The East Carolinian, February 13, 1996






-
TUE&?
February 13,1996
Vol 71, No. 38
The East Carolinian
-JL
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
University works on property deal
Around the State
CHARLOTTE. N.C. (AP) -
Two Lexington women were
killed when the vehicle they were
in ran off the road, overturned
anC struck a utility pole, the state
Highway Patrol said.
Tracy Young Walker, 29, and
Luann Kilby Wyson, 39, were two
of six people who died in week-
end accidents on North Carolina
highways, according to troopers.
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) -
The trial of the man charged with
killing Michael Jordan's father
began a half-hour late because
the defendant fought with an-
other prisoner in a holding cell.
Daniel Green needed fresh
clothing because his clothes got
blood on them during the fight
in the holding cell in the court-
room, said Maj. Willie Watson of
the Robeson County Sheriffs
Department
The other prisoner, who was
not identified, was treated at
Southeastern Regional Hospital
in Lumberton and released,
Watson said.
Around the Country
NEWARK, NJ. (AP) - No
one was hurt the first two times
commuter train engineer John
DeCurtis went past stop signals.
The third time, it cost three lives,
including his own.
DeCurtis' train struck an-
other in a grind of sparks and
derailed in Seacaucus on Friday,
leaving 162 injured in addition
to the dead.
The National Transportation
Safety Board said Sunday that
DeCurtis had been suspended
four times for a total of 105 days
between 1983 and 1989.
NEW YORK (AP) - AT&T
and MCI, fierce competitors in
long distance phone service, are
talking about joining forces in
creating local telephone net-
works in major U.S. markets, The
Wall Street Journal reported
Monday.
The negotiations between
the two rivals - considered highly
unusual in the industry - are only
in the early stages, the Journal
said.
Around the World
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) -
Demonstrations and bloodshed,
tied to upcoming general elec-
tions, left three people dead and
200 injured over the weekend
police and news reports said Mon-
day.
Rival activists and political
parties clashed across Bangladesh
on Sunday and police counterat-
tacked, as cars were set on fire and
homemade bombs were thrown.
The three killed in southern
Bangladesh on Sunday raised the
death toll from pre-election vio-
lence in the last two weeks to 15.
MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) - A
bomb exploded in the lobby of a
luxury seafront hotel in Bahrain
on Sunday, injuring at least four
people. There were conflicting re-
ports about whether a militant
Islamic group was responsible.
Additional space
means more
offices, parking
David Durham
Stuff Wrllvf
The university's committee for
expansion plans to buy 56,900 square
feet of land in downtown Greenville for
the use of parking and administrative
offices.
"The request went before the UNC
Board of Governors (Thursday) said
Layton Getsinger, associate vice chan-
cellor for business affairs.
The land is located across Reade
Street from the freshman parking lot
and is surrounded by Reade, Cotanche.
Third and Fourth Streets. Getsinger
said the property encompasses about
three-fourths of a city block.
Getsinger said that once the board
of governors has approved the pur-
chase of the land, the State Property
Office will use their appraisal of the
land in negotiations with the owners
to determine an acceptable price. Then
the purchase will go before the board
of governmental operations. If it is also
approved by this board, and the uni-
versity still wants to buy at the deter-
mined price, the Council of State will
have to make the final approval of the
purchase.
"The deal is not consummated and
(it will be) probably another couple of
months before it will ail be finished
Getsinger said.
The building of FarleyMizelle &
Company, Inc. and a building which
used to house the Sub Station II sand-
wich shop are the only buildings lo-
cated on the property. The rest of it is
currently being used as parking,
Getsinger said.
"Right now we'll use the land
that's there for parking (although) I
don't know what kind of parking
Getsinger said.
Getsinger said the 3,450 square
foot building, which currently houses
the FarleyMizelle accounting firm,
will be used for administrative offices.
He said the university is trying to move
offices that do not pertain to teaching
off of the main campus area to clear
up space for things that are essential
to teaching.
"The Sub Station will be taken
down Getsinger said. "There's no use
of that building to the university
Getsinger said that it will cosi
nothing to go ahead and start using
the land for parking. He said that when
the time comes to take down the Sub
Station, the contractor with the best
bid will be hired.
"It seems to be a fairly simple
building (to take down) Getsinger
said.
However, he said that expensive
problems such as asbestos removal
have been known to arise in the past
when removing older buildings such
as the Sub Station.
Getsinger said he doesn't expect
it to cost very much to prej?are the
accounting firm for administrative of-
fices, either.
See DEAL page 4
Waste incinerator
approved by state
ECU and Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital share use
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
The state approved an air qual-
ity permit last week for a new medi-
cal waste incinerator to be built re-
placing two incinerators that were
once operated by ECU and Pitt
County Memorial Hospital (PCMH).
The plan calls for a $3.8 mil-
lion incinerator to be built which
will burn waste from the two insti-
tutions. This incinerator will be
cleaner and more environmentally
sound than the previous two.
Gary Vanderpool. assistant vice
chancellor for health sciences and
administration, said the plan was
endorsed and approved by the ECU
board of trustees which then went
to air quality division in Raleigh.
The division then ran a public no-
tice of the plan's intent. The envi-
ronmental advisory commission
then voted to endorse the plan and
the state's approval was granted af-
ter a meeting with the commission
last week.
The incinerator will be entirely
owned by ECU, using their prop-
erty and personnel. ECU will have
a contract with PCMH to dispose
of their waste as well.
Vanderpool said that in the
past, the medical school and the
hospital each had their own incin-
erator which handled immediate
waste. New air sanitation regula-
tions that were put into effect on
Jan. 1, 1995 caused them both to
shut down.
Back in 1991, plans were dis-
cussed on what to do with the
waste if the incinerators had to shut
down at some point. Currently, the
medical waste is being stored or
shipped out by contractors.
The division of air quality has
seen the design for the incinerator
and are satisfied that the current
standards for air quality have been
met.
Vanderpool said the building of
the incinerator will not have a nega-
tive effect on ECU, PCMH or the
Greenville community.
"For one thing, the incinerator
will be cleaner, the second benefit
is that we will be able to handle
and be responsible for our own
waste Vanderpool said. "The third
benefit is that for the next 10-15
years we will be in control of waste
management costs. The alternative
would be to ship off waste and al-
low someone else to control the
cost
The money for this incinerator
will come from Medicare reimburse-
ments and will be built adjacent to
the shut down incinerator at the
School of Medicine. The bid date
for this incinerator will be some-
time this month and will take a
minimum of 18 months to build.
Recycling effort needs boost
Pizza boxes and "
other trash placed
in campus trailers
Joann Reed
Staff Writar
You could be wearing your old
Pepsi bottle or driving on streets paved
with used tires. Recycled materials are
used to make our clothing as well as
to carpet the floors in our apartments
and residence halls. Recycling efforts
are being made here at ECU, but more
student participation is needed to help
existing programs be successful.
According to Associate Director of
Facility Management Inez Fridley, a
study done by the recycling coordina-
tor showed what things students throw
away that can be recycled.
"Students are shown to have more
aluminum to recycle, while the rest of
the campus concentrates more on
white paper recycling Fridley said.
Recycling bins have been provided
in residence halls for students, but they
are not being used as much as they
could be.
"One of the main problems in get-
ting students to bring their recyclables
down to one floor in a central loca-
tion Fridley said. "The trash rooms
are located on each floor in the resi-
Recycling trailer
locations, times
Phofo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
The recycling trailer sat empty Saturday on College Hill,
awaiting recyclable goods. The trailer will be there until 4
p.m. today, and will then travel on to Greene Hall.
dence halls, and it is not feasible to
have recycling stations on each floor.
That could also cause a problem with
sanitation
George Armistead, hazardous
waste manager and recycling coordi-
nator agreed.
"In order to have recycling sta-
tions on each floor, we would have to
have a huge staff to cover all the loca-
-College Hill Monday 8 a.mTuesday 4 p.m.
-Greene Hall Wednesday 8 a.mThursday 4 p.m.
-Cotten Hall Friday 10 a.mMonday 8 a.m.
tions Armistead said. "Sanitation,
especially with cans and bottles, would
be a problem because of ants and other
bugs that would get down inside them.
Armistead, along with his staff if
three, is responsible for all of the col-
lection and maintenance of all recycled
materials done on campus.
"We mainly keep our aluminum
recycling efforts separate because it
provides the money to keep our efforts
going Armistead said. "We are plan-
ning to eventually recycle plastic and
glass in conjunction with the alumi-
num.
We have provided a recycling
trailer at different sites during the week
See BOOST page 4
Drum talks
Whittlin' away
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
(Left) Members of North Carolina's Native American organization beat a drum and sang in protest Saturday morning against the university s
anthropology department which has ancestral remains of Native Americans. (Right), Chief Leon Locklear of the Tuscarora Nation of North
Carolina and Bennie Thunder Eagle, 8. whittle while sitting on ECU'S main gate. Look for more details in Thursday's edition.






Tuesday,February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
Health organizations
promote Condom Day
Amy L Roystar
The ECU Student Health Center supports the American Social Health
Association's (ASHA) designation of Valentine's Day, Feb. 14, as National
Condom Day.
"Of course, we support it said Dr. Donna Walsh, director of health pro-
motion and wefrbeing.
Walsh said that ECU peer health educators are gearing up to do educa-
tional workshops from Feb. 14-21 that will teach students how to use contra-
ceptives correctly and about the many sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)
that present in our society and on campus. Any organization can call for a peer
health educator to give a STD presentation at one of their meetings.
ASHA is an 82-yearoid nonprofit organization based in the Research
Triangle Park, N.C ASHA's goal is to stop the transmission of STDs, while
educating the public
ASHA sponsors National Condom Day and distributes the brochure,
Condoms. Contraceptives andSTDs in order to remind couples to use condoms
whencngaging in sexual intercourse on Valentine's Day or any other day.
Walsh said that peer health educators stress in their workshops the im
portance of condoms and their correct use.
"We encourage people to use condoms if they choose to be sexually
active Walsh said. "And teach them how to use them effectively"
Couples who use condoms "love responsibly the brochure stated. "Pro-
tecting yourself doesn't mean giving up sexual pleasure. It just means finding
ways to have sex more safely
Walsh said that some students still believe that a condom can be used
more than once and that others foil for the fancy packages of condoms that
have been proven less effective than the recommended latex condoms.
The brochure highlights the most effective ways to use the male and
female condoms as well as the effectiveness of various birth control methods
at preventing STDs. Among the methods evaluated, the male and female condom
ranked "very good" at the prevention of STDs, while the Pill. Depo-Provera,
Norplant and IUDs ranked, "none
The male latex condom is the most effective method for preventing STDs.
Natural membrane or animal skin condoms are not effective, the brochure
stated. Even the male condom does not always protect against herpes.
Putting on the male condom before any sexual contact leaving space at
the tip, and rolling the condom all the way over the erect penis are the proper
methods for using the condom.
ASHA estimates that one in four American adults have STDs. Two-thirds
of new infections occur in people under the age of 25.
In a news release ASHA President Peggy Clarke pointed out that "many
STDs have very mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, infected persons can
transmit a disease without being aware of the infection"
The brochure also suggests showing your love on Valentine's Day by
practicing "outercourse meaning not engaging in sexual intercourse at all.
"There are many ways to show toe and to give and get pleasure without
having sexual intercourse the brochure stated.
ASHA's brochure is available by calling their healthJine at 1-800-972-8500.
Students with questions about STDs can contact ECU's health educator Heather
Zophy at 3286794.
The Student Health Center 3286317, located between Flanagan and
Joyner, offers a $20 exam. For women this includes a pelvic exam, wet mount
Chlarnydia test and Gonorrhea test For men this includes both Chlamydia and
Gonorrhea tests as well as a gram stain Students who wish to be tested for
HIV should contact the Pitt County Health Department
Medical school aids
eastern N.C. town
Preparing to
march
The concerned Citizens of Tillery, ECU professors and
students gathered together Saturday to discuss ways to
improve the health care of the townspeople.
Professors,
students teach
health care issues
Sharon Franklin
Staff Wrttar
ECU and the Concerned Citizens
of Tillery (CCT) inaugurated a pro-
gram Feb. 10th that should prove
beneficial to both.
More than 100 guests arrived in
the tiny Halifax County town of Tillery
on Saturday for the Learn and Serve
Community Kick-off celebration. This
officially commemorated the begin-
ning of the community health part-
nership funded by the Learn and
Serve America: Higher Education
Grant
The primary purpose of this
grant is to support a campus based
service-learning environment for stu-
dents that benefits both the commu-
nity served and the students involved
according to Dr. Nina Sehgal, princi-
pal investigator of the grant and
project director.
Sehgal said the one year Federal
grant of $130,000 was received by the
university in November and will be
used to assess the health care needs
of the population through surveys and
personal health checks in a clinical
setting.
Heroes Are Here Toot
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Star Wit us Curd Game - Sport Curds
H8IITE OFFICERS' TBAIWIIG COIPS
SUMMED SCHOOL FOR PEOPLE
WAT TO THE TOP.
: M i;
If you didn't sign up for ROTC as a
freshman or sophomore, you can still
catch up to your classmates by
attending Army ROTC Camp Chal-
lenge, a paid six-week summer
course in leadership training.
4
!


By the time you have graduated from
college, you'll have the credentials of
an Army officer. You'll also have
the self-confidence and discipline
it takes to succeed in college and
beyond.
ARMY ROTC
TIE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE YOC CAN TAKE
For details, visit 346 Rawl Building or call
328-0967
Plans are currently underway to
involve students from the depart-
ments of medicine, nursing, commu-
nity health, occupational therapy,
physical therapy and speech and au-
dioiogy.
"Tillery is a very unusual town
said Or. Mary Clascoff, associate pro-
fessor of health education. "It was
settled in the 1930's under one of
FDR's New Deal projects. Black ten-
ant farm families from VA N.C. and
S.C. were given 40 acres and a mule
to settle the area. Small homes, a com-
munity center and farm equipment
were also provided.
"Because of the high unemploy-
See MEDICAL page 4
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Tara Smith looks at graduation announcements as she
holds her cap and gown in the student stores.
IPROCTOR BARBER SHOP
Men's Hairstyling
222-D Cofcuiche St
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Corner of 3rd &
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 13,1996
Relationships tested on Valentine's Day
Freak and Silk Arrangement
Gourmet Baskets and Wines
Chocolates and Confections
February Special: Buy 2 Silk
Roses and Get a 3rd One Free
Beautifully wrapped
(Delivery not included with this �peeial)
Jefferson's
Serving all your Valentine needs
505 Red Banks Road
Next to Staccato
756-6196
f Valentine's Day
at
On the 14th indulge in the Professor's
Valentine's Special for Two:
� Steak and Shrimp served with Soup or Salad
4�) $19.95 per couple te
To quench you Valentine's thirst:
� Strawberry Margaritas and Daiquaris . . . , ,
� � (ilu.1 �e iaa. Winn Dixie Marketplace
S2.95T Greenville 355-2946
Be on the lookout for the Professor's
upcoming Mardi Gras Specials Brentwood Center
� � r Wilson 291-4242
CPS - Valentine's Day is fast
approaching. The greeting card
aisle is a sea of red and pink; heart-
shaped boxes are turning up in
store windows and florists have
cleared room in their coolers for
bulk shipments of roses. �
But for many, Feb. 14 has the
reputation of being the crudest of
holidays. It's a day that sets couples
up for disappointment and sends
singles scurrying into fits of self-
doubt and introspection.
"I hate Valentine's Day said
University of Minnesota student
Ann Hawkins. "You have great ex-
pectations, and it never turns out.
You always end up disappointed,
it's really stressful. Everyone else
is getting flowers and
You're not? Or the flowers
don't arrive until 10 p.m. Or they
do arrive, but they're wilted and
sickly and look as if they've been
snatched from someone's grave.
So this year, Hawkins said she
and her boyfriend are fighting back
by not celebrating.
"Valentine's Day gets to be like,
'I didn't get asked to the prom
said Lib Roth, author of How To
Get A Date. It's all how you feel
about your situation that's impor-
tant
Why is Valentine's Day so
stressful for people who on other
Plaza Mali, Greenville
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Visit Greenville Aquarium
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Bring in this ad '& get your swee-tie a new pet!
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If your sweetie IS your pet get
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�,
days wouldn't think twice about
their romantic status?
"One reason is that men and
women have different perceptions
of Valentine's Day said Loyola
University of Chicago professor
Bren Ortega Murphy. She said that
in the U.S Valentine's Day was tra-
ditionally a
"woman's holiday
"Historically
women have been
the keeper of all
that's gentle and ro-
mantic in the pri-
vate relationship
said Murphy, chair-
person of the com-
munications depart-
ment. "And
Valentine's Day is a
public celebration
of romance. Tradi-
tionally, she is not �����������
supposed to be the initiator
Even now, Murphy said, some
traditions still remain.
"No one would think it odd if
a woman received flowers and a
man didn't Murphy said. "But if
a man received flowers and the
woman didn't
While Murphy acknowledges
that times-are-a-changin women
still tend to have more expectations
than men on this frilly holiday.
"It's bad form to communicate
that Murphy said.
In other words, the guy should
just know what to do.
That men and women have dif-
ferent perceptions of Valentine's
Day is annoying, but not surpris-
ing. Murphy said in her 1993 study
of children's
Valentine's
Day cards
she found
that girls
were de-
picted in
softer and
more passive
terms than
boys by a 7-1
margin.
Boys' cards
tended to use
"competitive
mmmmmmmmmmmmillim terms like
'cool, all-star, winner while girls
were depicted as sweet and ador-
able
Greeting cards, like advertis-
ing, do tend to reflect and project
our cultural perceptions of how
things should be. For some couples,
Valentine's Day acts as a catalyst,
causing them to evaluate the way
things really are.
"1 was in a Hallmark store look-
ing at the Valentine's Day cards for
'All too often,
particularly
females, think
how much is spent
is a measure of
actual affection
� Judith Sherven,
psychologist
MIAMI, FLORIDA
DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Are interviewing ALL QUALIFIED TEACHERS with
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EQUAL OPPORTUNTTY EMPLOYER
M-sat 10-8
Sun 1-6
my
girl- friend)
and thought, i don't feel any of
this said Chuck Marschall.
Marschall said after eight
months of seeing one another, he
and his girlfriend broke up.
"The problem with cards is that
they are meant to create grandios-
ity said relationship expert Jim
Sniechowski. "You can't match
that. It's commercialized love
Sniechowski and psychologist
Judith Sherven, partners in both
marriage and business, work as re-
lationship counselors across the
nation.
"For most males, Valentine's
Day doesn't carry the same weight
as it does for females
Sniechowski said.
Sniechowski said it's the ro-
mance-on-command that most
males aren't comfortable with.
Sherven said people should
keep their expectations modest for
Valentine's Day.
"AH too often, particularly fe-
males, think how much is spent is
a measure of actual affection
Sherven said.
Sniechowski gave an example.
"What if you needed back tires,
and for Valentine's Day I took
your car and returned with back
tires? Would that be enough?"
Sniechowski asked. "That's not ro-
mantic
But what heart-shaped expec-
tations are reasonable in a new re-
lationship?
"Do what you feel comfortable
doing Sherven said. "If he gets
you a card and you didn't get him
anything, tell the truth, 'I thought
about getting a card, but Deal
with the reality instead of the fan-
tasy
Roth said meanwhile singles
should take control over their
Valentine's Day plans and not feel
as if they are wall flowers at a jun-
ior high dance.
"Who made this rule that we
all have to be paired off Roth said.
"It takes a lot more originality to
be single
Charlie Johnson, a senior in mi-
crobiology at the University of Min-
nesota, said that being single on
Valentine's Day doesn't bother him.
"I do like being single
Johnson said. "Kinda
If you do want a date for V-Day,
Roth said "ask someone out
"Most people don't really try
Roth said. "They expect it to hap-
pen without any forethought
If you can't find anyone to take
out, take yourself out.
"Anyone who is prone to be sad
or depressive, make a plan with a
friend Sherven said. "Do some-
thing out and about. Take care of
yourself, and don't languish at
home alone
Sniechowski agreed.
"Go out and treat yourself af-
fectionately Sniechowski said.
"You are alone, that's what real.
Now what are you going to do? Get
creative, throw a party. Celebrate
the reality of the event and who you
are. That's attractive
Every Wednesday College Day
$5.99 Large Pizza w One Topping Dine in
-�V
MB






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mmmmimmimmmmtmmi.
Tuesday, February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
MEDICAL from page 2
ment rate of the Depression years,
those receiving the 40 acres were for-
bidden to work elsewhere Glascoff
said. "As a result, 60 years later, the
population is very aged, very poor,
economically dependent on farming
and lacking adequate health care
According to Glascoff, community
leaders formed a concerned citizens
group which applied to Sehgal for
help with their health care needs.
Sehgal, assistant professor in the
department of family medicine, has
been involved with Tillery since 1987
when the Student Rural Health Coa-
lition sponsored their annual health
fair in the town. Sehgal said ECU
'medical students, deciding that
monthly visits were necessary to pro-
vide care for those with no other re-
sources, held their clinic in the old
community center. The students
would hang sheets, set up tables and
attend to patients.
After three years, Sehgal said,
the volunteer medical students con-
verted a sweet potato shed into a per:
manent clinic and it is still in use to-
day.
"Most of my students get no
credit for this work Sehgal said.
"Now, the fourth year students get
credit in their curriculum but the first,
second and third year students still
volunteer on their own.
"Now the students go to Tillery
twice a month to provide clinic visits
and educate the patients on health-
related issues to empower the people
to take more control of their own
health. When I read about the Learn
and Serve Grant, it matched what we
were already doing, It is wonderful to
be one of the 15 sites chosen across
the country
Carol Shields, an ECU graduate
student in health education, will be
coordinating grant activities. From a
student's perspective, she said this
program "offers the added enhance-
ment of hands-on experience to see
what these people's lives are really like
and the daily challenges they face
"Tillery is my classroom said
Glascoff, whose community health
students are involved in the program.
"Some students have never seen these
kinds of conditions and this will in-
crease their understanding of rural
health needs. We're having a wonder-
ful time, too
Susan Meggs, a graduate student
who coordinates the undergraduate
students agreed.
"It's a privilege to be a part of a
bridge between this self-reliant tiny
community and the ECU medical com-
munity Meggs said.
Sehgal said the medical school's
efforts are part of its commitment to
eastern North Carolina.
"This is the mission of the uni-
DEAL
from page 1
"I'm sure the people who are al-
ready in there wouldn't be in there if it
wasn't already a nice place Getsinger
said.
Getsinger said the land is currently
owned by a business group consisting
of .Richard K. Worsley, John R. Farley,
Eugene Prescott and Cecil Mizelle.
Farley and Mizelle a re partners in
FarleyMizelle & Company, Inc the
accounting firm located on the prop-
erty.
"Our firm doesn't own the prop-
erty Mizelle said. "Me and a group of
other people own the property, but we
prefer not to answer any questions
It is not known what will happen
to FarleyMizelle & Company, Inc. if
the university buys the land on which
it resides.
"We're not going out of business,
but no other comments concerning it"
Mizelle said.
Getsinger said the extra parking
and office space is definitely needed.
but the university did nut initially seek
the purchase of the property.
"We were approached by folks
who owned the property to see if we
were interested in buying it" Getsinger
said. "It looked like it was an opportu-
nity that would benefit a lot of people
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department of health education and
Gary Grant, executive director of the
mmmmmmmmmmmmtmammmmmmmmmmmmam
BOOS 1 from page 1
on campus, but we need students to
l use them and not to contaminate them
with trash that cannot be recycled
Contamination of recyclable ma-
terial in the bins has become a prob-
lem, Armistead said.
"People throw regular garbage
like pizza boxes into the trailer he
said. "We have even found heave, where
people have thrown up in the trailer
Even with the problems of con-
tamination and misuse, Armistead said
he believes more student involvement
is the answer.
"Students need to increase their
environmental awareness Armistead
said. "They need to get motivated and
use the recycling stations provided.
"At the end of the year, when stu-
dents are moving and throwing things
out they should recycle instead of just
throwing everything in the dumpster.
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ILLUMim
Art Exhibit Reception
Tuesday, February 13,1996 at 7:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
Ken Bonfield-Wednesday, February 14-FREE-
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM-The Wright Place
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Thursday, February 15
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DOCTOR'S
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�"
Tuesday, February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
Our View
With the amount
of money
students pay to
park on this
. campus, it seems
only reasonable
that we should
be able to park
our cars without
wondering if
they'll be there
when we return.
This academic year has proven to be one of the worst
in terms of vandalism and theft in university parking
lots. Week after week, TEC crime reports are filled with
reports from students whose vehicles have been damaged,
broken into or even stolen.
These incidents have left many of us wondering why
none of our many campus police officers have caught these
vandals and thieves in the act What puzzles us most is
that most of this destruction to property occur on cam-
pus right in the parking lots around the residence halls
(not way out in the freshman parking lots.) Maybe these
criminals feel much the same way students do about hav-
ing to cross the straits of Egypt to get to the freshman
parking lot, so they target the ones closer to campus.
Once upon a time, it used to be funny to watch the
infomercials on TV that showed shady characters dressed
all in black (complete with OJs toboggan) sneaking
through city parking lots searching for vehicles not pro-
tected by The Club or "armed with The Viper Now it's
not so funny because many of us don't have these secu-
rity systems, and we have to rely on the university to
protect our parents' investments.
One would think that the unholy cost of parking stick-
ers would go toward establishing at least some small mea-
sure of security. It's not like the university does not have
enough traffic personnel to monitor the lots. (Try getting
away with not dropping a quarter in a meter if you want
to test that theory.) Why is it that no one spots the van-
dals and thieves who have to take at least five minutes to
break a window and steal a CD player, but a student can
get a ticket for parking in the wrong space in a matter of
seconds?
On any given night a student can see a patrol car
parked in the shadows as if the officer is on a stake-out
looking for someone to break that oh so carefully thought
out two-inches-per-hour speed limit Exactly who are these
coppers supposed to be prosecuting - a student going 17
mph on College Hill Drive or the jerk rummaging the
parking lots shopping for new stereo equipment? Either
let us park for free and take our chances at getting ripped
off, or use our $96 for some kind of protection to give us
peace of mind. Why should we even have to pay to live in
a residence hall if we have to sleep in our cars with base-
ball bats to protect our goods?
We're not asking for a Jetson-style security system com-
plete with motion detectors and heat seeking laser beams
or a fleet of motorized traffic cops stalking around the
lots asking for student IDs. We are willing to settle for
any improvement to serve as justification for having to
fork over $96 for a license-to-hunt in the university's park-
ing lots.
Benefit rocks downtown
Hey everyone, it's that time of
year again - no, not the proverbial
chocolatey, flowery holiday coming
up on Wednesday, but something
equally important. What I'm talking
about and what all of Greenville is
preparing for is the Seventh annual
ROCK for REAL coming up or
Thursday night. Are you going?
You don't have to tell me (but
if you would like to, drop us a line).
What I am hoping is that besides
the five great and extremely excit-
ing bands that will play Thursday,
you the concerned citizens of
Greenville, will help keep one of
Greenville's foremost non-profit pro-
grams running for another 25 years.
You do know that REAL Crisis
will be celebrating its 25th anniver-
sary this year, don't you? Do you
know who will be playing at the At-
tic on Thursday night? If you don't
know the answers to either of these
,uestions then stay tuned, I'll give
you more information soon.
But first, let me explain the ad-
vantages of having the REAL Crisis
Intervention Center service in
Greenville. First of all, its a 24 hour,
seven days a week non-profit orga-
nization that handles over-the-
phone. walk-in and off-site counsel-
ing, referrals and information to
anyone who needs help. That's one
advantage, but here's more: all ser-
vices are free and confidential and
Eric Bartels
Opinion Columnist
Because without
your support, the
REAL Crisis
Center could not
continue.

The East Carolinian
Tambra Zton, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wltaea, Production Manager
Wendy Roantree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paal Haawead, Staff Illustrator
Crlstie Farley, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yana, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Htnsen, Copy Editor
Rwanda Cnimatan, Copy Editor
Paal D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
. . . , . Deoeraa Daniel, Secretary
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 192S, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Use breaks wisely
Can you feel it? Is there a mol-
ecule in your body that is not bounc-
ing around even faster with every
passing day, minute and second?
Please tell me that tomorrow will be
shorter than today because if it is,
March 2 comes a little faster.
I am boasting about spring break.
No, not the spring break that is de-
picted so poorly by all of those silly
70s movies, but the spring break that
brings sun and road trips and waves
that can rock you to sleep.
Go to the beach! Go to the moun-
tains! Go somewhere that provides
beautiful scenery and activities that
you can enjoy without a bottle opener
please, so you will remember it
1 have a news flash for all of you
out there in ECU land this is col-
lege. What this means to the student
is that his or her life has not yet turned
into the rat race. This week that the
university so gracefully provides is one
that can really make the rest of the
semester easier. Hey, here's a concept,
the school giving the student some-
thing that actually helps their experi-
ence.
This article is a plea for your
grades, for your sanity, for your safety
and lasdy, simply for your benefit that
you use your break in a responsible
but fun way don't waste it by drink-
ing.
This week is the appropriate one
to publish this article because it is
most likely the one where those who
are planning a trip are scurrying
around making sure that they have
enough people to pay for accommo-
dations, making sure that evervone
who goes can get a ride and deciding
on what will happen on the trip.
As I commonly do, 1 will create a
picture instead of tellinct about one. I
don't know about you but I hate read-
ing things that would be screamed if
they were spoken. Know what I mean?
It is 8:30 on the Friday morning
that you are leaving on your trip. You
slam your hand down onto the snooze
bar that ends the deafening sound of
your roommate's aiarm clock. Laying
your head back onto the pillow you
are aware of only two things it will
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
be nine minutes until the alarm goes
off again, and you have two sets of
snoozes until you really have to get
up.
Grabbing your stuffed giraffe that
you won at the state fair last year
when that little kid threw up on the
gravitron, you roll over and the first
of two dreams ensues
Piling into a car that is loaded
with people that you love to be with
you buckle in and notice a brochure
laying under the seat in front of you.
Asking the driver to stop at the bank
machine on the way out of town, you
pick up the pamphlet and you hear
music come over the radio ah, the
first song of your trip.
Inside this brochure you see sway-
ing trees, health clubs, amazing golf
courses and waitresses that bring you
ice water while you soak up the rays
on some crystal-white beach. You see
yourself standing up and running into
the water for a dip. After a few min-
utes you towel off and go inside to
take a nap in the hammock that
swings peacefully on the patio of your
bungalow.
In the kitchen, your friends have
just arrived from the store with a big
bag of shrimp that you will boil and
eat for dinner. After dinner, a three
hour game of Trivial Pursuit will pre-
cede your nightly stroll on the sand
glaring up at the stars and creating
memories for a lifetime. You shake you
head and return to consciousness as
your friend stops the car and you step
out to see that what you had dreamed
about is right in front of you
Waking up you slam your hand
again on the snooze bar and fall back
asleep to enter ?nto the second dream,
except this time the picture is a little
different
Climbing into the car that will
take you to your spring break desti-
nation, you are crowded by the two
kegs that share the back seat with you.
As you wipe the condensation that has
rubbed onto your arm from the keg,
you spy a picture laying on the floor.
As you reach down to pick it up, a
bottle from the front seat smashes you
in the head and is followed by a, "sorry
man from the front seat It rolls down
by your hand and the last drip trick-
les out and fills your nostrils with a
horrible stench.
The picture is of the house that
you and your friends are going to. You
realize that because you decided to
spend so much money on beer and
bottle openers that the lodging that
you chose is most likely less than sat-
isfactory.
Slipping into a dream state, you
picture your first afternoon swilling
beer while sitting on the beach. At
first you smile in anticipation but as
the scene unfolds your facial expres-
sion changes. Laying on the beach you
down a twelve pack and top it off with
a tall boy. Watching yourself pass out,
you see the sun come out from
hind the clouds and scorch you
sweating skin. When you wake up you
discover that the six mile walk back
to your friends' cousin's house will
not be so much fun with a third-de-
gree sunburn on 80 percent of your
body. As you see the week pass, you
find that it flies by because your
drunkenness exceeds new limits, yee
haw, and you hardly remember any-
thing except the paper that you didn't
do before you left for the trip because
you spent so long working on your
fake ID
When you wake up the day is
creeping through the blinds and you
know where you'li go. You'll go and
have fun without finding yourself in
the hospital right?
any individual who looks for assis-
tance through REAL can and will
remain anonymous. Most impor-
tantly, all services are open to ev-
eryone from every socio-economic
background and from every age
group.
By going to ROCK for REAL,
you will not only help the Greenville
community but you will help the
REAL Crisis Center with its fund-
ing. REAL is a United Way agency
and receives most of its funding
from the United Way and some
through the state of North Carolina,
but the biggest investment, of
course, comes from you. Because
without your support, the REAL
Crisis Center could not continue.
I
Second, REAL serves anyone
with the following information on
problems concerning interpersonal,
alcohol or drugs, family, community
information and sexual assault. The
REAL volunteers handle all calls and
the information that you exchange
with them will remain confidential.
Finally, the REAL Crisis Center
is always looking for volunteer cri-
sis counselors, financial support and
most importantly, publicity. The
REAL Crisis Center helps the com-
munity in so many different ways
that your support, no matter how
big or small, is always appreciated.
Each year. 6,000 people in Pitt
County and some surrounding coun-
ties are served by REAL.
So did you want to find out
about the bands who will be play-
ing at the Attic on Thursday night?
They are some of Greenville's finest:
Breed 13, Henry Acrobat, Unsound.
Modern Pilgrims and Slow Children
Playing. Hey. they will rock.
Oh. and one other thing I al-
most forgot. REAL Crisis will be 25
years old this year and what better
way to show your appreciation than
by either helping REAL celebrate its
seventh annual concert or by volun-
teering. For more information on
REAL'S services or getting involved,
please call (919) 758-HELP. If it's
important to you, then it's impor-
tant to them.
Letters to the Editor
Eating disorders are not a joke
To the Editor,
The editorial titled "Ladies Chow
Down" by Patrick Ware in your Feb-
ruary 6 edition was alarming. Al-
though it appeared that Mr. Ware was
trying to present a humorous and
somewhat sarcastic view of premen-
strual syndrome (PMS) and its rela-
tionship to binge eating, in our opin-
ion, the article was inappropriate and
misguiding. Furthermore, in light of
the fact that the article was published
during Eating Disorders Awareness
Week, the presence of this suppospdly
humorous article trivializes real issues
while aiso detracting from the seri-
ousness of the physical and psycho-
logical issues that many women
struggle with.
Premenstrual syndrome is a very
real condition that typically precedes
the onset of a woman's monthly men-
struation. It potentially involves sig-
nificant changes in body chemistry,
available energy, mood states and a
wide range of accompanying behav-
iors. In additions, those women who
do suffer from a bulimic eating disor-
der (bingeing andor bingeing and
purging) often find their condition is
exacerbated by the once monthly hor-
monal imbalances associated with
their menstrual cycle. Clearly, this is
no "picnic nor is it something that
most women have conscious control
over
If Mr. Ware's message to women
is that it is OK to "chow down our
alternative message is: If you feel you
have little control and that your eat-
ing behaviors interfere with your dairy
life or your self-esteem, there is help
available through appropriate campus
and community resources. We encour-
age you to seek this help instead of
chowing down.
Respectfully,
Russ Federman, Ph.D.
Director, Student Health, Mental
Health Services
Sara Sheperd, Ph.D.
Psychologist. Student Counseling
Center, and Chair. Eating Disorder
Treatment Team
Donna Walsh, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Health Promo-
tion and Well Being
"Words are, of course, the
most powerful drug used by
lankind
� Rudyard Kipling, English author, poet, 1923
��.





jfT-
Tuesday, February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
it
For Rent
RINGGOLD COWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ll
For Rent
RESPONSIBLE, FUN ROOMMATE
WANTED to sublease for May thru Au-
gust $190mth plus 12 utilities. On ECU
bus route. Call 758-7890.
FREE RENT 12 OF FEBRUARY WES-
LEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom, range,
refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups, decks
and patios in most units, laundry facility,
sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer, cable.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 bedrooms, stove
refrigeratordishwasher, washer, dryer
hookups, patios on first floor. Located 5
blocks from campus. These and other fine
properties managed by Pitt Property Man-
agement 108 A Brownlea Drive, 758-1921
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed-
room 2 bath duplex. Lots of amenities.
Walking distance of campus. $275mo.
12 utils. Call 758-2232
TWO BEDROOM APT FOR rent above
BW3's available March 1st for $500 a
month. Call Yvonne at 758-2616
TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH apt in
Oakmont Square near Minges Coliseum.
Rent & deposit special for six month lease.
Cable Incl. Call Phil � 321-2813
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IMME-
DIATELY. Tar river. Own bedroom.
$168.75 rent plus 14 utilities and phone.
Washerdryer. Non-Smoker preferred. Call
757-0406
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BED-
ROOM, $275, on river, watersewer in-
cluded, walk-in closet spacious bedroom,
cn-site laundry. Pitt Property Management
758-1921
FEMALE WANTED SEMI-PRIVATE
ROOM, 2 blocks from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown. Rent is $145month, plus
i4 utilities, please call Debbie, Dawn or
Jim at 758-8362
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE need
ed to sublease till May. 3 Bdrm Townhouse
at Sheraton Village. Master bdrm w pri-
vate bath. $200mo. and 13 util. Con-
tact at 1-2974
ROOMMATE WANTED: RM.MATE
WANTED to share half the rent and half
utilities at Dogwood Hollow. 2 bedrooms
and 2 full baths. Call Jason at 754-2076
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom 2 bath duplex. $292
mo. Close to campus. No deposit needed.
Non-smoker preferred. Call 830-3831
SUMMER SUBLEASE. SINGLE OCCU-
PANCY efficiency Apartment at Ringgold
Towers. Furnished, AC, Private Parking.
$275 per month. Call 830-6732
SUBLEASER WANTED IMMEDIATELY
TO share two bedroom 112 bath town-
house. Walking distance to campus. $250
per month, 12 utilities and phone. Call
758-9120 leave message, will return call
ASAP!
1 BEDROOM APT. ON ECU bus line, new
carpet & paint Pets with fee. 12 month
rent free in February. Potomac Properties
752-9722
LANCSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM, AP-
PLIANCES, water, basic cable. 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375 de-
posit $375month. Pitt Property Manage-
ment 758-1921
$505 DEPOSIT IS YOURS if you take
over my 6 month lease at Wilson Acres. 2
BR $505mth with February's rent alrea-
dy paid. Call 3554511
DUPLEX FOR RENT, TWO bedrooms, 1
12 bath, extra large closets, balconey off
of 2nd floor, master bedroom. 114 S.
Woodlawn Ave. 3 blocks from campus.
$500.00 month 1 yr. lease, wd hookups
pets OK 830-0530
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom house. 2 blocks from
ECU. 13 rent and utilities.WasherDry-
erand Dishwasher. Call 752-6999 ask for
Bridged or Dierdra.
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses:
fully furnished: washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6-1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 � $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
DOCKSIDE 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 4
car carport cathedral ceilings, fireplace,
dining room, balcony, exterior storage
room, nothing in the area compares Rea-
sonably Priced! Pitt Property Management
For Sale
SET OF TWO FLOOR size stereo speak-
ers and JVC stereo cabinet 752-9243
SOLOFLEX! $190, ROCKFORD FOS-
GATE dual 15 inch subwoofer box! $200,
Oak Finished dining table! $90, Cerwin
Vega 10 inch subwoofer tube! $75, Call
757-2935.
1990 KAWASAKI NINJA ZX-6 custom-
ized, excellent condition. Call Brian at 752-
1891 for details.
HARO FREESTYLE BIKE GREAT
shape $75 neg 8304064. Weight Bench,
its a steal at $60. Includes squat rack, leg
attachments, extra bars, lots of weight.
TOYOTA TRECEL1990 4SP, hatchback,
CC, AC, AMFM, Cass, 122,000 miles
$2,990 neg. Great for students 328-8246
Ask for David leave message. Must Sell!
FITNESS CLUB MEMBERSHIP FOR
sale, $25.00 a month. If interested call
Nickie: Day 756-6683, night 3214163.
1994 FORD ESCORT LX hatchback,
green, cruise control, airbag, five speed,
21,000 miles. Owe $7800.00. Pay owner
$1800.00 (negotiable). Serious callers
only. Leave message 355-3507
If
Help
Wanted
if
Help
Wanted
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS � make sure
your diploma will work for you! Save $4-
6000. Gain Resume experience. Call 1-800-
2514000 ext 1576
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Boardother benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext K53621
NEED EXTRA CASH FOR spring break!
Campus Dining Services is now hiring
smiling faces for all campus restaurants.
We offer flexible work schedules, free
meals and great pay. Best of all, when
school is on break, you don't have to work.
Stop by the ARAMARK office on the first
floor of Mendenhall for applications, or
call Robin Cross at 3284339. EOE
LIFEGUARDS, POOL MANAGERS,
SWIM COACHES. Summer positions
available in the Charlotte area. Call Caro-
lina Pool Management (704) 541-9303
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext J53623.
COMPUTER TECHNICAL SUPPORT,
FULL or part-time position available to
field technical support questions involv-
ing communications, hardware, software
and interfaces between our mortgage re-
posting system and in-field customer base.
We will train. However, you will need ba-
sic exposure to modems, hardware com-
ponents and operating systems, for inter-
view contact Dan Harris, Online Informa-
tion Services, 1206 Charles Blvd 757-
2107
RELIABLE BABYSITTER WANTED
FOR four year old boy. Non-smoker, with
own transportation. Flexible hours; occa-
sional nights andor weekends. Call 77,2-
9243 between 8am and 8pm only.
LOOKING FOR WAREHOUSE HELP
for Greenville screenprint company. Will
be monitoring machines and handling
clothing. No heavy lifting. All shifts avail-
able. If interested, report to the Employ-
ment Security Office on Thursday, Febru-
ary 15 between the hours of 8:30am and
12:00pm. Two forms of identification are
required at time of interview. Staff-Addi-
tions, Inc 112 N. Circle Dr Suite A,
Rocky Mount NC 27804. (919) 937-6633
LIBRARY PAGE. WEEKDAYS 9AM-
noon year round. Apply in person, Child-
ren's Department Sheppard Memorial Li-
brary, 530 Evans Street No Phone Calls.
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. Wit are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7580896 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour, for more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF Crifton
needs a Music Accompanist Organ and
piano. Will accept student Good pay. Call
524-5421 or 5244693
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR motivated students. If
you are interested call Chris at 3554402
or Jeff at 355-7700. Northwestern Mutual,
an internship like no other.
WANTED SERVICE MANAGER FOR
RHA. avg. 10 hrs a week, pay min doesn't
mind heavy lifting. Call 328-1679.
SITTING OUT A SEMESTER?
BRODY'S is accepting applications for re-
sponsible individuals to assist in new store
"setup Manual labor duties include lift-
ing, stocking, moving fixtures. Must be
available flexible hours, Mon-Sat Must
also be available Spring Break! Errand
running and daily travel also required. Ap-
ply Monday, lpm-5pm, Brody's, The Pla-
za.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext A53622.
Services
Offered
Services
Offered
m.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Lsrgtf Library of Information In U.S. �
ill subject
Or C�tk� Today wtth VImAHC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8228 '
113VviW.meJtSTcnoJ5
Handcrafted Jewelry
ECU School of Art
Valentine's Day Sale
Feb 13th & 14th 10:00-6:00
Jenkins Building Main Entrance 5th St
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
M
Greek
Personals
CONGRATULATIONS AMANDA ON
YOUR engagement Jerry is a very lucky
guy. Love, your Alpha Phi Sisters.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: THANKS for the
great time. Watch your backs! Love, AOPi
THANKS SIGMA NU. FOR a great Wed-
nesday night Love, Alpha Phi.
THE 5 SOCIETY OF Pi Lambda Phi Fra-
ternity would like to welcome it's new
members from The North Carolina Delta
Zeta Chapter! Congratulations - Keep the
Secrets!
KA THANKS FOR THE great social Fri-
day night! We had a wonderful time. Love
the Chi Omegas
Sfc
Travel
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800400-0209.
SHOW SPREE STABLE OFFERS west-
ern and english horse back riding lessons,
beginning March. $5 off with Student ID,
6 years old and up. 746443 or 746-7426
leave message.
NO NEED TO STRESS. Professional Tax
Return Service provided to students at a
Discount. Why wait? For more informa-
tion call 757-0573
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $S$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800-406-7027
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext
F53624
ll.lLlIilliilrf1��
http:www.tak8aliraak.cofn
1-800-9S-BREAK
TAKI A BREAK STUDENT TRAVEL
Angel Hair Design
Valentine's Pay Special
Waves, Scrunches, Trrenchrolls,
Buns, Ponytails, Up do's, &
Blow dry
JUST $25
Bring a friend and get your
style 12 Price
excluding relaxers & curls
Make appointment today or
stop by
514 E. 14th Street
near King Sandwich
752-9706 or 752-9707
Travel

t ATTENTION� �
1 SPRING BREAKERS!�
� BOOK NOW!�
IKMAKACAHCUHbUiAMASim�
� FLORIDA $119�
ORGANIZE CROUPS & CO FREE!� �
� ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS�
I 1-800-214-7007� �
��
Spring Break 1996
TRAVEL FREEH
Jamaica. Cancun. Bahamaa
Panama CHv. Davtona. Padre
Great low, low prices
Free Trip on only 15 sale
Call for a FREE
information
packet I
Sun Splash Tours
1-800-426-7710
S
WATCH FOUND ON JAN 27 between
Carrett and Greene Halls. Call 3284354
to claim.
KEYS FOUND FEB. 5 on top of a gray
Mazda beside freshman parking lot Call
328-7598 for inquiry
FOUND: LADIES ROLEX WATCH. Sun
day morning buried in the snow in front
of Sports Pad. Call 758-4039
Announcements
CANCUN A JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 lowest price guarantee! 7
Nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save S100
on fooddrinks!http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 14004784386
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches � Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800478-
6386
ACCOMMODATIONS FELL THROUGH
FOR spring break? Already have plane
ticket to any destination in the Caribbean
just need a place to stay. Please call Shan-
non 758-3673
SPRING BREAK '96 WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT BOOK NOW
Florida $109 Bahamas $359 JamaicaCan
cun $389. Organize a group � TRAVEL
FREE! Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-7710
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
cruise! 7 Days $279! Includes 15 Meals &
6 Free Parties! Great BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http: www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
6784386
ECNAO
WILL BE holding a meeting on Tuesday
Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. in MSC room 248. We
will be discussing ways to develop aware-
ness of Native Americans on campus, fund
raisers, school visits and organizing our
Native American festival for next month.
Any interested students are encouraged
to attend this proactive group, and old
members need to attend. For more infor-
mation please call Christa Outlaw at 328-
3782. See you there!
ECU HONORS BOARD
Applications are now being taken for the
Fall 96 Honor Board. Come by 210
Whichard or call 3284824 for further in-
formation. Last day to submit applications
will be Feb. 29.
THE GREENVILLE CHAPTER OF the
National Organization for Women (NOW)
will meet at 530 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 14 at the Szechuan Garden restau-
rant "Waiting to Exhale" is the discus-
sion topic for the February 14 meeting.
For more information, call 413-3303
HANDCRAFTED JEWELRY BY THE
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
Valentine's Day Sale Feb. 13 & 14.10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Jenkins Bid. main entrance 5th
Street
GET OUT OF YOUR
Room and sign up for Intramural Rac-
quetball Singles. There will be a registra-
tion meeting on February 14 at 5 p.m. in
Christenbury 204. For more information
call Recreational Services at 3284387.
LISTEN TO YOUR
-Principles of biofeedback. Body stress
affects you physically as well as emotion-
ally. By becoming aware of and modifying
your physical response to stress, you can
learn to relax and change your reaction
to pressure whenever you wish. This 90
minute workshop will introduce you to the
principles of biofeedback and help you be-
come aware of your body. Thursday Feb-
ruary 22 at 3p.m. Counseling Center. Call
3284661 to register.
B-GLAD
Our meeting is tomorrow night, 14 Feb-
ruary, 1996, in room 221 of Mendenhall
Student Center at 7:30 p.m. The meeting
will only be about 30 minutes maximum
in honor of Valentine's Day. Please come
as we are addressing constitutional amend-
ments. Also, please bring canned food for
our Picasso food drive. See you there
speech, language, hearing symposium
Announcements
The 26th Aaamal Speech, Laagnge,
aa4 BssrheJ ipmamtkm
will be held February 15th and 16th at
the Ramada Inn, Greenville. The purpose
of the symposium is to provide continu-
ing education and to augment the profes-
sional growth and knowledge of those who
provide services to the communicatively
impaired. All students and professionals
in the fields of speech language patholo-
gy and audiology are invited to attend.
The symposium is planned and sponsored
by students with support from the East
Carolina University Department of Com-
municative Sciences and Disorders and the
Eastern Area Health Education Center. All
proceeds from the symposium of to sup-
port student scholarships. Presentations
will focus, respectively, on infant hearing
screening and audiometric clinical man-
agement neurological communication dis-
orders, and improving effectiveness of
managed healthcare. For more informa-
tion, contact 'he ECU Speech and Hear-
ing Clinic at (919) 3284405.
ALCOHOL SUPPORT GROUP
Have you been affected by alcohol at some
point in your life? Abusive families, poor
relationship skills, difficulty with self-man-
agement skills, difficulty formulating and
reaching academic and personal goals, as
well as poor academic and employment
performance can all be related to trouble
with alcohol. This group examines the is-
sues surrounding the use of alcohol and
the consequences of drinking b naviors
Find out what to do BEFORE things get
out of hand. Mondays 3:304 p.m. Coun-
seling Center. Call 3284661 to register
Still lo�Ma for aa
exciting spring break? Check out Recre-
ational Services Spring Break 50 Miles
on the Appalachian Trail March 2-9. We
will hike an average of 10 miles a day on
the famous Appalachian Trail. The regis-
tration deadline will be February 19 in
204 Christenbury Cym. For more infor-
mation call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
ECU PHYSICAL THERAPY
MASSAGE CLINIC
Thursday, Feb. 15th 6-9pm, in the ECU
Back & Limb Clinic (Belk Bldg). Tickets
may be purchased from the ECU Back &
Limb Clinic or FT Students. Tickets $2
for 10 min. or $250 at the door.
STUDENT EXCHANGE-STUDY
ABROAD This is the time to consider a
student exchange or study abroad experi-
ence for next fall! if you are interested in
study sites which are available, visit GCB
lobby, Feb. 15th between 9 a,m. and 3 p.m.
to pick up brochures and information or
stop in the International Affairs office on
9th Street Pay EClT tuition, earn credit
while studying at another location! Do it
soon! Applications are currently being
accepted! Call 3284769 for more informa-
tion.
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS: MEETING
TODAY, February 15,1996. GAB 1019,5
p.m. Agenda: new officer nominations,
plan activities and regional conference,
drawings for ticket prizes and FREE
PIZZA! Any questions? Call Jacqie at 328-
3302.
THE STUDENT PIRATE CLUB will be
sponsoring a trip to Wilmington on Feb.
24 to watch the men's basketball team take
on UNC-W at Trask Coliseum. Buses will
leave around 3 p.m. and return after the
game. Price of trip includes pre-game so-
cial, transportation and game ticket For
further info call Chris Libert at 3284540
DON'T CALL 911, LEARN wilderness
medicine on February 20 as our EMT staff
will share knowledge on how to deal with
injuries when you are not close to a phone
or immediate help. The registration dead-
line will be February 16 in 204
Christenbury Cym. For more information
call Recreational Services at 3284387.
WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN you don't
want to study, but know you should? How
do you get up every day for that boring 8
a.m. lecture? Come find out how to moti-
vate yourself to perform your best Tues-
day February 20,3-5 p.m. Counseling Cen-
ter. Call 3284661 to register.
BECOME A HOSPICE VOLUNTEER! In-
terested? Place: Percolator Coffee-House.
Time. 6:00pm. Date: Feb 15th. Questions
call Vincent 7564844
Forms for Classifieds and
Announcements can be picked up in
Mendenhall and dropped off in the
Student Publication building.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
All Greek organizations must be
spelled out - no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reserves the right
to reject any ad for libel,
obscenity aiWor bad taste.
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add Si
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1






II - I ' �
llf IT 1 II ' I I ' � '
,1 i i in i ii
:
:
. �� ��� X"�� '
Mardi Gras '96


22
East Carolina Stifle
Friday February l6,199o
9:00pm - 2:00am
Mendenhall Student Center
Join in this mid-winter
celebration and experience:
Make an MTV style music videe starring you and your friends
FUN FUCKS
The ultimate multi-sensory Mind-Body Experience.
�ffffld fflttPODOD NASA did it first THE ALPHA EXPERIENCE does it better
.
(MPQffiOQtDOS
LAcrruucK
CASINO
Try yourinck with rotuette, the Wheel of Fortune, Blackjack,
and Poker
Lots of prizes for the winners
Also DJ Dance: free tattoos; Dixieland fczz music;
And a FREE CAJUN BUFFET featuring
lots of spicy and sweet treats.

Free with valid ECU ID. One free uest ticket per ID. Guest tickets are available at the
Community Service Desks located in Aycock, Fletcher, and Cotten Residence Halls; the Central
Ticket Office-Mendenhall, and in the lobby of the Student Stores on February 13 & 14, 12:00pm -
3:00pm. Pick up tickets today. The Deadline to pick up a guest ticket is 21696 at 5:00pm.
Sponsored by the Division of Student LifsJflaiaiyeaii
mm � w � "ifSfudent Stores
tttt
i





9
8
Tuesday, February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
Books found on Amazon
Internet site offers
textbook
alternative
Sarah Wahlert
Senior Writer
With just the push of a few but-
tons, any book that's in print can be
sent right to your doorstep. Sound
impossible?
Well, Amazon.com Books is here
to prove that it is possible. Created
by Wall Street investment banker Jeff
Bazos, Amazon has 40 times more
books than a typical mall bookstore,
and five times those of the country's
largest book superstores. In addition,
they stock textbooks and are actively
seeking business from college stu-
dents.
This is the deal. Amazon will have
any book you desire no matter what
If it's not included in the 1.4 million
titles they already stock, then they will
A Drop
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Is it too horribly unroman-
tic of me to say that Valentine's
Day is a tool of Satan?
Well, okay, maybe so. But I
don't care. There's something
rotten about this holiday, some-
thing that, when I really start
thinking about it makes me want
to gun Cupid down like a rabid
dog.
On the surface, Valentine's
Day seems benevolent enough.
It's a holiday to celebrate love,
and I'm all for iove. Love is a great
emotion; my girlfriend and I en-
joy it a whole heck of a lot Be-
ing in love is one of the most
wonderful experiences a human
being can have.
But Valentine's Day isn't just
about love. It like Christmas, is
about merchandising. And it's not
jolly merchandising, like at Christ-
mas. No, Valentine merchandis-
ing is blatantly manipulative.
You've seen the ads. They've
been all over TV for the last
couple of weeks. Come on, you
remember
Can't figure out how to tell
her that you love her more than
life itself? Go to Hallmark! They'll
express your undying passion for
you, without all the greasy mess!
You're in trouble if you don't
get her that special Valentine gift
but you're stumped. What gift
could possibly represent all that
your loved one means to you and
you alone? Roses, of course!
What better way to express your
own unique kinda love than to
give her the same gift every other
poor ignorant shmuck is giving
his girlfriend?
Men! We know you don't get
that romance stuff, but if you
don't do something romantic on
the holiday of love, your woman
will leave you! So come to us, and
we'll make her happy.
Now, that's a romantic sen-
timent Could we possibly come
up with a more insincere way to
conduct our love lives? A gift of
love should actually mean some-
thing. How rrTuch thought does
it take to buy overpriced roses?
Advertisers play on the fears
Sec DROP page 9
find it for you. Plus, depending on the
publisher, there are savings of 1040
percent (the average savings is 25 per-
cent) off regular price.
In addition, customers are auto-
matically given a free subscription to
a feature called "Eyes and Editors
Simply type in the topic of your choice
and each time a new book is published
concerning that topic, an e-mail mes-
sage will be sent to notify you. An-
other perk is a reviewer's section in-
cluding brief descriptions of each
book and reviews done by both the
Amazon stafi and other customers.
This sounds like a good deal, es-
pecially when you think about how
much college students spend on text-
books every semester.
But there's a catch, right?
That depends. Amazon Books is
based in Seattle, and shipping cross-
country will cost $3-5. In two to five
days, the book will be in your hands.
The school bookstore is more conve-
nient but also more expensive, so if
your budget is tight, maybe Amazon
is for you.
Chris Brincefield, who orders the
books for the Student Stores, doesn't
consider it a competition. "If students
need the book that second, they can
use the Student Store. If we don't have
it, they can use the Amazon site. We
the Student Store have a website too,
but it's a free enterprise. I hope thar
students would support the school
however, because we do help fund stu-
dent scholarships
Students did seem to go for the
idea of an internet site to buy books
at Senior John Marte thinks it's a
good idea, "because I've looked for
books that are rare or out of print and
if Amazon could find them, I'd go
there
Freshman Sabrina Smith agrees
and says, "It sounds like a good idea
as long as there's no catch yeah.
I'd use it"
You can check out Amazon.com
Books through the "What's New" and
"What's Cool" lists on Netscape and
Yahoo, or by contacting the website
address which is http:
www.amazon.com.
English professor
reads tales of love
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Greenville's creative writing com-
munity is steadily growing, and ECU
continues to nourish this growth by
offering venues for creative writers to
share their work. On Feb. 14, ECU
will get a creative
boost when Joe
David Bellamy, au-
thor of such works
as Suzi Sinzinnati
and Atomic Love,
reads in celebration
of Valentine's day.
Bellamy's read-
ing is entitled "Love
Stories for
Valentine's Day
and will offer the
public as the title
suggests, love sto-
ries. While
Bellamy's reading
may focus on love
and all the connota-
tions associated
with that idea, his
work and career re-
veals a versatile in-
dividual who has
made his mark on
the literary world.
"I spent my for-
mative years in
North Carolina
Bellamy said, in ref-
erence to his time
as a student at
Duke University. "And my first main
influence was a Southern writer
Bellamy has always respected
Southern writers, and he desired to
reach that level of artistic expressive-
ness. While he does admit growing up
in Ohio may have disadvantaged him
in the Southern genre, he asserts that
he does feel a connection to the
South.
"My connections to North Caro-
lina were renewed by coming back
here he said.
Jazz for lunch
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
The ECU Jazz Ensemble played at the Wright Place at the last event in the ECU
Student Union's Noon Day Tunes. The lunchtime music series resumes tomorrow.
P�ay44U4e IReatew
ECU Playhouse shines
under an eerie "Moon"
Jennifer Coieman
Senior Writer
"A witch-boy from the mountain
came.
A-pinin' to be human,
Fer he had seen the fairest gal
A gal named Barbara Allen
"Dark of the Moon" is based on
an old Appalachian folk song called
"The Ballad of Barbara Allen In the
prologue to the East Carolina Play-
house production of the play, John the
witch-boy (Ryan Christopher Cox) and
Barbara Allen (Allison Dennis) meet
in the woods while the rest of the cast
sings the ballad off-stage. The use of
"line-out" singing (where one member
of the cast cails the line out before
the rest sing it) combined with the
slow, "twangy" singing style makes
the result absolutely haunting.
With such a phenomenal begin-
ning, the natural inclination is to think
that the show can not possibly sur-
pass it and must therefore get worse
from there. Fortunately, that is not
the case with this performance of
"Dark of the Moon 1 came prepared
to be freaked out and i was not dis-
appointed.
Before 1 can even begin to dis-
cuss the acting in this show, I must
make mention of the set and lighting.
Phenomenal. The appearance of the
set could go from normal country vil-
lage square to haunted forest with
little more than the change of a light.
It was extremely adaptable, and highly
effective. The lighting set the mood
for the show from the very beginning.
The blues and purples at the opening
added to that mysterious, eerie feel-
ing that I thoroughly enjoyed through-
out the show.
That said, I can move on to the
more difficult part of the review: what
I thought of the show itself. Let me
start by saying I just plain like this
story. It's an interesting twist on the
old "Romeo and Juliet" theme, and
although I had seen the play per-
formed before, 1 discovered all new-
things to love watching this version.
I thought I knew what to expect
of the music, having seen a few dis-
jointed run-throughs. I was wrong.
The tidbits 1 heard while the show was
still in rough rehearsals were noth-
ing compared to the complete e ffect
with costumes, set and proper se-
quence. Director John Shearin more
than did his homework when select-
ing folk songs for the show, and it
showed.
I know from experience that I
never know what to expect from the
CD Reviews
East Carolina Playhouse actors, so I
won't even pretend that they didn't
surprise me as usual. This was the first
chance I have had to see Allison Den-
nis in a leading role, and it was worth
the wait She made an outstanding
Barbara Allen. Her combination of
innocence and sensuality made for a
very real portrayal of the fickle Bar-
bara.
Ryan Christopher Cox again gives
an outstanding performance, some-
thing 1 am beginning to expect from
him. His John is likable and loving to
Barbara, and yet cold-hearted and
dangerously savage when threatened.
The witches themselves were ex-
ceptional. The Dark Witch (Alayna
Hamilton) and the Fair Witch
(Amanda Whitford) were deliciously
wicked. Farah Lisa Whitley-Sebti was
a wonderful surprise as the Fiddler
Witch. Her fiddle worked instead of
words to mock John and Barbara's
love affair right along with the other
witches. The Shadow Witch (Elizabeth
South) was the only one I couldn't
figure out at first 1 kept waiting and
waiting for her to say something, and
it wasn't until after the show was over
that I realized that shadows don't talk.
After coming to that conclusion.
See MOON page 10
W
Said
Photo Courtesy of ECU NEWS BUREAU
Joe David Bellamy
That return was significant for
Bellamy because, as he notes, "the
See LOVE page 10
a
Get wrapped up for
Condom Week '96
The Beau Hunks
Little Rascals Music
Heather Zophy
Student Health
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
National Condom Week, which is des
ignated for the week of Feb. 14-21, is
an event observed by more than � -
350 universities, AIDSSTD edu-
cation organizations, high
schools, family planning clinics
and pharmacies across the �
United States and Canada. The
national awareness week was
started in 1978 by some students
at the University of California-Ber
keley.
A number of ECU's departments
organizations will observe National
Week in a couple of different ways. The Peer
and
Condom
Health Educators
will be selling "interesting" condoms in front of the Student Store today
See HEALTH page 10
Okay, even if you've never seen
the show, you know who the Little
Rascals are. right? Spanky. Alfalfa.
Buckwheat and the rest of Our Gang
were parodied on Saturday Night
Live a decade ago. so that may be
recent enough to jog the memory of
some of the younger readers out
there.
On this double CD box set, 100
of the old background tunes played
during the Little Rascals show have
been faithfully reproduced for your
listening pleasure by a Dutch band
known as The Beau Hunks.
The story of how this collection
came to be is almost as good as the
music itself. None of this music has
been available in this form before. For
the last 60 years or so, the only way
to listen to Little Rascals music was
to watch the videos.
Who cares, right? Well, do you
remember how good those old
Warner Brothers cartoon themes
were during Bugs Bunny? They al-
ways punched up the action and im-
proved the comic timing. AH' of that
music was written by Carl Stalling
and Raymond Scott, both considered
now to be geniuses of film composi-
tion. Both have had their music im-
mortalized recently on The Carl
Stalling Project and Reckless Nights
and Turkish Twilights: The Music of
Raymond Scott, in fact. Scott has
gained some newer fans because his
music is also used on Ren & Stimpy.
That same respect has now been
given to Roy Shields, the man behind
all of the music of the Little Rascals
(and Laurel & Hardy, too), through
the hard-working efforts of Dutch
bandleader Gert-Jan Blom and his or-
chestra. The Beau Hunks.
Blom. already familiar with Stall-
ing and Scott's music through his
other orchestras (with names like
The Boulevard of Broken Dreams Or-
chestra. The Gangbusters, and The
Wooden Indians), was involved with
scoring a tribute to Laurel & Hardy
when he found out that hardly any
purely musical form of Roy Shields'
music existed. In order to produce
the music of Shields. Blom and The
Beau Hunks had to go back to the
See BEAU page 10
Today's Topic:
The Little Rascals
1. Name the dog.
2. Who was the first black
Little Rascal?
3. Name Alfalfa's sweet-
heart.
4. Name the bullies.
5. Which Little Rascal
went on to star in such
grown-up fare as
"Baretta" and Truman
Capote's In Cold Blood?
6. What was Alfalfa's spe-
cialty?
7. Name the Rascals'
teacher.
8. What was Spanky's last
name?
9. Which Rascal had the
least dialogue?
10. Was Scatman Crothers
ever a Little Rascal?
Answers in Thursday's issue
-JJ
�' m
I i.i ' "i�





Tuesday, February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
Recruits commit
to Logan's team
Crunch time begins in CAA
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
If you've been around CAA bas-
ketball long enough, you probably
are used to a tight race in the con-
ference standings at this time of the
year. 1996 is not that much differ-
ent from what the avid CAA bas-
ketball fan used to, along with a
few surprises.
Most fans in this area are ac-
customed to seeing Old Dominion
and Lefty Driesell's James Madison
Dukes on top of the standings. Old
Dominion is still in the upper half
of the standings at second, but
they're topped by the "new kid on
the block Virginia Common-
wealth.
VCU, coming from the defunct
Metro Conference, has brought a
new physical style of play to the
CAA with a front line that is around
6'8" apiece and are all over 200
pounds. Sitting atop of the CAA
with an 11-1 record (18-7 overall)
it's clear to see that VCU has made
an immediate impact on its new af-
filiation.
Despite the one blemish, com-
pliments of the ECU Pirates in
Greenville earlier this season, the
Rams are riding an eight game win-
ning streak, their longest since the
'8485 season when they chalked
up eleven in a row. This momen-
tum could give VCU a good chance
at finishing their first season in the
Colonial with only one loss and sew
up the top seed in the conference
tournament on their home floor,
The Richmond Coliseum.
Jeff Capel's Monarchs are all
alone in second as of this past week-
end and their win over surprise last
place James Madison. ODU looks to
at least keep their second place
standing, but that could be in jeop-
ardy with the Monarchs remaining
schedule.
Even though all but two games
are at home for Capel's troops, the
two road games will be at the pesky
George Mason and the ever danger-
ous American University. Along
with those battles, the Monarchs
will have to play host to the Pirates
who beat the second place team
and seemed to match up well with
their big front line.
That brings us to what makes
this conference race so dangerous
the teams in the middle of the
standings. UNC-Wilmington at
third, ECU a close forth, with
American and George Mason round-
ing out the top six. The Seahawks
have won their last two and look
to make a run, but they still have
the Pirates on their heels as well
as on their schedule. The Pirates
have found themselves in a rut, los-
ing their last three games, two of
those coming in the usually,
See CAA page 13
High school
players sign to
play football
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Winners. That's what any high
school football player aspiring to play
in the college ranks wants to be asso-
ciated with, and what every college
and university in the country wants
to be in hopes of luring talent into
their program.
For years ECU has played second
fiddle in the recruiting war to the
other Division 1A schools in North
Carolina (UNC-Chapel Hill, N.C. State,
Duke and Wake Forest). But now, with
the tremendous success achieved by
the Pirate football program in the
1990s, times have changed.
"Winning is the key to it all said
ECU Head Coach Steve Logan. "Kids
go where they believe they can win.
Right now the young men in this state
believe they can come to East Caro-
lina and win
Seventeen of the 25 recruits who
have committed to ECU are from
North Carolina. This is a goal and a
policy that Logan has always adhered
to.
"That is a mission I've been on,
to accomplish that Logan said. "Last
year we signed more players from
North Carolina than the other Divi-
sion 1 schools. I think we may have
done it again and
I intend on it be-
ing a yearly hap-
pening if we con-
tinue to prove to
people that we
are a quality pro-
gram
At a press
conference on na-
tional signing
day last Wednes-
day, Logan was
hesitant to com-
ment on the .ex-
pected impact of
certain players in
fear of putting
"We had a
tremendous
reception from the
high school
coaches in North
Carolina, and the
eastern part in
particular
� Coach Logan
School. Ward set the Kinston single-
season record for passing yards with
1,602 and for touchdown passes with
16. He is listed as the no. 37 prospect
in the state by SuperPrep Magazine.
"He's the mobile kind of player I
like to try and
work with at quar-
terback Logan
said.
Jamie Wilson
is a Greenville na-
tive who at the
running back posi-
tion, rushed for
more than 2,900
yards in two sea-
sons for D.H.
Conley. Wilson
has scored 33
touchdowns in his
career at Conley,
so he knows how
MHnHMBMH
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH 11-1
too much pressure on the young ath-
letes to perform, but he couldn't con-
ceal his pride when it came to east-
ern North Carolina signees.
"We had a tremendous reception
from the high school coaches in North
Carolina, and the eastern part in par-
ticular he said.
Kevin Ward is a 6'3 180 lb. quar-
terback who played at Kinston High
CAA STANDINGS
TEAM
CAA OVERALL STREAK
IOLD DOMINION
UNC WILMINGTON
EAST CAROLINA
AMERICAN
GEORGE MASON
WILLIAM & MARY
RICHMOND
JAMES MADISON
8-3
7-4
7-5
6-5
5-7
4-8
3-9
1-10
18-7
13-11
9-12
14-7
10-10
10-12
8-13
7-15
5-19
WON 8
WON 1
WON 2
LOST 3
WON 1
WON 2
LOST 2
LOST 1
LOST 8
to get into the end
zone. He also played defensive back,
recording 200-plus tackles and 13 in-
terceptions in h;s career, but Logan
plans to start him out on the offen-
sive side of the ball.
With 85 scholarships to give, av-
eraging four per position, the Pirates
are already fully stocked at the run-
See TEAM page 13
L
Stltate
The ECUs men basketball team lost a crucial game to
VCU. The Rams still remain atop the CAA with one loss.
Saturday night ECU traveled to Richmond in an attempt
to hand VCU their second loss in the CAA. VCU's only loss
came against ECU on Jan. 13 here in Greenville, 73-72. Since
then the Rams have gone on an eight game winning streak.
The Pirates shot 46 percent from the field and only 22
percent from the three point arc in the first half. VCU shot
48 and 36 percent respectively from the field androm three
point range.
ECU headed into the locker room with a three point
deficit, 32-35.
The Pirates' numbers improved from the free throw
line and three point arc. ECU shot 25 percent for three's
and 81 percent from the line, which was up from 66 percent
in the first half. However, ECU's field goal percentage was
down in the second half to 41 percent
ECU couldn't hang on, and lost the battle 80-71. Four
Pirates were in double figures for the game.
Tim Basham led the way with 17 points. Jonathan
Kerner had 14, Othello Meadows added 12 and Vic
Hamilton finished with 10.
The Pirates drop to 7-5 in the CAA and 14-7 overall.
This is the third straight conference loss for ECU. They
now drop to fourth place in the CAA race.
ECU will return home tomorrow night and look to
end their losing streak when they host William & Mary at
Minges Coliseum. Tiroff is set for 7 p.m.
The ECU women's basketball team dropped two away
games in the CAA over the weekend on the road.
Friday night VCU hosted ECU in Richmond, Va. The
Lady Pirates shot 25 percent in the first half making only
See NOTES page 13
Highlights from last
weekend's Schick
SuperHoops 3-on-3
Basketball Tourney.
Teams from four dif-
ferent states com-
peted.
(Top right), Members of the Liberty University
team check out competition in between games.
(Bottom right), Head referee gives instruction to
Citadel and Coastal Carolina players before the
morning's first game. (Top left), A Liberty University
player if foiled by an N.C. State player. (Middle),
VA Tech's Mandy Worliman gets past ECU'S
Emily Murrary in women's final game. ECU won
23-21.
Photos by CHRIS GAYDOSH
AROUND THE CAA THIS WEEKEND
(MEN'S BASKETBALL)
Virginia Commonwealth beat East Carolina
Old Dominion beat James Madison �
UNC Wilmington �
American beat William & Mary �
George Mason beat Richmond �
-80-71
76-72
idle
100-66
98-91
Don't
Tomorrow night there will be a
men's home basketball game
against William & Mary.
Tip-off is set for 7 p.m.





10
Tuesday,February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
s
HfjAJLl H. from page
and tomorrow for Valentine's Day.
The condoms will be sold for less
than the amount of a Valentine's
Day card and sales will continue
through Feb. 21.
Peer Health also has a variety
of programs in relation to sexual-
ity that are offered through the
Office of Health Promotion and
Weil-Being. Any student organiza-
tion, student group or class can re-
quest a program by calling 328-
6793.
There are also relationship pre-
sentations sponsored by the Coun-
seling Center and Ledonia Wright
African-American Cultural Center
on Feb. 15 at 3:30 p.m. and 6:30
p.m. For more detailed information
call either of those offices. These
programs tie nicely into the whole
Valentine theme.
Condoms are the recom-
mended protection for anyone en-
gaging in sexual activity. While
abstinence is the only sure way to
prevent the spread of sexually
transmitted diseases (STDs), and
engaging in mutually monogamous
relationships is the second best pre-
vention, condoms are the next best
MOON from page 8
I spent a good deal of time reliving
their scenes and saying to myself,
"Yeah, I see how that works The only-
thing that bothered me (and it really
wasn't that big of a deal) was
Hamilton's hair. The wigs looked
great, and really made the costumes,
but she was the only one whose hair
got in her face so that I couldn't see
her. If her hair had been swept away
from her face just a little more 1 would
have been completely happy. Luckily,
she and Whitford have such an incred-
ible stage presence that my hair hang-
up was nothing more than a slight
annoyance.
I do want to say one thing directly
to the witches. Ladies, run out right
now and get yourselves a recording
contract The song "I Once Had A
Sweetheart" was simply outstanding.
You can send me tickets to your first
concert
While I'm on the subject of songs,
I must mention "Down By the Green-
wood Sidey-O as sung by Mrs.
Summey (Alison Lawrence). This song
sent chills up my spine. I doubt a bet-
ter selection could have been made
for the extremely tense moments be-
fore Barbara finds out where her baby
is.
Tre Perry, I think you've missed
your calling. What a preacher you
would make! There isn't a soul out
there who wouldn't be saved by lis-
tening to Perry preach "hellfire and
damnation I think I enjoyed the char-
acter of Preacher Haggler a little too
much. I actually had myself believing,
for a few minutes at least that what
he was preaching was "the will of
God
The East Carolina Playhouse pro-
duction of "Dark of the Moon" was
incredibly enjoyable. It provided a very
real peek into the lives of the Appala-
chian mountain folk, despite the some-
what unreal premise.
On a scale of one to 10, "Dark of
the Moon" rates an 9.
thing. Condoms must be properly
used in order to provide effective
protection.
When an individual purchases
condoms, they must make sure that
the condoms are made of latex (not
natural membrane material such as
sheeplamb skin), be sure they con-
tain spermicide (Nonoxynol-9), be
sure they are in date and be sure
they are manufactured in the U.S.
or Japan (these two countries indi-
vidually test each condom prior to
packaging).
Storage of condoms is also very
important. Condoms should be
stored in a dry, cool environment.
Storage in extreme cold or heat, or
condoms stored in direct sunlight
can cause damage, making them in-
effective.
Individuals should also exam-
ine condoms before use to be sure
there are no holes or tears.
Condoms are relatively inex-
pensive. They can purchased over
the counter in almost any phar-
macy. They are sold at the Student
Health Center (15 for $2). They are
also available in vending machines
in the residence halls.
Condom Week is a preventive
technique aimed at reducing the
risk of sexually transmitted dis-
eases. Since one out of every four
college students is likely to have an
STD, college campuses are a prime
targeted population.
For more information on
condoms or sexuality in general,
the Health Educator is available at
328-6794. Please don't hesitate Lo
call with any questions.
BEAU from page 8 LAJ V JE. from page 8
original source: the short films them-
selves. Using multiple film prints and
a small number of original transcrip-
tions and notes, they began to reas-
semble the music piece by piece - a
painstakingly slow process that took
several months.
They then brought in original
period equipment, so that the music
would sound authentic, and set about
the task of recording what they
hoped would be a close approxima-
tion of the Little Rascals' music. The
Beau Hunks are so good at what they
do that almost all of the pieces re-
corded live were put on the album
as is, without editing or mixing.
Since the release of the collec-
tion, praises for The Beau Hunks
have poured in from such notable
people as underground cartoonist R.
Crumb, Beach Boy Brian Wilson, and
film criticLittle Rascals scholar
Leonard Maltin, and such notable
publications as The New Yorker, The
New York Times and Billboard maga-
zine. Listening to the 100 short tunes
(they range in length from the four
second "Laugh" to the six minute
"Shield Suspense Medley") it's easy
to see why this music is so adored.
Equally sweet and nostalgic, this is
pure childhood set to melody.
My only gripe is that there are
no Shields recordings to hear in their
original form. All have been lost and
that is a shame. The Beau Hunks
have done the best job anyone could
have recreating Shields' sound and
style, but having heard their version
it makes me want all the more to hear
how Shields would have done it him-
self.
South takes writers more seriously
than anywhere else in the country,
and that's an important influence
Bellamy is the Whichard Distin-
guished Professor in the Humanities
at ECU, but his reputation in the lit-
erary world extends far beyond this
campus. He has served as the Direc-
tor of the Literature Program of the
National Endowment for the Arts
from 1990 to 1992 and is a former
President of the Associated Writing
Programs (AWP) and the Coordinat-
ing Council of Literary Magazines
(CCLM).
He was also the founding editor
and publisher of Fiction Interna-
tional magazine and press. In fact,
Bellamy's skills as not only a writer
but also an editor have earned him
great notoriety. William Hallberg, an
author and creative writing professor
in the English department commends
Bellamy's editorial work. "In his one
hundred and fourteen years as editor
of Fiction International Hallberg
states, "Joe Bellamy has launched
the careers of many noteworthy writ-
ers
ECU writing professor and local
author Luke Whisnant praises
Bellamy's work as something which he
always looks forward to reading. "His
work draws from an amazing range
of sources - literary, historical, scien-
tific, musical, current events he said.
Still, Whisnant commends Bellamy for
grounding his creative efforts in the
human heart
And the human heart will be the
focus of Bellamy's reading on Feb. 14
when he narrates his love-inspired
tales. Since this is Bellamy's second
year as Whichard Professor, this will
more than likely be his last public read-
ing at ECU, so mark your calendar.
Joe David Bellamy will read in the
General Classroom Building, room
1026, at 7 p.m. Participate in what is
destined to be only part of a growing
creative tradition in Greenville as the
area's writing community thrives.
Its' as ?
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Services & Counseling
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Greenville, NC.
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Hours:
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8:00-4:00
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday. February 13, 1996
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HIGH POINT (AP) - Turn left
through a gate off Pine Lodge Road
- a one-lane, unpaved dirt road in
Davidson County - and what you find
could astound you.
Country folk have lived on the
wooded, rural road for generations,
raising their children and growing
old on the same dirt paths they
scampered along on as children.
But the road's newest inhabit-
ant, a cloaked, mysterious man from
the Far East, also enjoys the stark
simplicity of the area.
Stop your car at the end of the
driveway, traverse a short bridge,
and rap on the door of the small
shed.
Soon, a thin, ascetic-looking
man with a shaven head, clad in or-
ange and wrapped in an orange blan-
ket, may appear in the doorway,
blinking his eyes rapidly as he tries
to understand what you're saying.
Yes. in the middle of the woods
in rural Davidson County, you've
stumbled upon a Buddhist monk.
Bunrith Thun is a liberal arts
major at Davidson County Commu-
nity College. He fled Cambodia and
came to America seven years ago.
desperately hoping to escape the
brutal terror inflicted by the Khmer
Rouge upon his countrymen in Cam-
bodia.
After four years in Springfield.
Mass he moved to his peaceful
cabin in the woods.
It's more than just a cabin, how-
ever. The site has been referred to
as a Cambodian commune.
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At first blush, it looks more like
a summer camp.
There's an enormous building
used as a meeting hall, bridges and
walking trails, two ponds, a swim-
ming pool and a temple.
The temple isn't complete -
there's not enough money in the
small church's treasury to build the
temple church officials want to
build.
Rugs crisscross the floor of the
makeshift temple, surrounded by
pictures of the abbot. Thun and
other monks on the walls. Numer-
ous statues and various religious
items fill every inch of the enormous
altar at one end of the room. Paint-
ings of Buddha and his original five
disciples line the walls.
Most of the statues and paint-
ings come from overseas. Building
the collection is a slow. laborious
process. Thun said.
Although the collection may im-
press outsiders. "It's just a build-
ing Thun says with a shrug.
His abbot. Chok Toumka. will
make the decision about when there
is enough money to build a real
temple.
Toumka is a bald, ageless man.
with a face that looks inscrutable
and wise until he grins, which makes
his eyes disappear and causes him
to look more like a happy bulldog.
In his own country. pre-Khmer
Rouge. Thun would be a community
leader, a man with power.
Now, he wakes up early and
prays, goes to school, comes home
and prays. It's a lonely life, he said -
he doesn't get out much, besides
classes
You won't see Thun walking the
streets of Lexington, an area not
known for Eastern religions. How-
ever, about 100 Cambodian families
have quietly settled down in the bar-
becue city during the last few years.
Thun said.
When Thun began taking
classes at the community college, his
English was limited. So he became
friends with his advisor. Dottie
Burkhart. going to her home to im-
prove his language skills.
Burkhart was careful not to
schedule a visit during dinnertime.
Thun isn't permitted to eat after 11
a.m. and has to subsist on water,
soda and coffee the rest of the day.
Empty bottles of Mountain Dew lie
on the floor near his bed.
The Lexington area's Cambo-
dian population multiplies several
times a year, when Thun hosts reli-
gious celebrations attended by hun-
dreds of people. The goal is to raise
money for the host temple.
His religion, he said, "teaches
us to walk on the right way, to treat
people nice, to not do anything
against anyone else, to try to love
everyone like ourselves
LllVVlt from page 8
and laziness of the public to sell cards,
roses and jewelry. It's cheapened the
meaning of the holiday, turning
Valentine's Day into a big con game.
But that's not the only thing that
makes Valentine's Day so rotten. The
rampant pain it causes helps, too.
Sure, love is great, if you're in
love. But if you want love and don't
have it. love sucks. There's nothing
worse than suddenly finding yourself
submerged in the stuff, normally sane
people exploding into gooey volcanoes
of love, spreading romance around like
so many amorous Johnny Appleseeds
But that's what Valentine's Day
is like to the love-lorn. It's a day-long
torture spree, a 24-hour visit with the
iron maiden of love. Lonely binge
drinking becomes very popular. 1 un-
316 E. 10TH ST 7
There's No Sweeter Way To Say "I Love YoiT
Than To Send a Cake and Balloons
on Valentine's Day. (A
Total Price 111. I.U.nM.m ��
Add $2 JOT dtUVHt'Y Show this coupon when placing cake order
and receive FREE kids cone
derstand.
But those of us who are actually
in love don't even notice. We run
around being romantic all day, blithely
flaunting our love, oblivious to the
pain of others. Every card, every rose,
every cheesy commercialized expres-
sion of love drives a stake through
somebody's heart.
Valentine's Day is love overload.
It's arbitrary, meaningless and cruel.
It's rotten to the core, and it's high
time we did something about it
I'm not suggesting we do away
with the holiday. I must admit, I like
celebrating love. Anniversaries and
other, more personal, things are more
important, but Valentine's Day is kind
of a nice thing to have around.
But couldn't we celebrate it more
quietly? Don't send gifts to your
loved one at work. It's just going to
make somebody feel bad. Go away
somewhere quiet with the person you
love, and do your love stuff behind
closed doors. Don't depress or disgust
the rest of the world with your own
private stuff.
And, for God's sake, if you're go-
ing to give your lover a present, stop
giving such easy gifts. If someone's
worth the trouble it takes to be in-
volved with them in the first place,
they're worth the trouble of giving
them something special.
Gee, that wasn't as unromantic
as I thought, despite the Satanic pres-
ence. I must be slipping
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4
12
Tuesday,February 13,1996
The East Carolinian
Morrison suspended from fight
(AP) - Tommy Morrison tried
to get out of a test for the AIDS vi-
rus before state boxing officials is-
sued an ultimatum: Get tested or
don't fight.
Morrison finally took the test
but never fought after Nevada sus-
pended him for medical reasons only
hours before his bout with Arthur
Weathers. Boxing officials refused
to say why, but a source told The
Associated Press that Morrison's
HIV test came back positive.
Morrison had cited religious
reasons for his initial refusal to take
a test for the vi-
rus in the days
before his fight.
He left a doctor's
office but re-
turned the next
day to submit a
blood sample.
"I was called
and told he did
not want to take
the test said Dr.
James Nave,
chairman of the
Nevada, last fought Oct. 7 when he
was bloodied in getting stopped in
the seventh round by former WBC
champion Lennox Lewis.
A British promoter for Lewis,
Panos Eliades, said the former WBC
heavyweight champion was in Ja-
maica and hadn't heard about
Morrison's suspension.
"We'd better get our man in
there (for testing) Eliades said.
"There was a lot of blood in that
fight
Virgets said Morrison was
scheduled to fight two weeks later
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, in Richmond,
Va and was
then going to
meet a top-10
contender on the
March 16
undercard of the
Mike Tyson-
Frank Bruno
heavyweight title
fight at the MGM
Grand in Las Ve-
gas.
Virgets said
"We were going
to get either a
Tyson fight or a
light for one of
the titles
� Tom Virgets
Nevada Athletic Commission. "I said
he would take the test or he would
not fight and that's final
The blond heavyweight boxer
and occasional actor flew home im-
mediately to Oklahoma after he was
suspended Saturday and was in se-
clusion at his ranch home near Jay,
about 50 miles from Tulsa.
A woman who answered the
door Sunday afternoon at the home
spoke inside with the boxer for a few
minutes before returning to say he
did not wish to speak to reporters
at that time.
Morrison's promoter, Tony
Holden, said late Sunday that the
boxer had been moved from his
home so he wouldn't be bothered
by the media. Holden said he would
receive a written medical report
from the commission on Monday.
"At that point, we will see an-
other doctor here Holden said.
"We'll get retested to see if Tommy
can pass whatever he didn't pass in
Nevada. We don't know those
people. We don't know those doc-
tors out there. Let's go get retested
Holden said a news conference
on the matter could be scheduled
Tuesday.
Morrison's trainer, Tom Virgets,
said he told the fighter the news of
his suspension about 4 p.m. Satur-
day in the crowded casino at the
MGM Grand hotel.
Morrison was to have gotten
$50,000 to fight Weathers, the first
step in a package of fights under
promoter Don King that was to have
led to a possible $4 million payday
against Mike Tyson later this year.
Virgets refused to comment on
reports that Morrison tested posi-
tive for HIV, but said Morrison
planned to see a doctor on Monday
in Oklahoma
"We're going to go and get re-
tested Virgets said. "I would say
at this point in time that everything
is speculation
Morrison, who beat George
Foreman in 1993 in his last fight in
King had promised Morrison either
a title fight or a fight with Tyson by
the end of the year.
"We were well on our way up
the ladder, looking to get where we
wanted to be Virgets said. "We
were going to get either a Tyson
fight or a fight for one of the titles
Virgets said he went looking for
Morrison on Saturday afternoon af-
ter the Nevada commission informed
him of the medical suspension. He
said he found the boxer in the ca-
sino of the MGM Grand and sat him
down and told him the news.
"It's a shocking thing to hear
when you're told you've been medi-
cally disqualified Virgets said. "He
wanted to know if there was any-
thing we could do about it
The boxer's mother, Diana
Morrison, said she and her son did
not know what the suspension was
about
"I'm just taking it as it comes.
I'm not going to jump to any con-
clusions Diana Morrison said.
News of Morrison's suspension
seemed to go almost unnoticed in
his hometown.
Some residents said they no
longer follow the boxer's career and
others said he has grown too arro-
gant for the small community.
But Frank Allen, manager of a
Jay grocery store, said that when
Morrison is in town he often eats at
the local cafe and occasionally drops
in at the town's bowling alley. He said
he was surprised by the reports
about Morrison's suspension.
"I really wasn't expecting any-
thing like that Allen said.
Although state boxing officials
declined to comment on Morrison's
case, the commission's chief physi-
cian, Dr. Flip Homansky, said that if
a boxer would test positive for HIV,
the test would be repeated. If it still
comes up positive, a more sophisti-
cated test is administered. That analy-
sis takes 24 hours.
"So, in essence, we would check
it three times Homansky said.
Morrison, 27, was paid $2.1 mil-
lion for his sixth-round loss to Lewis,
a fight that could have led to his first
title shot since he lost the WBO
heavyweight crown to Michael Bentt
in October 1993. He is 45-3-1 in a
seven-year career with 39 knockouts,
including a 12-round decision over
Foreman in 1993 for the WBO title.
Morrison was a popular attrac-
tion in the heavyweight ranks, with
Jewelry & Gifts
Arlington Village
Greenville 321-8182
It's Your Choice!
omt
Looking for a more convenient way to pay your utility bill? Starting early
in February, you'll be able to use "GUC Express Greenville Utilities'
new satellite office. GUC Express features three drive- thru lanes so you
can pay your bill quickly and there's plenty of parking if you want to go inside
to apply for service or inquire about your bill.
For your convenience, GUC Express will be open Monday through Friday from
7:30am-5:30pm.
The 24-hour Drop Box will also be available for payments.
GUC Express is located in the former Centura Bank building at 509 SE
Greenville Boulevard, across the street from First Christian Church (near
Kroger).
Greenville flMf Utilities
a wyli
� i �
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m s-

a strong
following
drawn by
his good
looks
and
punch-
i n g
power
that
sometimes disguised a weak chin.
The crowd of about 5,000 at the
MGM Grand Saturday night booed
when told Morrison would not fight
in the semi main event on the Felix
Trinidad-Rodney Moore IBF welter-
weight title fight.
In addition to his boxing career,
Morrison was an actor who played a
featured part as a boxer trained by
Sylvester Stallone in "Rocky V He
most recently had a guest role last
month on the "Cybill" show, where
he also played a boxer.
Marc Ratner, executive director
of the Nevada Athletic Commission,
said he was under orders from Ne-
vada attorney general Frankie Sue
Del Papa not to disclose the reason
for Morrison's medical suspension.
Morrison also faces misde-
meanor charges in Oklahoma stem-
ming from an October incident in
which Tammy Witt, the mother of his
5-year-old son, alleged he hit her.
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWI, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
Criminal Law
24 Hour Message SfrVice
752-8556
IT
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t9-
�iinr"Tii riinf"rr
HaHamaa
MwaaHttHan
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 13, 1996
13
CAA
from page 11
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
PER PERSON PER WEEK
SANDPIPER3P4C0N
650 FEET OF GULF BEACjfFftT1" - ���-
i OUTDOOR POOLS � 1 INDOOR HEATtD POOL �- ftESTAURANT
SUITES UP TO TO PEOPLE � KITCHENS WrTH MICROWAVES
TIKI BAR � BEACH PARTIES ENTERTAINMENT
SAILBOATS � JETSKIS � PARASAILS
DISCOUNTS TO AREA CLUBS. RESTAURANTS & ATTRACTIONS
VOLLEYBAU HU6E BEACH SIDE WHIRLPOOL
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friendly confines of Wiiliams Arena.
Joe Dooleys troops have already
beat the Seahawks in a thriller, but
they'll have to travel to Wi'mington
and Norfolk the last two games and
try to steal two wins after a three
game home stand.
The ever dangerous George Ma-
son and American are looking to be
the spoilers once again in the con-
ference. They'll have to face each
other once more before the season's
close, but the majority of both of
these clubs' games will be on their
respective floors. Both hosting num-
ber two Old Dominion in this final
run to the CAA crown.
Now the big surprise In recent
years the Richmond Spiders and the
James Madison Dukes have stayed
in the mid to upper portion of the
CAA standings, but not this year.
Richmond has had its share of
woes with a dismal 3-9 CAA record
accompanied by a 7-15 overall
record. With road games at ODU and
We will broadcast LIVE from outside the Student Stores on
Wednesday, Feb. 15 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. as part of the
7th annual "Rock for Real We'll be handing out WZMB bumper
stickers and our spring programming schedule at the broadcast.
This year's "Rock for Real" event will be held at the Attic later that
night. Featured bands include Unsound, Breed 13, Henry Acrobat,
Modern Pilgrims and Slow Children. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. All
proceeds go to support the Real Crisis Intervention
Center of Pitt County.
Q1.3 FM
r East Carolina University
east coast
$4.99
POSTERS
expires 22196
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
10
OFF
IMPORTS
expires 22696 J
UNC-W, along with match-ups with
VCU and American, don't expect the
Spiders to do a lot of moving in the
standings.
JMU has been the biggest dis-
appointment in the CAA. With a 1-
10 CAA record with no signs of im-
provement, the Dukes who still
could be dangerous in the tourna-
ment, will have to finish the season
with all top five CAA opponents.
1996 thus far has been nothing
but interesting. With the fall of the
JMU empire to the usual chaotic late
season jockey for position in the
tournament, the CAA has been close
as always. It is obvious that VCU will
be the favorite in the tournament,
but that's the beauty of college bas-
ketball tournaments. In the tourna-
ment it's lose one game and you're
gone, and with this tight race, it's
still anybody's championship.
NOTES from page 11
5 of 20 shots. The Lady Rams shot 44
percent in the first half and took a 19-
33 lead in the first half. At half time
VCU led ECU 19-33.
The Lady Pirates improved their
field goal percentage in the second half
to 40 percent, while VCU's percentage
dropped to 37 percent, but it wasn't
enough and the Lady Pirates lost by
20 points, 51-71.
Justine Allpress scored 18 in the
loss and pulled down six rebounds,
while Tomekia Blackmon added 10 and
grabbed three off the boards. Tracey
Keiley finished with eight points and
eight rebounds.
That loss dropped ECU to 3-7 in
the conference before traveling to
Harrisonburg. Va. on Sunday to take
on the Lady Dukes of James Madison.
ECU shot 44 percent in the first
half and 80 percent from the free throw
line. JMU shot 42 percent in the first
1 JbAJVl from page 11
ning back position with four players
already on scholarship. But, due to
the fact that Wilson is an eastern
North Carolina native and a 3.0 stu-
dent, Logan made room for him.
"I was not going to let him get
away Logan said.
At other skill positions, a couple
of other notable athletes were signed
that fit into the Pirates' offensive
scheme.
Rashan Burns is a 64, 240 lb.
Toms River, New Jersey native that
can play tight end or even split out at
he wide receiver position. He's big,
ast. mobile, and can run under the
half and only 41 percent from the line.
At half time ECU was only down by
one point 33-34.
However, ECU could not hold on
to that lead and lost the game 54-66.
The Lady Pirates shot 32 percent from
the field in the second half. However,
the Ladv Dukes shot 52 percent and
100 percent from the line. JMU never
sent ECU to the line in the second half
to shoot free throws.
Allpress and Blackmon led the
ECU scoring drive with 16 points each.
Mary Thorn also scored double digits
with 10. Leading rebounder was Laurie
Ashenfelder, who despite only having
two points, pulled down eight re-
bounds.
ECU now drops to 3-8 in the CAA
and 7-13 overall. The Lady Pirates will
have this week to prepare for George
Mason who will be coming to Minges
this Friday night. Tip-off is set for 7
iiinim H ��
ball, so it is no wonder that he was
attracted to the Pirates' style of of-
fense.
"He'll be fun to coach Logan
said.
Burns was heavily recruited by
the likes of National Champion Ne-
braska. Syracuse and Illinois.
Marcellus Harris is a wide re-
ceiver hailing from Newport News, Va.
who caught 38 passes for 603 yards
(15.9 yards per catch) as a Senior. He
also rushed for 161 yards and five
TD's. He ranked eighth in the Penin-
sula District with 60 points this sea-
son. Logan said he thinks he will fit
ki
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well into the Pirates' receiving corps.
"He's another one of the proto-
type ECU receivers he said. "He's a
5-10 kid that can run like crazy
Despite the acquisition of these
highly regarded offensive skill players,
Logan's emphasis was filling future
voids at offensive line and linebacker.
This coming season ECU will be los-
ing LB's Marvin Burke, Carlos Brown
and B J. Crane, who are three and four
year starters for the Pirates.
"We're anticipating the loss of
those guys and we needed to replen-
ish that area, along with our offen-
sive line said Logan. "We also
brought in a punter and a kicker to
give Chad (Holcomb) and Matt
(Levine) some competition and to play
some guys when the turnover begins
Probably the most valuable line-
backer, or recruit for that matter, that
Logan signed is Raymond Massey.
Massey is a 6'3 238 lb. Charlotte
native that follows the outstanding
linebacker tradition at ECU, along the
lines of Morris Foreman, Mark
Libiano or Robert Jones. He is rated
as the no. 19 prospect in North Caro-
lina by SuperPrep Magazine and was
the defensive MVP of the North Caro-
lina squad in the 1995 Shrine Bowl.
Massey had 189 tackles in 1995,
six sacks, three fumble recoveries (one
for a touchdown), caused five fumbles
and had one interception. Massey's
coach at Olympic High School, Scott
Stein, called him "the most dominant
player I have coached in 12 years
Massey was ail-conference and
All-CharlotteMecklenburg County.
Overall, the Pirates have a superb
recruiting class, and it will remain so
year after year if the winning tradi-
tion started by Steve Logan at ECU
continues.
"I feel real good about it and I'm
really proud Logan said. "We've
done a good job recruiting the best
athletes and then finding them a place
to play. I really believe they can play
the game, but that's what we went out
to do and we got it done. I'm really
proud of the way we recruited
Logan went to the Liberty Bowl
with 20 or 21 commitments in hand
and said the Pirates will indeed sign
the full complement of 25 players.
Logan had no negative surprises from
the recruits.
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�-





� III ' ��
Tuesday,February 13, 1996
The East Carolinian
Love
Lines
TO TRACY: ROSES ARE red and white
Pee-dee wears Purple and Gold, what else
can be said. I Love You heart and soul.
Love, Randy
DEAR JEN, NO MATTER where you go
or what you do I want you to know that
I love you! Love Always, Bubba
BISCUT, 777, I LOVE YOU Happy V
Day 777 222 333 666 888 Delacy
TRACY, I HAD A REALLY good time
the nights we went out and hopefully we
can do it again. Happy Valentines Day!
Keep Smiling, J.K.
SUSIE-Q-(MY HIP BUDDY) We will be
together always! Just nod your head and
agree. Cossip on girl! � your partner in
crime, Kyle the great!
RAYMNE, YOU ARE THE fire behind
each star 1 wish upon. Now I only wish
you could be closer and yet 1 know you
are. Love, Everest
BIG FATTY: PEPPERMINT, WHIRLY-
BIRD, and Porky are so happy to have
you in their life. We love you. Love, The
Family.
TH THE MAN 1 HARRIED. HAPPY
Valentine's Day! I Love you as much as
the day I married you. Love Always.
Pebbles
SWEET. LOVE SHARED between two
is wonderful when the two can become
one, especially in the clouds where we
are 9 times out of 10.1 Love You Always,
Dawn.
I WANT TO SAY TO YOU � I LOVE YOU
Kenneth Norman number two! Leaving
this note i the Love Line. You are my
love, my Valentine, Love, Alexis
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY to all the
ladies of crimson and creme. Remember
any love is good, but "Her First love is
DST Love ya, Genia
KAREN, I THOUGHT AND thought and
thought and tried to come up with some-
thing witty to say but all 1 really want to
tell you is I love you and Happy V-Day,
Mark
MW - Will you marry me?
HAPPY VALENTINE'S Day Jana Leigh!
I Love You! -CW
MIKE, THE PAST 7 12 months have
been great. Tomorrow, 1 start my 10 week
stroll. Be patient with me, it's going to
be tough. Love Always Tori
TEDDY BEAR T, YOU'LL Always Be My
Sweetheart 1 Love You, B.F.
HAPPY VALENTINES Day! Roses are
Red, Violets are blue. One day I hope we
wed, You're the best My Little Pumpkin
Head!
DEAR SHANNON, THANK you for all
your love over the past two years. You
have all my love for a lifetime. Love Al-
ways, Kevin.
LNB, ON THIS Valentine's Day 1 just
wanted you to remember how much I love
you - And 1 always will! Love, Pooh &
Tigger.
TINA, I CAN TAKE ALL the madness
of the world, But I won't last a day with-
out you. Will you be my valentine? Jo-Jo
MIKEY B SURPRISE Pooky! Have a
very Happy Valentine's Day Love always,
Tracy
ALAN, YOU WERE MY first friend here
at ECU. Thank you for being a great
friend. Happy Feb. 14th. M.F.
NICOLE, HERES TO A wonderful 5
years together! Happy Valentine's Day
and Happy Anniversary! YOU MEAN THE
MOST IN MY LIFE! Love you forever,
Erik.
HEATHER, I JUST WANTED to say
Happy Valentine's Day. Now give me
some candy. Just kidding. 1 love you, Ja-
TO JEFF G. YOU already have my heart
how about taking the rest of me as well.
Be my valentine. Love. Jeff D.
BRIAN, EVEN THOUGH you are going
to the game - I'll be thinking of you very
much! Forever, Amy.
TO KEVIN, FOR AS long as the sun ris-
es and sets, I will love you and cherish
you within my heart. Love, Sarah.
ISN'T IT IRONIC THE DAY of Amore
is on Hump Day? Wishing Dolphin,
Pocahontas, and Jurassic a Sappy Hearts
Day and begging y'all to be my freakin'
Valentine! From, WKCJR
CORBITT, IT ALL started with a dance
to Oasis! Look where we are now - Late
night dancing, peaches and dreams!
Thanks for "saving me "Rita"
SHERRi, LIFE IS TO short for me to
show you all my love in our lifetime, so
be mine until the sun shines no more!
Everlasting Love. Ike
ERIC, OUR LOVE IS unconditional we
knew it from the start I see it in you
eyes, you can feel it from my heart From
here on after let's stay the way we are
right now and share all the love and
laughter that a lifetime, will allow. My
love is true to you Valentine Tigger, pun-
for me. Love, Kim
DEAREST HANNAH, Thanks for the
special times, especially the night with
the best tossed salad of my life. Love,
Chris M.
DIND IS 11 SHARKS, Bunnies, Dinos,
Cookies and kitties! Cookie thing loves
her Dinosaur!
JULIE, FROM RUSSEL with love. "0
none, unless this miracle have might,
That in black ink my love may still shine
bright" (W.S.) God Rules!
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY JOHN! I
Love You. Love Harley.
TRACY, WEND1, MISTY, Oh I want to
take you all out and gaze into your eyes.
Actually 1'tj just sending this thought in
hopes of winning the prize! Chris
TO MY BEST FRIEND and only love,
Kevin, Happy Valentine's Day Sweet-
heart I Love you very much! Forever
Yours, Shannon
JEB, YOU ARE THE most precious gift
ever given to me and I'm so thankful for
the past 15 months. You've made me very
happy. I'll love you always, Missy
SNOOKIE, PRECIOUS, Good lxwking,
Big Muscles, 1 Love You! 1 Love You You
are great you are wonderful. I Love You!
I Love You, Angelina
KELLY, THROUGH THE GOOD and
the bad, I will always love you with all of
my heart! Frank
GORDO&L1V - YOU ALL are my best
Valentines ever! I love y'all a lot & will
miss you in Wilm. Who will I have to play
with? Love, Crafty
JEFF, LIKE THE STARS in the sky, my
love for you will stay constant. I will
marry you! Hugs and kisses, Belinda
DAVID - YOU are my world. Always and
forever yours. Love, Deb
JANET, I HOPE YOU know how much
you mean to me! Happy Valentine's Day!
-R
DIANE- NILES, champagne singing
"Live laughing, crying, loving, hating.
I'll really miss you - You'll always be a
part of me! Love you- your little, Alanis
TONYA, I'M CLAD WE met. I hope we
can be like peas and carrots forever. Her-
cules will take care of you tonight. Love
always, Poncho
TO: KB, THANKS FOR bringing so
much chaos to my life. 1 can't wait to see
what the future holds for us. Love ya
much. Lumbeeman
EARL, A LIFETIME OF happiness be-
gan over three years ago when 1 first met
you. 1 love you so much and 1 can't wait
to marry you October 26, Amy
THUMPER, I LOVE YOU with all of my
heart I know the road seems rocky, but
just believe in us and God will see us
through. Love, Your Tiger
MIKE DAIL "YOGI BEAR I drink, I
feel, I touch, I'm hairy - "I'm craay for
you From the girls of Phi Sigma Pi.
AMANDA, 1 think you are beautiful. Will
you go out with me? Your secret admirer
N umBER Zero, you'remyhe
r o L u v M. L.
CELESTE, your so awesome I can't stand
itT.
WENDY, 1 do love you, but I'm not gay
Keep up the great work. T.
TO EVERYONE IN B-GLAD I just love
your courage to be just who you are Be
my Valentine! - A.L.
SONIA, YOU ARE MY sunshine because
you bring me so much joy. The sparkle
in your eyes has always made every day
Valentine's Day. Love. Brian
BB, YOU ARE MY sunshine and you al-
ways say it best when you say nothing at
all. I love you, Puppa
JON-THANKS FOR being my Valen-
tine PS. Aren't mittens for girls? - Trae-
Z
KEVIN, WE'VE BEEN through so much
together. Thanks for always being there
for me. You hold the key to my heart I
love you, Alicia
TO MY BIG MOOSE, 1 love you with all
my heart May this be your best Valen-
tine's Day ever. Remember, I love you
more! Love your little Moose.
STEPH, WORDS ALONE cannot say
how much I love you! You are a special
part of my life so I want to wish you a
very special Valentine's Day! Love always,
Chad
THOMAS-THE STRONGEST love two
people can share is built upon friendship
and nothing in the world is better than
being in love with your very best friend.
Happy Valentine's Day! Rebecca
SWEETIE, SOMEWHERE, somehow,
someday I promise we will be together.
Just remember The Dance and the Unan-
swered Prayers. I love you, Cutie
AL YOU WILL ALWAYS BE SPECIAL
TO ME; YESTERDAY, TODAY, TOMOR-
ROW. ALWAYS (18 YEARS). FROM
SOMEONE WHO LOVES YOU BABY!
DLT, ROSES ARE RED, violets are blue,
always remember I'm thinking of you.
Please keep the night free for tonight you
are mine, at six we will dine. MGM
ROBIN, ROSES ARE red, violets are
blue. I asked you to marry me and you
said "I DO Happy Valentine's Day. I
Love You. David
DOOFY, DEREK, WOW, you've been
whupped a whole year now! 1 love you
very much! Happy Valentine's Day to you
and Big Bruce! Will you marry me some-
day? Love, Tanny
NANCY, I DON'T HAVE all the money
in the world, but I know how to say I
Love You. Your love, Kevin. P.S. Forever
ROUNDMAN THE laughter in your eyes
and the warmth of your smile bring hap-
piness to my heart Thank you for being
my friend, lover and companion. Love
you! Always and Forever, Wonder who?
cHofitu) (VJtntine'i
23ou from �"it
�ait CaxoCiman
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY TO my
Kyle! Wouldn't rather be "joined to an-
yone else's hip" let no guy ever separate
us! (uhh-huh!) 1 love you - Susan.
PIERRE, FOR ALL THE wonderful
years, for the many things you do for me.
For the love we share, Happy Valentine's
Day! Always, Bree
ZING ZARUBA FROM BREAKING out
of jail and being "there" to your bid night
and being "there" again It's been great!
Cold hands and all! Love, "Hoover"
GEOFFREY, I AM TRULY blessed to
have you in my life. You are my inspira-
tion. Happy Valentine's Day! I love you.
Always, Christie
KNOCK-MYSOCKS-OFF Too bad we
couldn't spark a romance in town! Happy
V-Day! Love, your out-of-town lover
DANAE, THE PAST seven months have
been wonderful. I hope we have many
more days together because you are a
great person to be with. Love, Michael
J.P Happy Valentine's Day! I love you
with all my heart! Love, Dawn
TO MY KISS MONSTER: I love you, I
need you and 1 hate living without you!
Please be mine. Love, T.
CHRISTOPHY, YOU'RE the light of my
life and the joy in my soul. You are my
Pumpkin Boy! Love, Moma
LAMONT, FOR THE PAST four years I
have been wrapped in the two strongest
and loving arms that a woman could ask
for. I Love You! Pafli
KS THANKS FOR everything! You're the
best and I hope to make your Valentine's
Day the best ever! I know mine will be!
Always. SH
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY TO THE
GIRLFRIENDS OF PI LAMBDA PHI. We
hope you have a good time at our social,
We promise we won't get too emotional.
But if there is one thing we have to say.
It's that we love you in every shape, form,
and way! The 5 society
Congratulations to the
winners of our "Perfect
Valentine's Day" contest:
1st prizeJAIME RACE
2nd prizeDAWN HERRING
3rd prizeKYLE SMITH
And thank you to the participating sponsors:
Jefferson's Florist, Riverside Steak Bar,
Carmike Cinemas, Percolator Coffeehouse,
Chico's, Papa John's Pizza, & The Attic.

wetl
i�$f
-?-





Title
The East Carolinian, February 13, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 13, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1124
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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