The East Carolinian, February 6, 1996






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February 6,1996
Vol71,No. 36
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Briefs
Around the State
After a weekend of snow, skies
cleared and temperatures dropped
to bitter lows around North Caro-
lina this morning.
Record cold was reported at
spots around the state. At the Ra-
leigh-Durham International Air-
port, the mercury fell to zero de-
grees, breaking a 1971 record o 5
degrees for the month of February,
in Wilmington, the temperature
dropped to 17 degrees, tying a
1985 record.
The winter storm has been
blamed for 11 deaths in North
Carolina, including that of a Win-
ston-Saiem high school student
killed Sunday when a tree fell on
him.
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) -
The prosecutor in the trial of the
man charged with killing Michael
Jordan's father says he'll have
about two and a half days of evi-
dence remaining after the state's
key witness finishes testifying.
Larry Martin Demery has
testified 5 12 days, including a
hearing without the jury present,
in the murder trial of Daniel Andre
Green. Demery faces hours more
examination by attorneys, District
Attorney Johnson Britt said Sun-
day.
Around the Country
MOSES LAKE, Wash. (AP) -
Math teacher Jon Lane rushed to
the algebra classroom two doors
down after hearing gunfire and the
sound of students crying.
He dove behind the
teacher's desk when he saw bloody
bodies on the floor, students cow-
ering in their desks and a 14-year-
old boy standing in a corner in a
trenchcoat with a hunting rifle. The
young gunman ordered him to
stand.
Police and grateful par-
ents hailed Lane as a hero for dis-
arming the hoy after his bloody
rampage Friday left a Frontier Jun-
ior High teacher and two students
dead and a third classmate seri-
ously wounded.
CHEEKTOWAGA, N.Y. (AP) -
The No. 6 bus from Buffalo's in-
ner city got a route change Mon-
day that will finally take it to one
of the main entrances of an up-
scale suburban mall.
For years, the bus
could get no closer to Walden
Galleria than a stop on the far
side of a seven-lane thorough-
fare with no sidewalks. Then
Cynthia Wiggins, a black teen-
ager who worked in the mall's
food court, was run down and
killed by a dump truck as she
tried to cross the busy highway.
Around the World
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - Egypt
will open four pyramids in June
in a region long closed to the
public to attract tourists away
from the overwhelmed pyramids
at Giza.
Two of the ruins, in-
cluding the so-called "bent pyra-
mid are considered some of
the first attempts at pyramid
building.
Powder
play
Alex Brown and Karen
Minor battle it out in
front of the A.J. Fletcher
Music Center over the
weekend. They were two
of a great number of
people enjoying the
white stuff.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Campus participates
in disorder screening
Eating disorders
affect more
women than men
David Durham
Staff Writer
The ECU counseling center is
holding free screenings and informa-
tion sessions on eating disorders from
nine ajn. to three p.m. on Feb. 7,19,
as part of the National Eating Disor-
ders Screening Program.
According to a public service an-
nouncement from the counseling cen-
ter, the program will consist of an
educational presentation, an anony-
mous screening questionnaire and the
opportunity for students to discuss
their responses with a health care
professional. Information will be avail-
able at a table in front of the student
stores and the screenings will take
place in the counseling center, 312
Wright Building. The announcement
stated that although the program is
directed toward students, any inter-
ested person may participate.
"The screening day itself is be-
ing done at some point this month
1 q
on over 600 col-
lege campuses
across the coun-
try said Dr.
Sara Shepherd,
counselor and
NEDSP Site Co-
ordinator. "This
is the first year
it's being done
and it's being
specifically fo-
cused on college
campuses
"Five per-
cent of college-
aged women and
one percent of
men have
anorexia,
bulimia, or the
binge eating dis-
order Shepherd
said.
Shepherd
said that there is
a difference, how-
ever, between an eating disorder and
disordered eating.
She said that 15 percent of col-
lege-aged women experience disor-
dered eating as opposed to 5 percent
Stats on Eating Disorders
.90 of sufferers are women
! 5 of college-aged women
have anorexia, bulimia or
binge easting disorder
of men have anorexia,
"Bulimia or binge eating
disorder
Q1 5 of college-aged women
experience disordered
eating; which is usually
triggered by stress or a
death in the family and is
usually temporary
that suffer from an eating disorder.
"While all of us can experience
disordered eating when we're under
See EATING page 4
Ninth district candidate talks in
General Classroom Building
Aldridge
responds via
telephone
interview
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
A candidate for the Ninth Dis-
trict House seat was on campus last
week to answer questions from stu-
dents.
Dr. Charles Ward, democratic
candidate in the district which in-
cludes ECU, addressed a sparse audi-
ence at the College Democrats "Get
To Know Your Candidates" meeting
Tuesday night.
"The next large area of growth
in N.C. will be in the East Ward said.
"In 30 years, Kinston will be the East-
em Research Triangle Park
"ECU is an important part of that
growth said Ward, an ECU alumnus
and part-time professor of criminal
Fiberoptic
network may
cut long lines
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Charles Ward spoke to a group of students in a room in the
General Classroom Building last Tuesday evening. The event
was sponsored by ECU College Democrates.
justice. "We're a progressive school.
Our schools of art and music are na-
tionally known. We have one of the
first and finest schools of education
Ward, director of education at
Eastern Correctional Center in Maury,
identified education, the criminal jus-
tice system and health care as top
priorities in the campaign.
"I have two of these three cov-
ered well Ward said. "I won't take a
back seat to anybody
See ALDRIDGE page 3
Residence halls,
classrooms see
improvement
Tambra Zlon
Editor
Wiring for ECU's fiberoptic net-
work is complete, and may mean a
world of technological advances for
students.
Voice mail was installed into cam-
pus residence halls over the summer
and although not all students use the
system, many enjoy the convenience
of not buying an answering machine
or missing calls.
"We had one
problem with some-
body calling and
changing our greet-
ing, but that's be-
cause we didn't
change our pass-
word said Richard
Barlow, a freshman
in Scott Hall. He said
he and his roommate
like having voice
mail.
"What we've
spent the last two
years on was build-
ing a basic infra- mmmmmmmmm
structure that we could use said
Blake Price, director of Computing
and Information Systems (CIS). "Now
we're ready to start implementing and
doing some things that will really im-
pact students
One of the first enhancements
students can look forward to will be
electronic fund transfer from the fi-
nancial aid office. Administrators are
hoping to have this system in place
by next fall.
"Students won't have to stand in
line to endorse checks and then re-
turn a few days later to pick up ex-
cess financial aid checks said Rose
Mary Stelma, director of the office of
financial aid. "They'll only have to
appear once - to pick up the excess
financial aid checks. Students will, of
course, still have to return a copy of
their bill by the deadline so their
schedules will be saved
Automated crediting leaves many
with the question, will the lines at the
Cashier's Office end?
"Some
will - students
will only have
to be there
once to get ex-
cess financial
aid checks
Stelma said.
"Eventually,
this line may
be eliminated,
or dramatically
reduced, if the
one card sys-
tem allows us
to directly
credit student's
mmmmmmmmmmmmm bank accounts,
etc. This is a long term possibility
Stelma said that money saved on
postage and buying checks will be
used to upgrading services. She also
believes the process of applying for
See FIBER page 4
Loans affected by
electronic transfer as
of fall '96
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Supplemental
Grant (SEOG)
Federal Perkins Loan
(report to Student Loans
Office)
Federal Stafford Loans
ECU Grant
N.C. Need Based Grant
Team places fifth overall
Students travel to Houston for national
convention to compete in finals
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Stsff Wrttw
Students in the construction management department represented ECU
at a National Association of Home Builders Convention held in Houston,
Texas.
At the national convention on Jan. 25, these students competed against
17 universities from all over the United States. The students were asked to
plan a $114 million construction project The students had to estimate utili-
ties, discuss landscaping, financing, where to put in roads and an abundance
of other topics.
When the competition was over, ECU walked away with two awards.
ECU came in fifth place overall in the competition. Arizona State re-
ceived first place, Purdue received second place, Brigham Young received
third place and the fourth place award was given to the University of North
Florida.
"I am really proud of the students said ECU's faculty coach, Jim Kennedy.
"They did a lot of hard work
Kennedy said ECU beat the schools of Texas A&M, University of Florida,
Michigan, Illinois State and many other top rated institutions.
"These schools had construction programs that had been competing ir�
this competition for years Kennedy said.
This was ECU's first time competing in this type of competition. Their
strong third place showing at the regional conference in Atlanta and their
fifth place finish at the national competition helped ECU receive the "Rookie
of the Year" award.
Kennedy said not only was this a competition, but it also gave the stu-
dents who went the opportunity to be exposed to seminars and job fairs. The
four seniors who went receded multiple interviews.
The six students who represented ECU at the national competition were
Dante Berini, Jason Ellington, Chris Edwards, Brian Relay, Mike Zurey and
Heather Banks.
"This was a great opportunity for students Kennedy said. "I hope that
we can go back and compete next year
On Nov. 17, ECU placed third at the Associated School of Construction
Southeast Region in Atlanta. This victory allowed the students to travel to
Houston.
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Rock entertains Wright Thursday nightpage
OPINION
Lets remember Black Historypage O
Men say goodbye to home winspage I U
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Tuesday
Sunny
High 36
Low 15
Wednesday
Clear
High 50
Low 22
r?W t& teacA ct&
Phone
6366
2000
(newsroom) 328
(advertising) 328
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.C1S.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
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Tuesday, February 6, 1996
The East Carolinian
Women encouraged to speak more in class
Texas A&M prof arrested for taking student bribe
An art professor at Texas A&M University resigned in December af-
ter police said he offered to give a student an A in exchange for $100.
Jose Martinez, on faculty with the university for more than 15 years,
was arrested after he accepted money from freshman Christopher Cruz,
who was wired to campus police.
Baby death stuns U of Georgia
The brutal murder of a newborn baby - found in a residence hall
restroom and stabbed in the heart - sent a chill through the University
of Georgia.
A custodian cleaning the women's restroom of Oglethrope House
residence hall on Jan. 8 found the seven-pound baby boy stuffed inside a
trash can. The infant had stab wounds to the heart and other parts of his
body.
NCSU club finds homes for old textbooks
When the fall semester ended, many students traded in their text-
books for a lot less than they paid for them at local bookstores.
The only thing worse than getting next to nothing for your book is
finding out that the bookstore does not even want to buy it back, because
new editions have been published or the professor has changed books.
These books usually end up in the trash or as door stops. But thanks
to the Lorax Environmental Club at North Carolina State, unwanted
textbooks now can be relocated to a place where they will be appreciated.
Committee recommends dining overhaul at UNC-Chapel Hill
A student congress committee agreed to let students vote on a plan
that would gut Lenoir Dining Hall, raise student fees and make the uni-
versity responsible for financial losses in food service.
The Student Affairs Committee forwarded a bill to congress that
would let students vote on some of the recommendations generated by
the Food Services Advisory Task Force. Two-thirds of congress must agree
to place the referendum on the Feb. 13 ballot The board of trustees must
approve any fee increases.
UMC Research shows plusminus grading causes little change in G.P.A.s
After its first semester, the grade on plusminus grading system at
the University of Missouri-Columbia is starting to come in.
Some UMC professors believe it is too early to judge the plusminus
system.
Despite affecting many individual students' grades, plusminus grad-
ing had only a minor affect on overall averages, according to the registrar's
report on grade distribution from the fall semester.
The report showed that the mean grade point average for the fall
semester was 2.852, a slight drop from the 2.868 mean grade point aver-
age from the fall 1994 semester.
Compiled by Wendy Rountree. Taken from College Press Service
and various college newspapers.
CPS - Ever notice that woman
sitting next to you in class, the one
who does not participate in class dis-
cussions, or who tries to talk but is
not recognized by the instructor?
Her problem may be more than just
a case of the nerves.
According to University of Cali-
fornia-Davis Women's Resources and
Research Director Robin Whitmore,
many female students' reluctance to
speak up in class is a result of years
of subtle discrimination.
"By the time a female student
comes to college, she has experi-
enced 12 years in a classroom set-
ting she said. "Her behavior be-
comes patterned and unconscious
Whitmore said that even in
classes with mostly female students,
men are often given more speaking
time proportionally.
"Susan a UCD teaching assis
tant who preferred t
to remain anony-
mous, agreed that
women do not
speak up as much
in class as men do.
"I see males
assuming a right
to speak, and I'm
concerned about
it she said.
"Once. I decided
to stay out of the
class discussion
and let the debate
go. What hap-
pened was that
four men were
talking about gender and the
women's voices were silenced with-
out an intermediary
Whitmore said the classroom
environment
� � .
may encourage
male-dominated
participation.
"Class-
rooms are set
up to be more
competitive,
and men are
comfortable
with that kind
of situation
she said.
"Women wait
and take time
to process infor-
mation and for-
�MMHHMHMB
mulate their an-
swers. Clearly, there are exceptions
to the rule
Whitmore said that women's
"Classrooms are
set up to be more
competitive, and
men are
comfortable with
that kind of
situation"
� Robin Whitmore
methods for answering questions
differ from those of men.
"Women tend to raise their
hands while men are more willing
to shojt out answers, which means
there are more male responses she
said.
UCD sophomore Tuwanna Pe-
ters said that she sees this type of
behavior occurring in some of her
classes.
"Women are more respectful
and don't blurt out she said. "Of-
ten women will try to speak up, but
the teacher will call on guys
According to UCD Italian lec-
turer Jay Grossi, women speak up
as much as men in class.
"In my class it seems to be
pretty equal he said. "Often women
See SPEAK page 4
Scholarship searches could he scams
CPS - You've probably seen the
ads: Free financial aid! Over $6 bil-
lion in private sector grants and schol-
arships available to students.
For a process fee ranging from
$25 to several hundred dollars, schol-
arship search companies guarantee
students can be "matched" with
sources of funding, often regardless
of their grades, income or family in-
come.
But are scholarship search com-
panies effective?
Representatives of these compa-
nies claim they help thousands of stu-
dents every year, but many educators
take a dim view of the businesses.
"Overall. I think it's a real con-
sumer rip-off said Phyllis K.
Hooyman, director of financial aid at
Hope College in Holland, Mich.
"People have to be aware and proceed
cautiously
Ro i Shunk, director of financial
aid at Gettyburg College in Gettyburg,
Penn said often students receive no
more information than they could find
themselves at their school's financial
aid office or during a trip to the li-
brary.
"You can learn just as much by
going through the college's financial
aid office, the high school guidance
office or the library - for free Shunk
Providing Adult & Pediatric Care � Women's
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Pregnancy Testing Flu and Tetanus
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DOCTOR'S
URGENT CARE
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Participating
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BCBS 507 E. 14th Street, Greenville,
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Mon-Fri 8am - 8pm, Sat 9am -
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�j
said. "These companies make profits
by capitalizing on people's laziness
Here's how most scholarship
search companies work: students pay
a fee. and the scholarship search com-
pany sends a list of possible scholar-
ship sources. At �
Student Financial
Services, for ex-
ample, a phone
representative ex-
plained that in
exchange for a
one-time fee of
$69.95, students
receive informa-
tion on how to
apply for private-
sector scholar-
ships.
The phone representative said
requirements for the scholarships
vary. Students are guaranteed their
fee back if they don't see a $300 re-
turn.
"These scholarships are set up
tor tax breaks he said, adding that
the company is 95 percent successful

Overall, I think
it's a real
consumer rip-off,
� Phyllis K. Hooyman,
director of financial aid at
Hope College in Holland,
Mich.
in finding students scholarship money.
"Usually the requirements deal with
what state you live in and what your
major is
A New York City Better Business
Bureau investigation, however, after
contacting more
than 30 scholar-
ship search firms,
revealed only
three students re-
ported receiving
any funds. The
bureau also found
that most scholar-
ship matching
companies are ei-
ther "licensees"
or "information
brokers Rather than screen appli-
cants, they simply forward the stu-
dents' paperwork to a parent com-
pany, which sends out the list of po-
tential sources to the student. It's up
to the student to research and con-
tact each organization listed.
The New York City Better Busi-
ness Bureau issued a consumer alert
on bogus scholarship companies in
September 1992 and gave 20 schol-
arship matching firms operating in the
city unsatisfactory ratings. The report
noted that some consumers com-
plained they did not receive the guar-
anteed number of scholarship sources
and were unable to obtain refunds.
Others claim they didn't qualify be-
cause the sources did not match the
information on the student's profile.
Still others stated they received infor-
mation after the application deadlines
had passed. As a result, they were
unable to apply to even one source.
Chris Vaughn, director of finan-
cial aid at Mansfield University in
Mansfield. Penn said while it is pos-
sible to have success by using these
companies, students are better off
going through all the traditional av-
enues first. Many scholarships have
strict requirements - from grade av-
erages to residency - that would elimi-
nate many students foi .n qualifying.
"The stipulations that private
See SCAM page 3
(SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING
Adam Sandier
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 6, 1996
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Teen convicted of murder
Tired of Waiting For Cool
(AP) - Three young men were
convicted of murder and a fourth was
found guilty of voluntary manslaugh-
ter Monday in the slaying of a teen-
ager who was beaten with baseball
bats on the steps of his church in
Philadelphia.
Two other teen-agers were con-
victed of conspiracy in the attack on
16-year-old Eddie Polec.
Polec, who was from
Philadelphia's Fox Chase section, was
attacked by teen-agers from a rival
high school in 1994 to avenge insults
and get even for a reported assault
on a girl from their suburban com-
munity of Abington.
The girl later acknowledged she
was never assaulted.
The ferocity of attack stunned
residents of both neighborhoods and
exposed problems with Philadelphia's
police dispatch system. Seven 911
operators were disciplined after tran-
scripts showed that some of them
grew impatient and didn't send po-
lice until about 40 minutes after the
first of many calls. "
Parents sobbed as the jury con-
victed three of the defendants - Nick
Pinero, 18; Anthony Rienzi. 18; and
Thomas Crook, 19 - of third-degree
murder, rather than first-degree mur-
der, as prosecutors had sought.
According to witnesses, all three
wielded the bats that left Polec lying
on the steps of St. Cecilia's Church
in Philadelphia, bleeding from seven
skull fractures.
The jury convicted Dewan
Alexander, 18, of voluntary man-
slaughter. Witnesses said he kicked
Polec.
Bou Khathavong, 18, and Carlo
Johnson, 20, - two defendants who
no witnesses said beat Polec - were
cleared of all homicide charges.
All six were convicted of con-
spiracy.
Prosecutors said Reinzi held
Polec up after he had already been
injured, giving Crook and Pinero
clean shots at the teen's head. Reinzi
also was accused of taking a "golf
swing" at Polec's head.
Johnson was accused of supply-
ing the bats, while Khathavong was
identified as the organizer of the at-
tack.
Prosecutors relied on the testi-
mony of youths at the scene, particu-
larly Kevin Convey, who was origi-
nally charged with first-degree mur-
der but pleaded guilty to third-degree
murder and testified against his
friends.
Defense attorneys said that teen-
agers were lying to avoid implicating
themselves and their closer friends,
and noted that Convey named at least
five other youths who beat Polec but
who were never charged.
If you have 15 - 96
credits and a 3.0
g.ra. or better,
then you meet the
initial requirements
for membership to the
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society.
TllHRi; Will. Bh AN INFORMATIONAL
MI-TUNG ON TlTSDAY. FEBRUARY 6 AT
4:()()pm in Mindi NHAi.i. Room 244.
Till Rl.Ol l.AR MILTING I OR OLD MLMBLRS
WILL BL AT 5:00.
??? Any questions ???
OvvAJVl from page 2
corporations and foundations use for
awarding scholarships are so tight,
scholarships often can't be awarded
because students don't meet all the
requirement Vaughn said.
"When people come into my of-
fice and ask about these firms, I take
them next door to the library and let
them do a scholarship search on the
Internet said Tommy Blair, director
of financial aid at Roanoke College in
Salem, Va. "I can get the same results
for no money
Helen Nunn, director of financial
aid at Suseniiehanna Universitv in
Selinsgrove, Pa agreed.
"If you're going to use a scholar-
ship search company, contact the Bet-
ter Business Bureau to check on their
record she said
ALDRIDGE from page 1
Ward said the government has
an important role in education.
"If children don't have the ba-
sics that AFDC, school lunch pro-
grams and Social Services may be
providing, they won't succeed Ward
said.
Ward said our prison system
costs taxpayers $800 million per year.
"We can either send inmates out
to be taxpayers or we can continue
paying to keep them in prison Ward
said. "Three per cent of North Caro-
linians cause 95 percent of the prob-
lems. We can change this
Responding to a question of in-
creasing tuition and fee hikes, Ward
said the increases are probably neces-
sary. When asked why he had decided
to enter politics with this race, the
candidate said he had considered sev-
eral local possibilities but concluded
that "it would be necessary to go west
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Save
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of I-95 to make change
Remaining true to his policy of
running a "clean campaign Ward's
only comment concerning possible
opponent Henry Aldridge was "that
he had to make it through the demo-
cratic primary before he started cam-
paigning for November's race" and
that Aldridge was a "good person
Students interviewed before the
meeting all expressed a desire to learn
more about the issues.
"He made a lot of good points
said Amy Rogers, a freshman. "I'd like
to see the other candidates
Tonya Dennis, a graduate stu-
dent said she believed the session was
informative and has given her new
insight.
College Democrats president
Matt Stuart said he hopes to bring
candidates of various political races
to campus for similar sessions. Stuart
noted that there used to be a College
Republicans organization on campus,
but it is no longer active.
In a telephone interview, Repub-
lican incumbent Dr. Henry Aldridge
addressed several questions concern-
ing campus issues. "ECU is my
school he said. "I'm proud of it and
have done a lot to support it
Citing the Model Clinical Teach-
ing Program as his most important
achievement, Aldridge said, "Without
my support for this excellent program,
it would never have been funded be-
cause, of all the budget restrictions
this year
Concerning the university bud-
get cuts, he said it was important for
students to realize that the monies cut
were from increases that had been
requested for next year and not from
money already appropriated.
"To my knowledge, no cuts in
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staff positions will be necessary
Aldridge said.
Aldridge commented on the
controversy surrounding his state-
ments that abortions need not be
funded Lr rape cases because real
rape victims couldn't get pregnant.
"I believe they have been ex-
plained and accepted by the voters of
my district Aldridge said. "I never
intended to demean women or show
any lack of understanding of the
trauma associated with violence and
rape. I continue to oppose the taking
of a human life through abortion and
certainly oppose the use of taxpayer
money to fund abortions
The Daily Reflector reported
that Aldridge advocated budget cuts
at ECU because of advertisements for
condom ads that ran in TEC.
I find it very difficult to be sym-
pathetic toward the requests of a uni-
versity that condones this type of
publication under its umbrella
Aldridge said in the Greenville paper.
In response, Aldridge said that he
found the ads to be extremely offen-
sive and "it hurt to see the ads associ-
ated with such a fine university
"I get into trouble sometimes
because when asked a question, I say
what I think without worrying about
how it's going to sound on the news
Aldridge said I have to get better at
that
Aldridge said he has been instru-
mental in passing a parental consent
law, cutting the state abortion fund
from $1.2 million to $50,000, creat-
ing the "no frills" prison and limiting
government growth.
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Tuesday, February 6,1996
The East Carolinian
SPEAIv from page 2
are more talkative than men, because
I find they study more
Grossi said some people are ner-
vous and need additional encourage-
ment.
"I try not to intimidate students,
but it's important for them to try and
talk, especially in language class he
said. "If they are prepared and confi-
dent, it's easier to lead them into dis-
cussion
UCD senior Jason Lurie agreed
that a person's willingness to partici-
pate in class depends on self-confi-
dence.
"It's just personality he said.
"Some people are less inclined to at-
tract attention to themselves he
said.
Lurie added that he did not no-
tice whether men spoke more than
women in class, but that instructors
tend to call on some students more
than others.
"It always seems to be the same
people who talk in class he said.
"In most classes, the same people
speak up, and of those, at least half
EATING from page 1
are women.
Instructors can help to create
discussions in which there is equal
gender representation, according to
Whitmore.
"Teachers should make it clear
that students reply to questions by
raising their hands she said. "Give
more positive feedback to students
and make sure to use inclusive lan-
guage and examples that aren't gen-
der-biased
Susan said that she pays careful
attention to people who are less likely
to participate.
"I ask to hear from people who
haven't said anything yet in class
she said. "I think teachers should
work on trying to create an environ-
ment in which people feel safe ex-
pressing their opinions
Susan said female students need
to assert themselves more in class.
"Set up your own boundaries
and agree to discuss issues, but not
to be attacked she said. "It's a brave
act to get your voice out there, but
at the same time it's really important,
because you're representing all
women
Peters said she advises students
to participate and get all they can
out of class.
"Try to be more open and more
assertive so you can be as educated
and well-trained as possible - get
more for what you're paying for she
said.
Whitmore said male students
should also be aware of any class-
room discrimination.
"When women don't talk men
also lose, because they don't benefit
from another way of thinking she
said. "Men as well as women should
observe the classroom setting and
approach the instructor with prob-
lems
Susan noted that class discus-
sions should not exclude any perspec-
tives.
"If I don't say that I have a dif-
ferent viewpoint, we may be overlook-
ing something very important she
said. "It goes beyond the classroom.
It's about voices heard in society
FIBER from page 1
financial aid should also become a lot
easier.
"It looks like we'll be receiving
financial aid applications for 1996-97
in an electronic manner, which could
possibly mean that there will be less
of a delay between the time a student
applies for financial aid and when the
application data appears on the ECU
student database
The student database, along with
several other options will soon be
available to students through the
Internet and kiosk (information) ma-
chines that programmers in CIS are
currently working on. The machines
have touch screens and with the aid
of an identification card, will allow
students to access their financial aid
status, class schedule, grades and
many other services, Price said. CIS
has three machines which will be
spread across campus.
Price said CIS built extra space
into the network, but that demand for
connections has been so great that the
department has almost run out of
space. CIS continues to hook depart-
ments into the network, and is plan-
ning to help design a video surveillance
system for ECU Police to monitor a few
parking lots across campus.
CIS employees' hard work paid off
recently, when they took first place in
the Consulting Engineers of North
Carolina '95 "Engineering Excel-
lence Competition" for design.
"We've got u very technologically
advanced design said Thorn Lamb,
associate director of systems and com-
munication for CIS. "I think the
award was really a combination of the
stress or when we've had a death in
the family disordered eating, when
taken to an extreme, can lead to an
eating disorder Shepherd said.
Shepherd said the timing of the
screening program is ideal because
this time of year is when many stu-
dents may experience disordered eat-
ing as they try to lose weight in prepa-
ration for spring break.
Part of the goal of the screening
program is to provide some education
and early identification in an effort
to prevent such disordered eating
from becoming a serious eating dis-
order, Shepherd said.
According to the counseling
center's brochure on eating disorders,
90 percent of sufferers are female.
Shepherd said however, men cannot
be overlooked. She said that male ath-
letes in some individualized sports
including gymnastics, weight lifting,
running and swimming are at a higher
risk of developing an eating disorder.
Shepherd also said that men are more
likely to have the binge eating disor-
der over anorexia nervosa or bulimia.
Others at a higher risk for devel-
opment include frequent dieters, those
with a family history of obesity and
those with a family history of alcohol
fact that we did it with a limited bud-
get in a state system in a very short
period of time, and still managed to
pull off the technical side of it"
Lamb said several factors were
used to judge the competition includ-
ing budget timing, technical complex-
ity and innovative uses of the system.
A voice response system is another
area the administration has started
talking about
"We've also talked with Telecom-
munications about the possibility of
having some options on our telephone
system Stelma said. "One option
would allow students to request finan-
cial aid application forms, another op-
tion would allow students to listen to
general information about the finan-
cial aid application process. We want
to limit the options so people don't
have to wade through a maze to get to
a real person
Registration may also see an over-
haul in years to come.
"There is a task force put together
by the Chancellor and chaired by David
Watkins, Academic Affairs, that is look-
ing at the entire 'registration' process
� which we are defining as the whole
process of becoming an ECU students
- scheduling classes, getting financial
aid, paying the bill, etc Stelma said.
"I personally Have the hope that we
will make the system work better for
students
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Ice has once again forced us off the air, but were working
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FREE ADVERTISING! If your group or organization has an
announcement about an upcoming event and want it announced
over the air, simply mail the information to WZMB, Mendenhall
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This is a free service for all non-profit campus and community
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or substance abuse.
Treatment for an eating disorder
largely depends upon the individual's
needs. Shepherd said that treatment
most often consists of a combination
of individual counseling, nutritional
counseling, group therapy, a physical
evaluation and in some cases, medi-
cation.
Shepherd said that she wants
people to encourage their friends who
have eating disorders to come to the
screening and get help. If not the per-
son with the disorder then the friend
should come to the screening and at-
tend the information session, in which
written information will be provided
that describes how to approach a
friend about his or her problem and
how to help the person get help.
Shepherd said the screenings will
consist of several stages, including the
information session. She said partici-
pation in the entire program will take
from 45 minutes to an hour, but par-
ticipants are free to participate in as
much or as little of the program as
they wish.
Funding for the network came
from a variety of sources.
"We sold tax exempt bonds to fi-
nance the over a 10-year term said
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs
Richard Brown. "The bonds will be
repaid from state appropriations, dor-
mitory charges and student fees that
are already in place
The video capabilities in the sys-
tem are numerous.
We're using some of it in a lim-
ited fashion now, but the capabilities
are there for up to 80 channels to be
broadcast anywhere on campus Lamb
said. "I think it's 16 that we can feed
off campus and that's more of a limita-
tion of what the cable company can
take from us.
"As far as the interactive video and
sessions between different buildings on
campus, that's a 16 by 16 matrix. I
could have 16 different people in 16
different locations all talking to each
other
Equipment for actual broadcast
however, is not adequate for 16 loca-
tions.
"The actual studio equipment the
cameras, the lights and all were not a
part of this project its just a matter
of supply catching up with demand
Lamb said.
Price and Lamb said CIS will con-
tinue to upgrade their systems
throughout the next year.
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Greenville, NC 27858
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Reminder
The ECU Immunization Policy mandates:
?Students will be withdrawn from classes if immunization
information is not complete before February 12,1996 (end
of 30 day grace period)
For more
information
contact the
ECU Student
Health Service
(328-6841)
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Tuesday, February 6,1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
February is a
time to reflect
on a part of
American
culture that has
pushed us to
succeed.
Think of February and what comes to mind? Sweet romance,
candy, flowers and, oh yeah, it's a leap year too.
February is also Black History month.
It's a time to reflect on the African history of our culture.
But these reflections may not be so easy to come by when we
consider that the vast majority of Black history has been writ-
ten by Europeans and other non-Africans, and what we've been
taught in school may present skewed images of reality.
Luckily, America's society is opening its eyes, and the Afri-
can American culture is becoming more available to those who
seek it Groups such as Aliied Blacks for Leadership and Equal-
ity (ABLE), the opening of the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
last fall and the office of minority affairs provide opportunities
for every ECU student to learn more about their own and other
students' cultures.
According to Dr. Brian Haynes, director of minority affairs
at ECU, Black History Week was introduced by Carter G.
Woodson, also known as the father of negro history, in 1926.
This week was established in response to the segregation preva-
lent in America at the time. Woodson chose the month of Feb-
ruary because it is the birth month of historical figures Frederick
Douglas and Abraham Lincoln, signer of the Emancipation Proc-
lamation.
Black History Week progressively evolved into Black His-
tory month in the late '60s, Haynes said.
When we think of prominent African American role mod-
els, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X may come to mind.
But did you know that street lights, golf tees and even ice cream
were invented by African Americans?
Considering the fact that Africans were in America before
Europeans, it may be time to learn about a culture long forgot-
ten or disregarded in the first half of this century. Our celebra-
tion of African culture will last throughout the month and sev-
eral activities are planned to bring awareness throughout the
ECU community.
The Ledonia Wright African American Cultural Center is
sponsoring at least six events, many of them free-of-charge.
Through these sessions, male and female students can learn
about self-love and relationships, focusing on the past to learn
about tne present And on Feb. 25, Clifton Davis will present
"God's Trombones For more information about how you can
get involved, pick up the phone and call the Ledonia Wright
Center at 328-1680.
Ladies chow down
Ft has taken me almost an entire
year to get up enough raw guts to
write this article. My life may be at
stake simply attempting to get these
words out into the general public. I
am writing with the fear of a secret
agent undercover. Dare I use the
wrong words or speak in the wrong
way, it could be curtains for me so
remember that I write for the good of
the campus.
I'm not sure who this is for, if
not for my own pleasure, but I want
to make it clear that the female race
is my favorite race on people of this
earth. Girls are cool and guys are stu-
pid and inconsiderate. There, I said it
so; that you can't
. P.M.S is the sole reason for the
troubles of the world. Just kidding, I
just wanted to write it one time be-
cause most of you would be expect-
ing it by now.
P.M.S is a phenomenon that we
men only hear about Yes, it is often
the reason for unanswerable ques-
tions that we men have, but it is not
always the cause. It is, however the
source of one of the most feared sick-
nesses that takes over the women that
we so dearly love and respect
It is the reason for creature
cravings.
These insane binges for food are
present in women all over campus, let
alone in the world. For the purposes
of this article, the women of the sixth
floor of Green hall were kind enough
to share with me the most common
foods that satisfy them in this situa-
tion as well as others.
Let me first paint a picture. It's
10:45 on a Thursday night and Mindy
(not a real person so don't think that
it's you) is pacing around her room
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
These insane
binges for food
are present in
women all over
campus, let
alone in the
World.
wincing and complaining about any-
thing that crosses her mind. All of a
sudden a picture pops into her head.
The refrigerator, surrounded by a
glowing light, hovers over a cloud in
a vision that she has just seen.
Quickly, she rushes to it and reaches
for the first and, according to my most
valuable and wonderful source, most
important source of satisfaction -
chocolate.
An un-named source said that
"chocolate and P.M.S. go hand-in-hand
because chocolate satisfies another
important craving ,
After chowing down on a bag of
Hershey Kisses that Mindy kept in the
fridge, she reached again into the
depths and pulled out a can of peaches
which she proceeded to eat with
melted marshmailows on top.
I know, you're saying, "I know
somebody that lives in that dorm. Do
they do these things?" I'll tell you
right now that it is not just that dorm.
Next, with the knowledge that
the peach and marshmallow smores
2�a
did not do the job, she climbed over
the table behind her to grab a giant
jar of peanut butter which she eats
on the end of oourdough pretzels. As
sne scoops out the peanut butter, she
spies out of the corner of her eye, a
family size bottle of ranch dressing in
the doer of the refrigerator. Climbing
back over the table, she shoves a two
day old plate of French fries into the
microwave for two minutes and pulls
them out only to drown them in a
molten pouring of dressing.
At this point the average person
might think about stopping, but not
this one because she has been taken
over and is being controlled.
Finishing off even the Styrofoam
plate which held only a dribble,of
dressing, she pours an entire gallon
of milk into the sink, careful to plug
up the hole at the bottom and emp-
ties a box of fruity pebbles into it A
ladle provides the necessary tool for
this craving, and she is almost satis-
fied when she trips over a pile of pizza
coupons sitting on the floor in a two
foot pile.
She orders a pizza that she will
eat after she goes through all-of the
normal craving foods like popcorn,
donuts, French onion dip and potato
chips and finally, ice cream.
It is almost three o'clock in the
morning when Mindy decides that the
hole in her stomach has been appeased.
She shuts the door to the fridge whigh
was the only light source in the entire
room. It is now dark.
It is the opinion of this writer that
if women have to have P.M.S then they
deserve a little midnight chomping. So
chow down and don't let a silly little
man tell you that you're strange.
Well ladies, thumbs up?
FOUNDED1925,

�Of,
Kgr
�DI3925 '��
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crlssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor Kmi Klmmr Production Assistant
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor XtaH �"�� sy$tems Manager
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor Tta CoW Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Crato; Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Crlstte Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27854353. For information, all (919)
326366.
Patrick Hlnson, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumnton, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Violence hits everyone
Move over Al Capone, here come
some really sinister and nasty people!
I couldn't help but read this
amazing article in Newsweek about
an upstart gang that's controlled by
its cult-like leader who, ironically
enough is sitting in a Chicago jail cell.
It almost sounds like another David
Koresh-Timothj McVeigh story, with
a few plot twists.
However, the thing that caught
my attention was the violence that this
mythical cultgang had administered
to those people that got in its way.
baseball bat beatings characterized by
making the transgressor look like a
"pumpkin head after the group had
finished its business. Sometimes the
punishments were worse. Not only
that but the leader of this regime, the
Gangster Disciples, are in jail and have
supposedly been there for 22 years,
convicted of murder.
It is really appalling to find out
that this murderer and cult leader he
been able to coerce minds and make
inner-city youth and aduits carry out
his orders as the supreme being. A
false deity, who's behind Illinois State
Penitentiary bars, that no one has ever
met can control the drug trade and
mastermind the killings of those
people in the CD's way. What kind of
Eric Bartels
Opinion Columnist
person are we dealing with?
His name is not Adolph Hitler, but
it's very close. Larry Hoover is the
kingpin of all kingpins in Chicago,
very similar to his predecessor who
roamed the Chicago streets using
thuggery as a means of getting his
way. Now you find his heir apparently
looking to control Chicago once again.
Wrong.
Not so though, considering the
IRS's findings of a Chicago concert
promoters' financial files. This search
came up with resoundingly good in-
formation for the feds in the cracking
down of one of the biggest mid-west-
ernChicago drug cartels and more
importantly, super gangs. Not since
the Crips and the Bloods have we seen
this much press.
It's really a terrible thing consid-
ering the fact that this gang has more
of a mythical and cult-like presence
in the Chicago area and in approxi-
mately 35 states with more than
roughly 50,000 members roaming
around.
One good thing about the
government's findings is that some
CD members and their devious leader,
now supposedly reformed, will stand
trial for drug conspiracy this week.
Isn't it nice to find that our govern
ment has ways of destroying these evil
gangs that only make our world an
often wretched place to live.
As this trial goes to court maybe
we will see some justice done. But if
not, don't cross the leaders of the
movement because you may end up
like Charles "Big Chuck" Dorsey, who
took over gang operations back in
August "Dorsey did not follow orders
and assumed he was higher than
Hoover, but that's treason said Chi-
cago police commander Donald
Hilbring, "apparently punishable by
death
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor,
Americans love their sports. Ev-
ery year millions of people set them-
selves in front of the TV to watch their
favorite sports: the Monday night
football, professional basketball, and
the baseball league. People dress up
in their favorite team's colors, fly their
flags, and cheer loudly for their fa-
vorite players. In American society,
sport has somewhat reached the po-
sition of religion. It is "the opium of
the masses Sport has its own ideol-
ogy, values, norms, hierarchy, and the
ways of worshipping its Gods.
Because United States is sic a
highly capitalized society, so are its
institutions organized like commercial
enterprises. The goal being to make
business as profitable as possible. In
modem world sport is a profitable en-
tertainment business in Which the
heroes and heroines of sport are the
stars of the show and so treated as
celebrities. They are admired and
emulated, glorified and identified
with.
I appreciate a good, skilled sport
performance like I would appreciate
a delicious dinner with candle lights,
and good company. Being an athlete
all my life and competing in interna-
tional level (sic) for some years, I know
what it takes to get there. You have
to work harder than anybody else, be
ready to sacrifice and not to give up
when the first headwind drags you
down. But that is the case in every-
thing in life when you are aiming to
the top sic.
And yes, I agree it felt great when
I succeeded in a race and people came
up to me and told me they admire
what I do. But it never was because
of these people that I got up every
morning during the winter to go for
my one and a half hour run or two
hour cross-country skiing in freezing
temperatures. I did it because there
was something so important for me
in that short moment of solitude that
1 couldn't found sic anywhere else
in my life at that time.
The way sports are delivered and
consumed in a society depends exclu-
sively on that particular culture. Most
Americans love spectator sports over
others and that requires big crowds.
But look at Africans, for example, they
are the best middle and long distance
runners in the world but the only
crowd in the jungle to cheer them on
are the camels and zebras. For Afri-
cans sports is sic not dependent on
the fans but on their own determina-
tion.
In American society (and in many
other western societies) sport is what
it is because of the media. These two
institutions live in a highly symbiotic
relationship in which without the one
there won't be the other. Media, be-
ing the delivery system, is therefore
widely responsible for the way sports
are seen and interpreted by the audi-
ence. There is a growing concern
among lot sic of people, however,
that today's sports doesn't sic pro-
vide healthy role models for kids. Ath-
letes who get caught beating their
wives, trashing bars, insulting refer-
ees or having problems with drugs are
hardly worth admiring, let alone iden-
tifying with. Of course, these are only
some extreme cases, and there are also
lot sic of "true" sport heroes out
there who are responsible and who
care about their behavior in and out-
side the court. The point here is, how-
ever, that these athletes, although
they may be the best in the world in
their sport are just people like you
and me. They are not invincible or
untouchable. They can also fall like
you and me and they should be held
responsible for their actions like you
and me, which often is not the case.
People, and especially the media has
sic the tendency to put the athletes
on pedestal sic and treat them as
"larger than life" figures, human em-
bodiments of Gods on earth.
Athletes are unique like every
individual but they are in no sense
special. Tomorrow there will be a new
hero, and the next day Sport hero
as sic its best can help people in the
process of socialization by displaying
the values, norms, attitudes, and ap-
proved forms of behavior prevalent in
the society. As sic its worst, sport
shows the selfishness, immaturity,
anti-intellectualism, and incapability
to pursue equal opportunities for ev-
erybody. Modern spectator sports, no
matter how fun it is to watch, is sic
still just a game. A great show, which,
to put it crudely, doesn't produce any-
thing without which we couldn't live
if we had to.
Anne Valta
graduate student of sport and
health sciences
NXMWO� x M m
If you have a complaint or comment write a letter to the editor. Letters
must be typed, 250 words or less and include name, major, year, and
telephone number.Drop your letters by the Student Publications bldg.
across from Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what you think.
Your voice can be heard!
0 ?�?�?�?� x oooooow
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JUU






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Tuesday, February 6,1995
The East Carolinian
Services
Offered
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Lmrg�t Library ot Information In US. �
allaubfaeta
Order Catalog Today with VlaaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
yV�Travel i Announcements!
mr 1 � � �� - � - - .n.i,in H mnnik
&tt&$�&tt&&&i
vm
�III HOI US
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
� md 2 Bfd'ooms �
AZALEA GARDENS
Clejn and Quite one b'dioom
Kirnishf-d aparmenH $25.0 a month
6 month lease
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS'
. ' ��' - 2901 East jth Strtel
�located rx-a: ECU . �
� ECU Bus Seivic '
�On-site Laundf y
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
J 1 or Tommy Williams
756-7815 758-7436
ROOMMATE WANTED: RM.MATE
WANTED to share half the rent and half
utilities at Dogwood Hollow. 2 bedrooms
and 2 full baths. Call Jason at 754-2076
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom 2 bath duplex. $292
mo. Close to campus. No deposit needed.
Non-smoker preferred. Call 830-3831
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; room-
mate wanted to share 3 bedroom 2 bath
house. $180 rent 13 utilities. Fun, easy-
going, studious. Call Danielle or Stacy 758-
6649
ROOMMATE WANTED PRIVATE
ROOM in large 3 br house. $200 per mo.
13 util. Male or female welcome. Non-
smoker preferred. Call 752-3116 leave mes-
sage.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE, DISHWASHER,
ice maker, less than 100 yards from cam-
pus. We want to sublease fromto Aug
$580 7584984
3 BEDROOM APT FOR rent above
BW3s, 1500 sq. ft 2 12 baths, $775.00
a month. Ask for Yvonne at 758-2616
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE rent
for a nice three bedroom house. Rent
$175mo. 13 utilities. 3 blocks from
campus. Contact Evan at 752-8837.
RESPONSIBLE, FUN ROOMMATE
WANTED to sublease for May thru Au-
gust $190mth plus 12 utilities. On ECU
bus route. Call 758-7890.
LANGSTON PARK 2 BEDROOM, AP-
PLIANCES, water, basic cable, 5 blocks
from campus. New ownership. $375 de-
posit, $375month. Pitt Property Manage-
ment 758-1921
NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR ECU
DOCKSIDE 3 and 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 4
car carport cathedral ceilings, fireplace,
dining room, balcony, exterior storage
room, nothing in the area compares Rea-
sonably Priced! Pitt Property Management
758-1921
1 BEDROOM APT. ON ECU bus line, new
carpet & paint Pets with fee. 12 month
rent free in February. Potomac Properties
752-9722
SEMI-PRIVATE ROOM, 2 blocks from
campus, 3 blocks from downtown. R"nt is
$145month. plus 14 utilities, please call
Debbie, Dawn or Jim at 7584362
AVERY STREET APARTMENTS 1 BED-
ROOM, $275, on river, watersewer in-
cluded, walk-in closet spacious bedroom,
on-site laundry. Pitt Property Management
758-1921
FREE RENT 12 OF FEBRUARY WES-
LEY COMMONS: 1 and 2 bedroom, range,
refrigerator, washer, dryer hookups, decks
and patios in most units, laundry facility,
sand volleyball court Located 5 blocks
from campus. Free water, sewer, cable.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 bedrooms, stove
refrigeratordishwasher, washer, dryer
hookups, patios on first floor. Located 5
blocks from campus. These and other fine
properties managed by Pitt Property Man-
agement 108 A Brownlea Drive, 758-1921
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed
room 2 bath duplex. Lots of amenities.
Walking distance of campus. $275mo. ?
12 utils. Call 758-2232
GREAT HOUSE! 2 ROOMMATES
needed to share 3 bedroom 2 bath house.
$210 rent utilities. Right across the
street from campus. Call Jenai 758-6649
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share a 2 bedroom 1 12 bath. Rent
$123.75 a month and 14 utilities. For
summer andor Fall. Call 830-3748.
orRent j pfribrRem j ffj'P
11 Wanted
M .il o MtM- J
Hothing But A Partg!
"NUFFSAID
call tea at 768-4644
COMPurTr Mtati T
3
Why shop in LA
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is ail that matters.
For Sale
GREAT VALENTINE'S GIFT! EMER-
ALD and diamond wrap, less than 1 yr
old. 5yr warranty. Only $185. Call 758-
8834
REDUCE EXCESS FAT FOR thigh and
body. Order your Thigh Body Contour
Cream Now as seen on TV! Retails for
$19.90. Now being sold for only $12.90.
S&H is already included. Price Enter-
prises. 1543 Battery Drive. Raleigh, NC
27610
HARO FREESTYLE BIKE GREAT
shape $75 neg 83U-4064. Weight Bench,
its a steal at $60. Includes squat rack, leg
attachments, extra bars, lots of weight
STUDENT WHOLESALE CATALOG.
STUDENTS now, you can buy electron-
ics, home appliances, office supplies, au-
thentic jewelry, costume jewelry, perfume,
novelty items, and other items at whole-
sale price. The Student Wholesale Cata-
log is only $5.00. S&H is already includ-
ed. So order your Student Wholesale Cat-
alog now. Price Enterprises. 1543 Battery
Drive. Raleigh, NC 27610.
1994 FORD ESCORT LX hatchback,
green, cruise control, airbag, five speed,
21.000 miles. Owe $7800.00. Pay owner
$1800.00 (negotiable). Serious callers
only. Leave message 355-3507
DRESSER FOR SALE: GOOD condition
5 large drawers, $50 or best offer. Call 758-
4796
TOYOTA TRECEL 1990 4SP, hatchback,
GC, AC, AMFM, Cass, 122,000 miles
$2,990 neg. Great for students 3284246
Ask for David leave message. Must Sell!
SONY CD PLAYER LIKE new100. Will
negotiate. Call 355-3741
FOR SALE CMC JIMMY 4wd, power
steering and brakes, burgundy, excellent
condition, 50k, $9,600. Call Nan or Chris
752-2383
1993 YAMAHA SECA II 600cc 3600
miles, Vance Hines pipes, new back tire,
recently tuned up. with helmet and cover
$2500.00 Call 714-3953
LOOKING FOR WAREHOUSE HELP
for Greenville screenprint company. Will
be monitoring machines and handling
clothing. No heavy lifting. All shifts avail-
able. If interested, report to the Employ-
ment Security Office on Thursday, Febru-
ary 15 between the hours of 8:30am and
12:00pm. Two forms of identification are
required at time of interview. Staff-Addi-
tions, Inc 112 N. Circle Dr Suite A
Rocky Mount NC 27804. (919) 937-6633
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7584896 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
COMPUTER TECHNICAL SUPPORT,
FULL or part-time position available to
field technical support questions involv-
ing communications, hardware, software
and interfaces between our mortgage re-
posting system and in-field customer base.
We will train. However, you will need ba-
sic exposure to modems, hardware com-
ponents and operating systems, for inter-
view contact Dan Harris, Online Informa-
tion Services, 1206 Charles Blvd 757-
2107
WANTED SERVICE MANAGER FOR
RHA. avg. 10 hrs a week, pay min doesn't
mind heavy lifting. Call 328-1679.
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour, for more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
ATTENTION LADIES TIRED OF being
broke, want to get paid Everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686
CRUISESHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
FREE FINANCIAL AID OVER S6 billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income or
parent's income. Let us help. Call Student
Financial Services: 1400-2634495 ext
F53624
NEED A RIDE TO Raleigh. Zebulon, or
Chapel Hill? Can you leave Friday after-
noon and return early Monday morning!
$10.00 per person. Call 413-9099
START THE NEW YEAR off right by
calling Diamond Dave for your next party
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave at 758-5711 or 8094474.
NO NEED TO STRESS. Professional Tax
Return Service provided to students at a
Discount Why wait? For more informa-
tion call 7574573
TYPING SERVICES CAMPUS SECRE-
TARY will provide campus pick-up and de-
livery for typing resumes, documents, re-
search papers, etc at a reasonable rate!
Call Susan at 7464504 after 6:00pm
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1400-406-7027
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
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DAYTONA BEACH
KEY WEST
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w 1-800-999-Ski-9
M
Greek
Personals
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW-
EST brothers of Delta Sigma Phi: Jo-
nathan Fields, Wes Godwin, Greg Kisshau-
er, Miles Layton. Tim Pyle, Scott Rose,
Steve Smith, and Todd Young
CONGRATULATIONS TO ZETA TAU
ALPHA'S new Executive Council: Cath-
ryn Singletary-President; Audra Latham-
VPI; Jennifer Hudson-VPIl: Liz Cibson-
Treasurer Amy Bergner-Secretary: Cather-
ine Trudell-New Member Chair; Meg Wat-
son-Ritual: Jenn Taylor-Historian; and Erin
Riley-Panhellenic Representative
DELTA ZETA IS HOSTING THEIR an-
nual Sexy Boxer Contest at The Attic on
February 8,1996. Doors will open at 9:30.
Come and see the hottest men in
Greenville!
��
: ATTENTION� �
SPRING BREAKERS!� �
� MOKNOffl�
JAMAICADINCIWBAHAMASSW� �
� FLORIDA $129�
ORGANIZE GROUPS 4 CO FREE!�
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SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
cruise! 7 Days $279! Includes 15 Meals &
6 Free Parties! Great BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http:www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
6784386
ferred for potential jobs, receive a month-
ly newsletter and can establish a creden-
tials file with Career Services
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAL
JUSTICE
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Applications for the Spring 1996 semes-
ter are now available to intended Social
Work and Criminal Justice Students. Ap-
plications are available February 1, and
due on March 1, 1996
HANG GLIDING KITTY HAWK
Attention all high adventure people! Take
to the skies February 25 and go Hang Glid-
ing at Kitty Hawk. The registration dead-
line is February 9 in 204 Christenbury
Gym. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 3284387
EXSS MAJOR CLUB
Everyone who is interesteU in this field of
study should attend this meeting. Feb. 7th
in the Pat Draughon room in the Sports
Medicine BIdg. at 7:30pm. There will be a
social mixer at this meeting so, come out
& meet other students with your major.
If you have any questions call Jessika at
328-3480 or Lindsey at 328-3411. See you
there.
RESUME WRITING WORKSHOP
THE Career Services staff will hold work-
shops on developing a professional resume
and cover letter on Wed. Feb. 7 at 5:00
and Mon. Feb. 12 at 4:00pm. Tips on writ-
ing scannable resumes will be included,
come to the Career Services Building, 701
E. Fifth St
IN TOUCH WITH NATURE
Get back in touch with nature. Learn win-
ter "survival" skills as you backpack in
the Uwharrie National Forest February 16-
18. The registration deadline is February
9 in 204 Christenbury Gym. For more in-
formation call Recreational Services at
3284387
ATTENTION LOCAL BANDS:
Video Yearbook in need of local band mu-
sic. The Video Yearbook wants to use your
music to soundtrack this 1995-96 video
memorabilia. Get noticed. Be remembered.
Call Greg Brown at 3284717. Jimi Hen-
drix did it once.
LIVING HOPE MINISTRIES
WILL have a love feast Banquest at the
Farmville Recreational Center February
10, 1996. The time of the event is 6-
9:30pm. $25 per couple and $12.50 for
singles. Call Annie at 758-3977 for tick-
ets. Join in on the fun, food and romance!
wanted
BACKPACKING EQUIPMENT WANT-
ED - scouts seeking used backpacks
frames, foam sleeping pads, stoves, etc
in good condition. Please call 7564430
after 7:00pm
U

Travel
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished: washer & drypr: dish-
washer: central AC; Available May 1
through August 31: sleeps 6-1500.00 per
month, sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
CAREFREE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 2 br College View Apt $175month
12 utilities & phone. Smokers welcome.
757-9303 leave a message.
THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR
rent near university. Central heat and air.
WasherDryer hookups. Range, refrigera-
tor furnished. $489.7524276.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE need
ed to sublease till May. 3 Bdrm Townhouse
at Sheraton Village. Master bdrm w pri-
vate bath. $200mo. and 13 util. Con-
tact at 321-2974
m
Help
11 wanted
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF Grifton
needs a Music Accompanist Organ and
piano. Will accept student. Good pay. Call
524-5421 or 524-4693
REPRESENTATIVES NEEDED FOR A
long distance telephone company. Must
have high morals and great personality
758-9181.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague. Budapest, or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Boardother benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext. K53621
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR motivated students. If
you are interested call Chris at 3554402
or Jeff at 355-7700. Northwestern Mutual,
an internship like no other.
DON'T PASS UP THIS opportunity! Fast
growing telecommunications Co. looking
for reps in this area. Must be motivated,
self-starter looking for fun and money!
Enjoy working with others and being your
own boss. Full or part-time. Finally get
the rewards that match your efforts. Call
Scott for more information at 754-2111
LIFEGUARDS, POOL MANAGERS,
SWIM COACHES. Summer positions
available in the Charlotte area. Call Caro-
lina Pool Management (704) 541-9303
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3.000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext. A53622.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan. Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext. J53623.
SKI & SNOWBOARD-CAMPUS REPS
NEEDED Springbreak '96 Intercollegiate
Ski Weeks- 5 day lift ticketcondo lodg-
ing 5 nights parties & activities. Mt Or-
ford, Canada (Near Vermont) (Drinking
Age-18) Trip only $219. Reps earn free
trips, CASH, New Equip etc. Call Ski Trav-
el Unlimited: 1400-999-Ski-9.
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 lowest price guarantee! 7
Nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on fooddrinks!http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 1400478-6386
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches - Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1400-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK '96 WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT BOOK NOW
Florida $109 Bahamas $359 JamaicaCan-
cun $389. Organize a group - TRAVEL
FREE! Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-7710
SPRING BREAK
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
Jamaica
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!
v Sun Splash Tours y,
7" 1-800-426-7710SL
Spring Break!
Bahamas Party Cruise
$279
It's Better In The Bahamas
15 Meal � 6 Parties
800-678-6386
Cancun $3591
Jamaica $419!
7 Nights Air & Hotel! Parties &
Discounts!
Florida $119!
1-800-678-6386
Announcements
ECU PHYSICAL THERAPY
MASSAGE CLINIC
Thursday. Feb. 15th 6-9pm, in the ECU
Back & Limb Clinic (Belk Bldg). Tickets
may be purchased from the ECU Back &
Limb Clinic or PT Students. Tickets $2
for 10 min. or $2.50 at the door.
LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be held on Febru-
ary 7th at 5:15pm in Ragsdale room 218A.
A detective officer will be present to an-
swer questions and talk about procedures.
The meeting is open to all majors, so come
and join us.
SCUBA DIVE IN MINGES
Want to know how to scuba dive when
you go to the Bahamas? Learn the essen-
tials of underwater breathing during Re-
creational Services Try Scuba in Minges
Pool February 15. All these interested
should register in 204 Christenbury Gym
by February 9. For more information call
Recreational Services at 3284387
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be an informational meeting
for ail new members held on February 6th
in Mendenhall 244 at 4:00pm. There will
also be a regular meeting on February 6th
in Mendenhall 244 at 5:00pm. We will be
taking nominations for secretary. Contact
Mike at 7524075 if any questions.
NEW WAYS TO COOK
Learn new ways to cook when taking
those camping adventures. Our chef will
shed light on new ways of cooking with-
out those big hassles during Backpack
Gourmet on February 13. The registration
deadline will be February 12 in 204 Chris-
tenbury Gym. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328-6387
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
seniors and graduate students graduating
in MaySummerDec. 1996 who wish to
register with the Career Services Office
are invited to attend one of the following
Orientation meetings: Tue. Feb 6,
11:00am. Wed. Feb. 14. 4:00pm. Students
who register will be able to participate in
employment interviews on campus, be re-
PHI SIGMA PI NATIONAL HONOR FRA
TERNITY will hold a car wash on Febru-
ary 10 from 8am4pm at the Fuel Dock
on the corner of 10th street and Green-
ville Llvd.
THE EXERCISE AND SPORT
SCIENCE MOTOR AND PHYSICAL
FITNESS COMPETENCY TEST IS
SCHEDULED AS FOLLOWS:
Place: Minges Coliseum (Williams Arena).
Time: 1:00pm. Date: Friday, February 9,
1996. A passing score on this test is re-
quired of all students prior to declaring
Exercise and Sport Science as a major.
"Any student with a medical condition
that would contraindicate participation in
the testing should contact Mike McCam-
mon or Dr. Gay Israel at 328-4688. To be
exempted from any portion of the test
you must have a physician's excuse. A de-
tailed summary of the test components is
available in the Human Performance Lab-
oratory (Room 371, Sports Medicine
Bldg.). Your physician's excuse must spe-
cifically state from which items you are
exempt
Forms for
Classifieds
and
Annoircernents
can be picked up in
Mendenhall and
dropped off in the
Student Publication
building.
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for
next Thursday's
edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add Si
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations must be
spelled out no abbreviations. The
East Carolinian reerves the right
to reject any ad forlibel, obsecnity
andor bad taste.
jou �





Tuesday, February 6,1995
The East Carolinian
Comedian set
to rock Wright
Heavy Weather
Brandon Wadded
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
"The war on drugs crack de-
stroyed the ghetto, as if the ghetto
wasn't that bad before chuckled
Chris Rock. "You see, there's a civil
war among people, blacks against
niggers black people are really di-
vided and the niggers are spoiling it
for black people. There's gay people
and there's faggots
Armed with a fresh, new come-
dic routine, Chris Rock is set to shock
ECU Thursday night Touring a colle-
giate circuit Rock is coming from New
Orleans to Greenville this week and
will also be on this week's episode of
"Martin
Rock has come a long way since
his humble beginnings in the neigh-
borhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in
Brooklyn, New York.
"I grew up on the nicest block in
the ghetto and was bused to a white
school in Brooklyn Rock said.
At the tender age of 18, Rock was
performing at New York's Comedy
Strip. Rock's performance was sup-
posed to be the final headlining act
but at the request of Eddie Murphy,
it was pushed up to earlier in the
evening. Murphy wanted to see the
young comic, and after the show, Rock
was invited to perform with Murphy
on his HBO special, "Uptown Comedy
Express
"I started out in white comedy
dubs. There weren't any black ones,
so I think that's helped me to appeal
to both blacks and whites explained
Rock in a recent phone interview.
Since that initial break, Rock has
enjoyed exponential success in the
cut-throat world of stand-up comedy.
But Rock considers the turning point
of his career to be his tenure as a rep-
ertory cast member of "Saturday
Night Live creating such memorable
characters as militant black talk show
host Nat X, of the "The Dark Side with
NatX
Saturday Night Live' was com-
edy college Rock said. "I got to work
with some of the best writers in the
business. I had a lot of breaks before
'SNL but I'm from New York and to
hear 'Live from New York, it's Satur-
day Night
"It's like Anthony Mason a na-
tive New Yorker playing for the
Knicks. I had the job I always wanted
and for the first time 1 made money
Several jobs came through for
Rock aside from his work on "Satur-
day Night Live He gottiis first film
role from Eddie Murphy in Beverly
Hills Cop II and later in Boomerang.
Other roles also appealed to Rock,
such as the one of a desperate crack
addict named "Pookie" in New Jack
City.
During the 19931994 season,
he made several guest appearances on
Fox's in Living Color Rock has per-
formed his stand-up routine on "Late
Show with David Letterman "Late
Pool Pirate
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
ECU student Joey Tant prepares to take his opponents to the cleaners in a pick-up
game in Mendenhall, the cleanest, friendliest pool room you'li ever want to see.
Town tries to ban toy string
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
This weekend's cold weather takes its toll on local foliage, as this tree on snow-
covered Charles Boulevard feels the heavy weight of Old Man Winter's icy gloves.
1Ue lecueUfL
Watch it for
the kicks baby
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Union
Night with Conan O'Brien" and made
several appearances on "The Arsenio
Hall Show
Chris Rock's stand-up routine
this go round will focus on current
events, domestic violence, love versus
sex and America having too much
food.
"Where else in the world do
people need to go on diets?" Rock
asks.
"An Evening with Chris Rock
is Thursday night at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. His routine is billed as
controversial, unusual, ethnic and
adult in content. Tickets are available
for students for $8, faculty and staff
$10 and $15 at the door. This will be
Rock's first time performing at ECU
and the event is general admission
seating, so get there early for a good
seat
The 1966 classic
Faster Pussycat
offers funny thrills
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Heading to the video store is a
good way to check out some classic
movies. For example, I was recently
looking r something to watch with
my friends when it hit me. 1 had never
seen a Russ Meyer film.
Innocently, I asked one of my
buddies what Meyer is known for as a
director. He laughed and casually
walked over to the "adult" section of
the store, where he picked up Meyer's
1966 classic, Faster Pussycat Kill!
Kill! When I saw the cover of the video
box, I knew what Meyer was known
for. big-breasted women.
It was a night with the guys, so
why not?
Faster Pussycat follows the ex-
ploits of three hotrod women who
drive fast, talk trash and kick ass.
When the film opens, our three hel-
lions on wheels race through the
desert just for kicks. Led by the darkly
seductive Tura Satana, our little dar-
lings eventually murder a man with
poor fashion taste and kidnap his
Gidget-like girlfriend.
Why did they do it? Well, because
it's just what these women do. They
do what they want to who they want
No apologies.
Meyer wastes no time with bor-
ing stuff like exposition or character
background. No sir. He jumps right
into the game and sets up what seems
to be a fugitive film. You know, the
kind of movie where the murderers
run away with a kidnapped victim.
Well, he kind of does that, but
somewhere along the way our hero-
ines find out about an old, crippled
man (listed in the credits as "The Old
Man") who is rumored to have a lot
of money stashed away. You need
money if you're going to run off with
a kidnapped victim, so our healthy trio
go to the man's farm.
From here, the film just becomes
a little bizarre. We are introduced to
the crippled old man (who seems to
have some sort of tragic past with
trains); his hulking hunk of a son,
See TRASH page 9
M CD. Reviews
MORRISON
Van Morrison with
Georgie Fame &
Friends
How Long Has This
Been Going On
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
SOUTHINGTON, Conn. (AP) - By most accounts, the
aftermath resembled an explosion in a Play-Doh factory -
hardened goo in hues of orange, pink and blue stuck fast tc
everything that makes Southington's town square a perfect
New England snapshot
Kids of many ages wreaked havoc at the Apple Harvest
Festival one weekend four months ago with Silly String, a
non-toxic chemical toy twine launched from aerosol cans.
Now Southington figures that if you can't beat 'em, join
'em. It's ready to outlaw the stuff under most circumstances
and smack a $99 fine on anyone, kid or adult caught with it
"This product has no legitimate use Police Chief Wil-
liam Perry, who requested the ban, said sternly. "It's being
manufact . - and sold with one purpose in mind � to annoy
other people
Last week, after a town meeting ended with citizens
arguing Silly String's virtues, the council kicked back the
original "Objectionable Products Ordinance for revision to
avoid making petty criminals of people who use it in their
homes.
It wasn't just the sprayed shop windows and the shel-
lacked sidewalks that rankled anti-stringers. Classic cars left
See TOY page 9
How long has this been going
on, Van? Here I was, thinking you
were the king of melancholic con-
templation and you turn out one of
the most joyful records you've ever
done. I had forgotten Van could be
so upbeat.
Even the most professional
crooners - Sinatra. Bennett, Cole,
Crosby - would have a hard time
recording an album in a single day,
especially one that resonates with
as much emotional clarity as this.
But that's exactly what Van
Morrison did when he got together
at Ronnie Scott's London jazz club
with some of his close friends on
the third day of May, 1995. We were
in finals and Van was swinging.
Among those present at this live
jam were longtime Morrison
bandmates Georgie Fame (organ)
and Pee Wee Ellis (saxophone), who
have about as much renown in the
blues, jazz and soul scene as
Morrison does as a singer
songwriter. From arrangements to
solos to scats, their effect on this
record is felt across the board.
Morrison covers many of the
artists who influenced him in the
early days: Mose Allison ("Your Mind
is on Vacation" and "Don't Worry
About a Thing"), Louis Jordan
("Early in the Morning"), George &
Ira Gershwin ("How Long Has This
Been Going On?"), and Cannonball
Adderly ("Sack o' Woe"). Only a few
original Morrison tunes turn up
here ("All Saint's Day "Heathrow
Shuffle "I Will Be There" and
"Moondance").
Although many of these tracks
are wonderful reinterpretations, es-
pecially "Early in the Morning" and
"Don't Worry About a Thing the
standout track is the seven minute
plus version of Van's own hit,
"Moondance Not merely a cover,
this is a major reworking. Just lis-
tening to the opening intro, you'll
have a hard time understanding how
this could be the same song. The
tempo and intonation have all
See VAN page 8
ADrop
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
A great man died recently.
He wasn't a general, or a politi-
cian, or even a famous movie
star. In fact I'd be willing to bet
that most of my audience has
never even heard of him. But
that doesn't make Jerry Siegel
any less great.
Why? Because, while you
may not know the man, you most
certainly know his work. You
know the legacy he left America.
It's a heroic legacy, one that has
become synonymous with
America's highest ideals. But you
still don't know what I'm talk-
ing about.
Does this ring any bells?
Look! Up in the sky!
How about this?
Truth, justice and the
American way.
That's right, Jerry Siegel
was the creator of Superman. In
1938, he and artist Joe Shuster
(who died himself a few years
back) brought Superman to life
in the pages of Action Comics.
The release of that comic book
was a galvanizing moment in
American history; its import is
still being felt today.
Superman's impact on the
American comic book industry,
for example, is staggering.
Within a year of his debut Su-
perman comics were selling in
the millions, and he had
spawned a host of imitators. The
entire comics publishing indus-
try is built on a foundation laid
down by the Man of Steel. De-
cades of colorful superhero ad-
ventures have been published,
and every one of them is a Su-
perman story at the core. With-
out Siegel, Shuster and Super-
man, comic books probably
wouldn't exist today.
But the existence of the
American comic book industry
isn't what makes Siegel a great
man. Sure, comics are neat, and
to fans like myself they mean a
lot Siegel is a hero to me.
But all of America lost some-
thing when Jerry Siegel died,
whether you like comic books or
not.
Superman is an important
figure in American popular cul-
ture. While he certainly wasn't
the first larger than life hero fig-
ure, he was definitely the larg-
est. Other heroes were crack
shots or good fighters. Super-
man could pick cars up over his
head! Bullets just bounced off
his chest! He could leap over tall
buildings in a single bound! Evil
didn't stand a chance.
America needed a hero like
that in 1938. We were still stag-
gering from the Great Depres-
sion, and Nazi aggression in
See DROP page 9
. �� �
�- . in ft-





8
Tuesday, February 6,1996
The East Carolinian
Photos illustrate Nazi rise to power
LONDON (AP) - A huge collec-
tion of high-quality photographs
taken in Germany in the 1930s has
emerged in London after being
stored in a Dutch barn for more than
half a century.
The photos depict everyday life
before and after the coming to power
of dictator Adolf Hitler in 1933. They
reflect the speedy transition from the
tolerance of the Weimar Republic to
the tension of the Nazi era.
Scenes of children playing in
sunny meadows and frolicking young
lovers, as well as the hard times when
over 5 million people were unem-
ployed, gave way to images of young
aviators, marches and parades. There
are uniforms, loudspeakers on street
corners, construction of the
Autobahn and portraits personifying
Hitler's ideal of the Aryan race.
Within four months after Hitler
is made chancellor, a patriotic farmer
near Munich scattered chicken feed
in the shape of a gigantic swastika,
the Nazi emblem. The camera clicked
as the flock of white birds spreads
out to peck at the corn.
Within a year, a photographer
snapped a ballerina performing be-
fore a selection board which includes
a man in Nazi party uniform.
Other photos express the Ger-
man interest in work and technology:
nuns use the telephone, brew beer,
mill grain and operate an X-ray ma-
chine; workers put on waders and
descend into the massive Berlin sew-
ers through which they can walk up-
right, go by boat and even ride bi-
cycles.
Some 150 of the photos were on
show at the Royal Festival Hall and
have transferred to the Royal Photo-
graphic Society in Bath.
The photos formed the stock of
the Klinsky picture agency set up in
Amsterdam about 1930 to distribute
pictures from Berlin agencies to the
Dutch press. It ceased activity at the
end of World War II.
The stock was bought from a
Dutch dealer by Timothy Prus, cura-
tor of the Archive of Modern Con-
flict in London, a privately owned col-
lection of 200,000 images of military
and social affairs from the 1880s to
1990, mostly amateur photos, films
and snapshot albums, as well as pro-
fessional material.
Prus travels the world looking
for such photos and said the stock
was in good condition, having been
sealed in boxes and stored in a dry
barn in Dordrecht near Amsterdam
since 1945.
"There is still a lot to find out
about it. We don't even know
Klinsky's first name or whether that
was his real name Prus said in an
interview.
"The Klinsky stock contains
27,580 photos. I know because I
counted every one said Ian Jeffrey,
a free-lance art historian who orga-
nized the exhibition.
He began work on it when
London's South Bank Center arts
complex asked him to curate a photo
show of the dictator era in Germany,
Italy and Russia as part of its "Art
and Power" exhibition on the same
theme at its Hayward Gallery. The
photo project was canceled when
funds ran out, but as Jeffrey had com-
pleted the German part, that was
mounted separately at the center's
neighboring Royal Festival Hall.
The Klinsky stock contains 700
to 800 photos taken by the late Alfred
Eisenstaedt, who worked in Berlin and
who left Germany in 1934. He later
became famous in the United States
working for Life magazine.
Eric Borchert, who worked for
the same agency as Eisenstaedt and
later became a war photographer with
the German army, specialized in pho-
tos of workers and peasant life.
The exhibition includes two se-
VAjN from page 7
change Morrison bests himself
here on what many consider to be
his best ballad.
This is a jazz album. In fact, it's
so jazzy that Morrison felt the need
to have it released under the legend-
ary jazz label Verve, rather than his
usual Poiydor (although both labels
are owned by Polygram). And it be-
longs on Verve, for this album is a
throwback to the halcyon days of
jazz. I'm surprised that this record
REASON
N O.
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for free!
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couple. We'll notify the winners by phone on Feb. 9.
Participating sponsors: Jefferson Florist, Riverside Steak Bar,
Carmike Cinemas, Percolator Coffee House, Papa John's
Pizza, Chico's and the Attic.
ries Borchert made in Paris, in 1934
and 1936.
The first time he pictured veter-
ans who had shared trench-fighting
experiences with the Germans in
World War I, and who said French and
Germans should be friends in future.
On his second visit, Borchert's
stance had changed. He emphasized
the decrepit and unhygienic side of
Paris, and depicted whites and blacks
together, something that Hitler
scorned.
Other photographers repre-
sented, well known in their day. are
Walter S essmann, Use Steinhoff,
Willi Ruge and Fritz Eschen.
Jeffrey said little if any informa-
tion has come his way about photog-
raphers known only from their names
on the photos: Eisenhart, Lueders,
Eva Besnjoe, Blumenschein, Homan,
Hellman, Moebius and P. Roth.
"The archive is a great survival.
Time after time, we see collections like
it only appreciated years later, some-
times too late, when they have been
dispersed or even thrown away he
added.
Jeffrey said there are few action
photos in the archive because it must
have been difficult and dangerous to
get close to the Nazi leaders and to
special events for photographers who
weren't specifically accredited to
them.
"So these cameramen took their
pictures on the periphery. If you don't
see Hitler speaking in a beer cellar,
you do see the rank and file, and that
way you see ordinary Germans he
said.
All the photos are in black and
white, and Jeffrey feels that medium
makes even commonplace events look
dramatic.
"German Photographs of the
1930s" appeared at the Royal Festi-
val Hall, and will run through March
31 at the Royal Photographic Society
in Bath.
was recorded in the '90s.
Many modern jazz artists could
learn a thing or two from the en-
ergy and vitality that Morrison pre-
sents here, for it shows how jazz can
be loose, free and happy. Not every
jazz album has to be a effort of ex-
alted, sincere artistic vision. Some-
times having fun with music can be
just as earnest and poetic. Even
Coltrane and Miles were happy
sometimes.
Bj H
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VISA
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O vim U.S.A. lnc 1995

�J '





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 6,1996
V9
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kiper-0bcure
tfrivia Quix,
This week's
topic:
. The Beverly
Hillbillies
1. What relation was
Jethro to jed?
2. Who was Claude?
3. In what bank did Jed
Clampett keep his $60
million?
4. What oil company
bought the Clampetts'
Osark property?
5. Name Jethro's
mother and sister.
6. True or False: Sam
Drucker from "Green
Acres" once tried to
woo Granny.
7. Name the Drysdales'
son.
8. Who was Ellie May's
movie star boyfriend?
9. What made Jethro
different from the rest
of the family (besides
his last name)?
10. Name Jed's dog.
Answers in Thursday's issue
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Thursday, February 8,
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General Public $12.00 - At the Door S15.C
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Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
For more information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
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TOY
from page 7
the festival's parade with corroded paint
Marching band members - and their
uniforms and instruments - got spritzed.
Two motorcycle cops, bombarded by a
neon-colored fusillade, nearly ran off the
road.
Some residents say they fear that
some of the festival's hundreds of visi-
tors might not come back.
"This isn't like firearms, which have
certain constitutional protections said
David Kelley, the town attorney. "There
is absolutely no constitutional right for
something like this
The no-string contingent claims
broad support and says it's natural to
ban what amounts to training-wheels
for spray-painting vandals.
But it's difficult to find anyone on
Southington's streets who doesn't think
the law, and the taxpayer time spent
prattling about it, is sillier than the
string
"If they were walking around
dumping cups of water on people, would
they ban water? It's ridiculous said
Kevin Brunetti, who owns a comic book
store just off the square. "If they can't
handle this, how are they supposed to
deal with real crimes?"
"We're paying for town services
and these guys are arguing about Silly
String?" said Doug Charamut, shopping
at a toy store with his wife and four
young children.
The original ordinance would have
made Silly String a controlled substance
anywhere in town. That posed certain
problems, such as how to handle truck-
loads of canned string passing through
on Interstate 84.
"There could be a black market be-
fore you know it said a disgusted
Brendan Duff, 18. "You'll have people
on the street whispering, 'I got the
stuff
The council ordered Kelley to re-
work the law for a Feb. 12 vote. Now, as
written, it bars canned string and smoke
bombs from all public areas and on days
of carnivals or parades. On other days,
Kelley says, it "probably" wouldn't be
illegal.
And the law authorizes
Southington's 58 officers to "take any
and all actions reasonable and neces-
sary' to ferret out Silly String includ-
ing searching stores.
All of this is quite preposterous to
Bob D'Agostino, whose Waterbury dis-
tributorship wholesales the product to
Southington and much of Connecticut,
Massachusetts and New York.
D'Agostino unloads 30,000 cans
each year under the brand name Fun
String many to vendors at the Apple
Harvest Festival, and he's adamant-
String doesn't spray people - people
spray people.
"Americans don't take responsibil-
ity for anything anymore D'Agostino
said. "If kids aren't disciplined by par-
ents to know you're not supposed to
squirt someone driving a motorcycle,
it's not the product's fault"
To be sure, the ordinance has its
supporters. Ardelle Pelletier, who be-
longs to a local beautification associa-
tion, came home from the parade with
sprayed shoes and pants. She backs the
ban and says her friends do, too.
"Its an invasion of space she said.
"We take pride here in keeping things
clean
TRASH from page 7
Vegetable (who is about as smart as
a potato chip); and the old man's
older son (who is lucky enough to
roll around in the hay with Ms.
Satana).
The film paces itself as if it re-
ally doesn't know where it's going,
but that doesn't matter. The story
fills itself with enough eccentric
moments and snappy dialogue to
keep its audience awake.
We get to see Satana and her
tiery female friends shower in the
open desert (no frontal nudity,
though; this is a family film). We get
to watch Vegetable impress one of
our heroines by lifting weights with-
out his shirt We get to watch a wa-
tery cat fight We get to watch Satana
bitch slap just about everyone in the
film. But most importantly, we get
to see Russ Meyer's brilliant casting
work its wonders in V-cut shirts and
painted-on jeans.
This is not the most PC film
you're ever going to see. You either
get the joke and run with it, or you're
just going to hate everything it rep-
resents. Since it was my night out
with the guys, I figured what the hell.
I'm taking the film for what it is.
Faster Pussycat (as if the title
doesn't give it away) is a trashy good
time. Sometimes you need a break
from those "artsy" films that have a
purpose and a message and good act-
ing and all that stuff. Sometimes you
just want to see a bunch of crazy,
big-breasted women drive their
muscle cars over old, crippled men
as they steal all the cash they can
get their hands on. They just don't
make movies like this anymore.
There's good reason to rush out
and rent Russ Meyer's classic now.
Since 1996 marks the 30th anniver-
sary of Faster Pussycat Kill! Kill
can a prestige-format, widescreen
director's cut be hovering somewhere
along the desert horizon? Or how
about a big-budget remake from
Quentin Tarantino and Robert
Rodriguez? One could only pray for
such a miracle.
On a scale of one to 10, Russ
Meyer's politically incorrect actioner
rates a fun-filled eight
UiVVJr from page 7
Europe was beginning to divide the
country. People were frightened, and
into that cultural landscape came Su-
perman. Sure he was just a fictional
character, but when you've got a guy
on your team who can change the
course of mighty rivers and bend
steel in his bare hands, it's a little bit
easier to face the day. Even if he's
just imaginary.
Plus, like a great deal of the
American population at the time, he
was an immigrant. Supermnn may
have been a strange visitor from an-
other planet, but he was a success,
the American Dream made flesh.
And not only that, he embraced
American ideals and made them his
own. Superman was a straight
shooter, a stand-up guy, just an all-
around good joe. He loved his mom
and saved kittens from trees and gave
everybody an even break. He pro-
tected his adopted society from the
criminal element and never asked for
a reward. He got all the money he
wanted from just being mild-man-
nered Clark Kent, a working stiff with
a white-collar job and dreams of mar-
riage to his beautiful co-worker, Lois
Lane.
All this, despite the staggering
power at his disposal. Superman
could have been the world's greatest
criminal, or an iron-fisted despot that
no one dared defy. He could have
been a god.
But none of that even crossed
his mind. He was just that damned
good. Truth, justice and the Ameri-
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWI, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC Bar Ce
Criminal mi
im in State
24 Hour Message Service
752-7529
can way weren't just words to this
guy. They were a way of life.
That's a powerful cultural mes-
sage to be wrapped up in a garish
red and blue body suit, but there it
is. Siegel and Shuster couldn't have
been aware of all that back in 1938;
they were just two Jewish kids who
wanted to make a living doing comic
books. But they did it anyway.
Few fictional characters have
been around as long as Superman.
He's been in continuous publication
since '38, and new adventures are
being cranked out even as we speak.
He's been popular on television and
in the movies, and all the while he's
stood for the same good stuff. He
must speak to something in our cul-
tural psyche.
Superman represents America's
highest ideals. While we may find him
hokey at times, or even a touch au-
thoritarian, he still stands on moral
ground that most of us aspire to.
Even cynics like me.
So when Jerry Siegel died last
month, we didn't just lose some old
comic book writer. We lost a man
who gave America an important part
of its cultural heritage. We lost some-
one who let us remember how great
this country is supposed to be. If that
doesn't make him great, I don't know
what would.
Goodbye, Mr. Siegel. We barely
knew you.
More's the shame.
25 OFF
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� w
10
Tuesday, February 6,1995
The East Carolinian
Home winning
streak ends
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The ECU men's basketball
i team's home winning streak ended
at nine with an
the ECU fans to come out in this type
of weather and we appreciate it
Dooley said. "After that, that was
probably the only highlight of the day
for us
The Pirates quickly jumped out
89-73 loss to
American.
Saturday's
game was the
first home loss
for the Pirates
this season and
their second
loss to Ameri-
can this year.
There
wasn't a lot of
good that
could be said
about the
game, except
for the fact
that 5,011 fans
braved the
nasty weather
to support the
Pirates. Even
inside of
Minges it was
cold. During
pre-game
warm-ups, play-
ers were rub-
"Saturday's Scorers"
Jonathan Kerner
14pts
5 rebounds
4 fouls
13pts
5 rebounds
4 fouls
24 minutes of play 25 minutes of play
the Eagles finally scored with a Tho-
mas Treadwell shot underneath and
the score was 5-2.
ECU held on to the lead until
9:53 when the Eagles' Duane Gilliam
hit a jumper to give American a 12-
13 lead. From
that point on, for
the duration of
the game, ECU
would never re-
gain the lead.
The Pirates
ended the half
with a Vic
Hamilton jumper
that would send
ECU into the
locker room
down by 11
points, 23-34.
ECU did not
shoot very well
from the field,
where they only
hit 9 of 24 shots
for 37 percent in
the first half.
From the three
point arc, the Pi-
rates shot 33 per-
cent hitting 3 of
9 shots. Free
throw shots hurt
too, with the Pi-
Deron Rippey
bing their hands together t'ving to
stay warm. Head Coach Joe Looley
was pleased with the attendance.
"It showed some character by
to a three point lead after an Othello
Meadows three point shot That shot
was followed by a Jonathan Kerner
jumper, to put ECU up 5-0. However,
rates not even hitting the 50 percent
mark. They only shot 40 percent mak-
Sce HOME page 12
Track season looks bright
: Women's team
J ready to improve
I from last year
l Dave Pond
i Senior Writer
t
, One of the most important as-
� pects of building a successful ath-
t letic program is building a strong
� nucleus around which the program
can grow.
� Just ask East Carolina women's
� track coach Charles "Choo" Justice,
whose roster last season was loaded
with talent athletes in virtually ev-
� ery event. Almost all of them return
in 1996, and partnered with a tal-
ented freshman class, Justice is
looking to improve on last season's
second-place CAA finish.
"We're fairly experienced this
season, and we've added some good
freshmen he said. "They know
what we've got to do already, so it's
just an extension of what we've
done before
Three team members know al-
ready that actions speak louder
than words.
Senior Carla Powell (55-meter
sprints: 7.22), sophomore Saundra
Teel (55-meter hurdles: 8.31) and
junior Amanda Johnson (long jump:
19'07") have already posted ECAC
qualifying times during the Lady Pi-
rates' first three meets.
Teel was the Lady Pirates'
1995 Outstanding Freshman,
and holds school records in
the long jump and 100-
meter high hurdles. She
placed in three events at
the CAA championships
last season and advanced
to the semifinals of the
1995 ECAC 55-meter high
hurdles.
Johnson
placed
15th in
the NCAA
long jump
a season
ago, and
holds the ECU record as
well. She will also run the an-
chor leg of both he Lady Pirates'
4x100 and 4x200-meter relays in
'96.
"I told the team that if they
take care of their individual perfor-
mances, that we'll do well as a
team Justice said. "We still have
several athletes who have a good
shot at qualifying for the ECACs
1995 ECU Outstanding Track
Winter
Olympics?
PeeDee sleds down the
hill in front of Todd
Dining Hall. The icy
weather brought lots of
dare devils out to
College Hill over the
weekend.
Photo by MICHELE AMICK
Charlotte spoils game
Amanda Ross
Sports editor
Athlete Cindy Szymanski (2:21.41)
won the 800-meter dash at the
Carolina Classic earlier this season,
and will see action in the 100-meter
indoors as well. She is the ECU
recordholder in the 1000,
and earned All-East hon-
ors in the event last sea-
son.
Sophomore
Michelle Clayton was
ECU'S Outstanding
Field Event Per-
former last season,
and will compete in
the shot, discus,
and weight throw.
She has posted second,
fifth and sixth-place
finishes in the shotput
already this season,
and a second in the
weight throw.
Inclement
weather has proven
to be the biggest
handicap to date for
the Lady Pirates as they race
through the indoor and then the
outdoor seasons.
"The more meets we get under
our belts the better Justice said.
"We're limited because we
See TRACK page 11
A loss is a loss, but some are
more important than others. How-
ever, that wasn't the case for the Lady
Pirate basketball team.
True, a loss hurts, but
Wednesday's game against UNC-
Charlotte was a non-conference
battle.
The 49er's got off to a 0-6 lead
over the Lady Pirates. Tomekia
Blackmon was the first to score for
ECU, after she made a jump shot with
16:45 to go. UNC-Charlotte had a lot
of height in the paint; therefore, they
were able to get a
lot of easy shots
down low.
ECU an-
swered with some
shots down low
themselves, but a
majority of their
first half shots
were jump shots.
The 49er's
largest lead in the
first half was 11
points, after a Lisa
Gerton three
pointer. ECU an-
swered with a
three of their own
by Justine
Allpress. Each .mniumumm�in
team traded bas-
kets back and forth with UNC-Char-
lotte still hanging on to the lead, but
not by much.
The Lady Pirates ball movement
was effective in getting people open
for the jumpers.
After that 11 point deficit, the
Lady Pirates brought the 49er's lead
to only three points on two separate
occasions. The first time the lead was
cut, Beth Jaynes hit a jumper to cut
the score to 17-20 with 9:20 left A
free throw by Blackmon again cut the
49er's lead to three, 29-32, with just
1:44 remaining in the half.
ECU went into the locker room
down 31-36. The Lady Pirates hit 48
percent of their shots in the first half,
33 percent of their three's and 66
percent of free throws.
Blackmon finished the half with
nine points, Tracey Kelley added six
and Allpress had five.
UNC-Charlotte shot 50 percent
from the field
and from the
three point arc,
while shooting
only 40 percent
from the line.
The second
half saw ECU
getting good
shots, but as
luck would have
it they just
weren't falling.
" W e
couldn't have
gotten better
shots than we
got, with the ex-
ception of the
rushed ones
Head Coach
Anne Donovan said.
UNC-Charlotte opened up the
scoring drive with a Markita Aldridge
lay up. However, on ECU'S next pos-
session Blackmon was fouled and
nailed both free throws. The 49er's
"I think
defensively we
executed a pretty
good zone, and we
had Charlotte
taking shots they
weren't
accustomed to
taking
� Coach Donovan
Justine A'I press
were ahead 33-38, but it looked like
ECU was closing in on that lead.
Good defense helpED contribute
to the Lady Pirate's comeback.
"I think defensively we executed
a pretty good zone, and we had Char-
lotte taking shots they weren't ac-
customed to taking Donovan said.
"So we got them out of their rhythm
somewhat"
A Kelley lay up made the score
35-38 with 18:12 left in the game.
The 49er's and Lady Pirates would
go basket-for-basket for the next 13
minutes, until the Lady Pirates tied
the ballgame up with 5:48 left at 54
apiece.
UNC-Charlotte called a time out
to regroup, and that is exactly what
they did. The 49er's quickly regained
the lead and never looked back.
The 49er's won the game by
eight points, 60-68. The Lady Pirate's
shooting percentages fell in the sec-
See GAME page 12
Statute
Strike up another victory for first year coach Anne Donovan and her Lady Pirates. The Lady Bucs needed a
win after a disappointing loss to UNC-Charlotte, and they came away with a close one when they defeated the Lady
Seahawks of UNC-W 60-57 in CAA play this past Friday in the Port city.
Donovan's troops vere led by junior shooting guard Justine Allpress who registered 17 points four assists,
two steals and one rebound. Following close behind Allpress was center Tomekia Blackmon with 11, and Danielle
Charlesworth who added 10 points of her own.
ECU led at the half 36-30 by shooting 52 from the field and a much improved 83 from the charity stripe.
The Lady Bucs continued their percentage by finishing the game 25-50 from the floor and 6-7 from the free throw
line. This much needed victory puts the Lady Pirates at 7-10 on the over-all mark and 3-5 in the CAA standings.
With the win in Trask Coliseum, the Lady Pirates keep the Lady Seahawks in the conference cellar by leaving
UNC-W winless in conference play.
The next challenge for the Lady Pirates will come on Wednesday night Due to the winter weather, Sunday's
game against ODU was canceled. They will travel to Norfolk, Va. to face the conference leading Lady Monarchs of
ODU.
Men's CAA Standings
TEAM
VIRGINIA COM-
MONWEALTH
EAST CAROLINA
OLD DOMINION
UNC WILMINGTON
AMERICAN
WILLIAM & MARY
GEORGE MASON
RICHMOND
JAMES MADISON
CAA
OVERALL
9-1
7-3
7-3
64
5-4
44
3-7
2-8
1-8
16-7
14-5
12-10
8-12
9-9
8-11
8-12
6-14
5-16
ECU's
SPORTS INFORMATION BERtRTMEOT
SID-East Carolina University
basketball forward Morris Grooms
will miss at least two weeks of ac-
tion after suffering a collapsed lung
from a blow received in last
Saturday's 89-73 loss to American.
Grooms, a 6-7 junior from Pom-
pano Beach, Fla suffered the in-
jury in the first half of the game
against the Eagles, he was able to
continue playing in the game but
his endurance and effectiveness
were extremely limited.
The injury to Grooms has been
diagnosed as pneumothorax, which
is more commonly referred to as a
collapsed lung. Groom's injury re-
quired treatment in the emergency-
room with admission to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital. Grooms is listed
in good condition but continues to
be held for observation.
"First, we're happy that Morris
is alright Said Pirate head coach
Joe Dooley. "and hope he has a
speedy recovery. This is disappoint-
ing for our basketball team and cer-
tainly his loss will be felt
Grooms has been one of the Pi-
rates' top contributors off the
bench this season, averaging 5.8
points and 3.4 rebounds. In one of
his two starts of the season-at
George Mason Jan. 6-Grooms
scored a season-high 20 points and
grabbed seven rebounds. Grooms is
in his first season at ECU after
transferring from Pasco-Hernando
Community College.





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, February 6, 1996
11
NFC holds on to deny a late AFC comeback
HONOLULU (AP) - For Brett
Favre, being surrounded by a group of
"West Coasters" proved advantageous.
For Jim Harbaugh, another opportu-
nity to add to his "Captain Comeback"
heroics fell short - not once, but twice.
It was only a simple one-yard out
pattern, but Favre, the NFL's player of
the year from Green Bay, made the
most of it by drilling a pass to San
Francisco's Jerry Rice that gave the
NFC a lead it never relinquished in
Sunday's 20-13 victory over the AFC
in the Pro Bowl.
"I was in synch with Jerry (Rice)
said Favre, even though they worked
together for only a week. "There were
times when a play was called, I just
knew where he'd be as I've done with
Robert (Brooks of the Packers) dur-
ing the season. Even though he wasn't
the primary guy, I hit him with several
balls.
"The touchdown was jusjt a simple
out by Jerry, a one-on-one with man
coverage, and he beat his guy so good
I just had to hit him. It was easy
Rice, voted the game's most valu-
able player, seconded Favre's rationale.
"I think Favre knew that I would
be there the wide receiver said.
"When I looked back, I didn't see him;
I just saw the ball. We run a similar
kind of offense at San Francisco, so I
didn't have to do too much thinking
today
That Favre-Rice combination
stemmed from the "West Coast of-
fense which Green Bay coach Mike
Holmgren helped develop while an as-
sistant with the 49ers.
It was different for Harbaugh, who
pulled off several game-ending victo-
ries for Indianapolis during the regu-
lar season.
Given two opportunities to at least
tie the score with two minutes left in
the game, Harbaugh couldn't pull it
off. First he threw an interception from
the NFC 8 and then misfired on three
passes from the 14, including missing
a wide open Tim Brown of Oakland in
the end zone as time ran out
Harbaugh was more upset about
the interception than the incompletion.
"He was covered the quarter-
back said of his receiver. "I tried to
throw it high, giving him a chance to
catch it It got tipped right up and in-
tercepted
Tim McDonald of the 49ers picked
it off in the end zone to stop that threat
but the AFC defense held on downs to
force an NFC punt and give Harbaugh
another shot at a score.
A 36-yard pass to New England's
Ben Coates put the ball on the 14 with
47 seconds left but after spiking the
ball to stop the clock, Harbaugh threw
consecutive incompletions, including
the game-ending overthrow to Brown.
Had the AFC scored, coach Ted
Marchibroda of the Colts said he would
have settled for a tie and not gone for
a two-point conversion.
Harbaugh's miscues earlier in the
game resulted in 10 points for the NFC.
Ken Harvey of Washington picked
off a pass and returned it 36 yards for
a touchdown late in the second quar-
ter.
"I saw him there and I thought I
could get it by him Harbaugh said.
"He made a good play and he was gone.
I saw him standing right there and I
thought I could slip it by him and I
couldn't"
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Drop-Ad with
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Were talking classifieds, not classes.
The East Carolinian introduces
0J, NO HASSLE DROP-AD!
"T? Pick up one of our classified ad
kS2pSj'j envelopes (like the one shown
$0&Zp here), fill it out and place
your payment inside.
Then drop it off in our box in front
of Student Stores or at the information desk in
Mendenhall, in addition to The East Carolinian office.
Placing a classified ad couldnt be easier
!
Just look for our logo
around campus for
No Hassle Drop-Ad!
A service of The East Carolinian.
Watch for additional drop box locations as we make it even easier to Drop-Ad!
Another interception of a
Harbaugh pass, by Darren Woodson
of Dallas, set up a 24-yard field goal by
Morten Andersen of Atlanta with two
seconds left in the half that made it
20-7.
The NFC appeared to have a safe
lead, but the AFC went on a time-con-
suming 8:01. 87-yard drive that was
capped by a 17-yard pass from
Harbaugh to Curtis Martin of New
England to make it a 7-point lead with
one quarter left
The NFC's only threat in the sec-
ond half was Andersen's 53-yard field
goal attempt, which hit the upright
That kick preceded the first AFC drive
that ended with McDonald's intercep-
tion.
The AFC got off to a record-break-
ing start on its first possession with a
93-yard touchdown pass from
Cincinnati's Jeff Blake to Yancey
Thigpen of Pittsburgh.
The Blake-Thigpen hookup bet-
tered the game record of 64 yards set
by the Houston combination of Dan
Pastorini and Ken Burrough in 1976.
Thigpen made a one-handed catch
over the middle at the 35 and outraced
San Francisco's Merton Hanks to the
end zone.
"I was looking at the tight end
(Coates) and saw Merton Hanks (San
Francisco defensive back) come up to
the middle of the field to cover Yancey
Blake said. "He came up too far and I
saw Yancey go right past him so I laid
it up
The NFC responded with a 36-yard
field goal by Andersen to make it 7-3
AFC at the end of the first quarter.
At halftime, New York City police
Sgt Michael Volino lost his chance to
win $1 million when he missed a 35-
yard field goal. The kick, taken off a
tee, was on line but it had little height
and landed around the 2-yard line.
"I was hoping for a miracle he
said. "The crowd roar took my mind
off the kick
Volino, 35, trained under Jets spe-
cial teams coach Ken Rose in New York
and then under Denver kicker Jason
Elam in Honolulu.
Volino qualified for the "Million
Dollar Kick" in a random drawing by
Hershey's. The company received more
than 125,000 entries.
Women'sBasketball StaPOINTS
NAMEREBOUNDS
LAURIE ASHENFELDER72
TOMEKIA BLACKMON317
TRACEY KELLEY68
JUSTINE ALLPRESS910
DANIELLE06
CHARLESWORTH26
LATESHA SUTTON48
SHAY HAYES13
BETHJAYNES6
TOTALS3860
1 IvAvlV from page 10
don't have an indoor facility to
train in, but by the time we get to
outdoor it doesn't faze us
An added bonus is the fact that
many of the athletes ran cross-coun-
try in the fall, helping them to stay
in shape and on top of their game.
CAA cross-country Rookie of
the Year Suzanne Bellamy, who was
ECU's top runner in six of seven
cross-country events in the fall, has
posted an early second-place finish
East Carolina Playhouse
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in five different distance events,
was named All-State and All-CAA
in cross-country this season. She
finished second in the 5000-meters
at the Delaware Invitational in late
January.
"We've got a real limited in-
door season, so it's nice that we
have had some athletes qualify for
the ECAC's early Justice said. "A
lot of the success is a direct result
of the work they did in the
offseason and in training
All in all, the 1996 season is
definitely off and running in a good
way for Justice and the Lady Pi-
rates.
"We've got the best team we've
ever had at ECU Justice said. "We
are more consistent in all areas
than ever before. We should be very
competitive this season
ECU
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For details, visit 346 Rawl Building or call
328-6967





12
Tuesday, February 6, 1996
The East Carolinian
HOME from page 10
ing 2 ol 5 shots
The first half was sloppy and the
ol selection was shaky. It wasn't
al Pirate U a re used
to seeing.
"We re glad to get this one out
of our system but we are disap-
pointed Parham said "We let our-
lown and l ms down.
laid in the locker room
they came through a blizzard and the
m they saw tonight wasn't the
usual team
Turnovers were the name of the
game for the Pirates. ECU comi
ted 15 turnovers in the first hall
alone. There were also i 1 fouls called
on the Pirates, compared to four
called on the Eagles.
Kerner and Meadows led ECl
seorers in the first half with seven
points each. Hamilton added four.
Tim Basham had three and .
Bryant contributed two.
The second half would prov
not he much bettertl n
"We didn't com? out ready to
play tonight as well as we should
have Kerner said.
Three minute- the second
half Kerner was called ' � - inal
toul and then slapped with a techni-
cal. That gave hin I fouls I be-
gin the second half. Kei
didn't say anything to the referee to
warrant the foul hut was still given
it anyw.i.
"1 didn't even say anything
Kerner said. "I thought he called the
technical I Von and that other
guy got in a scuffle I was trying to
break Von up and the next thing I
know he called a technical on me
That would prove to he a big loss
ECU, since Kernel had to sit out.
Fouls seemed to be .i big problem for
ECU. The 1'irates picked up tour fouls
in a row in a span of about a minute.
Tony Parham picked up his sec-
ond foul with 16:23 left, and 13 sec-
onds later. Deron Rippey got his tirst
foul. Parham then picked up two
more fouls in a span ol 12 seconds.
Parham went to the bench with tour
fouls.
Now ECL' had one of the top
guards and then center out with foul
trouble. Neither I ooley r the crowd
was pleased with the foul situations.
ECU struggled in the second
half. The closest they came to cut-
ting the lead was nine points, and
that was with 18:36 left in the game.
The Pirates had a problem get-
ting the ball down the court with the
full court press by the Eagles. ECU
would inbound the ball and immedi-
ately American would douhle team
the ball handler, and too many times
ECU overturned it.
American's biggest lead was 23
points with 10:41 left in the game.
14-57.
"We were upset we got ourselves
in a hole Parham said. "We knew
we could dig ourselves back out ot
the hole. You have to give all the
credit in the world to American be-
cause they just didn't crack tonight
ECl s shooting percentage diu
improve to 47 percent for the second
half and their free throws were up to
Si percent.
ECU committed 24 turnovers for
the game and was charged with 25
fouls. American turned the ball over
GAME from page 10
17 times and committed 18 fouls ond 1 f. I t the free I out for the rest of thi
We can't dwell on thi: ta age did increase. In the second hall
ECl the lu-ld. and Kelleyhadsix Om
nt fron the three point ai ' ECU did oul '
3-32 for the game Thi n I hurt E( I'
With Cagle out foi good il J - lei 1
Id overall and I 5 in '
ft
t dwell on a win lor too long.
Jo pel
and 80 percent In
Dooley said.
Even sitting out a gond portii
of the game. Kerner still led ECU Blackmon led ECl
scorers with 14 points. Rippey. who 17 points. Allpress had lOandKelli imewhat of a strain on the Lad)
was hut out in the first half with no and Shay Hayes i
ints. came out in the second hall eight Mlpress also grabbed nil
po
and added 13 points and live re
bounds. Hamilton added 12. while
Meadows finished with 10. Basham
ended the night with nine points, hut
led the way for rebounding with
seven.
Chuck Jones, who had missed the
two previous games with an illness,
contributed eight points for ECU
Fouls were a killer lot the Pirates.
Rippey ended the night with four pet-
s' mals while I )amon Van Weerdhuizen
and Bryant finished with three fouls
each.
Needless to say. this was disap-
pointing for ECU.
"It was a big disappointment but
you have to give American credit.
Kerner said. "They have an unortho-
dox style of play that our team is not
use to
The loss drops ECl' to 7-3 in the
conference and 14-5 overall. The Pi-
rates are still in the race for the top
spot in the CAA Currently, excluding
last night's games in the CAA. ECl is
tied tor second with ODU
ECU will be on the road this Sat
urday at VCU. VCU's only conference
loss was to ECU on Jan. El at Minges
The Rams lost 73-72. The Pirates will
return home on Valentine's Day. Feb.
14. to take on William & Mary. That
game is set to begin at 7 p.m.
bounds. Laurie shenfelder. who has
taken the spol "i Belinda
"She's a great leader, great d
ive playi tead
iistenl playei foi Don
.
Joyner Library plans to move into its new
facility during the break between spring
semester and first summer session. The library
will be closed at this time. This is Phase I of
three phases of the library's move.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 6, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 06, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1122
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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