The East Carolinian, February 27, 1996






TUE&?
February 27,1996
Vol 71, No. 42
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pages
Briefs
Around the State
LONGWOOD, N.C. (AP) - Take
away the video screen and music
and it might be just another Satur-
day night in a Christian camp-
ground tradition - except the
woman leading the song has no
clothes on, her husband wears only
a T-shirt and all the others are simi-
larly undressed.
This was the scene of the first
Christian Nudist Conference, where
naked Christian karaoke is but one
sign of a coming-out party for this
tiny but growing movement of reli-
gious naturists.
Some 40 Christian nudists
from around the country stood na-
ked and unashamed before their
God at the conference.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
The weekend killing and mutilation
of a sheep probably was not related
to its use as a sports mascot at the
University of North Carolina at
Chape! Hill, the animal's owner said.
After serving only one year as
the UNC-CH mascot Rameses the
ram was found dead Sunday morn-
ing.
The animal's throat had been
cut it had been gutted and its left
front quarter had been cut off, ac-
cording to sheriff's officials.
Around the Country
NEW YORK (AP) - On Mon-
day, a jury rejected a $25 million
wrongful death lawsuit filed against
Bellevue Hospital by the husband
of a pregnant doctor who was raped
and killed by a former mental pa-
tient
The 10-2 verdict awarded noth-
ing to Eric Johnson, the widower
who had accused the hospital of
negligence in the January 1989
death of his wife, Dr. Kathryn
Hinnant
Hinnant 33, was beaten, raped,
sodomized and strangled in her of-
fice Jan. 7, 1989, by Steven Smith,
a mentally ill, homeless man who
had been secretly living in a hospi-
tal storage room.
Hinnant was five months preg-
nant with her first child.
Smith, 31, was convicted and
is serving 50 years to life in prison
for the murder.
MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) - A 5-
year-old boy jumping on a bed
bounced out a third-story apart-
ment window and landed in some
landscaping, where he was shaken
up but not seriously hurt
The boy, whose name was with-
held by authorities, was with a baby
sitter Sunday afternoon. Bittinger
said the boy bounced right through
the screen of an open window and
fell about 25 feet.
A trail of bark dust up the stair-
way indicated he walked back to the
apartment after the fall, Bittinger
said.
Around the World
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A mod-
erate earthquake hit southwestern
Mexico on Saturday, rocking sky-
scrapers far to the north in Mexico
City.
There were no reports of inju-
ries or damage.
Student health ponders HIV testing
Lack of space,
time and money
limit services
David Durham
Staff Writer
The number of 15 to 20-year-olds
diagnosed with AIDS has increased dra-
matically over the past few years. The
American College Health Association
said college campuses should offer HIV
testing and counseling to students.
However, these services are not pres-
ently provided to students at ECU.
"There's obviously a need said
Heather Zophy, health educator at Stu-
dent Health Services.
Zophy said Student Health Ser-
vices lacks the staff, space and funds
needed to provide for the legally man-
dated pre and post test counseling that
have to accompany HIV testing.
Zophy said plans are currently be-
ing drawn up for an addition to the
Student Health Services building, but
she doesn't know when the addition
will actually be built
"They say a couple of years, but it
could be a lot longer Zophy said.
Zophy said Student Health Ser-
vices is looking into the possibility of
cooperating with the Pitt County
Health Department to provide HIV test-
ing on campus. She said mat in this
case, the health department would
come on campus to do the testing
themselves.
"They would handle all of the le-
galities of it" Zophy said. This would
provide easy access to testing by stu-
dents, but would take the burden of
legal technicalities off Student Health
Services, Zophy said.
"That's hope for the future
Zophy said.
Some other campuses within the
UNC-system offer HIV testing, but in
various ways.
Student Health Services at UNC
at Chapel Hill has offered HIV testing
since 1989, said Christian Godwin, HIV
coordinator and counselor. She said
that a chancellor's aid task force
Dribbling
along
the way
Zack Stone, a member
of Pi Kappa Alpha
fraternity, and
Chancellor Richard
Eakin chatted and
dribbled basketballs
Friday as the fraternity
set off on its annual
"Walk to Wilmington-
event. The event raises
money for the Ronald
McDonald House of
Greenville.
Photo By MICHELE AMICK
Professor joins Welsh Academy
Latest publication,
book on essays,
due this April
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
Pride filled the heart of an ECU
professor when he was given an invi-
tation to become a full member of a
national society of writers.
C.W. Sullivan III, a member of
the English department, accepted an
invitation to become a full member
of the Welsh Academy.
"I was delighted said Sullivan
when he found out that he had been
invited into the academy.
The Welsh Academy is the En-
glish language section of Yr
Academia Gymreig, a national soci-
ety of writers of Wales. Membership
is offered to individuals who have
made a contribution to literature in
Wales. The academy was founded in
1968.There are fewer than 200 mem-
bers.
"The Welsh Academy is a group
of scholars and authors who are in-
volved with Wales literature
Sullivan said.
The academy organizes the an-
nual Cardiff Literature Festival, lit-
erary competitions and awards, lit-
erary exhibitions throughout Wales
and an annual conference.
Sullivan has been a professor at
ECU since 1977. He is a professor of
English with a concentration in Folk-
lore Mythology. Most often you will
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Sullivan sits at his office desk reading up on Celtic and
Welsh literature, which will come in handy when he goes the
Welsh Academy's annual conference.
find Sullivan teaching Northern Eu-
ropean Mythology a class that ex-
amines Celtic and Scandinavian
myths, folklore and legends and
traces their influences on British and
American literature and culture.
Sullivan is having his book titled
The Mabinogi: A Book of Essays
published in April. Other forthcom-
ing publications Welsh Celtic Myth
in Modern Fantasy and articles in
"Tran-actions of the Honourable So-
ciety of Cymmrodorian, Planet The
Welsh Internationalist" and
"Dragon's Tale: Journal of the Welsh
National Centre for Children's Lit-
erature
Sullivan has published a vast
amount of articles on folklore, my-
thology and fantasy that draw to
some extent on traditional Welsh
material.
Sullivan has made several re-
search trips to the National Library
of Wales, the Hugh Owen Library of
the University of Wales and the Cen-
tre for Advanced Welsh and Celtics
Studies. These places are highly re-
spected for their Celtic Studies col-
lection.
Sullivan does not believe that this
great honor will change his role at
ECU.
" I don't think my honor will
change my work at ECU Sullivan
said. "This honor has given me recog-
nition on the work that I have done
and the work I will do in the future
worked to get the program started on
campus
"The task force worked with the
state to allow us to process the blood
with the state Godwin said. "It's defi-
nitely something that's a needed ser-
vice
She said that students feel more
comfortable being tested on campus.
Godwin also said there has been no
controversy over the issue of whether
to offer testing or not
"It's completely supported
Godwin said.
HIV testing is also offered on cam-
pus at N.C. State, but not by its Stu-
dent Health Services. Testing is pro-
vided on campus each Wednesday by
the Wake County Health Department,
said Jennifer Philip, health promotion
educator of Student Health Services
at State. She said that the testing is
free and anonymous, and that the test-
ing has been offered since October of
1995.
"It's been very well accepted
Philip said. "Every Wednesday it's full.
I'm proud of the students. They've re-
sponded very well to it"
HIV testing is also provided for
students at UNC-G at Greensboro. It
has been offered for approximately
three years, said Megan Evans, admin-
istrator of Student Health at UNC-G.
Evans said that the decision to
begin the program was made by the
See AIDS page 3
Speaker addresses
book, Beloved
Discussion held in
General
Classroom
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
Black History Month and the cel-
ebration of the contributions of out-
standing African-Americans continues
as the Ethnic Studies Program, the
Women's Studies Program and the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center join forces to spon-
sor renowned speaker, Mae
Henderson.
On Tuesday, Feb. 27, Henderson
will be giving a lecture in the General
Classroom Building, room 1032 at 4
p.m. The lecture, entitled "History
Narrative and Identity in Toni
Morrison's Beloved is based on the
novel set in 1873 that explores
women's experiences in slavery and
freedom after the civil war.
Taffye Benson-Clayton, director
of the Ledonia Wright Cultural Cen-
ter, said she is pleased to take part in
making the event possible.
"We're doing this as a conjunc-
tive effort because we want to be sup-
portive of any opportunity to bring
African-American and minority speak-
ers to our campus Clayton said, add-
ing that the list of Henderson's nu-
merous achievements includes train-
ing at Yale university and extensive
travel.
"Henderson has done a great
deal of work in the areas of women's
studies and African-American history
Clayton said. "She is also the speaker
for Women's History Month which will
be celebrated in March of this year.
"We at the Center are proud to
be involved. We want to do more with
forging alliances with other organiza-
tions on campus that can help boost
the activity of minority related pro-
grams
According to Angela Thompson,
a professor in the history department
and an advocate of both ethnic and
women's studies, Henderson's appear-
ance on campus should be an enlight-
ening one.
"This (topic) is one area of her
research Thompson said. "She has
lectured extensively on the writings
of Toni Morrison.
Thompson said Morrison will be
speaking in her Ethnic Studies class
today at 11 a.m.
"My class, however, is not open
to everyone Thompson said. "My
class has been preparing for this lec-
ture for weeks by reading the novel
The 4 p.m. lecture is open to ev-
eryone.
New ID process makes
logging-on easier
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
Any student or other member of the uni-
versity community interested in gaining ac-
cess to ECU's mainframe can now apply for a
userlD more conveniently than in the past
UserlD are mainly used for e-mail, said
Ernest Marshburn, associate director of com-
puting and information systems. They are like
electronic phone numbers that go directly to
the user. Some professors require students to
get a userlD for their classes since they will then be able to log-on to different
resources. However a majority of people get an ID for the e-mail component
There are three different systems which you can get an ID for: ECUVM
which is the most widely used, ECUVAX and ECUSUN. Application forms are
still available in the Austin Building at the academic computing lab, as well as
at the inputoutput window which is open 24 hours a day. However now
students can apply for a userlD without leaving home - just turn on a com-
puter.
Marshburn said applications went on-line at the end of 1995, and the
process is simple. First go to ECU's home page on Netscape. Then click on
academic computing to apply for a userlD. After that type in basic informa-
tion such as name, social security number and major. Finally, click on submit
application. A response with general information and rules will appear on the
screen. The userlD will be ready to pick up at the inputoutput window in
Austin in three days.
See ID page 3
A trip to the moviespage O
AIDS testing needed on campuspage 4
Seahawks scratch Piratespage O
Tuesday
Partly cloudy
k
High 75
Low 45
Wednesday
Chance of rain
High 65
Low 50
VW
r?W t& eocA U4,
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





Tuesday, February 27,1996
The East Carolinian
UNC Student issued citation for non-alcoholic brew
Graduate student Johnathan McMurray, the self proclaimed "original
beer patriot was recently issued his second citation for allegedly violat-
ing the open container law at UNC-Chapel Hill.
McMurray said he was issued the most recent violation as he walked
past the university's theater building holding a non-alcoholic beer There
were two witnesses and a television crew from Court TV, the national
cable network, present when McMurray was cited.
Authorities say death of student's spouse was no hit-and-run
UNC-Chape! Hill student William Boychuk has been charged with
murder in the New Year's Eve death of his pregnant wife.
Karen Boychuk's body was found beneafi a bridge after a late-night
incident that her husband described to police as a hit-and-run. A prelimi-
nary autopsy revealed that Karen died from blunt trauma to the head, a
condition likely to be caused by being struck repeatedly.
Boychuk is being held at the Wake County Jail while the district
attorney awaits the results of Karen's autopsy. Bail will not be set until
the autopsy is complete.
U of Tennessee, Knoxville student attacked at liquor store
According to the director of university relations at the UT Medical
Center, Walter W. Duncan, 20, was injured in a robbery while working at
the Vestal Package Store at 1057 Maryville Pike.
Several men broke into the liquor store and attacked Duncan who
was later listed in stable condition.
After the attack, the men proceeded to steal money. The robbers did
not use guns.
East Texas State University teaches students to use guns
ETSU is offering a concealed handgun license training course. It is a
one-day class consisting of 8 hours in the classroom and 2 hours at the
shooting range.
Students are required to pass a 50-question written examination an a
shooting proficiency test at the range. A person can qualify with either a
revolver-type pistol or a semi-automatic handgun.
The course has been offered since last year and discusses the use of
force, dealing with law enforcement, non-violent dispute resolution, weapon
storage and safety and basic range safety.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from College Press Ser-
vice and various college newspapers.
Career Services offers
internship opportunities
On-the-job
experience can
lead to career
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
Summer internships and part time
jobs are available to students of all
majors through the cooperative edu-
cation department, located in suite
2300 of the General Classroom Build-
ing.
Christian Swain, graduate assis-
tant and co-op co-
ordinator said the
cooperative edu-
cation depart-
ment offers infor-
mation and re-
sources on a vari-
ety of summer
positions. There
are paid positions,
internships which
earn class credits, mmmmmmmmmmmm
local positions
and camp or resort jobs available.
"We give students all the right
information that they need to find and
apply for internships and jobs Swain
said.
Swain said that students inter-
ested in utilizing the department's re-
sources should first attend an informa-
tion seminar. Students are then asked
to complete a coop application which
describes the type of position desired.
Next students can make an appoint-
ment with a co-op coordinator.
Coordinators specialize in helping
students of specific majors. Students
will be assigned to the appropriate
coordinator when they make their ap-
pointments. Coordinators assist stu-
dents in applying and interviewing for
positions.
Swain said the department's avail-
able positions are listed on a database
on the ECUVM. The cooperative edu-
cation department will assist students
in obtaining an ID and in accessing the
computer system. The information
seminars will explain the abbreviations
used in the data base.
There is no charge to students to
attend seminars, meet with coordina-
tors or apply for positions. The
department's only requirement is that
students have at least a 2.0 GPA.
Swain said that while some dead-
lines have already passed, there are still
plenty of opportunities for trie sum-
mer.
"There are over 100 camps with
openings Swain said.
Last year, the
department placed
students in posi-
tions which
earned them an
average annual
earning per stu-
dent of, $2,692.
Students also ob-
tained a total of
1,647 semester
hours of credit for
work experience.
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
PER PERSON PER WEEK
SANDPIPER BE.
650 FEET OF GULF BSACH.FftONTAGT
1 OUTDOOR POOLS � 1 INDOOR HEATED POOL RESTAURANT
SUITES UP TO 10 PEOPLE � KITCHENS WITH MtCROWAVfS
' TIKI BAR .�' BEACH PARTIES � ENTERTAINMENT
SAILBOATS � JETSKIS � PARASAILS
DISCOUNTS TO AREA CLUBS. RESTAURANTS i. ATTRACTIONS
VOLLEYBALL � HUCE BEACH .SIDE WHIRLPOOL
"Everyone should
get some work
experience
� Christian Swain,
graduate assistant and co-op
coordinator
SANDPIPER
)NTBEACH
PANAMA CITY BEACH. Fl 32413
INFORMATION 1-800-488-8828
sarah Jessica parfcrr � ric schaeffer ben stiller elle macphtrson
IF LUCY FELL
In a city with a million love stories theirs was one of a kind.
i!MWll�Milir�IW!ll�!Wi immMtfiSISIIl HSlfUIH
mm hh lira ini'mm jsimhk niiMini
MllllHIlllffB.lW
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday Feb 27
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theater
Stop by and see the new
Tracker and Metro
in front of
Mendenhall
Courtesy of
Phelps Chevrolet
Pick Up Passes at
Mendenhall Info Desk
& ECU Student Store
Presented By
The Student Union and
Student Union Films Committee
Gto .lUtro IS; Coup
G� Trodw ISi 2-Dmt 4i4 CamrtMt
Although some majors do not re-
quire that students do internships,
Swain said there are many reasons for
doing some type of career related work.
"Everyone should get some work
experience Swain said. "Internships
get your foot in the door and show stu-
dents the realities of the job. Students
leam the qualities in a job that they
value most and that helps them decide
on a permanent job later
Freshmen and sophomores can
benefit from the department as well.
"Many students do an internship
and then realize that they just don't
like the job environment in general
Swain said. "It is a good idea to do an
internship before getting too involved
in a major
The next information session is
scheduled for Monday, March, 11th at
4 p.m. in room 1003 of the General
Classroom Building. The department
lists other weekly seminars in a news-
letter. Students can call 326979 for
more information and a copy of the
newsletter.
Now, Let's Review
Surveys show more people are
going back to school. That means
that getting into the college c
graduate program of your choice is
more competitive than hdbre.
Therefore, you need etfery edge
you can get to
score on the
exams. For
School of Bi
intensive
demanded st
Going to
Know somecHpf;
into col
Call Professional programs in the
School of Business to get iaore
information on how you can
improve your score!

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3286377
School of Business
Professional Programs
East Carolina University
ECU
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�namm
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 27,1996
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWI, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC Bar Cm
Criminal Law
24 Hour Message Service
ust in State
Studying abroad allows students
to explore new experiences
4Mfc
752-8556
M.
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Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
While it is true that students can
acquire a great deal of enlightenment
while attending ECU and living in
Greenville from day to day, the staff
of the department of international
affairs realize that a students' hori-
zons can be broadened even further
if they venture out of the country to
complete at least one semester of their
college experience.
Linda McGowen has served as
overseas opportunities coordinator for
the university for the past two years.
"Studying abroad gives students
a broader perspective on the world
McGowen said. "The experience helps
them to more readily understand how
the world works.
"When they learn how to func-
tion in other countries, they learn
more about their own countries and,
therefore, learn more about them-
selves
According to McGowen, the uni-
versity now has connections with
many more universities and countries
than it has had in the past
"There actually are a number of
universities where ECU has direct
exchange relationships McGowen
said. "We have links to over 30 coun-
tries, and our association with the
International Exchange Program in-
creases that number even further.
"In the past, we have had stu-
dents go to France, Costa Rica, Ger-
many, Italy and many other countries.
Right now, some students are apply-
ing to go to Korea in the fall
McGowen said students who go
to Korea will either attend Yonsei
University or Korea University, both
of which are members of the Interna-
tional Exchange Program.
McGowen said the university also
offers summer exchange programs as
well as the usual semester and year-
long exchange opportunities.
Students receive credit for all of
the courses they take while studying
abroad, McGowen said, since students
get university approval for all of the
courses they take before they actu-
ally go.
McGowen said language barriers
are not usually a problem when stu-
dents study abroad, but students
should be at least a little familiar with
the language of the country they are
visiting.
"In some countries where En-
glish is not the language, classes are
offered in English McGowen said. "In
other instances, it is important that
students be quite proficient in the lan-
guage of the country
McGowen said students pay ECU
tuition and fees when they go to study
in other countries in the exchange
program; however, there are other
programs that require the students to
pay and additional program fees.
McGowen said ECU students who
choose to study abroad live much like
the students who are native to the
country they are visiting.
"Typically the (transfer) students'
housing options are whatever the
countries' normal students have
McGowen said. "Sometimes those
options include residence halls, shared
apartments or even living with host
families. No one arrangement is true
for all situations
ECU has an international stud-
ies minor in which students do not
have to study in other countries to
receive the necessary credits,
McGowen said. For this minor, only
two courses are actually required, the
rest of the courses come form vari-
ous academic disciplines and are tai-
lored to fit the interests of the stu-
dents. Still, McGowen recommends
studying abroad as a means of broad-
ening one's horizon.
"All a student has to do to get
more information about the exchange
program is come down and talk to me
to learn more about their options
McGowen said.
Interested students should con-
tact McGowen at the office of inter-
national affairs at 328-1937.
� V
'i'
t
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� r
r4ri
it
Through March 9
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
Mon-Sat 9-7 Wed& Fri 9-9
Sun 1-5
1 LI from page 1
This can be done at any academic
computing lab, in the residence halls,
library and even at home.
E-mail is an easy way to commu-
nicate all over the world, and best of
all, there is no charge to use it In-
stead of mailing a letter which can
take a few days, e-mail can be sent to
another address to someone with a
userid in two to five seconds.
Marshburn said if someone were
to report that an account has been
used in an unprofessional manner,
appropriate action will be taken. Gen-
erally the matter goes before the stu-
dent judiciary council and the account
may be taken away. Situations where
people do not use their accounts re-
sponsibly happen here at ECU once
or twice a week.
"We are not the e-mail police, we
do not look for problems Marshburn
said. "If something is brought to our
attention it is necessary that we re-
spond to it"
Marshburn said Netscape has
other useful purposes besides apply-
ing for a userlD. It is a browser that
allows students to view information
on the World Wide Web (WWW).
Netscape is like a phone itself while
the WWW can be compared to actual
phone lines across the world. You do
not need a userid to browse the
WWW.
Internet searches can be done on
almost any subject or area of interest
Marshburn said using Netscape in the
morning is much easier and faster
than in the afternoon. Since Netscape
is similar to a phone system, lines can
be tied up causing a slower search.
"The World Wide Web is a popu-
lar vehicle for finding information and
communicating to other people
Marshburn said. "This is safe, reliable,
secure and easy access for you. Com-
puters are a way of life
1MZZA
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757-7700
Store Hours
Mon. - Wed. 11am - lam
Thurs. - Sat. 11am - 3am
Sun. 12pm - 12am
SHOE OUTLET
Corner of 9th & Washington Street
Walking Distance from Campus (3 hloehs)
Large Selection of
Men's & Women's
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AIDS) from page 1
director of Student Health Services at
the time. She said it was talcing too
long for students to receive the results
of their tests when they would go to
the county health department, so the
program was started on campus.
"Everyone thought it was in the
best interest of the students Evans
said. She said there was no controversy
surrounding the decision to test on
campus.
Testing for HIV is also offered at
UNC-A at Asheville. Testing there has
just begun within the past year, said
Linda Pyeritz, registered nurse at Stu-
dent Health Services of UNC-A
Pyeritz said the idea to offer test-
ing was first brought up and approved
by a committee appointed by the chan-
cellor.
ECU is not alone in its lack of HIV
testing
Student Health Services at UNC-
W also lacks the funds and staff to of-
fer the legally mandated pre and post
test counseling, said Judy Bowers, di-
rector of the Student Health and
Wellness Center at UNC-W.
Bowers said since UNC-W is a
small school, she had concerns about
the confidentiality of testing if it were
offered on campus. She said testing is
also readily available from the New
Hanover County Health Department,
which is a short distance from campus.
"At this point we have not had a
need demonstrated on campus Bow-
ers said.
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I-





tamm
Tuesday, February 27,1995
The East Carolinian
I
Our View
Pitt County has the third highest number of reported AIDS
cases in the state of North Carolina, according to a story which
ran in last week's TEC. That's a ranking many of us would not
like to see.
The AIDS message has been pounded into our heads for
more than 10 years now, and it's not going to go away whether
the students of ECU choose to use preventative methods of
protection or not How many students are infected with the
disease you ask? We don't know because the infirmary makes
no attempt to keep records of or report the number of possible
cases at ECU. The infirmary keeps no records as to how many
students could be infected - they don't even offer testing for
this deadly virus. Sure, testing is available: anyone can go to
the health department and be tested, but who's going to make
the effort to find out if they are going to die? Wouldn't it just
be easier to keep living without knowing what kind of harm
you could bring to others?
The infirmary mandates Chlamydia and Ghonorrhia test-
ing for females Setting Pap Smears, so why isn't AIDS included
in the testing procedure? Is it too expensive, or does the uni-
versity just not want to know? According the Director of Stu-
dent Health Services Kay VanNortwick, testing for AIDS takes
a lot more than a simple blood sample. In order for such test-
ing to be possible, she said that counseling before and after the
test would have to be available, and that would take a lot of
time, money and space that the infirmary doesn't have to offer.
However, she also said she believes AIDS testing is a good idea
and she hopes Student Health will move in that direction in
the near future.
The AIDS virus is not going away, and neither will the in-
crease of infected individuals if we don't increase awareness
across campus and offer testing and counseling to individuals
who think they may have been infected or want to get tested
just to make sure. If the infirmary were to provide testing to
students, it is quite possible we could increase awareness of
this deadly disease and possibly decrease the number of HIV
cases at ECU and in Pitt County.
Pitt County has
the third highest
number of AIDS
cases in the
state, so why
doesn't Student
Health Services
offer testing for
this deadly
desease?
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor,
In response to your recent edi-
torial regarding the impending loss
of the intramural playing fields, I
wish to introduce the facts, as we
know them, because I feel that stu-
dents may have been unduly
alarmed by being lead to believe that
all of the fields would be removed.
Currently, the lighted field north of
Ficklen is configured to accommo-
date four softball or four football
fields according to the season. The
stadium construction wili encroach
110 feet into the area. The remain-
ing space will still accommodate two
We can play
softball or three football fields. The
current timetable affects the area in
early fall 1996. After completion of
the expansion by September 1997,
it is possible that the fourth foot-
ball field could be reactivated. There
are additional plans to build more
commuter parking in that location,
however, that project will need to
be coordinated with the develop-
ment of the new Blount Intramural
Complex, located at the Allied
Health Campus, scheduled for fall
1997.
I don't speak for Recreational
Services, but I do know considerable
effort is being expended trying to
line up alternative fields. We are still
six months ahead of the "wrecking
ball so sufficient time exists to find
acceptable alternatives. I assure you
that, although at times the process
appears somewhat chaotic to the ca-
sual observer, the University has a
record showing it reacts well to such
challenges, plans for contingencies,
shows concern for the interests of
students and never loses sight of its
ultimate goals.
George W. Harrell
Assistant Vice Chancellor for
Facilities
Construction is good
To the Editor,
I am writing in regards to the Feb-
ruary 20th East Carolinian. Your
opinion about the construction and
how it is a waste is really a petty ar-
gument. 1 would like to say that the
construction is what this school
needs. Hi many universities can you
name that have not improved their
school by way of construction and still
progress. Probably not many. Tell me
where we would be if the General
Classroom was not built. I am also
assuming that you don't want a new
library. You probably don't want new
books or easier ways of acquiring in-
formation to make your life any less
stressful right? You know that new
recreational center their building, the
one you think is a waste of a good
parking spot, don't let me catch you
using it. You are also complaining
about the lack of hadi-cap sic paths
around campus, well I haven't seen any
handi-cap people have any trouble
around campus have you? You aiso
mention that we have lost our intra-
mural fields. Well yes we've lost the
ones beside the stadium but they will
be move sic to the other side by the
baseball fields. You say "What more
can the university do to make our lives
more stressful?" I'm sure the univer-
sity is doing all this construction to
benefit itself rather than for us. We
need to expand if we're going to make
it in the future. If you don't like all the
construction transfer to N.C. State.
Scott Rose
Store loses customer
To the Editor,
On Dec. 31, 1995, as Americans
everywhere sat down to make their
New Years Resolutions, Harris Teeter
of University Center located on
Charles Boulevard was making a few
resolutions of its own. One in particu-
lar was to tow the cars of East Caro-
lina students who had been conve-
niently parking at the University
Center's parking lot since the begin-
ning of East Carolina University's aca-
demic school year.
On Jan. 4, 1996, students re-
turned from a much needed Christ-
mas break, and a few parked where
the usually had with no prior prob-
lems, at the University Center park-
ing lot. Surprisingly, on Jan. 5, 1996,
Jack Malcahn, manager of Harris Tee-
ter, had their vehicles towed away. I
was one of those infuriated students
who had to pay a $75 towing fee in
order to have my car returned. I was
at Harris Teeter picking up a few gro-
cery items when I realized my vehicle
was gone. When I spoke with Jack
Malcahn. he uncaringly told me that
he had placed flyers warning students
of Harris Teeter's future actions and
that the Dean of Students had phoned
each student who was parking at the
lot informing them that their cars
would be towed. How could any of thif
have taken place while we were on
Christmas break? 1 told him no Dean
of Students called me, nor did I re-
ceive any flyer. He could care less. The
situation sounded kind of fishy to me
so 1 contacted the customer complaint
office of Harris Teeter and reported
Jack Malcahn's action and attitude.
Ms. Beverly Griffin nor Mr. Dan Marett
(who is the district manager) saw any-
thing wrong with the situation. Why
not? Do they not understand that East
Carolina students probably pay their
salaries by working and shopping
there? How were we to know that
Harris Teeter thought that they
owned the entire University Center
parking lot? There are many other
shops in the University Center. More
importantly, there were no signs
threatening of towing cars. Why is
everything done for the love of
money? Needless to say I am an ex-
customer of Harris Teeter Grocery
Stores.
Tamika Richardson
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
�&
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Wadded, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
America falls to censorship
I have absolutely got to get some-
thing off of my chest What is up with
this censorship of the Internet? The
last time I checked, I still lived in
America - land of the free, home of
the brave? Does this ring a bell to any-
body? Yoo hoo, Mr. Clinton, are you
home?
I don't know where the President
of the United States gets off infring-
ing on my Constitutional rights, but
it's got me PISSED. I thought that
the President was supposed to uphold
those rights silly me, must have
been something I heard in some
speech about an oath of office. But
then again, who takes oaths seriously
these days?
Obviously not Mr. Clinton. Bill -
wake up! We're coming up on an elec-
tion year. Do you know how many
registered voters "surf the Net?" You
must not. Surely you couldn't be so
stupid as to purposely alienate a large
majority of voters - could you?
What am I talking about? This is
the so-called "education president" -
and by the way, I'm still waiting for
that college money you promised me.
But don't even get me started on that;
today my gripe is with censorship.
Let me tell you what happened
to me the other day. I was doing some
research for a paper (believe what you
want, it's true) about how accessible
pornography is to children on the
Internet So, I figured I'd try to see
how accessible it was to ME. So, I
surfed aro id a little, didn't really see
anything I found offensive at first
But then I saw something so gro-
tesque, so offensive, it almost made
me sick. I couldn't believe what I was
seeing! I couldn't believe that this crap
Jennifer Coleman
GuBBt Columnist
I am an American
citizen reveling in
my right to wear a
blue ribbon to
protest censorship
on the Net.
was right out there for small children
to see!
Was it child pornography? No.
Was it bestiality? Nope, not that ei-
ther. Was it any kind of sexual devi-
ance at all? No. It was a message from
a religious group.
Don't get me wrong. I'm not
against religion. Hell, I'm a Christian.
But this group (and I can't even re-
member their name - something like
the Internet Bible Association) had
the nerve to interrupt my transmis-
sion with a message that.said some-
thing to the effect of, "we have inter-
rupted your transmission because we
have found that this site has links to
extreme pornography. We are commit-
ted to keeping pornography off of the
Internet and we suggest you find a
life in Jesus Christ And then they
quoted some Bible verse that I didn't
read.
I have got to find out what is on
that site!
Now, I was under the impression
that if I want to defile my mind by
wallowing in debauchery and filth,
that was my right as a God-fearing
American citizen. But no! The Internet
Bible Association thinks that they
know what's best for me. The last per-
son who thought that was my mother,
and now you know why I don't live at
home anymore.
I tried every way I could think of
to circumvent their ban on the site. I
wheedled and cajoled that computer.
I said "pretty please" and I said, "with
sugar on it?" and I said, "please please
please?" I tried to get to it through
other sites, using their homepages as
a leaping point Nothing doing. Ev-
ery time I got the same message. They
didn't even switch the Bible verse!
Now. Mr. Clinton, pay attention
to this next part because I'm about to
discuss something I think you've for-
gotten. See, I'm a college student, so
I know these things: there's this little
document called the Constitution of
the United States of America. And in
. it is this thing called the Bill of Rights.
And in that Bill of Rights is the First
Amendment And do you know what
that says?
It says that I, as an American citi-
zen, have the right to say what I want
see what I want and hear what I want
when I want to do it! And nobody, not
Bill Clinton, not the Internet Bible
Association, not even God himself can
take that right away from me!
So before you go signing any-
more "Telecommunications Acts" you
better think hard, Bill Clinton. Just
remember who your boss is. I am an
American citizen reveling in my right
to wear a blue ribbon to protest cen-
sorship on the Net I am also a regis-
tered voter. And Bill, you're fired.
Christian finds comfort
I spent the first three weeks of
my college career sleeping on the floor
of the lounge in my residence hall. I
couldn't have gone home if I had
wanted to because I was 11 hours
away by car and $450 away by plane.
I actually became homesick and I
wanted to leave. Only God knew why
I didn't
This all took place at a different
university, however. When I arrived
at ECU, I was bombarded with coun-
try music blaring throughout the hall-
ways and malls that only had one level.
For a city boy like myself, these things
more than established my place in this
community as being an outsider. God
had a plan.
I think that everyone, at some
point in their college career or cer-
tainly their life, feels like an outsider.
I don't want you to start crying now
because this all sounds sad - just bear
with me and we will get through this
together.
In case your wondering, I slept
on the floor of the lounge because
my roommate, a lacrosse player, de-
cided to make our dorm room into
his bachelor pad. He hung up every
type of neon sign known to man and
regularly (by this I mean every night)
had overnight guests. Had I not dis-
covered the lounge until later in the
year, 1 might have dropped out of col-
lege altogether. God was in control of
my life.
I have even heard from people
that live in the near vicinity to this
school that they felt like somewhat of
an outsider when they first arrived
here. So what's the deal? How come
no matter where you live or where you
go you can always find a way to feel
like an outsider? Because we do not
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
The knowledge
of His presence
in my life is the
comfort.
allow ourselves to be comforted by
God's presence in our life.
Firstly, I would like to offer up
my credentials as a psychologist They
are quite limited, in fact I am not one
at all. I do not profess to wield an over-
whelming understanding of the hu-
man psyche, however, I remember all
too well what it feels like, and it is my
opinion that this phenomenon is natu-
ral but explainable.
The reason I felt like an outsider
when I was a freshman was most likely
because I was out of the south for
the first time. After the initial shock
wore off of learning that ice tea could
be consumed without sugar, I realized
that I was on my own. This is the key
to this condition. People, when in the
absence of a comforting environment
like their hometown or their family,
tend to create the illusion that they
have to take care of themselves and
that they can take care of themselves.
Most people would say that it is
absurd to say that people cannot take
care of themselves. People have been
doing it since the beginning of time.
Well they're wrong.
One of the reasons for this state-
ment is because I believe people take
care of people. I know that without
the friendship and support of people
in my life, I would have trouble bear-
ing the strains of this world. People
that bear with each other give each
other the support necessary to glide
through things. God knows what we
need.
Most importantly, in my life, be-
ing a Christian takes care of me. God
puts people in my life who can care
for me. I am cared for because I know
that God is in control of my life. By
knowing and believing that God has
a plan for me that is more wonderful
than I can imagine, I am cared for
because I do not have to limit my op-
tions to what is in my head. The knowl-
edge of His presence in my life is the
comfort
My natural tendency, as a human
being, is to compare myself to other
people. This constant measuring of
oneself against people and standards
set by TV (etc.) is what allows the mind
to convince itself that it does not be-
long. Because being a Christian means
giving God the permission to lead my
life, and asking him for his forgive-
ness: when I feel like an outsider I
can thank Him for His leadership and
forgiveness instead of wondering why
I don't fit in with everything else in
this society.
It is simply my opinion that it is
human for people to feel like they do
not belong. Christianity does not guar-
antee that I will never feel this way
again, but it does offer the answer (or
more importantly, the comfort) if in
my life I ever feel the need lo ask the
question again.
"One man's vulgarity is another's lyric
� John Marshall Harlan, Supreme Court justice, 1971





Sm
Tuesday, February 27, 1995
The East Carolinian
m m hh
Thespians breathe life
into "Black Voices"
Historical play
looks at problems
of black America
Dale Williamson
Wrttf
The ECU Thespians of Diversity
once again brought the magic of live
theater to Greenville when they per-
formed last weekend at the
Mendenhall Student Center. The play,
entitled "Black Voices Prom the Past
was written and directed by Thespian
organizer Reginald Watson, and it
proved to be an engaging and infor-
mative experience filled with anger,
sorrow, hope and pride.
"Black Voices" is a history play
that is divided into several segments
focusing on different African-Ameri-
can figures (both real and fictional)
from the past Since one of Watson's
main concerns is educating his audi-
ence, he chose a dramatic structure
that may wear thin on some but, judg-
ing from the positive reaction of Sat-
urday night's audience, seemed to fit
perfectly within the overall theme of
the play.
Instead of telling a single narra-
tive, "Black Voices" has individual
characters walk onto stage and speak
their particular perspective on a par-
ticular aspect of African or African-
American history. All of the actors
wore their roles nicely. With such lo-
cal talent as Courtney Draughn,
Terrence Dove, Nakisha Spellers and
Olayta Rigsby, these characters were
given a larger-than-life presence that
was felt long after one character had
been replaced on stage by another.
But Watson didn't just throw the
audience immediately into the anger
and pains of his characters. Instead,
he seduced the audience into his
world by opening the play with a won-
derfully choreographed interpretative
dance, lead by Sebrina Cooke. Ms.
Cooke, with the help of two other
young women, beautifully moved her
body to the rhythms of African drums
and magically captured the sensual-
ity of a nation that would soon suffer
the rape of colonization.
After the dance, Man-sa Musa, a
former king 'of Africa, walked onto
stage. The seduction of the dance was
gone. In its place was the anger and
hatred of a man forced to watch his
mother country fall to the chains of
Europe. As Man-sa Musa, Dana Reeves
was a towering presence with a thun-
dering voice. To watch such a figure
fall to his knees in a desperate plea
for Africa is to watch a man break
under the pressure of oppression.
Such oppression was narrated
throughout the play. While "Black
Voices" was filled with hope, it still
was not an easy experience. When
Laetitia Lisane performed as a slave
woman, we heard her tales of being
dragged from her family as a 16-year-
old girl to only be raped by her white
master. Nine months later, she became
the mother of a half-breed child that
could never be fully accepted into the
black or white community.
Other notable characters in-
cluded Sebrina Cooke as Zora Neale
Hurston, one of the most influential
African-American women's writers of
all time, and CJ. Rowland as a black
See VOICES page 7
Jackie Chan rumbles
onto US movie screens
Kavln Chalaaon
Settlor Writer
Some say that one of the best
ways to judge your enjoyment of a film
is to ask yourself this question: would
I mind seeing this flick again? Ever?
Without being bribed, or guilted, or
begged to go by somebody? Pretty
valid questions, so I will address them
in regards to the new release of the
Jackie Chan film Rumble in the
Bronx, Chan's first such release in the
U.S.
I saw the movie. Sixteen hours
later, I paid to see it again. I was nei-
ther bribed, guilted, or begged to go
a second time. In fact, I suggested it
And about the American release?
Finally! What took these knuckle-
headed studio executives so damn
long before they got a Jackie Chan
movie? Auugh!
But wait Some of you don't know
who the hell Jackie Chan is, do you?
Ever seen the Chinese films Police
Story, Armour of God or Chan's fin-
est film to date, Drunken Master 2i
Ugh. all right I hate to do this, but
Ever seen The Cannonball Run?
Oh, you have too! Fess up! Show
a little backbone, willya? Cannonball
Run? Dean Martin, Dom Deluis and
a cast of thousands? Well, in that
hodgepodge of actors in desperate
need of money was Chan, playing the
Kung Fu fighting driver of that
souped-up Subaru.
Still lost? Walk with me, my aco-
lyte.
You see, Chan did some films in
the U.S. in the early '80s, but martial
arts films took a dive about that time.
He then stayed in China, gained con-
trol over his own movie production
facility, and has 39 films under his belt
today, including Rumble. He is the
most recognizable action star in the
world, and the most bankable. Nine
out of the top 10 films in Hong Kong
are Chan films, bested only by Juras-
sic Park at number one. He is the king-
daddy cheese.
Everywhere except here. All this
praise for a chop-socky guy, you ask?
See Rumble in the Bronx and your
questions will be answered.
Rumble is about a guy named
Cheung (Chan), who comes to the Big
Apple to help out his Uncle Bill, who
is getting married. Uncle Bill wants
Cheung to hang out
in town for a week
or so after the wed-
ding, helping the
pretty new owner of
the family super-
market (Anita Mui)
get accustomed to
the tough Bronx
neighborhood that
surrounds them.
After Cheung
stands up to some
members of a vi-
cious, yet flashy,
gang of motorcycle
hoodlums threaten-
ing the store, all hell
literally breaks
loose. Throw in
some Mafia hoods
in nice suits lead by
the mysterious
White Tiger, roman-
tic liaisons with the
biker king's girl-
friend (the stunning
Francoise Yip),
some stolen dia-
monds, a whiny
handicapped child,
a hovercraft chase
(I'm not kidding
here), lots of insane
fighting, much bro-
ken glass, Chan,
Chan, Chan and
even more Chan
and you've got yourself a high-octane,
fuel-injected, over-the-top action ride
that makes Speed and all other Ameri-
can action flicks look like The Re-
mains of the Day.
Did I mention Chan does ail of
his own stunts?
And what stunts! To attempt to
describe any of this stuff in mere
printed form would not do Mr. Chan,
or any of the staggering fightstunt
scenes, any amount of justice. As a
friend of mine pointed out after a
particularly cool scene involving an
entire GE appliance warehouse (in
which all the appliances were imple-
mented in some way during the fight),
"This is like watching violent ballet
Yer damn right it is!
So, when you see the movie, re-
member these statements about the
stunts you see.
Yes, that jump was eight stories
up.
Has spring sprung?
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Freshman Christina Mayday enjoys the unseasonably warm February weather we've
been enjoying by taking her history studies into the great outdoors and our fountain.
Usual Suspects
has moxie
Some films never make it to the
Emerald City. Some are too contro-
versial Some are too small. What-
ever the reason, we just never get to
see some mighty good movies on the
big screen. When they hit video, how-
ever, they're ours for the taking. This
series will look at some of he films
that didn 't make the Greenville cut,
the ones that got away
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Edttor
Okay, you mugs, listen up!
The Usual Suspects is out on
video, and I'm here to give you the
skinny. This is one helluva movie, kids,
despite the fact that the bigwigs at
Greenville's movie theaters didn't
think anybody in this burg would
wanna see it.
Well, the bigshots made an error
in judgment this time, pal. It's num-
ber 10 in video rentals this week, and
I had to go to four places just to find
one lousy copy for review. 1 think it's
safe to say that Greenville wanted to
see this flick pretty bad.
So what's the lowdown on this
Usual Suspects deal?
It's like this, see? There's this
group of small-time hoods; pros, you
understand, but strictly small potatoes
crime-wise. Bank jobs, second-story
burglaries, fraud, that kinda thing.
More Ma Barker than Al Capone, if
you get my meaning.
Anyway, these mugs get muted up
with this character named Kaiser
Sosa. Now, Sosa is big-time. The big-
gest He sits on top of a major inter-
national crime syndicate, and he's so
shady his own shadow don't know
where he is most of the time. He's slip-
pery, this one, so slippery that a lot
of people don't even think he's for
real.
Cops, thugs, it doesn't matter.
Kaiser Sosa is a bogeyman, a legend,
a fabrication, they say. But even the
most jaded mug on the scene won-
ders. So the question is (or should I
say, the question becomes), who is
Kaiser Sosa?
Well, I ain't telling. Just when you
think you've got a handle on where
this story's going, they pull the rug
out from under you and you start to
see things different. Then they do it
again.
And that's all you're getting outta
me. The plot's the big deal in this pic-
ture, the whole reason for seeing it. If
you wanna know more, you'll have to
See USUAL page 6
CD Reviews

DEAD MAN
WALKING
Photo courtesy New Line Cinema
Hi-Keeba! Watch that lens, pal! The furious
flying fists of Jackie Chan know no bounds!
And they don't stay still long enough in his
new film, Rumble in the Bronx, to register
as anything more than a blur.
Yes, he did really break his ankle
in that other jump.
About 85 percent of those liquor
bottles thrown were real ones.
Nope, no blue screens (there is
this one lousy matte-painting of a golf
course - but that doesn't involve any
of the stunts).
Yes, that's really him the entire
time.
Yep, that's real blood.
However, it's not just the stunt
work that sets Chan and Rumble
apart from the cookie cutter action
flicks. Chan's films also have a hys-
terically wacky sense of humor, fol-
lowing in the vein of the silent com-
edies of the '20s. The scenes between
Chan and Mui (a Chan film regular
and sort of the Whitney Houston of
China), for example, are like classic
screwball comedy. Chan is a gifted
See CHAN page 6
� :�rrti
Dead Man Walking
Soundtrack
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
What Tim Robbins and his
brother David, who acts as musical
director on this record, have accom-
plished here is a true work of art.
Something unique in and of itself,
considering that most soundtracks
are cobbled together at the last mo-
ment from available B-sides. Both
Robbins brothers felt so inspired by
Sister Helen Prejean's novel (the
basis for the film) that they felt it
could inspire other artists as well. So
they sent the novel to some musi-
cians and asked them to respond cre-
atively to it. Boy, did they respond.
If the film itseif is anywhere near
as brilliant as the music found on its
soundtrack, then Dead Man Walk-
ing deserves its Oscar nominations
(of course, we'll never know since the
film didn't open in Greenville). The
soundtrack itself even got a Best
Song nomination for "Dead Man
Walkin by Bruce Springsteen.
I've never been a fan of the Boss,
but this sparse acoustic song has a
simple, weary beauty that communi-
cates the point-of-view of a con-
demned man perfectly: "Once I had
a job, I had it good But between
our dreams and actions lies this
world In the deep forest, their
blood and tears rushed over me
All I could feel was the drugs and
the shotgun and my fear up inside of
me Like a dead man talking
'Neath the summer sky, my eyes went
black Sister, I won't ask for for-
giveness, my sins are all I have
This record is a powerhouse col-
lection of gifted American singer-
songwriters, including such high-cali-
ber artists as Tom Waits. Michelle
Shocked, Patti Smith, Lyle Lovett,
Suzanne Vega, Steve Earle and Mary
Chapin Carpenter. Even Pearl Jam
frontman Eddie Vedder contributes
two eclectic duets with qwaali singer
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan from Paki-
stani, adding a little more credibility
to Vedder's efforts to be taken seri-
ously as an artist.
Finally, there is the man himself,
Johnny Cash, whom the film's direc-
tor, Tim Robbins, describes in the
liner notes: "Johnny Cash has been
there. He knows the world of this
See DEAD page 7
ADr?P
ticket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Last week, on "A Drop in the
Bucket
Our hero found himself in
the mental clutches of '70s pop
icon Olivia Newton John. Fbrced
to relive John s horrifying career
again and again (minus, thank-
fully, Xanadu), our stalwart col-
umnist found himself on the
verge of giving in to her nefari-
ous subliminal influence.
And now, a very special
"Drop in the Bucket"
Yeah, that's what I said.
Sometimes, I don't think I want
to be rid of Olivia Newton John's
hold over my mind. Much as I
dislike her music, I can't deny that
it's a part of America's pop cul-
ture heritage.
I mean, I think disco is a tool
of Satan, but I would never sug-
gest that we erase it from the his-
tory books. The long national
nightmare that was the disco era
has to be remembered, if for no
other reason than to make sure
it never happens again. It's im-
portant
Like it or not pop culture is
our culture. It's the glue that
holds America together. In a so-
ciety as diverse as ours, it's diffi-
cult to find a common bond.
There are as many different tastes
as there are cultures and creeds
and cities. But no matter what
our differences are, we can all
laugh at the memory of Miili
Vanilli.
And that's why, sometimes,
no matter how much I hate her, I
welcome Olivia Newton John into
my head. Even though the pres-
ence of "Physical" in my grey
matter sends a sharp, pop-sweet
pain through my molars a couple
of times a week, I welcome it
sometimes. I savor it, because it
gives me a connection, however
tenuous, with somebody some-
where who may not try to kill me
because of our great American
pop culture gestalt Sometimes.
But then there are other
times, when I'm not feeling quite
so damned Jungian, that I just
want to rip out my own brain for
reminding me of something so
insipid.
Once I realize the impossi-
bility of such a task (even if 1 got
through my skull without losing
consciousness, 1 figure the mo-
tor functions would go with the
first cordy handful of brain mat-
ter, leaving me helpless with
"Physical" on endless replay), I
get kind of scared. Not because
I've just caught myself contem-
plating a most likely suicidal act,
but because of the power popu-
lar culture has over us all.
Evenings, weekends, lives
are planned around pop culture.
See DROPpage 7





mmUUSmmi i i � il
i m.knmwtmmi nwwilttwui
MiiiiaiBiiMiiliiiB(
MWWM
Tuesday, February 27, 1996
fhe fast Carolinian
U 9 U AXj from page 5
see it for yourself. I'm no rat
So you'll pardon me if I talk about
the acting to get my mind off the plot
for a minute. There's a lot of good
performances in this flick, from stand-
up guys like Gabriel Byrne and Steven
Baldwin, but the real prize pony here
is Kevin Spacey. This Spacey charac-
ter plays one of the hoods, a mug
called Verbal, who tells the story to
the cops in flashback.
Verbal's a real smart guy, but he's
got a bum leg and a bad habit of just
going on and on about nothing until
Today's Topic:
Jackie Chan
1. In what movie did Chan
nearly die while perform-
ing a stunt?
2. Name Chan's two
disasterous American mar
tial arts film?
3. How many films in the
"Drunken Master" series
star Chan?
4. What is the highest
grossing Hong Kong film
of all time?
5. Why does Chan include
an outtake reel at the end
of every film that features
stunt "bloopers includ-
ing serious injuries that
often lead to actors being
carried off on stretchers to
local hospitals?
Answers in Thursday's issue
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you wanna bust him in the chops to
get him to shut up. Verbal's got a lot
up his sleeve, though, see, and Spacey
lets you see the gears turning in his
head.
But I'm saying too much. Maybe
it would be best if I just moved on to
something else, like the way this flick
reminds me of those old film noir
gangster pictures from the '40s. The
shadows, the music, the tough guy
patter, it's all here.
You know what I'm talking about.
The kind of movie with fog and shad-
ows and guys getting axed because
they know too much, where everybody
smokes cigarettes and drinks straight
liquor and likes it just fine. The kinda
flick that stars Peter Lorre and Rob-
ert Mitchum, baby, cause they couldn't
get anybody else that tough or that
dirty to play the kinda mugs they
played.
So if you like that kinda movie,
with tough guys and smart guys and
complicated action, check out this
Usual Suspects flick. It's got the
moxie.
One a scale of one to 10, The
Usual Suspects rates a nine.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
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209 B S. Evans St
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757-0003
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Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
VixAiN from page 5
mime and has a wonderfully expres-
sive face, honed through years of
training in the Peking Opera. What
more do you people need to know?
Is there anything wrong with this
movie? In my opinion, no. But to be
fair, I must warn the folks that aren't
used to Asian cinema. All of the dia-
logue in this film is dubbed. Even the
actors who spoke English in the origi-
nal Hong Kong version are dubbed.
Why? God knows, but it probably has
something to do with international
distribution.
Also, there is a choppy speed
and abruptness to how the scenes
play, the plot is only a little better
than okay, and a somewhat absurd
moral backbone intrudes on the ac-
tion at times, but who really cares?
This movie is exactly what it is - one
hell of a fun ride.
It's the kind of a movie that
makes you. want to try to imitate
some of the stuff you've just seen out
in the theater parking lot, like you
were 10 years old (despite the clos-
ing outtake footage of Chan and the
other actors being seriously injured
on the set). And plot? Who really
cares? Chariots of Fire won four
Oscars. How many of you have seen
that?
On a scale of one to 10, any
faults are brushed under the carpet
and Rumble in the Bronx gets a big
Kung Fu-fighting 12! I may just go
see it again tonight! I think I pulled
a muscle again
BLOWOUT
5 ALE!
onnecfaon
D.v.s.onOf W�&
210 E. 5th Street. 758-8612 MS 10-6; SUN 1-5
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�CAROLINA
ECU
Ihe Lost Co Cony
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J offer SUMMER INTERNSHIPS for
i dramatheatre students and teachers!
I Put your training and skills to work and earn credit at the same time!
Roles available for actors, singers, dancers, plus
1 stage and technical crew, and costuming positions.
J Stipends & housing available through The Lost Colony.
i Southeastern Theatre Conference Auditions
i Louisville, KY, March 7-9, 1996
Institute of Outdoor Drama Auditions
UNC-Chapel Hill, March 23,1996
i
i
i
I For more information, call Jon Summerton, General Manager. The Lost Colony
I Manteo , 919-473-2127, or Continuing Education, 919-328-6109 or 800-398-9275
Sponsored by the Division of Continuing Education and the Theatre Arts Department
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away. Listen for your chance to win all this week!
WZMB Sports will broadcast Pirate Talk LIVE from the lobby of
the RICHMOND MARRIOTT, headquarters for the men's CAA
Tournament, on Thursday, Feb. 29 from 7-8 p.m.
We will be off the air during Spring Break (Sunday, March 2
through March 10). Go frolic on the beach!
m
Ql .3 FM
r East Carolina University
'ECU. Honor 'Board
Do you want to get involved
witi a good
A I
Arqyo
ext
Emj tnonot
becwme
ization?
n
University.
Applications are now being
��
taken for the Fall 96' Honor
Board. Come by 210
Whichard or call 328-6824
for further information. Last
day to submit applications .
will be February 29th. ,
���





�r-r r i
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 27,1996
Summer 1996!
Term I: May 16- June 27
Term II: July 1 - August 10
Our summer rate is comparable
to most out-of-state student rates.
A quick and easy registration process.
Pre-professional courses (pre-med, pre-law, pre-business)
in biology, chemistry, physics, political science, history,
economics, and more.
� One-of-a-kind courses: Studies in Film History-Silent
Film; Grotesque in American Fiction; The Photograph
and Native American History; The Russian Revolutionary
Cinema; Street ChildrenWorking Children; The Brain of the
Robot; and many more.
� Summer housing is in one-bedroom, air-conditioned apartments
(only a five-minute walk to classrooms) with amenities includ-
ing swimming pools and lighted tennis courts, all adjacent to
the Sarah P. Duke Gardens on the Duke campus.
� Institute in English Language and U.S. Culture: an inten-
sive four-week, noncredit English program.
For more information or to request a bulletin:
CALL (919) 684-2621; FAX (919) 681-8235; or
e-mail summer@acpub.duke.edu
Continuing Education and Summer Session
DUKE UNIVERSITY
mJmZJAAJ from page 5
film. In his music and in his life, he
stands up-front for the dispossessed,
the poor, the prisoner he reminds
us that we have hearts, that we can
have compassion even for those that
have fallen, that have hit bottom
When you hear the poignancy
of Cash's song "In Your Mind"
(about a prisoner's final thoughts),
you can easily understand his recent
comeback and Robbin's praise:
"Sunday words are back again, and
you'll eat your fundamentalist pie
But just a piece you understand,
you'll get the rest up in the sky
Praise and glory, wounded angels
shufflin' round the room Eternity
is down the hall, and you sit there
bendin' spoons In your mind, in
your mind
What's even more remarkable
than the artistry presented here is
the generosity provided by the
Robbins brothers. They are giving a
portion of the royalties that the al-
bum will most assuredly rake in to
Leap Into Sweetheart's For Our Deuoous Leap Day Buffet!
Thursday, February 29th from 11:30 AM - 2:00 PM.
v We're having a buffet you'll find only once in the next four years.
Don't miss this opportunity!
M-E-N-U
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Sweetheart's Is Jumping Every Day With Greet Food and Service!
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OLD PACTOLOUS v hwy y x.

Murder Victims' Families for Recon-
ciliation, "a group that looks to-
wards ending violence as an answer
for violence and Hope House, "a
community based organization in
New Orleans that through educa-
tional programs and food distribu-
tion works to help wipe out the root
causes of violence
Considering the conservative
lean that the Academy has towards
throwing out its Oscars (conserva-
tive in terms of liberal Hollywood),
then, more than likely, Springsteen's
"Dead Man Walkin will lose to
some Disney fluff from Pocahontas
and that talking pig movie will
sweep the film categories. But that's
all right No simple award could do
justice to the praise this soundtrack
deserves.
V01lll5 from page 5
soldier. Rowland's performance as the
black soldier, a soldier who represents
all the black soldiers who have fought
American wars, was a perfect balance
between frustration, bitterness and
pride. While it may have been inter-
esting to focus more on an individual
soldier's efforts in a particular war,
Watson's decision to have this char-
acter represent all black soldiers is
justified. He, like all the black soldiers
before him, has continuously done his
duty for a country that does not value
him.
Watson's pacing for the play was
admirable. He interjected songs,
dance numbers and poetry readings
between his characters' narration to
help keep the rhythm of the play flow-
ing. Creative choices such as this kept
the audience on its toes and never let
them grow tired. In fact, the show's
finale was a treat when a "street bum"
came in and had the audience partake
in a quick question-and-answer game.
Not only did this bum require that the
audience interact with him, but he
also quizzed the audience to see how
much Black history they knew. As silly
as this may seem, it was an inspired
way to end a burdened play on a
lighter note.
I applaud Mr. Watson and the
Thespians of Diversity for not only
putting on such a fine production but
also for having the vision, dedication
and inspiration to see such projects
through. I hope they enjoy continued
success as they prepare for future per-
formances.
On a scale of one to 10, "Black
Voices from the Past" rates an eight
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise with
us in
The East
Carolinian.
Lllvvllr from page 5
We get together with friends to watch
television programs. We interrupt the
normal flow of our lives to drive long
distances for concerts. We meet po-
tential mates by going to the movies
(now there's a good way to get to
know somebody: staring at a screen
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And when we're not absorbing
pop culture in some way, we're talk-
ing about it Conversations revolve
around our favorite shows, movies and
albums. Humor is based on references
to those same things, references that
jump to mind as easily as our birth-
days or parents' names.
I've made entire groups of friends
based on a common love of conic
books or music or "Star Trek Hell,
I've fallen in love with people for those
reasons. Sometimes, late at night I
think there might just be something
sick about that
We're all steeping in the juice of
entertainment It soaks into our brains
and settles there, waiting for a chance
to spill out We can't escape it any
more than I can stop Olivia Newton
John from singing in my head. It's
buried too deep.
Like most things, America's de-
votion to pop culture is both a bless-
ing and a curse. It holds us together,
but it also invades and controls our
lives. It's a parasite, but we've got to
live with it We don't have any choice.
So sing on, Olivia. You bitch.
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday, March 14Friday, March 15-Saturday, March 16
THE WAIT IS OVER
'his is one satisfying savvy movie. I wish more films
were as intelligent and observant as this one
Jeffrey lyom. SNEAK PREVIEWSWORID NEWS NOW
HWY 264
TVNSS
Matt Blake-Wednesday, February 28
Leslie Tucker-Wednesday, March 13
ABSOLUTELY FREE! BE THERE
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM - The Wright Place
�M?f o.
HAVE A GREAT BREAK
Presented by the East Carolina University Student Union
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.

I
� �?�
11
to
. ��
�r
PIIU '





8
Tuesday, February 27,1995
The East Carolinian
Seahawks glide into win
Good bye!
Amanda Ross
Sport Editor
Revenge. That's what UNC-W
was looking for and that's exactly
what they got.
The first time ECU and UNC-W
matched up was Jan. 27 in Minges
Coliseum. The game came down to
the wire and in the end, ECU had
notched another victory 45-44.
But this rematch would prove
to be the Seahawks' night.
Saturday's game was a disappoint-
ment for all players and fans. Con-
sidering the first time these two
teams met the margin of victory was
excepted to be close. But the
Seahawks won by 22 points, 67-45.
The Pirates only shot 24 per-
cent from the field and scored 17
points in the first half. Both were
season lows for ECU.
Head coach Joe Dooley admit-
ted UNC-W had the upper hand
i throughout the game.
"They controlled the tempo and
� once they got us down, they never
; took their foot off our throat"
Despite the poor shooting per-
l centages, ECU only trailed 20-17 at
: the half.
Point guard Tony Parham, who
.� has been plagued with a hip pointer
�i injury all
� season,
; went out
J of the
' game late
! in the first
half, after
he got
kneed in
� he hip.
Dooley
said he
�wasn't
.sure how
Z
1 o n g
:� Parham
would be
�'out
-We
w o n ' t
f.know the
severity of it until we get back and
I let the doctors look at it" Dooley
'said.
ECU 17FGUNC-W
18
59FGA42
53PT.FG6
213PT.FGA18
6FT25
11FTA35
36REBOUNDS39
28FOULS14
5ASSISTS.10
13TURNOVERS15
45FINAL SCORE67
ECU got off
to a qui"k start
when Von Bryant
scored the first
bucket of the
game, but UNC-
W's Darren Moore
answered with a
three point basket
to give the
Seawhks a one
point edge, 3-2.
Both teams
kept trading bas-
kets, and the big-
gest lead in the
first half was after
Stan Simmons
slammed one in
and gave the
Seahawks a 20-12
lead.
ECU battled
back to cut UNC-
W's lead to three
going into the
locker room. After
a Tim Basham
baseline jumper
and an Othello
Meadows last sec-
ond three pointer,
the Seahawks
lead was 20-17.
Meadows was the Pirates lead-
ing scorer
with six
points, fol-
lowed by
Basham who
added five.
Bryant, Vic
Hamilton and
Deron Rippey
each had two
points. Bryant
and Hamilton
led the re-
bo u n d i n g
game for ECU
with five
apiece.
If Dooley
thought
things
couldn't get
any worse in the second half, he was
wrong.
ECU shot 33 percent from the
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Vic Hamilton looks to shoot in Wedneday's
contest against JMU. Hamilton combined
for 25 points against JMU and UNC-W.
field and 17 percent from three
point range.
The Pirates kept the score close
at the beginning of the first half, but
then the game began to fall apart
for ECU. ECU'S offense struggled
throughout the game, but in the sec-
ond half the Pirate's offense kept
breaking down.
ECU gave up 47 points in the
second half and produced only 28
of their own. UNC-W's first double
digit lead came with 11:49 remain-
ing when Mark Byington connected
for three. However, on the next trip
down, ECU'S Hamilton answered
with his own three point bomb to
make the score 32-35.
The Seahawks kept picking
away at the Pirates and eventually,
with 8:55 remaining in the game,
UNC-W kept the double digit lead
and never looked back.
SeeSEApage9
i
Lady Swimmers win second straight title
CraSg Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
For the second consecutive sea-
! son, the ECU women's swim team has
captured the CAA Championship.
The Lady Pirates led conference
foe James Madison by 52.5 points at
the end of Friday's action in the con-
ference meet and then went on to
extend their lead to 696.5-632 to win
the CAA crown.
"We put it away early Saturday
Head Coach Rick Kobe said. "It was
the greatest swim meet we've ever had
and the fastest win ever. We domi-
nated the actioa"
Kobe is obviously proud his
team's efforts.
"It's really special. To win a
championship is rare, and to win two
in a row is just wonderful
The ECU women did not win any
of the events in the meet but did score
in every outing. This was the key to
the victory, compounded with the fact
that four of the eight competitors that
had placed in the finals were Lady
Pirates.

It was the first time in history
that a team has ever won a champi-
onship without winning any events,
and the depth of the team was cer-
tainly a factor in the win.
"You win championships on
depth Kobe said. "We have a lot of
talented girls, and that goes a long
way
Since every
swimmer from
ECU scored in
the finals, Kobe
accredits all the
girls as being the
most outstanding
performers.
The Lady Pi-
rates were led by
sophomore
Sandra Ossman
who took second
place in the 1650
Free, and junior Melanie Mackwood
who was the runner-up in the 100
Free.
Mackwood is proud of her team-
mates.
"I'm really proud of the way we
pulled together when mistakes hap-
It's really special.
To win a
championship is
rare, and to win
two in a row is just
wonderful
� Head Coach Rick Kobe
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Seniors Von Bryant and Vic Hamilton receive a special gift during seniors' night last
Wednesday. They played their last home game in Minges against James Madsion.
Baseball team strikes up wins
Players go the
distance in
tournament
Dill Dillard
Staff Wrltor
After a snowedout opening game
against Duke, Coach Gary Overton
and his Pirate baseball team were
more than ready to take the field. This
eagerness showed as the Bucs took
three out of four games at the
Seahawk Baseball Challenge this past
weekend in Wilmington.
After dropping the first game
against UNC-Asheville, the Pirates
regrouped to beat Charleston South-
ern, Kentucky and the nationally
ranked Vols of Tennessee.
On Friday, it certainly looked like
it was the opening game for the Pi-
rates, as a solid UNC-Asheville club
jumped on ECU early 7-1.
"Going into the game against
Asheville we really didn't have a feel
for our unit as players and as
coaches Overton said.
Despite a solid pitching perfor-
mance by junior Chad Newton, a fcur
run outburst by Asheville in the third
inning proved to be the downfall for
the Bucs.
"Essentially we were testing the
waters so to speak Overton said. "We
were a little slow in getting started. I
felt that there was a little apprehen-
pened, and the way we held together
when we needed points. I was im-
pressed by the attitude of the team
the whole year Mackwood said.
The women refused to give up,
and kept screaming and cheering each
other on during every event
"We all lost our voices Kobe
Mackwood
said she thought
that the meet was
tougher than she
expected, even
though ECU went
in as defending
champs.
"It's all worth
it to see the look
of fulfillment on
your coach's face
when you finish a
race Mackwood
said.
Sophomore Kim Field said that
even though the team was expected
to do well, they didn't let that go to
their heads.
See SWIM page 9
Sta$7UeeA
For the second time this season, the Lady Pi-
rate basketball team defeated Richmond in overtime.
Sunday's game in Richmond proved to be victo-
rious for ECU as Tracey Kelley hit a 10-foot jumper
with seven seconds remaining in overtime to send
the Lady Pirates away with a 68-67 victory.
Justine Allpress led four ECU players in double
figures with 18 points. Tomekia Blackmon added
14, Shay Hayes scored 12 and Danielle Charlesworth
contributed 10 points.
Allpress, Kelley and Hayes grabbed the most
rebounds for the Lady Pirates each pulling down
eight.
ECU shot 44 percent from the field. 38 percent
from three point range and 78 percent from the line.
The Lady Pirates improve their conference record
to 5-9 and 10-14 overall.
ECU will host two home games at the end of the
week. Friday night William & Mary will come to town
and tip off for that game is 7 p.m. Sunday UNC-W
will be hosted by the Lady Pirates at 2 p.m.
These will be the last regular season games be-
fore ECU travels up to Richmond for the CAA confer-
ence championships next week.
sion and wa fell behind four to noth-
ing
Along with the early deficit the
outstanding pitching performance of
Freddie Rask of Asheville shut the
door on the Pirates opener in the tour-
nament allowing only five hits and
one run to score.
After an awkward opening game
for Overton's troops, the Pirates
roared back by winning the remain-
ing three games starting with SEC
member Kentucky 54. After falling
down one to zero in the first inning,
the Pirates tied it in the third only to
gain the lead in mmmmmmm
the fifth. Ken-
tucky would
battle back to
take a one run
lead, but the Pi-
rates would an-
swer in the
eighth to ice
their first win of
the season.
"We pulled
together as a
unit to beat Ken-
tucky and in the raanamamNa�m
same day to beat
Charleston Southern Overton said.
It was sophomore Patrick
Dunham that went the distance for
the Pirates, ringing up 13 K's in the
wining effort. In the 4 p.m. game
against Charleston Southern the Pi-
rates used something they used very
sparingly relief pitchers.
"We were very fortunate that in
"We were very
fortunate that in
four games of
baseball we used
only three relief
pitchers"
� Coach Gary Overton
four games of baseball we used only
three relief pitchers Overton added.
Senior Jeff Hewitt started for
ECU recorded 4 K's but had his
troubles giving up sue runs in just over
three innings of play. Overton then
called upon sophomore John Payne
who finished the game giving up only
one run the rest of the way for the
win.
"Along with veteran perfor-
mances by such players as Lamont
Edwards, Timmy Flaherty and Jason
Head, our freshmen have stepped up
and performed well which gave us the
shove we needed to
come out of the
tournament as we
did Overton said.
Home runs
from freshmen
Steve Salargo and
Antaine Jones in
the Charleston
Southern game is
just a sample of the
contribution the
four freshmen and
two to three sopho-
mores that started
throughout the
tournament
As a busy weekend was winding
down for the Pirates, you would guess
the road would get easier. Wrong. It
was time for Overton's troops to lock
horns with Tennessee, the fourth
ranked team in the country.
See STRIKE page 9
SID - The ECU women's ten-
nis team wrapped up its three day
weekend with a 6-1 loss to
Davidson College in Davidson, N.C.
on Sunday afternoon.
The Lady Pirates (1-2) only
managed to get one win out of the
singles competition and were un-
able to win the double point.
Sophomore Rachel Cohen was vic-
torious for ECU at No. 2 singles,
defeating Davidson's Ashley Maner
by a 6-3, 6-1 score.
On the doubles side, the No.
1 combination of Anne Svae
Cohen defeated Dana Casner
Amber Bradford 8-6. ECU'S No. 2
duo of Allison DeBastianiLisa
Hadelman were dealt an 8-5 set-
back, while the team of Chelsea
EarnhardtCatherine Morgan lost
at No. 3 doubles by an 8-4 score.
The Lady Pirates will return
to action on March 1, when they
travel to Myrtle Beach, S.C to
take on Coastal Carolina at 2:30
p.m.
SID - The men's track 4x200
and 4x400-meter relay squads both
placed fifth at he 1996 Mobil 1
invitational track meet, hosted by
George Mason University on Sat-
urday in Fairfax, Va.
Freshmen Rashawn Deans,
Vaughn Monroe, Chris Rey and
junior Ar'tee Franklin comprised
the Pirate 200-meter squad which
ran a 1996 season best 1:31.49 in
the event.
Rey, freshmen Damon Davis and
Mike Miller and junior Brian Johnson
competed in the 4x400 relay, and
posted a 3:17.68 time to finish fifth.
On Saturday. March 2, ECU be-
gins competition in the USAT&F
Championships held in Atlanta, Ga.
The tournament will conclude on
Sunday, March 3.
SID - ECU'S softball team split
its doubleheader in Raleigh on Sat-
urday at he Walnut Creek Softball
Complex, losing to St Francis in the
opening game, 4-3 and defeating
LaSalle, 6-1.
"It was a tough loss ECU As-
sistant Coach Jenny Parsons said.
Senior pitcher Trade Podratsky
(Centreville, Va.) took the loss for the
ladies as the game moved into extra-
innings. Senior Joey Clark (Los An-
geles, Calif.) had a career day, going
two-for-three and driving in a run.
In the second game, the Lady-
Pirates came ready to play. Sopho-
more pitcher Christi Davis (Eugene,
Ore.) had a no-hitter going into the
seventh inning with two outs, but
gave up three hits as she earned the
victory. Clark, once again, played
solidly for ECU hitting a double and
going one-for-three. Junior outfielder
Tanya Oxendine (Winston-Salem.
N.C.) also has a double as she col-
lected two hits in three at bats.
Other ECU hitters who had out-
standing performances include. Amy
Swaim (Kernersville, N.C.) who re-
corded a triple as well as going two-
for-three and Dawn Conrad
(Kernersville, N.C), who scoreed
two runs for the ladies' cause.
SID - The 1996 ECU golf
team finished its first spring tour-
nament in Tampa, Fla. on Sunday
at the University of South Florida
Ron Smith Intercollegiate by plac-
ing 14th.
Although their results did not
reveal an improvement over the
course of three days, the Pirates
continued to shoot consistently
better as they shot a 301. The host
USF team won both team and in-
dividual medalist honors as two
Bulls' golfers, Chris Colli and
Ricky Michelmore, finished in the
top-five.
Senior Brent Padrick
(Fayetteville, N.C.) completed a
final round even par 72 moving
him in a three-way tie at 19 and
making him ECU's top finisher.
Sophomore Kevin Miller (Erwin ,
N.C.) closed out the third round
with a 75, tying him at 22 with
five others.
"We didn't lose a lot of
ground and we didn't gain a lot of
ground ECU Golf Coach Kevin
Williams said. "We got a little prac-
tice in and we got the rust off. We
are now looking forward to Will-
iam & Mary next week
The ECU golf team will travel,
March 4-5. to the KingsmillWill-
iam & Mary Intercollegiate in
Williamsburg, Va.
sm
-s-V.





JJMiiMuMitiu'iiWiiiiiiill) lllii MKiiiilirfSa
' ilTiii
T?e East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 27, 1996
21st Century
5
Clothing for men and & women
Beside 5th St. Brewery Downtown Greenville

Tftr
jWlJYl from page 8
'We didn't go in there all cocky
Field said. "We have a lot of together-
ness, and we just pull for each other
Field placed fifth in the 200 Fly
and sixth in the 200 Breast
In men's action, the guys didn't
do as well as their female counterparts,
but they still made their presence
known.
"I thought the guys swam out-
standing Kobe said. "It was an excel-
lent showing
The men finished in fifth place with
374.5 points. 25.5 points behind Ameri-
can University. James Madison came out
as champions with a score of 766 points.
Coach Kobe cited Paul Pinther,
Richard Chen and Lee Hutchens as key
performers for the Pirates.
"I thought everyone did the best
SEA
from page 8
they could Pinther said. "We have a
good bunch of guys and a lot of spirit
and that helps a lot during the course
of the season. Since the season is so
long and the practices are so tough, with
good teammates it's easier to stick with
it"
The ECU diving team faired well
in competetion too. For the women,
Stacie haymes placed third on the three
meter board and 10th on the one meter
board. Lisa Fredrick placed 12th on
both boards and Lisa mcCoy placed
11th on the three meter and 16th on
the one meter.
For the men, Stephen Barnes
placed fourth on both boards. Tony
novak finished eighth on both boards
and Bobby Austin placed 16th on both
boards.
ECU was never a real threat for
the Seahawks in the second half.
"When things didn't go well for
us in the second half, you know, I
don't like this term, but we sort of
folded about the 12-minute mark
Meadows said. "We didn't have the
poise to play through it and I don't
know why
UNC-W won the contest 67-45.
Only two Pirates scored double dig-
its. Meadows and Hamilton scored
11 each. Rippey added five and
Basham contributed five. Big men
Jonathan Kerner and Bryant were
held to just three points each.
Kerner grabbed eight boards, while
Bryant and Hamilton each pulled
down seven.
The loss drops ECU's confer-
ence record to 8-7. This loss com-
bined with last Wednesday's 70-72
loss to JMU puts the Pirates in a
three way tie with the Seahawks and
American. (At press time results
were not known of CAA games Mon-
day night.)
ECU concluded their regular
season play last night against ODU.
ECU will travel to Richmond at the
end of this week to compete in the
CAA conference championships.
O 1 Kl ivJb from page 8
'Courses in anthropology, biology, geology, history, music and Spanish uiith regular East Carolina
University credit. Ho language requirement.
� Field excursions to the Pacific Coast to visit national parks,
and louiland tropical forests
-Field excursions to volcaaos and cloud forests
Trips to Costa Rica's major cities and cultural centers
Visits to museums and the national theatre
There is no application deadline. Houiever. in order to
get the best airline rates applications hould be submitted
by March 15. 1996. Later applicant should anitcipate additional
airline expenses.
Projected Co.sts:
Residents? 190 00 Hon Resident $3 680 00
Included are room and board uiith a Costa Rican Family. ECU tuition and fees, round trip
airfare from Raleigh to Costa Rica, and the costs of excursion in Costa Rica. Inquire right
aujay.
For more information contact Dr. lohn Bort (Program Director) Department of
Anthropology East Carolina University Greenville. MC 27558 4353 Telephone: (919) 32S 6136
(costa Ruca
1996
East Carolina university
Isuaiimmer Program
biay 8-JTLa.ne 10. lggs
The Pirates jumped out first with
five unanswered runs aided by five
hits from Randy Rigsby. Going into
the final three innings, the Bucs knew
the Vols would make a run. After
pitching six innings of scoreless base-
ball, senior left hander Bryan Smith
lasted eight innings and it was junior
Chad Newton who shut the door on
the Vols in the ninth inning to pre-
serve the Pirate victory.
"These were exciting wins, and
I 3193-A E. 10th St.
I Greenville, NC
j 785-0204
I
certainly good wins for our program
Overton said.
"These are wins that we're very
proud of. What I'm most pleased with
is that we pulled together as a unit
and did something great and that's
play East Carolina baseball
The next challenge for Overton's
troops will be on March 2 at high
noon, when Radford will roll into
Harrington Field for a double header
as well as ECU's home opening series.
"I
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KROCER, WHITE, WHEAT OR
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Where Your Dollars Support Student Scholars
"1"�WWII�1ll II I � .





10
Tuesday, February 27, 1995
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
it?
Help
Wanted
m.
Travel
EQbl
For Rent
Sa
For Rent
m
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
rnished apartments. $250 a month
6month lease
SO UNIVERSITY APART Ml N IS
' ' $99-2901 raM Mb Street
�Located ne.n I LU
�ICUBu, S.m -t�- '
�Or sit ! ,iuml! .
"Spr il Stu'cjent I i-j-i
MOBII E HOMi. P.I NlAI .
1 BEDROOM APART. TO sublet for sum-
mer in Ringgold Towers. Rent only
$250.00 per month. Start May 1st Call
754-2596
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
Help
Wanted
For Sale
Pit! Property Management
758-1921
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM,
APPLIANCES, water, basic cable. 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375
deposit. $375month.
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1
BEDROOM, $275. on river, watersewer
included, walk-in closet, spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry.
FREE RENT 12 OFF FEBRUARY
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom,
range, refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups,
decks and patios in most units, laundry facil-
ity, sand volleyball court. Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer cable.
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
Dockside 3 and 2 bedrooms. 2 baths. 4 car
carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace, dining
room, balcony, exterior storage room, noth-
ing in the area compares. Reasonably
Priced!
SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM APT. in
Ringgold Towers. No deposit. $300
month. 754-2633
ROOMMATE WANTED: RESPONSI-
BLE, CONSIDERATE, non-smoker, likes
pets; Available March, own room, close to
campus (off tenth street nice neighbor-
hood) $227.5012 util12 phone,
$100 deposit Amy @ 931-0865
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR 2 br in Cy-
press Cardens. Call this month, no depos-
it and half 1st month is free. If interested
or just want to know more, Call 758-6061
ask or leave message of Kisha
SHARE A ROOM FOR cheap! Female
roomie needed for 2 Br. Apt close to cam-
pus. $125.00mo. plus 13 utility. No
deposit needed. Call 931-0129 ask for Jen
2 BEDROOM, 1 and 2 bath apartments.
Water. Sewer, Basic Cable included. Only
2 blocks from ECU Campus. Also, 1 and
2 bedroom furnished units available with
Short Term lease. 2 and 3 bedroom town-
houses available for March 1. Short term
lease. Pets OK with deposit Call 752-8900
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom house. 2 blocks from
ECU. 13 rent and utilities.WasherDry-
er and Dishwasher. Call 752-6999 ask for
Bridged or Dierdra.
SUBLEASER WANTED IMMEDIATELY
TO share two bedroom 1 12 bath town-
house. Walking distance to campus. $250
per month, 12 utilities and phone. Call
758-9120 leave message, will return call
ASAP!
PEONY GARDENS NOW LEASING
newly renovated two bedrooms. Unique
floor plan. $350.00 mont h. Call 355-1313
to make an appointment. Managed by
Remco East Inc.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT SUB-
lease for summer. Close to campus $450
per month. Contact Chad or Matt at 830-
5194
EASYGOING, CLEAN ROOMMATE
WANTED ASAP for 4BR house on Jar vis
St, own room, 14 utils. Pet OK, $200
mo. 752-9102
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; Female
roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom, 2
bath house. $160 rent 13 utilities. Fun
easy-going, studious. Call 757-1467
ONE - TWO bedroom Apartments $285-
$340. Water-Sewage Free, Washer-Dryer
Hookups. Quiet location near malls and
restaurants. Call 355-4499 Brasswood
Apartments - near Lowe's
DO YOU NEED A ROOMMATE NOW?
My apt. is located near The Plaza & Ming-
es Coliseum. Rent and deposit special wit h
cable incl. If you'd like to enjoy your school
year, for a change off campus, then call
today for details. On ECU busline. 321-
2813Phil.
1993 KAW 2X-6 lOOOOmi, good cond.
$5000 will trade for car. Call Matt 551-
1016 leave message.
LONG WHITE FORMAL DRESS, size 6
worn once. $150 obo. Also 14Kt Gold dia-
mond ring $225 obo. Call Catherine 752-
7107
ZAP THE FAT, LOSE Weight & Feel
great 100 Natural, Dr. Recommended,
30 day money back guarantee. 16 years
of Healthy, Fit & Content Customers. Call
(919) 633-9840.
GIVING AWAY A BLACK, male cat to
good home. He has had all shot s, and is
declawed and neutered. Call Michelle at
752-6094
CAMCORDER $450 (NEG); sleeper sofa
$100 (neg); dorm size refrigerator $75; a
single wooden loft for dorm size rooms
$80. Call Kim (or Evon) at 321-7539
OAK FINISHED DINING TABLE with
18" leaf and 4 solid hardwood pressback
chairs! $225. Microsoft Office Pro with
bookshelf, CD Rom version for WIN 95.
$200. Call 757-2935
GREAT PRICES ON GREAT selection
of Tradeins. Used Bikes by Trek, Giant
GT, Schwin, and more. Cycle Center 355-
8050
FOR SALE; BARRECR AFTERS SKI
rack universal fit for gutterless vehicles
$25. New GM factory Radio with Tape
Deck $25. Must Sell. Call 551-6754.
TIOGA CLIPMAN CLIPLESS PEDAL
never used cleats included $100 call Hal
756-3393
DAY BED WHITE AND brass, also pop
up trundle, two orthopedic mattresses.
New Never used. Cost $750; sell for
$325.00. (919) 637-2645
m
Help
Wanted
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el, Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53624
THE CITY OF RALEIGH Parks and Re
creation Department is seeking enthusias-
tic individuals for summer employment
Positions include pool managers, life-
guards, camp counselors, nature, athletic,
arts, therapeutic and lake personnel. EOE.
Applications available at 2401 Wade Ave-
nue, Raleigh, NC 27602 or call 890-3285
Prestonwood Country Club
in Cary NC is accepting
applications for summer
lifeguards and snack bar
attendants at its 2 pools.
Come by during spring
break to fill out an applica-
tion and to interview. Get
a head start on summer at
North Carolina's Finest
Club.
(Lifeguard cert, required.)
300 Prestonwood Parkway
Cary NC 27511
919-467-2566
Ask for Tom
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
offering part-time positions for late after-
noon and evening hours. Typing skills a
must! Please apply in person at 1206 Cha-
rles Blvd, Ask for Christoph.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - ENTRY-
LEVEL & CAREER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE WORLDWIDE (HAWAII, MEXICO,
CARIBBEAN, ETC.). WAITSTAFF,
HOUSEKEEPERS, SCUBA DIVE LEAD
ERS, FITNESS COUNSELORS, AND
MORE. CALL RESORT EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES 1-206-971-3600 EXT R53622.
OUTER BANKS LARGEST WATER-
SPORTS center hiring reliable, enthusi-
astic sailingwindsurf ing instructors, res-
ervationists, and watersports rental per-
sonnel for '96 season. Cont act Bill Miles,
North Beach Sailing, PO Box 8279; Duck,
NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conv ersa-
tional English in Japan, Taiw an, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206)971-3570extJ53624
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escor ts Inc.
at 75808 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
RESIDENT PROGRAM ASSISTANT AT
campus ministry facility - furnished 1 BR
apartment and utilities provided in lieu
of salary. Send letter and resume to Dan
Earnhardt PO Box 8245, Greenville, NC
27835
ESTABLISHED ADVENTURE OUTFIT-
TERS ON the Outer Banks hiring enthu-
siastic, reliable, experienced rental help for
'96 season. Excellent working conditions.
Contact Bill Miles, North Beach Sailing
and Outfitters, PO Box 8279; Duck, NC
27949. (919) 261-6262
LIFEGUARDS, POOL MANAGERS,
SWIM COACHES. Summer positions
available in the Charlotte area. Call Caro-
lina Pool Management (704) 541-9303
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR motivated students. If
you are interested call Chris at 355-4402
or Jeff at 355-7700. Nor thwestern Mutual,
an internship like no other.
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS co
ordinator of environmental sales. Interna-
tional marketing company expanding to
Greenville seeking part-time team orient-
ed individuals. Good pay. Call for an ap-
pointment 321-6250.
PART TIME SALES HELP needed. Seek
ing individuals with neat appearance and
a positive attitude. Training provided. Full
time advancement potential. Call 321-6727
9am-5pm for an appointment
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee Recreation
and Wellness Department Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Lauie Woolard between 8am-4;30pm at
(919) 816-5590. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital EOEAA.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Car-
olina (Nags Head). Call Dona for applica-
tion and housing info 800-662-2122
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC
Relations. Please call Bill Fleming 355-
7700
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Call 1-800-
251-4000 ext 1576
EXCELLENT INCOME OPPORTUNI-
TIES WORKING Flexible hours, you
can make $50-$100 per hour: Amateur vid-
eo modeling, Escorting, or Exotic Danc-
ing. DiscreteConfidential. TLC 758680
SITTING OUT A SEMESTER?
BRODY'S is accepting applications for re-
sponsible individuals to assis t in new store
"set-up Manual labor duties include lift-
ing, stocking, moving fixtures. Must be
available flexible hours, Mon-Sat, Must
also be available Spring Break! Errand
running and daily travel also required. Ap-
ply Monday, lpm-5pm, Brody's, The Pla-
za.
POOL MANAGERS NEEDED FOR sum
mer 1996: Greenville, Raleigh, Rocky Mt,
Tarboro, Cary, Smithfield, Goldsboro ar-
eas. Call Ashley at BWPMSS, In c. for more
information (919) 321-1214
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - STUDENTS
NEEDED! FISHING INDUSTRY. EARN
UP TO $3,000-$6,000 PER MONTH.
ROOM AND BOARD! TRANSPORTA-
TION! MALE OR FEMALE. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NECESSARY. CALL(206)971-3510
EXT A53623
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches - Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-80078-
6386

w
Lost and
Found
LOST: 50 POUNDS - if found please con-
tact Graham at (919) 633-9840
41
Greek
Personals
Announcements
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS: GENERAL COL-
LEGE STUDENTS Should contact their
advisers the week of March 18-22 to make
arrangements for academic advising for
Summer Session and Fall S emester 1996.
Early registration week is set for March
25-29.
EAST CAROLINA NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION, ECNAO will be having
a mandatory meeting for all members on
Tuesday Feb. 27th at 7pm in MSC room
248. We will be nominating officers for
next school year & obtaining T-shirt or-
ders. The final decisions will be made re-
garding the rest of Spring Semester's ac-
tivities, particularly the Festival. Please at-
tend. If interested or need more informa-
tion about ECNAO, please contact Nikki
Epps at 752-9042
Services
Offered
RESEARCH INFORMATION
laryasf Library of information In U.S. �
��vtytcti '
Ordar Catalog Today with VlaaMC or CO
800-351-0222 ,
or (310)477-6226
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 100400209.
SHOW SPREE STABLE OFFERS west-
ern and english horseback r iding lessons,
beginning March. $5 off with Student ID,
6 years old and up. 746443 or 746-7426
leave message.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 Bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-
6495ext.F53625
GET THE JUMP O N THE JOB MARKET
Stand out with a professional video re-
sume. Coming to your campus March 13,
1996. Cost is $50 - full screen colored
graphic with your name, address, etc and
then you're on camera to tell the rest Call
919-636-5860 to reserve your spot Limit-
ed spots available.
ALPHA PHI - We're so glad you're our
sister sorority - we'll have a great time!
Love the sisters of AZD.
KAPPA SIGMA - Roller Skating with you
guys Friday night was a blast! We can't
wait until next time! Love, The Sigmas
J J THOMPSON - congrats on your re-
cent engagement! We are so happy for you!
Love, your Sigma Sisters.
TO THE NEW SISTERS of AOPI: Thanks
for the great time and all of your effort
We love you guys. Roses, The sisters of
AOPi.
SUSAN WHITFIELD - congrats on Rho
Chi Director! We know you'll do a great
job! Love, your AZD sisters.
A BELATED CONGRATULATIONS TO
AOPi for their Panhellenic Banquet
Awards: Educational Programming, Phi-
lanthropy, Outstanding Faculty Adviser.
Keep up the great work.
PIKA � THANKS for the predowntowr
Thursday night We all had a great time!
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
ALPHA XI DELTA HOPES everyone has
a safe and fun spring break!
PI KAPPA PHI: THE stakes were high
as the night went by. We hit it big and
danced a jig. Let's be sure to do it again.
Love, AOPi.
TKE � THANKS for the social on Thurs-
day night We had a great time. Love. Tri
Sigma
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA WANTS to thank
the sisters of Chi Omega for the Social at
the Cellar. We had a great time.
THANK YOU PI DELTA for a Great So-
cial at the Elbo. We must do it again some-
time. The Brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma
ALPHA SIG: THANKS FOR the great
time. Hope to do it again soon. L ove, AOPi
Announcements
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS will
have a meeting Tuesday February 27th
7:00pm @ Chico's any ?'s or more info -
Call Cristie 355474 or e-mail ugfarley
B-GLAD (Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians, and
Allies for Diversity). Will meet Wednesday
(228) at 7:30pm in MSC 221. Topic is
"Race issues in the Lesbigay Communi-
ty Speaker will be Derek Livingston, pos-
sibly joined by others. Come out to learn
about this issue from a leader in the Afri-
can-American GLB Community
ST. PETER'S CHURCH IS again spon-
soring an International Dinner in the Par-
ish Hall on Saturday, March 2. The deli-
cious oriental meal will feature your choice
of Beef Broccoli or Lo Mein with vegeta-
bles served with wontons, fruit and for-
tune cookies. Take outs will be ser ved bet-
ween 5:00 and 6:30pm. Table ser vice will
begin at 6:30. Tickets are $7.50 for adults
$3.50 for children. Tickets may be pur-
chased after mass, or from the Rectory
and will also be available at the door. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the church.
TAKE A TRIP TO CEDAR island and
spend the day horseback k riding on Re-
creational Services Horseback Riding Tr ip
March 17. This trip is very popular so sign
up earlyl The registration deadline is
march 1 in 204 Christenbury. for more
information call Recreational Services at
328387
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
WED. Feb 28-EAST CAROLINA SYM-
PHONY ORCHESTRA Steohen Black-
welder.ConductorlWright Auditorium,
8:00pm, free) THURS, Feb 29-SENIOR
RECITAL, Michael Montgomery, compo-
sition (AJ Fletcher Hall, 7:00pm, free).
ECU SYMPHONIC AND CONCERT
BANDS, Chris Knighten, Conduc-
tor(Wright Auditorium, 8:00pm, free).
SENIOR RECITAL, Brian Jones, trum-
pet(AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00pm, free).
For additional information, call ECU-6851
or the 24-hour hotline at ECU4370
DON'T LET OVERDUE FINES or books
hold up your registration for summer &
fall! Students with overdue fines or books
have a tag placed on their record and are
not permitted to register until tag is
cleared. Please return any overdue books
so you will not be delayed during regis-
tration.
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCR ATS will pres-
ent "Get to know you Candidates II on
Wednesday Feb. 28 at 8:00pm. The meet-
ing will be held in Room 1001 GC. All
students and faculty are welcome. For
more info, contact Matt at 328-3709
m
HAMMOND'S BEACH WEEKEND FOR
you paddling pleasure March 16-17. par-
ticipants will canoe across the sound to
bear island and camp for the night Reg-
ister in Christenbury 204 by March 1. For
more information call Recreational Serv-
ices at 328387
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS MEETING for
current officials and interested individu-
als on February 28 at 5pm in Brewster C-
103. There will be three training sessions
to be announced at the meeting. The ses-
sions will last two to three hours. For more
information call Recreational Services
328387.
Travel
Overtoil's
Seasonal packaging &. shipping openings available. Personnel
needed to fill customer orders and prepare packages for shipment.
Students seeking full time work for Spring and Summer are
encouraged to apply. Days: MonFri First shift hours: 7am-4pm
Second shift hours: 4pm-11pm. Applications will be taken from
9-1 lam & 2-4pm, MonThur. Apply at the Corporate Center
Offices, 11 IRed Banks Rd. Greenville, NC 27834.
0 vert oft s
ATTENTION
Spring Breakers I
Book Now I
JAMAICACANCUHBAHAMAS $3O0
Florida12�
Organize groups & oo FREE
H800-234-7007
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 lowest price guarantee! 7
Nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on fooddrinks!http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 10078386
SPRING BREAK! LAST MINUTE SPE-
CIALS! 6 Day Bahamas Party Cruise $299
Quad! Sail from Florida! Hurry only 10
rooms left! http:www.springbreaktrav-
el.com 10078386
ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK - 5 fun
filled days, music, dance, adventures, med-
itation in mystical Missouri Ozarks. 15 veg-
etarian meals $145. Rides available; Re-
naissance Universal Club 80096-2387
SPRING BREAK '96, WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT! BOOK NOW
Florida $109, Bahamas $359, Jamaica
Cancun $389. Organize a group � TRAV-
EL FREE Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-
7710
All Greek
organizations must
be spelled put - no
abbreviations. The
East Carolinian
reserves the right to
reject any ad for
libel, obscenity and
or bad taste.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
THE HARD WAY. THE EASY WAY.
Try the easy way by advertising
in our classifieds.
328-2000
�m





Title
The East Carolinian, February 27, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 27, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1128
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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