currently Pre-
Leasing for the Fall. Call Wainwright Prop-
erty Management 756209
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
ROOMMATE WANTED: RESPONSI-
BLE, CONSIDERATE, non-smoker, likes
pets; Available March, own room, close to
campus (off tenth street nice neighbor-
hood) $227.50 12 util 12 phone,
$100 deposit Amy @ 931-0865
DUPLEX FOR RENT, TWO bedrooms, 1
12 bath, extra large closets, baloney off
of 2nd floor, master bedroom. 114 S.
Woodlawn Ave. 3 blocks from campus.
$500.00 month 1 yr. lease, wd hookups,
pets OK 752-6833
NEED A NEW PAD? Roommate wanted
to share 2br, 2 bath Duplex. Walking dis-
tance from campus. Lots of Extras. Non-
Smoking student requested. $275 mo. plus
12 utilities. 758-2232
1 BEDROOM APART. TO sublet for sum-
mer in Ringgold Towers. Rent only
$250.00 per month. Start May 1st Call
754-2596
Ne�J CASH?!?
We Boy CDS,
Caaaette, and Lp �
Well pay up to $5 eaak tor
CD
CD
I )� ni.m 7.VS )(i-2(,
Enjoy the Outdoors?
Earn $$$ This Summer
Monitroing Cotton Fields!
$5.7VHR Mileage
Must Be
Honest Reliable
Conscientious
Reg-Full-Time Hrs.
Mail Resume To:
MCSI
P.O. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Or FAX.
(919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM:
Greenville, Kinston. New Bern
DAY BED WHITE AND brass, also pop
up trundle, two orthopedic mattresses.
New Never used. Cost $750: sell for
$325.00. (919) 637-2645
BMX 20" BIKE, LIKE new. Sell for $100.
Call Neill 328-3853
ONE ROCKFORD FOSGATE AUDI-
OPHILE 12 inch woofer in a Q-Logic Bass
Box 400 dollars. Rockford Fosgate Punch
40 amplifier 200 dollars O.B.O. Contact
754-2547 Ask for Jon
CAMCORDER $450 (NEG); sleeper sofa
$100 (neg); dorm size refrigerator $75; a
single wooden loft for dorm size rooms
$80. Call Kim (or Evon) at 321-7539
SELLING EVERYTHING: TV, MI-
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Solid Maple Dresser and Night Stands,
Space Rugs, Lamps, Tables, Chairs and
more. Bargain Prices. Call 321-6511
ATTENTION! MAKE BIG $$$$$$ by
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manuals! Amazing Recorded Information!
1-800-732-2863 Extension 9187
FOR SALE SALOMOM SKIS EXP 8000
size 205cm with Salomon 977 composite
bindings. New this season. Only skied on
7 times. Call 551-1849
MOUNTAIN BIKE $100, WHITE and
green, good condition. Call Aimee at 758-
6649 anytime after 6pm
ZAP THE FAT, LOSE Weight & Feel
great, 100 Natural, Dr. Recommended,
30 day money back guarantee. 16 years
of Healthy, Fit & Content Customers. Call
(919) 633-9840.
GOOD LITTLE DORM FRIDGE for sale.
$50 firm. Call Maree at 8300870 and leave
message.
QUEEN SUE WATER BED nice! for $75
and a washer for $125. Please contact
Ashley at 355-6354
GREAT PRICES ON GREAT selection
of Tradeins. Used Bikes by Trek, Giant
GT, Schwin, and more. Cycle Center 355-
8050

It
Help
11 Wanted

Why shop in L. A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter ,
2st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 80&662-2122
ESTABLISHED ADVENTURE OUTFIT-
TERS ON the Outer Banks hiring enthu-
siastic, reliable, experienced rental help for
'96 season. Excellent working conditions.
Contact Bill Miles, North Beach Sailing
and Outfitters, PO Box 8279; Duck, NC
27949. (919) 261-6262
SUMMER CAMP STAFF Counselors, In-
structors, & Other Positions for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed 8 week
youth recreationalsports campour 42nd
season! Over 25 activities, including wa-
ter ski, heated pool, tennis, Go-karts,
artCool Mountain Climate, EXCEL-
LENT pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For
applicationbrochure: 704-692-6239 or
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS � make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Call 1-800-
2514000 ext 1576
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRINC � ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF,
HOUSEKEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEAD
ERS, FITNESS COUNSELORS, AND
MORE. CALL RESORT EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES 1-206-971-3600 EXT R53622.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN BECO MING
an Indoor Soccer Official will need to at-
tend the March 19 Meeting at 7:00pm in
Brewster C-103. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328387
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el, Seasonal & full-time emplo yment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53624
SWEETHEARTS IS ACCEPTING AP-
PLICATIONS for part-time Waitstaff.
Come by Sweethearts at Todd Dining Hall
and ask for Jen Behr, Mon. through Fri
9am-llam or 2pm-3pm
PART TIME WORK FOR students who
will be in Greenville year round. Prefer
students with a least two (2) years left
Call North American Fiberglass Corp
758-9901.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES IS LOOK-
ING for S.H.I.P. Recs (marketing assis-
tants). Interested students should have
outgoing personalities and possess some
marketing and computer experience. For
more information call Angela Baumann
at Recreational Services 328387
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK - Make
up to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiw an, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206)971-3570exU53624
RECREATIONAL SERVICES IS LOOK-
ING for a photographer who will be re-
sponsible for shooting, developing and
printing candid and group sport and rec-
reational photographs. Utilization of vid-
eo camcorder required. 35mm slide pho-
tography desired. Special skills include:
black and white film developing and pr int-
ing. A fully equipped dark room is pro
vided. For more information call Angela
Baumann at Recreational Services 328-
6387
DOES YOUR JOB SUCK? Wouid you like
to make $6225 this summer working with
SW Co.? Call 1-80085-7194 X4681 M-F
between 9-7 for more info Leave message.
HURRY � TAN while you work. Spring
Summertime Job 12 miles from Greenville.
Flexible Hours. 21 or older. Call for Inter-
view 975-2265 Day 830-9280 Night
COURTYARD TAVERN IS NOW accept-
ing applications to fill the positions of
waits and kitchen staff. Please apply in
person between 2pm and 5pm weekdays.
Help
11 Wanted
SOMEONE NEEDED TO TELEMAR-
KET office furniture. Training provided.
9:00-12:00 or 1:00-4:00. Sales background
and outgoing personality helpful. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
&
Greek
Personals
t
Services
Offered
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
NEED A BABYSITTER? I'M available on
weeknights (except Tues) and weekends.
Great references. Transportation. CPR
First Aid Certified. Call Sophie @ 328-
3592
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495extF53625
ECU'S 1DJ SERVICE! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey serv-
ice for your party or social function. Wid-
est variety of any disc jockey company in
Greenville. Alternative to Hip Hop. Spe-
cializing in the needs of ECU Organiza-
tions and Greeks. Spring dates are filling
fast so call early. Ask for Lee 7584644.
GET THE JUMP O N THE JOB MARKET
Stand out with a professional video re-
sume. Coming to your campus the week
of March 25th, 19. Cost is $50 - full
screen colored graphic with your name,
address, etc and then you're on camera
to tell the rest Call 91936-5860 to re-
serve your spot Limited spots available.
PI LAMB: THANKS F OR the social guys!
We all had a really good time and hope to
do it again soon. PI DELTA sisters and
pledges
SIGMA PI AND TAU KAPPA EPSILON,
We are looking forward to the social with
you, Chi Omega and Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to thank Delta
Zeta for coming over. We think his leg is
okay.
SMILE! YOU'RE DOING GREAT! Les-
lie Brown, Sabrina Fleak, and Misty Ed-
wards: We're glad to have you as our New
Members! Love, Delta Zeta Sisters
PI DELTA PLEDGES: CONGRATULA-
TIONS and the best of luck this semes-
ter! Love, the Sisters.
DELTA SIG WOULD LIKE to thank
Sigma Sigma Sigma for the great social
before Spring Break. You guys really lit
up our beach.
DELTA CHI WE'RE LOOKING forward
to our annual St Patrick's Day social on
Saturday! Love, Delta Zeta
TO THE 6 ALPHA SIG PANAMA CITY
SPRING BREAKERS: Panama City will
never be the same. Had a CD. good time
at the "Halfway House Chuck- Bald is
beautiful! "Ricky Is your favorite color
still orange? "Albert share that blanket
and slide over. Brad- Let's go Pirates!
Brian- Big Poppa - what was up with that
bed head? CD. Cale- I lost my contact
Looking forward to that Satisfaction So
cial! Love, Melanie, Jennifer, Rhonda,
Sharon and Mariel.
ATTENTION GREEKS! GAMMA WEEK
is March 18-20. Come out wearing letters
to a skating party, social, and guest speak-
er. See your social chair or Gamma Rep
for details!
mfy Lost and
Found
syc
Personals
HELP! LOST BLACK CAT! From ECU
area, shorthaired, black leather studded
collar, named Gracie � $100 reward! Call
757-0511 Leave message.
Bee Fa
Advertise
with Us.
Call 328-2000
The East C
ALL INCLUSIVE CHURCH SUNDAY at
7:00pm. Come as you are. Jeans and Tee
shirts Okay. For location and info call
Debbie at 752-7674
A SPECIAL THANKS TO Michelle
Streath and Deana McLeod on their top
ten award for their convention seminar!
Great job you two! The ECU Ambassadors
THANKS TO ALL THE ECU AMBAS-
SADORS who represented us at District
III convention! Hope you all had fun and
brought back lots of new ideas!
c
u
12 Price Sale
Educated Men's Clothir
(Bought From College Students)
Famous Name Brands
Price 12 Price
Shirts, Sweaters, Sweats, Winter Jackets, Long Coats
x
f
Price 12 Price
This only happens twice a year
C5
Open Thursdays ck Fridays 10:00 - 5:00
closed 12:00 - 1:30 for lunch
Saturdays 10:00 - 1:00
Parking in front or rear
(the estate shop) Downtown Walking Mall
414 Evans St.
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK summer
in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hir ing Lifeguards and
Beach Concession Workers. Earn Good
Money while working on the Beach $$
Salary plus bonuses $$Discounted
Housing To apply or for further infor-
mation, callfax North Myrtle Beach Life-
guards at 803-2724170.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN
UP TO $3,000-$6,000 PER MONTH.
ROOM AND BOARD! TRANSPORTA-
TION! MALE OR FEMALE. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NECESSARY. CALL206)971-3510
EXT A53623
OUTER BANKS LARGEST WATER-
SPORTS center hiring reliable, enthusi-
astic sailingwindsurfing instructors, res-
ervationists, and watersports rental per-
sonnel for '96 season. Contact Bill Miles,
North Beach Sailing, PO Box 8279; Duck,
NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH Parks and Re-
creation Department is seeking enthusias-
tic individuals for summer employment
Positions include pool managers, life-
guards, camp counselors, natur e, athletic
arts, therapeutic and lake personnel. EOE.
Applications available at 2401 Wade Ave-
nue, Raleigh, NC 27602 or call 890-3285
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC
Relations. Please call Bill Fleming 355-
7700
CHEERLEADINC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED TO t each summer camps in NC
& SC. Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free
weekends! College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job, CALL ES-
PRIT! CHEERLEADINC 1-800-280-3223
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee Recreation
and Wellness Department Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Laurie Woolard between 8am-4:30pm at
(919) 816-5590. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital EOEAA.
EXTRA MONEY NEW ENVIRONMEN-
TAL company in Greenville seeking PT
FT sales reps and managers. Positive atti-
tude and people skills needed. For appt
321-6250
HEALTH: NATIONAL COMPANY HAS
NOW reached Greenville. We are looking
for Health Conscious, Neatly Dr essed, Ca-
reer Oriented Individuals to fill Part and
Full Time Positions. Great Pay 758390
Forms for Classifieds and
Announcements can be picked up in
Mendenhall and dropped off in the
Student Publication building.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
All Greek organizations must be
spelled out - no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reserves the right
to reject any ad for libel,
obscenity andor bad taste.
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1

J�xj-ml-JB
I
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Thursday, March 14, 1996
The East Carolinian
NTS
PERSONALITY - WHAT TYPE ARE
YOU? Examining personality is one way
of understanding yourself and your inter-
actions with others. This two hour work-
shop will introduce you to one method of
personality assessment, the Myers-Briggs
Type Indicator. Find out how personality
affects your work in groups, your time
management, your career choice, and your
intimate relationships. Friday March 22
at 2:30pm. Counseling Center. Call 328-
6661 to register.
THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY WILL be
having a meeting Thurs. March 14th in
Brewster C room 305 at 5:00pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend, so bring a friend.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: WHAT DO
you do when you don't want to study, but
you know you should? How do you get
up every day for that boring 8AM lee ture?
Come find out how to motivate yourself
to preform your best. Thursday March 21,
10:00am-l 1:30am. Counseling Cent er. Call
328-6661 to register.
"A READ-IN OF works written by wom-
en, entitled "Reading Women: A Celebra-
tion of Women's Voices" will take place
on March 21 from l:30-3:30pm in CCB
1014. If you would like to present short
selections of poetry, fiction, or drama,
please come by the English Dept. (GCB
2201) by March 18 to Sign Up"
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER wishes to announce and to inv
ite you to attend the Blessing and Dedi-
cation of its new addition by Most Rever-
end F. Joseph Cossman. Bishop of Raleigh.
The Blessing and Dedication will take
place this Sunday. March 17, 1996, at the
11:30am Eucharistic Celebration. The
Newman Center is located at 953 E 10th
St two houses from the Fletcher Music
Building. Free parking is available on uni-
versity's parking lots.
ECU CRS: ECU COLLEGE REPUBLI
CANS will have a meeting. Tuesday, March
19th. See Tuesday's ad for time & place.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND a career:
Find out which career is right for you.
Take assessment instruments and learn
how personality affects career choice and
satisfaction. Learn the secrets of good de-
cision making as well as the best way to
really find out what a job is like. This five-
part program will help you find the an-
swers to your future. Mondays at 9:00am
beginning March 18 or Thursdays at
3:30pm beginning March 21. Counseling
Center. Call 328-6661 for more informa-
tion
UNIVERSITY FOLK & COUNTRY
DANCE CLUB- The March Contra Dance
will be held Sat. March 16, at the Jaycee
Park Auditorium (Cedar Lane). 7:30-10:30.
Live. Old-Time Music by Elderber ry Jam.
Come alone or bring a friend. FREE!
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS: GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS Should contact their
advisers the week of March 18-22 to make
arrangements for academic advising for
Summer Session and Fall Semester 1996.
Early registration week is set for March
25-29.
STRESS MANAGEMENT: THIS FIVE-
part program will explore the causes of
stress and how it affects you. Learn a num-
ber of stress reduction and relaxation tech-
niques. Do something good for both your
mind and your body and enroll in this pro-
gram. Mondays, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, begin-
ning March 25. Counseling Center. Call
328661 to register.
ATTENTION FRESHMEN: INVITA-
TION TO join Phi Eta Sigma Freshman
Honor Society. Invitations to freshmen
with a 3.5 GPA were sent to parents'
111
Food for Your Brain
Lectures
I 12:00 Noon -1:00 PM
Nl?� MendenhaH Underground
Monday, March 25
Carnival in Rio De Janeiro
Presented by Palmyra Leahy
Associate Professor - ECU Geography
Department
Bring Your lunch
FREE Prinks and Gourmet Dessert
For More Information, Call the Student Urtpn Hotline at 328-6004
Presented by the ECU Student Union Lecture Committee
Drop-Ad with
NO lines.
NO waiting.
NO headaches.
Were talking classifieds, not classes.
The East Carolinian introduces NO HASSLE DROP-AD!
Pick up one of our classified ad envelopes, fill it out and place
your payment inside. Then drop it off in our box in front of Stu-
dent Stores or at the information desk in MendenhaH, in addition
to The East Carolinian office. And if you'll call us at 328-6366,
we'll even drop some classified ad envelopes
in campus mail for you.
Placing n classified ad
couldnt be easier!
&p
A service tj 'The East Carolinian.
ch for tdditi rial drop box local
sier to Drop-Ad!
home before spring break. If you are eli-
gible to join Phi Eta Sigma and did not
receive an invitation, please contact Dr
David Sanders. Honors Program, 2026
GCB (328-6373) or Lori Wilson (328979)
immediately. REGISTRATION DEADLINE
IS FRIDAY, MARCH 15
SOCWCJ ALLIANCE: NEXT MEETING
March 18th 4:00pm. Officers meet at
3:30pm. Meet in Break Room outside 218-
A. We will be discussing our fundraiser
and plans for Fall '96.
THE EAST CAROLINA NATIVE
AMERICAN ORGANIZATION will be
holding a reception for the Lumbee In-
dian Heritage Art Exhibit on March 18,
1996 at 7pm on the second floor of the
MendenhaH Student Center. Ther e will be
food, drumming by the ECNAO drum
team. Eastern Bull, and also dancing by
members of ECNAO's Four Winds Dance
Team. The Lumbee Indian Heritage Art
Exhibit will be in t he MendenhaH Student
Center Gallery on the campus of ECU from
March 18-April 14. 1996.
G L B SUPPORT group: ECU isn't the
easiest place to be gay, lesbian, or bisexu-
al. This confidential group is designed for
those people who do not feel comfortable
facing the community in a more public
way at this time. Meet with us to discuss
your successes and frustrations and to
share coping mechanisms that work for
you. Wednesdays 3:30pm-5:00pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328661 for a confi-
dential interview.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP: This
is the season for recruiters to visit ECU
soon to interview prospective graduates
for employment! Learn how to prepare,
package and present your product-Your-
self-in this import ant interview. This work-
shop includes questions you may be asked,
questions you may ask, interview attire,
and how to follow-up for positive results.
Sponsored by Career Services, the work-
shops are scheduled for Thur. March 14
at 4:00pm and Wed. March 20 at 2:00pm
in the Career services Building, 701 E
Fifth SL
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MARSHALS:
STUDENTS interested in serving as a Uni-
versity Marshal for the 1996 Spring Com-
mencement may obtain an application
from Room A-16 Minges. Student must be
classified as a Junior by the end of Fall
semester 1995 and have a 3.0 GPA to be
eligible. Return completed application to
Carol-Ann Tucker, Advis' , A-16 Minges
by March 22,1996. For more information
call 3284661
ASSERTIVENESS TR AIN1NC Learn
how to get what you want from life in a
healthy manner. Discover the difference
between assertiveness and aggressiveness.
Become more confident in your interac-
tions with others. This four-part program
meets Mondays, 3:30pm-5:00pm, begin-
ning March 18. Counseling Center. Call
3286661 to register.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER SERVIC-
ES: Seniors and graduate students grad-
uating in MaySummerDec. 1996 who
wish to register with the Career Services
Office are invited to attend one of the fol-
lowing Orientation meetings: MON.
MARCH 18, 4:00PM OR WED. MARCH
27,5:00PM. Students who register will be
able to participate in employment inter-
views on campus, be referred for poten-
tial jobs, receive a monthly newsletter and
can establish a credentials file with Ca-
reer Services.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS: AH General
College students who intend to major in
the Dept of Sciences and Disorders and
have Mr. Robert Muzzarelli or Mrs. Meta
Downes as their adviser are to meet on Wed-
nesday. March 20 at 5:00pm in Brewster
B-102. Advising for early registration will
take place at that time. Please prepare a
tentative class schedule before the meet-
ing
DON'T LET OVERDUE FINES or books
hold up your registration for summer &
fall! Students with overdue fines or books
have a tag placed on their record and are
not permitted to register until tag is cleared.
Please return any overdue books so you
will not be delayed during registration.
CANOEING ON A SPRING afternoon:
Looking for a great way to spend a spring
afternoon? Go canoeing in the waters of
Goose Creek State Park and enjoy the hid-
den marshes and open w aters of this beau-
tiful area on March 27. The registration
deadline is March 21 in 204 Christenbury.
For mose information call Recreational
Services at 328387
SERVICE AWARD GALA- The Dynamic
Ladies of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Inc.
will be holding their 1st Annual Service
Award Gala on March 16,1996. Tickets are
on sale NOW! $10singles and SIScou-
ples. The gala will be held in MendenhaH
Student Center at 7pm. This is a Black-Tie
Affair. We would honor your presence at
this fund-raising event. Proceeds will be do-
nated to the Sickle Cell Anemia Founda-
tion, for more information Contict Shan-
non Bledsoe @ 328-7573
ALCOHOL SUPPORT GROUP: Have you
been affected by alcohol at some point in
your life? Abusive families, poor relation-
ship skills, difficulty with self-management
skills, difficulty formulating and reaching
academic and personal goals, as well as
poor academic and employment perfor-
mance can all be related to trouble with
alcohol. This group examines the issues sur-
rounding the use of alcohol and t he conse-
quences of drinking behaviors. Find out
what to do BEFORE things get out of hand.
Mondays 3:30pm-5:00-m. Counseling Cen-
ter. Call 328661 to register.
THE GREENVILLE-PIT T COUNTY SPE-
CIAL OLYMPICS Local Spring Games will
be held on Friday, April 19 at J. H. Rose
High School from 9:30am-l:30pm. If you
would like to volunteer to be a Buddy for
our Special Olympians on that day. please
attend our buddy orientation meeting on
Wednesday, April 17 at MendenhaH from
5pmpm in room 244. All of our volun-
teers will receive a Special Olympics Vol-
unteer T-Shirt and a lunch (hot dog and
coke). Please call the Special Olympics Of-
fice at 830-4551 if you have any questions.
We here at the Special Olympics office on
behalf of our 769 Special 01 ympians. Thank
you for your support of our Local Program.
PREOCCUPATIONAL THERAPY STUD-
ENT advising: Early registration for sum-
mer and fall semesters will be Tuesday and
Wednesday March 19th and 20th from 5:30-
7:30 in room 203 of the Belk Building. Oth-
er advising hours will be by appoint ment
only.
RACQUETBALL DOUBLES: Anyone in
terested in playing in Recreational Servic-
es Racquetball Doubles needs to register
in 204 Christenbury by 5:00pm on March
20. For more information call Recreation-
al Services at 328387
PERSPECTIVES : A NOON time lecture
series. Monday, March 18 8:00am-4:15pm.
The Hilton of Greenville. Conference, "CON-
TROVERSIES IN BIOETHICS" Pre-regis-
tration required; Call Eastern AHEC at 816-
3082 for conference brochure. Sponsored
by Department of Medical Humanit ies and
Bioethics Center 816-2797. The Public is
invited to attend.
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS: MEETING
TODAY, Thursday March 14. 1996. GCB
1019 at 5:00pm. Become a par t of Campus
Awareness and Barefoot on the Mall. Also
officer elections and much more. See you
there! If you have any questions, call Jac-
qie at 328-3302.
OVERCOMING GRIEF AND LOSS: an
yone can experience the loss of a signifi-
cant person and often the grieving person
can benefit from the support of others who
have had a similar experience. This con-
tinuing group will bring people together
under the direction of a skilled counselor
for mutual support and to learn healthy
ways of grieving. Tuesdays at 3.30pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328661 to register.
?3 ANGER ?@ this three part program
will teach you about the causes and mani-
festations of anger. Find out why you react
as you do. and how to change those reac-
tions to ones that are more healthy. Be able
to let people know how angry you are with-
out "flying off the handle Fridays 3:30pm-
5:00pm, begini.ng March 15. Counseling
Center. Call 328661 to register.
mn iii rTTTTrrrmrnrmwHHHWfwtHHhH4WKmt
STREET BRAWLERS CONTEST
IIIMIHIIlllinilllllH
�����!�����
For the Baldest of the Badd
Anyone Can enter (amateurs only)
- looz. gloves
- 3 rounds
- 1 mln each round
National Guard Armory
T401 . N. Memorial Dr. Greenville,NC
Prl A Sat March 15 4 16 - 8pm
Bikini Contest $250 each night
Also: Teen wrestlings ages 15-19
(Jen. Admn. $10.00 Ringside: $15.00
Beautiful Ring Girls
(Prom Professor 0'Cools)
To Inter A Tickets
available at:
-Hard Bodies Health Club
752-3880
-Professor 0'Cools
355-2946






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Thursday, March 14,1996
The East Carolinian
ltcfle
WW6e
Humor runs rampant
on bizarre Freakazoid!
Every paper has a TV critic, but
our critic is no normal couch potato,
no mere TV junkie. No, our man wil
watch anything, anytime, regardless
of quality or good taste. Truly, he has
no shame, and that is why we call
him "The TV Whore
Kevin Chalsson
Senior Writer
"Technology the knack of so
arranging the world that we don't
have to experience it" A guy named
Max Frisch said that way back in 1957,
but he probably wasn't talking about
my VCR. Allow me to explain.
As your TV Whore, I feel that it
is my sworn duty to give to all the
fairest most accurate (in my opinion)
representations of the various new
and used TV offerings, whether they
be good or positively vomitous. And
so, to do that I confess that 1 video-
tape the shows that I review. Well, I
did up until my VCR failed me last
week.
My intention was to review the
new Aaron Spelling suds-n-smut offer-
ing, Malibu Shores, but the damn
VCR threw a shoe. So while 1 was off
watching good TV on another chan-
nel, the first episode of Shores was
chugging off into infinity - a per-
petual loop of twisted tendrils of tape.
I was at a serious loss. Then i remem-
bered Freakazoid airing the next
morning. And dammit, you should all
know about Freakazoid!
No, no, it's not that weird late
'70s early
'80s musical of-
fering that
went some-
thing like "I'll
be your
freakazoid
C'mon and
wind me up"
(although I
wouldn't put it
past the show's
writers to in-
clude that
somehow in an
episode). No,
this is a legiti-
mate animated
Freakazoid is
really a teenage
computer geek
named Dexter,
who gets sucked
into his computer
during a freak
accident
show, brought to you by the folks
behind the excellenMnwianacs and
Pinky & the Brain cartoons, namely
Warner Brothers and Speilberg's
Amblin Entertainment. Like
Animaniacs, Freakazoid! is part of
the Kids WB! lineup on the Warner
Bros, network, blending perfectly with
the already-rampant lunacy therein.
And what lunacy! Obvious com-
parisons have been made between
Freakazoid! and the insanely funny
Tick, which airs on Fox, so let's go
that road for a little while too. Both
shows deal with an inept super hero
and poke giant l&wheeler truck-sized
holes into the
mythos of the said
heroes.
Freakazoid is
really a teenage com-
puter geek named
Dexter, who gets
sucked into his com-
puter during a freak
accident and is ex-
pelled as this "hero
What makes all this
so bizarre is the lack
of explanation given
for any of it The ori-
gin is told in the
show's opening
�i��� theme, which I've
got to say is one of the coolest catchi-
est theme songs I've ever heard. An-
other oddity? I've seen about eight epi-
sodes and I still couldn't tell you what
Freakazoid's powers are, or if he in-
deed has any.
Next big comparison: like The
See FREAK page 10
Aahhrr,
Matey!
Young Jim Hawkes
(standing) is terrified by
the bizarre way spooky
Ben Gunn chooses to
give him some advice in
Treasure Island, which
will be performed on
Saturday as part of the
ECU Family Fare Series.
For more information,
call 328-4788.
Photo Courtesy of ECU Family
Fare Series
76e 0ete& 76ot
�atf4to4Xf,
0 �
Characters drive
Roan Inish
Sa6 Review-
Renaissance Europe lives
again in Chiaroscuro
Some films never make it to the
Emerald City. Some are too contro-
versial. Some are too small. What-
ever the reason, we just never get to
see some mighty good movies on the
big screen. When they hit video,
however, they're ours for the taking.
This series will look at some of the
films that didn 't make the Greenville
cut, the ones that got away
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
John Sayles is one of the most
gifted independent filmmakers in
America. He writes, edits, acts and
directs. He tells tales which involve
complex human beings making daily
decisions that affect their lives.
Sayles does not grandstand; he
does not fill his stories with cinematic
moments designed to make the au-
dience swoon; he does not believe in
cliches. Instead, Sayles believes that
the daily lives inhabited by ordinary
people offer much more cinematic
fodder than the contrived tales usu-
ally pitched by Hollywood.
John Sayles' newest cinematic
delight has just been released on
video. The film, called The Secret of
Roan Inish, follows in the footsteps
of his other films by being charac-
ter-driven. The film tells the fable of
an island where selkies (a seal that
can assume human form) live.
The central character of The Se-
cret of Roan Inish is Fiona (Jeni
Courtney), a quiet young girl. Fiona
goes to live with her grandparents
early in the film near the island of
Roan Inish. Slowly Fiona learns of
the island's secret. Her brother
Jimmie disappeared from the island
a few years before and Fiona begins
to believe that Jimmie is still alive
See INISH page 11
CD Reviews
Comic book series
lushly explores the
ife of Da Vinci
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Leonardo Da Vinci could bend
horseshoes with his bare hands. He
was a student of human anatomy (in-
ternal and external) and was one of
the great scientific minds of his age.
He noted the similarities between
ocean currents and wind patterns,
and designed both a flying machine
and a submarine. Oh, and he painted
lots of pretty pictures, too.
What we know of Da Vinci
comes mostly from his notebooks,
which are filled with sketches, in-
sights and observations from the
mind of a genius. But of the 13,000
pages Leonardo produced in his life-
time, only 7,000 can be accounted
for today. We know little of his per-
sonal life beyond the bare facts of
his various residences and sponsor-
ships from the crowned heads of
Europe.
What a great opportunity for
historical fiction! In the recently-
completed Chiaroscuro: the Private
Lives of Leonardo Da Vinci, a fas-
cinating attempt has been made to
fill in the gaps of Da Vinci's personal
life.
Published as a 10-part comic
bcok series from writers Pat
McGreal and David Rawson and art-
ists Chas Truog and Rafaef Kayanan,
Chiaroscuro has been meticulously
researched. Historical accuracy was
priority one.
This attention to detail shines
through in Truog and Kayanan's art
Their work is lush and incredibly de-
tailed. Though their figures are a bit
cartoony and a little stiff in the be-
ginning, they manage to make the
Renaissance come alive. And the art
improves steadily as the series
progresses, until the 10th and final
issue features the sure-handed, dy-
namic work the story begged for.
McGreal and Rawson have simi-
lar problems with dialogue; in an at-
tempt to translate Italian Renais-
sance slang, they sometimes put
words that sound a bit too modem
into their characters' mouths. This
problem, along with some stiff dia-
logue, mars early issues but clears
up by the series' end.
And besides, McGreal and
Rawson have done their homework
so thoroughly that I can't complain
about the dialogue too much. Intri-
cate historical research has yielded
a wonderful cast of characters to
surround Da Vinci with. They weave
a complex web of fact, extrapolation
of fact and outright fiction, and
they've done their job so well that
it's hard to tell where fact ends and
fiction begins.
Their story centers around a
young man named Salai (a nickname
meaning "little devil"), a street ur-
chin Leonardo adopted early in his
See DA VINCI page 11
ThKind
ThKInd
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
Illustration by Chas Truog and Rafael Kayanan
Leonardo in repose. The commentary in this panel from the comic book Chiaroscuro: the
Private Lives of Leonardo Da Vinci is provided by the great artist's spiteful assistant, Salai.
It's a bird, it's a plane, it's a group
of four guys who sound like
What do they sound like? This
disc is weird! Talk about jumping
around all over the place-one minute
it's Bob Dylan, then Jane's Addiction,
then a song called "Sybill" mat sounds
like a Beatles tune that Richie
Sambora soloed on. Fellas, fellas, is
something wrong? Does the word
"context" mean anything to you?
Although putting things into con-
text isn't their strong suit there are
other areas in which ThKind could be
widely appreciated. The quartet from
North Jersey seems to be known for
their live performances; cm the other
hand, a band like this could only be
praised for their daring diversity.
How can you classify them? Per-
haps they are a grass roots band that
pays respects to all of the artists that
they have kept with them since child-
hood. Sort of eclectic, wouldn't you
say?
The band's vocalist and rhythm
guitar player, Kevin Lacarrubba,
seems to be very present in all of their
tunes. Although he maintains the
same vocal tone in every song, the
music is different and that allows him
to look halfway decent Don't get me
wrong; he is good at what he does,
but another "Freebird" is something
that we just don't need. One is
enough! Be yourself, if you're sure
that's what you are!
The album opens with a tune
called "Patience" that has a slow-
driven '60s beat relying totally on vo-
cal capability. Do the vocals deliver a
strong message?
"I try and try to run away, but
something makes me wanna stay
First you're out and then you're in
Patience is a virgin I don't think so.
I wonder if he uses a dictionary
when writing songs or if these melo-
dramatic lyrics are the shadow of his
soul. "Patience" is not only a title that
works for the first song, it could also
work for the title of the album. It
would serve as a good warning for
what you're about to get into.
Other members of the band, such
as Sam Magill on bassvocals, Joe
Serin on lead guitarvocals and
Tommy Dillon on drumsvocals prove
that they are a tight band no matter
what the genre of the music may be.
It appears that Lacarrubba has found
his ideal band. A band that will finally
take everything that is thrown at them
and turn it into presentable material.
The band altogether is good, but
anyone that knows anything about
presentable material knows that it has
to fit into some type of context If
you're playing an upbeat Ramones
groove, stay on that groove! Don't try
to lessen it by playing a solo that could
have fit in Beethoven's third sym-
phony. Sure, music is a universal lan-
guage, but just like any language we
have to team how to speak before we
can use the tools that have been
passed on to us.
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement-
Thursday, March 14
Rolley Gray and Sunfire
at the Attic
(reggae)
John Thursday
at Peasant's Cafe
ECU Faculty Jazz Ensemble
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Mendenhall Movie:
Waiting to Exhale
8 p.m.
Free
Friday, March IS
ECU Opera Scenes Recital
at Fletcher Recital Hall
One Step Beyond and
Hawaiian Tropic Bikini Contest
at the Attic
('80s retro)
Roscoe
at Peasant's Cafe
Mendenhall Movie:
Waiting to Exhale
8 p.m.
Free
Saturday, March 16
Family Fare: Treasure Island
Wright Auditorium
ECU Opera Scenes Recital
at Fletcher Recital Hall
Purple Schoolbus
at the Attic
Unsound
at Peasant's Cafe
Mendenhall Movie:
Waiting to Exhale
8 p.m.
Free
Sunday, March 17
Guest Recital
Hilda Harris from
Metropolitan Opera in NYC
at Fletcher Recital Hall
St Patrick's Day Party
3 Bands
at the Attic
Monday, March 18
Germany - Wunderbar!
Travel-Adventure Film
at Hendrix Theatre
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If
so, please send us information .
m
'





10
Thursday, March 14,1996
The East Carolinian
FREAK from page 9
Tick, Freakazoid! has an amusing
rogues' gallery of super,
meglomaniacally-wacky villains. My
two faves are The Lobe and Arms
Akimbo. The lx)be is pretty much just
an evil scientist with a big brain-
shaped head who is just plain weird.
Arms Akimbo, on the other hand,
is basically a thug from Jersey with
really long arms and hands "frozen
in a jaunty pose Arms Akimbo's ori-
gin explains that his parents were fa-
mous print models and drove young
Akimbo to do the same, thus freezing
his arms and driving him to become
evil (the modeling industry has been
known to do that, you know). There
the basic comparisons with The Tick
end, and Freakazoid! becomes its own
show.
What makes it so cool? Well, to
begin, it's really, really funny. Most of
the lines are funny, some laugh out
loud funny, and some just damn funny.
Unlike The Tick, however, it seems
that an effort is being made by the
writers and producers to keep all of
the comedy accessible to an average,
mixed-age audience. Let me explain.
I'm not really praising accessibil-
ity, but simply stating this fact: some
shows, like Mystery Science Theater
Attention ECU
Faculty and Staff
403(b)
k.
3000, for example, make their jokes
and if you don't get them, you're out
of the loop and have to wait and pick
up the next one. I respect that qual-
ity in comedy, actually.
Freakazoid! doesn't do that and
it's not necessarily a bad thing at all.
In fact some folks might like the show
better because it's more accessible.
Example: Freakazoid quizzes his po-
lice buddy Cosgrove on what gift to
get his girlfriend and Cosgrove says,
gravely, "Buy her something any girl
would want like banjo lessons or a
turban
That's really funny, but the same
set-up on MST3K might gamer a re-
sponse that has to do with Nietzsche
or Mexican midget wrestlers. See, I've
already lost some of you with that one,
haven't I? No worries, just pick up the
next one.
Another wonderful thing about
Freakazoid! is its dead-on parodies of
other genre-bits (wow, that would make
a cool breakfast cereal!). So far, I have
caught an episode called "The Cloud"
that is a killer send-up of a '60s-style
James Bond thriller, right down to the
teaser scene (showing something un-
fortunate happening to a member of a
Swiss mountain climbing team) before
the colorful, circa-1965 title sequence.
Another was a vicious parody of
Jonny Quest that I plan to show ev-
eryone I know if I can ever get it on
tape. It featured a variation on the Race
Bannon character named Dash who
hurled barrels and vaguely racist in-
sults at the bad guys, along with tons
of other dead on target Quest jabs.
The show isn't even beyond pok-
ing fun at its producer, the mighty
Speilberg himself. One episode mir-
rored the opening of �.7! perfectly,
right down to the men racing through
the woods, flashlights cutting through
the night air as they hunt down the
poor, lost alien. Later, Dexter
Freakazoid discovers the alien in his
garage, luring it outside with Reese's
Pieces until it lunges forward and
eats him!
The camera cuts to a screening
room where Speilberg is going "What
are you guys thinking?" The other ex-
ecutives look at him sheepishly and say,
"We were thinking of ending the show
early and showing some Animaniacs
reruns
Ah, you've got to love an in-joke.
Freakazoid! is a consistently great
show and well worth the effort to get
up Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. (or
Sundays at 11 a.m.) to watch. OK, at
least you can set your VCR to tape it
before you head out for your weekend
binges. It will offer soothing amuse-
ment for your achin' noggin when you
finally return home.
On a scale of one to 10,
Freakazoid! scores a medicinal nine.
Pottery Salt
Nikki Lvnn'
i H iw i 'luiv
S .t I "A I.
it 1 iiuT' tr -n
nit' unu t
Tax Sheltered Annuities and Custodial Accounts
403(b)(7)
General information workshop on these flexible
supplemental retirement savings plans
ISSUES ADDRESSED THAT MAY BE BENEFICIAL TO YOU:
Current Income Tax Savings - Pre-Tax salary reduction.
- Tax Deferred Growth - Take advantage of the growth
potential of the financial markets to accumulate wealth and
defer taxes until retirement.
Loan Provisions - Borrow income tax free and pay
back at a low interest rate.
Early Retirement - Withdraw before age 59 12
Without paying 10 IRS early withdrawl penalty (SEEP)"
- Estate Planning - How these dollars can affect your
�estate and the proper use of beneficiary designations.
- Charitable Giving - Pass tax free to your favorite
I charities.
I - TransfersExchangesDirect Rollovers - What to look
for, proscons, and procedures.
� Other Supplemental Plans - How 403(b) co-ordinates and
compares to 401 (k) and 457 plans.
Date: Tuesday, March 19,1996
Time: 5:15 - 6:30 pm
Place: Ramada Inn, 203 W. Greenville Blvd.
No Fee or Obligation
Reply by Friday, March 15,1996. Call 355-5222 for reservations.
Sponsored By:
American Express Financial Advisors Inc.
The premier
J Financial Education
ISeminar organization!
"Offical ECU Ring Event"
f

1RTQ1RVED
V. COLLEGE JEWELRY
, March 14-15
(Thurs - Fri)
9:00am - 4:00pm '
ECU Student Stores Deposit $25.00
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
0L-
gffl QQ ;2r Special Payment Plans Available
IRTCIRVED
X. COLLEGE JEWELRY
J
Tuesdays
70V & 80V
Donee Party
Ladies Free
til 11pm
$1 bottle beer all night
Ccfcefflf
752-7303
ATiTIC
Thursdays
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
209E. 5St. 24th year in
Greenville, NC m � downtown
,VEv- Greenville
$1,50
tall boys
�a?

Wednesdays
6V
&
CcWetf
"Come spend the funniest night
of your life"
only $1 w ECU ID
before 9:30
Thursdays
Members FREE Admission til 11 pm
$1.00 32oz Draft
March
Fri 15
Th 21
Th 28
April
Th 11
Fri 26
FINALS
Qualifying Rounds
HAWi
IAN
$1CC
1st Place
Prize
To Enter call 752-7303
Thurs 14th
members FREE
til 11pm
Fri 15th
RolLeY GfceY u $15t�
Thurs 21st
reggaeisland
I members FREE
til 11pm
Offlp) I Qformer r,
S5ST" far to� Jones
opened for craven melon
$2 32oz Draft
Fri 22nd
80s Retro
Rock 1 st round Hawaiian Tropicualifying
$2 32oz Draft
Sat 16th
Purple Schoolbus
Sat 23rd
Greenville's own $2 32oz Draft
"S?
eg EVERYTHING
special Guest Angic Aparo
the BACK DOORS
the shocking reincarniation of the doors
$2 32oz Draft
Sun 17 th
,� Paddy's Day Party
All Night! members FREE ADMISSION
Coming Soon
Breakfast Club, Madhatter,
Chairmen of the Board,
Mesmer"Eyes Cravin' Melon, Jupiter Coyote, Brother Cane
' �-�






The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 14,1996
11
rfteemoUU's only
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam
CASH PRIZE
�ContMlanu need to call & register in advance.
Must arrive by &00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
DA VINCI from page 9
We do Baftaiay Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
1(1 -i 11
ECU
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p,m.
Gall 756-6278

5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Pkida�a�As.
"1
1
I
I
i
i
1
iBehudJohrtCofwwtieniMart)
cam.
HKKC
L , jyaicALDi.sgBigL trl
career. Salai served as Leonardo's
assistant for most the artist's career.
Though little is know about the his-
torical Salai, McGreal and Rawson
have the fictional one into a memo-
rable character.
Hateful, shallow and mean-spir-
ited, their Salai chafes under Da
Vinci's guidance and spends much
of his life trying to ruin everything
Leonardo holds dear. Much of the
story is told by Salai, as he attempts
to paint a terrible, unflattering pic-
ture of his master.
Some of what Salai says is true
(Leonardo is vain, harsh and often
self-aggrandizing). But the authors
are careful to leaven Salai's slander
with passages from Da Vinci's note-
books and flashes of his dreams (as
recorded in the notebooks) that re-
veal the artist's deeper feelings.
What emerges is a "warts and all"
portrait of a complicated man, as
lusty and troubled as any great art-
ist
11
ere are a
lot o good reasons or choosing
me Juiel Lompamj.
Unlimited potential is one of tn

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P.O. Box 261
Stokes, NC 27884
Please include $4.00
for shipping
5unded Organisations,
fknnual (IpptoptiationA ate Aete
Please
Have your proposal for the upcoming fiscal year to the SGA office
255 Mendenhall Student Center
by April 1996
Questions call Angie Nix 328-4720
To be eligible, your group needs a
VALID CONSTITUTION
Questions: call Jonathan Phillips 785-6405
But the inaccuracy of Salai's
twisted perspective is often revealed
in another way, through the art. As
Salai rants on about Leonardo's
shortcomings, we see Da Vinci act-
ing on his real motivations in the
background.
This is one of the visual
storytelling elements that comic
books offer better than any other
form. This kind of subtlety would
be lost if Chiaroscuro had been
done in prose, while the brevity of
film wouldn't allow the story to be
told with the complexity it deserves.
When comics fans say that there
are comics for adults out there, this
is the kind of book they should be
talking about. A title like this is easy
to miss among the gun-toting
spandex psychos and trenchcoated
coffee shop hipsters that rule the
comics racks, but it's well worth
searching out
Chiaroscuro: the Private Lives
of Leonardo Da Vinci is a rare treat
to read. Anyone who misses it is just
denying themselves.
INISH from page 9
and has been living with the selkies.
The film moves at a deliberate
pace. That is not to say it moves
slowly, but when you rent the film,
get yourself in the proper frame of
mind. John Sayles can work magic
in his films and if you allow that
magic to work, you will be deeply
affected by his work.
Sayles has a master's degree in
psychology and began his artistic ca-
reer as a novelist His films blend
both these influences. He strives to
convey the underlying psychology of
his characters by having them talk a
lot about their situations.
While The Secret of Roan Inish
is magical, it does not achieve the
power of Sayles" other work. Part of
the problem may be that the talkative
nature of the characters in this film
is undermined by the strong Irish ac-
cents. I found myself struggling to
keep up with the dialogue, but the
dialogue is ultimately important The
beautiful setting and the striking vi-
suals compensate for the thick ac-
cents and help to convey the magic.
If the video store is out of this
film, try renting some of Sayles'
other works: Matewan, Eight Men
Out, The Return of the Secaucus
Seven (a predecessor to The Big
Chill), City of Hope and Passion
Fish. All these films resonate with
powerful emotions from well-drawn
characters.
John Sayles may not be a house-
hold name, but he is one of the most
consistently artistic of filmmakers.
Check out a few of his films to see
what I mean.
On a scale of one to 10, The Se-
cret of Roan Inish rates an eight.
Things Really Move
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THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
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INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's Loan
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could get out from under
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The gorority information
Open fflouse
Thursday, fftarcb 14, 1996
Thursday, ffjarch 21, 1996
cftonday, April, 15, 1996
Sftendenhall Student qgenter
6:30 pro- 7:00 pro
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1996 Rush August 22-26
Registration deadline August 19
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mTnmiT�i 'iii.iiiiiiii
mmmmmmmmmamm
12
Thursday, March 14, 1996
The East Carolinian
Svuper-Oh$cire
Trivia Quix qfaiwer$
Today's Topic:
Alternative Mussc
1. Frankenchrist got the Dead Kennedys taken to court
on charges of distributing obscene materials to minors
because of a poster insert painted by H.R. Giger.
2. The first Dead Milkmen album is titled Big Lizard in
my Backyard.
3. Balsak Jaws of Death and Slymenstra Hymen are
gore-stomping members of alty heavy metal outfit GWAR.
4. "Bela Lugosi's Dead" was recorded by Bauhaus.
5. The Ramones are generally credited with being the
first punk band.
. rfv
5 i-
4J �
Do you have some
things you need to get
rid of?
Advertising in our
classifieds can help.
The East Carolinian
328-2000
Natural life I I
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Estimates indicate that more than one of every six sexual assaults in a week
is committed by a family member.
�National Citizens Association on Alcohol Problems
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
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5000 Falls of the Neuse,
Suite 404, Raleigh, NC 27609
(Attention: Sgt. Jennifer Rice)
While Supplies Last
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Order Until April 17th
PARTY
Where:
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What:
PLAYERS CLUB
APART ME.NTS
WHO:
Saturday, March 16,1996
starting at 12 noon.
Live Band
Sand Volleyball
Roommate Matching
Tennis Games
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Basketball games
Give-a-ways
Anyone who wants to live at
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WHY: "We Love You, Man
Come and bring a roommate, or find one here
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call for more information
FACT:
Americans drive
nearly 4 billion miles
a day, using 200
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The toman Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce and to invite you to attend the
Blessing and Dedication of its New Addition
by
Most Reverend F. Joseph Gossman
Bishop of Raleigh.
The Blessing and Dedication will take place this Sunday, March
17, 1996, at the 11:30 a.m. Eucharistic Celebration. The
Newman Center is located at 953 E. 10th Street, two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building. Free parking is availible on
university's parking lots.
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Friday March 15th
St. Paddy's Day
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Live Remote, Giveways, Party Favors,
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Sunday March 17th
St Patrick's Day Special
Block Party
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18 & over Downtown Greenville





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TjirT.rTBfi�T �
13
Thursday, March 14,1996
Tie fast Carolinian
SRHRTSv
Broncos saddled by sluggers
Baseball team
chalks up seventh
win of season
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
When you're hot, you're hot
The ECU baseball team downed
the Broncos of Rider University at
Harrington Field Monday afternoon
11-5.
Sophomore Pitcher Patrick
Dunham pitched eight innings and
recorded another win for the season.
Dunham led the pitching staff with
a 3.28 ERA and finished the '95 sea-
son 7-5. This most recent win against
Rider gives Dunham his third win of
the season. Currently, his ERA stands
at 3.75.
Dunham knows that every game
offers up a different situation.
"I try to look at every outing as
a big game to help me keep sharp
Dunham said.
Head coach Gary Overton was
proud of Dunham who struck out
eight batters, adding to his team to-
tal of 29.
"We weren't as sharp as we
should have been, but it was an out-
standing pitching performance by
Dunham Overton said.
Senior right-hander Jeff Hewitt
retired the final three batters of the
afternoon.
The Pirates had an excellent of-
fensive showing as ECU scored runs
in four of the first five innings, in-
cluding a five-run burst in the bot-
tom of the fifth.
Senior Second Baseman Lamont
Edwards and freshman Chris Glanz
both singled in runs in the fifth in-
ning. Edwards received second team
CAA honors in '95, and will look
to extend his team-best batting aver-
age of .340 from last year. Rider re-
liever Jeff Fenelli walked the first
three batters before Edwards and
Glanz singled on him.
The win extends the Pirates
record to 7-2, but Overton would like
to see a more consistent ballgame the
in the games ahead.
"We hope to have a better over-
all performance in the future
Overton said.
Rider, 1-6 overall, scored two
runs in the tot1 of the sixth from Ja-
son Koehler's two run blast. The
Broncs added three runs on three
doubles in the seventh. But that
would end the scoring drive for Rider,
who didn't score in the final two in-
nings.
The Broncs had hoped to avenge
their loss in a doubleheader match-
up yesterday to wrap up the three
game series. At press time, results
were not available of the outcome of
the game.
ECU will host Yale today begin-
ning at 3 p.m.
Court of dreams
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Seen at a recent women's basketball game, these girls look on and hope one day
that they will be able to play for the Lady Pirates and have fans watch them.
Tae Shundo Club offers variety
PMoto by MICHELE AMICK
Freshman outfielder Steve Salargo rounds third base Monday afternoon in the
Pirates seventh win of the season. The Pirates beat Riders' Broncos 11-5.
Martial arts kicks
up added support
across campus
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
With the growing popularity of
the controversial pay-per-view mar-
tial arts tournament, the Ultimate
Fighting Championship, many
people have become interested in
the art of grappling.
Grappling, traditionally re-
ferred to as Jiu Jitsu, uses a combi-
nation of wrestling skills, throws,
joint locks and submission tech-
niques. In the UFC. which includes
competitors from all styles of mar-
tial combat, grapplers have domi-
nated.
The only club at ECU which of-
fers instruction in grappling to a
great extent is the newly formed
Tae Shudo Club.
Grappling is just one of the
techniques taught in the Tae Shudo
Club. In fact, it's main focus is
stand-up fighting consisting of
Irates host "ultimate" weekend challenge
Ultimax
tournament held at
intramural fields
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Looking for something to do
this weekend? Then check out the
defending men's national Ultimate
Frisbee champions, tLe Irates.
ECU will play
host to Ultimax 26 ��
this Saturday and
Sunday. Play is set
to begin around 10
a.m. Saturday and
will last until
around 6 p.m. that
same night. Sun-
day will be the
same, except the
championship
game will be
played around 3
p.m.
The Helios,
the women's Ulti-
mate Frisbee team, wmmmmmmmmm
will be host to 10
women's teams from around the
country. Many of those teams will
be from the same schools that the
men will be playing.
Sean Howe and Fuller Reeves,
co-captains of the Irates, expect to
see some tough competition this
weekend. Both Howe and Reeves
have been on the team for three
years. UNC-W, N.C. State, Carleton
(Minnesota) and University of Wis-
consin at Madison, are some of the
16 teams scheduled to compete in
the tournament
ECU's team, the Irates, go into
the tournament with a college
record of 2-1. Their only loss came
from UNC-W this year by two
points.
According to Howe, that was a
tough loss for the Irates.
"We are trying to avenge that
loss Howe said.
N.C. State has proven to be a
strong competitor the entire sea-
son. However, the Irates have
beaten State one time this year.
Their other win came against Duke.
The
record of 2-1
might be de-
ceiving to
some. The
Irates have
played more
games than
three. That
record is their
college record.
But the Irates
travel around
the country
and play in
open tourna-
ments against
mvmmmmmmmmmmmm 0l(Jer pro
teams.
Howe said this is because the
competition is better. However,
those wins and losses do not count
towards their college record.
"We haven't played as many
college games as we'd like to have
played Reeves said.
Going into the season, the
Irates were ranked in the preseason
top 10 by the UPA, Ultimate Play-
ers Association, which is based in
Colorado. This organization ranks
Ultimate teams around the country.
"The last two
years, the winners
of Ultimax and
Easterns have
gone on to win the
national
tournament
� Sean Howe
Howe said Ul-
timate is a combi-
nation of many dif-
ferent sports.
"It is most re-
lated to soccer
Howe said. "But it
differs because we
score in an
endzone like foot-
ball
The goal of
the Ultimate play-
ers is to get the
disc down the field
and get into the
endzone where the
winning catch is
worth one point.
Just as in basket-
ball, when a player
catches the disc
they must plant a
pivot foot and they
can't run around
the field with the
disc. If this hap-
pens a penalty will
be issued.
There are ap-
proximately 20
players on the team, with seven on
the field at one time.
Howe said that this is one of
the biggest tournaments around.
Next weekend the Irates will com-
pete in the College Easterns in
Wilmington. Howe believes this is
another important tournament.
"The last two years, the win-
ners of Ultimax and Easterns have
gone on to win the national tour-
nament Howe said.
He said he based his judgment
on the fact that ECU has won both
those tournaments and for the
past two years has gone on to
Leaping up
what you'll
�i
punches and kicks.
Tae Shudo is an ecclectic style
of martial arts, fusing the best ele-
ments from Korean Tae Kwon Do
and Japanese Shotokan Karate.
The head
instructor, Guy
Pendergrass, is
a black belt in
Tae Shudo, as
well as a second
degree brown
belt in Jiu Jitsu.
Guy is assisted
by his twin
brother Rob,
who is a brown
belt (second
only to black)
in Tae Shudo
and Jiu Jitsu.
Both Guy and
Rob are certi- amm
fied by the U.S. Judo Association
but give instruction in all four
ranges of combat, which include
punching, kicking, trapping and
grappling.
Students can work at their own
pace and Tae Shudo offers a belt
system ranging from white, yellow,
orange, green, blue, purple, brown,
'We use strikes,
but since a smaller
person cannot
subdue a larger
opponent with
strikes, we also
use submission
techniques
� Guy Pendergrass
brown with black stripe, to black.
Many students opt not to go
through the belt ranks, instead con-
centrating their efforts into learn-
ing the practical applications of
self-defense and
street fighting.
Brazilian Jiu
Jitsu great Rorian
Gracie of the leg-
endary Gracie
family once said
"a street fight is
not what you
want it to be, it's
not what you ex-
pect it to be, it
simply is Guy
and Rob go by
that philosophy
in teaching street
fighting tactics.
"A typical
class focuses on real situations
Guy said. "We use strikes, but since
a smaller person cannot subdue a
larger opponent with strikes, we
also use submission techniques
Beside the realistic practical
applications, Tae Shudo basically
See TAE page 15
Photo Courtesy of Gene Howe
to catch the disc is only part of
see at this weekend's tpurney.
I
claim the national title and call
themselves the best of the Ulti-
mates in the country.
Reeves is confident the Irates
will win the Ultimax 26 challenge.
"It should be some good com-
petition as far as the east coast
Reeves said. "I'm sure we're going
to win it since we're playing at
home
As for a third national title,
the Irates see their chances as very
good.
"We're definitely going after
a third championship Reeves
said.
7&eeSewtcei
David Gasklns
Roc Sor vices
The end of Spring Break sig-
nals the true onset of March Mad-
ness- ECU style.
As college basketball begins
the "Big Dance the intramural
basketball season heads into its
final rounds with a number of
teams still in the hunt for cham-
pionships in their respective divi-
sions.
Each of the divisions are
down to eight or fewer teams and
the post-break action is expected
to be intense and hotly contested.
A total of 137 teams began the
season in nine different divisions.
In Men's Gold, "A Buncha
Zaggin qualified for the semis
with a tough 41-40 win over last
year's Gold runner-ups "Ole
Skool
Chris Pressley, Anthony
Barnett and Derrick Harris lead
the up tempo five guard offense
in the victory. The other
quarterfinals had not been com-
pleted at press time but promised
to be fast and furious.
Defending champion "Total
Package" returns in full force be-
hind footballers EJ. Gunthrope,
Mitchell Galloway and David and
Daren Hart and were set to face
"The Specialist" who have been
fueled on offense by the area code
jumpers of Eric Foley and the in-
timidating presence of Brandon
Hodges.
Ernest Tinnen's "Fab Five II"
squared off against "Da Monster
Squad" in one of the other
quarterfinal games. "Da Monster
Squad" captured the Mejt's
Purple in 1995 and have experi-
enced an up and down season
but will rest their hopes on the
dominating inside play of Brian
Levering and the bombing of
Brian Murphy and Ray Parnther.
The newest and strongest chal-
lenger to the crown held by "To-
tal Package" appears to be "Cash
Money Hoops" as smooth-talking
captain James McMillan has
landed prize-recruit Troy Smith,
a football wide receiver and high
school all-state basketball guard
who passed on playing for the
varsity team in favor of
intramurals.
"Cash Money Hoops" will
face "Walkin' on Water" and at-
tempt to shut down the penetra-
tion of Marquise Samuels and
the all-around offensive skills of
Vander White.
In Fraternity Gold, a number
of teams will contend for top
honors. Defending champion
"Kappa Alpha A" returns outside
shooters Jason Warren and Will
Temple while "Theta Chi A"
boasts the strong interior play of
Brad Wiese. "Lambda Chi A" was
considered by many as the pre-
season favorite with a balanced
attack of prime-time players in-
cluding the bombing twins, Brad
and Barnes Harris, Chad
Reynolds, Steve Bartley and
speedy Mike West manning the
point guard spot.
Other top "A" teams include
See REC page 14
��
Vijiwh





14
Thursday, March 14, 1996
The East Carolinian
lvfcV from page 13
"Sigma Phi Epsilon A who despite
several key player losses will still
be tough with Dale Emery leading
the way and "Pi Kappa Alpha A"
behind the veteran all-around play
of Steve Boykin. Mike Moonan. and
Kevin Robertson.
Fraternity Purple appears to
be an open division where depth of
talent is more of a measuring stick
than previous year's performance.
However, Bryan Moore's "Sigma
Phi Epsilon B "Lambda Chi Alpha
B Justin Conrad's "Pi Kappa Phi
B" and "Kappa Sigma B" went into
the break as the Final Four.
The Men's Purple division is al-
ways the largest and most difficult
to predict because of the distribu-
tion of talent and the introduction
of several new outstanding players
to a team. Despite this uncertainty,
a number of teams have earned
reputations worthy of notice as the
playoffs wind down.
The field has become even
more wide open with the stunning
first round upset of Vu "Tough
Man" Donie's "Club 106 Despite
Donie's bold predictions the team
was unable to overcome the distrac-
tions caused by continuous rumors
that Donie would accept the vacant
head coaching position at the Uni-
versity of Illinois at season's end.
Among the other prominent
Purple teams still alive are "De
Boyz" who hope to rebound from
a disappointing season last year
and return to the top of the divi-
sion behind Tobacco Belt alums
Donnie Peaks. Jeff Warren and Rob-
ert Rawls, last year's runner-ups
"The Knuckleheadz" behind the
complaining of Chris Loeffel, John
Whitehead's "Economics Society
The "TPK's" will depend on Brad
"I was fouled" Thompson and pow-
erful Brian Manning to complete a
strong playoff run. "The Clan of the
Arc" and the "UKB Posse" have
dominated most of their opponents
and appear to be among the favor-
ites to watch.
Foremost among the surprises
has been the "Lunch Bunch who
lead the league in Ph.D's and have
held stringent practices three times
a week for several years in order to
offset the drastic discrepancy in age
which they face against their op-
ponents. However, savvy t jint
guard Micheal "The Colonel"
Myrick. Richard "I must have been
fouled" Hauser, and Dan "I'm
open, I'm open" Schisler have pro-
vided the leadership to teach the
youngsters a thing or two.
In Men's Blue, where the em-
phasis is more on recreation than
on high speed action, the legend-
ary "Cavemen" began the season
looking to Mike Norwood for scor-
ing and anyone for rebounding and
defense. However, several late sea-
son roster additions added speed
to the lineup in Geoufrey Anderson
and Daniel Finn. Other Blue semi-
final teams include Brian Tuck's
"Hornets Jeff Martin's "Tantaliz-
ing Thompsons and the "Killer
Keg Crew The Residence Hall di-
vision was also considered to he a
wide-open race as numerous new
players populate team rosters.
Chris Williford leads "Going Down
Swinging" with his heady ball han-
dling and are set to face the
"Garrett Fighting Pirates" in the fi-
nal game.
The Women's leagues who
have been more competitive as key
players from last year's dominating
championship squad have split off
into several teams. "Goof Troop"
has reached the finals with Candy
Foust fueling the offense and
Allison Kemp, Charlotte Garner and
Tara Venn adding balance to the
attack.
Meanwhile, the other semi-final
produced a stunning result as pre-
viously-undefeated " Backstabbed"
was playing with only five players
when internal squabbles caused
one player to walk off and leave the
team shorthanded. "CSC" and
Hope Murray took advantage of the
dissension to escape with the up-
set victory and a berth in the fi-
nals.
In Women's Purple, the "Foxy
Javiers" have reached the finals
with Bonnie MacMillan. Grace
Glasgow and aerobi
Michelle Rizzi
They will I
Sigma lead I
the Hall' Dawson in tl
Sorority division !
final contest bel �
Delta" with capta
and "Alpha Delta Pi,
rode the ballhand
court skills of Ashley Damn
For a complete listing o
uling information, pl�
the bulletin I
Christenbui � G n
Fur further infi -
Intramural Spurt
call David Gaskins r Pa
Evans at 328-6387.
Home & Brown
'ATTORNEYS AT L
Speeding Tickets
Protect Driving Record
Reduce Insurance Costs
Driving While Impaired
Driving Privileges
758-4333 Free Consultation
300 Contanche St.
Greenville
HENDRIX
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'his is one satisfying savvy movie. I wish more films
were as intelligent and observant as this one
Jsftey Lyom SNEAK PREVIEWSWORLD NEWS NOW -�-
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210E.5THST.
758-8612
10:00-6:00 MS
Drastic
up to
90 off �
Reductions �
A
fuesday, March 12th, 1996 9pm-2am
Come by to sign up or call 758-4591.





The East Carolinian
Thursday, March 14,1996
15
IWREKLY
Harris teeter
Means Low Prices
12 Gallon
All Natural Hunter
Ice
Cream
Pillsbury
Toaster
3gZQO Sour
Strudel �u.soz. w
Harris Teeter
Cream
16 ox.
Selected Varieties
Bryan
Ham
6oz.
Buy One 8 Oz,
Healthy Choice
B0l0gna & Get One
Free
Ground
Beef
Patties
f
lb. ml
Stock Up And Save
Harris Teeter Regular
Butter
Quarters
16 oz.
Soft Drink Feature
Sngp ?
� j
I CRUNCHERS
Selected Varieties
Cheerios
Cereal
14-15 oz.
So-Dri
k Paper
2 Liter
Coke Or Diet
Coke
Last weekend the ECU men's Lacrosse
team traveled to Daytona Beach, Fl. to
compete in the Sixth Annual Moxley
Memorial Tournament. In round robin
play on Saturday, ECU went 3-0,
defeating Wheeling 18-0, Emory Riddle
13-1 and Texas A&M 8-7. On Sunday,
ECU went up against Illinois and was
defeated 9-3. Florida was next for ECU,
Florida was defeated 7-3. In the
championship game, ECU fell to Illinois
in a rain soaked final.
Next up for ECU is ODU (away) 7 p.m.
this Saturday and William & Mary at
home on Sunday beginning at 3 p.m.
TAE
from page 13
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
-9-
21st Century

follows the same respectable tradi-
tions of the ancient martial arts.
Tae Shudo practitioners believe
that all styles have something of
value to offer, and therefore do not
put down any other forms of com-
bat. They do not, however, partici-
pate in any tournaments or compe-
titions.
"Point fighting is not realistic
Guy said. "We prefer events such
as the Ultimate Fighting Champi-
onship to promote the martial
arts
Once a student has reached the
rank of black belt, he or she may
train in the use of weapons.
"A weapon is an extension of
your body Guy said. "You should
be able to use your own body be-
fore you can use a weapon
Guy stresses that Tae Shudo is
not all about fighting, however. Fit-
ness, disipline, self-esteem and fun
are also emphasized.
Anyone is welcome to join the
club at anytime. Tae Shudo meets
on Mondays and Wednesdays from
6:30-8 p.m. in room 112
Christenbury Gym. Any attire is al-
lowed, but shorts and a tee shirt
or the traditional uniform called a
"gi" is preferred.
"We'll take anybody regardless
of size, gender or age Guy said.
ECU students, staff, or faculty
interested in joining the Tae Shudo
Club should contact Guy or Rob at
752-3900, or call the head of intra-
mural sports, Pat Cox, in
Christenbury Gym.
� Clothing for men and & women 9
Beside 5th St. Brewery Downtown Greenville -ft Tho Pt -� .
KSlIB �f EiNB 2IK!f IB HIE1IIB KIKillB
HERE'S WHAT'S i
HAPPENING i
g at Mendenhall Student Center m
2 Advance tickets are now on salezQ
� for these upcoming events:
gj The Hunchback of Notre Dame
! Treasure Island .
5 Travel-Adventure FilmTheme Dinner:
El
Germany- Wunderbar
Contact the Central Ticket Office at 328-4788 for more information
!? Waituui ta CxJuUe �
Thursday, Friday, Saturday � March 14-16
8 p.m. � Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU ID - one guest permitted per I.D.
J
The MSC Computer Lab is
�pen on Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
and on Saturday & Sunday
from 1 - 10 P.M.
���
Ml
3
El
TOWelS 47 sq ft '
Tropicana
Season's
Best
Reg Lemon Or Aloe And Lanolin
Gillette 449
11 oz. m
2'
64 oz.
39�
Foamy
Sweet
Florida
Strawberries P,
FREE COUNTRY UNE DANCE LESSONS CONTINUE ON
THURSDAYS AT 8 P.M. IN THE MULThPURPOSE ROOM �
m
SFRVIf
ENDENHAtt STUDENT
Prices In This Ad EffectiveMarch 13 through March 19 In Our Greenville Stores
Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games pt
� � Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand � . ��
HOURS: Mon -Thurs. 8a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. JJjj
m �
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A guide to on- and off-campus housing
available to students in Greenville





The East Carolinian MOU1MG GUI
March 14,1996
When a landlord can
enter your property
NOLO PRESS EDITORS
Here are answers to fre-
quently asked questions on a
landlord's right to entry.
1. Does my landlord have the
right to enter my apartment
whenever he or she wants?
It depends on the state. In
all states, a landlord or man-
ager may enter rented premises
while the tenant is living there
without advance notice in the
case of emergency, such as a
fire or serious water leak. And,
of course, a landlord may enter
when a tenant gives permis-
sion. Beyond that, laws in
many states guarantee tenants
reasonable privacy rights
against landlord intrusions.
2. What are examples of situa-
tions when a landlord may en-
ter, but only after giving the
tenant reasonable notice?
Typically, a landlord has
the right to enter rented pre-
mises after giving tenants rea-
sonable notice in order to make
needed repairs (or assess the
need for them) and to show the
property to prospective new
tenants or purchasers. In addi-
tion, a landlord may enter
rented premises in instances of
abandonment (that is, when the
tenant moves out without noti-
fying the landlord) or by court
order. A landlord may not en-
ter just to check up on the ten-
ant.
3. Assuming it is not an
emergency, but the landlord
has a valid reason to enter �
for example, to make repairs
� what kind of notice is re-
quired?
States typically require
landlords to provide a specific
amount of notice (usually 24
hours) before entering a rental
unit. In some states, such as
California, landlords must pro-
vide a reasonable amount of
notice, legally presumed to be
24 hours. Landlords can usu-
ally enter on shorter notice if it
is impracticable to provide the
required amount of notice.
4. May a landlord enter a
rental unit any time of day,
as long as he's given the re-
quired amount of notice?
No. In most instances �
except emergencies, abandon-
ment and invitation by tenant
� states allow a landlord to
enter only at reasonable times,
without setting specific hours
and days. However, some
states, such as California, re-
quire that landlords may enter
only during normal business
hours.
5. What are the landlords
options if a tenant refuses to
allow entry even when a
landlord has given adequate
notice and has a valid reason
to enter?
A landlord should not force
entry except when there is a
true emergency, such as a
fire or gas leak. However, if
a tenant is repeatedly unrea-
sonable in denying the landlord
access, the landlord can legally
enter anyway, during reason-
able times, provided he does so
in a peaceful manner. How-
ever, in no case should the
landlord enter if the tenant is
present and saying "stay out
If a landlord has a serious
conflict over access with an
otherwise satisfactory tenant, a
sensible first step is to meet
with the tenant to see if the
problem can be resolved. Of-
ten, neighborhood mediation
programs will, for a low cost,
help work out an agreement. If
these attempts at compromise
don't work, a landlord can
usually evict the tenant for
violating the lease or rental
agreement, assuming it con-
tains an appropriate right-of-
entry provision.
if a landlord repeatedly
violates her privacy rights by
entering the rental unit with
no good reason andor
advance notice?
As a first step, the tenant
will usually first meet with the
landlord to ask for assurance
that this conduct won't be re-
peated. If this doesn't work,
the tenant (depending on the
laws of her state) may be
able to simply move out,
claiming that the landlord's re-
peated violation of her privacy
amounts to a "constructive
eviction Finally, if the
landlord's conduct seriously
interferes with the tenant's
peace of mind, the tenant may
have grounds for a successful
lawsuit, asking for damages.
Typically, a tenant will file suit
in small claims court without
a lawyer. For details on small
claims court procedures and
the maximum amount for
which someone can sue, see
Everybody's Guide to Small
Claims Court (National or
California Edition), by Ralph
Warner (Nolo Press).
7. How can I find out the
specific laws on privacy in
my state?
Find your state's statutes at
a law library or large public li-
brary. If possible, look for the
larger annotated version which
will also contain brief notes as
to key court decisions. Look
in the index under Landlord-
Tenant and then for the sub-
heading Privacy. You may also
be able to get information from
a local apartment association
or tenants'rights group. Your
state Attorney General's Of-
fice or Consumer Protection
Agency can also provide ad-
vice. Nolo Press publishes
two books on the subject for
California: The Landlord's
Law Book, by Brown and
Warner and Tenants' Rights,
by Moskovitz and Warner.
6. What should a tenant do �1995 Nolo Press
I�
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT
inc.
1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments 5. Houses Available
355-13 13
1807 Charles Blvd.
LOOKING FOR A ROOMMATE?
PON'T OVERLOOK THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS!
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water � Sewer -Cable -Draperies
�Self-cleaning Oven -Frost-free Refrigerator 'WasherDryer Connections �
Utility Room � Patio with Fence -Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks 'Walk-in Closets
featuring
� Swimming Pool � Basketball Court
�Tennis Court -Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
� Yearly Lease � Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE MINUTES
WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"NOW LEASING FOR SUMMER AND FALL 1996"
� Bring This Coupon in to receive 12 off security deposit & $50 off rent in May, June, and July.
Applies only to leases beginning in May
752-0277 Equal Housing Oppurtunity
EASTBROO
VILLAGE G
"The Best Value in Town"
SRI
� �,
i"i
"
,
:vv
,Vt �
I'tViV �
.UrtTi'tM
���
I
varied styles and location
1,2, and 3 bedroom
� �� '�
� '��.
: �
pools, laundry faciliti
on ecu bus route
�V
' I
cable tv included
all units fully carpeted
free water and sewer

central heat and air
fully equipped kitchens
on site management
on site maintenance
��� : ' S?:S
m $285
�om $370-400
room $465
752-5100
Office 204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC
J

i





March 14,1996
The East Carolinian �OU I G GUI
How to get neighbors to turn down the noise
CORA JORDAN
It's 2 in the morning.
You're lying in bed trying to
sleep because you have a big
meeting tomorrow morning.
You feel a pounding sensation
in your head.
At first, you think it's a
headache. But then you realize
that it's the funky disco beat
blasting from your next-door
neighbor's stereo, reverberat-
ing through your bedroom and
rattling your windows.
Before you pound on the
neighbor's door and yell some-
thing you'll regret, or. even
worse, resign yourself to living
with the noise, try some more
constructive alternatives.
copy of your local noise laws.
Most cities and counties have
ordinances that control the
times, types and loudness of
noise. For example, many lo-
cal ordinances prohibit unrea-
sonable vehicle noise (like
honking the car horn early ev-
ery morning for a carpool) or
dogs barking all night long ev-
ery night. Noisy neighbors are
in for a anting or even a fine.
You can look up your local
ordinance at city hall or the
public library. Make at least
two copies of it. one for your
neighbor and one for vourself.
J
bor and try to help you resolve
your differences.
Just call the mediation ser-
vice: someone there will con-
tact the neighbor and suggest
mediation (These people are
very good at convincing others
to give mediation a chance.)

I.Talt to your neighbor
Your first step is to talk to
your neighbor and try to re-
solve your differences in per-
son. It's hard to believe, but
sometimes neighbors are not
aware that they are causing a
disturbance. Even if you're
ready to punch somebody's
lights out. try a little sugar in-
stead.
2. Get a copy of your
local ordnance
Your next step is to get a
3. Warn your neighbor
in writing
If things don't improve, ask
your neighbor again � this
time in writing � to quiet
down. Oon't make threats, but
state that if the situation
doesn't improve you'll be
forced to notify the authorities.
Enclose a copy of the noise or-
dinance. Keep a copy of your
letter: you'll need it if. as a last
resort, you later sue your
neighbor.
4. Suggest mecfation
Most cities offer free or
low-cost mediation services,
which means they provide an
impartial mediator who will sit
down with vou and your neish-
5. Cal the poSee
If you have done all of the
above and your neighbor has
responded by turning up the
volume, now is the time to call
the police (or the Animal Con-
trol officer if the problem is a
barking dog). Try to get the
police to come while the noise
is occurring.
Of course, you can call the
police on a noisy neighbor the
first time the music gets too
loud for your taste. But the po-
lice will be more sympathetic
to your situation if they see that
you have tried to solve the
problem on your own.
8. Sue tor nuisance
If all else fails, you can get
your neighbor's attention�and
maybe some money�by suing
in small claims court. You can
sue your neighbor for nuisance
March Madness!
You don't need
four-leafed clovers or
rabbits' feet to find a
great place to live!
Come to Tar River
Estates today to
reserve your
apartment for
Fall 1996!
SHAMROCK SPECIAL
Move into a 2 bedroom apartment in
March with no security deposit!

Come join Tar River Estates and the Pitt
County Red Cross on Friday, March
15th from 1:00 - 5:00 for our 1st annual
"Have Heart- Give Blood" Drive Well
have great prizes, pizza and a live
remote with arrow 93.3 Help us make
it a huge success!
if your neighbor's noise unrea-
sonably interferes with your
enjoj ment of your property. In
the lawsuit, you ask for money
to compensate you for the in-
terference with your right to
peacefully enjoy your home.
Small claims coin! is easy
and inexpensive, and you don't
need a lawyer. You will need
to show the following:
�There is excessive and dis-
turbing noise.
�Your enjoyment o' your
property is diminished.
�You have asked the person
to slop the noise (your letter
should be enough to prove
this).
ESTATES
Decide on a reasonable dol-
lar amount per day, and multi-
ply that figure by the number
of days you've been seriously
bothered. The amount of
monej you can ask for in small
claims court is limited, be-
tween $2,000 and $5,000 in
most states
To prove your case, you
can use police reports, wit-
nesses, recordings, your own
testimony and the testimony oi'
neighbors or other witnesses.
The amount you'll want to
ask for will depend on how
much the noise bothered you.
Did you lose sleep'1 Were you
unable to carry on your usual
activities, such as reading,
playing music or talking to
friends?
If you're in an apartment
Noisy neighbors are always
had news. But when you share
walls with the insensitive
neighbor, the problem is espe-
cial ly vexing. The good news
for renters is that, in addition to
all your other options, you
have built-in allies in the battle
to keep your apartment livable:
your lease or rental agreement
and your landlord.
Remember the lease or
rental agreement you signed?
Chances are your neighbor
signed one too. Standard
leases and rental agreements
contain clauses that entitle you
to "quiet enjoyment" of your
home.
A neighbor who is blasting
the stereo in an unreasonable
manner is probably violating
the lease or rental agreement
and can Ix: evicted for doing
so.
If you warn your neighbor
about the noise in writing and
are sine that your lease entitles
you to a reasonable amount of
quiet, send a cop of the lease
along with your letter. In your
letter, tell the neighbor that the
next complaint will be to the
landlord or neighborhood asso-
ciation if the noise continues.
It warning your neighbor
doesn't work, go to your land-
lord. Most tenants don't like to
complain to the landlord or
manager about unreasonable
noise or other nuisances be-
cause they are afraid of being
branded as troublemakers. But
other neighbors are probably
bothered by the noise too.
Get together with them and
complain to the landlord as a
group. It's easier and you
might get faster results. Most
landlords don't want argu-
ments between tenants and
won't put up with tenants who
cause trouble by ignoring
signed lease or rental agree-
ments. Your landlord will
probably tell the noisy tenant
to pipe down or face eviction.
�1994 N'olo Press
wi �
17-ri
Green Mill Run Apartments
11th Street
Phone: 758-2628
GREAT LOCATION - CLOSE TO
ECU MAIN CAMPUS
also:
- on site maintenance and management
swimming pool
- laundry room
- LOW UTILITY BILLS
- CLEAN QUIET ENVIRONMENT
KINGSARMS MANAGEMENT PROPERTIES
� Office'located at: 1209 S. Charles Blvd. Apt. 104
752-8915
Offering Apartment Communities Convenient to ECU.
Pitt Community College, and the Medical District.
L
WOODLANDS
Convenient to Medical
District A. I'm Community
College
I .v 2 Bedroom Apts
Energ) Efficient
Central Heat A i r
W at erSe w e t IncI u d e d
Kitche n A p p 11 a n c e s
asherDr) ei Hookups
Back DecksPatios
No Pets
WESLEY COMMONS
Convenient to 1 � ('t
ECl Bus Scr ice
1 & 2 Bedroom Apt-
Energj Efficient
WaterSewei 1 nc I tide d
Kitchen p p 11 a iu
WasherDryei Hookup;
No Pels
PARKWEST
3 Miles to ECU
Convenient to
Medical District
New, Spacious I & 2
Bedroom A pis.
Enet g) Efficient
Central HenAir
Ceiling Fans
V ,i u 11 e d (' i' 111 n g s
K ,i n g e
Refrigeratot � I c e m a k e r
I) i s h u a s h e r
.i t e ti S e w e r I n c I u d e d
Hack DecksPatios
Washei Hi e r Hook u p s
No Pets
KINGSARMS
4 Blocks from ECU
I Bedroom Apis.
Energ) Efficient
C t n t r a I HeatAir
Kitchen pp 1 iances
Laundrj Facilities
No Pets
SUMMERFIELD
Convenient to Pitt
Community College &
Medical District
1 Hod loom Apts.
Energ) Efficient
V atei Sewer I n eluded
K i K hc ii A ppl i ances
a s h e rDryer Hookups
No Pels
Looking for a place v
to hang your hat?
Look no further than The
East Carolinian classifieds.





� r � i
w
The East Carolinian ffiOUlMG GU
March 14,1996
APARTMENT
BREAKDOWN
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
WILSON ACRES
TATTRTVER ESTATES
EASTBROOK
RiNGGOLD
2 Bedroom2 Bath Apartments
Range, Refrigerator, Dishwasher;
and Garbage Disposal
WasherDryer Rentals Available
Water Sewer Basic Cable Included
On Site Manager
Fully .Furnished Units Available
Also Available
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
On Site Laundry Facilities
On Site Manager
Dogwood
H o 11 o w
Apartments
752-8900
1 and 2 Bedroom Units Available
Woo del liistove Refri�erat�r
yVp3.rtrn.GntS WasherDryer Hookups
7585005 9 and u Month Lease �ptions
Fully Furnished Units Available
Walking Distance to ECU
'Also Available
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses
Pets Allowed with Deposit
3 Bedroom Houses Near Campus
Beautifully Maintained Houses
also Available for Rent
contact 752-8900 for available locations
Your new home away from home"
for your convenience
patios
2 bedroom
swimming pool
1 12 bath
on site management
fully carpeted
recreation area
all appliances furnished
free basic cable
free water services
laundry facilities
central heat and air
24 hour emergency maintenance
Limited Time Only!
RentSecurity Deposit Special!
Now I
l$Ufe4 Banks JEUL
7564J5J
King's Row Apartments
"Comfortable,
affordable
off campus living"
ecu bus service
groat location
2 be$Nom apartments
fully carpeted
1 bath
all appliances furnished
water services available
basic cable
pool
on site management
on site maintenance
���Ii, nil iiti.ii
G-l Verdant Dr.
752-3519
Now Leasing
v-





�s�-i .Vr�v- -
naHHMBHM
March 14,1996
The East Carolinian OL I G GUESS
GreenTille Area Apailments
as listed by the Greenville Chamber of Commerce
Arlington Square
Azalea Gardens
Branches Apts
Brasswood Apts.
Brookfield
Brookgreen
Brookhill
Campus Sites II
Cannon Court
Captains Quarters
Carriage House
Cedar Court
Cherry Court
Cheyenne Court
College Towne Row
College View
Colonial Village
Courtney Square
Cypress Gardens
Doctor's Park
Dogwood Hollow
Eastbrook
Elm Villa
Fairlane Farms
Forest Acres
Forest Glen
Forest Manor
Georgetown
Mulberry Lane
Portertown Rd.
1809 E. 5th Street
264 Bypass
Evans St. Extension
10th St.
Across from Lowes
1309 E. 11th St.
Luci Drive
301 E. 12th St.
New Bern Hwy.
Cedar Lane
Cherry Court Dr.
Off Red Banks Rd.
Evans St.
E. 10th St.
Hwy. 11
S. Arlington
E. 10th St.
Beasley Dr.
1110E. 10th St.
204 Eastbrook Dr.
S. Elm St.
Bridle Circle
Heath St.
McGregor Downs Rd.
2603 E. 10th St.
Reade Circle
756-5067
756-7815
758-3781
355-5006
355-5497
752-8900
355-1313
355-2213
756-6209
355-8731
756-3450
355-1313
752-1557
355-1313
355-8731
355-8731
756-5067
756-6209
758-2577
752-8900
752-5100
752-3376
355-2198
756-5577
355-1313
756-5577
752-0277
Green Mill Run
Greenville Manor
Greentree Village
Greenway
Heritage Care
Holloman
Holloman
Hyde Park
Johnston St. Apts.
Kennelworth
King's Arms
King's Row
Langston Park
Medical Center Apts.
Medical Oaks
Oakmont Square
Park Village
Pine Brook Apts.
Pinewood Village
Pirate's Landing
Plantations Apts.
Player's Club
Property Management
Quail RidgeAVind Ridge
Regency House
Ringgold Towers
River Oak
Rollinwood
11th St.
Riverbluff
2915TammieTr.
Country Club Dr.
506 Mattox Rd.
2509 E. 10th St.
1100 Charles St.
Hwy. 43 South
Johnston St.
132 Oakmont Dr.
1209 Charles
E. 10th St.
Stand! Dr.
Paladin West Dr.
1202 Allen Rd.
1212RedbanksRd.
Adams Blvd.
E. 10th St.
Winterville
200 W. 8th St.
3278 Colony Ct.
1500 Charles
103 Oakmont Dr.
14th St.
405 E. 5th St.
635 Contache St.
N. Summit St.
264 Bypass
758-2628
355-1313
757-1799
756-6869
752-9210
758-0491
756-7809
756-5067
355-1313
355-8731
752-8915
752-3519
752-2533
756-1234
355-3900
756-4151
756-6209
756-4151
756-4615
355-1313
355-5995
321-7613
355-8731
355-1313
355-1313
752-2865
355-8731
355-1313
Sandy Villa
Sedgefield Towers
Shenandoah Village
Sheraton Village
Shore Drive
South Square
Stratford Arms
Summerfield
Sycamore Hill
Tanglewood
Tar River Estates
Treybrook
Twin Oaks
University Apts.
University Medical Park
Village Green
Wandsworth Commons
Wedgewood Arms
West HillsGreenndge
Whitton Court
Williamsburg Manor
Willoughby Park
Wilmardel
Wilson Acres
Woodlawn
Woodland Apts.
Wood's Edge
Woodside
Haven Dr.
St. Andrews
Alice Dr.
Landmark St.
705 E. 1st St.
Patton Circle
S. Charles Blvd
Peed Dr.
11 E. 5th St.
125 Avery St.
214 Elm St
14th St.
5th St.
106 Scales Place
Heath St.
Arlington Blvd.
Wedgewood Dr.
14th St.
1008 Peed Dr.
Concord
Evans St. Ext.
1005 S. Elm St.
1806 E. 1st St.
122 S. Woodlawn
3364 Tobacco Rd
14th St. Ext.
Brookwood Dr.
756-8903
355-1313
756-6209
355-1313
752-2754
756-6209
756-4800
355-5006
355-8731
752-3804
752-4225
830-0661
355-1313
756-7815
752-0277
752-5100
355-2213
355-6302
355-1313
355-5497
756-2675
355-1313
752-3804
752-0277
355-8731
321-7106
756-4151
355-1313
riMg
SWrS
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENT S
The Ultimate In
Student Living
New Luxury
4 Bedroom Apartments
Fully equipped fitness center
I Exciting social events
Clubhouse with giant screen TV and pool tables
Swimming pool basketball tennis, and volleyball jeourts
Washerdryer in every apartment
Roommate Matching Service Available
NOW LEASING
Mil
3
3
as
FREE
MICROWAVE
With 1 year lease
New qualified applicants
City water and sewer ftee
Refrigerator, stove, tans, carpet
WasherDryer hookups
Management oc site
Quiet neighborhood
Small pets OK with deposit
1 & 2 bedrooms, most w decks
Located on Greenville Blvd
just past Lowes on right next to
Victory Christian Center
APARTME
355-4499
Limited time, certain restrictions apply
Pitt Property Management
7581921
108a Brownlea Dr.
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable. 5 blocks
from campus New ownership $375 deposit,
$375month
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1
BEDROOM, $275. on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF MARCH
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facili-
ty, sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer cable
WYNDHAM CTt 2 bedrooms, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer
hookups, patios on 1st floor, located 5
blocks from campus. Free rent 12 of month
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockside 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. 4 car
carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room, balcony, exterior storage room, noth-
ing in the area compares Reasonably
Priced!
1526 Charles Blvd. .
Across the street from
������
Minges ColiSeum
Today
76
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for
the position of:
Editor
The East Carolinian
General Manager
WZMB
General Manager
Expressions
Editor
Rebel
for the 1996-97 academic year.
Applications are available from the
Media Board office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a
completed application is
Friday, April 5 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board
office at 328-6009.
,�






bmmmaiammamwnMmmKM&umm
The East Carolinian lEOUiEf G GUES
March 14,1996
!0(tf timss, iooI foo��, ipsat frigid
Millions have
already come
forward
"Last year I had an opportunity to live
on campus and be a winner. But instead
I chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. I got stuck with utility, phone
and cable bills. The security deposit I
had to pay for the apartment really cut
me short on money. I had to eat my
own cooking and then wash all the
messy dishes. I even had to clean my
own bathroomYuck! I don't have time
to meet new friends because I have to
spend so much time cleaning my
apartment, not to mention shopping for
groceries. I have an 8:00 class, and
searching for a commuter parking space
is a big headache. If I lived on campus, I
could just walk to class. My roommate
has left Greenville and I'm stuck with
the rent. Now, it also looks like I will
have to find someone to sublet my
apartment because I won't be in
Greenville during the summer. Man, did
I goof by not choosing to live on campus.
I am so embarrassed.
Hey, I just heard that it's not too late
for next yearl can still be a winner! I
hear that there is no rate increase for
next year. What more can you ask for?
University Housing Services is offering
"second chance housing" on March
18-20 in 214 Whichard Building. I'll
see you there
You don't want to end up being embarrassed like poor
Rob here? Do you? He decided not to live on campus and look
what he had to put up with.
PRICE COMPARISON
BETWEEN ON AND OFF CAMPUS LIVING
COST COMPARISON
RENT
ON CAMPUS-double OFF CAMPUS-one
room without air bedroom apt.
per person one person
$ 1690 for 9 months $3,480 for IJ 2 months
($2000)
OFF CAMPUS-two OFF CAMPUS-three
bedroom w2 people bedroom w2 people
per person per person
$2,460 for 12 months $2,300 for 12 months
$610 for 12 months $600 for 12 months
�� �� "V.





Title
The East Carolinian, March 14, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 14, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1131
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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