The East Carolinian, January 18, 1996






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January 18,1996
Vol 71, No. 31
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Around the State
GASTON1A (AP) - The Greens-
boro man who fired nearly 30 bul-
lets at rush-hour traffic on Inter-
state 85, shot at police and led of-
ficers on a 40-mile chase dueled with
demons, his widow said.
James William Murray, 37, was
shot and killed by a police sharp-
shooter Monday after leading police
on the chase through Cabarrus,
Mecklenburg and Gaston counties,
investigators said.
FORT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) - A
Fort Bragg soldier died after his
parachute malfunctioned during an
airborne operation at the base.
The soldier's name is being
withheld pending notification of
family.
The soldier was transported to
Womack Army Medical Center fol-
lowing the mishap, and was pro-
nounced dead on arrival.
Around the Country
NEW YORK (AP) - The more
previously born brothers a man has,
the greater his chances of being gay,
a study said.
Several earlier studies found
that gay men tended to have more
previously born siblings than het-
erosexual men did. The new study
said this effect comes only from
brothers, not sisters.
DETROIT (AP) - If thieves gave
a car-of-the-year award, it would go
to the Olds Cutlass Supreme.
Cutlasses captured the top
three spots on the 1995 list com-
piled by CCC Information Services
Inc. The 1986 Supreme was No. 1,
the '87 model second and the '84
third.
The top 10 also included the
1994 Toyota Camry, the 1987
Chevrolet Caprice and five Honda
Accords.
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) - Clutch-
ing a red rose from his wife's cas-
ket, soul singer James Brown leaned
forward and kissed the metal sur-
face as she was laid to rest after a
funeral service attended by more
than 800 people.
Mrs. Brown, 45, died in Los
Angeles two days after undergoing
cosmetic surgery. Officials at the
Los Angeles County coroner's office
have ruled out foul play, but they
haven't determined what caused her
death.
Around the World
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP)
- Autopsies have found routine ex-
planations for the deaths of farm
animals that have been popularly
attributed to a mysterious blood-
sucking creature, a government doc-
tor said.
Goats, hens, rabbits and geese
all fell prey last year. The reputed
creature was a nocturnal killer that
bit their necks and sucked out their
blood. �
LONDON (AP) - Queen Eliza-
beth II let it be known Wednesday
that she won't bail out her daugh-
ter-in-law, the Duchess of York, who
was reported to be $1.55 million or
more in debt.
Foundation president resigns
Mismanagent of
medical funds
investigated
Wendy Rountree
News Editor
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
Questionable money handling
has led to the investigation of ECU's
Medical Foundation.
"The complaint involved travel
expenses paid by the state after the
same payment had been made by the
foundation said Ben Irons Jr uni-
versity attorney.
The travel expenses were for out-
of-state conferences.
State auditors were tipped off by
an anonymous caller who used their
hot- line to inform them of the prob-
lem. As a result, the state auditor's
office called the university's auditor
office on Dec. 20. At that time a full
investigation began.
Soon, the former president of
the foundation and Vice Chancellor
for Health Affairs Dr. Robert K.
Adams resigned but not before re-
sponding to the state. He repaid the
state the sum of $3,546.51.
"A check was written by Dr. Rob-
ert K. Adams, who resigned on Dec.
22, 1995 Irons said.
Currently, no permanent replace- Omega Inc. A company that deals
ment has been put
in the position.
"There has not
been a permanent
replacement
named Irons said.
However, Ellis
Hall has been
named interim as-
sociate vice chan-
cellor for develop-
ment and alumni af-
fairs.
Other allega-
tions surfaced with
the complaint
Irons said the
foundation had also
w
'The complaint
involved travel
expenses paid by
the state after the
same payment
had been made by
the foundation
� Ben Irons Jr, university
attorney
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
paid $14,000 to chard Eakin in a
with technol-
ogy such as
computers. The
company has
been linked to
two university
employees who
have economic
interests in the
company.
"We are
deeply dis-
turbed by the
complaint that
has been
made said
i Chancellor Ri-
written statement
to The Daily Reflector. "It is vital to
the integrity of the foundation, the
medical school and the university
that this matter be investigated and
acted upon as quickly and as thor-
oughly as possible
The investigation continues.
"The major concern we had was
about the first matter (travel ex-
penses) Irons said. "But, there are
other allegations that have not been
thoroughly investigated at this point
The university is looking into these
allegations
Irons said the university has en-
listed the aid of outside officials.
"The State Bureau of Investiga-
tion has been notified in accordance
with the law Irons said.
Library, Student Rec Center delayed
New completion
dates scheduled
for May, August
Tambra Zion
Editor
Both the library and rec center
construction sites on the west end of
campus have pushed their completion
dates back once again.
The library's general contractor,
J.H. Hudson, said they would relin-
quish control of the project in Decem-
ber due to a liquidation of subsidiar-
ies of the parent company.
Director of Facilities Planning,
Design and Construction Bruce Flye
Jr. said there has been "no change in
contractor yet"
Phase I of the library is now aim-
ing for a completion date between
spring and first summer session; li-
brary personnel were originally sched-
uled to move in during Christmas
break, but "weather, shippingmanu-
facturing, labor availability, plan re-
finements and a pending change in
contractors were all contributing
factors to the structure's delay, Flye
said.
When asked whether structural
changes such as the addition of more
study rooms for the library were cause
for delay, Flye said, "Some refine-
ments in plan were made in conjunc-
tion with final furnitureequipment
selection. This slowed us down some
T.A. Loving company replaced
Lott Construction Inc. as general con-
tractor for the rec center. The new
scheduled completion for that project
has been set for next August Flye is
hoping students will be able to use
the facility next fall.
"We devised a new schedule
which we update every two weeks
said Tom Move, manager for the rec
center. "We're trying to work with the
university to get this project com-
pleted in early August"
Flye said the change in contrac-
tor was a factor in the rec center's
delay, "but mostly the original con-
tractor poorly planned the work
Moye said the rec center con-
struction is running smoothly since
the project is 85 percent complete.
Flye said only minimal changes
were made to the rec center's origi-
nal plans.
Library personnel continue to
plan and make adjustments for mov-
ing into their new building this spring.
"Volumes of bound journals in
storage dated prior to 1980 are be-
ing relocated TEMPORARILY to off-
campus storage an e-mail message
distributed across campus from the
library stated. The message stated
that all bound journals are being
moved due to a lack of space, and
will be returned once the move is
complete. In the Aug. 29 issue of
TEC, Assistant Professor Nancy
Shires said that some texts would
remain in storage due to a lack of
space, despite the library's expan-
sion.
Phase II of the library should be
completed in May 1997 and Phase
III in February of 1998.
Photo by TAMBRA ZION
Construction at the Student Rec Center is running smoothly, according to Tom Moye,
manager for the site. The building spans an entire block along Cotanche Street.
Parking lot attacker arrested
Grand jury
hearing this week
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
During the winter break, the
wife of an ECU professor of music
was the victim of an attempted armed
robbery.
The incident occurred in the
Harris Teeter parking lot on the cor-
ner of Charles Boulevard and 14th
Street on Dec. 18, 1995. Between 9
p.m. and 10 p.m the victim was at-
tacked while entering her car.
After grocery shopping at Har-
ris Teeter she placed her groceries
in the passenger's side of the vehicle.
"She had just entered her car
when the suspect snatched the door
open and pushed her into the
passenger's seat said Officer TJ.
Overton of the Greenville Police De-
partment.
The suspect threatened her with
a knife and told her to keep quiet.
"She fought back by pushing
and screaming, but the suspect cut
her face and the collar of her coat
Overton said.
Witnesses heard screams and ap-
proached the car. The suspect fled
on foot.
Greenville Police Detective
Ricky Best said the victim was brave
to protest her attacker and not sub-
mit to his demands. The victim's
quick reaction may have saved her
from an even worse situation.
The victim's car was parked near
a street light and close to the road.
"The suspect was probably
watching from across the road
Overton said.
Greenville Police and a rescue
unit were dispatched to the scene.
The victim was taken to the hospital
where she received stitches for the
wound on her face.
Bruce Eric Daniels, 37, was ar-
rested the following day and charged
with attempted armed robbery. He
appeared in court for his probable
cause hearing on Jan. 12, 1996.
Daniels is scheduled to appear before
the Grand Jury this week.
The manager of Harris Teeter
said the supermarket would be add-
ing extra security measures. As soon
as the store's budget will allow, em-
ployees will be available to carry gro-
ceries out to shopper's cars.
Overton said she believes the
Harris Teeter parking lot is "as safe
as any other parking lot
Overton said there are precau-
tions students should take in any
parking lot.
"When walking back to a parked
car, look in between other cars and
lock your doors as soon as you get
in Overton said.
Most importantly, Overton rec-
ommends that people "stay alert
Medical school recieves $1.5 million
Photo by TAMBRA ZION
Jayme Tripp calks a window around the Student Rec Center.
The facility is scheduled for completion in August.
Donation will be used to fill
school's mission of service
Staff Reports
A $1.5 million gift was recently presented to ECU's
School of Medicine.
The Brody family of eastern North Carolina pre-
sented the school with $1.5 million for its Brody Schol-
arship Fund.
This gift is to honor J.S. "Sammy" Brody who passed
away in 1994. He was a longtime supporter of the Medi-
cal School.
The money given to the scholarship fund will sup-
port a number of scholarships beginning in fall 1996.
The Brody Scholarship Fund consists of 20 four-
year scholarships awarded on the basis of merit. Five
students per year will receive this scholarship. While
four individuals will receive $3,000 each year, one indi-
vidual in each class will receive the largest scholarship,
$8,500. This student will be named the J.S. "Sammy"
Brody Medical Scholar.
Thomas Fortner, director of the office of the medi-
cal center's news and information, said the Brody's are
longtime contributors to the school. In the late 1970s,
the family donated $1.5 million to the medical school.
This was used to build the main education and research
building of the medical school, The Brody Medical Sci-
ences Building. This building was completed in 1982.
"The Brody's are early believers of the value of the
medical school and for better health care in eastern North
Carolina Fortner said.
David S. Brody, a co-administrator of the Brody
Brothers Foundation and the J.S. Brody Trust, said the
Brody family believes that ECU's School of Medicine is
large enough to be competitive with the other schools of
today. He also said scholarships should continue to im-
prove.
"We believe in the beginning mission of the school
and the concept that the medical center can serve the
region, provide primary health care physicians and impor-
tant health services in eastern North Carolina Brody said.
Poetry series is food for thoughtpage
Watch your backpage
SPORTjfcgM
Acceptance may be nearpage
10
ta �4Z�& CC&
Thursday
Partly cloudy
High 68
Low 40
Weekend
Rain
High 65
Low 41

Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC @ ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
��-�ft





Thursday, January 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
January 10
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of his staff decal from
his vehicle sometime between 8595 and 11096.
Larceny - A resident of Jones Hall reported the larceny of his vehicle,
1979 Datsun 210 hatchback, NJ license plate XAF29248. The vehicle is
tan in color. The vehicle was parked in the parking lot at Curry Court
Controlled substance violation - A resident of Slay Hall was issued a
state citation and campus appearance ticket for simple possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Another resident of Slay
Hall was issued a campus appearance ticket for using marijuana.
Failure to stop for blue light & sirenCareless and reckless driving
� A student was arrested after failing to stop for blue lights and siren
when he was being pursued for reckless driving on campus.
January 11
Trespa ing - A student was issued a campus appearance ticket for
assisting a non-student in the attempt to obtain a free meal from Todd
Dining Hall. The non-student was banned from campus.
January 12
Communicating Threats - A resident of Slay Hall reported that he
received a threatening telephone call in his room.
Order for arrest - A student was served with an order for arrest in
the Brewster Building after failing to show up for a court date.
Possession of a controlled substance - A resident of Fletcher Hall
was issued a state citation for possession of marijuana, drug parapherna-
lia, a knife and a sickle after officers found these items in his room.
January 13
Assault off campus - A student filed a report with the Greenville
Police Department in reference to her ex-boyfriend assaulting her off cam-
pus. She received minor injuries and was treated at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
January 14
Provisional DWI revoked license - A non-student was arrested for
driving while license revoked after officers stopped him north of Student
Health. He was also charged with having alcohol in his system and being
less than 21 years of age.
January 15
Breaking and EnteringLarceny - An officer found two cars broken
into at Curry Court. Contact was made with the students, and they re-
ported items missing from the vehicles.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from official ECU police reports
WZMB returns
to airwaves
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
ECU students are once again able
to enjoy the sounds of WZMB 91.3,
ECU's radio station.
John Reeves, news director for
WZMB, said that originally the prob-
lem was caused by the recent snow and
ice storm Greenville received. The sta-
tion believed ice was covering the disk
which prevented signals from being
received or sent out
"Originally we thought ice was
covering the disk Reeves said. "When
the ice melted the radio station was
still having malfunctioning problems.
The station called in an engineer from
Chapel Hill to help handle the prob-
lem
The radio station is still not clear
on the reason why they went off the
air.
"We still don't know why the sta-
tion went off the air said Jeremy
Leftwich, WZMB's general manager.
"One day we were working and one
day we weren't We moved the antenna
on the roof of Mendenhall because we
feel the new library was blocking the
radio signals that were sent out to the
tower on top of Tyler Hall
WZMB corrected the problem and
were back on the air by 6 p.m. January
12.
WZMB did not lose any money
with advertisement
"WZMB does not take money from
endorsements Reeves said, "We re-
ceive money to run the stations from
grants. The radio station did not lose
money when we were temporarily off
the air
Leftwich said the grants that were
not run during the time that the sta-
tion was off the air will be running this
week.
Several people were affected by
the malfunction of the station.
Leftwich said the DJs were the ones
who were the most affected because
they did not get paid while the station
was off the air. The listening audience
also was affected.
"We are not an extremely popu-
lar station Reeves said. "But people
did miss us when we were off the air
Leftwich said the station really
cannot do anything to make sure this
problem does not happen again.
"We have been exploring options
Leftwich said. "Unfortunately, we re-
ally have no control over the library
construction. We are hoping with the
movement of the antenna this will pre-
vent us from having anymore prob-
lems
There is a news writers'
meeting Tuesday at 5:30.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
WAREHOUSE
SALE
STARTS TODAY
WINTER COATS 75 off
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WAXING
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TODAY'S LATEST HAIR FASHIONS
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2510 S.CHARLES BLVD.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
PHONE: 756)705
MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH KELLY
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atalog
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Division Of royiU,
210 K. r.th St.
Mon - Sat 10 : Sunday 1r
w
Mall-wide Savings
Up To 70!
Thursday-Sunday, January 18th-21st
Four days of sizzling sales!
Catch the rays in our
after-holiday clearance!
THE PLAZA
Over 60 perfect stores plus Brady's, JCPenney and Belk on Greenville Boulevard.
ATTIC
752-7303
'TUESDAY!
iM llpm
120� Bottle Beer
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
24th year in
downtown
Greenville
THURSDAY COLLEGE NITE
$1.00 32 oz. Draft
$1.00 Membership
$1.50 Bottle Beer
$1.50 HiBalls
Thursday 18th
$1.50 Hi Balls
Miraci
$1.00 32oz Draft
$1.00 Membership
I
$1.50
32oz
draft
Friday 19th
4fo Annual ECU
OHi mp swan
ml�p- CHAMPAGNE TOAST, PARTY FAVORS & BAR SPECIALS!
Saturday 20th
Chairmen of the Board
7eachkusics 1 hen
S2.00 32oz
DRAFT
Doors 7pm
Show 8pm
Suoday Jan. 21st
Marshall Tucker Band
advance tix locations
WSFL Listener Appreciation Concert
East Coast
music
Quicksilver
Wash Pub
Attic
Advance tickets only $10
Bruce
Frye
Cominq Next Week.
B9 EVERYTHING
Archers of Loaf
wQueen Sarah Saturday





The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 18, 1996
r
C ANT SiZS
SUBMARINES
ASALADS
Voted "Best Sub in Greenville'l
by the Greenville Times!
college night on tuesday and thursday
Si .99 reg Ham & Chesse Subs
$1.00 32 oz Draft
5 until close
Downtown location only
Downtown Greenville
across from Stop Shop
214 East 5th Street
Phone: 758-7227
Hours: 11 am-10pm Mon-Sat
12pm-7pm Sun
HENDRIX FIIM
O
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20
All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed)
with valid ECU ID.
UDEnr
J
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Grad reaches finals
Design student
enjoys creating
environmental art
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
An ECU School or Art gradu-
ate was selected as a finalist for the
NICHE Student Award Program.
NICHE magazine is a national
magazine of American crafts. The
NICHE award program, founded in
1990. recognizes outstanding work
done by American crafts artists
Judging criteria are based on tech-
nical mastery of surface design,
market viability and originality.
NICHE selected Lauren Lampe
as one of ten finalists in the nation
for a small scale sculptural environ-
ment entitled. 'Emotional
Rollercoaster
Lampe will attend an awards
ceremony at the Philadelphia Buy-
ers Market Feb. 11. 1996.
The winning piece, made of wal-
nut, birch, and purple heart woods
is a display rack holding four silver
spoons. Each spoon is a unique de
sign.
The work is small enough to sel
on a dinning room table, li is mi
to be a part of
the room.
Lampe
wanted the
spoons, "to be
in an environ-
ment you can
live with and
not just put
away in a
chest
Lampe
said the ideas
for her work
come from ev-
eryday life.
"Design
sort of oozes
out of me Lampe said. "Even the
doodles on your telephone book
could be nice jewelry
Lampe said her works are a re-
flection of her current life situation
and emotional state. Lampe created
"Design sort of
oozes out of me.
Even the doodles
on your
telephone book
could be nice
jewelry
�Lauren Lampe
iriniMiiiii iinniw�m it, .niiiiDiiiiwinullimiMtiiiinMiBii
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH. FLORIDA
PER PERSON PER WEEK
"Emotional Rollercoaster" during a
confusing time in her life.
Lampe uses a mixed media of
wood and metal for many of her de-
signs. Most of the metal pieces in
her works can be removed from the
sculpture and
worn as jewelry.
Lampe gradu-
ated from ECU in
Dec. 1995 with a
Masters of Fine
Arts Degree. She
received her de-
gree in Visual
Communications
from the Cniver-
sity ot Delaware in
1984
Lampe has
taught design and
metals survey
classes at ECU.
She also has 12
years of experience in the retail jew-
elry industry. Currently she teaches
at the Greenville Museum of Art.
Lampe said she enjoys teaching
and she hopes to obtain a position
teaching at the university level.
"I am as proud of my students
work as 1 am of my own Lampe
said.
Lampe said that she would like
to try to sell reproductions of "Emo-
tional Rollercoaster after she
pours a mold for it.
'�SSDJaULXwil
fi�icirfaw
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INFORMATION 1-800-488-8828
BUY
DC COMICS
HERE!
Nostalgia Newsstand
919 Dickenson Ave.
758 � 6909
Recreational Services Spring Activities
Club Sports
Individuals interested in joining a Club Sport or starting their own cum
are encouraged lo contact the Recreational Services office, 204 Oirlslenhury
Gym, tor cluh team president and adviser Information. Practice and game
schedules vary per sport. Current Cluh Sports Include:
Adventure Program
Ski Trips
Wintergreen
February 25
$52 student; $55 nonstudent
($25 extra for ski rentals)
Total payment due February 15
includes lift ticket and transportation
Snowshoe
February 9-11
$235 student; $255 nonstudent
($35 extra for two-day ski, boot, and pole rental)
Total payment due January 22
includes lodging, 5-day lift ticket and transportation
Intramural Sport Programs
TuesJan.23 Water Polo Reg. Mtg. 5pm-Bio 103
Tues.Jan.30 Bowling Reg. Mtg. 5pm-Bio 103
Natural Life Program
Thurs. Jan. 25 Pirate Double Dare
Register in 204 Christenbury by Jan. 23!
Facility Hours oi Operation
Cltristemfury Swimming Pool
MonFri.
MonFri.
MonThurs
Friday
Saturday
6:30 a.m8:00 a.m.
11:30 a.m1:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m 5:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m 6:00 p.m. rx
12 noon - 5:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m5:00 p.m.
Sunday
Mtages swimming Pool
J
Mon. Wed . Fri. 7:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Tues. kThurs. 6:00 p.m8:00 p.m.
Sunday 2:00 p.m. -5:00 pjn.
Men's "irate'Dlrunate Frisbee
Women's "Helios" Frisbee
ttoju Sfiorin karale
Women's Lacrosse.
?Men's and Women's Rugby
TaeKwonDo
Underwater Hockey
Kayaking
DISC dOll
Waier Skiing
�Men's Lacrosse
Tal Chi Chaon
�Men's and Women's
Water Polo
?Isshlnryu
� Volleyball
Tae Shodo
Trp to HECC (Michigan) � Hack
Complete 24 days of at least 20 minutes of
exercise between 'January 15-Jebruary 23
and accumulate enough miles to make a trip
from Qreenville, filC to Hell, AT9 and back.
Jor only $5lperson, let us help you get in
shape for Spring IQreak!
Win a T-shirt by completing the trip and
be eligible to win a JREE SK9MACH9ME
from THE 9CyC�E POST.
Register in 204 Ghristenbury.
Spring 1996 Lifestyle
Enhancement Calendar
Date 115-19Event You are What You Eal RegistrationTime 5:00 p.m.Location CG204Fee $5 student $10 nonstudent
226-315Swim Lessons Reg.5:00 p.m.CG204$30 student $40 nonstudent
314-25Burgers, Buns, & Thighs Registration5:00 p.m.CG204$5 student $10 nonstudent
226-318Beginning Tennis Lessons Registration5:00 P.m.CG204$20 student $30 nonstudent
315-426Adult Swtm Lessons Child Swim LessonsFri. p.m. Sat. a.m.CG Pool n. Pool
48,10,12Wellness Brown Bag Lunch Series12:10 p.m.MSfroom HFree
517National Play Day lor Health12:10 p.m.CGFree
For more information on any of these programs call 328-6387.





Thursday, January 18,1996
The East Carolinian
Center created for
asthma suffers
U-�ctsant 4
Staff Reports
Help is on the way for the many
eastern North Carolinians who suf-
fer from allergies, asthma and other
related diseases each year. �
On Oct 20,1995 the ECU Board
of Trustees approved the center
which will be used for the education
and treatment of allergies, asthma
and other immunologic diseases.
Presently the medical school is seek-
ing approval from the University of
North Carolina Board of Governors.
The main focus of this center will
be on education, given to both care
givers and patients. A program will
be included as well for the medical
students.
Dr. James Metzger, a professor
of medicine at ECU, will be the di-
rector of the program.
"The vision is to reduce mortal-
ity from asthma, reduce hospitaliza-
tion and improve personal heath
Metzger said. "Secondary benefits
often affect the family. You do not
usually see one person with asthma,
often half of the family has an aller-
Uplifting voices
gic disease of some sort"
The education and treatment
that this center will provide can help
families and schools deal with asthma
and the other related problems that
go along with it
An estimated 20 percent of the
population suffer from allergies each
year. A fewer number of people suf-
fer from asthma. However, the mor-
tality rate in eastern North Carolina
due to asthma is three to four times
higher than in other parts of the
country.
If the UNC Board of Governors
approve the proposal for this center,
it can be expected to open up within
the next year.
insane prices on bourbon & vodka drinks
-�?�
original roots rock
9 i n o I roots rock
Catfish Jenkins
HELAMtt (PUNK (AID
nqw original band
ekoostic HookaH
� Mugnite � w epic recording artist
24h Th� ttaodrton Qran
jBfoody Sundcg $150 Bloody Mays $100 Dom beer
i NIff Brino Q mua a smile, & o dollar and receive q beer
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
ECU's Gospel Choir sang inspirational songs to celebrate
Dr. Martin Luther King Jrs birthday Monday night.
Want to make your
dollar
go far?

Advertise with us. 'gefr;v-m
328-2000
JL
The ECU Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
kSTZ
TICKET PRICES
Student $8.00
FocuhyStaff $10.00
General Publk $12.00
At the Door $15.00
wna wroo
$&z
AND THE FLECKTONES
Wednesday, January 24,1996
Wright Auditorium
MasterCardand Visa accepted. AH tickets ore General Admission. Doors open at 7:00 PM.
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in MendenhaH Student Center, ECU.
For more information, coll 1 800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
C
Jwmury 22 - 25
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Monday, Jan.22 Mandatory bus tour 8-11
Tuesday, Jan. 23 Rushees visit houses of their choice
II K Awecnesday, Jan. 24 (A map of all Fraternity houses will be
Thursday, Jan. 25 printed in the Tues, Jan. 23 issue of The
East Carolinian)
EXPERIENCE A NEW WAY OF LIFE .
? ?
THE GREEK WAY
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Thursday, Janaury 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Crime has
increased across
campus, so why
do students wait
until they become
victims to think
about safety?
Crime is on the rise according to ECU Police. So does
that mean we should lock our doors all the time, get tim-
ers for our lights and generally live a life of fear? Not nec-
essarily.
Drug citations, arrests, vandalism, theft and crimes of
all types have risen during the past year, but many of us
don't feel threatened. When the subject of crime came up
during oui meeting last week, it didn't seem to scare any-
one in the room. In fact, the mentality of our editorial
board staff was almost an invincible air of "it doesn't re-
ally affect me Crime usually doesn't affect you until it
happens to you or someone close to you. And it does hap-
pen.
The police reports come in every week, and every week
someone's bike is stolen or their car is broken into or some-
one has been violated. Drug offenses and arrests usually
don't affect us either - that is until recreation becomes
habit and users try to find anything they can to pawn for
drug money. Then they break into your room or house,
steal your things and suddenly, crime is your problem.
It is quite possible that the increase in reported crimes
is due in part to increased awareness and the excellent job
ECU police do in protecting our students. More reports
certainly mean more arrests and convictions. Students seem
to think they're safe even after the occasional assault or
two is reported on campus each year. The campus is well
lit, officers are on foot, bike and car patrol 24 hours a day,
and emergency phones are located throughout the area.
So why be concerned? Because the police department can't
always be there all of the time and crime - serious crime,
could happen to you.
If students aren't cautious and smart, they dramati-
cally increase their chances of becoming victims. You
haven't been told that walking with someone and carrying
mace at night is safer a million times because crime pre-
vention officers like to hear their voices. You've been told
how to be safe because having a friend with you and carry-
ing protection such as mace works. Some of us practice
these precautions and others do not, but how long will it
be before ECU's overall attitude about safety changes? If
our campus was located in the middle of Richmond where
crime reaches proportions higher than eastern North Caro-
lina sees in a year, attitudes might be different.
ECU Police. Chief Teresa Crocker said the increase in
crime might come with the new faces we see each year.
Does this mean our younger counterparts are more in-
volved with drugs and crime than we were a few years
ago? Possibly and possibly not. No one wants to be a vic-
tim, so be smart, take precaution and remember that crime
does affect everyone.
Going for the money
Here we are entering the year of
the centennial Olympic games. Ath-
letes from all around the world will
be making a pilgrimage to Atlanta, Ga.
Their focus is on bringing glory to
their native countries and to them-
selves. To attain this glory they must
train long and hard, give their best
and play by the rules (Remember Ben
Johnson?). If they do all of the above
better than anyone else, then they can
bring home the most mythical of all
symbols of championship - the Olym-
pic gold medal.
While the gold that goes into the
medals is not cheap, they look like
pennies in the bottom of a wishing
well compared to the money spent by
corporate "sponsors There will be
over $1 billion spent by companies to
be allowed to put the term "Official
Olympic Sponsor" on their products.
According to Jim Wade of the United
Postai Service (UPS) "you're purchas-
ing the right to spend money
How much does it cost to get on
the five mullet-colored ring express?
Well, you have three seat options. For
our coach option you can chose to be
a Sponsor. This will run you up to
$20 million and will allow you to use
the term 19 Olympic Games, but
not the word centennial. For our busi-
ness class seating we offer the Cen-
tennial Partner option. This will al-
low you to use the torch, the logo and
the emblazoned rings all for a price
tag of up to $40 million. While the
two previous options are expensive,
the are also limited to the good old
US of A. The third option is our most
lucrative; if you're going to see the
world then the best way to go is first
Christopher S. Arline
Opinion Columnist
Advertising for the
Olympic games
can be a lot
cheaper than the
price tag that
comes with
sponsorship
class. The first class title is Worldwide
Sponsor. The seat with plenty of room
for stretching out will run you up to
$40 million and services and will al-
low you to use whatever you want (in
regards to Olympic copyrights) any-
where in the world.
Now that you have your flight,
it's time for the advertising in-flight
meal. The bad news is that it is not
included in the price of your flight
and will cost you about $400,000 per
30 second bite.
The question that rises is
whether or not a corporation stands
to make their money back. Some com-
panies do and some don't
Companies like McDonald's and
Anheuser-Busch stand to make a kill-
ing. With successful marketing pro-
grams like theirs, it shouldn't be hard
to convince American couch potatoes
of the need to do their duty. That duty
being to support their teams by con-
suming Big Macs, french fries, chug
Buds and cheer. Few things make me
prouder to be an American.
Pharmacy companies learned the
hard way that the Olympics weren't for
them. Aside from Chapstick and a few
common cold remedies advertising
during the Winter Olympics, no one
has made any money. People just don't
like associating being sick with sports.
My feeling is that these companies
could save a fortune by skipping out
on the Olympic logos and opting for
less bold but just as effective slightly
more subliminal advertising. They
should plaster their names every where
they can and this includes the athletes
themselves.
If it were my company I'd have
advertising on every bus stop, every
wall, every billboard and every fan. I'd
put priority on working out a deal with
the athletes.
Think about it, as they run the
marathon, all you would see were
Arline Corporation billboards, Arline
Corporation posters on bus stops and
even Arline Corporation headbands on
the runners themselves.
I think crowd support is a great
market I would make thousands of red,
white and blue Arline Corporation T-
shirts and give them out at the gates
so that every crowd shot of screaming
American fans would contain the Arline
Corporation logo.
The benefits are worth it Deep
down, television viewers don't care if
the spectators paid for their tickets
with Visa. But like it or not, they will
see the Arline Corporation logo in the
background for every highlight film
they show of the '96 Centennial Olym-
pics forever. And it didn't cost me $40
million to have the rights to do it
IDUJDED.925, '�
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crlssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Hinted o
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, all (919)
328-6366.
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Sterotypes still exist
Fraternities have been given a
bad rap. We fraternity members are
perceived as elitist drunks who care
only about ourselves. This is simply
not true.
Yes, to pledge a fraterr'ty and to
be a brother in that fraternity costs
money. Everything in life costs money.
It all depends on how you wish to
spend that money. Fraternities are not
for everyone, that is true, but the ul-
timate decision of whether a student
gets into a fraternity depends on
them. Do they want to be in a certain
fraternity?
I do not believe that being called
an elitist is a valid point The frater-
nity members that I know here at ECU
like to go out with their brothers and
have a good time. If one of the mem-
bers wishes to bring along some of
their friends, that is fine, the more
the merrier. Brothers are not required
to hang out only with brothers. Fra-
ternities are not an exclusive group.
Just about anyone who wishes to join
a fraternity is given the opportunity.
The leading contributing factor
to students not getting into fraterni-
ties is their school work. When a stu-
dent neglects their primary responsi-
bility, then it is true they should not
be in a fraternity. School should a stu-
dents first responsibility.
Since I have been a student here
Brian Lewis Bums
Opinion Columnist
If I buyymy
friends, can
take them h
and put them
heif?
at ECU, I have heard numerous posi-
tive and negative comments about the
fraternities here on campus. So many
times the comment floats around
about the high amount of drinking
that goes on in fraternities. Drinking
occurs regardless of whether an indi-
vidual is in a fraternity or not I know
from experience that I drank alcohol
before I got into my fraternity. Join-
ing the fraternity did not encourage
me to drink. That is a false rumor.
Fraternities in their basic ele-
ments are groups of friends with a
common bond; friendship and broth-
erhood. Remember that the next time
you and your friends sit around and
bash fraternities before ever learning
about them. I'm tired of people auto-
matically seeing me and saying, "Oh,
you're a frat boy What is that? What
is a FRAT BOY? I thought that here
in America we have learned or at least
begun to learn that we can not ste-
reotype groups. When you do so, you
neglect the individual, and that is act-
ing in ignorance.
The whole scope of this article is
that before anyone ever makes up
their mind about fraternities, or any
other group for that matter, they
should check it out
You may be surprised when you
find out that being a fraternity mem-
ber is one of the closest relationships
you will ever know. You are not buy-
ing your friends. Most of that money
goes to help maintain or purchase a
house and to pay for the fraternity's
national office and staff. Where is this
buying of friends coming from? If I
buy my friends, can I take them home
and put them on my shelf? Are they
like baseball cards? Can I take them
to a card shop and try to trade them
for a older one? NO! They are my
friends and brothers and that will al-
ways be.
Before making any hasty deci-
sions about what fraternities are all
about come by and check them out
It could perhaps be the best decision
you ever made.
Letters to the Editor
Say no to hamburgers
To the Editor,
Your health may suffer, deserv-
ing students may not finish college,
grandparents medical costs may push
them into poverty, rainforests may
disappear and wildlife species may
vanish if you eat hamburgers.
The cattle lobby helps elect leg-
islators who trash programs protect-
ing the environment and kill programs
not benefiting the wealthy. By not
helping finance the cattle lobby, the
"Hamburger Rebellion" (people not
eating hamburger) aids programs
helping the less fortunate, the envi-
ronment and good health.
The "Hamburger Rebellion" op-
poses the "Sagebrush Rebellion" (a
movement initiated by Western ranch-
ers to block rangeland reform and to
block a raise in grazing fees on our
public lands by gaining control of the
land.) If Congress gives ranchers our
public lands by turning control over
to states and countries or passes laws
to prevent fair grazing fees and pre-
vents regulation protecting the land
from overgrazing, the effect is the
same: ranchers (who control most
rural county governments and many
state governments) will control land
which should belong to all Americans.
In the wild, predators prey on the
young, old and infirm � not unlike
wealthy congressmen selecting bud-
get cut victims. In a civilized society,
shouldn't lawmakers behave differ-
ently?
In the courts (and in lawmaking
bodies) wealth may circumvent truth
and justice but enough people saying
no to hamburgers may counter greed's
triumph.
Greed has no conscience. Do you?
James Griffin
"The nation's college campuses have become a hothouse
for a virulent strain of intellectual kudzu, which is quickly
strangling free expression
� Paul McMasters First Amendment Ombudsman The Freedom Forum, 1994
i
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Thursday, January 18,1996
The East Carolinian
SPARE TIME
BY ANDYFARKAS
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Thursday, January 18,1996
The East Carolinian
Poetry gets baked
Bloody business
The Upper Crust
Reading Series
rolls on in spring
Dale Williamson
Senior MMter
Tired of shooting pool in a smoke-
filled room with nothing else to do
but drink beer? As fun as this activity
may be, there is an alternative. The
Upper Crust Bakery Reading Series
offers the tasty combination of cof-
fee, baked goods, and public readings
from accomplished and aspiring writ-
ers.
The Reading Series, which began
in 1992 through the efforts of former
ECU poet and lecturer Adam
Schonbrun, has enjoyed enormous
success thanks to its willingness to
open up an art from which many feel
excluded. While the series features
speakers from both inside and outside
the Greenville community, it also
opens the floor for anyone who has
something to say through its "open
mic" forum, when audience members
are invited to step into the spotlight
"We're trying to promote literary
culture to Greenville stated assis-
tant director Wayne Robbins. "We en-
courage you to read your own stuff,
but you don't have to. We want people
who don't write to feel welcome to
read
Resa Crane-Rodger, who is the co-
director for the series, sees great value
in the project "It enables people to
not only hear other writers read their
works she said, "but it also gives
them a forum to read their own
works
Crane-Rodger pointed out that
while the series started primarily as a
local function, it now draws people
from outside of Greenville and its sur-
rounding communities. "The appeal
is becoming wider and wider, even
attracting people from other states
she explained.
This appeal has sparked interest
in developing such readings in other
areas, even non-academic communi-
ties. As Crane-Rodger stressed, "Up-
per Crust readings are not limited to
academic settings
The overall atmosphere of any-
given reading carries the support and
enthusiasm of its dedicated audience,
thanks largely to Upper Crust Bakery
owners Greg and Trish Hayes, who al-
low their business to be flooded with
people hungry for literature. Even in-
complete pieces or works in progress
can be read, and inevitably people will
discuss what was read after the read-
ings.
Another selling point for the read-
ing series is its willingness to experi-
ment with the genre. Patrick Bizarro.
the series' director and an ECU En-
glish professor, incorporated the mu-
See UPPER page 9
rW NOTS FfeOM "Die UNDeRGROUND
The Force made difficult
Mark Brett
Ufostyie Editor
Man, do I ever love me some Star
Wars.
Those movies helped shape my
childhood, and made me a science fic-
tion fan for life. Never mind that I think
the third film is kind of crappy, or that
the 10 million spin-off toys, books and
comics smack of corporate profiteer-
ing. I'll still be first in line for the new
Wars flick in '98.
But until then, I'll have to feed
my Force jones with the Star Wars
Roleplaying Game. For those not in
the know, a roleplaying game (RPG) is
a game in which the players act out
the roles of different characters in a
story. Dungeons and Dragons is the
most popular (and therefore most fa-
mous) RPG; in that game, players run
around a medieval fantasy setting and
kill monsters in the name of good.
Other games allow you to play anything
from vampires to FBI agents to car-
toon characters. It's sort of like impro-
visational theater, except with dice.
Contrary to popular belief, how-
ever, RPG aficionados don't put on silly
costumes and chase each other around
in caves, forests and sewer systems. We
leave that stuff to survivalists.
No, RPGs are generally played
around a big table covered with maps,
rulebooks dice and assorted snack
items. People make lots of stupid jokes
and play char-
acters with
improbable
names like
"Betron, Mas-
ter of
Keldorn
H m m .
Suddenly,
RPGs sound
a lot less like
a tool of Sa-
tan and a lot
more like
nerd Bingo.
Sigh.
Regard-
less of that,
RPGs are a
lot of fun if
you're in a
certain frame
of mind and
have a sense
of humor about yourself. If you love
adventure stories, RPGs can be particu-
larly cool because they allow you to
take part in the story, and even have a
hand in its outcome. While they cer-
tainly can't take the place of having
real adventure in your life, they are a
nice way to kill an evening (and a lot
less dangerous).
But I'm here to tell you about the
Star Wars RPG. All the rules are con-
tained in one
book, which is
kind of a relief.
Dungeons and
Dragons requires
players to buy as
many as three or
four expensive
volumes to play
the game effec-
tively. Still, at 25
bucks, the one
book that makes
Up the Star Wars
RPG is pretty
pricey; other one-
book systems can
be had for $5 or
$10 less.
But hey, it's
Star Wars. So it's
worth the price
tag, right?
Well
If you're new to roleplaying, or if
you're a kid, the Star Wars RPG is
great The book includes lots of mate-
rial on the basics of RPG play, from
effective roleplaying tips to ideas for
story generation. It explains clearly
See STAR page 8
Artwork Courtesy West End Games
CD Reviews
Bootlegged
Various Artists
Brandon Wadded
iatWant Utmtoh Editor
L
First off, a record company can't
release bootleg recordings. They
can't can't can't It goes against ev-
erything that is bootleg.
A long time ago, in a galaxy far,
far away, record companies regarded
a bootlegger as the anti-Christ An evil
amateur recorder who would flood the
market with so many live recordings
of a certain band that the poor little
record companies would go bankrupt
They had a legitimate gripe; why
should consumers buy a CD at $17
each when they could have a free copy
of an entire live show if they knew
somebody?
But now the tables have turned,
as has my stomach. Bootlegging is
popular and hip nowadays. It used to
be that the only band recorded and
circulated was the Dead, but today
almost every improvisational rock
band is being taped. And first genera-
tion quality tapes aren't being traded
for a couple of doses in the back of
some old Volkswagen bus in an over-
crowded parking lot anymore either.
Tapers are trading over the internet
But enough about a record com-
pany cashing in on what used to be
considered their foe.
Bootlegged provides groove-rock
fans a compilation to put in their pipes
and smoke. Many people won't break
down and buy a full-length CD from a
band that they're unfamiliar with.
Therefore, a compilation such as Boot-
legged may seem tike an economi-
cally sound investment
My favorite track on Bootlegged
is "Satisfaction Guaranteed" by
Aquarium Rescue Unit (I like them
so much better since Col. Bruce left).
A.R.Us jazz-blues-funk stylings have
earned the respect and admiration
of critics and musicians alike. The
uniqueness of their sound is the com-
bination of guitarist Jimmy Hering
and bassistscat vocalist Oteil
Burbridge. But I'm still a little dis-
appointed, because 1 was expecting
a real live A.R.U. track; one where
Burbridge and Hering improvise be-
tween verses and their talent as mu-
sicians could truly be showcased. Oh
well, I guess I need to listen to one
of my Aquarium bootlegs instead of
the record company's.
Not to be outdone. Peasant's
Cafe regulars Moe offer a strong
nine-minute version of "Timmy
Tucker" to Bootlegged. The New
York quartet has played in Greenville
several times and I haven't seen
them perform, but I won't miss their
next show.
The CD's third track, "Tempo-
See BOOT page 8
Prioro by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Local blood supplies depleted during the recent snowstorm, the Bloodmobile made
a campus stop Tuesday as students turned out to replenish our stock of the red stuff.
Gloom lurks In the Cut
Ronda Cranford
Staff Writer
There's a lot of sex
in this book. Most
of it is the kind
that's illegal in the
state of North
Carolina.
If all this winter gloom has given you a taste for dark
and gritty reading material, that's what you'll get in
Susanna Moore's mysterythriller In the Cut. This book
comes recommended with the warning that you might
feel the need to take a shower after you turn that last
page, as well as deal with any paranoia you may develop.
Moore has brought to life a very engaging main char-
acter in Frannie, the speaker in the story. Frannie teaches
creative writing at a university in New York city, and is
divorced from a famous photographer. She feels as if she
is being pulled into the intrigue �.����.�
around the serial murders taking
place in her neighborhood by fate,
but it's clear to the reader that she
seeks out the dangerous without re-
alizing it
The plot is set up with Frannie
getting lost on her way to the bath-
room in a bar and accidentally walk-
ing in on a sex act in progress. In-
stead of making a hasty exit she stays
to watch. The woman involved
doesn't see her, but the man does, mmm�mmmmmmm
although Frannie can't see his face.
The next day Frannie learns that the woman was killed
later that night
Frannie is intelligent and funny - likable enough to
put a suspenseful pressure on readers when she puts her-
self in harm's way. The unconscious, self destructive mo-
tive within Frannie is evident in the way she goes through
life as if nothing can happen to her. She walks unaccom-
panied in the city at night on a regular basis, hangs out in
seedy bars and lives in an apartment building that is eas-
ily accessible to strangers.
Frannie seems inexplicably drawn to dangerous
people as well. For example, when she first meets Detec-
tive Malloy, the man investigating the murders and with
whom she later becomes involved, she describes him like
this: "His trousers were a little tight. Black shoes, lace
up. Needed a shine What does she see in him? He's got
foul mouth, considers one of the perks of his job to be
frequent opportunities to get laid and describes himself
like this: "1 been two steps away from prison my whole
life In addition, Frannie immediately suspects Malloy is
the man she saw having sex with the girl in the bar, and
possibly her killer.
Every single one of the men Frannie comes into con-
tact with on a regular basis is a suspect. Malloy's partner
is a man who has tried to kill his wife. When he hears
about a case in which a wife was stabbed to death by her
husband, his response is. "She must not of known when
to shut up
There's Cornelius, the student who was with her in
the bar on the night of the first murder. He seems to be
stalking her, and he turns in a term paper about serial
murderer John Wayne Gacy. There's John Graham, a neu-
rotic old friend who keeps a close eye on Frannie's apart-
ment building to see what she's doing.
There's also a mysterious character who sends Frannie
and her friend Pauline drinks as they
��-������ sit in the bar downstairs from Pauline's
anartment one night A few days after
that Pauline is killed and pulled to
pieces in her apartment.
Is this man a police colleague of
Malloy's? Is there a conspiracy, a secret
organization within the police force be-
hind the murders? All of the possibili-
ties seem equally plausible. Moore does
an excellent job of toying with the
reader's head - she teases the reader
with subtie possible clues. Although it's
��mmmmm possible to form hunches about who the
roal killer is, it's not possible to feel good about them for
long.
The dialogue between characters that Moore has pro-
duced is excellent They all have sharp, realistic, distinct
voices. Each one uses diction and slang indicative of his
her social and ethnic background. Moore also succeeds in
communicating a sense of the psychology at work in each
character, especially Frannie. Frannie drops little hints
about herself that make us aware of things at work in her
head that she is not For example, at the point where she
taiks briefly about her relationship with her father, it be-
comes clear that the failure of this relationship could be
responsible for her self-defeating habits in forming rela-
tionships with other men.
The best thing about In The Cut is the fact that it
doesn't insult the reader's intelligence. The complexity of
the plot and the characters within it make it very difficult
to figure out It's thoroughly involving. There's a lot of
sex in this book. Most of it is the kind that's illegal in the
State of North Carolina, too. It is probably not a good
idea to give it to your grandmother for her birthday.
Unless you have a low tolerance for sex and darkness,
In The Cut is a good read.
�?a
Wildlife comes alive in Jumanji
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
A few years ago I ran across a won-
derful children's book called Jumanji.
Written by Chris Van Allsburg (a fa-
vorite of mine), the creative mind that
gave the world The Polar Express.
Jumanji told the incredible tale of a
game that came to life on each roll of
the dice.
I was pleased but wary of the film
version of Van Allsburg's imaginatively
illustrated book. I need not have wor-
ried, however, because the film version
of Jumanji provides as much visual
candy for the eyes as did Van Allsburg's
illustrations. The computer images cre-
ated for Jumanji fit perfectly into the
film because the wild animals brought
to life by the board game are just dif-
ferent enough from reality to suggest
that the animals came from the world
of the game instead of the real world.
Monkeys released from the game
seem more reminiscent of the terrify-
ing but amusing creatures in Gremlirs
than of the furry creatures swinging
from trees at the zoo. Vines growing
all through the house seem far more
menacing because of their other-
worldly appearance than any vines
found in a jungle. Lions, elephants,
crocodiles, zebras, mosquitoes and rhi-
nos all look ferocious and more like
they arose from the game solely to ter-
rorize the players.
Jumanji centers on the game
played by Alan Parrish with his friend
Sarah Wittle. Alan gets sucked into the
board where he has to wait until some-
one rolls "a five or eight" Sarah be-
comes so frightened that she runs away
and the game is left unfinished for over
20 years. Luckily two youngsters in
1995 finally begin the game again.
When one of them rolls an eight Alan
Parrish appears.
Alan (Robin Williams) has grown
into an adult When Alan realizes that
the only way to return everything to
the board is to finish the game, he sets
out to find Sarah (Bonnie Hunt). Sa-
rah has spent many years in therapy
See JUMANJI page 9
This week's topic:
Scooby Doo
1. The original title of
Scooby's show was "Scooby
Doo, Where Are You?"
2. Scooby made his first
appearance in 1969.
3. "The New Scooby Doo
Movies" featured weekly
celebrity guest stars. For one
glorious season, Scooby
cavorted with the likes of Don
Knotts, and Jonathan Winters.
4. Scooby's sleuthing south-
ern cousin was called Scooby
Dumb. Yet another cruel joke
at the expense Of good
country folk.
5. Vincent Price joined the
cast of "Scooby Doo" for one
blissfully brief season. At that
point, the series featured only
Shaggy, Scooby, Scrappy,
Daphne and some annoying
child thrown in for kiddie
appeal.





8
Thursday, January 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
BOOT from page 7
rary Saint" was sort of a letdown, like
"Satisfaction Guaranteed Govern-
ment Mule is an ominous sounding
power trio with Allman Brothers
bandmates Warren Haynes and Allen
Woody up front. The Mule puts on
impressive live performances. But the
Bootlegged version lacked the real-
ness of a Gov't Mule show. Warren
Haynes and Jimmy Hering are two of
my favorite guitarists, but I guess I
expected too much from this compi-
J) 1AJK. from page 7
what RPGs are all about (telling sto-
ries and having fun), and defines the
terminology of these games in concise
terms (an amazing feat considering
that RPG sessions tend to sound like
they're being conducted in a foreign
tongue). For the newcomer, this is es-
sential information, and the Star Wars
RPG does a good job with it
Children who want to play in
George Lucas' fictional back yard will
also be well-served by this rulebook.
Speaking as someone who's been
roleplaying since I was 12, I can tell
you that kids are not the most ma-
ture people when it comes to playing
these games.
Disputes always arise, and quickly
become heated arguments, when some-
body wants their character to do some-
thing harmful to somebody else's char-
acter. In games where every detail of
such conflicts is not covered explicitly
in the rules, kids bicker incessantly and
nobody has any fun.
There's no danger of that in the
Star Wars RPG. Every possible action
a character can take is dictated by a
roll of the dice. You can't take a piss in
this game without first consulting the
almighty dice. Numbers don't lie, and
kids know it If they get a bad dice roll,
they'll grumble but they won't get into
screaming matches.
Okay, that's the people who will
enjoy this game. As for the rest of us
Experienced roleplayers may find
the Star Wars RPG a little tedious. All
the rules covering minute details tend
to slow play down. If you're really into
a story, nothing is more annoying than
having to stop and roll dice every five
seconds. Sometimes, things are better
if dictated by the decision of the
gamemaster, who can make up his
mind without having to consult charts
and scores.
In addition to the sheer number
of dice rolls players have to make, the
rolls themselves can be impossibly
complex. For example, check out this
description of a player figuring out
what he has to roll to hit another ship
in a dogfight: "Tirog has a starship
gunnery skill of 2D2, and the
weapon has a fire control of 2D1.
Greg rolls his skill dice, and gets a 3
and 2 The fire control dice come
up as a 2 and a 5. Since the die cap is
4, the 5 counts as a 4, so his die total
is 11
Uh That's confusing even if you
understand the terminology. By the
time you've figured all that out (and
the process goes on beyond that
simple computation), all the other
players are dozing off or heading
home.
Game mechanics aside, though,
I still have other problems with this
game. There's something called
'Dark Side points" that you can be
saddled with if you do something evil.
And for Jedi Knights who choose to
follow the Dark Side of the Force,
there are restrictions so severe that
nobody would want to play a Dark
Side character.
This is a kind of dictated moral-
ity that's common to RPGs. Sure, evil
is something that should have some
price attached. But that price would
more likely come from plot elements.
If you commit evil deeds, there's
bound to be somebody out there who
wants revenge on you. That should
screw up your character's life
enough. We don't need game me-
chanics to dictate the costs of evil.
But it's not all bad. The Star
Wars RPG does offer some neat stuff.
The information included on how to
roleplay Jedi Knights is cool and in-
valuable in running a Star Wars
game. Likewise, the stuff on the back-
ground of the Star Wars universe is
interesting to fans and can provide
"fodder for good adventures.
Overall, the Star Wars RPG is
only a mediocre.game. It could be a
lot of fun, but experienced gamers
will probably want to re-write the
rules a little bit to make the dice-work
a bit easier to swallow. This is a space
opera game, after all, and it calls for
fast-paced action. Too many game me-
chanics only slow the action down.
It does get major cool points just for
being Star Wars, though.
On a scale of one to 10, the Star
Wars RPG rates a six.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 18, 1996
Harris feeler
Means Low Prices
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OS
UPPER from page 7 JUMANJI from page 7
sic of Mike Hamer. a local musician, as
well as dance interpretation within his
reading.
As it stands now. the series has a
full schedule. On Jan. 22. Cindy Thomp-
son-Rumple and Will Mahn and the Nitty
Gritty Breakdancers will be the featured
speakers. Feb. 19 brings Todd Lovettand
Laura Wright March 18 will spotlight
Debra Kang Dean and Susan Meyers.
April 8 will have Jeffery Beam and Ronda
Cranford. And finally, April 29 will show-
case Marianne Allen and Debbie
Morrison. All readings begin at 8 p.m. at
the Upper Crust Bakery in downtown
Greenville.
But remember, even though the
schedule is full, each reading will feature
an open mic session following the fea-
tured speakers.
The Upper Crust Bakery Reading
Series has enjoyed nothing but steady
growth since its birth four years ago, and
it doesn't plan on slowing down. As
Robbins said, "As long as there are people
who'll show up, it'll continue to grow
trying to overcome the problems cre-
ated in her life by the game Jumanji.
After getting Sarah to agree to finish
the game, the four players sit down to
brave out the remainder of the game.
Through all kinds of fantastic ad-
ventures, including a monsoon and a
big game hunter looking for Alan, the
four players stick together to finish the
game.
Adding comic relief to the happen-
ings is a local police officer (David Allan
Grier) who keeps bumping into crea-
tures released from the game. The of-
ficer has several accidents with his car,
then watches helplessly as monkeys
drive it away.
Bonnie Hunt deserves another
chance at her TV sitcom (which she is
supposedly getting), because she is a
comic gem. Her timing is nearly per-
fect and she possesses a good-hearted
integrity that should win her many
fans. In Jumanji Hunt gives a well-
modulated performance that verges on
the edge of hysteria but never crosses
into it. Robin Williams does a fine job
also, but he is required by the script to
be more rugged and straight in his role
which does not permit much of the
trademark Williams' zaniness.
The special effects complement a
simple but rewarding story to make a
respectable film that the entire family
can enjoy. Jumanji provides, at the risk
of being a bit too cute for the first re-
view of the new year, more fun than a
barrel of monkeys.
On a scale of one to 10. Jumanji
rates a seven.
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Prices Effective Through Jan. 23, 1995
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10
Thursday, January 18, 1996
The East Carolinian
Conference USA
shows interest
One, two breath
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Junior swimmer, Brendon Vermillion swims in prepara-
tion for this weekends away meet against Richmond.
Lady Pirate's
wUt be taking on
OOU tomorrow
night at Minges Coliseum at
7 fMft. OOU is currently tied
for 15th in the country tth
Colorado. The athletic depart-
ment is holding a contest for
the next three Friday night
women's homegamesfor
students in dorms Whichever
dorm brings the most people
to watch the lady Pirates w8�
receive a pizza party. The
contest starts tomorrow night
against OOUand w�be in
effect for theFeb. 16 and
March 1 Lady Pirate games.
The men's basketball team
wM also be In action this
Saturday night egamst ODU.
Tip-off Is slated for 7 p.m.
Brian Paiz
Senior Writer
The invitation that ECU Athlet-
ics has so long been waiting for, could
becoming very soon.
Conference USA, which is lo-
cated in Chicago, 111. has been ru-
mored to be very
HOW CONFERENCE USA
COULD SHAPE UP
FOOTBALL
Houston
Southern Mississippi
Cincinnati
Tulane
Memphis
Louisville
East Carolina
Navy
Army
interested i hav-
ing the Pirates
join their confer-
ence, which was
formed in 1994.
As many Pirate
fans remember,
ECU was left out
of Conference
USA when it was
first formed, but
the Pirates suc-
cess in football
this season has
commissioner
Michael Slive and
the other 12
member institutions taking a serious
look at East Carolina.
"Everybody knows that East
Carolina has a solid program Con-
ference USA Assistant Commissioner
Brian Teeter said. "ECU's success in
the '90s is well known and the fan
support is great"
Expansion for Conference USA
was a big topic at the recent NCAA
convention in Dallas, Texas. Confer-
ence USA was made part of the col-
lege football coalition (C-F-C), which
is locked into the bowl alliance. Foot-
ball competition begins next fall for
Conference USA, and as of now there
are six institutions that play Division
I football: Cincinnati, Houston, Lou-
isville, Memphis, Southern Missis-
sippi and Tulane.
East Caro-
lina would make
the seventh
team, plus there
is a possibility
that Army and
Navy could join
the conference.
Alabama-Bir-
mingham, a
member of Con-
ference USA in
basketball only,
is moving to Di-
vision I next sea-
son in football,
and has shown
interest in mov-
ing into the football conference.
The Pirates would probably be
a football-only member at first with
the long range plan to be an all
sports playing member. Conference
USA could definitely help gain re-
spect for the Pirate basketball pro-
gram. The CAA, in which ECU nov
competes, is ranked 18th out of 22
conference in the power ratings. Con-
ference USA is one of the premier
basketball conferences in the coun-
try, boasting such top 20 teams as
Cincinnati, Memphis, Louisville and
Saint Louis. The biggest improve-
ment for Pirate basketball could
come in recruiting, where being in a
major conference is a definite plus.
An aspect that many thought
was a reason ECU might have not
gotten into a conference the first go-
around was the question of ECU's
TV market. However, with the addi-
tion of the ESPN deal, which begins
next season, and the Pirate Sports
Television Network becoming a very
visible medium, the Pirates are pre-
paring themselves for a move into a
major conference. Also. Raycom and
Creative Sports, two of the major
players in sports television, have
moved their headquarters to North
Carolina
"North Carolina is a great sports
state said Teeter. "That is a major
factor in our thoughts of expansion,
but we also look at history, tradition,
population and fan support, and East
Carolina does bring a lot to the
table
Conference USA needs the Pi-
rates, just as much as the Pirates
need Conference USA. The league
officials are showing great interest
in making the conference football
oriented, and they need ECU to do
that With the exception of Louisville,
See USA page 11
Sports medicine often overlooked
Runners prepare for season
Cralg Perrott
Assistant Sports editor
It's a hard, low-paying, low-pro-
file job but someone's got to do it.
The job of the ECU athletic train-
ers is one that is often unnoticed and
underappreciated, but one that is
intrical to the Pirate athletic program.
"I think that's something every-
one understands in this field said
Head Athletic Trainer Mike Hanley.
"Trainers don't think of the spotlight
and believe that they don't deserve
the spotlight Wins and loses don't de-
pend on us
The sports medicine program at
ECU is one of the best in the South-
east and offers top-notch prevention
care, treatment and rehabilitation of
injuries that befall the student-athlete.
Serving ail of our varsity sports,
the Sports Medicine Department is
lead by Hanley, assistants Jim Bazluki
and Sue Graner and team physician
Dr. John Siegal. Dr. Katie Speth has
joined the staff this year and is head
of the sports medicine curriculum.
The sports medicine division also
has more than a dozen community-
based physicians at their disposal.
They lend their time and expertise to
the student-athletes in various fields
including orthopedics, neurosurgery,
opthalmology, urology, dentistry,
pharmacology, oral surgery and inter-
nal medicine. There's even two ear,
nose and throat specialists and an at-
torney.
"Our doctors come in every day
providing day to day treatment for our
athletes Hanley
said. "From a
cost-cutting
standpoint there
are no bills for
our doctors. The
advantage of this
is we can get the
athletes back
faster and pre-
vent complica-
tions
The services
of the Profes-
sional Consult-
"Our doctors come
in every day
providing day to
day treatment for
our athletes
� Mike Hanley, Head
Athletic Trainer
Human Performance laboratory as
well.
The injury treatment and reha-
bilitation center of the Sports Med De-
partment includes the latest in tech-
' nology, making it
one of the top
sports medicine
programs in the
country. The
building also
houses a 5,000
square foot
strength training
center, a biome-
chanics lab, men's
and women's
locker rooms and
classroom space.
The Sports
Dave Pond
Senior Writer
Lately, ECU men's track coach Bill Carson has been
plagued by racing thoughts. There's no cure, but Carson
doesn't mind. In fact he wouldn't trade them for any-
thing.
In preparing for the upcoming Pirate indoor track
season, pleasant thoughts of a returning AH-American
4x100 relay squad blend into high hopes for a talented
incoming freshman class. Add a few two-sport athletes
from the Liberty Bowl champion Pirate football program
and the ECU squad becomes a fast and furious jugger-
naut ready to race up the conference charts and ulti-
mately back to the NCAAs.
Lewis Harris ran the first leg on the Pirates' AH-
American 4100 relay team a season ago, and returns in
1996 alongside Brian Johnson, Ar'tee Franklin and
Dwight Henry.
"We expect Lewis to lead off again Carson said.
"He looks good and is practicing well, and we'll also sprint
him more this season.
"This year Dwight will run the quarter mile and the
4x400. We're not going to sprint him on the short relays
because we have enough quality runners and depth so
that we can protect his hamstrings. I'm also looking for
big things from Brian this year
Franklin is among many Pirates who have overcome
injuries, along with Harris and Ken Laws. All three are
doing well as they prepare for the upcoming season.
"Right now, Ar'tee is healthy, but his Achilles ten-
don tends to flare up. If he gets back to his form, he'll
definitely be a factor in the CAAs and possibly in the
IC4As
The freshman who may have the most immediate
impact on the ten in 1996 is Damon Davis, an ECU
two-sport future star whom Carson describes one of the
top two athletes ever recruited .into the ECU program.
Davi- was the South Carolina 4-A state champion in both
the 200 and 400-meter dash as well as a member of two
state champion relay teams.
Freshmen Chris Rea and Mike Miller will give Carson
the quality depth that track coaches covet
"We are not deep in the 400-meter races Carson
said. "We are strong, but you like to have six quarter-
miiers. Through my experience, you can't sprint without
sustaining injuries. Sprinting is a volatile sport that puts
the kids through a lot of stress, and we know it takes six
athletes to have an NCAA-level 4x400 team
CAA 1995 Most Valuable Athlete Chris McKinney
returns for his final season to lead the Pirate jumpers,
and has made the most of his first three seasons at ECU.
"He's placed every year at the IC4As in the triple
jump and was both the CAA triple and long jump cham-
pion last year, as well as their most valuable athlete
Carson said. "There will be a few meets he has to miss in
1996 because of his commitment to academics and his
major, but he's in really good shape right now
Chris Pressley was a jack of all trades for ECU in
1995, and performed well in almost every event Robert
ants are also available to undergradu-
ate students enrolled in the Sports
Medicine educational program for ath-
letic trainers.
The home base of the sports
medicine program is located in the
Ward Sports Medicine Building, adja-
cent to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
It is a state-of-the-art facility equipped
with the utmost in modern equipment
"Our facility provides excellent
care for our athletes Hanley said. "It
offers a number of advantages
The three-story, 82,095 square-
foot structure is home not only to the
ECU Athletic Department, but the
Medicine Training Center itself is
filled with sophisticated injury treat-
ment evaluation and rehabilitation
equipment These include touch-con-
trol whirlpools, a computerized
isokineti? rehab and evaluation ma-
chine, exam rooms with one dental
chair, and a seven-foot deep whirlpool
that allows an injured athlete to exer-
cise without bearing weight
The training area also boasts 19
taping stations and a unique radio
communication center which allows
sports med officials to monitor action
on the football field and basketball
See SPORTS page 11
Memorable shot for contestant
Car given away
during half-time
shoot-out
Dill Dlllard
Start Writer
Photo by Garrett Killian
(L-R) Brian Johnson, Dwight Henry and Lewis
Harris are getting ready for the '96 season.
Campbell, a junior walk-on, will also jump for Carson and
the Pirates during the upcoming season.
"Robert has good speed and body definition Carson
said. "He'll go along with McKinney and give us two long
jumpers. He had been concentrating solely on academics
and has now found time to compete on a collegiate level
The Pirates have two new hurdlers in junior college
transfer Fred Douglas and freshman Raeshawn Deans.
"Fred is a strong hurdler and has a lot of heart" Carson
said. "We are going to hurdle Raeshawn as well, but in a
pleasant development we found that he is faster than we
thought he was going to be, so he'll run the 200-meter
sprints and the 4x200 relays, as well as the 55 and 110-
meter hurdles
Senior Derrick Floyd will run the 200-meter sprints
this season, as will freshman Vaughn Monroe, who will
also compete in the 100, 4x100 and 4x200-meter relays.
Junior Ken Laws will primarily run in the 55 and the
100-meter sprints, as will ECU senior running back Jerris
McPhail, whom Carson attempted to recruit out of high
school. After attending Wake Forest and Mount Olive Col-
lege, McPhail gained over 900 rushing yards in his senior
season for the 9-3 Pirates and will now focus on track to
improve his speed.
"Part of Jerris' situation is to hone down his 40-yard
dash time for the NFL combines to give him a better shot
at pro football Carson said. "Well use him primarily in
the 55-meter. It's a win-win situation - whatever he can do
for us is a plus
As Carson looks over his roster stacked deep with
highly-talented and motivated Pirate athletes, it's certain
that even the loftiest goals are within reason.
"As a team, our goal at the lC4As this year is to enter
and score in individual events as well as relays, something
we didn't do last year he said. "We're going to spread
ourselves out and go after more points. We have much
more depth, so we are able to use a different philosophy
than we've used in the past"
Whatever the philosophy, continued hard work and
eluding the injury bug remain critical to the squad's suc-
cess - and a run at the NCAA championships.
"The potential might be there to break our school
record in the 4x100 relay Carson said. "It depends how
everything goes. You have to stay healthy a couple of
injured hamstrings and you are down to mediocrity pretty
fast"
Some people get only one shot
at stardom. Some come through and
are remembered, and some crack un-
der pressure. In Alan Powell's case,
lighting struck twice.
You might have heard Powell's
name somewhere before. Try the guy
who made "the shot" heard around
the state which resulted in Powell
driving away with a new car Dec. 23.
Okay now you know who I'm talking
a')out
Alan Powell, a native of Hamp-
ton, Va graduated from ECU in 1986
with a degree in business administra-
tion concentrating in marketing. To
say the least, Powell, a current
Greenville resident, was no stranger
to ECU basketball or the "Halftime
Shoot-out"
"It's funny, but my senior year
here at ECU I was picked to be a con-
testant for the Shoot-out" said Powell.
"I made my lay-up, my free-throw and
the three pointer, but I missed the
half-court shot by three inches
Ouch. For nearly 10 years Powell
had to live with the thoughts of be-
ing three inches away from a new car.
You could say Powell, a member of
the Pirate Club since 1984, had some
"unfinished business" of his own.
"I told myself, if I ever got the
chance that I would win the car
Powell added.
Being a former high school ath-
lete at Charlotte's East Mecklenburg,
before coming to ECU, Powell knew
the ups and downs of competition.
"I didn't play any college ball. I
just mainly played baseball, golf, and
pick-up basketball in high school
said Powell.
After 10 year's worth of pick-up
games and keeping the memory of
"the shot" in the back of his head,
Powell's lucky number popped up
again.
"When I found out that I was
shooting for the car I practiced for
hours on my shot. This time it wasn't
going to slip through my finger tips
Powell stated.
After having his correct answer
to a local trivia contest Powell was
all set to shoot for the car when the
Bears of Southwest Missouri State
came rolling into Williams Arena.
The stage was set As everybody
knows, every hero has got to have a
legendary quote.
"Due to the heat in Greenville in
the summer, I asked WITN's Phil
Wertz if the car has air-condition
said Powell.
After missing his first few shots,
Powell went on to drill the three
pointer and the allusive half court
shot. Not only did Powell have to ex-
ercise the demons of the three inch
miss, but when it came time for the
half court shot, the officials of the
contest forgot to move the sign. So,
Powell's final shot was over the sign,
five feet behind the mark.
"It wasn't bad enough that I had
to make an impossible shot but they
gave me an obstacle to shoot over
Powell said jokingly.
Despite the adversity, Powell fin-
ished his form of the "unfinished busi-
ness" and drove away from Williams
Arena with a '96 Toyota Celica from
Washington Toyota. Now Powell can
rest easy at night with the echoes of
the roaring crowd playing back in his
head rather than the disappointing
sigh of 10 years ago. Who said you
never get a second chance at fame?
StWTUu
The ECU men's basketball team
has some catching up to do. After
dropping a loss to American 85-75,
the Pirates now must fight harder
to get back in the race for the top
spot.
Tuesday's game in Washington,
D.C didn't turn out how the Pirates
had hoped. ECU only shot .451 in the
first half making just 14-31 shots and
just 14 three point shots. The free
throw percentage for the Pirates was
a plus at .853 making 6-7 atte ,ts.
ECU went into the locker room down
by 18 points, 53-35 at half-time.
The Pirates came out in the sec-
ond half and upped their shooting
percentage to .444 while the Eagles
dropped their percentage from .586
in the first half to .350 in the second
half. However, the Pirates could not
overcome the deficit from the first half
despite out scoring American 40-32
in the second half, and the Pirates
walked away with the loss.
Leading scorers for the Pirates
were Tim Basham and Jonathan
Kerner each with 16 points, Tony
Parham adding 12 and Deron Rippey
with eight
The loss drops ECU's record to
2-2 in the CAA. The Pirates will be in
action this Saturday night against Old
Dominion. Tip-off is slated for 7 p.m.
at Minges Coliseum.

Former ECU Head Coach Bill
Lewis, who coached the Pirates from
1989-1992 and led ECU to a Peach
Bowl victory in the '92 season, has
been named the secondary coach for
the Miami Dolphins. Lewis coached
ECU to an 11-1 season and a national
ranking of ninth in the country.
Jimmy Johnson, the Dolphins newly
named head coach, and Lewis
coached together in Arkansas back
in the '70s. After leaving the Pirates
in '92, Lewis took the head coaching
job at Georgia Tech. From there he
was fired in '94 and became the ath-
letic director for Marist High School,
until he was named secondary coach
The official list of coaches has not
yet been released and won't be until
the end of this week or early next
week.
I
nfti.i! :iwg?r





r
The East Caroiinian
Thursday, January 18, 1996
11
ILTORO
Barber & Style
men's hair styling shoppe
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across trom Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon-Fri 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Siy PIRATES
& Get Hair Cut for S6
Everytime
$6.00
Haircut
USA
from page 10
East Carolina is the only school that
is going to bring the fan support to a
major bowl. How satisfied could Con-
ference USA be with a team that
brings very little fan fair such as Cin-
cinnati or Tulane?
Another important reality of join-
ing a conference is money. The finan-
r

FREE TRIP TO
KNOXVILLE.TENN
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
TABLE TENNIS CHESS SPADES
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 23-25, 1996. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Monday , January 22, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Wednesday, January 24, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
AIM
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Thursday, January 25, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
�HERESTHE FINE PRINT
There is a S2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the Mendenhall Information
Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the
Student Activities Office. 328-4711. for more information.
cial standpoint of a conference is very
important in the fact that every team
that makes a bowl has to share their
revenues with the rest of the confer-
ence. For example, this season if ECU
had been in Conference USA, they
would have had to share their revenue
with the other schools. However the
plus side to this is that if another team
in the conference receives a bowl bid,
or does well in the NCAA basketball
tournament then ECU would also gain
some of that revenue.
It is definitely the time for ECU
to get into a conference, and Confer-
ence USA seems to be a good fit. But
what about the Big East Conference,
who has been rumored to be dropping
Temple? Well, the Pirates need not to
worry about that, and let things take
care of themselves. If the Big East
wants the Pirates, they will let us
know. But in the meantime, does any-
one have a Conference USA media
guide?
TEMPORARY
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
DURING '96
ATLANTA GAMES
Thousands of private
employers are now pre-
hiring temporary workers
for May through August.
High wages, overtime,
tips, benefits. See Games
Venues. Free information
and registration forms for
college students. Send
self-addressed, stamped
envelope postmarked by
January 26, 1996 to:
Summer Job FaxBank
Post Office Box 52594
Atlanta, GA 30355-0594
ijJ: OKI v from page 10
court simultaneously.
Armed with all of this technol-
ogy, the training staff is well equipped
to handle any injury and take sports
medicine into the 21st century. Due
to the low-profile nature of their oc-
cupation, however, an athletic trainer
must base their beliefs on sincere sen-
sitivity, dedication, personal attention,
as well as providing the best possible
treatment for Pirate student-athletes.
You have to love what you do.
Mike Hanley's main emphasis is
on the football team, a sport which is
operating basically all year long.
Hanley comes in everyday at 5:30 in
the morning to do treatment and
evaluation of injuries. Around 1:30 in
the afternoon, Mike gets all of the
players taped and ready for practice.
The student trainers get the field
ready for practice, which lasts from
2:45 to about 6:00. After practice Mike
is there taping until 7:30. As you can
see, it makes for a full day and Mike
works seven days a week.
"1 have a very understanding
wife Hanley said. "That helps a lot"
H?nley also spends 90 hours of
week traveling with the team and at-
tending to other sports as well: that's
where his assistants come in.
According to Mike, "a trainer is
only as good as his assistants
Hanley's assistants help with paper-
work and other administrative tasks,
as well as attending to the 115 foot-
ball players and 3400 other athletes
at ECU.
"The relationships you build with
the kids is very rewarding Hanley
said.
So the next time you see the
training team run out on the field or
court to help an injured athlete, re-
member the hours of prevention that
came before the injury, and the hours
of rehabilitation that will result. Those
trainers are out there because of guts,
not glory.
�xelic fiiqktclub (J CJouCfl oj CCoSJ
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers llpm-lamU?
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants need to call &. register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
S Dancers Wanted $
r
r'
i
i
i
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties. & Divorces
ECU
McDonald
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Avc.
-
I �
I
LVJLli&N.CA LDJ&gffitgd. ZZL
(Behind John's Convenient Mart)
CONV.
MART

A
Here's what we did last semester:
Athletics
Flag Football 2nd
Basketball 2nd
Tennis 1st
Softball 2nd
Water Polo 2nd
Soccer 1st
Scholarship
2nd on Campus! 2.45 Overall
Community Service
1,980 Total Hours
$2,475.25 donated to
Ronald McDonald House
1 on campus!
nKA
riKA
What will YOU do this semester?
Call 752-4181 for Rides or Information





m,
12
Thursday, January 18,1996
The East Carolinian
iff
Help
11 wonted
fy
Services
Offered
&.
Travel
EHbl
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom. 2 bedroom &.
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AZALEA GARDEN?
UNIVERSE APARTMENTS
N�J CASH???
We Buy CD'S,
Caaaette, ana Lp �
Well pay up to $5 eah for
CDV
� �
For Sale
TANNING BED, PULETAN 24 BULB
fullsize bed. will pay for itself during Pre-
Spring Break months, charge your friends
and tan for free! $1200.00. Financing Avl.
752-6833
YAKIMA CAR RACK for sale. Fairly new
and in great condition. Includes bars and
feet $75, call 413-0513, ask for Greg.
MOBILE HOME RENTAL
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3
bedroom 2 12 bath townhouse in Quail
Ridge. $250 month including utilities.Call
David or Jamie at 756-7374
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS 2
bedroom 1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Water & basic cable included. 752-
8900. Professionally managed by Pro Man-
agement of Greenville.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: TAKE OVER
lease that ends in June. 2 bedroom, 4
blocks from campus. Water and cable in-
cluded. WD hookup, $197.50 mo. 12
utilities. Call Kisha 758061
RENT IN JANUARY AND receive your
last months rent free with lease. 1 and 2
bedroom apts. in various locations. Poto-
mac Properties 752-9722
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed-
room, 2 bath duplex. Lost of amenities.
Walking distance from campus. $275mo
12 utilities. Call 758-2232
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses:
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
KINGSTON PLACE CONDO 2 bedroom
2 bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per
month. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; large
room, 10' ceilings, 14 utilities, $200 per
month. Call 754-2892 ASAP. Don't miss
out:
BEDROOM AVAILABLE IN PLAYERS
CLUB apartments. Nice roommates, fun
atmosphere and affordable rent Washer
Dryer, fully furnished from two other
roommates. $250.00 a month 321-7737
ask for Sarah.
HOUSE TO SHARE 2 rooms in 4 bed 2
bath to rent responsible non-smoker. $175
can 746549
FEMALE NONSMOKER NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY to share four bedroom apt.
in Tar River. Own bedroom. WasherDry-
er. $168.75 rent plus 14 utilities and
phone. Call 757-0406
ROOMMATE NEEDED FREE RENT in
January and security deposit is paid in full.
Players Club Apts. Own room, 2 Full
Baths. $250 month. Call Kyle at 353-
0668(91n 862-2491.
DORM SIZE FRIDGE FOR sale $70 or
best offer. Sega Genesis for sale 2 con-
trollers 10 games $100 or best offer. Call
756-5309 Ask for Jeff
GUITAR EFFECTS FOR SALE. Fully
programmable, 128 channels with pro-
grammable presets, use up to 8 effects si-
mutaneously. Great Sound. Call Mike at
758-2994
GUITAR EFFECTS FOR SALE, fully pro-
grammable, 128 channels with program-
mable presets. Use up to 8 effects simuta-
neosry. Great sound. Call Mike at 758-2994
�95 FLEETWOOD SW 14X76 2BR.
2bath, All options. 10 min. from ECU. Take
over pmts, plus cash back from owner. 1-
919-556905
GUITAR POWER AMP FOR sale.
Tubeworks mosvalve, 80 watts per chan-
nel, in stereo, very loud. Call Mike at 758-
2994
95 FLEETWOOD SW 14X76, 2br, 2
bath. All options. 10 min from ECU. Take
over pmts. plus cash back from owner. 1-
919-556905
'94 SPECIALIZED STUMP JUMPER,
DOUBLE-butted Chromoly framefork,
full LX components, custom rear wheel,
rear derailer. new tires, handlebar, stem,
shifters, skewers. $600 OBO must sell. Call
551754
IBM 286 COMPUTER GOOD condition
color monitor and keyboard included great
for wordprocessing. $80 obo call 353-0966
ATTENTION LADIES CLUB FOR
women. Free membership $39.00 month
with tanning. Pregnant must sell ASAP.
Contact Tammy 756-1135 day or 946-1438
night desperate to sell.
'94 SPECIALIZED STUMPJUMPER,
DOUBLE-butted Chromoly Framefork.
Full LX compoents, custom rear wheel,
rear derailer, new tires, handlebar, stem,
shifters, skewers. $600 OBO. Must sell.
Call 551754
GUITAR POWER AMP FOR sale.
Tubeworks Mosvalve, 80 Watts per chan-
nel, in stereo, very loud. Call Mike at 758-
2994
96 GT ZASKARLE 18 inch frame with
bottom bracket front derailer & seat post
White Industries hubset 3 weeks old.
Frame $500.00, Hubs $225.00. Call Mark
at 830973 or 355050
If
Help
n wanted
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largatt library of Information In US. �
alfubiects y
Order Catalog Today with VlaWMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
Or rush S2.00 to ftimrch tntonnaBon
11322 Idaho Sve K205-A Los Angles, CA 90025
Gumby s
Drivers Wnntert
96 GT ZASKARLE 18" frame with Bot-
tom Bracket Front Derailer Seat post
White industries hubset. 3 weeks old.
Frame $500.00, Hubs $225.00. Call Mike
at 830973 or 355050
LOFT FOR SALE. FITS full size bed. $50
Call 752508
fDO YOU NEED MQNEYfj
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
WANTED INDIVIDUALS, STUDENT
ORGANIZATIONS and small groups to
Promote Spring Break '96. Earn MONEY
and FREE TRIPS. Call the Nations's Lead-
er, Inter-Campus Programs, http:
www.icptcom or 100-327013
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit Card
Fundraisers for fraternities, soroities &
groups. Any campus organization can
raise up to $1000 by earning a whopping
$5.00Visa application. Call 100-932-
0528 ext. 65 Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
ATTENTION LADIES TIRED OF being
broke, want to get paid Everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage. Snow Hill. NC 747-7686
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE to students who are inter-
ested in becoming personal care attend-
ants to students in wheelchairs, readers,
and tutors. Past experience is desired but
not required. For an application, contact:
Office for Disability Support Services,
Brewster A-l 16 ot A-l 14, Telephone: (919)
328799.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2.000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & fufl-tuue employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IS
looking for college students wishing to
gain valuable work experience with a rap-
idly growing company. Ideal applicant
would be energetic, efficient billing to
learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are looking to hire about 12-15
people for our collections department over
the next month. Working hours are from
8am-12pm Monday through Saturday
andor 5pm to 9pm Monday through Fri-
day. Extra hours are available from 12pm
to 5pm. We will work around school sched-
ules. Please apply in person at 1206
Charles Blvd or call Brian at 757-2127
FAMILY IN WESTHAVEN DESIRES
part-time caregiver beginning Feb. 5th
M.W.Th or F 8:30am-12:30 children inf-
ant - 4 12 must have own transportation
knowledge of CPRlst Aid preferred. Call
Beck 756-9950
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext J53623.
THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH is
currently hiring for nursery attendants
during the Sunday osrvices. Looking for
dependable and nurturing individuals.
Child care experience as well as CPR cer-
tification a plus. Please call Lori at 321-
0299
HELP WANTED; EXPERIENCED
WAITSTAFF daytime and night shifts
available. Must be able to work at least
two weekday lunch shifts. NO CALLS,
please apply in person between 8am and
10am or 2pm and 4pm, Professor O'Cools
Winn Dixie Market Place.
THE DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS is
currently seeking tutors for all subject
areas for student-athletes. Applicants must
be a full-time student at East Carolina with
a minimum GPA of 2.5. Call 3284550 for
more information.
KIND, PATIENT AND LOVING sitter
wanted 3 days per week to care for 2 boys,
ages 18 months and 4 years. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238
BABYSITTER NEEDED MW, 9:30-
2:30,TTH 9:00-2:15. Partial hours ac-
cepted. Female 20 months, well-behaved.
Non-smokeT only. Call Melissa 757336
leave message.
DON'T PASS UP THIS opportunity! Fast
growing telecommunications Co. looking
for reps in this area. Must be motivated,
self-starter looking for fun and money!
Enjoy working with others and being your
own boss. Full or part-time. Finally get
the rewards that match your efforts. Call
Scott for more information at 754-2111
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in a way to
virtually eliminate you� long distance
phone bill and make a substantial income
while doing it call Jason at 756577.
START THE NEW YEAR off right by
calling Diamond Dave for your next party
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave at 758-5711 or 809474.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 100400209.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income.
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 100-263495 ext.
F53624
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 100406-7027
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars' 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches - Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
cruise! 7 Days $27b! Includes 15 Meals &
6 Free Parties! Great BeachesNightlife'
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http:www.springbreaktravel.com 100-
678386
SPRING BREAK '96, WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT! BOOK NOW
Florida $109, Bahamas $359. Jamaica
Cancun $389. Organize a group - TRAV-
EL FREE Sun Splash Tours 100-426-
7710
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 lowest price guarantee! 7
Nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on fooddrinks!http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 10078386
&
Travel
RTV
neals
Spring Break 1996
TRAVEL FREEH
tJimakri. Cancun. Bahamas
Panama Cltv. OavtOlM. Padre
Great low, low prices
�� Free Trip on only 15 Mies
Hall for a FREE
information
0pm Sun Splash Tours
" 1-B00-426-771Q
m
Greek
i Personals
CONGRATULATIONS REBECCA
CUNN ON your Sigma Phi Epsilon
lavalier! Love your Sigma Sisters.
LEE JORDAN - congratulations on your
election as Education Officer! Love youT
Sigma Sisters.
SIGMA WISHES ALL FRATERNITIES
a successful Spring rush!
CONGRATULATIONS REBECCA! I'M
VERY happy foT you. Love ya always. Your
little sister Holly. RS. your paddle is done,
finally!
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 Lowest Price Guarantee! 7
nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on FoodDrinks! httpv'www.spring-
breaktravel.com 10078386 '
Announcements
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS MEETING
today Speaker. Angie Nix. Jan 18, 1996
GC 1019 Time 5:u0
THE GREENVILLE PITT COUNTY spe-
cial Olympics will be conducting a track
& field training school on Saturday Feb
3rd from 9am - 4pm for all individuals in-
terested in individuals to coach track
field, we are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: rollers
kating. swimming, gymnastics, bowling,
and volleyball, for more information con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 8304551
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PA
CRUISE 7 days $279! Includes 15 m-
& 6 free parties! Great BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http:www.springbreaktravel.com -1-800-
678386
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to Best
Bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches-Near Disney)
$169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 10078-
6386
SPRING BREAK '96 WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT BOOK NOW
Florida $109 Bahamas $359 JamaicaCan-
cun $389. Organize a group TRAVEL
FREE! Sun Splash Tours 100426-7710
Don't delay!
f
Advertise
in The East
Carolinian.
328-2000
We also buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken Gold
Pieces
&
Stereo's
TV's
VCR's
CD players
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER
JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
Student Swap Shop
j DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
j HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
S come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown,
V, drive to back dj30�&ringbuzzer
TUTOR NEEDED MATH 3228, if you
had Prof. Creech call me @ 746549
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest, or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Board other benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext K53621
SPRING BREAK - NASSAUParadise Is-
land. Cancun and Jamaica from $299. Air,
Hotel, Transfers, Parties and More! Organ-
ize small group - earn FREE trips plus
commissions! Call 1- 80022321
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext A53622.
TslscmbeTo
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To receive The East
Carolinian, check the
length of subscription
desired, complete your
name address, and send a
check or money order to
Circulation Dept The
East Carolinian, Student
Pubs Bldg, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27858-
4353.
I $110 first class t1�
$40 third (Bulk)
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Address
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 18, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 18, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1117
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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