The East Carolinian, February 20, 1996






TUE&
February 20,1996
Vol 71, No. 40
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Around the State
LUMBERTON. N.C. (AP) - The
defense theory in the James Jordan
murder case is simple - Daniel
Andre Green was not there when
Michael Jordan's father was killed.
Defense witnesses are expected
to testify they saw Green at a cook-
out the night of July 22, 1993. Jor-
dan was killed about 3 a.m. on July
23 as he napped in his Lexus coupe.
A witness will tell jurors that
Larry Martin Demery, Green's co-
defendant, frantically knocked on
Green's door about 5 a.m. seeking
help disposing of Jordan's body,
Bowen said. Demery pleaded guilty
in the case last year.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -A
weekend trip to watch the biggest
event in stock car racing ended in
tragedy when a plane returning from
Daytona Beach, Fla with six people
aboard crashed near the Morganton-
Lenoir Airport
Authorities said the pilot of the
twin-engine Beechcraft Baron and
one of his five passengers died Sun-
day night after the plane clipped
some trees near the end of the run-
way, crashed and burned.
Around the Country
DETROIT (AP) - John Hall in-
sists he's a history scholar, not a spy.
But the Albion College profes-
sor still wore a wire under his tweed
coat to help the FBI bust
Smithsonian Institution curator Karl
S. Schneide who was stealing rare
World War I items he was supposed
to be protecting.
FBI officials convinced Hall to
wear a tape recorder and transmit-
ter, pose as a collector and meet
Schneide face-to-face at the
Smithsonian's National Air and
Space Museum.
CHATTANOOGA. Tenn. (AP) -
Gary Dockery. a police officer who
had been shot in the head after re-
sponding to a call, occasionally
blinked and nodded but never spoke
during the seven and a half years
he lay in a coma-like state.
Monday, just one week after he
amazed doctors and relatives by
awaking and talking for 18 hours,
Dockery was again silent.
Since surgery on Thursday to
remove infectious fluid from his
lungs, the former police officer has
communicated only by moving his
eyes and squeezing hands.
Around the World
GENEVA (AP) - A virus that
killed villagers in a remote part of
the West African nation of Gabon
has been confirmed as Ebola, the
World Health Organization said
Monday.
Thirteen people have died of
the disease, seven more are infected
and seven more are under surveil-
lance as possible cases, the U.N.
agency said.
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) -
Following a powerful earthquake
and deadly tidal waves, aftershocks
persuaded even those persons in
east Indonesia who still had homes
to sleep outdoors alongside the hun-
dreds who had lost theirs.
Man survives abduction, shooting
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
A customer was abducted from
the Krispy Kreme parking lot, robbed
and shot four times, last Thursday.
Alfred Earl Garris, Jr 35 rou-
tinely stopped at Krispy Kreme on
the corner of Charles Boulevard and
Fifth Street before going to his con-
struction job said a relative, Doris
Langley.
"He pulled over after getting a
cup of coffee to look over his blue-
prints for work when someone came
up to his car Langley said.
According to Greenville police
reports and investigating officer T. E.
Neville, a masked suspect entered
Garris' car on the passengers side. The
suspect then instructed Garris to drive
across the street to 1012 Charles Blvd.
the parking lot of dentists Dr. Capp's
and Dr. Bowman's office
In the parking lot of 1012 Charles
Blvd a second suspect joined the
first. Neville said.
The two men robbed Garris his
pocket money and told him to kneel
on the pavement.
Before being shot in the back of
the neck with a handgun, "he (Garris)
them that he had a family Langley
said.
Neville said that after the first
shot, Garris attempted to run away
from his assailants but was shot three
more times from behind.
"He is a very fortunate individual
to have been shot so many times and
survive Neville said.
Garris underwent surgery' for a
wound to his hand this weekend,
Neville said. He was scheduled to be
released from the hospital Monday.
Police reports described both
men as black males. One man is 5' 11"
and wore a dark mask. The other is a
little shorter than the first and wore
a toboggan.
The suspects were last seer driv-
ing a four-door burgundy car head-
ing North on Forbes Street.
"The investigation is still continu-
ing Neville said. "There are no sus-
pects, positive leads or potential wit-
nesses. In a situation like this, we work
with Crime Stoppers and appeal to the
community to give us any information
there may be
Eupha Pulley, the manager of
Krispy Kreme. said she feels her prop-
erty is properly secured.
"My property (Krispy Kreme) is
policed by the city police and county
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
The Krispy Kreme doughnut shop, a favorite haunt for students, was the scene of an
abduction and schooting on Feb. 15. Police are still looking for the suspects.
"We give them free coffee, so they are
in and out at all hours
Friends and family of Garris have
fund in order to facilitate identifica-
tion of the suspects. Anyone can con-
tribute to the fund by sending contri-
Greenville, N.C. 27858.
Anyone with information on the
two suspects is asked to call Crime
asked them not to kill him and told officers quite frequently Pulley said, initiated the Earl Garris. Jr. reward butions donations to P.O. Box 2053, Stoppers at 758-7777.
Employee's daughter Native Americans
seeks marrow donors protest partn,fl"
Bone marrow
needed to live
Sherri Parrish
Staff Writer
The American Red Cross and the
ECU chapter of the American Mar-
keting Association is sponsoring a
"Marrow-thon" in response to an
emergency appeal to help of an ECU
employee's daughter. The marrow-
thon is scheduled for Feb. 28 from
9a.m. to 5p.m. at Mendenhall Student
Center.
Cornelia Anderson, 16. daughter
of Computing & Information Systems
(CIS) employee Marlene Anderson, is
in critical need of a bone marrow
match.
Cornelia has been diagnosed
with aplastic anemia, a rare and fa-
tal blood disease that causes one's
bone marrow to fail to produce red
blood cells and platelets. Platelets are
the clotting factor in blood.
According to Cynthia Patrick, co-
ordinator of For the Love of Us Cam-
paign with the American Red Cross,
only five out of one million people
contract the disease.
Patrick said that the only hope
for survival for those stricken with
aplastic anemia is a bone marrow
transplant.
Unfortu-
nately, it is dif-
ficult to find a
suitably
matched mar-
row donor for
Anderson. If
one cannot be
found within
the victim's
family, as in �cmmmtmmmmmmaMjim
Cornelia's case,
then an unrelated donor must be
found. That's where the purpose of
the marrow-thon comes in.
"As the number of donors in-
creases, so do the chances of finding
Cornelia a match Anderson said.
Because tissue types are inher-
it!
'Regardless of
what the doctors
are saying we're
trusting in God
and prayer
� Marlene Anderson
ited, the best chance
for finding a match is
within a victim's own
ethnic group. How-
ever, this poses one
more obstacle in find-
ing Cornelia's match
because there is a low
number of African-
Americans on the Na-
tional Marrow Donor
Program's national
register.
"The reason
we're having the
marrow.thon is there
are not many African-
Americans on the na-
tional registry to
search for a match
Anderson said. "Hav-
ing the marrow-thon
will increase the
(number of) African-
Americans on the
register so we'll have a better
chance
Until a donor is found for
Cornelia, there is medication avail-
able to keep her as comfortable as
possible and she undergoes blood
transfusions about every two weeks.
Cornelia was diagnosed with the
disease shortly after her doctor real-
ized her blood counts were down af-
ter a routine physical.
At that time,
her platelets were
counted at 49,000,
the average number
should have been
around 350.000
platelets. Since
January her count
has fallen to 6,000
and it is now
around 3.000.
According to
Anderson. her
daughter's doctors said there is a 25
percent to 50 percent chance that a
marrow transplant from an unrelated
donor will be successful.
Anderson also said that even
though there's only a one to 20,000
chance of finding a donor, she and
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
Photo Courtesy of Marlene Anderson
her daughter will not give up.
"Regardless of what the doctors
are saying we're trusting in God and
prayer Anderson said. "We won't
give up hope Anderson said. "She's
young and needs a shot at life
Anderson not only attributes
their positive attitude to faith in God
but also to the department she works
for, CIS.
"My department and supervisor
have been wonderful through all
this Anderson said. "I give that de-
partment two thumbs up and I am
very thankful
Despite Cornelia's situation, she
still maintains grades of As and B's.
She is now a homebound student
who is tutored twice a week because
she doesn't have the energy to go to
school.
While she was a student at Rose
High School. Cornelia played basket-
ball, ran track and has been class
president for the past three years.
Anderson said she has hopes for
the future.
"This is something that's hap-
pened Anderson said. " We don't know-
why, but we take it one day at a time. We
keep a good attitude and trust in God
Negotiations will not be made
with the Native American group who
protested against the archeology lab
on Saturday. Feb. 10.
Members from the Tri-State Na-
tive American Coalition marched to
ECU demanding that ECU's archeolo-
gists return the remains of their an-
cestors.
The university knew ahead of
time that there was going to be a pro-
test because the Meherrin Tribal
Council let the department know what
to expect.
Anthropology Professor Dr.
David Phelps said the protesters had
no idea what was going on and that
the department is covered by law.
Chapter 70 of the N.C. Statute
was passed in 1981 and provides for
the North Carolina Commission of
Indian Affairs to serve as a reburial
agency for all Native American re-
mains everywhere in N.C. The archae-
ology lab holds these remains until
the commission tells them what to do.
The law covers the specifics of
excavation and reburial and demands
that everybody be reburried.
"We don't determine reburial. we
deliver for reburial after an official
request is made by the tribe Phelps
said. "This is the first and best state
law ever covering the reburial of hu-
man remains. To actually have some-
one come into N.C. and protest is ab-
surd
The archaeology lab has remains
that have been excavated in research
that belong to the Tuscarrora Nation,
Meherrin Nation and some various
groups that no longer have descen-
dants.
When archaeologist? open the
earth, it is their responsibility to get
everything and do what analysis they
can to describe the population. Re-
claiming Native American culture that
no one has written about, or recorded
is what the archaeologists set out to
do. If anything is done that is destruc-
tive, permission is required from the
group.
"The Tuscarora's are federally
recognized and they are the ones who
determine what will be done with their
remains Phelps said. "We just hold
them until they request something be
done, it's not our call
The Meherrins are recognized by
the state and bury their own remains.
Phelps is currently helping them gain
recognition from the U.S. government.
The Tuscarora as well as the
Meherrin Nation have been working
closely with ECU. The laboratory
See PROTEST page 3
LIFfee
?iMde
Photo by CHRIS GArDOSH
One of many demonstrators holds up a pasteboard sign in
protest against the university's anthropology department.
Broadway, closer than you thinkpage
OPINION ,y
Construction causes problems, againpage O
Last chance for home gamespage I U
?(vieca4�
Tuesday
Sunny
High 62
Low 40
Wednesday
Partly cloudy
High 65
Low 38
r?W fa xeac& u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328-6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
It lit whCUVM.C IV! I .1 1)1'
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Jovner





Tuesday, February 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
David Durham
Staff Writer
Organization
Profile
To the members of the Society of Physics Students (SPS). science is
about much more than experimentation and observation. It is about com-
munity involvement and participation.
"We're there to promote physics and encourage active participation
from the student body said Timothy Tiemeyer. vice president of SPS.
Tiemeyer said SPS is currently working on physics displays and demon-
strations for the ECU orientation sessions, attended by all incoming stu-
dents.
"Richard Lynch, president of SPS. is organizing a community link pro-
gram where we do free tutoring for high school students (and) we do dem-
onstrations for various high schools and elementary schools Tiemeyer said.
Lynch said that in the past SPS has held a physics fun day on which
numerous students from high schools in Pitt. Greene and surrounding coun-
ties would visit the university for a full day of physics experiments and
demonstrations.
"We offer tutoring for high school students in the evenings Lynch
said.
Now the club is venturing out into the community and actually doing
on-site demonstrations at various schools, he said.
"We went out to EB Aycock (Junior High School) the other day and did
a demonstration there Lynch said.
Lynch said the program is designed to encourage a general interest in
science among young students. He said that the demonstrations bring stu-
dents' textbooks to life.
"Science is not just something tucked away in a textbook Lynch said.
"It's all around them in everyday life. By doing the program we're recruit-
ing kids to science and to ECU
He said students whose interests are captured by SPS's demonstrations
will be more likely to attend ECU when pursuing their college degrees. By
attracting local students to ECU, SPS is helping preserve Greenville's intel-
lectual resources.
Lynch said SPS will continue this program in the future.
"We'd like for this program to be a permanent thing Lynch said.
Tiemeyer said SPS is not only- about Physics, it has a social side, too.
"We've planned events like barbecues Tiemeyer said.
He said the club also gets together to watch movies every once in a
while.
"You basically get a large number of benefits from being associated
with the SPS Tiemeyer said.
He said that academic support through tutoring is provided to mem-
bers.
"It's an environment that's basically there to help you learn and to help
you grow Tiemeyer caid. "It's about people. It's just not so cut and dry with
the physics thing
The Society of Physics Students meets every other Friday in E213,
Howell Science Complex. The next meeting is this Friday at 2 p.m Lynch
said.Lynch said there are currently about 24 members in SPS.Membership
is open to all majors and there is no GPA requirement. Applications for
membership are available in E209, Howell Science Complex.
Loans aid student emergencies
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
Donations from retired faculty
members in the local area fund two
sources of financial aid for students.
The ECU Retired Faculty Associa-
tion provides emergency loans, up to
$500. to students experiencing unfore-
seen and temporary financial problems.
Beatrice Chauncev, president of
the Association, said that the funds
are not targeted to cover ongoing ,
everyday expenses like rent and utili-
ties.
"The loan is designed to enable
students with unexpected emergen-
cies like car repairs and medical bills
to remain in school Chauncey said.
According to Chauncey, a profes-
sor of music for 41 years until her re-
tirement in 1990, the association de-
cided to endow the emergency fund
in 1982, ECU's 75th anniversary year.
Loan amounts are financed from the
interest earned on the original endow-
ment
Four of the six available loans
have been processed this year. As the
loans are repaid, at minimal interest
rates, the money is turned over into
additional loans.
The 170 Member association sub-
sequently endowed an Undergraduate
Foundation scholarship, awarded for
the first time this year. The $700 an-
nual scholarship, administered by the
admissions office, is renewable for
four years.
Richard Robert Proseus, of Wil-
son, received the first scholarship.
Proseus, a computer science major, is
in the Freshman Honors Program.
Chauncey said the association is
currently accumulating money for a
graduate scholarship and hopes to
achieve that goal soon.
"The retired faculty still have
close ties to the university and close
ties to the students Chauncey said.
"We are anxious to be of service still
Additional campus scholarships
have been funded through the Shared
Vi-ions Campaign, a five year fund-
raiser completed in December '95.
The successful campaign has
added needed funds to some existing
scholarships as well as offering new-
opportunities, according to Vicky
Morris from the office of institutional
advancement
Merit scholarships for incoming
freshmen as well as departmental
awards for declared majors are avail-
able. Morris said. Information from
the campaign is incomplete so she
suggests that juniors and seniors
check with their departments for
more information. Admissions handles
the program for incoming freshmen.
The library and financial aid of-
fice offer a complete listing of the
many local, state and federal scholar-
ships available. The financial aid of-
fice suggests that interested students
should investigate their options now
to avoid missing deadlines.
The loans, available to under-
graduates and graduate students, are
administered by the office of institu-
tional advancement. Contact Vicky
Morris, 328-6685, for application in-
formation.
Twenty somethings
reject Gen X label
Now, Let's Review
CPS - Someday, maybe even this
spring, you will leave the hallowed
halls of academia behind, don a cap
and gown, and become, at long last, a
college graduate. Then what?
After lounging a few days on your
parent's coach, some big-picture ques-
tions may begin to gnaw at you. For
instance, how will you find a job that
pays you enough to live on?
What about health insurance?
And when should you start plan-
ning for your retirement? (No, really,
you'll be retiring someday.)
Welcome to life after senior week.
For anyone in their twenties, life
can be frequently confusing,
oftentimes complicated. That's why
Jennifer Sesen Klein, 26, recently
started the National Association of
Twentysomethings, which she runs
out of a small office space rented from
a Washington law firm.
After paying the $10 yearly due.
noorf timss, coo too, nrsat frisks
Wakeup
ereve
hoose cai
BE
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Hey! I just found out that there is no housing rate
increase for next year! I can't afford NOT to live on campus.
Don't forget�return housing and dining sign-up will take place during
the week of February 19 through 23. If I don't have the100the people
in Housing Services told me not to worry�they will bill either me or my
parents later.
So wake up and sign up to live on
campus and be a winnerlike me!
university housini �?, 4x� ssrvicss
. fisstiOM? w" 328-8450
members have access to temporary
and long-term group health insurance,
job resources and financial planning.
So far, more than 100
twentysomethings, many of them re-
cent college grads with out jobs, have
joined up.
And not just for the health ben-
efits. More than anything, Klein said
members are trying to shake the Gen
X label and it stereotypes: Self-indul-
gent Isolated. Ignorant Profoundly
cynical.
"I hate the label Generation X
Klein said, ticking off the unflatter-
ing traits associated with the term.
"We're apathetic. We're slackers. We
don't care about our future. We don't
work
None of her friends wear grunge
clothes, sit at home and listen to mu-
sic all day, she said. Many are con-
See LABEL page 4
9v
Surveys show more people are
going back to school. That means
that getting into the college or
graduate program of your choice is T
more competitive than before. 'S�
Therefore, you need every edge
you can get to insure the best
score on the standardised entrance
exams. For several years,Jhe ECU
School of Business has
intensive reviews forth?
demanded standardized -lists
Going to Grad school?
Know someone trying to get
into college?
Call Professional programs in the
School of Business to get more
information on how you can
improve your score!
a
�y


-
&
$$
&
328�6377
School of Business
Professional Programs
East Carolina University
ECU
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 20,1996
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
New bill restricts Internet
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21st Century if
t

Clothing for men and & women
Beside 5th St. Brewery Downtown Greenville
CPS - Hundreds of web masters
went into "virtual mourning" this
month, turning their pages black in
protest of a new telecommunications
bill they say may restrict freedom of
expression.
The dark screen symbolized to
"Interactive Days of Mourning" that
kicked off Feb. 8 when President
Clinton signed the new Telecommu-
nications Act
Among other provisions, the
omnibus legislation makes publishing
"indecent" material on the Internet
punishable by a fine of $250,000 or a
two-year prison term. Such vague ter-
minology, say critics, could limit free-
dom of speech on the Internet and
restrict discussion in topics like AIDS
and abortion.
Many students and student
groups joined the virtual protest The
home page for the Daily Bruin, the
student newspaper for the University
WZMB SPORTS will broadcast the Lady Pirates game against
Campbell tonight from Williams Arena. Airtime is 6:45 p.m.
WZMB SPORTS will broadcast "Pirate Talk" live from the lobby of
the Richmond Marriott for the men's CAA tournament on Thurs-
day, February 29 from 7 - 8 p.m.
We will be off the a'r during Spring Break (Sunday, March 2
through March 10). Go frolic on the beach!
of California at Los Angeles, was
black. So was the home page for the
Computer Writing and Research Labs
at the University of Texas at Austin
and the student government page at
Duke University.
Some students wrote personal
messages; others chose to simply add
a link to a page created by the Blue
Ribbon Campaign for Online Freedom
of Speech, Press and Association.
"Censorship is not for the gov-
ernment to undertake wrote Alex
Kohr, a third-year student at Drexel
University, explaining why his page
was black. "Parents should watch
their sic children as mine did and
limit what they see and hear
Richard Dvorscak, a freshman at
Rensselear Polytechnic Institute,
added a link to the campaign's page
along with the message: .This page
will be black for 48 hours to protest
second-class treatment from the U.S.
government for free speech
University-related sites were not
the only ones to turn off their colors.
From the Princeton Review to the City
of Houston, from the San Diego
Children's Hospital to the Illinois Vir-
Q1.3 FM
r East Carolina University
I
OH THIS
Food for Your Brain
Lectures
12:00 Noon-1:00 PM
Mendenhflll Underground
Monday, February 26
She Hulk: Meta-Fiction m
Comic Books
Prt-f-nted by Dr. Donald Palumbo
lit IChdif - LCLHnqlish Dopdrl-nu-nlJ
Bring Your Lunch
FREE Drinks and Gourmet Desserts
Matt Blake-Wednesday, February 28-FREE!
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM - The Wright Place
Presented by the East Carolina University Student Union
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
tual Tourist, hundreds of sites joined
the "virtual protest" eschewing old-
fashioned public rallies and Ami-band
wearing with electronic demonstra-
tions.
HotWired, a popular site for col-
lege students, replaced its entire home
page with a black screen containing
just the blue ribbon symbol. Only af-
ter clicking onto the blue ribbon could
a user access the contents of the
online magazine.
Also black were the web pages
of popular search tools, such as Ya-
hoo, those logging on to America
Oniine were referred to the "lighten-
ing fast" search tool Webcrawler and
its now midnight-black page. The
Netscape page was also darkened.
The Webcrawler page linked us-
ers to a statement by the Coalition
to Stop Net Censorship, one of sev-
eral groups that have sprung into
action to protest the new law. An-
other is the Turn the Screen Black
Coalition.
The Coalition directed users to
"turn their World Wide Web pages
black to show just how many people
will be affected by this legislation
It also directed users to e-mail the
president
Even a few from Capitol Hill
joined the protest Rep. Jerrold Nadler,
D-N.Y was the first member of con-
gress to turn his web page black.
"I am proud to join the thousands
of groups and individuals who are
committed to freedom of expression,
and are turning their web pages black
to show their opposition to cyber-cen-
sorship Nadler said.
Rep. Pat Schroeder, D-Colo
voiced her support for the protest
saying she would introduce a measure
to lift the ban on abortion-related
speech in the telecommunications law.
"Abortion has been legal in this
country for the last 23 years she said.
"Thisthreatens women's ability to
use the Internet to find out where and
how to get a medical procedure that
is legal in this country
Two Internet groups instrumen-
tal in staging the protest, the New
York-based Voters' Technology Watch
and the San-Francisco based Elec-
tronic Frontier Foundation, provided
volumes of online material opposing
the new law.
PROTEST frontpage 1
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space where their remains are stored
has been blessed by both tribes.
The Native American Organiza-
tion is a recognized club on campus
that did not sponsor the protest
Belinda Jacobs is a student mem-
ber of the club and said that the or-
ganization does not have a stand on
the issue. Some members agree and
some disagree with what is going on.
Phelps said that all laws are be-
ing obeyed.
"We deal with, by law, the N.C.
Commission of Indian Affairs and with
recognized and unrecognized groups
as well as we can
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���.� ������
IhiiwiiiiiifiTiiiTirii'iirv
-�
Tuesday, February 20,1996
The East Carolinian
LABEL from page 2
cerned about Social Security, balanc-
ing the federal government and
Internet restrictions.
"We formed to support and pro-
tect twentysomethings she said.
Paul Rogat Loeb, author of Gen-
eration at the Crossroads, said the as-
sociation is right to challenge the
unfavorable "slacker" stereotype of its
members.
"It's a god-awful characteristic
said Loeb, a writer who has spent the
last seven years tracking the social
and political culture on college cam-
puses.
"Watching the different labels
dumped in succession on mis genera-
tion - it's dismaying Loeb said.
"People I talk to really resent that
Klein said she remembers how
she felt, fresh out of New York Uni-
versity in 1990, when she didn't have
a job and her parents' health plan no
longer covered her.
No one should have to go
through that alone, she said she de-
cided. Although she eventually got a
job with the National Association of
Radio Talk Show Hosts, she quit last
year to devote all her time to forming
a group for her peers.
Like senior citizens,
twentysomethings need to band to-
gether so they can get the best group
rates possible, Klein said. So, she ap-
proached insurance companies and
found one that would set up state-by-
state health plans for members, from
HMO to catastrophic coverage.
"After I got that I worked on call-
ing companies to see if 1 could get
discounts she said.
Her inquiries met with success,
and the group's discount package in-
cludes slashed prices on movie tick-
ets, magazine subscriptions and even
hotel rates.
Then, she began a resume data-
base for members and spread the word
among potential employers. Job re-
sources for members include classified
sections from papers all over the na-
tion.
She also found a financial expert
who could give advice to members on
starting a retirement plan.
"Social Security is going bank-
rupt she said. "This is the first gen-
eration ahead of it It will run out.
We'll end up being the ones paying
That's one reason why the Na-
tional Association of
Twentysomethings will soon have new
status as a lobbying group.
"We don't seem to have represen-
tation said Klein, who is keeping an
eye on Capitol Hill for issues that af-
fect twentysomethings - from the flat
tax to health care.
"I'm watching very closely she
said.
For now, Klein is funding the as-
sociation from her own pocket but is
considering a loan or even a grant.
She expects membership dues to fund
the group someday, but is realistic.
"Dues will only go so far
Already she has received hun-
dreds of calls from interested
twentysomethings.
"I'm excited Klein said. "It's
moving faster than I thought"
Members live in Atlanta, Denver,
Chicago and Boston, among other cit-
ies. Rebecca Yturregui, 23, a gradu-
ate of Simmons College in Boston,
recently became a member
Yturregui, who now works for the
Simmons public relations office, said
she was fortunate enough to find a �
job with health benefits soon after
graduation. When she reads articles
about Generation X and their sup-
posed slacker attitude, she gets "in-
furiated
She read a news article about the
National Association of
Twentysomethings and said "it really
spoke to feelings I've been having
Even though she has no need for the
group's health insurance or job re-
source center, she joined and looks
forward to "education
twentysomethings and getting edu-
cated
She is encouraging her brother
and boyfriend to join.
"I think the more people we get
in'olved the better she said. "If my
mother weren't 48, I'd encourage her
to do it too
Most members said they are ex-
cited that the group "is changing how
people see us and getting a unified
voice Klein said.
But there have been some crit-
ics. In a recent news article, a sociol-
ogy professor from Georgetown Uni-
versity called the association "a small
group of white bourgeois kids who
want to have more say in the world
The professor said that a group
cannot survive unless it stands for
something other than its own needs.
"If they are going to make an
impact, they need to have a larger vi-
sion such as anti-war. civil rights or
feminist causes, the professor said.
Klein said that an association
should stand for the needs of its mem-
bers.
"That's why you have an associa-
tion Klein said. "That's what an as-
sociation does. I do think we have a
vision. Maybe our issue isn't a war.
Our issut is the future
And she is indignant at the idea
that members are "white bourgeois
"I don't ask on my memberships
forms what their ethnic background
News
Telnet
Web Pages
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is she said.
Defining a vision that goes be-
yond a generational one may prove a
challenge for the association. Loeb
said. Providing access to health care
is a great benefit for graduates facing
tough economic times. Unlike other
generations, today's
twentysomethings come out of school
with more debt and enter a terrible
job market.
However, Loeb said "the vision
should focus on the real divides and
real crises in the country, not pit one
generation against the other
Klein said she envisions the
group spreading across the nation,
perhaps opening chapters on college
campuses.
"The more member, the more
powerful we are Klein said.
Her most immediate plan is a
website for the group, which she
hopes to have running by this spring.
She also plans to stay with the
group, even as she heads into her thir-
ties.
So, will the group eventually
evolve into a National Association of
Thirtysomethings?
Absolutely not, Klein said.
"It is for the twenties age group
Klein said. "As you move into your
30s, you probably won't need this
one
For more information, contact
the National Association of
Twentysomethings, 1725 K Street,
NW, Suite 602, Washington, DC
20006, or call 1-800-941-471.
Grand Opening Special
Free Yearly Membership

Student Discounts on
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Memberships
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8:00 am to 8:00 pm.
? Gift Hems
? Leftover Textbooks
? Kids Apparel
and more!
Ronald E. Dowdy
Cash, personal check, visa, mastercard, and discover card welcome
Student Stores
More than just books your dollars support student scholars!





Tuesday, February 20,1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Construction is beginning to disrupt more and more seg-
ments of campus life.
First we lost parking lots because of the addition to Joyner
Library and the building of a new student recreation center,
leaving us to play chicken with each other for the last on-
campus parking space.
Then we get the news that our intramural fields are be-
ing sacrificed for the expansion of Williams Arena. Bye-bye
soccer. Bye-bye football. Bye-bye volleyball. Guess we will have
to be content watching professionals from the sidelines or on
the televesion set or trek to an off-campus park to satisfiy our
interactive recreational needs.
What else? What more can the university do to make our
lives more stressful? How about removing the wheel chair ac-
cessible sidewalk and parking spaces behind Joyner and
Mendenhall Student Center.
If you have not noticed, the parking spaces have been gone
for a long while and the sidewalk has recently been blocked.
At first the sidewalk was like a little paved detour that
lead directly to the parking lots, sure it was a little bit out of
the way, but at least physically challenged students could reach
their cars or other means of transportation, only having to
deal with the loud noise level from construction drills and
jackhammers.
Now, if you follow the same sidewalk, students reach a
dead end mark by a bright orange plastic net-like gate that
forces students to walk off the sidewalk onto a short dirt path
behind Mendenhall where trucks unload items for the cafateria.
Man, it's tiring and frustrating just trying to describe
the situation. Can you image the problems a physically chal-
lenged person would have if he or she didn't know that a new
walkway had not been created to replace the old one or hav-
ing to go all the way around Mendenhall where there is gravel
walkway between Mendenhall and the recreation center con-
struction, to reach the parking lot?
In recent years, the university has put forth the effort and
money to make most, if not all, campus buildings and resi-
dence halls wheel chair accessible and adding more handicap
parking spaces near buildings. Therefore, it seems the univer-
sity must continue its obligation to disabled students.
Even though, we understand that the construction is sup-
posed to make us more competitive with other universities,
improve the look of our campus overall and give future stu-
dents more priveledges, we want to remind the university that
current students have needs that have to be met now.
Between
expansion,
construction and
destruction of
existing property,
how does the
university expect
the disabled to
get around
campus?
Letters to the Editor
Laughter makes the world go 'round
To the editor,
I am writing in regards to the
February 13th article titled "Eating
Disorders not a joke
After reading this response to Mr.
Ware's article, I felt compelled to write
in his defense. I know Patrick Ware
personally and know he would never
risk belittling a serious disorder to
benefit his attempt at humor. In fact,
I never saw the words bulimia or
anorexia in the entire article. Mr. Ware
has presented many controversial is-
sues over the past year in a perspec-
tive that represented numerous posi-
tive alternatives to issues that seem
predetermined to the average college
student He has promoted a view of
the ECU student that reflects well-
roundness, honesty and dedication.
His articles have caused many of us
to look at our own lives and be com-
fortable with decisions we will make
and also reassured about decisions,
good or bad, that we have made in
the past He also gives us reassurance
that our troubles are shared with oth-
ers and even though we are all from
different places, generations and
races, we are all struggling with the
same issues. We could all leam some-
thing from Mr. Ware about determi-
nation, acceptance and belief in the
human race Although he does ap-
proach issues that hit sensitive areas
in some people, isn't it the responsi-
bility of the reader to judge for him
herself when lines have been crossed?
In my opinion, Mr. Ware has come no
where being offensive or threatening
to any issue that may be regarded as
"serious to the physical or psychologi-
cal issues that many women struggle
with I wish we had more Patrick
Wares on this campus, in fact I wish
we had more people like Patrick Ware
in this world. We could all use a break
from the seriousness of this world and
instead, look at the craziness of our
ways and the absurdness of our meth-
ods. Things would be a little more
bearable if we could sit back once in
a while and get a good laugh at our-
selves before we set out to face it all
again.
Mary Lucas,
graduate student CDFR
m
ATTENTION STUDENTS
If you have a complaint or comment write a letter to the editor. Letters
must be typed, 250 words or less and include name, major, year, and
telephone number.Drop your letters by the Student Publications bldg.
across from Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
te current media madness to condemn"
every 'I took a cookie' event in political life
could drive decent servants out
slvfc
The East Carolinian
Tambra lion, Editor-in-Chief
Crlssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
A �a
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Wadded, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff illustrator
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crwnpton, Copy Editor
Pant D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Crlstle Farley, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, HC 27858-4353. For information call (919)
3284366.
Legislation sparks protest
Recently, there has been a battle
over the new Communications De-
cency Act, the bill Clinton signed on
Thursday, Feb. 8. The bill tears down
obstacles between cable, phone and
long-distance companies, but at the
same time outlaws indecent content
on the Internet Anyone sending sex
messages via on-line could be pros-
ecuted. The bill's provision about
Internet content has two visible
groups protesting, one in court, the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) and the other, home page
publishers.
Many parents and teachers
might applaud the censorship. Who
would argue that young children
shouldn't see pornography? I cer-
tainly would not But, this is a lack of
responsibility bill. What is happening?
The ACLU is currently question-
ing the constitutionality of the law in
a Philadelphia courtroom. Home page
publishers protested by blacking out
on Friday, Feb. 9th.
The big picture though isn't nu-
dity, it is knowledge. Knowledge is
power and computers have a massive
amount of it. The Internet knows no
boundaries for knowledge; it crosses
state lines and international bound-
aries - this scares our government.
What scared me was the "how
to make a bomb" on the Internet.
Does the bill include censoring this?
This might be a worthwhile thing to
censor. Further, do we want another
Oklahoma City disaster? As far as
censoring goes, will our government
make the right choices? Wi we help
it make the right choices? We can
agree that certain things, like
bombmaking. should be censored. The
Neill Dalberg
Opinion Columnist
problem is, how much of our personal
freedom do we have to give up before
we feel safe? I feel that we need to
have town meetings like the '92 Presi-
dential campaign, where hundreds of
people would talk and agree on an
issue and an action.
We need laws that will work. Ap-
parently, this bill hasn't worked and
won't Just listen to Albert Vezza in
USA Today Feb. 14, an MIT labora-
tory professor for computer science,
Vezza said he believes that "there's
no way of censoring that appropri-
ately Because the bill is in the courts,
the Justice Department is not enforc-
ing the law. Ke is part of a coopera-
tive effort of computer jock scholars
and businesses, better known as the
World Wide Web Consortium, who
want blocking methods instead of leg-
islation. They are developing an al-
most completed program called, the
Platform for Internet Content Selec-
tion, located at http:www.w3.org.
The blocking method would be
an international rating system like
movies use. Tuere would be ratings
of R and PC. A software package could
be sold to the parents or schools wh�
want to block content
Passing laws is good sometimesj
but what about responsibility? When
I first read about this bill in the pa-
pers I thought "how many school!
have computers with Internet access!
and do the kids access it without be-
ing monitored? Just how responsible,
are the teachers? Is this as serious as
the TV media makes it out to be?" ;
I took it upon myself to call somi
local Pitt County Schools in searcfi
of an answer. I mostly called higfi
schools but a few were middle school;
I called: Cavalry Christian Academy:
D.H. Conley H.S JH Rose H.S Ayderf
Grifton H.S North Pitt H.S WahC
Coats Middle School, Farmville Cer
tral H.S. and Farmville Middle School
Of all those called, almost all had
Internet access. Each and every orj$
that let students use them said thl
they closely monitor the students ariJ
that instances of them viewing irrde
cent material were few and far jbej
tween. � J
The teachers of Pitt county!
schools have done their jobs welt
Bravo and congratulations to them!
they have taken responsibility over
this issue. We can conclude, in th
instance of Pitt county at least that
pornography is not as serious or avaiC
able to ordinary school children as thd
media makes it out to be. Fbr otheft
like parents, it seems to me that if the j
follow the example of the teacher, theg
will be doing their job well too. TJwJ
government is doing the job parent
should be doing. It is time for the
parents to pull their own weight
Liz Smith, cloumnist, author
SUBSCRIBE TO
Af The East Carolinian
W
Support student-run media by
subscribing:
To receive The East Carolinian, check the
length of subscription desired, complete your
name address, and send a check or money
order to Circulation Dept The East
Carolinian, Student Pubs Bldg ECU,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
Name
j $110 for first class
$40 for bulk rate
Address
" " �w �-a rr- �� irr- � rc- �pp -j : nmv �





Tuesday, February 20, 1995
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
A
ffiffl
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Housi I or Ri'iit
1 Ills I nrtx's Miwt. 3Hk,2Batlis,
C i-ntui! I litt 6i, ir. Stvurih
Sstiii 'MtHXI IVi Month, .o IVts
Hl 12th stnoi, :VHK, 1 12
'B.lths SpKV'l ItAlt.Ul) I'lT
Monthu I'l-ts IamsvA-
s�'i ii.iit-1 Vposit Kt"t.iinvd On
Both. Du'ffus Realty Ipk
1 and- 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
urnished apartments. S250 a month
6month lease
1 SO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
. ;&9Q 290: F.tst b'h Street
fc NtALS
For Sale
GIVING AWAY A BLACK, male cat to
good home. He has had all shot s, and is
declawed and neutered. Call Michelle at
752-6094
PUPPY, BLONDE LABGOLDEN RE-
TRIEVER mix, first two set of shots and
neutering taken care of, very playful,
FREE to good home. Call 757-3789
AUDI 4000S 1987, LOADED, power
doors, windows, sunroof. Automatic. One
owner. Great for students. $2900 neg. 321-
3939
RETROYARD SALE. 70'S CLOTHIER.
Sat Feb. 24th. Raindate 25th. Corner of
1st and Summit 100 S. Summit St
DO YOU NEED A ROOMMATE NOW?
My apt. is located near The Plaza & Ming-
es Coliseum. Rent and deposit special wit h
cable incl. If you'd like to enjoy your school
year, for a change off campus, then call
today for details. On ECU busline. 321-
2813Phil.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR 2 br in Cy
press Gardens. Call this month, no depos-
it and half 1st month is free. If interested
or just want to know more, Call 758-6061
ask or leave message for Kisha
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM, AP-
PLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375 de-
posit $375month. Pitt Property Manage-
ment 758-1921
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BED-
ROOM. $275, on river, watersewer in-
cluded, walk-in closet spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry. Pitt Property Management
758-1921
SUBLEASER WANTED IMMEDIATELY
TO share two bedroom 1 12 bath town-
house. Walking distance to campus. $250
per month, 12 utilities and phone. Call
758-9120 leave message, will return call
ASAP!
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE two
bedroom apartment at Twin Oaks. Half of
rent and utilities. Call John at 752-7352
after 7pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom house. 2 blocks from
ECU. 13 rent and utilities.WasherDry-
erand Dishwasher. Call 752-6999 ask for
Bridget or Dierdra.
FREE RENT 12 OF FEBRUAR Y WES-
LEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom, range,
refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups, decks
and patios in most units, laundry facility,
sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer, cable.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 bedrooms, stove
refrigeratordishwasher, washer, dryer
hookups, patios on first floor. Located 5
blocks from campus. These and ot her fine
properties managed by Pitt Prooertv Man.
agement 108 A Brownlea Drive. 758-1921
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
DOCKSIDE 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. 4
car carport, cathedral ceilings, fireplace,
dining room, balcony, exterior storage
room, nothing in the area compares Rea-
sonably Priced! Pitt Property Management
758-1921
$505 DEPOSIT IS YOURS if you take
over my 6 month lease at Wilson Acres. 2
BR $505mth with February's rent alrea-
dy paid. Call 3554511
1 BEDROOM APT. ON ECU bus line, new
carpet & paint. Pets with fee. 1 2 month
rent free in February. Potomac Properties
752-9722
For Sale
ZAP THE FAT, LOSE Weight & Feel
great 100 Natural. Dr. Recommended.
30 day money back guarantee. 16 years
of Healthy, Fit & Content Customers. Call
(919) 633-9840.
CAMCORDER S450 (NEG); sleeper sofa
$100 (neg): dorm size refrigerator $75; a
single wooden loft for dorm size rooms
$80. Call Kim (or Evan) at 321-7539
Help
11 Wanted
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
Lunch Special
$5.49 I Large 2 Topping
$8.99 2 Large 2 Topping
Alfredo's now Delivers
Pizza � Beer � Smokes
752 - 0022
Dorms Welcome � Restricted area
tf
Help
n wanted
WANTED SERVICE MANAGER FOR
RHA. avg. 10 hrs a week, pay min doesn't
mind heavy lifting. Call 328-1679.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC
Relations. Please call Bill Fleming 355-
7700
PART TIME SALES HELP needed. Seek-
ing individuals with neat appearance and
a positive attitude. Training provided. Full
time advancement potential. Call 321-6727
9am-5pm for an appointment
SITTING OUT A SEMESTER?
BRODVS is accepting applications for re-
sponsible individuals to assis t in new store
"set-up Manual labor duties include lift-
ing, stocking, moving fixtures. Must be
available flexible hours, Mon-Sat Must
also be available Spring Break! Errand
running and daily travel also required. Ap-
ply Monday. lpm-5pm, Brody's, The Pla-
POOL MANAGERS NEEDED FOR sum
mer 19: Greenville, Raleigh. Rocky Mt,
Tarboro, Cary, Smithfield, Goldsboro ar-
eas. Call Ashley at BWPMSS, In c. for more
information (919) 321-1214
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS - make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Call 1-800-
2514000 ext 1576
OUTER BANKS LARGEST WATER-
SPORTS center hiring reliable, enthusi-
astic sailingwindsurf ing instructors, res-
ervationists. and watersports rental per-
sonnel for '96 season. Contact Bill Miles,
North Beach Sailing. PO Box 8279: Duck,
NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
RESIDENT PROGRAM ASSISTANT AT
campus ministry facility - furnished 1 BR
apartment and utilities provided in lieu
of salary. Send letter and resume to Dan
Earnhardt PO Box 8245, Greenville, NC
27835
SPORTS MINDED INDIVIDUAL AS co-
ordinator of environmental sales. Interna-
tional marketing company expanding to
Greenville seeking part-time team orient-
ed individuals. Good pay. Cali for an ap-
pointment 321-6250.
CAMP STAFF FOR GIRLS resident
camp - Counselors, lifeguards, backpack-
ing, canoeing, climbing, nature, and crafts
specialists; assistant camp director, kitch-
en, nurse, and business manager. June 5-
July 22, 1996. Includes training. Lenoir,
NC - Call Deb at 704-328-2444 or 1-800-
328-8388
Services
Offered
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Idaho Ave 206-A Los Angolas. CA 90025
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800-400-0209.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
TYPING SERVICES CAMPUS SECRE-
TARY will provide campus pick-up and de-
livery for typing resumes, documents, re-
search papers, etc at a reasonable rate!
'Call Susan at 746-4504 after 6:00pm
NO NEED TO STRESS. Professional Tax
Return Service provided to students at a
Discount Why wait? For more informa-
tion call 757-0573
RECREATIONAL SERVICES IS LOOK-
ING for S.H.I.P. Recs (marketing assis-
tants). Interested students should have
outgoing personalities and possess some
marketing and computer experience. For
more information call Angela Baumann
at Recreational Services 328-1569
ESTABLISHED ADVENTURE OUTFIT-
TERS ON the Outer Banks hiring enthu-
siastic, reliable, experienced rental help for
'96 season. Excellent working conditions.
Contact Bill Miles, North Beach Sailing
and Outfitters. PO Box 8279; Duck. NC
27949. (919) 261-6262
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR motivated students. If
you are interested call Chris at 355-4402
or Jeff at 35S7700. Nor thwestern Mutual,
an internship like no other.
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escor ts Inc
at 758-0896 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
LIFEGUARDS, POOL MANAGERS,
SWIM COACHES. Summer positions
available in the Charlotte area. Call Caro-
lina Pool Management (704) 541-9303
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seeking
qualified individuals to teach aerobic
classes through its Employee Recreation
and Wellness Department Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Laurie Woolard between 8am-4:30pm at
(919) 816-5590. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital EOEAA.
EXCELLENT INCOME OPPORTUNI-
TIES WORKING Flexible hours, you
can make $50-$ 100 per hour Amat eur vid-
eo modeling, Escorting, or Exotic Danc-
ing. DiscreetConfidential. TLC 7580680
SHOW SPREE STABLE OFFERS west
em and english horse back riding less-
ons, beginning March . $5 off with Stud-
ent ID, 6 years old and up. 746-8443 or
746-7426 leave message.
JAMAICA $299 DAYTON A $119
PANAMA CITY$129 CANCUN $299
LIMITED AVAILABILITY BOOK NOW!
1-800-779-4030
j
Overtoil's
Seasonal packaging & shipping openings available. Personnel
needed to fill customer orders and prepare packages for shipment.
Students seeking full time work for Spring and Summer are
encouraged to apply. Days: MonFri First shift hours: 7arn-4pm
Second shift hours: 4pm-llpm. Applications will be taken from
9-1 lam & 2-4pm, MonThur. Apply at the Corporate Center
Offices, 11 IRed Banks Rd. Greenville, NC 27834.
Overtoil's
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Personals
Announcements
BONNIE IN SEARCH OF Clyde. Thelma
needing Louise. Grad. Student new to
area, seeking friendship. Adventurous spir-
it loves art music, books, travel. Call 830-
2966
V-DAY IS A week gone by,
Everyday I pass your picture It catches
my eye; With hair of blond and eyes of
blue, I remember always the good times I
shared with you; "We'll share a Lite Ice"
Was my last line, Because I still care and
wish you were mine. From you I'll await a
reply. Campaigning again with twinkle in
my eye.
Announcements
THE BROTHERS OF LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA want to thank everyone, who
came out to the grab a date. Valentines
Social. We hope everyone had a great time.
ALPHA XI DELTA, THE "Cheesy" So-
cial was a real blast You guys were look-
ing "sharpe Just thought we would drop
a cheesy line to go with your wine. The
Brothers of Delta Sig.
THANK YOU, MIKE CULLIGHAN, for
representing us in the Sexy Boxers con-
test You did an awesome job. Lov' .lie
sisters of Alpha Phi.
THETA CHI - Thanks for the great social
last Thursday Night The casino games
were the best Love, the Chi Omegas .
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to congratu-
late its three new pledges, Jason Carbado,
Mike Talercio. and Rob Murphy. Good
Luck!
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to thank the
Helios for coming over, we had a great
time, thanks.
PHI TAU - the board game was fun friday
night Let's play again sometime soon.
Thanks! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GREEKS of the week: ADPI- Brook Hunt-
er; AOPi -Saysha Raper; Alpha Phi -Nicole
Nicosia, Jonnie Wright; AZD -Michelle Wil-
liams; Chi Omega- Lauri Johnson, DZ -Sue
Clark; Sigma- Lauren Flanagan; Zeta- Ro-
bvn Hawkins; Pi Delta- Renee Hester
mk, lost and
Found
ECU'S AEROBIC CLASSES
Get ready for Spring Break Beaches with
ECU's aerobic classes. Choose from STEP,
Low Impact Hi-Lo, Hip Hop, Aquarobics,
Hi-Lo STEP, Belly Busters, and much
much more. The session dates are March
11-April 19. The registration dates are Fe-
bruary 19-29 in Christenbury 204. For
more information call Recreational Serv-
ices at 328-6387
ASH WEDNESDAY AT THE Ntrau
Ceater
The Newman Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce special Feb 21 Ash
Wednesday Masses with the distribution
of ashes: 8am at the Newman Center, 12
noon.in room 224 Mendenhall Student
Center and 5:30pm at the Newman Cen-
ter. The Newman Center is located at 953
E 10th St, 2 houses from the Fletcher
Music Building.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
will have a meeting February 20th. 7:00pm
@ Chicos. New and old members w elcome.
For more information or ?'s Call Cristie
@ 355-6474
OVERCOMING GRED? AND LOSS
Anyone can experience the loss of a sig-
nificant person and often the grieving per-
son can benefit from the support of oth-
ers who have had a similar experience.
This continuing group will bring people
together under the direction of a skilled
counselor for mutual support and to lear n
healthy ways of grieving. Tuesdays at
330pm. Counseling Center. Call 3286661
to register.
EXPLORING ESTEKN NORTH
CAROUNIA
Find out more about outdoor opportuni-
ties in Eastern North Carolina during Re-
creational Services free Exploring East-
ern North Carolina Tuesday February 27
at 6:30pm in the ROC. Interested individ-
uals need to register by February 26 in
Christenbury 204. For more information
call Recreational Services at 328-6387
EPILSON SIGMA ALPHA SERVICE
SORORITY
benefiting St Jude's and the community.
Great way to meet friends and have fun.
RUSH February 19th-22nd, Rawl 105,
6pm-7pm. For info call Heidi 355-8166
UNDECIDED ABOUT A MA JOR? come
to Phi Upsilon Omicr on's information ses-
sion By Students For Students on Feb.
22nd from 24pm in the Vanlandingham
Room (2 doors down from Dr. Shea's of
fice) of the Human Environmental Scienc
es Building. There will be a raffle of many;
prizes and refreshments. Hope to see you1
there. '
i
UNIVERSITY FOLK AND DANCE Club
CONTRA DANCE! Sat, Feb. 23, at the
Baptist Student Center. 7:30-10:00pm
FREE! Come alone or Br ing a Friend
gamma beta phi
i
THERE will be a meeting held on Tues-
day. February 20 at 5:00pm in Menden-
hall, room 244. If you plan on attending;
semi-formal on Saturday, March 23, costs
are $15.00 up until February 20. After that
date, the cost will be raised to $20.00. S ee
you at the next meeting. Any questions.
contact Mike at 7524075
ecu law society
i
i
JUDGE Leach will be our guest speaker
at our next meeting on Wednesday , Fe-
bruary 21st at 5:15pm. The meeting wiWJ
be held in Ragsdale room 218A and is)
open to all majors,
gsac meeting
GSAC will meet this Wednesday, Febru-
ary 21 at 5pm in room 14 Mendenhall.
Budget results will be discussed.
SPRING BREAK '96, WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT! BOOK NOW
Florida $109, Bahamas $359, Jamaica
Cancun $389. Organize a group - TRAV-
EL FREE Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-
7710
ACCOMMODATIONS FELL THROUGH
FOR spring break. Already haw plane tick-
et to any destination in the Caribbean just
need a place to stay. Please call Shannon
758-3673
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best bars!
7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa Beach
Hilton (Great Beaches - Near Disney) $169!
Daytona $139! http:
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Quad! Sail from Florida! Hurry only 10
rooms left! http:www.springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-8006786386
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Tuesday, February 20, 1995
The East Carolinian
Multicultural iss
explored by Wald
Study habits
Author discusses
Jewish, African-
American lifestyles
Dale Williamson
SenlorWrttor
Continuing in its efforts to bring
outside speakers who are willing to
share their works and ideas, the ECU
English Department Graduate
Colloquium Committee presents the
annual Tag Lecture with Dr. Alan
Wald on Thursday, Feb. 22.
His talk is entitled "African-
Americans in the Imagination of the
Jewish Literary Left and will be of
extreme interest to all those engaged
in multicultural concerns, regardless
of their field.
Wald, who has written five books
dealing with Marxist ideas, Jewish
Intellectuals, Literary Modernism and
multiculturalism, is a specialist in 20th
century U.S. literary radicalism. His
best known work to date is The New
York Intellectuals (1987), and his
most recent publication is entitled
Writing From the Left (1994).
As a professor in the English
Department and in the Program in
American Culture at the University of
Michigan, Wald has done extensive
research on the post-World War II
political and literary relations among
Leftist African-Americans and Jewish-
Americans. Wald's work illustrates
how many Jewish-American left-wing
writers used their creative works to
address and reveal the anti-Black rac-
ism that bled throughout much of
America during the late 1940s and
1950s.
As opposed to creating stereotypi-
cal, racist black caricatures, these
writers made an intentional effort to
flesh out well-rounded African-Ameri-
can characters. In his talk, Wald will
make references to such Jewish-Ameri-
can novelists as Katya and Bert
Gilden, Warren Miller, Howard Fast
and Earl Conrad.
According to Wald, one of the
main purposes of this lecture is to "en-
courage new scholarship and perspec-
tives, especially from a multicultural
approach. And an approach that raises
social responsibility for the audience
Wald admits that his topic is contro-
versial, but he believes that "we can
find effective ways of talking about
such controversial topics
Wald uses his own life experi-
ences as an inspiration for his work.
"My own life experiences have shown
me that racism against African-Ameri-
cans is perhaps one of the most im-
portant issues in American history
he said. "Yet, my investigation of lit-
erary history did not satisfy me in
regards as to how racism has been
treated? So, I began my own research
and discovered that a number of Jew-
ish writers have tackled the issue
themselves
Anyone interested in
multiculturalism or the rethinking of
the literary canon should make an
effort to attend Alan Wald's lecture.
He will speak at 4 p.m. in the General
Classroom Building, room 3008. All
are welcome to attend and participate
in what is sure to be an engaging and
important discussion.
Orchestra survives hardship
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Want to see a Broadway musi-
cal?
All you have to do is travel to
New York, stand in line for hours
just to pay an absolutely ridiculous
price for very had seats and in re-
turn you can see one performance
of a famous musical.
Or, you can stay right here in
Greenville, pay a reasonable price for
general admission and hear selec-
tions from all the great hits.
This Thursday, the S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
will host the world renowned Royal
Liverpool Philharmonic as they per-
form "A Night On Broadway The
show will feature selections from all
the Broadway greats, such as "Cats
"Oklahoma "West Side Story
"Phantom of the Opera" and "Hair
The Royal Liverpool Philhar-
monic Society (RLPS) was founded
in 1840. It is the fifth oldest con-
cert-giving organization in the
world. It gives almost 100 concerts
each season in its newly renovated
Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. Aside
from that, the company tours Eu-
rope and North America, with regu-
lar stops in Boston and New York.
Many notable conductors have
performed with the RLPS, including
Max Bruch, Sir Henry Wood, Sir
Malcolm Sargent and Walter Weller,
the current Conductor Laureate.
The RLPS has continued
throughout its distinguished history
to provide enter-
tainment to its pa-
trons despite many
hardships. In Jury of
1933, a fire de-
stroyed their home
concert hall, and
with it many instru-
ments, including
two grand pianos
and an almost
brand new organ.
Funds were
raised and soon a
new hall was built,
which employed sci-
entific design to
augment the acous-
tics. The new hall
was completed in
June of 1939, just
in time to celebrate
the 100th anniver-
sary of the Royal
Liverpool Philhar-
monic. However,
just three short
months later war
broke out, and the
plans for the cel-
ebration were aban-
doned.
The RLPS
managed to thrive during the war
by joining with Louis Cohen's
Merseyside Symphony Orchestra
and bringing in many well-known
guest artists, including Anthony Pini
on cello and Reginald Kell on clari-
net.
It was after the war was over
that the RLPS began to court a new
Photo by MICHELEAMICK
Despite the non-stop fun and games ECU is famous for, people here still have to
study. Want proof? Witness Erin Kulbieda and Julie Mulhern, two diligent students
hard at work in Joyner Library without a beer or pool cue in sight.
CD Reviews
t�HBBff
�-
Passengers
Original Soundtracks
1
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
U2 has gone through several
shifts as a band over the years. When
they first came onto the scene, they
were a bunch of young Irish rebels
who sang songs of social concerns.
Eventually, their popularity grew, and
they even furthered embraced their
pop elements, branching out into love-
inspired motifs. Many fans and critics
accused U2 of selling out Worse yet
many more believed the band to be
getting more and more pretentious.
Well, U2 is back with a new al-
bum, but this time they're not calling
themselves U2. The boys in the band
(Bono, Adam Clayton, the Edge and
Larry Mullen Jr.) have once again
teamed with their producer Brian
Eno, but this time they're disguising
themselves as a band named The Pas-
sengers. The title of The Passengers'
album is Original Soundtracks 1, and
it follows a logical progression for U2
by downplaying the lyrical aspects a
bit and placing more emphasis on
sound.
See PASSENGERS page 8
A Drop
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is just
what it claims to be: a very tiny
drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opin-
ion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
7tyZZecAteca
L � IBII �
"Gargoyles" live
again in animation
Photo courtesy Performing Arts Series
Piano soloist John Bayless is only one of
the musicians in the Royal Liverpool
Philharmonic Orchestra, performing
Thursday night at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium as part of ECU'S Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series.
audience striving to bridge the gap
between the aristocracy and the
middle class by hosting lectures and
performances to educate the public
about the virtues of the musical arts.
This practice is continued today in
the group known as the Friends of
See PHIL page 9
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
&h6 IRevtee
This is the TV Slut filling in for
the TV Whore, who is on vacation.
The rates are the same, so feel free to
ogle.
Recently my life has been taken
over by an addiction. It is sick and it
takes over all of my other functions
on weekday mornings. I am a "Gar-
goyles" junkie. I collect every episode
on tape and watch them over and over
and over again. What's worse is that
I'm 28, married and a graduate stu-
dent This show is something my kids
(if I had any) should be interested in,
not me. Yet I can't stop. I'm pathetic.
Help me.
So what's all the hoopla about?
The best way to find out is to go and
rent Gargoyles: The Heroes Awaken.
a feature-length video movie that was
made from the first five-episode story
arc of the TV show, called "Awaken-
ings However, to save you the rental,
here's the skinny.
The story concerns a heroic gar-
goyle (you know, those scary stone
monsters who protect cathedrals and
castles and stuff) by the name of
Goliath and his clan (family) of fellow
gargoyles, all of whom are stone dur-
ing the day, but come to life at night
They live to serve and protect a castle
in Scotland during the 10th century.
Through a bit of treacherous
magic, Goliath and his pals are fro-
zen in stone for 1,000 years. They are
reawakened in modem day Manhat-
tan by a self-serving multi-millionaire
technocrat named Xanatos, who hopes
that by experimenting on them he
might find out the secret to immor-
tality.
See GARGOYLE page 9

Essays ride in on High Tide
Ronda Cranford
Senior Writer
If you're in the mood for light yet thought pro-
voking reading, High Tide in Tucson is a good place
to get it. In this collection of es-
says, Kingsolver writes about day
to day living with a refreshing per
spective. She ties commonplace
events to larger themes in nature
and history in her most successful
essays.
For example, in "Making
Peace she describes the frustrat-
ing experience of trying to manage
a garden in the desert, where wild
pigs who love the taste of cultivated roots don't un-
derstand the concept of trespassing. From there, she
examines the concepts of ownership and property as
thdy arose in human history. Kingsolver leaves the
wild pigs don't
comprehend
the notion of
ownership
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
reader with an expanded sense of humanity's place in
nature, and how ownership is more of a concept than a
real thing. Human beings are the only ones who "own"
pieces of property, but since wild pigs don't compre-
hend the notion of ownership, they don't feel embar-
rassed about invading our yards.
In "The Muscle Mystique
Kingsolver examines an irony of
modern life: people pay money to
join health clubs and get muscles.
It is almost sick when you think
about it; people used to maintain
healthy bodies without thinking
about it through hard work. Now
they do it out of vanity In the past,
muscles came about as a by-prod-
uct of striving to gain an end. such
as a new barn or a corn crop. Now the muscles are the
end in themselves
S f
See HIGH page 8

Artwork courtesy Disney Animation
The monstrous, yet heroic cast of Disney's hard-edged
"Gargoyles" cartoon: (k) Hudson, Goliath and Broadway
(back row), Bronx, Lexington and Brooklyn (back row).
Ever notice how some people
have trouble keeping certain con-
cepts straight in their heads! For
many people, it's stalactites and sta-
lagmites. For others, it's which way
to turn the steering wheel when
they're backing up their car.
For me, it's horizontal and ver-
tical. Every time I have to deal with
these terms, it takes me a second
to remember which is which. I'm
not sure why the idea is so hard
for me to grasp; it's a simple
enough concept, certainly. Maybe
the memory cells where that infor-
mation is stored are defective or
something. I don't know.
But there it is. Luckily, how-
ever, I have an easy mnemonic de-
vice (a mental trick used to remind
you of something you're prone to
forget) that allows me to remem-
ber which is which pretty quickly.
Unfortunately, this device also re-
minds me of things I'd rather for-
get. As you can probably guess, my
brain hasn't latched on to the ob-
vious mnemonic device. No, when
I want to remember the difference
between horizontal and vertical, I
don't think "Horizon - flat surface
� horizontal
I think about Olivia Newton
John's early '80s pop hit "Physical
You see, long before Janet
Jackson paid a male model to
fondle her on an album cover, even
before Madonna pulled on her first
leather girdle, the demure Ms. John
donned a black vinyl jumpsuit and
sang about the joys of cheap sex.
There's a line in this song, a line
that I can't even remember in its
entirety, that helps me over the
horizontalvertical hump. It goes,
"Something something something
unless it's horizontally
So the mental gymnastics I go
through every time I want to re-
member the difference between
horizontal and vertical are as fol-
lows; Olivia Newton John "Physi-
cal" - unless it's horizontally"
sex - lying down � horizontal
Wait, it gets worse.
Not only do 1 remember this
lyric fragment and the sexual mes-
sage inherent in it. but I remember
the whole Olivia Newton John
"Physical" experience. I remember
the frizzy hair, the black vinyl
jumpsuit, the horrible pseudo-new-
wave backbeat I remember the in-
credible crush my older brother
had on Olivia Newton John in the
70s1; when she was this earnest
young Australian neo-hippy pop
balladeer. I remember the shrine
my brother erected to her in the
bedroom we shared, and all the
hours I was forced to listen to her
music because the stereo belonged
to him. God forgive me. 1 rcimm
ber Crease
See DROP page 9
�MOM
kommmb-pi





8
Tuesday, February 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
$uper-Ob$cur?
Trivia Quiz
HIGH
from page 7
This week's topic:
Hogan's Heroes
1. Who played Col. Klink?
2. Which one of Hogan's
men most often imitated
Hitler?
3. Name the character
played by Richard Dawson,
and his nationality.
4. What was the name of
the POW camp in which
the series took place?
5. Who was Klink's supe-
rior?
6. Name the S.S. officer
who made frequent stops
at the camp.
7. Who was Hogan's radio
operator?
8. Name the French mem-
ber of Hogan's team.
9. What was Hogan's radio
code-name?
10. Did any of Hogan's
men ever escape for good?
Answers in Thursday's issue
Kingsolver describes her
Grandfather Henry as a strong man
who worked every day of his life,
and says "If we'd pay our thirty
dollars a month to him. we could
come out to the construction site
and run up and down ladders bring
ing him nails If we want to look
good, maybe a more honest way to
go about it would be to quit school
and become subsistence farmers.
"Yeah, right Kingsolver seems to
say. Laziness is honest, too.
Kingsolver's essays on similar
themes, involving connectedness
and principles of unity in nature in
the face of the nearsightedness of
modern life, are all pretty absorb-
ing and eye opening. However, in
the essays where she simply remi-
nisces about her past and her de-
velopment as a person and a writer,
she becomes tiresome and self in-
dulgent.
in Case You Ever Want To Go
Home Again" is a prime example
of this. This essay is very much a
cliche - an "1 was gecky in high
school and nobody wanted to date
me but now I'm a writer and every-
body wants my autograph" kind of
thing. Not a very impressive retell-
ing of "The Ugly Duckling
On the whole, however,
Kingsolver conies across as witty,
personable and wise. Her back-
ground in science allows her to
shed an interesting new light on all
kinds of common topics involved
with day to day living, such as child
rearing and managing a household.
Some might be offended by her
politics. "In the Belly of the Beast"
and "Jabberwocky" showcase
Kingsolver's vehement opposition
to war and the production of tools
to wage it. Her arguments are very
convincing, but if such attitudes in-
furiate you, don't let them get in
the way of your enjoyment of this
entertaining and educational work.
High Tide in Tucson is good
reading, regardless of political af-
filiation. Don't miss out.
The first newspaper advertise-
ment appeared in a French news-
paper on October 14,1612
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC StUDENT CENTER
953 EAST 10TH STREET (AT THE FOOT OF COLLEGE HILL DRIVE)
GREENVILLE, NC27S58
757-l991
LENT BEGINS:
SPECIAL ASH WEDNESDAY MASSES AND
DISTRIBUTION OF ASHES
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21
12 NOON ITS MENDENHALL ROOM 224 STUDENT CENTER
5:30 PM AT THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
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PASSENGERS
from page 7
After such industrial inspired al-
bums as Achtung llahy and Zooropa.
U2 has become much more sound-
based than lyrically-based, although
their lyrics still hold their own. Origi-
nal Soundtracks I. which is some-
thing of a concept album filled with
songs from films that don't exist,
comes off as an intoxicating mood
piece.
"United Colours the album's
opening song, relies heavily on syn
thesizer techniques, as does the bulk
of the album. With no lyrics to pro-
vide a definitive framework and heavy
distortions from the synthesizers,
guitars and bass, "United Colours"
creates an audio maze that will throw
even a dedicated U2 fan off balance.
But that's the beauty of U2 and
this album. You never can really guess
what variation lies ahead. After the
distortion of "United Colours we are
lead back into more familiar territory
when Bono's voice (at it; sullen best)
carries us into the next song, "Slug
Those who admire and desire Bono's
voice need not worry Mr. Fly is a
prominent figure within The Passen-
gers concept. In fact, he even allows
himself to share space with other vo-
calists, most notably Luciano
Pavarotti on "Miss Sarajevo
Mockingly based on a fake docu-
mentary detailing a beauty contest
held during a war. "Miss Sarajevo"
carries a steady, rhythmic beat as it is
guided by Bono's relaxed vocals. Sud-
denly, about halfway through the
song, Pavarotti knocks Bono off the
stage and fills the song with his larger
thaniife persona. While combing an
operatic presence with pop elements
may seem pretentious (it is, and we
all know it), the song magically works.
Bono and Pavarotti create distinctive
contrasts to one another, yet they still
manage to play off each other won-
derfully.
But the real star of The Passen-
gers is the heard-but-not-seen fifth
member of U2 Brian Eno. As a pro-
ducer who orchestrates U2's sound.
Eno has done more for U2 than many
acknowledge. Original Soundtracks
I may very well be more Eno's cre-
ative child than U2's. especially since
his name is listed before the band on
the album's liner notes. Like U2's
more recent projects, Original
Soundtracks 1 is a highly produced
album. With any project that is so
dependent on high production values,
a visionary figure like Eno is neces-
sary and welcome.
One of the most admirable as-
pects of U2 as a band is their willing-
ness to experiment and grow. Many
wish they would go back to their ga-
rage rock roots, but they were a dif-
ferent band then. U2 has become a
rich merchandising product, no doubt,
but at least they are willing to use
their financial pull to push the enve-
lope and see what other musical op-
tions exist. The days of "Sunday
Bloody Sunday" are gone. Still. U2 has
much more to say.
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The East Carolinian
mmi �;��
Tuesday, February 20,1996
PHI-L from page 7
the Philharmonic. Another pro-
gram which continues today is the
Industrial, which was created to
give blue-collar workers a chance
to enjoy performances at a reduced
price.
The RLPS gained another first
when it became the only profes-
sional music society in England to
run an orchestra, choir and youth
orchestra concurrently. The RLPS
took over the Merseyside Youth Or-
chestra in 1972. The relationship
between the RLPS and the youth
orchestra is an unusually philan-
thropic one - the professional art-
ists provide tuition for the younger
musicians. This tradition was
started under the direction of Sir
Charles Groves and continues to-
GARGOYLE from page 7
day.
The Royal Liverpool Philhar-
monic Society has a vibrant history
that makes it stand out from other
orchestras. It isn't often that such
a well-known and accomplished per-
forming group comes to North
Carolina, and an opportunity to
hear the RLPS without even leav-
ing Greenville should not be
missed.
Tickets can be purchased
through the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall (328-4788). Admis-
sion is $30 for the public, $25 for
ECU facultystaff, and $15 for ECU
students and youth. Group rates are
available. Showtime is at 8 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 22 in Wright Audi-
torium.
With the help of a New York po-
lice officer named Elisa Maza, the
gargoyles escape the clutches of
Xanatos, only to find more trouble out
in the real world. Lost in place and
time, Goliath and the others must
carve a new life for themselves in this
bizarre future world where they tend
to meet more enemies than friends.
And that's just the first episode.
The half-hour animated television
series now airs Monday through
Thursday mornings at 8:30 a.m. as
part of Disney's syndicated cartoon
line-up. It began in the fall of '94, when
the first season of 13 episodes aired.
Because the look and feel of "Gar-
goyles" is similar to that of Warner
Brothers' "Batman: The Animated
Series it began to draw the same
audience, kids and, more significantly,
their parents.
Now, with over 30 episodes aired,
the internal structure of the "Gar-
goyles" story-telling mode is more rec-
ognizable. Each episode has ramifica-
tions that are constantly being re-ad-
dressed in later episodes. Unlike the
"Batman" cartoon, "Gargoyles" has a
ongoing continuity where every story
has its place and time.
Because so many episodes con-
tain some change in the overall
storyline, it can be difficult for the
newcomer to grasp what's going on
in the show. However, repeats are al-
ways on (it seems like every week
there's at least one repeat, if not
more), so if you're patient enough you
can catch the whole thing.
And they don't stray from diffi-
cult stories either. Episodes have dealt
with such tough issues as gun con-
trol, genetic experimentation, media
manipulation and schizophrenia. The
censors for the show seem to be more
lenient and willing to tackle emotional
subjects than other Disney shows, like
"The Gummi Bears"
Equally dark and heroic, "Gar-
goyles" has expanded from a small
premise to create an entire world of
magic and mystery for the cast to ex-
plore. They have traveled to Nigeria,
Guatemala, Arizona, Ireland, London
and Norway. Along the way they've
met such legendary figures as
Macbeth, King Arthur, the Irish hero
Cu Chulainn, the Norse god Odin, the
decendants of the Olympian gods, and,
of course, evil Nazis. The omy com-
parison I can draw for the distinct
world they have created is the Jack
KirbyStan Lee output for Marvel
comics in the early '60s.
And the show's quality doesn't
rest solely in its creativity. The pro-
ducers-have lined up an impressive
array of voice talent to bring their
creations to life. Regular cast mem-
bers include Ed Asner ("Lou Grant")
as elder gargoyle Hudson, Keith David
(Spike Lee's dockers) as Goliath,
Marina Sirtis ("Star Trek: the Next
Generation") as evil gargoyle Demona
and Jonathan Frakes (also of "Star
Trek") as Xanatos. The "Gaigoyles"
connection to "Star Trek" has ex-
panded this season, as we've seen
Michael Dom and LaVar Burton (Worf
and Geordi of "Next Generation") and
Kate MulgrewCaptain Janeway of
"Voyager") lend their voices to the
show.
All the voice actors, regular or
guest star, bring another dimension
to "Gargoyles Too often, actors
overdo it on cartoons, rendering even
serious characters silly. The perfor-
mances on this show, however, hit all
the right notes and make the ani-
mated characters seem just a bit more
real. This is an essential element for
the kind of high melodrama "Gar-
goyles" deals with, and the actors sel-
dom miss a beat
Interest in the show has exploded
since the first season. The current (sec-
ond) season of 52 episodes is slowly
being shown amongst numerous re-
peats. "Gargoyles" has also spawned
a merchandising frenzy with an action
figure line, a board game, a (pathetic)
comic book series and even its own
bubble bath.
I hope that things continue to go
well for the show, because much of
my life right now centers around it
Of course that means I give it the high-
est junkie rating, 10.
atalog
Connection
"oiv.sionOf C2�U2�
nowinfrofi
�� �
210 E. 5th St. � Sun 1-5 MS 10-6
LljKvlJr from page 7
I didn't choose this torture,
mind you. I didn't wrack my brain
trying to come up with a way to re-
member and go, "Of course! Olivia
Newton John I hate Olivia Newton
John. I always have, even when I was
a small child. The "Physical" connec-
tion just popped into my head one
day, and I can't escape it
I've tried to break myself of it.
I've tried to train myself to think
about sunsets and the Lone Ranger.
I've tried to think of Mel Gibson in
Mad Max. But it just won't work.
Olivia won't let go.
And that's not the worst of it.
In my capacity as Lifestyle page edi-
tor for The East Carolinian, I have
to deal with the lay-out of my sec-
tion. In dealing with lay-out, I work
with photographs. And one of the
big lay-out concerns with photos is
whether a given picture is wide or
narrow. Or, in other words hori-
zontal or vertical.
This, gentle reader, is the hell I
live with. Every time you enjoy an
issue of this fine publication, I've
had to remember the horror that is
the career of Olivia Newton John.
Sometimes, I've had to relive it
twice.
The most amazing (and, per-
haps, merciful) thing about my con-
dition is the speed with which my
brain can process this information.
When confronted with the horizon-
talvertical dilemma, I relive my
entire lifetime's worth of experience
with Olivia Newton John in the tim?
it takes to blink an eye.
I don't even really hear the per-
tinent lyric in my head anymore. It's
more a visual flash, a mental image
of Olivia Newton John in that damn
jumpsuit, trying and failing to do a
convincing bump and grind to match
the hip-twisting rhythm of her song.
That pops in my head, and I think,
"Ah, horizontal means flat
But the rest of it's back there,
undulating just at the corner of my
mind's eye like the sneaky pop cul-
ture demon it is.
In thinking about this tall,
blonde, Australian demon, 1 realized
that similar demons plague our so-
ciety all the time. But the fact that
I have company doesn't make her
any easier to live with. The fact of
the matter is, 1 can't shake Olivia
Newton John.
Sometimes, I don't even think
I want to
To be continued
East Carolina University
Recreational Services
BCiliiifii
Learn basic tennis skills!
Registration: February 26-March 18
Classes start: March 19-April 16
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Location: Minges Tennis Courts
Cost: $20 student; $30 nonstudent
All lessons are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays
Lifeguard Training
Become Red Cross Certified!
Registration: February 26-March 13
Classes start: March 15-31
Location: CG & Minges Pools
Cost: $50 for everyone
Classes will be held for three
hours each Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Aerobic Session
Get in shape!
Registration: March 19-29
8:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Location: 204 CG
Cost: $12 student; $15 nonstudent
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387





.
10
Tuesday, February 20,1995
The East Carolinian
spurns
Women split two
home games
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
After four away games, the
women's basketball team was look-
ing forward to playing two games
on their home court.
The Lady Pirates first played
host to George Mason Friday night,
who came into the ball game with
a 7-4 conference record. ECU
sported a 3-8 record and looked to
improve.
The game started off slowly
with the Lady Patriots quickly
jumping out to the lead. ECU's first
basket came from a Tomekia
Blackmon lay up with 19:03 left in
the first half. George Mason jumped
out to a five point lead but a Laurie
Ashenfelder baseline jumper cut
the lead to 4-7.
The Lady Patriots kept nailing
shots and the Lady Pirates didn't
have any answers for them. George
Mason's lead kept growing and ECU
watched the once single digit lead
the Lady Patriots had turn to
double digits midway through the
first half.
The Patriots kept building on
their lead, and at half time the Lady
Pirates were down by 22 points, 20-
42.
In the past, the Lady Pirates
have usually playe well on their
home court but it didn't show Fri-
day night
"Technically in the past we
have played well at home and you
would never know by the way we
played tonight said Head Coach
Anne Donovan.
Justine Allpress led ECU scor-
ers with eight points, with
Blackmon and Ashenfelder contrib-
uting four each. ECU only shot 31
percent in the first half making
seven of 22 shots. GMU shot 55
percent from the three point range,
while ECU only hit one of five three
pointers.
The Lady Pirates struggled
throughout the second half and
never came close to cutting the
Lady Patriots' lead.
GMU extended their biggest
lead to 30 points halfway through
the second half. ECU tried to come
back but victory was already out of
reach. ECU lost 53-77.
Throughout the game ECU had
a hard time making the easy shots.
"We got some great shots
Donovan said. "You don't get bet-
ter shots than the lay ups we
Don't
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Lady Pirate forward Tracey Kelley, a junior from Jefferson,
Md pulls up against the George Mason Patriots in an effort,
to win last Friday night. ECU lost 53-77.
missed
Allpress was the Lady Pirate in
double figures with 22 points.
Other leading scorers were Danielle
Charlesworth and Beth Jaynes with
five each.
ECU came out on Sunday af-
ternoon try to avenge Friday's loss
and they did exactly that. The Lady
Pirates broke their four game los-
ing streak by beating the Lady
Eagles 69-65.
It was an important win after
the losses they had suffered earlier.
"We came back to practice and
put the road trip behind us and con-
centrated on this weekend Kelley
said.
The first half saw many lead
changes for both teams. ECU
started off slowly with their first
point coming from an Allpress free
throw. ECU didn't score again un-
til Blackmon made a lay up with
17:51 left in the half.
This first half was much better
defensively and offensively for the
Lady Pirates. They seemed to be
playing with much more aggres-
sion. The Lady Pirates shot 50 per-
cent from both the field and three
point range.
Senior LaTesha Sutton, who
has been silent for most of season,
exploded for nine points, four re-
bounds and two assists in 14 min-
utes of playing time. Sutton was not
only a threat on offense but played
excellent defense and helped con-
tribute to the 12 turnovers the
Lady Eagles produced in the first
half.
"Her (Sutton) first half was
very important Donovan said.
ECU ended the half holding
onto a 10 point lead 34-24.
Other leading scorers in the
first half included Tracey Kelley
See WOMEN page 11
Tonight there will be a women's home basketball game against Campbell Uni-
versity. Tip off is set for 7 p.m.
The men's last home game will be tomorrow night against James Madison. It
will be sehior night and all ECU facultystaff who present valid ID will be allowed to
purchase up to two discount tickets for $5.00 each. This offer is good for ECU fac-
ultystaff appreciation night. This is the last time to come watch the ECU Pirates in
Minges Coliseum for the 95-96 season. . ,� M
3 TIP OFF IS SET FOR 7
p.m. See you there
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Head Men's basketball Coach Joe Dooley confers with his team during a time out in last
Wednesday's victory over William & Mary. The Pirates defeated the Tribe 88-78.
Men's basketball team
chalks up another win
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
After dropping their last three con-
ference games, the men's basketball
team needed to get back on track. That's
exactly what they did.
William & Mary came into Minges
with a 4-8 conference record, compared
to ECU's 7-5 record. ECU had already
won the first meeting between the two
schools back in January, 71-65. On this
their second meeting, ECU would pro-
duce an 88-78 win.
Head Coach Joe Dooley said he
knew this was an important win.
"It feels good to get back on the
winning track Dooley said. "Obvious
we have been struggling a bit"
The Tribe won the tip off and
quickly scored. ECU opened up the scor-
ing drive with a Jonathan Kemer jump
shot. An Othello Meadows lay up cut
the score to four apiece, and the Pirates
only lead in the first half came during
their next possession when Tony
Parham sank a jumper to put ECU up
64.
Despite shooting 53 percent from
the field. ECU still trailed during the
first half and at three different times,
the Pirates were down by seven. That
would prove to be the Tribe's biggest
lead in the first half. William & Mary
shot 48 percent from the field.
With 1:24 remaining in the half
Meadows drove to the basket and at-
tempted to make a reverse lay up. The
ball went up and hit the top of the back
board and somehow found its way into
the basket
At that point ECU was down 32-
34, but they still had one more hat trick
left Parham nailed a three pointer with
seven seconds left to ���.
tie the game up at
36 apiece before go-
ing into the locker
room.
Tim Basham
and Kerner led the
scoring game for
the Pirates in the anMBMa
first half with seven
points apiece. Deron Rippey and Vic
Hamilton each contributed six while
Parham added five.
ECU as a whole out rebounded the
Tribe 18-15. Basham and Kerner each
pulled down five boards of their own.
The Pirates came out strong in the
second half. Less than a minute into
the game Meadows drove in and made
a lay up that sent ECU ahead 38-36.
That would prove, to be the beginning
of the end for William & Mary. The Pi-
rates would never look back.
The story of the second half was
Hamilton. After having a steady six
points in the first half, Hamilton ex-
ploded for 18 points in the second.
With ECU's other big man Von
Bryant in foul trouble, Hamilton stepped
up and filled the void.
"He (Hamilton) was very good with
his shot selection Dooley said. "He did
the things he is capable of doing and
you need someone to step up and he's
a senior and he
did tonight He
was a determin-
ing factor
At one point
in the game,
Hamilton made
four shots in a
i) row for ECU.
With 17:27 left in
the second half, Hamilton tipped the
ball in, and on the next possession with
a Basham assist Hamilton dunked the
ball that sent the fans into a crazy fury.
After a William & Mary time out
to try to stop this 6M) run the Pirates
were on, Hamilton went right back onto
the court and made another lay up. But
Hamilton not only hit shots under the
basket he hit a 12' jumper to give ECU
a 4640 lead.
See MEN page 12
"It feels good to
get back on the
winning track
� Coach Dooley
s4t6lete otAe evee�
Vaughn Monroe
Zina Briley
Staff Writer
A freshman sensation from
Fayetteville, N.C. (Westover High
School), has burnt up the track to
become one of the fastest sprinters
in the conference.
Vaughn Monroe is a member of
the ECU Men's Track Team and con-
tinues to light up the track with his
speed and boyish personality. Mon-
roe had one of the third fastest times
in the CAA for the Men's 55 meter
dash. He also runs the 200 meter
dash and is a member of the 4x100
meter relay team.
With his latest race in George
Mason over the weekend Monroe has
now become the fastest runner in the
CAA in the 55 meter dash.
Monroe has been running com-
petitively since the seventh grade,
when he discovered his running tal-
ent while playing sports such as foot-
ball, basketball and baseball. While
attending Westover, under the direc-
tion of Head Coach Ha'cyon Blake
Monroe became an Ail-American and
still succeeded at maintaining a 4.0
GPA.
Monroe continues on the road to
success at ECU as a Criminal Justice
major. He is an honor roll student and
continues to pursue academic excel-
lence. One day he hopes to preside in
the court room as Judge Monroe.
In his spare time Monroe said he
enjoys eating and sleeping, which to
him are both important But he really
enjoys playing video games in his
spare time: his favorite game, is Mor-
tal Kombat II. He isn't shy in admit-
ting that he is pretty good at the game
and his favorite character is Jax.
Monroe came to ECU for one
simple reason.
"I liked the coach Monroe said.
As in any sport, team together-
ness is the key to producing victories.
"I feel that the team as a whole
has great chemistry and I hope that
the 4x100 relay team qualifies for
nationals Monroe said.
What's next for Monroe and the
other members of the team? Head
Coach Bill Carson and "the guys will
start to prepare for the outdoor sea-
son when they will be traveling to
places like Atlanta and sunny Jamaica.
"Personally I just want to con-
tinue to improve with each race
Monroe said.
1996 ECU Football Schedule
DATEOPPONENTSITE
SEPT. 7EAST TENNESSEE STATEGREENVILLE
SEPT. 14AT WEST VIRGINIAMORGANTOWN, W.VA.
SEPT. 21AT SOUTH CAROLINACOLUMBIA, S.C.
SEPT. 28CENTRAL FLORIDAGREENVILLE
OCT. 10 (THURSDAY)SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPIGREENVILLE
OCT. 19(ESPN)MIAMI, FLA.
NOV. 2AT MIAMIGREENVILLE
NOV. 9ARKANSAS STATEBLACKSBURG, VA.
NOV. 16AT VIRGINIA TECHGREENVILLE
NOV. 23OHIOMEMPHIS, TENN.
NOV. 30AT MEMPHISCHARLOTTE, N.C.
at Caroiinas Stadium in'NORTH CAROLINA STATE
Charlotte�
�MMMMHH
SPORTS INFORMATION DEHtRTMENT
k
SID - The ECU men's tennis team opened its 1996
dual meet season Saturday with a 5-2 loss to Davidson
College. The Pirates dropped four six singles matches and
Davidson wrapped up the win with a victory at No. one
doubles.
ECU sophomores Nils Alomar and Josh Campbell were
the only Pirates victorious in singes action. Number three
seeded Alomar defeated Davidson's Eric Bourn by a 7-5,
6-3 score while Campbell dropped No. four seeded Paul
Wulfsberg in three sets, 6-7. 6-3, 7-6.
Freshman Wen Kintner and Kenny Kirby lose in
straight sets at the No. one and two positions, respectively,
while sophomore Kris Hutton fell to Derek Schulze 7-6, 4-
6, 7-5. The Pirates will play UNC Charlotte Sunday in Cha
lotte.
INDIVIDUAL RESULTS
1. JON PASTEL (D) D. WES KINTER - 6-2, 6-1
2. BILL MITCHEL (D) D. KENNY KIRBY - 6-1, 6-1
3. NILS ALOMAR (ECU) D. ERIC BOURN - 7-5. 6-3
4. JOSH CAMPBELL (ECU) D. PAUL WULFSBERG
- 6-7, 6-3, 7-6
5. JEFF TOMDANDEL (D) D. DEREK SLATE - 6-2,
6-0
6. DEREK SCHULZE (D) D. KRIS HUTTON - 7-6,4-
6,7-5
See SID page 11





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 20,1996
11
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWl, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC BMmiii' State
Criminal
24 Hour
@S 752-8556 3E
i
WOMEN from page 10
with seven points and six boards,
and Blackmon and Allpress with six
points each.
The beginning of the second
half was all ECU, but the Lady
Eagles weren't ready to give up and
it began to show halfway through
the second half.
At one point the Lady Pirates
were ahead by 15 points, 44-29 af-
ter an Ashenfelder lay up. But ECU
saw that lead slowly decrease. The
Lady Eagles cut the lead to three
points with 4:57 remaining before
SID
from page 10
It's Your Choice!
oir
Looking for a more convenient way to pay your utility bill? Starting early
in February, you'll be able to use "GUC Express Greenville Utilities'
new satellite office. GUC Express features three drive- thru lanes so you
can pay your bill quickly and there's plenty of parking if you want to go inside
to apply for service or inquire about your bill.
For your convenience, GUC Express will be open Monday through Friday from
7:30am-5:30pm.
The 24-hour Drop Box will also be available for payments.
GUC Express is located in the former Centura Bank building at 509 SE
Greenville Boulevard, across the street from First Christian Church (near
Kroger).
Greenvill
Utilities
the Lady Pirates extended the lead
to 10 once again with 1:35 remain-
ing after Shay Hayes calmly nailed
two free throws.
For the remainder of the game,
the Pirates struggled to keep the
lead. With 21 seconds remaining
Ecu was only ahead by two points,
the lead was extended to four with
nine seconds left when
Charlesworth sank two free throws
to make the game 67-63.
Donovan said she realizes giving
up a 15 point lead is not what she
had hoped but a win is still a win.
"We played confidently and ag-
gressively and they (AU) made some
very difficult shots at the end of the
game Donovan said. "1 was a little
disappointed with how we finished,
but I am certainly pleased with how
we played
AU came out with a basket of
their own with 1.4 seconds left but
after Kelley was fouled and made
both free throw attempts, AU
couldn't reach a victory and ECU
won 69-65.
Kelley recorded a double-double
with 14 points and 11 rebounds.
Blackmon added 12 points, while
Allpress finished with 11 and
Charlesworth and Sutton both had
nine points.
No one was pleased with
Friday's results against Mason, but
Sunday afternoon the players put the
loss behind them and continued to
move forward.
"Against George Mason we
wanted to do a lot better than we
did Kelley said. "I was really im-
pressed with the way we came out
today after that loss and I think this
is what we needed
ECU now moves up to 4-9 in the
CAA and 8-14 overall. The Lady Pi-
rates will look to extend their over-
all record tomorrow night when they
host the Camels of Campbell Univer-
sity in a non-conference battle. Tip
off is at 7 p.m.
DOUBLES
1. PASTEL-MITCHEL (D) D.
K1NTER-ALOMAR - 8-3
2. KAPLAN-SUTHERLAND (D)
D. KIRBY-CAMPBELL - 8-3

SID - The ECU women's track
and field team competed in the Caro-
lina Valentine Classic track meet on
Friday night at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Coach Charles
Justice only took a few members of
his team to the meet as they prepared
for the Collegiate Invitational on Sun-
day.
Senior Zina Briley finished in the
top five of the two events she com-
peted in. Briley placed third in the
shot put with a throw of 39-01.75,
her best of the season. She also fin-
ished fifth in the weight throw with a
toss of 38-04.75.
Other Lady Pirate notables were
Leigh Brannon in the weight throw
(sixth) and Jennifer Kalanick in the
60 meter high hurdles (sixth).
The ECU women's track team will
be back in action on Sunday at the
Collegiate Invitational in Fairfax, Vir-
ginia hosted by George Mason Univer-
sity.
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"vO, "� w - �
T
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12
Tuesday, February 20, 1996
The East Carolinian
3193-A E. 10th St.
Greenville, NC
785-0204
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JVIJbiRl from page 10
William & Mary's Head Coach
Charlie Woolum admitted Hamilton
gave them some trouble.
"I was pleased that we didn't quit
Woolum said. "They took it to us with
their big guys and Vic Hamilton played
well off the bench for ECU. He realty
attacked the ball and made some great
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downtown Greenville all abc permits 757 � 1666
plays
The Pirates' biggest lead was with
7:30 remaining in the game when
Hamilton hit a 7'jumper that gave ECU
a 15 point cushion 6S50.
Hamilton, who went into the game
averaging 6.1 points per game, knew
his time would come.
"I have been waiting a long, long
time for this Hamilton said. "We all
need to step our games up
Hamilton ended the night 11-14
from the field and 2-2 from the free
throw line. He also grabbed five re-
bounds and finished with 24 points.
"Everything was clicking for me
tonight" Hamilton said. "I guess I vas
just in a zone tonight and hopefulV it
will continue on throughout the rest
of the season
The Tribe tried to mount a come-
back and came within five points with
2:39 left in the game, but ECU wasn't
going to give in and the Pirates won
by 10 points.
Other leading scorers for the night
were Kerner with 16, Rippey with 14
and Basham, Parham and Meadows
each with 11 points.
Most teams would lose their com-
posure after dropping three games, but
Kerner points out that ECU hung in
there when things weren't going too
well.
" After three losses, a lot of teams
begin to question themselves and this
team stuck together throughout it all,
and I think now we are back on the
winning track and now we'll be able to
focus and get ready for the CAA tour-
nament" Kerner said.
ECU now extends its conference
record to 8-5 and 15-7 overall. The Pi-
rates move up to third place in the CAA
behind Virginia Commonwealth who is
still atop the conference and Old Do-
minion.
The Pirates will host their last
home game tomorrow night against
James Madison who is in last place with
a 3-10 record. The game will begin at 7
p.m.
On Saturday, Feb. 17,
the ECU men's lacrosse
team traveled to
Charlotte to take on
UNC-Charlotte in a non-
conference game. After
a slow start ECU took
control of the game and
went on to an 11-3
victory which puts their
record at 1-0. next
weekend they travel to
Chapel hill to play UNC
on Saturday and then
on to Blacksburg, Va. to
take on Virginia Tech on
Sunday.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 20, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 20, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1126
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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