The East Carolinian, February 1, 1996






THUIg
Febuary 1,1996
Vol71,No. 35
rolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pages
Around the State
JACKSONVILLE. N.C. (AP) -
Onslow County authorities are
seeking extradition from Florida
of a man accused of impersonat-
ing a doctor.
Charles Ernest Ryles was ar-
rested in Daytona Beach, Fla
Tuesday night. Authorities said
Ryles found "patients" at a local
restaurant he frequented, was of-
fered a job at a military clinic pay-
ing S57.50 an hour, and even
fooled his wife, who divorced him
after learning she hadn't really
married a doctor.
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C.
(AP) - An accused rapist, whose
bond was reduced from $60,000
to $2,000 after the victim failed
to appear at a hearing, has been
charged with another rape, au-
thorities said Tuesday.
Walter Dewayne Stewart, 21,
of Saluda, was arrested last Satur-
day in connection with the rape
of a 16-year-old Mountain Home
girl. In the other case. Stewart was
arrested Aug. 15 and charged with
raping a 19-year-old Henderson
County girl.
Around the Country
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Twin
girls, fathered by different men. ap-
parently will stay with tneir mother
after one of the father? gave up
his custody fight.
UNA tests show Peter
Tonnessen is Lauren's father, and
Megan's father is Dean Taylor, who
is married to the twins' mother.
For twins to have different
fathers, the mother would have to
ovulate twice in one menstrual
cycle and have intercourse with
two men around the time of ovu-
lation.
SAN DIEGO (AP) - A baby
girl, who died minutes after being
separated from her Siamese twin,
may provide the key to her sister's
survival, doctors said.
Surgeons will use some of
Sarahi Morales' tissue and bones
to build a chest wall for her sister.
Sarah, who is 17 days old Wednes-
day. Sarah remained in critical but
stable condition, two days after a
six-hour separation surgery.
Around the World
COLOMBO. Sri Lanka (AP) -
An explosives-packed truck
crashed into Sri Lanka's central
bank Wednesday and exploded,
setting off a string of high-rise fires
that left at least 39 people dead
and 50u hurt.
A second explosion was heard
shortly after the first, but its cause
was not immediately clear.
LONDON (AP) - Thieves
raided the country mansion home
of Oueen Elizabeth IPs cousin, the
Duke of Kent, and stole antiques
and silverware worth $82,000.
Thames Valley police said, in
a statement Tuesday night, that
the Duke and Duchess of Kent
were away from their home near
Nettlebed village. 30 miles west of
London, when thieves broke in
through a ground-floor window
about 5 a.m. Monday.
Former president
appeals resignation
Foundation
investigation
continues
David Durham
Staff Writer
The former associate vice chan-
cellor for development and alumni
affairs and former president of ECU
Medical Foundation, is appealing ac-
tions that he claims were taken by
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin to force
him to resign from his position on
Dec. 22, 1995.
"Dr. Robert K. Adams was told
that he would be terminated if he
didn't resign said Adams' attorney,
Jeffrey L. Miller.
Miller said he has submitted a
document entitled "Grievance. Pe-
tition for Review and Appeal which
describes Adams' position in the dis-
pute, to the chancellor, the
chancellor's attorney and the board
of trustees. He said that the board
will review it and decide if there are
any grounds or reasons for dis-
charge.
"We are hopeful that the board
of trustees will agree with our posi-
tion and that Adams will be vin-
dicated Miller said.
"Adams denies that he was
engaged in any conduct that would
justify his dismissal Miller said.
Ben Irons, university attorney,
said he received the petition for re-
view from a board of trustees sub-
committee on Jan. 22 and has been
asked to respond within 15 days.
He said he intends to do so.
"It is the university's position
that Adams resigned voluntarily
Irons said. "His employment ter-
minated upon his resignation on
Dec. 22. 1995
Irons said that an interim re-
placement for Adams position has
been named. Ellis Hall now cur-
rently serves as the interim associ-
ate vice chancellor for development
and alumni affairs.
Irons said an investigation by
state auditors into the Medical
Foundation continues.
"I can't comment about the
substance of the investigation
Irons said.
Irons said when the auditors
complete their investigation, a pub-
lic report will be issued.
According to an article in TEC
on Jan. 18, the investigation is over
a misuse of state and Medical Foun-
dation funds. Irons said in the ar-
ticle, an anonymous complaint was
made to the State Auditor's Office
about travel expenses which had al-
ready been reimbursed by the foun-
dation were also paid by the state.
The complaint also involved a
$14,000 payment to Omega Inc a
company in which two university
employees have a vested interest
Officer accepts
blame for accident
Wendy Rountree
News Editor
An accident at the intersection of
Founders Drive and 10th Street re-
sulted in an ECU police officer being
sent to Pitt Memorial Hospital on Tues.
Jan. 30 around 6:30 p.m.
Officer M. Benson, a bike patrol
officer for ECU police, said he was re-
sponding to a call from College Hill
about a suspicious person when the
accident happened.
"I was heading east on the north
side of 10th Street" Benson said. "I
was going against traffic on the side-
walk
Benson, who was on the wrong
side of the street said that as he ap-
proached the intersection on his bi-
cycle he noticed that the traffic on 10th
Street had a green light and the traffic
from Founders Drive had a red light
"There was a gentleman there sit-
ting, waiting to turn right on red onto
10th Street Benson said.
Thomas Harold Lawrence, a psy-
chology and exercise science major, was
the driver of he car who was waiting
to turn right
"I pulled up in front of Brewster
and out to the red light" Lawrence
said. "I was turning right on red
Benson said that he decided to go
ahead and pass the car because the
ftV
am
� i �
Speakers deliver AIDS message
HIV facts, statistics,
practicing safe sex
top discussion
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
Tuesday evening two speakers
drew a large audience to Wright Au-
ditorium where they presented.
"Friendship in the age of AIDS
The presentation was about the
HIV virus and how it can effect us
as college students.
Alpha Omicron Pi sponsored
this event given by Joel Goldman,
who is HIV positive, and his best
friend T.J. Sullivan. The two met
while attending Indiana University
and now travel to different univer-
sities telling their story.
The presentation began with
clips from a film showing the AIDS
Quilt, while in Washington DC. The
song played during the film said,
"We're all in this together
Sullivan then began to speak
on how HIV fit into his life and how
he met his friend Joel over 10 years
ago. Since college, they had always
kept in touch and one afternoon
Joel had called him at work.
"I don't remember the exact
words that he said in the next few
minutes, but for the first time in
my life one of my very best fi lends
told me he was HIV positive
Sullivan said. "When one of your
best friends calls you and tells you
something like that, you suddenly
realize that you don't know any-
thing that you need to know at all
Goldman then came onto the
stage and told the audience a bit
about his background and his fam-
ily. A hard lesson that he has
learned is not to mix sex and alco-
hol. The decisions you make with
your partner when you've been
drinking can have a life long effect
on you both.
"When 1
was in school I
believed that I
was invincible
and nothing
could touch me.
especially when
alcohol was con-
c e r n e d . "
Goldman said.
After col-
lege when he
had stopped
drinking, he no-
ticed that he
was having safer
sex. That is
when he first de-
cided to get
tested for HIV.
The first test
came back nega-
tive. Goldman
got tested for a
second time af-
ter his health
started to dete-
riorate. That is
when Goldman
learned that he
was HIV posi-
tive.
"1 thought
it was a bad
dream and I would wake up and it
would all be over Goldman said.
When Goldman came to terms
with the fact he was HIV positive,
he decided to educate and help
other people deal with this issue.
Their presentation included
facts and statistics as they relate
to the college- aged student. It also
included how the virus is con-
tracted and ways it can be pre-
vented, basic things you need to
know about using condoms and a
seven minute video of college stu-
dents on spring break in Daytona
and their views on sex and drink-
ing.
Goldman suggested ways stu-
dents can be supportive when a
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Joel Goldman, who is HIV positive, spoke to
a large audience on Tuesday evening in
Wright Auditorium about living with the virus
and how it could be prevented.
loved one contracts the HIV virus.
Kurt Constantineau, a sopho-
more business major was one of the
many students at the performance.
"After listening to Joel and T.J
I really began to think about how
AIDS and HIV aren't just diseases
hat someone else can get
Constantineau said. "Their perfor-
mance made this disease seem more
real and added humor as well.
When the performance ended,
the pair wrapped things up.
"This is not going away, it is
getting bigger and bigger. The sad-
dest part is that this is something
I got by the choices that I made
and their consequences Goldman
said.
-r4
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
On Tuesday night, the intersection of Founders Drive and
10th Street became the scene of the accident between ECU
Police Officer M. Benson and student Thomas Lawerence.
traffic appeared to be stopped.
According the Greenville Police
report. Benson did so just at the mo-
ment that the lights changed. Lawrence
made a right turn, his vehicle struck
Benson on his left leg. causing him to
lose control of the bike and go down
"As I pulled out. I heard a thump
on my hood Lawrence said. "I was
looking left 1 didn't even see the guy.
I thought a person had just thrown a
rock at my car. As 1 pulled out and
straightened out. going up Kith Street.
ed in my rearview mirror and saw
a bic.wle lying in the road and a per-
son lying in the road
Benson said that 1 � i not
realize that he hit someone until he
looked back into his rearview mirror,
and then he stopped.
Lawrence said he had traveled at
least 50 feel before he realized what
had happened, and then backed up.
When he got back to the s(
See OFFICER page 3
Program seeks
new volunteers
David Durham
Staff Writer
The ECU Student Volunteer Pro-
gram offers many benefits to students,
including the opportunity to build your
resume, explore career options, gain
hands-on experience or just add more
meaning to your life.
Some may ask why they should
give more of their free time when school
already consumes so much. However.
3.000 students have
found reason
enough.
"Volunteer-
ing promotes re-
sponsibility and self
esteem said Judy
Baker, director of
the ECU Student
Volunteer Program.
She said it also
looks impressive on
a resume and can
give one more of a
sense of purpose in
life.
Many students, like speech pathol-
ogy major Amber Gaines. have used the
program to explore career options.
"I definitely think it's a good op-
portunity for anybody she said. It
gives you ways to decide what to d. i with
the rest of your life
.Alter Summer Walke volunti
at the Greenville Community Shelter,
she decided against majoring in social
work. However, she did say the
ence was enriching.
"It was kind of neat because you
got to know the people who came m.
Walke said.
Others, like Rose Anne and Daniel
Hobbs. are currently using the volun-
teer program to fulfill volunteer hours
required for their exercise physiology
major.
Ahne said they went in with the
general idea of doing an exercise and
stretching program, but didn't really
have the specifics worked out
Ahne said Baker then contacted
the Creative Living Center, and now the
two are scheduled to begin
program with mature adults in adult day
care.
The ECU Student Volunteer Pro-
gram has received numerous awards, in-
cluding President Hush's i tints of Light
Award, the National A
Vol-
unteer Program
from
tmpus
Outreach Oppor-
tunity Le
the
" Volunteering
promotes
responsibility and
self esteem"
.
Judy Baker, director ot the
ECU Student Volunteer
Program
lun-
just about all of 1
Baker founded tl am in
tion grants
funding it t
bega;
contii
��IViJis
1
until the univers
only a I id has
involved
II von ,
The
vices to sod
community.
they are vol
See VOL page 3
cfCe
4
H&C
Movie, CD reviews bring music to our earspage D
Athletes live the good lifepage r
l&iwuicUu
American comes to townpage
9
Thursday
Cloudy
Weekend
Showers
High 43
Low 29
High 46
Low 30
N

am �a xeacA u�
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328 - 2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
It lit i-N I YM.C IS.K I I IH
The Fast Carolinian
Student Publication Bklg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
'mm Jovner





!�'
Thursday, Febuary 1,1996
The East Carolinian
Alumna warns against club's policy
. . . ���:u l�. i AAn't chin mntrafts that are virtually
January 22
Harassing phone calls � A staff member reported that someone has
been leaving profane messages on her answering machine.
Larceny - A student reported that parts of his bicycle were stolen.
January 25
Breaking and EnteringLarceny - A staff member reported that some-
one entered a Flanagan office and stole a fax machine.
Assist residence hah coordinator - A staff member reported finding a
grenade in White Hall during a routine safety check of the rooms.
January 26
Larceny - A staff member was arrested for larceny of a check.
Suspicious person - A staff member reported that a female had been
sleeping in the lobby of Greene Hall for several days.
Assault - A staff member was arrested for assaulting another staff
member at Todd Dining Hall.
January 27
Controlled substance violation Possession of stolen property - Two
residents of Scott hall were issued state citations and campus appearance
tickets for possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, and
possession of stolen property.
January 28
Accident � A hit and run occurred in the 4th and Reade Circle parking
Club continues to
draft account after
member moves
Marguerite Benjamin
Assistant News Editor
lot
January 29
Second degree rape - A student reported that she had been raped
while visiting a friend at Slay Hall.
Larceny - A student reported that her parking decal had been stolen
from her vehicle while it was parked in the commuter lot on College Hill
Drive.
Assault with an automobile - A student reported that her roommate
tried to run her down on Founders Drive. The complainant refused to file
criminal charges; however, it will be referred to Resident Life.
Compiled by Marguerite Banjamin. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Knowing that Spring Break
and warmer weather are right
around the corner, many students
may decide to begin person work-
out programs or enlist in the ser-
vices of a professional fitness pro-
gram. However, students should
take caution when deciding to pur-
chase a fitness club membership.
Kathy Murray, a recent ECU
graduate and ex-member of The
Club for Women Only (CFWO) lo-
cated at 140 Oakmont Drive, said
that if she had known in advance
the hassles she would have to en-
dure with the club, she would have
never joined.
Murray said she became a mem-
ber of the fitness club in June of
1995 and had to cancel her mem-
bership early because she moved
out of Greenville in order to go
home and prepare for her wedding.
"That's when all the problems
started Murray said. "After I
graduated in May and moved back
home, I talked to the manager
about ending my membership.
There was a lot of things I had to
do before they would let me out of
my contract
Murray said she was given a list
of seven things she could do in or-
der to prove that she was no longer
a resident of Greenville in order to
forfeit her membership. The list in-
cluded providing copies of telephone
bills and mortgagerent statements
to certify having a new address.
"Since 1 was moving back in
with my parents and none of the
bills were going to be in my name,
none of the things on the list really
applied to me Murray said.
Murray said the following
month she noticed money was dis-
appearing from her checking ac-
count. The amounts she was miss-
ing corresponded with the $29
monthly membership fee she had
been paying to CFWO.
"I couldn't believe they were
taking money out of my account
Murray said, adding that in the be-
ginning she was told canceling her
membership would be easy, and she
should have no problems.
Later, Murray said she was told
CFWO would stop drafting money
from her account if she would get
her parents' address put on her
driver's license, so she did. For a
while, no more money disappeared
from her account.
"Then it happened again
Murray said. "They started taking
more money out. When I asked why,
they said it was because they found
out 1 was still working in Greenville.
"Apparently the contract also
said if I still worked in Greenville,
then my membership was still valid.
I thought about trying to sell the
remainder of the time on my mem-
bership, but I was told that (selling)
was not an option
Murray said she finally was al-
lowed to fully terminate her mem-
bership when she decided to quit her
job in Greenville.
"My boss wrote (the manager of
CFWO) a letter stating that I was
quitting my job because I didn't
want to commute from Winterville
anymore Murray said. "So now, in
January, they have finally stopped
drafting my account I hope
Murray said she probably will
not join another fitness club.
The owner of CFWO was not
available for comment, but Nick
Lembo, general manager of
Greenville Athletic Club GAC lo-
cated at 301 Plaza Drive, said he had
heard of membership termination
problems like the one Murray had
encountered.
"A consumer reports bulletin 1
saw told of clubs making and break-
ing promises to members and coerc-
ing people to sign life-time member-
ship contracts that are virtually im-
possible to break Lembo said.
Lembo said, GAC members can
terminate their contracts for relo-
cation or medical reasons.
"We do have a member-transfer
policy Lembo said. "All a member
has to do is get another person to
take over the monthly payments.
There is no extra fee or heavy pa-
perwork involved.
"We have one to two year mem-
bership contracts that we expect
people to commit to once they have
joined, but they can terminate for
various reasons Lembo said. "Af-
ter a member fulfills an agreement,
the membership can be canceled
with a 30-day notice
East Carolina Playhouse
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February 8, 9, 10, 12 and 13, 1996 at 8:00 p.m.
lebruarv 1 1, 1996 at 2:00 p.m.
Call-328-6829
General Public: S 8.00
ECU Students:5.00
Children:5.00
Mature Themes. Parental Discretion Advised.
Only at Perkins' Family Restaurants and Bakery can you enjoy
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�ij"ii -giiiiiiiiiwnTi' 'i i TiiTIP i Tiniil
i '� ��in- �' - �� w
The East Carolinian
Thursday, Febuary 1,1996
L-
tCjteenoUU's only
dxetic fllqhtclub ,J bueil oj
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam
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Must arrive by 8.00
THURSDWS - SATURDAYS
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$ Dancers Wanted $
r
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OFFICER from page 1
that Benson was on his radio calling
for help.
"I was just glad to see that he was
okay Lawrence said. "I was scared
Benson said that he called in a
1033 to the police dispatcher, which
basically means, "Emergency, I need
help immediately
In the meantime, two or three
pedestrians stopped to help Benson
and in a few moments, several ECU
police officers responded to the scene.
Benson said that at least one Greenville
police officer responded also. As with
VOL
from page 1
ECU
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all police calls, the emergency squad
and the fire department also came.
Benson said he was taken to the
emergency room.
"I was checked over by the doc-
tors Benson said. "There was no frac-
ture. I'll be back to work tomorrow
(Thursday) night"
Since Lawrence had little time to
speed up when the accident happened,
Benson was not seriously injured and
Lawrence's car suffered no damage.
Benson said that he is the first to
admit that he could have been more
cautious.
"There were some precautions
that 1 should have taken but did not
take Benson said. "I didn't utilize all
that waj at my disposal
Benson said he was not wearing
his reflector jacket, he was traveling
on the wrong side of the road and he
did not come to a full stop before try-
ing to cross the intersection.
"He had a black bike and a dark
uniform Lawrence said.
Even so, Benson, who is a liaison
representing the bike patrol to the
police administration, will be looking
into ways of stressing safety measures
to other bike patrol officers.
"I made a mistake and learned a
' valuable lesson Benson said. "I be-
lieve that it is a lesson that can be
learned by students who ride on bikes
at night
No charges have been filed in this
incident
"It will cover you from the time you
leave until the time you get back - that's
yourself, as a person, and also liability
wise in the event you should break
something or damage something
Baker said.
Although North Carolina has a
good Samaritan law that protects well
intentioned volunteers, Baker said "this
is an added incentive
Any student enrolled at ECU can
volunteer through the ECU Student
Volunteer Program. All he or she must
do is contact Baker and decide from a
list of 56 organizations' descriptions,
where he or she might want to volun-
teer. Although some organizations need
full semester-length volunteers, others
need help with specific, short-term ac-
tivities.
Croups such as fraternities, sorori-
ties, and clubs can also volunteer. Baker
said she can help groups find organiza-
tions that need volunteers during spe-
cific time frames or help plan and sched-
ule predetermined volunteer activities
that the groups intend to do.
Baker said some of the more popu-
lar organizations among the students
include the Boys and Girls Club, Shel-
ter for Battered Women, Ronald
McDonald House, Dream Factory,
P1CASO (support for AIDS victims) and
the American Red Cross.
"The organizations really appreci-
ate what we're doing" Baker said. "Its
been a real positive force for the univer-
sity
Baker said she is very thankful to
Chancellor Richard Eakin, Dean Chris-
tian Zauner of the School of Health and
Human Performance and Dr. David
White, chair of the department of health
education, for their strong support of
the ECU Student Volunteer Program.
"Our program has been very suc-
cessful and has grown because of those
three individuals and you can't have
anything on a campus like this unless
people believe in what you're doing
she said.
Blood Drive
Today in the
skills lab in the
Nursing Building
from 8 a.m. -
10:30 p.m.
Jk ATTENTION EASTENDERS AND A.
W FANS OF BRISTISH TV!
Dan Abramson, editor of The Walford Gazette"
and publisher of "British Television" will be
speaking in Greenville on Feb. 3. For Further
information call Judi Willis at 355-7374.
Jj
��� � A
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HERE'S WHAT'S
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
f
Students, faculty, and
staff are invited to
ouestion three
candidates for the
position of Student
Store director.
Participants also
evalute the candidates
on an exit survey.
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Feb.IMendenhall Social room
Feb.6Mendenhall Social room
"8Mendenhall Great room
H
4
f
at Mendenhall Student Center
9
Ya '11 come to the FREE
Country Line Dance Lessons
EVERY THURSDAY IN FEBRUARY 8-9:30 P.M.
i MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
1
II
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91
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Taught by Texas Two Step Dance instructors
Becky Fuller and Marvin Wells
N O
PARTNER N

Friday, Feb. 9 �EL.
at 8 p.m. tJBr�&
MSC Billiards Center j $tt0ty Vf
featuring "Dr. Cue"
9
rVAsirrr

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t
p
I
I
GRAND OPENING
of the MSC Computer Lab t
MONDAY, FEB. 26 3-9 P.M. I
Free refreshments, giveaways, surprises
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Acttiiif'
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board jj
Drop-Ad with:
f NO lines.
� NO waiting.
0 NO headaches.
Were talking classifieds, not classes.
The East Carolinian introduces
�& NO HASSLE DROP-AD!
v "JfeA Pick up one of our classified ad
�"0tSm envelopes (like the one shown
V8S8r here), fill it out and place
-ggzzz your payment inside.
Then drop it off in our box in front
of Student Stores or at the information desk in
Mendenhall, in addition to The East Carolinian office.
Placing a classified ad couldnt be easier,
SSI E
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
I
Just look for our logo
around campus for
No Hassle Drop-Ad!
A service of The East Carolinian.
Watch for additional drop box locations as we make it even easier to Drop-Ad!
����flfll
:�MPIl I





Thursday, February 1,1996
The East Carolinian
I
Our View
We at TEC are
proud of our
athletes, but do
they really
deserve all the
perks that came
with pumping
iron?
We at TEC are the first to cheer our athletic teams onto
victory. We wholeheartedly support all the endeavors of all
our students.
Many of our staff members are both radio sportscasters
as well as sportswriters. These folks probably spend as much
time preparing for on-air broadcasts, writing and re-writing
stories, as some of our athletic teams spend practicing. We
will also concede that there's a certain amount of positive
school name recognition that goes along with successful ath-
letic programs. And most recently, seeing Othello Meadows'
last second winning shot showcased as ESPN's "Play of the
Day" made Pirate alumni from far and wide full of pride.
But we don't think athletes are any more important to
East Carolina than the rest of us.
Student-athletes get a few perks for being athletes. Some
athletes get more than others: athletic scholarships, use of
top-notch training facilities, registering early for classes, free
meal plans and missing all classes on the day of or before
games.
Some may argue that since some teams practice twice a
day, they don't have time to go stand in line and register for
classes. Well some of us have jobs as well as classes. If stu-
dents who also work are scheduled to work during the days
of registration, would the administration let them register
early?
ECU's athletes train with the best equipment on the mar-
ket today. Since our football and basketball teams earn most
of the athletic dollars, it seems only fair that they are pro-
vided such training equipment For us non-athletes, it means
waiting in lines for use of equipment, over-crowded condi-
tions and trying to shuffle work, classes and some type of
physical fitness program. But does winning a game or two
have to mean the physical fitness needs of the rest of the
student body must suffer?
We aren't taking a cheap, low blow at our athletes. But in
comparison to the athletes, the rest of us are treated like
second-class citizens by the administration. We suppose such
unfair measures are necessary to keep the best young ath-
letes from going to school elsewhere, but that doesn't make
it right The world outside of ECU isn' fair, it's a realm of
compromise. At a state supported university of higher learn-
ing, where the leaders of tomorrow are being bred, are these
unfair practices implemented by the university going to make
us better leaders or teach us that some are better than oth-
ers?
Dreams of success lost to reality
In my English class today, we dis-
cussed on-line today's secondary
schools. What the general consensus
came to, was that today's schools are
more of a ritualistic prison than any-
thing else.
When a convicted criminal is sent
to prison, they are stripped of almost
all their rights and are told where to
go, when and how often. Does this
ring any bells? In high school, you
are stripped of almost all your rights
Mid told where to go, when and how
often.
Perhaps, this was not the best
example of high schools, but I think
it proves my point High schools to-
day have little educational merit Most
of the students that are in these
schools are not there by choice. If they
had the choice, they would be off with
their friends shooting hoops or shoot-
ing something else.
So, for that matter, schools are
good. They try to keep kids out of
trouble. What the schools fall short
on is that schools should be more
geared towards education. That is
what they were founded for. Schools
weren't founded for soccer or football,
lacrosse or basketball. No, they were
founded to educate young minds and
try to prepare them for the REAL
WORLD!
Uh Oh, I said it. The REAL
WORLD. You know, that majestic
place you always here about but can
never seem to find. That nirvana that
is at the end of the rainbow, life, free-
dom, a job, 2.5 kids and a white picket
fence.
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Writer
Today a high
school diploma
wonfteven get
Actually, I am speaking about the
chance to make something of your-
self, and be graded and judged based
upon your merits. Wait a minute, to
be graded and judged based upon my
merits, that would mean I would have
to be living in a open minded, caring,
non stereotypical society. As we all
know, we do not live in such a place.
So, if we live in a society that does
not care for the whole, but for itself,
and grades and judges a person on
their looks and the stereotype of what
kind of person they probably are - is
this the REAL WORLD we were prom-
ised?
We are meticulously crafted in
high school with these stereotypes of
groups of people. The best one of all,
is that all college students, especially
at ECU, sit around and drink. As I said,
that is a stereotype. ECU is a fine
university that has some excellent
programs and students.
But if we were judged based
solely on that stereotype, most people
would laugh in our faces and then
slam the door on us at job interviews.
This is a tame example of the stereo-
type being inbred in students today.
I remember back in high school
oh, a few years ago, stereotypes such
as this one were like God's own truth.
We were made to believe these were
truths. Of course, with some investi-
gation and experience, I have learned
otherwise.
Also, We were made all these
promises. For instance, one of which
is, when you get out in the REAL
WORLD, you can get these wonder-
ful jobs, because you have an educa-
tion. The emphasis was always on the
education. Well, perhaps 20 - 30 years
ago I could have. What kind of an
education is represented by a high
school diploma? Today a high school
diploma won't even get my foot in the
door at Taco Bell.
High schools are a glorified
prison. All students are prisoners with
a social security number instead of
an inmate number - same difference.
The warden is the principal and the
screws are the narcs and security
guards, who nowadays have to use
metal detectors to determine if a stu-
dent is safe to enter the school.
So the mirage that the wonder-
ful education I received in high school
has faded away, so the next step is to
go to college. Of course in today's
society, my foot in the door means,
OK, they will call me back perhaps in
a few days! Yeah, sure, right!
"the news media form the nervous system
of a free society
Newt Gringrich, 1995
FOWDED1925 ,
The East Carolinian
'w
:
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the EC" community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the upinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may bc'edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed, lettersshould
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information calW919)
328-6366.
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
7WC FUPSiDE
Bccause Ae Ae
?m& ART15T5, WRITER,
$U�rfnST3,EocTaRS, AND
otucbs Working lWo&
, -r so?� can't-
Vizise stfroKT rotie jwraj. semcc"
Candidate's plans fall flat
There once was a rather eccentric
man named Malcolm Forbes. He found
joy in riding motorcycles, collecting toy
soldiers and Faberge eggs, and owned
a castle in Morocco. He twice decided
to run for governor of New Jersey. He
had a son named Steve, and Steve has
decided to do his father one better.
Steve Forbes is more than just his
father's son. He is a successful busi-
ness man as well. He runs his father's
business and runs it well. He is in
charge of 10 magazines (one of which
is the family namesake, Forbes Maga-
zine) and about 14 newspapers. He is
also running for President of the
United States of America. His ticket
to ride is the flat tax and the train is
boarding now.
He doesn't care that his critics say
the flat tax will only help other wealthy
individuals like himself, he believes in
it because it is fair to everyone.
It would exempt the first $36,000
of income for families with two par-
ents and two kids. This plan would then
take all income above that line and tax
it by 17 percent It is a good idea that
would do a great job of ensuing that
everyone pays their dues equally.
Two questions arise, will it work
and can he get to the White House
with it? The second question is more
appropriate to answer first
Steve Forbes has never held po-
litical office before. He is financing
most of his own expenses and what he
has raised has been through
fundraising dinners (to say nothing of
the fact that they are at $1,000 a plate.)
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
The following is
what people
don't realize: the
federal budget
deficit will
increase.
This could be considered money that
he might owe favors for in return. In
his defense. Forbes is quick to point
out that a mere $1,000 doesn't buy a
very big favor by any standard.
Forbes has made some credible
gains in the three months since he be-
gan campaigning - in fact he is the
second leading Republican candidate
with 15 percent of the support in the
primaries taken to date, well Lehind
Bob Dole but well ahead of the other
contenders.
So far he has not made his opin-
ions on many different subjects known.
He does not believe in abortion but
feels that it should be handled by
'changing culture" instead of forcing
it with legislation. That splits the Re-
publican backing.
The second thing that is work-
ing against him is that Dole doesn't
have to attack him yet. With his con-
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor,
At the beginning of last Fall se-
mester, the ECU School of Business
was given the opportunity to expand
its international image by allowing or-
ganizations within the business
school to develop international rela-
tions between domestic students and
international students. One of the
primary reasons for the internation-
alization was to foster interest for an
international business curriculum at
the graduate level, which will be the
only program of this nature in North
Carolina.
As many business organizations
worked proficiently in the interna-
tional arena, the idea of the sought
after curriculum started to become
clearer until an imposing school
stepped in the way to hinder progress.
As soon as our sister school, UNC
We deserve it
Chapel Hill, received a notion of what
was happening, they decided to try
to rob ECU of its work by stating they
deserve the right to have this program
due to the egotistic fact that they are
"Carolina
UNC and ECU both have out-
standing business schools which meet
the same accreditations, but the main
differences are represented in the cur-
nculums each school offers. For ex-
ample, ECU is home to two of the most
renowned award winning business or-
ganizations in America, the ECU Chap-
ter of the American Marketing Asso-
ciation (AMA) and the Society for the
Advancement of Management (SAM).
I know from a personal experience that
the AMA has helped to achieve an in-
ternational image by appointing an
executive position for international
affairs to represent ECU in North Caro-
lina and at the International Collegiate
Marketing Conference in New Orleans.
On the other hand, UNC Chapel
Hill will not be represented in New
Orleans due to THE FACT that they
do not even have an AMA chapter, be-
cause they lack the diversity of mar-
keting courses, don't have�nough stu-
dent interest and lack of experience of
ECU's marketing faculty, which many
claim to be one of the best in the na-
tion.
The final decision of which school
obtains the international program
should be weighed on international
motivation ai.a which school has the
best programs and departments to pro-
vide the state of North Carolina with
its international needs.
Robert Lewis
American Marketing Association
vice president
vincing lead he doesn't need to. With
the other contenders trying to get
ahead, they'll be more than happy to
bash him. So far the only seed that
Dole has planted is that Forbes is in-
experienced and untested as a leader.
The main issue is will the flat tax
work? The American people seem to
like the idea of it In a recent Time
CNN poll, 48 percent of those polled
were in favor of the idea 42 percent
were opposed. JZlZH
If the Forbes JJtarrgggJj &�into
effect, there woulchbgggjussions
everywhere. There would be about
$200 billion less received each year,
this would mean big cutbacks and
higher state cutbacks. Corporations
would also face higher rates.
The following is what people
don't realize: the federal budget defi-
cit will increase. There will 'no longer
be deductions allowed for charitable
contributions, state and local taxes,
or home mortgages.
It is improbable to think that the
people would want to give up their
precious little tax breaks. The bottom
75 percent of tax payers actually pay
less than the planned 17 percent al-
ready.
The details of the plan will keep
Forbes from having a prayer at the
GOP nomination and out of any real
contention by late March or early
April. It is a great notion that the
American people could all be taxed
equally but it will never happen as
long as the majority of the people
would have to give something up.





Thursday, February 1,1996
The East Carolinian
,�Ki�i�L
LAKE IMP U.S.A.
.BY JOHN MURPHY
GENERAL FRUSTRATIONS
� ���� SCftiOHOHS
MW AUS KISS
One. re&K





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��
Thursday, February 1,1996
The East Carolinian
Tournament winners
take trip to Knoxville
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Wntw
Billiards, anyone?
How about bowling? A friendly
game of table tennis, perhaps? Or, for
the less active, spades or chess?
All of these games are part of the
annual Associated College Unions In-
ternational (ACUI) tournament Spon-
sored by the ECU Student Union, this
tournament is held in January each year
and the winners receive an all-expenses
paid trip to the regional competition in
Knoxville, TN at the end of February.
The winners of the regional competi-
tion will go to the nationals, a trip which
is also all expenses paid.
This year the competition was held
January 16-25. Prom those who partici-
pated, ECU is sending 23 students to
the regionals in Knoxville. They will
jcompete against students fom North
�Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Ken-
tucky and Tennessee.
In the billiards tournament Tommy
Lawrence, Jamie AUred and Maria Rocas
will represent ECU. Scott Smith, Jerry
Wilkins, Neil Dickinson and Corey
Algood make up the men's bowling
team The women's bowling team in-
cludes Cristie Phillips, H'Lee Moua,
Angela Adams and Stephanie Jones.
For the spades competition, ECU
is sending two teams of two players: Eric
Norris and Alex Paul on the first team
and Donald Yohn and Michael Brown
on the second team. In the chess tour-
nament John Wooten, Jr. will compete.
ECU is also sending Trung H.
Nguyen, James Gray and Thanh Pham
to compete in the table tennis tourna-
ment and Robb Cavanaugh, Robert
Joyner, Chandre Speight and Martin
Thomas as the College Bowl Team.
How does one get involved in the
tournament? Believe it or not you sim-
ply sign up. The Student Union adver-
tises the tournament for several weeks,
and interested participants return a reg-
istration form with a fee of $2 per event
The rules are set by the ACU-i direc-
tors, but are little different from normal
tournament rules. This ensures .that all
contestants are following the same for-
mat The games are double elimination,
which means that a contestant must lose
twice before being removed from the
competition.
For every eight people who partici-
pate, the Student Union can send one
person to the regionals. The limitations
exist only in the number of people who
participate Despite the low registration
fee and the outstanding prizes, the turn-
out for these games has been consifr
tentry less than anticipated.
"All we need is more participants,
and we can send more people to the
regionals said Mark Carroll, a repre-
sentative of the Student Union.
If you missed the competition this
year, don't kick yourself yet This is an
annual event and the competition will
be even better next year. Watch for ad-
vertisements in The East Carolinian
and around campus next January. And
with a whole year to practice, maybe
you'll be in Knoxville in '97!
7f TO tone.
Space Ghost conquers the night
Every paper has a TV critic, but
our critic is no normal couch potato,
no mere TV junkie. No, our man wil
watch anything, anytime, regardless
of quality or good taste Truly, he has
no shame, and that is why we call him
"TheTVWhon
Kevin Chaisson
There has been a war going on at
night
Not unlike a Toho Studio's rub-
ber-suited monster flick, this battle has
been raging for some time now. Of
course, it's not without casualties.
Thicke fell, then Miller, and the gap-
ing mouth of Rivers followed them.
Chevy went like a lamb to slaughter.
Then Arsenio, a mighty (if annoying)
warrior, fell, leaving only four or so of
the giants to finish each other off.
Of course, I'm talking about the
late night talk show wars. And if you
think that Leno, Letterman or Conan
are the winners here, you're sadly mis-
taken. The big winner in the late night
talk show battle is Space Ghost
He's got a heat ray.
What' Space Ghost you say? That
cartoon character from the sixties in
the white spandex, yellow cape and
armbands? Exactly the one, but now
he has no annoying twin sidekicks or
monkeys to get in his way.
Perhaps I should explain further
for those not in the know. The Car-
toon Network's late night warrior is
lleetitef Zoohv
What do
food, the me-
CT dia, men,
women and
e obsessive be-
U ior have in corn-
Well, you can probably
think of a few things that are interre-
lated to these issues, but when com-
bined together these things speB out
eating disorders.
Eating disorders are psychologi-
cal and physical ffinesies oit are as-
sociated with severe body image dis-
tortion and an obsession with weight
Disordered eating behavior affects mil-
lions of people yearly, especially young
women. According to David R Herzog,
MJD, Director of the Harvard Eating
Disorders Center, "Pour to five per-
cent of all female college students suf-
fer from anorexia, bulimia or binge eat-
kig disorder and at least five times as
many engage in substantially disor-
dered eating behaviors Men also suf-
fer from eating disorders. Males usu-
"Space Ghost Coast to Coast" running
at 11 p.m. on Friday nights. Yes, it is a
talk show, featuring an animated host
and set but with real people as guests
(if you can
safely say that
Susan Powter is
"real"). Guests
are videotaped
earlier answer-
ing questions
(sometimes
scripted) and
these ex-
changes are
then mixed
with stock foot-
age from the
old "Space
Ghost" car-
toons, tailored
to fit the situa-
tion.
Space Ghost is the host and his
crew and band are made up of super
alien villains that he has imprisoned
on Ghost Planet his home and main
base of operations.
Space Ghost's main cohorts are
Zorak, an evil, sarcastic, giant locus-
er, uh, mantis (the bandleader), and
Moltar (the technical guy), an alien
from a volcanic planet in a fifties-style
radiation suit
It's almost too funny to be legal.
Want some examples? In an epi-
sode entitled "Sleeper Space Ghost
has Hulk Hogan and Slash on as
guests. Now, the guests for this show
can be separated into two categories:
ally make up about five to 10 percent of
ail people with the illness.
Some common signs and symp-
toms of individuals who suffer from eat-
ing disorders include the following:
1. Anorexia nervosa - character-
ized by self-starvation, dramatically re-
stricting caloric intake, significant
weight loss, absence of menses (men-
strual cycle), dry skin, sallow complex-
ion and an intense fear of gaining
weight even when underweight
2. Bulimia nervosa (bingepurge
syndrome) - characterized by eating
large amounts of food (binge) and ex-
pelling the intake through vomiting or
use of laxatives (purge). Other symptoms
indude swelling of the feet hands or
cheeks; serious dental, throat or intes-
tinal problems; abuse of laxativesdi-
uretics and eating large amounts of food
uncontrollably.
3. Binge eating disorder - charac-
terized by eating large amounts of food
while feeling out of control. Similar to
bulimia but without the purging behav-
ior. Other symptoms include eating
quickly, eating when not hungry, eat-
ing until uncomfortably full, feelings of
embarrassment due to inability to con-
Space Ghost, with friend
those that get the joke, and those that
don't Those that get it play along with
the jokes, act strangely, and generally
seem to have a good time. Those who
don't are teased and
t ridiculed by Space
Ghost and his gang.
Well, actually all of
the guests are ridi-
culed, some more vi-
ciously than others.
The Hulkster
was on to plug his
show, "Thunder in
Paradise which
was reviewed (or
maybe reviled) in
this column last se-
mester. Hogan
makes the mistake
of ridiculing Space
Ghost's physical
prowess, a major faux pas indeed.
Space Ghost in turn, mocks Hogan's
show, saying, "Oh, you fight bad guys
in the name of justice, helping people
in need! Oh yeah, that's original De-
spite the ribbing, Hogan "got it"
Slash didn't even try to play along
with the show. When Space Ghost asks
him to mouth out a mean guitar riff,
he childishly refuses. So Space Ghost
and Zorak get up and leave him.
This episode alone features hu-
morous references to wrestling, sleeper
holds. Jane Fonda, Bridget Fonda, the
literary classic "Bartleby the Scriv-
ener Japanese haiku poetry, talk show
See GHOST page 7
trol intake of food.
Disordered eating affects a vari-
ety of different people With the influ-
ence of the media (super-models, work-
out videos, weight loss gimmicks and
advertisements) and the stresses of
everyday college life, students are at
significant risk.
If you find yourself or a friend
showing signs or symptoms of disor-
dered eating, get some help. There are
many individuals on this campus able
to assist students who need help.
Since eating disorders can cause
serious medical complications, and be-
-ause they do affect many students
on our campus, this year ECU will join
hundreds of other colleges and uni-
versities across the country in the first
ever National Eating Disorders Screen-
ing Program (NEEDS) during Eating
Disorders Awareness Week, Feb. SI 1.
ECU will hold eating disorders
screening on Feb. 7 from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. in Wright 312 (Counseling Cen-
ter). All screenings are free and anony-
mous. The event is sponsored by Stu-
dent Life. For more information con-
tact Sara Shepherd at 32&6661 or
Heather Zophy at 32S6794.
Take this
head, for
example
Ed Lark makes arrange-
ments to join a reindeer
roundup in Finland. This
is only one of the
strange sights that
await viewers in Fin-
land: Land of Con-
trasts, showing Mon-
day, Feb. 5, at Hendrix
Theatre as part of the
Travel-Adventure Rim
Series.
Photo Courtesy of
ECU Student Union
7tovte IRevceeoL
Dreyfus gives musical
performance in Opus
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
Teachers often make some of the
best heroes in dramatic stories. A
teacher can bring out the best in stu-
dents, which touches chords deep in
every human psyche because at the
heart of every being is a desire to
make a difference in this world. Teach-
ers have the opportunity to make a
difference every day of their life.
In Mr. Holland's Opus, a new film
about a teacher, the hero of the film
proves that teaching can be one of
the most rewarding professions imag-
inable. Glen Holland (Richard Dreyfus)
gets into the teaching "gig as he calls
it only because he has been unable
to make a living as a musician. Unsat-
isfied with playing Ramada Inns for
the rest of his life, Glen becomes a
music teacher at John F. Kennedy
High School.
Films about teachers succeed
most when they concentrate on the
strengths of the teacher. In Mr.
Hollands Opus, much film time con-
centrates on the interactions Glen
Holland has with his students. Glen
tries patiently to get a shy,
underconfident clarinet player to have
enough faith in herself that she can
have tun playing an instrument
Glen works diligently with a foot-
ball player who has been kicked off
the team because of poor grades. The
athlete leams how to find a beat and
plays a great bass drum.
Glen helps a singer in a musical
understand what the song "Someone
to Watch Over Me" really means,
which helps her to find her voice while
singing.
The scenes of one-on-one student
contact complement the scenes of
Glen trying to teach his class music
appreciation or practicing with the
orchestra. In his music appreciation
class, Glen plays rock and roll on his
piano to get the students involved in
the discussion and to show the differ-
ences between scales.
When Mr. Holland's Opus fo-
cuses on Glen's teaching, the film
soars. But it bogs down every time
scenes occur at home. Glen's wife (ably
played by Glenn Headley) tries to give
support, but finds that she needs sup-
port herself when they have a son who
is deaf. Glen spends more time with
his kids at school than he does with
his son, which causes tension at home.
Though the scenes at home give
added meaning to Glen's life, the time
they take away from the cassroom
scenes cannot be justified. The class-
room is where the heart of the story
lies, and it is there that the filmmak-
ers should have focused their atten-
tion.
Richard Dreyfus does a great job
in the title role. He plays a perfectly
imperfect human being struggling to
find some meaning in his life. Through
music Glen is able to appreciate the
beauty and wonder of life. The most
wonderful aspect of teaching is being
able to share with students the love
of a subject When students feel as
deeply and positive about a subject
as the teacher, then the teacher has
accomplished the task of educating
the student
Glen Holland educated his stu-
dents because he encouraged them to
appreciate music. The rewards Glen
See OPUS page 8
CD Reviews
Suspect Bill
Bill Me Later
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
As a rule, 1 don't like happy, frothy
pop music. It bores me. 1 much prefer
morbid, creepy, evil pop music. The kind
of stuff that seems happy until you get
up close. Then it jumps up and bites
your head off with unexpected venom
But if you're going to do the frothy
stuff, I think you should go all the way.
Have a fun frenzy. Break up some fur-
niture (and maybe a couple of legs while
you're at it). Rip out some throats with
your bare teeth! Viking fun! Monkey
fun! Kree-gah!
Ahem. That said. I must admit that
I've been a bit disappointed in music
this past year. It's been a period of will-
fully vapid music, when even the un-
derground has produced lit'Je but foamy
party tunes. Aside from Boss Hog and
a handful of others, it's been a year of
limp-wristed pop crap.
Thaf s why I'm glad we've got some-
body like Suspect Bill to remind us how
it's done.
A ska outfit from Minneapolis,
Suspect Bill takes the already-bouncy
ska formula back to its most unexplored
roots in swing music. Coming out of the
roaring '20s, a time when people knew
how to party, swing is an expression of
the wild abandon of the period that
spawned it
Though ska is generally seen as an
off-shoot of reggae, it owes just as much
to the bouncy brass madness of swing.
That debt gets repaid by Suspect
Bill on their debut album, Bill Me
Later In addition to a number of origi-
nal tracks. Suspect Bill redefines clas-
sic swing and big band numbers by the
likes of Gene Krupa, Louis Prima and
Count Basie. If you want a toe-tappin'
party album, this is it
Bill Me Later opens with "Week-
end World a song with a touch of so-
cial consciousness. While that seems an
odd move for such an aggressively frothy
album. "Weekend World" acts as the
album's conscience, revealing the dan-
gers of the high life that the rest of the
album celebrates.
"Cousin Victor was locked in the
TV lounge when he was four He made
friends with the talking heads on the
TV sings lead Suspect Heather Leach.
Unable to relate to real people, Victor
grows up to lead a sad, empty, disco
lifestyle.
Though done in a more traditional
ska style than the rest of the album,
"Weekend World" sets the stage for
what follows. Suspect Bill's excellent
horn section is featured briefly, and
Leach's throaty vocals shine.
See BILL page 7
Fighting Gravity
Forever 1 Day
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
From Richmond, Virginia and with
power to pack comes the amazing seven-
member band Fighting Gravity. Their
new release, Forever 1 Day, is full of
unexpected turns that will rattle your
mind from start to finish.
Schiavone McGee, lead vocalist,
seems to be the driving force behind the
band's complex nature. With a vocal
range that drops hints of Seal, George
Michael and Craig Honeycutt (of Every-
thing), McGee's future with the band
looks very secure. Security to a vocalist
is very important especially when you're
in a band that consists of bass, guitar,
keyboards, drums, trombone and sax.
Due to the horn section, the bass is
not as strong. Although this is not a bass-
See FIGHTING page 8
li
ftf�i"i '
resmw





Ihe East Carolinian
Thursday, Febuary 1,1996
If you're cm achiever, you can go
a long wa FAST at Northwestern
Mutual Life. In fat t. wi� am
c allege internship program, you
can aft ii head start on your
career while you're still in
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You'll have the freedom to set
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Call soon to vet your career off to
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Contact Jeff Mahoney
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The Quiet Company
GHOS 1 from page 6
traditions, and Xuxa, the South Ameri-
can soft-core-porn-star-turned-wildly-
famous-children's-TV- show-host
Other episodes have featured man-
tis mating rituals, "CHiPS" references,
foreign language lab tapes that become
dialogue, Banjo (king of the Sea Mon-
keys) and so on. Wow. And the show is
only 15 minutes long!
That's right- 15 minutes. Perhaps
that's the reason that the show is con-
sistently funny. Real talk shows have
to sustain interviews, with a charming
and prolific host asking thought-pro-
voking questions of their guests.
Yeah, right "Coast-to-Coast" real-
izes that talk shows are, for the most
part, inane drivel that allows us to see
how the rich and famous deal with
being asked inane drivel.
In the same vein, one of Space
Ghost's favorite questions is "What
super powers do you possess, citizen?"
When rapper Schooly D was on the
show, he was asked "Are you interested
in frolicking in a leafy glade?" Schooly
BILL
from page 6
politely declined.
Guests have included Jim Carrey.
Kevin Meany, Alice Cooper, Carol
Channing, Fran Drescher, the Bee Gees
(whose interview lasted a mere 30 sec-
onds), Matthew Sweet and others, all
given the Space Ghost treatment
As a host Space Ghost is like a
superherogameshow hostlittle kid
on ritalyn combo. To even try to imag-
ine his line delivery is impossible. You
need to watch the show to understand.
Zorak, however, is easily the fun-
niest aspect of the show. In the infa-
mous "mating mantis" episode, he goes
off to participate in his race's mating
ritual. There's just one hitch: the fe-
male mantis bites off the head of the
male after sex. "That's not what my
mom told me the naive Zorak replies.
When Zorak returns with head
intact Space Ghost and Moltar demand
to know how he survived. The lady
mantis Zorak hooked up with (in a hi-
larious mantis singles bar scene)
turned out to be a male in disguise.
East Carolina University's Student Union is Now
Accepting Applications for Chairpersons
of the Following Committees for the
1996-1997 Term:
DNJo
SPECIAL EVENTS
CULTURAL AWARENESS
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
MARKETING
VISUAL ARTS
BAREFOOT
LECTURE
FILMS
QUALIFICATIONS:
MINIMUM 2.25 GPA � FULL-TIME STUDENT
F0RM0RE INFORMATION.
CALL THE STUDENT UNION 328-4715,
OR COME BY ROOM 236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
DEADLINE TO APPLY - WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 7.1996
No. Zorak didn't play the crying game;
his erstwhile lover was part of a man-
tis resistance force formed to save
males from a fate worse than death.
So Zorak and his new buddy male-
bonded, "eating barbecue and watch-
ing sports until the mating urge
passed
Great, twistedly funny writers like
Joel Hodgson, creator of "Mystery Sci-
ence Theater 3000 and cartoonist
Evan Dorkin have signed on to give us
another great season of lunacy. The
new season begins Feb. 2, so be sure
to watch and become addicted to this
show. And when I say addicted. I mean
it. One viewing leaves you wanting
more, and maybe some munchies, too.
I leave you with Space Ghost's
haiku from the "Sleeper" episode:
"Floating asteroid Need to buy some
school supplies You're soaking in it"
What more need I say?
On a scale of one to 10, "Space
Ghost: Coast-to-Coast" is off the scale
with a 12.
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J
Leach's voice is perfect for this
stuff; she has a clear, deep, forceful vo-
cal style that fits the bouncy startstop
swing ska rhythms. She's no Billie Holi-
day, mind you, but she doesn't have to
be. With swing and ska, the beat car-
ries most of the weight
"Undecided a song about the un-
certainty of love, is a stand-out track,
as is "Jet Plane Off to Jamaica a happy
ode to the joys of travel that appropri-
ately, makes a nod to the reggae side of
ska's diverse musical family.
The centerpiece of the album, how-
ever, is "Sing Sing Sing The Suspects
do a sizzling ska rendition of this Louis
Prima classic that'll leave you breath-
less. If this one doesn't give you happy
feet check yourself for a pulse.
The band apparently liked this in-
strumental so much that they decided
to use it twice. Bill Me Later features
a CD-ROM video of Suspect Bill perform-
ing "Sing Sing Sing" live.
The studio version on the album
proper is better, but the live version fea-
tures excerpts from the comic book
"Milk and Cheese by cartoonist (and
ska fanatic) Evan Dorkin. The "Milk and
Cheese" stuff scores some very large
cool points in his reviewer's big book o'
fun, so if you've got a CDROM drive,
check it out
Suspect Bill, ladies and gentlemen.
Party music done right the way our
great-grandparents did it It's great big
screaming fun, so give it a shot Your
feet will be glad you did.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.�
See me for
car, home, life
and health
insurance.
Bill McDonald
2710 E 10th Street
752-6680
State Farm Insurance Compan.es-Home Offices Bioommgton Illinois
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5. They were executed by Su-
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8
Thursday, Febuary 1,1996
The East Carolinian
��������������������HMMI
FIGHTING from page 6
oriented album, David Peterson is well
trained. Not only does he know when to
play and not to play, he seems to be a
team player by concentrating on the
music, not the hype. Without band mem-
bers like these, we may as well forget
about the bold print and close the book.
One song after another, this album
lets you relax without having to push
track up or track down. Usually, there is
always that one song that you have to
fast forward, but not on this album. Start-
ing things off with "One Day a song
that is balanced by swinging horns
through a continuous reggae undertone,
the band really lets you get the feel for
what they are all about
The ballads "Bend the Light" and
"Sparrow" are also sure to spark inter-
est, as they both peak to great levels of
performance.
The title, Forever -1 Day, is every-
thing it looks like. With a cover pictur-
ing an ongoing universe, it is easy to see
that this band sets no limits whatsoever.
ft is this attitude that has given the band
opening spots for the Dave Matthews
Band. Big Head Todd and the Monsters,
and Julianna Hatfield. As long as they
keep that attitude, better offers will keep
flowing in.
The music and lyrics speak for
themselves. In 'Quiet Angel McGee's
lyrics are all over the place. First he
talks about a forgotten woman "dazed
in the light of her new life a life in the
heavens. Second. McGee moves on to a
brother who chose a different path than
he did himself. And third, he tells us
about some advice his mother gave him
("Look over your shoulder that he also
passed down to his son. The song is a
legacy. It is about handing down insight
to others so that they may see the light
and believe as you have. It is life!
When listening to this album, I ask
not for you to prepare for the unusual,
but to let an unfamiliar experience open
your mind to new levels of entertain-
ment that you may have not known were
there. Change is good! Keep an open
mind.
Ojl Uj from page 6
received came in the form of con-
tented smiles on the faces of pupils
who began to appreciate the music
as much as their teacher.
Mr. Holland's Opus slogs into a
sappy ending designed to rouse the
audience to tears, but the real
strength of the film comes in the
strong portrayal of a teacher at work.
The film serves also as a beacon to
future teachers, encouraging them to
share the love of subject with stu-
dents, and as a damning indictment
of the current state of education, as
the education budgets keep being cut
Though not strictly a political film,
Mr. Holland's Opus may do more to
evict Republicans from Congress than
a whole slate of democratic speeches.
Teaching remains one of the most
noble professions. Mr. Holland's Opus
pays admirable homage to this nobil-
ity.
On a scale of one to 10, Mr.
Holland's Opus rates an eight
"
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II I The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee Presents I
�fi
i j j j i i i i i i i i i i i I I i � � �
-��� �
To be held on Thursday, April 11, 1996, at 8:00 PM on the Mall
First Prize: $500 Cash Opening Band at Barefoot on the Mall (April 18th)
Second Prize: $100 Cash
-Deadline For demo tapes is Friday, February 16,1996. at 5:00 PM. VJ
-Five Bands will be chosen to perform at the Battle oF the Bands. 0:
-PA will be provided by the Popular Entertainment Committee. "
-Five finalists will be notified the week of February 25.
' � , � -
-Winners will be determined by judges.
To audition for the Battle of the Bands, please submit a demo tape containing
three songs, a Press-KitBio, and the Entry Form-below to the Student Union
Office, Room 236, on the second floor of Mendenhall Student Center or Mail to:
- i-
Popular Entertainment Committee "r.�x r� a r l0 RJ. Fntrv Fni
m
236 Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
i OFFicial Battle of the Bands Entry Form
j Name oP BandContact Person: ���HHHi
Address: ����HHHHHi
Phone Number(s)
r�





Thursday, February 1, 1996
The East Carolinian
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
For some odd reason there
has been a lot of sports bash-
ing in TEC lately. I am here to
say that those are not the views
of myself or anyone else on the
sports staff.
I know there are people out
there that don't have a clue
about anything that goes on in
the sports world. There is ab-
solutely nothing wrong with
that. Different people enjoy dif-
ferent activities.
Sports have always been a
part of my life since the day I
could walk. That is just how I
was raised. But 1 don't criticize
those who don't make sports a
part of their life, therefore I
don't expect anyone to put me
down because I have made it a
part of mine.
Some will say that athletes
get special perks just because
of who they are. Well I believe
athletes are special because
they possess certain qualities
that not everybody has. It takes
a lot of talent to play a sport
and be the best in that sport.
It has also come to my at-
tention that the fans who sup-
port athletics are being criti-
cized. Come on! If fans aren't
important to the game, I
wouldn't have spent all football
season pleading with the fans
to come and support the foot-
ball team during all four quar-
ters.
Fans are a vital part of the
sporting world. Hey, if it wasn't
for the fans, we wouldn't have
sports, period. Take it from me,
playing somewhere where there
aren't a lot of fans is not fun.
That is what usually happens in
girls' athletics in high school.
It seems like there is nothing
to motivate you, and you feel
like nobody cares.
The taunting and teasing
done by these faithfuls is what
makes the. atmosphere much
more enjoyable. Players and
coaches don't seem to mind be-
cause they know that is just a
part of the territory that goes
i along with athletics. Take away
the fans, and there isn't much
left.
For example, during the
Roosevelt Presidency, despite
the crisis the country was go-
ing through, at that time,
sports were still highly thought
of. Roosevelt canceled baseball
for a year, but quickly brought
it back because he thought it
boosted the morale of the coun-
try. It was an activity people
could enjoy, and it allowed
them to not think of the war
for a few hours.
I know in many instances
it is sports that draw people to-
gether. That is evident by the
fact that 13� million viewers
watched the Super Bowl this
past Sunday. And who says
sports aren't important?
College athletics offers
more opportunities for student
athletes than people will care
to admit. Many athletes receive
athletic scholarships, which not
only allow them to play sports
in college, but it also gives them
an education. I have found that
most athletes know that an edu-
cation is what they are here for
first. Many realize only a few
make it in the pro's.
I am tired of people putting
down sports and everything
they stand for. If it weren't for
sports, I don't know what kind
of future I would have in
sportscasting. Needless to say,
SeeVIEWpagell
Pirates hoping to
secure another
home victory
Brad Oldham
Senior Writer
When American University head
coach Chris Knoche and his Eagles
squad soar into Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum this Saturday after-
noon, they will have a huge task in
front of them.
ECU has amassed a home record
of 9-0 this season, which has included
upset victories over higher pre-season
ranked oppo- �
to adjust on the move. We looked at
the last six or seven games before the
conference as if it were pre-season all
over again
American's season came to an
end with an overtime loss to even-
tual CAA champion ODU in the semi-
finals.
"We had the ball with 50 sec-
onds left and the score tied against
Old Dominion, so we were basically
just one possession from getting to
the finals Knoche said.
This year Fudd is back for his fi-
nal season and is in full force, leading
the Eagles in scoring with 17.2 points
per game. Right behind him is fellow
senior and Chantilly High School
stand-out point-guard Darryl Franklin,
who with 100 con-
Don't
shoot!
Head men's basketball
coach Joe Dooley
watches his team in-
tently. The Pirates will
return home this Satur-
day for a 4 p.m. tip off.
Photo by Garrett Killian
"After Tim went
down last year, we
had to regroup
and redefine how
we wanted to
play
� American University
head coach Chris Knoche
nents Virginia
Commonwealth,
Old Dominion
and a breathtak-
ing win over in-
state rival UNC-
Wilmington, in
the Pirates' last
home game.
All this has
fueled the fire
for ECU at
Minges, which
was already an
incredibly tough
place for opponents to begin with.
With the recent success, as well as the
Pirates quest for one of their best sea-
sons ever in the conference, the Eagles
will have quite a chore staring them
in the face.
At 8-9 overall and 44 in the con-
ference, Knoche and company haven't
exactly put together a banner year so
far. After starting out with an impres-
sive 4-1 in the conference, the Eagles
have dropped their last three confer-
ence games, which included a 20 point
shellacking at the hands of Old Do-
minion Monday night. 67-47.
The hot start was a major turn-
around from last season, when AU
began with an abysmal 0-11 record.
The downfall was due to a season-end-
ing injury to 1993-94 first-team mem-
ber, center Tim Fudd. The Eagles
eventually regrouped by mid-season,
winning seven of its final 11 games
which included a first round upset of
ECU in the CAA tournament.
"After Tim went down last year,
we had to regroup and redefine how
we wanted to play Knoche said. "We
had no low post presence, so we had
secutive starts, is
just five games
away from break-
ing the AU record
previously held by
former Eagle
Brian Gilgeous.
Franklin
comes into Minges
averaging 14.9
ppg, but he knows
that bringing
down the Pirates
at home will be no
easy mission.
"We've played well in Greenville
before Franklin said. "We know its
going to be tough this year because
they haven't lost at home yet, but 1
expect us to play hard; especially af-
ter the letdown we've had in the last
couple of games
The highly intense Minges crowd
suits Franklin just fine.
"It's always fun to play in an at-
mosphere where everybody is out to
get you. We just need to do a lot of
the right things to win this game
Like his previous three seasons
at AU, Franklin has been looked to
by Knoche to use his on-court leader-
ship skills and composure to guide the
Eagles.
"We've asked Darryl to be a
scorer, a decision-maker, and a de-
fender in his last three seasons here
Knoche said.
Obviously the Eagles are going
to look for the Fudd-Franklin combi-
nation to lead the way on Saturday,
and after defeating the Pirates the last
two contests, both teams will be out
to get the win in a crucial conference
match-up.
Baseball seeks improvement
�;� ,�r. t 9Q.9fi ar.H finish- canable of more than a 29-26 mart
Dill Ditlard
Staff Writer
If you've been in Greenville for a
while, you're probably aware of the
winning ways of the ECU baseball
program. Headed by coach Gary
Overton, the Pirates have always been
a perennial power in the always solid
CAA baseball conference, but hard
times fell on the Bucs last year.
Winning five of the past nine
CAA championships. Overton's ball
clubs always have come with built-in
high expectations. Just squeaking out
a winning season at 29-26, and finish-
ing only fifth in last year's final CAA
standings, is not what Pirate baseball
fans are use to.
"Last year I felt was a disappoint-
ing year said Overton. "Many blamed
our youth as the biggest problem, I
disagree. I feel that we did not play to
our potential
Youth might not have been the
problem, but to say that the Bucs were
young last season would be a vast
understatement If one looks down the
1996 Pirate roster, they would find
ten sophomores, six juniors and only
six seniors. Despite the youth of last
year's club, it was a talented group
capable of more than a 29-26 mark. ;
"We did not have an outstanding ;
season, which we're accustomed to ;
here at East Carolina said Overton. !
"We had expectations and we simply
did not live up to them last season
In '95. the Bucs had everything, ;
but a normal ECU season. Last year, J
despite solid pitching efforts, the Pi-
rates received an early exit in the CAA
tourney, while Old Dominion took the
prize the Bucs are use to receiving
the CAA championship. This coveted
honor gave the Monarchs the right
to go to the NCAA tournament.
See OVERTON page 10
Qjve me Liberty
Id3 StTUte
Men's head basketball coach Joe Dooley, got a nice 30th birthday present
Monday night. The Pirates were on the road against William & Mary and won
the contest 71-65.
This was an especially needed win because the last two out of three
conference road games, the Pirates did not come away with a victory. Their
last road trip, before the William & Mary trip, was up to American where they
lost 75-85 and before that they suffered their first CAA loss to George Mason
76-80.
Jonathan Kerner scored 15 points in Monday's victory, while Othello
Meadows added 14. Other leading scorers include Von Bryant with 12 and
Tim Basham and Tony Parham each contributing 10 points apiece.
ECU shot 36.8 percent for the game while the Tribe only shot 32.2 per-
cent. The Pirates also out shot William & Mary from the free throw line. ECU
posted an 84.4 percent from the line, compared to 64.3 percent from the
Tribe.
ECU was on the road last night against Richmond. At publication time.
results were not available.
The Pirates will come home this Saturday and host American at Minges
Coliseum. ECU will look to avenge the loss they suffered at American earlier
in the year. The game will start at 4 p.m.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Members of the 1995 Liberty Bowl Championship team hoist theirtrophy during half-
time of the men's basketball game last Saturday in which they were honored.
DON'T
ECU's
SPORTS INfORMATION DEMllTMENT
The men's basketball team has two upcoming
home games this Saturday and Monday. The
Pirates will be hosting American starting at 4
p.m. on Saturday. Then on Monday ECU will
take on George Mason beginning at 7 p.m.
Both games will be played
in Minges Coliseum.
Belinda Cagle
SID - A reoccurring shoulder in-
jury has ended the basketball dareer
of ECU women's basketball plaer
Belinda Cagle.
The senior forward from Trenton.
Ga. dislocated her right .shoulder on
Jan. 15 and has been out ever since.
According to ECU Sports Medicine
officials, surgery is to be scheduled
soon to correct Cagle's chronic dislo-
cating in her shoulder.
"We're disappointed that Belinda
was not able to come back off her most
recent injury ECU Head Coach Anne
Doaovan said. "She had been playing
with a great deal of pain this season
and this last dislocation proved to be
too much for her. Her leadership on
the court will definitely be missed for
the remainder of the season
Cagle had started in 12 games
prior to her injury and averaged 3.9
points and 1.8 rebounds a game. She
recorded a season high 14 points
against Appalachian State and also had
a career-high four steals in that game.
Cagle played in 87 games during
her career with 35 starts. She averaged
3.0 points a game during her career.
A construction management ma-
jor, Cagle is scheduled to graduate in
Dec. 1996.
SID-The East Carolina Univer-
sity men's tennis team continued its
play in the William and Ma-
Invitational last Saturday. Sopho-
more Nils Alomar (MaUorca, Spain)
lost his quarterfinal match against
George Washington's Brent Lowder
by a 6-3, 3-6. 6-2 scon I
freshman Kenny Kirhv (Wilmington,
N.C.). who also advanced in the third
round, lost to George Washii
Lars Bergvist. 64,
The Pirates had I
(naming in consolation singles
Sophomore Kris Mutton (London
Ontario) would have feced fellow Pi-
rate Wes Kintner on Sunday in the
consolation semifinal
matches were cancel i
decision. Kintner (La
feated ECU's Jason Freem
N.Y.) 6-0. 6-2 to advance to the semifi-
nals.
The Pirates will he
tomorrow as thev play at th� v
Commonwealth Invitational.





10
Thursday, Febuary 1,1996
The East Carolinian
OVERTON from page 9
by fellow conference members James
Madison and Richmond.
"We seemed, somewhat anemic
last year on offense Overton com-
mented. "Although we had some fine
pitching efforts, the depth of the staff
fremely weak or thin as one
may say. That was of course not
helped by key injuries last season
On more than one occasion last
season, the Pirates would drop close
games in the final innings, due to
lack of depth as well as lack of offen-
sive production. This caused major
problems for the Pirates in the win-
I iss column, especially in the CAA
tournament.
As everybody knows, tourna-
ment time, a team must be prepared
to play until the final pitch and it
was obvious the Bucs were not ready
for that task With a sub-par year and
a frustrating one at that, in the back
of their minds, there's no doubt that
! Kerton and his troons were ready
to get to work on the '96 season.
"We hope to not only have a bet-
ter team, but we hope to have a bet-
ter performance than last year's as
well said Overton. "This team
should also be more exciting to
watch, and we feel that this club not
only should be better than last year's
club, but we hope to contend for the
CAA title
With returning starters like four
year starter Jason Head in left field,
and senior 2nd baseman Lamont
Burns, to go with pitchers Patrick
Dunham and Chad Newton, the Bucs
should have a solid talent nucleus
along with veteran leadership, to go
to the next level. Along with a tal-
ented recruiting class coming in, the
Pirates should get back to their "win-
ning ways
"We have some new players that
are talented, and we hope that
they'll be able to contribute to the
team immediately, as every coach
hopes for his new players added
Overton. "In our recruiting, we rec-
ognized the lack of depth, and
brought in a group of freshmen that
we felt could complement the talent
we already have, which we hope will
make us a more balanced team
Balance is the key. When a team
is in a highly rated conference such
as the CAA, each team must be pre-
pared to face superstars. Everybody
knows that a team's superstar cast
will produce game in and game out,
but it is often the steady players' per-
formances that is the difference.
"I feel this is a very balanced
team, and I say balanced, meaning
that there is depth in the pitching
staff and there is no real lull in our
line-up said Overton.
Many publications have rated
the Pirates from third to fifth in
their pre-season polls. This season
with the balanced Pirate attack, ex-
pect to see a significant improve-
ment and possibly a better finish
than the predicted fifth place fin-
ish.
THIS EDGE OF YOUR SEAT NAIL BITER
EXPLODES WITH SUSPENSE!
ONE TERRIFIC RIDE! ASK1LLFLL
BLEND OF TALT SUSPENSE,
THURSDAY, FEB. 1
FRIDAY, FEB. 2
SATURDAY, FEB. 3
.UDEA
PtV'Sl PJ KB'
l.tn it�.iM
;H I tit (l Uh
SANDRA BUtLOCK
THE NET
All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed)
with valid ECU ID.
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline
328-6004
mm mm
It minder
The ECU Immunization Policy
mandates:
Students will be withdrawn from
classes if immunization information is
not complete before February 12,
1996 (jrxd of the 30 day grace period).
For more information contact the
ECU Student Health Service (328-
6841).
fis up to MOMV.
Harris teeter
Means Low Prices
Tyson Boneless
Chicken
Breast
Limit 3 With
Additional $10
Purchase
Meat Or Beef Low Fat
waltney Big 8
Franks
16 oz.
Value Pack
39 Cube
Steak
lb.
Premier Selection
White
Potatoes
Salad
Tomatoes
Red Or White
Seedless
Grapes
lb.
Harris Teeter
Fat Free
Frozen Yogurt
112 gal
Stock Up And Save
Soft Drink Feature
Sunshine
Crackers
15-16
oz.
Campbell's
Tomato
Soup
2 Liter
Coke Or Diet
Coke
21
10.75 oz.
lb.
Selected Varieties
Jif Peanut
Butter
18 oz.
Freshly Sliced To Order
Honey Cured
Ham
8 Inch
Lattice
Cherry Pie
ea.
2
Puces In This Ad Effective January 31 through February 6. 1996 In Our Greenville Stores
Only Ve Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.





JMlMliI niiiii II HI 11 II � II
The East Carolinian
Thursday, Febuary 1, 1996
11
VIEW from page 9
you need athletics to have sports-
casters and 1 can't think of any-
thing else 1 would rather do.
Sports are an outlet for people
to enjoy themselves and to show-
case their talent. They bring people
together and it's just good old fash-
ion fun. Last time 1 checked, there
was no harm in that.
Even Presidents of the United
States have thought athletes and
athletics are important because of-
ten top winning teams and top ath-
letes are invited to the White
House. Personally, 1 think that says
a lot by itself.
In closing, I am here to say
sports are not meaningless and
they are just as important as any-
thing else that goei on in the world.
If they weren't as important, then
there wouldn't be sports pages,
sports magazines, ESPNetc.
So it still seems meaningless?
Sorry, but I don't think so.
TEAM
CAA OVERALL HOME AWAY STREAK
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH
EAST CAROLINA
OLD DOMINION
UNC WILMINGTON
AMERICAN
GEORGE MASON
WILLIAM & MARY
RICHMOND
AMES MADISON
7-1
6-2
6-2
5-3
4-4
3-5
2-6
2-6
1-7
14-7
13-4
11-9
7-11
8-9
8-10
6-11
6-12
5-14
8-1
9-0
4-3
3-5
6-2
7-2
3-7
3-5
2-6
2-6
4-4
7-3
3-6
1-7
1-8
2-4
1-7
0-5
WON 4
WON 4
WON 3
LOST 2
LOST 3
LOST1
LOST 4
WON 2
LOST 3
DOES NOT INCLUDE CAA GAMES FROM LAST NIGHT
TEC 1$ now teeking a courier to deliver our Tuesday, Thursday
route 5 a.m. until�
� valid license required
� good pay
Apply immediately!
328-6366
It's easy
to wrap!
oY Love Lines
" The best way to say Happy Valentine's Day.
APPEARING IN OUR FEB. 1 3 ISSUE � ON SALE NOW
WIN THE "PERFECT
VALENTINE'S DAY"
Buy a Love Lines ad you are automatically entered
into our contest to win the Perfect Valentine's Day.
Roses from Jefferson Florist, dinner for 2 at Riverside
Steak Bar, 2 passes to Carmike Cinemas, coffee &
dessert at Percolator Coffee House. We'll also award
two additional packages to a second and third
couple. We'll notify the winners by phone on Feb. 9.
Participating sponsors: Jefferson Florist, Riverside Steak Bar,
Carmike Cinemas, Percolator Coffee House, Papa John's
Pizza, Chico's and the Attic.
The ECU Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
mr0
TICKET PRICES
Student $8.00
FacultyStaff $10.00 iVg
General Public $12.00 uj gr
At the Door $15.00 1
4TI
wna wydo
Thursday, Februarys, 1996
Wright Auditorium�
MasterCard and Visa� accepted. All tickets are General Admission. Doors open at 7:00 PM.
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
For more information, call 1 -800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6-00 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Computer Books
for the entire month of February
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Wright Building 328-6731
Sale ends February 29,
1996. Coupons or other
discounts not valid in
conjunction with this offer.
Not valid on textbooks.
IX
Store Hours:
Monday - Thursday: 8 am � 8 pm
Friday: 8 am - 5 pm
Saturday: 11 am - 5 pm
Where Your Dollars Support Student Scholars
Hayden
Books
pue
M A M I I
c o m r i
PI H I, I S II
A N
E R
n G
SAMS
PUBLISHING
ObscirneB:
(t Aimw-tl - Get Hbornr
Hi luutf. QmIMj v'1
IDG
WMkS
a.
-v-
�g.�" �





12
Thursday, February 1,1996
The East Carolinian
p
Services
Offered
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all aubjacta
Order Catalog Today with ViaaMC or CO
800-351-0222
Of (310)477-8226
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natiS
For Rent
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aaa�a�Ba��-aaa-anaaar-J II II Ainf:
KINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms �
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quite, or bedroom
furnished aparrtients $250 a month.
6 month lease
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
� ECU rV� Ser�
� On-site Laundi y
. 'Special Student Leasts'
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
� J I or Tommy'Williams
756-7815 758-7436
II Iimim's I i.r�Kent
1 IDh I irhvs Muvl. MK.II'miIv
( Hill.I1 1 I.Ml.V AnSi in it
SvsfvnSddllVit.nth. c 1'i-t
111 112th stvvl, iUK. 1.1 '2
Baths,(,� S,).n.i' 1 1i Ml, si ,111) !i
Month St'curi, o.l' Heprts 1 , iill fvi�li � �llllli'li 1 ll
Both 1)iiltdsIV. ill'III
1511&7h-2'� '
3 BEDROOM APT FOR rent above
BW3's. 1500 sq. ft 2 12 baths, $775.00
a month. Ask for Yvonne at 758-2616
THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR
rent near uni sity. Central heat and air.
WasherDryer hookups. Range, refrigera-
tor furnished. $489,752-6276.
SUBLEASER WANTED IMMEDIATELY
TO share two bedroom 1 12 bath town-
house. Walking distance to campus. $250
per month 12 utilities and phone. Call
758-8952. Leave message. Will return call
ASAP
NACS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month: sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed
room, 2 bath duplex, lots of amenities.
Walking distance from campus. $275mo
? 12 utilities. Call 758-2232
RESPONSIBLE, FUN ROOMMATE
WANTED to sublease for May thru Au-
gust. $190mth plus 12 utilities. On ECU
bus route. Call 758-7890.
REMALE ROOMMATE WANTED CALL
830-383!
FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE. FENCED in
backyard, pets OK. Walk to campus. Lo-
cated off of Woodlawn Ave. Lease and de-
posit. Only $550 per month. 758-1459
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; room-
mate wanted to share 3 bedroom 2 bath
house. $180 rent. 13 utilities. Fun. easy-
going, studious. Call Danielle or Stacy 758-
6649
GREAT HOUSE! 2 ROOMMATES
needed to share 3 bedroom 2 bath house.
$210 rentutilities. Right across the
street from campus. Call Jenai 758-6649
CAREFREE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 2 br College View Apt $175month
12 utilities & phone. Smokers welcome.
757-9303 leave a message.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE need
ed to sublease till May. 3 Bdrm Townhouse
at Sheraton Village. Master bdrm w pri-
vate bath. $200mo. and 13 util. Con-
tact at 321-2974
ROOMMATE NEEDED. ONE PERSON
to share rent for three bedroom house.
Rent $208mo. Walking distance from
campus. Non-smoker preferred. Contact
Jody at Beeper 1-800-578-7243-18257.
TREK 830 EXCELLENT CONDITION
men's 20" frame $250 O.B.O. call John
355-3883
SONY CD PLAYER LIKE new $100. Will
negotiate. Call 355-3741
STUDENT WHOLESALE CATALOG.
STUDENTS now you can buy electron-
ics, home appliances, office supplies, au-
thentic jewelry, costume jewelry, perfume,
novelty items, and other items at whole-
sale price. The Student Wholesale Cata-
log is only $5.00. S&H is already includ-
ed. So order your Student Wholesale Cat-
alog now. Price Enterprises. 1543 Battery
Drive. Raleigh, NC 27610.
YAK1MA CAR RACK FAIRLY new and
in great condition. Includes bars and feet
$75.00 call Greg at 413-0513
FOR SALE CMC JIMMY 4wd, power
steering and brakes, burgundy, excellent
condition, 50k, $9,600. Call Nan or Chris
752-2383
SOLOFLEX WITH BUTTERFLY AT-
TACHMENT, dip-bar, and sit-up bar. $360.
Microsoft Office Pro for W1N95, CD-ROM
version $210. 10-inch Cerwin-Vega Sub-
woofer tube $60. Call 757-2935
REDUCE EXCESS FAT FOR thigh and
body. Order your Thigh Body Contour
Cream Now as seen on TV! Retails for
$19.90. Now being sold for only $12.90.
S&H is already included. Price Enter-
prises. 1543 Battery Drive. Raleigh, NC
27610
SCUBA EQUIP: TOP OF the line
Sherwood gear. Tank BC and regulator
for $600.00 a $1200.00 valve. Call Stan
at 752-0859.
TOYOTA TRECEL 1990 4SP, hatchback,
GC, AC, AMFM, Cass, 122,000 miles
$2,990 neg. Great for students 328-8246
Ask for David leave message. Must Sell!
11 Wonted
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour, for more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 75808 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est 1990.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext A53622.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS! LOSE 10-
30 Lbs. next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough. Guaranteed. Dr. recom-
mended. $35.50 MC VISA 24 hr free info:
1-800-229-7562.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
NEED A RIDE TO Raleigh, Zebulon, or
Chapel Hill? Car, ou leave Friday after-
noon and return early Monday morning!
$10.0') per person. Call 413-9099
LOVE? MONEY? FUTURE? TALK live
to Psychics! 24 hours! 1-900-255-0300 Ext
9710 only $3.99 min Must be 18 yTS or
older. Serv-U 619-645-8434
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800-400-0209.
START THE NEW YEAR off right by
calling Diamond Dave for your next party
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave at 758-5711 or 809-8474.
GRADUATING SPANISH MAJOR WILL
tutor. Turn your grades around and start
making A's Call Ana at 758-3977. Tutor
available as much as needed. Thank you.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800-406-7027
THE PARTY IS ON! your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile Mu-
sic Productions is "the" disc jockey serv-
ice for your party or social function. Wid-
est variety of any disc jockey company in
Greenville. Specializing in the needs of
ECU Organizations and Greeks. Spring
dates are filling fast, so call early. Ask for
Lee 7584644.
ML Greek j
Personals
Tl, THANK YOU FOR helping us with
Rush. Saturday was a blast, even though
we had to skip out the back. Thanks again
Delta Chi.
DELTA ZETA WOULD LIKE to invite any
woman interested in Greek life to attend
our open Rush functions starting Janu-
ary 30,1996. for more information please
call Jessica at 752-8428.
:�
Travel
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
amSJJ ' ��7A
VAILBEAVER CREEK
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
� KB raw otreionrj w mnumi vt zea i iec� o� n
t-gOO-SlfNCUASE
TOLL TOW HifOBMATIOM & aMWVATIOttt
wfriMiMrntnii

If
1 Help"
� wanted
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague. Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Board other benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext K5362'
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
DON'T PASS UP THIS opportunity! Fast
growing telecommunications Co. looking
for reps in this area. Must be motivated,
self-starter looking for fun and money!
Enjoy working with others and being your
own boss. Full or part-time. Finally get
the rewards that match your efforts. Call
Scott for more information at 754-2111
ATTENTION LADIES TIRED OF being
broke, want to get paid Everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in a way to
virtually eliminate your long distance
phone bill and make a substantial income
while doing it call Jason at 756-0577.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF Grifton
needs a Music Accompanist. Organ and
piano. Will accept student Good pay. Call
524-5421 or 5244693
LIFEGUARDS, POOL MANAGERS,
SWIM COACHES. Summer positions
available in the Charlotte area. Call Caro-
lina Pool Management (704) 541-9303
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext J53623.
SEEKING BABYSITTERS) FOR TOD-
DLER boy. No set hours, occasional even-
ings. Call 3554052 before 6:00pm
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
REPRESENTATIVES NEEDED FOR A
long distance telephone company. Must
have high morals and great personality
758-9181.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-2634495 ext
F53624
FREE FINANCIAL AID OVER S6 billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income or
parent's income. Let us help. Call Student
Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext
F53624
ATTENTION
SPRING BREAKERS!
BOOK NOW!
JAMAKVCMtOliNUUalAS $3W
FLORIDA $129
ORGANIZE CROUPS & CO FREE1
ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS
14004)4-7007
fijL Greek
ff Personals
SPRING BREAK
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
Announcements
DELTA ZETA
Delta Zeta would like to invite any wom-
an interested in Greek Life to attend our
Open Rush functions starting January 30,
1996. For more information, please call
Jessica at 752-8428.
LIVING HOPE MINISTRIES
WILL have a love feast Banquest at the
Farmville Recreational Center February
10, 1996. The time of the event is 6-
9:30pm. $25 per couple and $12 50 for
singles. Call Annie at 758-3977 for tick-
ets. Join in on the fun, food and romance!
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS
Resume workshop today (Feb 1st)! Jeff
Henley, Career Services - Speaker. Bring
your resume. GCB 1019,5:00pm. Upcom-
ing events: New Member Induction on Feb.
13th, 7:30pm in Speight Auditorium of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center. Next Meeting:
Feb 15th, GCB 1019,5:00pm. Officer nom-
inations for 1996-97. fun activities, chap-
ter T-shirts ($10), make some new friends,
and Free Pizza Any questions??? Call
Jacquie at 328-3302. See you there
LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be held on Febru-
ary 7th at 5:15pm in Ragsdale room 218A.
A detective officer will be present to an-
swer questions and talk about procedures.
The meeting is open to all majors, so come
and join us.
TUNNEL OF OPPRESSION
IS an activity being planned by Universi-
ty Housing. Diversity committee. This pro-
gram is an interactive training tool that
will allow the participants to experience
some forms of oppression. A variety of
senses and mediums will be utilized to
create this tunnel where the participants
will encounter hate words, sounds, visual
images and role plays. The "Tunnel of Op-
pression" will be in MendenhaH 244 Tues-
day, Jan, 30-Thursday, Feb 1. 6:30pm-
9:00pm.
ENVIROMENTAL AWARNESS
CLUB
2nd annual earth day bike rally-The Envi-
ronmental Awareness Club will be meet-
ing on Thursday, Feb 1st at 4:00pm in the
Biology Building Room BN 109 to discuss
plans and preparations for this year's bike
rally. The purpose of the rally is to raise
money for the Greenville Greenways and
to raise awareness about bicycle safety. If
you are interested in being a part of this
event or are just interested in our club,
please join us! Members please don't for-
get your dues.
r& Jamaica
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!
vStn Splash Tours Tj
T" 1-800-426-7710 "g
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
tn vniT NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
For Sale
NJCASHffl
We Buy CDS,
Cmmttfrm, and Lp �
Well p�y up to $5 eaak lor
CD
CD
Ai ����
Downtown 738 5t)2(i
We also buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken Gold
Pieces
&
Stereo's
TV's
VCR's
CD players
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER
JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
THE NEW SISTERS OF PI DELTA want
to thank our sisters for everything. We
had a great pledge period and we're proud
to be Pi Delta's! Y'all are the greatest! We
love you and we're looking forward to
another exciting semester together!
THANK YOU SIGMA PI EPSILON for
the nuclear waste social. We had a blast!
Let's get together again soon. Love, the
sisters of Alpha Delta Pi.
THANKS TO KARA TAWNI, AMY SEAL
and SAYSHA for working in the rain. Love,
your AOPi sisters.
DELTA CHI WOULD LIKE to congratu-
late it's new Associate Members: Jason
Hall, Paul Martinez, Steve Higdon, and
Bryan Tuck. Way to go and have fun!
PIKA - THANKS for a great time Friday
night. Hope you all enjoyed it as much as
we did! 'Til next time Love, the Sigmas
MELANIE LEE - We really appreciate the
great job you've been doing around the
house. We love you! Thanks - your Sigma
Sisters
TO THE BROTHERS OF TKE: We've
never had a move FABuous time. We dare
you to do it again. Love the sisters of AOPi.
DELTA ZETA IS HOSTING THEIR an-
nual Sexy Boxer Contest at The Attic on
February 8.1996. Doors will open at 9:30.
Come and see the hottest men in
Greenville!
ALPHA PHI - Seat Back! Eric with his
peanuts, Aaron's gay lion, Thomas wear-
ing his shoulder pads, Lori catching or-
ange wedges, Tristan spilling beer, Gam-
mas fetching beer, Cromwell down from
Maryland, Nicole trying to smoke in the
house, a couple of hood ups, and the fun-
niest friends we ever saw. It was an awe-
some Second Annual Superbowl Social.
Can't wait until next year. Love, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
Ski SnOWioaN
umstouicuTi mi mats it i
fmxm
-DAYurrncKET
�MK3MTSCONDO
- NIGHTS PAM1ES
Caff today for morm Information
1-800-999-Skt9
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
cruise! 7 Days $279! Includes la Meals &
6 Free Parties! Great BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http:www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 lowest price guarantee! 7
Nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on fooddrinks!http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678386
SPRING BREAK '96 WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT BOOK NOW
Florida $109 Bahamas $359 JamaicaCan-
cun $389. Organize a group - TRAVEL
FREE! Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-7710
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches - Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
Student Swap Shop
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown,
drive to back door & ring buzzer J
CONGRATS TO AOPI FOR region 3 In
ternational Convention Awards: Initiation
Honor Roll, Collegiate Chapter and Cor-
poration Board Certificates of Achieve-
ment. Keep up the great work!
SKI & SNOWBOARD-CAMPUS REPS
NEEDED Springbreak '96 Intercollegiate
Ski Weeks- 5 day lift ticketcondo lodg-
ing 5 nights parties & activities. Mt. Or-
ford, Canada (Near Vermont) (Drinking
Age-18) Trip only $219. Reps earn free
trips, CASH, New Equip etc. Call Ski Trav-
el Unlimited: l-800-999-Ski-9.
-&L Lost and
THE GREENVILLE PITT COUNTY spe-
cial Olympics will be conducting a track
& field training school on Saturday Feb
3rd from 9am - 4pm for all individuals in-
terested in individuals to coach track
field, we are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: rollers-
kating, swimming, gymnastics, bowling,
and volleyball, for more information con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 8304551
WOMEN'S ISSUES GROUP
This counseling group is for women who
have experienced sexual assault or dating
violence. The group will address self-es-
teem, assertiveness, relationships, coping
skills, and life goals. Tuesdays, 3:30pm-
5:00pm. Counseling Center. Call 328-6661
for more information
ATTENTION OMICRON DELTA
KAPPA nominees
Please return applications by noon on
February 2 to 109 MendenhaH Student
Center. If you have any questions call Lisa
Shibley @ 3284796 or Lucy Goodwin @
551-7650.
ECU POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will meet on
Thursday, February 1st in MendenhaH
Student Center, Room 248, at 8pm. Open
to the general public, the Forum is a free
workshop. Those planning to attend and
wanting critical feedback on their work
should bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be an informational meeting
for ail new members held on February 6th
in MendenhaH 244 at 4:00pm. There will
also be a regular meeting on February 6th
in MendenhaH 244 at 5:00pm. We will be
taking nominations for secretary. Contact
Mike at 7524075 if any questions.
UNDERSTANDING ROMANCE
Starting new relationships. How do you
find the right person for you, and once
you do how do you get up the nerve to
talk to them? How do you find out what
someone is really like? Find out on Wed-
nesday February 7.3:30pm-5:00pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328661 to register
international student organization
Who: ISA, When, February 5. 96, Where:
GCB 1017. What: Organizations plans.
Everyone is welcomed to attend. Don't
miss it Free Food.
Found
REWARD! LOST: SHORT FAT female
beagle mix. Pink collar. Very timid; lost in
campus area. Call 830-0696 anytime.
YOUNG LIFE MINISTRY
Are you interested in Christian outreach
Ministry with local High School Students.
Informational meeting Sunday. February
4th, 7pm, General Classroom Bldg. Room
1019. Qu lions, call Steve Kimmel 830-
5533






Title
The East Carolinian, February 1, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 01, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1121
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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