The East Carolinian, January 11, 1996







mum?
January 11,1995 �
Vol71,No. 29
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,0C0
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
20 pases
Around the State
SHELBY, N.C. (AP) Six
people have died on North Caro-
lina roads this weekend, includ-
ing a 5-year-old Shelby boy who
was riding in a vehicle that slid
into the path of another on icy
N.C. 226 in Cleveland County,
the state Highway Patrol said
Sunday.
Adam James Rousell died in
the accident that occurred four
miles north of Shelby on Satur-
day evening, the patrol said.
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) -
A firearms expert testified
Wednesday that the bullet recov-
ered from James Jordan's body-
was of poor quality and smaller
than most .38-caliber bullets.
David Collins of the South
Carolina Law Enforcement Divi-
sion said that as a result, marks
on the bullet from the gun bar-
rel were not as distinct as they
would be otherwise.
He was the first witness of
the day in the trial of Daniel
Andre Green, who is accused of
robbing and killing basketball
star Michael Jordan's father in
July 1993.
Around the
Country
NEW YORK (AP) - Crews
digging the East out after the
Blizzard of '96 piled the snow
15 feet high or dumped it by the
truckload into rivers Tuesday as
cabin fever set in among idled
workers and snowbound chil-
dren.
At least 96 deaths were
blamed on the storm that para-
lyzed much of the East under 1
12 to 3 feet of snow.
ANGOLA, La. (AP) - More
than 37 years after he was sen-
tenced to death for shooting two
white policemen he claimed were
Ku Klux Klansmen trying to kill
him. Moreese "Pop Bickham
walked out of prison a free man.
Bickham. who had seven
stays of execution during his
time on death row. was released
from the Louisiana State Peni-
tentiary precisely at 12:04 a.m.
Wednesday.
Around the World
JERUSALEM (AP) - Secre-
tary of State Warren Christopher
opened a new round of talks
with Israeli and Syrian leaders
in an effort to step up the pace
of their peace talks. Big gaps
remain between the two sides,
he said.
Negotiations have now
reached the point where the two
sides can see the tradeoffs nec-
essary for a settlement, Christo-
pher said on his way from Wash-
ington.
KINSHAZA. Zaire (AP) -
Zairians began burying their
dead Wednesday as investigators
hunted for clues to what caused
a cargo plane to crash, killing at
least 300 people as it mowed
through a crowded market.
Pirates finish business in Memphis
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
What was billed as a clash be-
tween two of the nation's most intri-
cate offenses turned out to be a de-
fensive battle as ECU held off
Stanford 19-13 to become the 1995
Liberty Bowl Champions and com-
plete their "unfinished business
It was the first victory for the
Pirates (9-3) without an offensive
touchdown since Pat Dye's troops
beat The Citadel in 1975, 3-0.
ECU's sole offensive point pro-
duction came from place-kicker Chad
Holcomb, who took home the award
for the ECU Most Outstanding Of-
fensive Player and kicked a Liberty-
Bowl record four field goals. It was
interesting to see Holcomb out-kick
Stanford kicker Eric Abrams, the top
kicker in the Pac-10 conference, who
kicked 16-18 field goals during the
course of the regular season.
"This is probably the best thing
that's ever happened to me
Holcomb said.
Holcomb has been chastised for
his inconsistency throughout his ca-
reer at ECU but seemed to gain more
confidence in his abilities every
game. kicking winning field goals
against West Virginia and Southern
Miss earlier this year.
"Special teams, all year long, has
been a blessing and a curse to us
ECU Head Coach Steve Logan said.
"Chad was four for four and I'm glad
to see that. He's had a rough career
at East Carolina, but he won three
football games for us this year. I'm
happy for him
Holcomb kicked three field goals
in the second quarter alone, includ-
ing a personal best 46-yar r. His
final field goal came with 1:15 re-
maining to give ECU the 19-13 deci-
sion. Stanford stayed in the game
until the very end, however, the Pi-
rate "D" held on to the final tick.
"When we go out on the field. I
really believe we can win the game
with defense Logan said.
The ECU defense, which has out-
shined its offensive counterparts this
season, played its best game of the
year against the Cardinal (7-4-1).
holding Stanford to a season-low 211
yards.
The "Purple Haze" defense was
sparked during Stanford's second
possession of the game when quar-
terback Mark Butterfield's pass was
tipped by ECU defensive tackle
Lorenzo West and picked off by
safety Daren Hart who scooted 39
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yards for the score, accounting for
the team's only touchdown.
"I think that slapped them
Stanford in the face said line-
backer Mark Libiano. They didn't
think we were any good. That set the
tone for the entire game
In last year's Liberty Bowl ap-
pearance. Daren's twin brother David
won the award for the ECU Most Out-
standing Defensive Player. This time
it was Daren's turn to capture the
accolade.
"Me and my brother have a
motto: play your best game Daren
said. "We said that we both had to
have a good game to win. We just
went out and executed as a team. We
wanted to show the country that we
See LIBERTY page 6
Winter wonderland?
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
A few of brave students make their way by the Wright Building as the snow kept
coming on Monday. The Blizzard of -96 blanketed most of the East coast.
SG A investigation
ends, no charges filed
. . . . Tkn cl� ( .L. :J i i i � . ,
ECU police have
no evidence in
alleged break-in
Tambra Zion
Editor
ECU Police have concluded that
they can find no evidence proving
who sold a copy of mailing labels list-
ing incoming freshmen students to
the Elbo Room last June or how the
copies were obtained for sale.
Their four-month investigation,
which ended Oct. 13, found no evi-
dence to prove that a crime had been
committed by an identifiable indi-
vidual.
The sale of the copied labels
took place following an alleged break-
ing and entering of the Student Gov-
ernment Association (SCA) offices.
ECU Police Detective Mike Jor-
dan said the person who took the la-
bels did so in order to photocopy
them and not with the intent to keep
them.
"For larceny, the state says you
have to take the property with the
intent to deprive the owner of it per-
manently Jordan said. "It was re-
ported as a breaking and entering
and larceny. There was never any evi-
dence that a breaking and entering
and larceny had been committed
The labels in question were re-
quested by SCA President Ian
Eastman for the purpose of sending
an informational pamphlet to morni-
ng freshmen. The mailing was never
sent, however, due to damaged enve-
lopes. Questions arose concerning
possible misuse of the labels when a
parent of a freshman student brought
a mailing to Dean of Students Ron
Speier. The mailing contained free
passes and an invitation from Elbo
Room owner Kirby Bryson to visit his
club.
"We had questioned whether
there were things dealing with state
property. There are laws concerning
the misuse of state property Jordan
said. "We questioned whether there
was embezzlement of property re-
ceived by virtue of office and employ-
ment - it applies to employees of the
state or someone who is entrusted
See LABEL page 6
Photos by KEN CLARK
The signs says it all. The Pirates are the Liberty Bowl champs
after defeating Stanford. Below, they receive their reward.
King holiday
celebrated
Wendy Rountree
News Editor
Observers will sing, march and
make speeches in celebration of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jrs birthday on
Jan. 15 and 17.
"We are starting the week of Janu-
ary 15 with a Martin Luther King pro-
gram, which is entitled MLK Remem-
bered a tribute to the life and legacy
of Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr said
Dr. Taffye Benson-Clayton, director of
the Ledonia Wright African American
Cultural Center.
Starting at 6 p.m. there will be a
' candlelight vigil at the crest of College
Hill. Participants will hear selections
from the ECU Gospel Choir, words
from mayor of Greenville Nancy-
Jenkins or one of her representatives,
and observe a moment of silence.
Next, participants will march
across 10th Street and to Hendrix The-
ater in Mendenhall Student Center,
where the actual program will be held
at 7:30.
"That pro-
gram will include
various students
from campus
Benson-Clayton
said. "It's basi-
cally sponsored
by the Cultural
Awareness Com-
mittee from Stu-
dent Activities),
the National
Panhellenic
Council and the
Ledonia Wright
African American
Cultural Center. We will have students
representing the various sponsors in
the program
Also, the organization Allied
Blacks for Leadership and Equality
(A.B.L.E.) has been somewhat involved
with putting the program together.
Benson-Clayton, a representative
from the chancellor's office, and
Stephen Gray, who heads Student V
tivities, will offer remarks.
Rev. Kenneth R. Hammond
Then a speech will be given by the
Rev. Kenneth R. Hammond, the pas-
tor of the Union Baptist Church of
Durham. Hammond is formerly of
Greenville, and was a member on the
ECU staff in the division of student life.
Also during the program, there
will be awards handed out for student
leadership and academic achievement.
and the ECU Gos-
pel Choir will per-
form again.
"It's going to
he a great affair
m-Clayton
said. We've been
able to collabo-
rate with various
organizations on
campus to come
together in the
spirit of Dr.
King.
� in Jan 17.
Dorothy Cotton
of Ithaca. N.Y. will give a presentation
in celebration of the King holiday at
7:30 p.m. in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center. The pre-
sentation is called "Lessons from the
Past. Visions for the Future
Cotton was the only female mem-
ber ot Martin Luther King's executive
staff and has served as the vice presi-
Dorothy Cotton
Playhouse opens for spring season page 1 1
Positive despite criticism page 9
SPOBTSw
Men's basketball team triumphspage 1 7
See MLK page 6
Thursday
Sunny
High 48
Low 25
Weekend
Rain, possible snow
)
High 48
Low 26

ffyacA C teacA u&
Phone
(newsroom) 328-6366
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Fax
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The East Carolinian
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Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across Iroin o ner





2
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
January 2
Larceny - A staff member reported that a fire extinguisher had
been stolen from Jenkins Art.
Larceny � A staff member reported that a fire extinguisher had
been stolen from Scott Hall.
January 3
DWI, DWLR, Stop light violation - A student was arrested for
drivir ' while impaired, driving while license revoked, and stop light
violation. The incident occurred on Founders Drive.
Breaking and entering - The coordinator of Cotten Hall reported
a door to a room in Fleming Hall was open and had pry marks. The
residents have not been contacted. Investigation continuing.
January 4
Harassing phone calls - A student reported receiving harassing
phone calls from another student on campus.
B&E Larceny � A student reported the breaking and entering of
his room in Scott Hall. An amplifier was taken from his room.
January 5
Possession of stolen property - A student was arrested by
Greenville police for being in possession of the Career Services sign.
January 8
Larceny - A student reported that her parking decal was stolen
from her car while is was parked south of Garrett Hall.
Worthless check - Seven criminal summons and one order for
arrest were served on a student at White Hall.
Consuming a Controlled Substance - Two non-students were
banned from campus after using marijuana in a room they were visit-
ing in Tyler Hall. The residents of the room were issued campus ap-
pearance tickets for this violation.
Breaking and entering a vending machine - A student reported
that a vending machine in Jarvis Hall had been broken into and an
unknown quantity of food items taken.
January 9
B&E Larceny - A student reported that his vehicle was broken
into. His radio, CD player and coat were stolen. The door, window and
dashboard were damaged.
B&E Larceny - A student reported that his vehicle was broken
into. His CD player, equalizer and CD's were stolen. The window was
broken out of the vehicle.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin . Taken from official ECU
police reports.
Graduates urged to pursue excellence
Ceremony sends
ECU grads out
into real world
Amy Royster
Staff Writer
Excited ECU graduates filled Wil-
liams Arena on Dec. 9 for the 87th fall
commencement exercises.
As graduates paraded into the
arena behind their perspective school's
flag, they smiled and waved to friends
and relatives in the crowd. Many gradu-
ates donned special signs thanking
their parents and loved ones.
Dr. Erwin Hester, a professor of
English at ECU, gave the commence-
ment speech. Hester advised students
to strive for civility, to recognize the
value of knowledge, to pursue excel-
lence and to maintain the ideal of ser-
vitude, ECU's founding motto.
"No real thought or analysis can
take place without knowledge Hester
said.
Students responded to Hester's
speech.
Kathryn Dail who graduated with
a B. S. B. A. in Accounting said, "I
thought Dr. Hester's speech had good
advice as for the things you need in
life to succeed
The crowd benefited from the
large television screens in the arena.
Throughout the ceremony, the camera
focused on graduates and speakers.
After the ceremony, many gradu-
ates lingered taking pictures with
friends and family.
"I received a well rounded experi-
ence said Amy Sadler, an elementary
education major. "I got as much so-
cial skills as academic skills. I'll be
moving back to Howard County to find
a job teaching
Many graduates were already look-
ing toward the future.
"I'm nervous, but excited plan
to work a little bit but I will think about
graduate school said Monique Hayes,
a merchandising major.
Industrial technology graduate
Hank Norwood wore a gigantic som-
brero underneath his cap. "1 wanted
to make an effort to be different to-
day he explained. "I plan to stay in
the area and find a job. I would like to
keep in touch with alumni if I'm in the
area
Friends Nicole Laurion and Susan
Klotsko graduated with degrees in Spe-
cial Education.
"I feel relieved and accom-
plished Laurion said. "We both
worked hard and it has paid off. I have
a job at Farmville Middle School
Klotsko advised undergraduates
to "Try not to party too much. Start
being serious about school early
Gary Peterson from the School of
Business graduated with a degree in
decision science and plans to move to
New Bern.
"Be ready for college. If you are
not ready, don't come Peterson said.
Robin Mclntyre graduated Magna
Cum Lauda in Social Work.
"My education at ECU was the
tops. You can't beat the Social Work
professors Mclntyre said. Like most
graduates, when asked what she was
doing immediately after the ceremony,
she responded, "I'm going to see my
family off and then go party
Technical difficulties blamed at WZMB
WZMB workers
stay home home
for fourth day
Grace Sullivan
Staff Writer
WZMB, ECU's radio station, will
definitely be off the air tomorrow,
and it could be as late as the week-
end before the problem is fixed and
the station returns to the airwaves.
Early Saturday morning at 1
a.m WZMB lost power and was
forced to go off the air.
The station's general manager.
Jeremy Leftwich, and program direc-
tor Brad Oldham have been work-
ing since Saturday to figure out
what is causing the power shortage.
WZMB was forced to go off the
air due to the risk of burning some-
thing up at the station since the em-
ployees did not know what was caus-
ing the malfunctioning problems.
Radio employees are being
called daily and notified of the
progress being made with repairing
the tower.
"We first thought the problem
was due to the extreme bad weather,
which we thought had caused ice to
build up on the tower Leftwich
said.
The tower from which the trans-
mitter receives its power is located
on top of Tyler dormitory.
"In 1993 the same thing hap-
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pened when ice accumulated on the
tower, causing the power to be cut
to half, but we worked through it
and were able to stay on the air
Leftwich said.
Problems with ice on the tower
occur because ECU's radio towers
are not equipped with deicers.
"Radio towers in the north are
equipped with deicers on the tow-
ers: however, since we are in the
south and seldom get lots of ice our
towers are not equipped for such
extreme bad weather Leftwich
said.
Electrical engineer, Macon
Dail, was then called in to more
closely examine the transmitter to
find the real problem causing the
power outage.
It was then thought the prob-
lem lay with the antenna on the
transmitter.
Closer examination of the prob-
lem has shown it to be coming from
the cable located with the antenna
on Mendenhal.
"It seems the severe wind
caused the antenna to twist, which
caused the cable to malfunction,
and as a result, the radio waves are
not being received by the transmit-
ter Leftwich said.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 11,1995
Donors needed across state
Amy Royster
Staff Writer
There are 1,200 North Carolin-
ians waiting for organ and tissue
transplants. Students and faculty have
the opportunity to assist these people
by choosing to be organ donors.
Paige Brett, the Pitt County hos-
pital liaison for the Greenville office
of Carolina Organ Procurement
Agency, urges students to become
educated on the issue. "I just can't
stress enough, please get more infor-
mation so that you can make an in-
formed decision
"The demand for organs is two
thirds more than what we are getting.
One third of the people waiting for
organs will die before a transfer can
be made. One third will receive an
organ. The rest are waiting. There are
approximately. 40,000 people in the
United States waiting for donated or-
gans and tissues. From Jan. 1995 to
Dec. 1995.73 people in eastern North
Carolina donated their organs
Students from North Carolina
can indicate on their drivers license
whether or not they want to be a do-
nor. Other students can get a free plas-
tic license cover which indicates their
choice to donate from the North Caro-
lina Department of Motor Vehicles.
Students can also carry donor
cards in their wallets specifying the
organs they wish to donate.
When a person dies, their legal
next of kin makes the decision on
donating organs and tissues. Brett
stresses the importance of communi-
cating your personal choice to your
next of kin now. Making a decision
on organ donations following the
death of a loved one can be difficult.
"In order for a person to be an
organ donor, they must die a brain
death Brett said. "Brain death al-
lows for a recucitator to keep organs
functioning long enough for their re-
moval to be facilitated. It is often
associated with major head trauma.
"The heart, lung, liver, kidney, pan-
creas and small bowel can be do-
nated
"When death is caused by the
heart stopping, skin, bone, heart
valve, and eye donations are pos-
sible Brett said. She described that
"the amount of skin donated is the
size of a Kleenex if you puil it apart
Open casket funeral services are
still possible for organ donors. Re-
moval of most organs does not delay
the funeral proceedings.
Carolina Organ Procurement
Agency pays for the cost of surgery
related to donated organs. The
agency is a non-profit organization
funded by grants and insurance re-
imbursements.
Carolina Organ Procurement
Agency is available at 1-800-200-2672
to answer questions on organ and tis-
sue donation. They are also available
to give free educational presentations
to campus groups.
EAST
CAROLINA
COIN cV
PAWN
�jMli sl.l I i )s
VCR'S
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BUILION
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Hours
9-6 M-F
9-5 SAT
Al Transactions Stnctly Confidential
Global Transpark
calls for new school
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
A School of Engineering may
be in the future for ECU if The
Global TransPark has its way.
Late September the Global
Transpark Commission made the
recommendation that ECU begin
the program and sent it to the
President of the UNC Board of
Governors, CD. Spangler for re-
view.
Thompson Greenwood, Ex-
ecutive Director of the Global
Transpark Commission feels this
idea makes sense because of
ECU'S central location to all of
eastern North Carolina. An Engi-
neering Program at ECU would be
viewed as a big plus for compa-
nies seeking to locate here.
"I wonder how many of east-
ern North Carolina's best students
went to NCSU, received engineer-
ing degrees and stayed in that
region because of the opportu-
nities that companies locating in
the Research Triangle Park gen-
erated in the last 30 years
Greenwood said. "With the de-
velopment of the Global
Transpark in Kinston will come
higher skilled employee expecta-
tions by companies looking to re-
locate or expand in the region.
The Global TransPark favors the
idea because they are interested
in the health, wealth and mar-
ketability of the region
Chancellor Richard Eakin,
who sits on the Global
TransPark Authority Board said,
"We have a wonderful School of
Business, a first rate School of
Industry and Technology and
programs in Arts and Sciences,
all of which can be of value to
the developments of the Global
SeeGTPpage6
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Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
Violators of university codes punished
Amy Royster
Staff Writer
Last semester, most students who
visited the attorney general's office
at 262 Mendenhall were probably in
trouble. David McDaniel prosecutes
students who are in violation of ECU'S
code of conduct.
This semester. McDaniel wanted
to highlight some common misconcep-
tions students have concerning cam-
pus regulations. ECU's code of con-
duct is published in The Cue Book
and distributed to all freshman. All
students are responsible for reading
this code. McDaniel stressed that, �stu-
dents need to read and understand
policies under the code, because that
is what they will be held against"
Penalties for code violations
range from verbal warnings to expul-
sion from school.
"Many students expect a slap on
the wrist and end up being expelled
because they do not realize the sever-
ity of the consequences. This is not
high school McDaniel said.
When a student is expelled from
ECU, they cannot attend any other
school in the North Carolina system.
This is one example where McDaniel
said, "students do not fully under-
stand the consequences of their ac-
tions
Letter H in the code of conduct
forbids, "receiving stolen property
and "selling stolen property Many
students do not realize that this in-
cludes having road signs hanging in
dorm rooms. McDaniel said students
mistakenly view this as a minor of-
fense and are surprised to discover
that it can carry a penalty of one year
of probation.
Students who keep or try to sell
textbooks that they find can be pe-
nalized under code H as well. "Books
which are found on campus should
be returned to the Student Store
Karen Boyd, associate dean of stu-
dents, said.
McDaniel warned students to ask
to see registration when buying a used
bicycle. If the bike was stolen, then
the student is in trouble for receiving
stolen property.
Letter J in the code concerns, "il-
legally manufacturing, selling or pos-
sessing" drugs. Boyd said that stu-
dents may not think that obtaining a
drug for a friend is regulated under
the code. Letter J can even refer to
giving a friend a prescription drug for
which they are not authorized to use.
Both McDaniel and Boyd wanted
to clarify the misconception that ECU
police only have jurisdiction on cam-
pus. ECU police have authority on
campus as well as every road adjacent
to the campus. Fifth, 10th and
Cotanche streets are in the realm of
the campus police.
McDaniel said that most of the
more serious offenses occur in the
residence halls. McDaniel urged stu-
dents returning from downtown to
exercise common sense. Many stu-
dents are cited for having open con-
tainers of alcohol during their treks
back from the bars. The open con-
tainer rule is also a Greenville city
ordinance.
McDaniel works with more aca-
demic integrity violations at the end
of the semester when there is an in-
crease of exams. Letter S defines
cheating as "the actual giving or re-
ceiving of any unauthorized aid or
assistance, or the giving and receiv-
ing of any unfair advantage on any
form of any academic work
Letter I in the code states, "To
carry a concealed weapon or display
firearms in public areas or adjacent
thereto is prohibited by law Fire-
arms are not allowed anywhere on
ECU's campus including parked ve-
hicles. Visitors to campus must com-
ply with the code of conduct policies
as well.
Other behaviors prohibited by
the code of conduct include possess-
ing fireworks, writing bad checks to
the university, gambling and failing
to discourage or prevent transgres-
sions of the code. Students can be
charged with a string of violations.
The combination of offenses makes
the penalty even more severe.
"Everyone views this office as
not having anything to do with stu-
dents until they get in to trouble
McDaniel explained. "We are here to
educate and assist students He
stressed that his office is available to
speak to campus organizations about
campus regulations. He is also avail-
able to assist new organizations in
drawing up t teir constitutions in com-
pliance with campus rules.
"I would prefer not to have any
business. J would prefer that people
not get into trouble McDaniel said.
News
Writers
Wanted
Join us at TEC.
Call or come by
the Student
Publications
Building today.
Looking for a new
living space for 1996?
Check with the Methodist Student
Center, 501 East Fifth Street.
Call our office between
8:30-12:00 noon.
758-2030
GET
WE CAN HELP YOU DO TT
Free extra shot of expresso in all drinks!
VERYWEDN
7am
REQUES
Midnight
COFFEE- MUSIC � ART
new vegetarian lunch menu
11am til 2pm
Art Shows By Appointment
'Contact Tina or Jeff at 757-1070. or come by.
104 West 5th St, Greenville, NC 27834
OOt '9.6
Get Involved
The ECU Student Union Barefoot Committee is now accepting
applications for committee members to help plan and organize
Barefoot on the Mall next spring.
Applications are available in the Student Union Office, �
Room 236 - Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply is Friday, December 8th.
For more information, call the Student Union Office at 328-4715.
aODEv
tales You Ought To Know
Some Violations of ECU Code of Conduct
� Hanging Road Signs in
dorms rooms
�Fireworks on campus
�Buying or Selling Stolen
Textbooks
�Knowingly acting as an
accessory (includes failing to
discourage or prevent an
offense)
� Having Open Containers of
Alcohol on campus (Campus
police have jurisdiction on
every road adjacent to
campus)
�Weapons and Firearms on
campus
Penalties for
Violation
�Written reprimand
� Fine$10-$250
�Up to 75 hrs. community
service done on campus
�Expulsion (student can
NOT graduate form ECU or
any other universtiy in
UNC-system.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 11,1995
No weapons allowed on campus
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
A law made effective Dec. 1,
j95 has several ECU students won-
ting whether or not it is okay to
irry guns on campus.
New Article 54B of Chapter 14
f the General Statutes (G.S.) sets
)rth the procedures and criteria for
ie issuance of concealed handgun
ermits.
According to the Sept 1995 is-
ue of the Administration of Justice
'ulletin, "To carry a concealed hand-
i un, a person must have a permit in
is or her possession along with valid
lentification. When approached by
a law-enforcement officer the person
must disclose that he or she is carry-
ing a concealed handgun and has a
permit; when requested by an officer,
the person must display both the per-
mit and proper identification. The
permit is valid throughout the state
for four years and authorizes a per-
son to carry a concealed handgun
except in areas prohibited
The law does not permit stu-
dents to carry weapons on campus.
The law states that a person cannot
carry a concealed weapon into any
type of assembly, educational facil-
ity, a building where alcohol is con-
sumed, a state or federal office, a
parade, a funeral, financial institu-
tions, any correctional institution or
any place where signs are posted stat-
ing that you are not allowed to carry
concealed weapons.
"Students cannot have con-
cealed weapons on campus said
Karen Boyd, associate dean of stu-
dents. "A policy was passed this sum-
mer stating that any student caught
with a gun or explosive will be sus-
pended for a year. A student who is
caught with a knife that is used for
purposes other than cooking will be
suspended for a semester. The weap-
ons don't have to be concealed
Boyd believes the law will in-
crease the amount of weapons being
carried on campus.
"The law has the potential to in-
crease the amount of weapons on
campus because it gives students the
false understanding that it is okay
to carry weapons at ECU Boyd said.
Many students at ECU feel safer
knowing that students are not al-
lowed to carry weapons on campus.
They feel ECU should be a place
where their only concerns should be
academics.
"You are here to learn said
Zach Loch, a student. "You are not
here to shoot people
East Carolina University's Student Union is
Now Accepting Applications for a
Popular Entertainment
Committee Chairperson
for the 1996-1997 Term.
QUALIFICATIONS:
MINIMUM 2.25 GPA � FULL-TIME STUDENT
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO APPLY, CALL THE
STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-4715,
OR COME BY ROOM 236 MENDENHALL STUDENT
DEADLINE TO APPLY: FRIDAY, JANUARY 12,1996
Every Wednesday
c
N.C's Legendary
Rock N Roll
Nightclub
now in its
24th year in
downtown
Greenville
THURSDAY COLLEGE NITE
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
PARTY
Ladies FREE till
Pray SI 00 Bottle
$1.00 32 oz. Draft
$1.00 Membership
$1.50 Bottle Beer
$1.50 HiBalls
$1 Mm
9:30 - 10pw w
ECU ID
Thursday 11th
reggae, reggae
RoLLY GRAY
Island Drink
Specials
$'1,00
32 orv Draft
jjujphtur
ott
Sunday14th
acoustic bus
?nly S4 Adm
�. Members
purple school bus unplugged
Doors 7pm
Show 8pm
Sunday Jan. 21st
advance tix locations
Marshall Tucker Band
WSFL Listener Appreciation Concert
East Coast
music
Quicksilver
Wash Pub
Attic
Advance tickets only $10
Teresea Crocker, ECU's Police
Chief, does not feel that the law has
any impact on ECU or the commu-
nity.
"The law will not effect students
because students are still prohibited
to carry weapons on campus
Crocker said. "As for the community,
I do not feel that this law will have
any effect on crime. There has not
been a large amount of permits ac-
quired
In Pitt County no one is allowed
to get a permit without a certificate
from a handgun safety class. Pitt
County offers two such classes at Pitt
Community College and Eastern
Carolina Shooting Range.
These classes typically last be-
tween eight and 12 hours. Students
must score at least 80 percent on a
written exam and show proficiency
at the shooting range.
Crocker feels that everyone has
a right to carry a weapon but believes
before a person carries a weapon they
should be skilled on how to use it
"I believe people have a consti-
tutional right to carry a weapon
Crocker said. "A person needs to be
trained on how to carry a weapon. A
person needs to resolve in their mind
whether or not they would be will-
ing to use a weapon and not just use
it to scare people
FACT:
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Sorority builds
new look for house
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
Delta Zeta plans to close their
construction loan of $300,000,
which wiJJ allow them to completely
renovate their sorority house at the
end of this month. The house's ex-
pectant opening date is mid August
The Zeta Lambda Chapter of
Delta Zeta received their charter at
ECU in 1960 and signed for their
house three years later. The house,
located on E. Fifth Street is a his-
torical site and was closed for reno-
vation in Jan. 1995 by Delta Zeta's
National Housing Corporation.
"Our house was not con-
demned said Jill Johnson, chapter
president of Delta Zeta. "As a mat-
ter of fact, it had never been in-
spected
The house was not built to pro-
vide shelter for 22 sorority women.
Therefore, the age of the building
and safety awareness was a major
concern of Delta Zeta's national or-
ganization and a determining fac-
tor in why it was closed.
"An architect has designed
plans for a facelift of our house
Johnson said. "We .vill be getting
an alarm system, a new heating and
cooling system and added space in
the bedrooms and closets. We also
have an environmentalist team com-
ing to remove lead
Even though there will be
added space, there will not be an
increase in the amount of girls al-
lowed to maintain living quarters.
Delta Zeta does not have enough
land to permit a parking lot If any
more women were to move into the
house, a grandfather clause noted
in their original construction con-
tract would require a city code to
increase square footage to allow for
parking spaces.
"It has taken a good year to
plan the renovations Johnson
said. "And our nationals wanted to
find the best financial strategy
Last year was difficult for the
Delta Zeta sisterhood. Because
they did not have a house, Kappa
Alpha Order volunteered their
party room during formal RUSH.
"It was really difficult
Johnson said. "While all the other
sororities were giving house tours,
we showed house plans. In addi-
tion, it was very hard to justify the
amount of our dues
Fortunately, Delta Zeta re-
cently initiated 14 women, bring-
ing them to a total of 30 active
members, but leaving them behind
the campus average of 65. How-
ever, Delta Zeta is nationally the
second largest sorority on college
campuses.
"The chapter is as strong as
it's ever been, thanks to the sup-
port from Dean (Ron Speier, Laura
Sweet and fraternities, especially
KA (Kappa Alpha Johnson said.
"This experience has brought our
sisterhood closer together and
given us the chance to appreciate
each other even more. We will get
through this as quickly as possible
and go on
Delta Zeta will hold an infor-
mal RUSH during the week of Jan.
22-24 in Mendenhali Student Cen-
ter and Todd Dining HalL
INTRAMURAL SOCCER
CHAMPIONS 1995
Congratulations from ECU Recreational Services, MoJo's Sportswear and The Bicycle PostJmm MB iMsMsv-i HI

Men's Gold:Tappa Kegs
Men's Purple:F.C. Hurricanes
Men's Res Hall Purple: Pee Dee's Back
Fraternity Gold:Kappa Sigma
Fraternity Purple:Alpha Sigma Phi
Sorority:Chi Omega
Women's Gold:The Krush
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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of talented students. If you qualify, frfa, i
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effect Find out today if you qualify
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE TOO CAN TAKE.
For details, visit 346 Rcrwl Building or call
328-6967





Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
iVlJL.Iv from page 1
dent for Field Operations for the Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr. Center for Non-Vio-
lent Social Change in Atlanta, Ga.
Benson-Clayton said she hopes
that all students, including the ones
who use the cultural center, will par-
ticipate in the activities.
"We're appealing to the students
who come through the center as well
as the organizations that meet in the
center to be a part of this program
Benson-Clayton said.
GTP
from page 3
Some of the organizations that
meet in the center are A.B.L.E New
Generations and the Nubian Novel
Discussion Series.
Dr. David Dennard, associate pro-
fessor of history and chairman for the
Martin Luther King planning commit-
tee, feels that it is important for ECU
students to celebrate the holiday.
"ECU students need to play a role
in helping to create the kind of America
that we want Dennard said.
TransPark. One of our jobs is to
educate people to the strengths of
those programs and help them un-
derstand that the programs we
presently have could be of great
benefit to the Global TransPark.
"We are ideally situated to
serve the Global Transpark. With
or without an Engineering School,
ECU can be a tremendous value to
the Global Transpark development.
ECU already has programs in place
that perspective employers will be
anxious to use
Eakin also said the Commis-
sion does have the best of inten-
tions by wanting to improve the
economic conditions of eastern
North Carolina and that the pro-
posal is friendly to ECU.
"Both are commendable quali-
ties, however the need for careful
examination of the notion still ex-
ists and needs to be examined in
an academic context
Greenwood said the commis-
sion is still very much for the idea
of a School of Engineering at ECU.
"There isn't a covert or overt
plan here. The "how" comes out of
the energy that gets generated
when people of vision realize they
need to be part of a good opportu-
nity. People with vision are those
kinds of people who see beyond a
system into the future
Emergency
Blood Drive
Tuesday, January 16
from noon-op. m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center
�The American Red
Cross has declared a
nationwide blood
emergency to help
snowbound residents of
the Northeast.
LAIS Jl1 from page 1
A check of the three sets of la-
bels made by the university revealed
that the SGA set had been copied.
"The labels, when SGA Secre-
tary Angela Nix picked them up,
were in one continuous sheet Jor-
dan said. "When the investigation
started, they had been pulled apart"
In a June 21 TEC article, Speier
said the labels used in the mailing
were taken from Eastman's office.
Eastman told Speier someone must
have broken into his office. ECU po-
lice were then called to begin their
investigation of the break-in.
Eastman and SGA Vice President
Dale Emery denied any involvement
with the incident to police.
ECU police questioned whether
a break-in had occurred after foot-
prints were found on the wall of
Eastman's office, where the labels
were stored. The investigation iden-
tified the footprints as Emery's. Em-
ery admitted climbing through the
ceiling to gain entrance to Eastman's
office to obtain a tape recorder and
scissors in the early morning of June
10.
Emery had gained admittance to
Mendenhall Student Center (MSC)
using Eastman's key which he picked
up at the home of Heath Truelove, a
non-student, the day before. He re-
ported that the key was left there for
him by Eastman.
According to the key agreement
which a student should sign when
receiving a key to MSC, "Prior to en-
tering and upon leaving the Student
Organization Office Wing during
Mendenhall Student Center non-op-
erating hours, the President must
notify the Office of Campus Police
no persons shall be admitted or
remain in the Student Organization
Office when the president is not
present. (Exception: ECU Transit
Manager)
The keys are non-transferable
and the agreement states that proper
conduct should be observed while in
MSC. At the time of the alleged
breaking and entering, neither
Eastman or Emery had signed key
agreements.
The question of who had access
to keys for the building and the SGA
offices caused some concern, said
Betty Hardee, associate director of
operations for MSC.
"In the past the keys were just
handed down when someone new
took office Eastman said. He has
since signed an agreement.
Eastman reported loaning his
keys to Emery on June 6 or 7. Em-
ery placed the keys in a box in the
hallway when he left, Eastman told
police. Emery told police that he had
borrowed the keys on June 7, and
returned them (to the box) at 8:30
a.m. June 8.
"Anybody in Greenville could
have walked into that office Jor-
dan said. "There was never any evi-
dence to tie it to one person. You
couldn't find someone to say who
did it. Without proof, there is no
charge
When police interviewed Elbo
Owner Kirby Bryson, he said he was
approached by an unknown male on
June 8. The male offered Bryson a
list of labels which Bryson pur-
chased for $300. An Elbo employee
later said the male's name was
Heath and he was riding a purple
bike. Police questioned Heath True-
love, the person with whom
Eastman left his keys for Emery, but
he denied any involvement in sell-
ing the list to the Elbo Room. True-
love was unavailable for comment.
According to police reports, in
a June 12 interview. Eastman denied
knowing Heath Truelove. Ten days
later, reports indicate that Eastman
told police that he has known True-
love for a few years.
Eastman told TEC that he did
not recall denying his friendship
with Truelove.
Police closed the investigation
in late June. It was reopened wher)
a bartender from the Elbo Room wai
interviewed, but later refused to co�
operate.
While the police found no evi-
dence to support filing criminaf-
charges, Speier said the labels were
only for university purposes.
"We told those who got thje
mailing lists that it could only bje
used for certain activities Speier
said.
Attorney General David
McDaniel said the university does
not plan to pursue any disciplinary
action at this time.
-
LIBERTY fr.�
pagel
do play defense at ECU
David had an interception of his
own, as well as nine tackles. Daren
was second on the team in tackles
with 11.
Daren's touchdown put the Pi-
rates ahead and they would never re-
linquish the lead. Stanford's offense,
which lead the Pac-10 with an aver-
age 30.1 points per game, scored only
one TD.
"Their defense stepped up and
played what we thought was an out-
standing performance said Stanford
Head Coach and Kinston native
Tyrone Willingham. "Their defense
stymied us just enough that we
couldn't get our offense on track.
That was the difference in the ball
game
Seniors Mark Libiano and
Morris Foreman went out in style in
the last game of their collegiate foot-
ball career, leading the team by ex-
ample- by each getting a QB sack
and churning out hit after hit.
"They thought that they were
going to slap us around a little bit
Libiano said. "The impression that 1
got was that we weren't hitting, and
that turned the tables today Libiano
finished the day with nine tackles.
Defensive coordinator Paul Jette
stuck with his theme of "bringing the
heat" and putting pressure on the
quarterback. It is a formula that has
worked all season, and worked again
against the slower Cardinal.
"I think Coach Jette did a great
job today, he's been doing a great job
all year Foreman said.
Foreman lead the team in tack-
les with 12, but contributed on the
offensive side of the ball as well, tak-
ing the snap on a fake punt and run-
ning 23 yards to the Stanford 30 for
a key first down. "Mo-Fo" who faked
a pitch to punter Matt Levine on the
fourth-and-one play, was an option
quarterback in highschool.
Freshman nose guard Travis
Darden had a flashback to his run-
ning back days when he scooped up
a fumble and rambled seven yards.
"The guys were telling me I
looked pretty slow Darden said. "I
think my running back days are
over
Speaking of running backs,
Jerris McPiiail turned in a solid per-
formance at fullback for the Pirates,
and could be considered the unsung
hero of the game. McPhail carried the
ball 27 times for 92 yards, including
an 18-yard screen play.
Despite a mediocr 19-46 pass-
ing by Marcus Crandell. the offense
moved the ball well outside the red
zone, tallying 218 yards in the air.
"Stanford had a great game-plan
ready in the red zone Logan said.
"They out-executed us in the red
zone
Mitchell Galloway lead the Pirate
receiving corps with four catches for
70 yards, followed by tight end Scott
Richards, who had five snags for 59
yards.
The Player-of-the-Game Award
went to Stanford's Kwame Ellis, who
was a thorn in the side of the Pirates
all day long. Ellis returned a blocked
Matt Levine punt for a touchdown,
blocked a Chad Holcomb field goal,
had three pass break-ups and an in-
terception.
Ellis' performance was not
enough to overcome the intangible
of the 37th annual Liberty Bowl Fooj
ball Classic. The Pirates showed m
in Memphis focused and intent oo
winning this game. There was a monj
key on their back from last year's M-
feat and it took 365 days to get it ol
The bottom line is ECU was
against much more than the Stanford
Cardinal. j
"We came here to win the game
Lorenzo West said. "Not to party, nti
to see the events and the sights otto
here; we came here to win the game.
ECU is playing for respect
��
The Cultural Awareness Committee
The National Pan-hellenic Council
and
The Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center
Presents
MLK
�Sj
REMEMBERED
A Celebration of the life, work and acheivement of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Monday, January 15,1996
CANDLELIGHT VIGIL AND MARCH
THE CREST OF COLLEGE HILL
6pm (Processional to Hendrix Theatre)
MLK CELEBRATION PROGRAM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
7:30pm
featuring guest speaker
KEN HAMMOND and The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
Reception immediately Following program in the Mendenhall Multipurpose Roon

Wednesday, January 17,1996 at 7:30pm
Dorothy E Cotton
Speaking
Great Room
Sponsored by the MLK committee





iimi�miiir
J7
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
1&&MC4,
PRIMAT1V. MAN
BY Karl Trolenberq
CARTOONIST
MEETING
When? Jan: 18
Time? 6:00pm
Where? East
Carolinian
It'll be short and
to the point so try to be
there. Any questions
call me, Paul.
fUAT &&$
COfAH
met A
SPARE TIME
BY ANDYFARKAS
'OW H�Re'5 A S� tlfrit 4itl
WHAT P� Y�"� aofflit t�H9 M NM
LAKE IMP U.S.A
BY JOHN MURPHY
OFF THE PAGE
MOg I ��- STUPID-
tern, umt
'wpreet to
.Iiu.i4E.Ds?
lanrdtimv
Moe, i'n rucAtci. i should
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WfcH WUA OR
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feJ mtef WfTH THIS CLIVE
iS.jei 4CTU4CL.V 4SUTP
BY Trevor VanMeter
16M DOUG'S WOUvJ
INFANTICIDE
OK AUtaQyfrHT
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xs)�oRt.y AFTER
RAPED HER
By Dustin Massey
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5. God of love
7. Flaw
8. Opponent
10. Wicked
11. Withstood
13. Murdered
14. Strategem
17. Correct
19. Threesome
21. Tendency
22. Passionate
23. Requested
24. Furtiveness
CLUES DOWN
2. Exceptional
3. Destroy
4. Resounded
5. Woolen jacket
6. Turn
7. First meal of day
9. Absurd
12. Humiliated
15. Commotion
16. Wanders
18. Office worker
20. Additional
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8
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian

RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Help
11 Wanted
Gumby's
Drfvers Wanted
�:�� $100 Pi'i Ni(ih
TP A Help
�I ill lXinf
AZALEA GARCCNS
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
� I .irH nc v f (1 J
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
TOWNHOUSE 2 BEDROOM 1 12
BATH. 2 blocks from campus. $475 per
month. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234
HOUSES FOR RENT NEAR campus.
$450.00-5550.00. Call Cindy. Pro Manage-
ment of Greenville. 756-1234
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED TO
share duplex apartment Fully furnished
except beds. Close to campus. Share rent,
utilities, cable, and telephone bills. Call
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-v
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
opjmm

Our View
Is ECU left out or
are we just
paranoid? It's
high time we got
some recognition
for a winning
team that
continues to
succeed.
What have ve got to do? I'm sure that has crossed the minds of
many Pirates near and far concerning ECU's absence in this year's
final top 25 poll by the Associated Press. From someone who has
seen just about everything in sports, it even baffles yours truly.
Okay, let's review ECU goes 8-3 for the regular season de-
spite a suicide September schedule, which included Tennessee, West
Virginia, Illinois and Syracuse. Then the Bucs made their second
consecutive trip to the Liberty Bowl as Alliance champions. Hey
that's not all. Not only did they return to Memphis, but they avenged
last year's Liberty Bowl defeat by stopping PAC-10 member Stanford
19-13. If you ask me that shows class, character, and yes, qualities
of a top 25 team.
This lack of recognition is nothing new to the Pirates. After a
solid win in the Carrier Dome against the Syracuse Orangemen
(top 25 on that game day), many felt that ECU deserved a spot in
the nation's elite. Once again - nothing. Despite the fact that the
Bucs finished the season on a six game win streak (including the
bowl game) and going unbeaten at home, there was still no purple
and gold in the polls.
Folks I'm here to tell you - Buc up. ECU is still the Liberty
Bowl Champions, they're still 9-3 and ECU still has the best record
in North Carolina. The AP pollsters can't say any differently. This
incredible oversight should not dim the accomplishments made by
Head Coach Steve Logan's program the last few years.
Hey, I'm a positive thinker. The most important aspect of this
season is not that ECU didn't get recognized in the AP top 25. Oh
no. The most important aspect this season for the Pirates was that
every primary goal was set and met by Steve Logan's team. They
wanted back to back winning seasons got it They wanted to get
back to the Liberty Bowl to have an opportunity to finish the "un-
finished business did it The Bucs, if given the opportunity, wanted
to finish "the unfinished business finished it
Just because that chapter of ECU football goes down in the
books as "Liberty Bowl Champs" doesn't mean the book Steve
Logan is writing with the Pirate football program is completed. Oh
no.
This ride that we call Pirate football has just gotten started.
First of all, by accomplishing the feats listed above Logan is build-
ing something special at East Carolina, a consistent winning foot-
ball program. Notice I didn't say "team but program. Great teams
that stay great come from great programs. You see. a winning team
could possibly last no longer than one season with the right amount
of seniors. The difference is a great program will either improve on
the last season or stay the same, give or take one or two games.
Now out of all the starters on this Liberty Bowl championship
team there are only seven starters that will bid farewell to Greenville.
Two on offense and five on defense. To say the least Logan's cup-
board is everything, but bare. Along with a promising recruiting
season ahead and a ESPN television contract, I will have to agree
with Logan when he says ECU has a "healthy football program
So rest easy Pirate fans, and join me in giving Logan and his
troops a hardy BRAVO on a job well done.
With all of this talk of the AP poll and building a successful
football program, we're all forgetting the USA TodayCfiii coaches
poll. In that poll ECU is ranked 23rd and the Bucs ranked 13th in
the New York Times poll. If simple math doesn't fail me, I believe
that's in the top 25.
Letters to the Editor
m
The East Carolinian
?m
' �
��
Zion, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
i Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Ross, Sports Editor
Crakj Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagweod, Staff Illustrator
Gristle Farley, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer Production Assistant
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Stephanie Lassfter, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
It could have been free
To the editor,
I have a few comments about the
two ads in he December 7 issue of
The East Carolinian regarding Paul
Hagwood's comic strip If Pigs Could
Fly. In order to save space, I'm just
going to list the many problems I see
with the ads and use Ian Eastman as
a simple point of reference since his
name is at the top of the list in the
full page ad.
1.) A full page ad in TEC costs
$350. Did Eastman pay for both ads
out of his own pocket, and if he did
not, then who paid for it? If he used
SGA funds, why did Eastman feel com-
pelled to spend SGA money to express
an opinion which could have been
published at no cost in a letter to the
editor? If I'm not mistaken, SGA funds
come directly from student fees. Stu-
dents who don't agree with Eastman's
views are unfairly and inaccurately
represented by the ad, but their
money has been confiscated to pay
for it nontheless. If Eastman was
afraid that taking out an expensive
ad was the only way he could make
his dissenting voice heard, I don't
understand why. I've seen plenty of
letters which complained about vari-
ous articles in the past not to men-
tion that TEC could easily have cho-
sen not to publish the ads, but they
did.
2.) Eastman's lack of basic gram-
mar, spelling and punctuation rules
which he displays in the ads is far
more damaging to out university than
Paul Haigwood's strip. For example,
Eastman writes that "We at the STU-
DENT GOVERNMENT ORGANIZA-
TION are appalled and embarrassed
at the ETHICAL and MORAL BEHAV-
IOR of the EDITOR, NEWS EDITOR,
Angela Raper
Guest columnist
and the WRITER of the COMiC
Caps as they appear in original This
means that TEC has acted in a way
that is morally and ethically correct,
and Eastman is "appalled" by (not
"at") it If he wants to castigate TEC,
then he should call it "unethical" and
"immoral" behavior. Indeed these ads
are so incredibly rife with error that
if one of my students turned in a pa-
per that looked like this, they would
be lucky to get a C.
3.) "Satire" is defined as "a liter-
ary work holding up human vices and
follies to ridicule or scorn Obviously
Eastman has given the strip a shal-
low, facile reading without recogniz-
ing the qualities inherent in its genre.
Taboo subjects have always been fod-
der for comedians; Shakespeare's Ri-
chard III jokes about committing
murder, and Falstaff gives and receives
blunt quips about his obesity. Using
laughter as a weapon against our
greatest fears and problems is just one
way of dealing with them.
4.) Eastman is so upset about the
date rape issue, but he completely
ignores the joke about the Christian
gun shop in the same strip. Does this
mean that he is offended when date
rape is made fun of, but not when
Christianity is made fun of? Hmmm
5.) I wonder if date rape is the
real issue here, or is it the focus of
the date rape joke on zombie frat
boys? If Eastman is a member of a
fraternity, he may be letting his loy-
alty to his brothers color his opinions
to the point of being unfairly biased.
Deserve it or not, frat boys have a
heavy reputation for drinking, vio-
lence and instance of date rape. The
half-page ad corroborates this when
it states, "no fraternity member at
ECU has been convicted of sexual
assault since before 1990. This is due
to extensive Date Rape education
throughout the Greek system
6.) The implications is that there
were convictions prior to 1990, which
is only 5 years ago.
7.) Just because no Greek has
been convicted of sexual assault since
1990 doesn't mean it hasn't hap-
pened. It could have been urireported,
or a conviction may not have occurred
in a case that was reported.
8.) The fact that extensive date
rape education was enacted through-
out the Greek system implies that
there was a need for extensive date
rape education throughout the Greek
system. All of this points to the fact
that Eastman seems not so much up-
set about the. date rape joke itself but
the emphasis on the zombie frat boys
who want to commit rape in the strip.
My final comment to Eastman is
simply this: Lighten up� it's just a
joke. If you can't stand the heat, then
get out of the frat
The Grinch no more
To the Editor,
Congratulations to the East
Carolina University Pirates football
team, coaches, and fans. The Liberty
Bowl victory serves as an outstand-
ing achievement and is a forebear of
even greater things in all realms of
ECU to come. It is important to re-
member that along with accomplish-
ments such as this comes greater
exposure and notoriety for the en-
tire university. Our athletic depart-
ment is a highly visible example na-
tionwide of the quality programs,
Way to go
both academic and athletic, that ECU
prides itself on.
The predominant theme cur-
rently being exhibited and promoted
at ECU is success through leadership.
This prevailing spirit is leading us to
become one of the most premiere in-
stitutions in the country. It is mo-
mentous that we are finally receiv-
ing much well deserved praise and
acclaim. All levels of administration
have worked together to propel our
university to this level and anticipate
the needs for the next millennium. It
is imperative to recognize that ECU's
continued achievement and welfare
is pursuant upon the involvement of
everyone in the university commu-
nity. Only together can we as elected
officials, faculty, staff, students, and
citizens of the Ninth District ensure
that the opportunity remains for us
to enjoy all the university affords us.
As was proven in Memphis and many
times before, good things happen
when we work together to take care
of "unfinished business
Senator Ed Warren
To the Editor,
For the past couple of years,
loyal Pirate fans have had to endure
a seemingly never-ending bombard-
ment of criticism. This letter is from
one of "the few, the proud, the true
pirate fans We demand and de-
serve more respect than we are
given. We are tired of the constant
"put-downs" from the likes of Chip
. Alexander, the Stanford Band and
even our own athletic program.
There are some of us who are proud
to say we are from the "51st State
- the forgotten state" as the
Stanford Band proclaimed us. The
following points need to be taken
into consideration before speaking
Give us credit
of ECU fans:
There are some of us who are
loyal to the program even through
the bad years. There are some of us
who go to every home game and stay
until the last play is completed.
There are some of us who endured
the 1315 hour car ride or 1822
hour bus rides to the 1994 Liberty
Bowl game only to sit in the rain
and witness the Pirates being shut
out by the Illini. There are some of
us who returned to Memphis AGAIN
this year to watch as our offense
crumbled and our defense emerged
victorious. There are some of us who
are proud to say that we had our
"fannies" in the stands when it was
raining and "sleeting sideways" dur-
ing the 1995 Liberty Bowl game.
ECU has a very loyal following
of fans that has been proven in the
purple pride evident in Memphis for
the past two years. We are the ones
who can say "We came but we left
with unfinished business in 1994.
We returned AGAIN this year to see
it finished. WE WERE THERE The
Pirate football team deserves con-
gratulations for the last 2 winning
seasons and the Liberty Bowl vic-
tory, but the fans also deserve rec-
ognition for the support they have
shown.
E.H. Cox
Graduate Student
In December of 1994, Newsweek
magazine graced its cover with the
soon to be appointed new Speaker of
the House of Representatives, Newt
Gingrich, clad in a little red and white
Santa suit. The title read "The
Gingrich Who Stole Christmas The
feature article went on to praise him
for succeeding to spearhead a move-
ment that achieved what no other had
done in the past 40 years, land a Re-
publican majority in Congress. He
blasted Democrats, began drafting a
contract with America, and wrote a
book. Newt was at front center stage
in Washington's political theater.
The dawn of a new year has come
upon us. We still find ourselves play-
ing witness to the same soloist we did
a year ago. Now the Democrats have
smiles bigger than Cindy Lou Who
herself. Why, you might ask, are the
Democrats happy that the limelight
still rests on the Republican with a
heart three sizes too small? Because
he'll be their poster whipping boy
come next fall. The Republican ma-
jority will no longer have a place at
the table and it will be the Democrats
playing likeness to the part of the
Whos enjoying the roast beast in that
Doctor Seuss fable.
All children's literature references
aside, the above stands to go from
speculation to fact next November.
The Democrats are poised to use him
as their whipping boy next fali just as
he used them and their tax and spend
policies in the fall of '94.
According to Clinton's campaign
strategist James Carville, "He'll be
featured in more Democratic ads than
Republican ones
The question is how did this come
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
to be? In the past year, he has gone
from GOP messiah to congressional
crybaby.
Let's look back a year ago: Ameri-
can sentiment was that Welfare, Medi-
care and other forms of transfer pay-
ments were sucking hardworking
American taxpayers dry. We were tired
of seeing that the debt was not being
addressed and we were angry. We
were presented with the notion that
we finally had a government that was
not afraid to hold itself accountable
for its faults and admit that the buck
stops here. At last a government that
stood up for the taxpayers. The no-
tions were noble and it allowed Re-
publicans to pull an awful lot of Demo-
cratic blue collar votes. All was well
in GOP land.
The problems began when
Gingrich wouldn't leave even the good
stuff alone. He attacked college loans.
The changes were not to curb defaults
or raise requirement standards. In-
stead, he went after more foolish
things such as raising interest rates,
abolishing post graduation grace pe-
riods and general lump sum cuts. This
has turned the sentiments of an aw-
ful lot of young educated people
against him and his followers.
The people who are at risk of los-
ing their benefits and allowances due
to the reform are now accusing the
Republicans of trying to starve inno-
cent defenseless children and throw the
elderly out of hospital beds and into
the streets.
All this set the stage for the re- .
turn trip from Israel and Yitzak Rabin's
funeral. Gingrich complained that he
was snubbed by Clinton and thus re-
ceived the political black eye on being
labeled as a crybaby. This has left him
gun-shy. It's hard to back a visionary
who is afraid to speak his mind.
Gingrich was great as a minority
whip. 1 saw him give a speech at Old
Dominion University in the fall of '92.
He riled support and public sentiment
for his party when it mattered most
after they had lost the presidency and
needed a little face saving. The prob-
lem is that he could not turn the cor-
ner and stay on top. When making the
transition between Minority Whip to
Speaker, of the House, you cease to
point out injustice or wrongdoing,
you're in charge so you show how you
have and will fee the problems and not
just blame the other side.
He operates best in a system
where chaos reigns supreme which is
great when you are trying to win con-
trol, but that just isn'tffective when
you already have it
My prediction is that at this time
next year The Gingrich will not be abU
to touch the role of Speaker with a 3
12 foot poll.
Do you have an opinion? It so let's hear it. TEC
is seeking opinion writers. Apply today.
�� t
�i � �' - �
"SaSs





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-i - �





11
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
LIF&We
APJ2P
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
So 1995 is over at last It
was a decrepit old year, all wrin-
kly and liver-spotted before it
ever left the starting gate last
January. I don't know why ex-
actly, but I really just found the
whole thing kind of tiresome.
Maybe it was that whole
mid-decade thing. The '90s
aren't the shiny new decade
they were five years ago. All the
anticipation we tend to feel at
the beginning of a new decade,
the hope for the winds of
change to come blowing
through our dreary lives, is
gone.
I mean, let's face it. Any
hope we had for a good ten
years is shot all to hell by now.
The '90s have defined them-
selves just like the 70s and '80s
before them, and they've turned
out every bit as boring and
cheesy as our wildest night-
mares. The '90s, it seems, are
the Apathy Decade.
Nobody really seems to
care about anything. At least
the '70s and '80s were defined
by hedonism and rampant
greed. The '90s can't even seem
to muster up any self-interest
Bad as that is, it would at least
be more interesting than the
wasteland of a decade we've
given ourselves so far.
The signs of apathy are ev-
erywhere. In the drug culture,
cocaine is out, heroin is in. As
annoying as coke heads are,
with their "I-can-conquer-the-
world-even-though-I'm-a-pa-
thetic-addict" rants, at least
they're manic enough to be
funny. Smack addicts tend to
just sit and drool, occasionally
babbling something incoherent
and frightening. There's noth-
ing more boring than a smack
head, but it's the drug of choice
for the apathetic.
Even our music is racked
with apathy. Can't come up
with a cool new musicai trend
to replace grunge in the wake
of the Cobain suicide? Ah, just
rip off some lame-ass '70s gui-
tar riffs. And while you're at it,
snatch up some fashion too, so
the kids can dress like 'their
parents. Who cares?
We can't even come up
with decent fanatics this de-
cade! Social watchdog groups
like the Moral Majority and the
PMRC have either lost interest
in their crusades (apathetic fa-
natics?) or lost their political
teeth. David Koresh was fun
news for a little while, but he
was no Jim Jones. The
Menendez Brothers? Give me a
break! Charlie Manson would
have them for lunch! OJ? Bah!
Could we have a more uninter-
esting murderer? Damn it, 1
want a fruitcake!
Of course, I guess the
coming turn of the millennium
could also have a lot to do with
our apathy. The decade has
ceased to amuse us and the cen-
tury is on its last, wheezing
legs. We're tired of the 20th
century, with its excess of in-
vention, gleaming technology,
engineered diseases and mass
war death. We want a new cen-
tury, a baby-bottom-smooth
slate of history, to write our sto-
ries on.
Considering what we've
done with our decades, though,
1 shudder to think of the future.
ECU
PLAY
UPCOMING
EVENTS
FOR
'sk
Looking forward
to a busy season
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
For many ECU students, the be-
ginning of the spring semester does not
mean fun and frolic. Granted, there are
some who find fun and frolic no matter
what the season, but for most the spring
semester means hard work with little
or no rest "for the wicked
To break the monotony, the East
Carolina Play-
Feb 813
"Dark of the Moon"
March 28-April 2
"Tartuffe"
April 18-23
East Carolina Dance
Theater
house offers the
second half of its
1995-96 season.
Already this year
the Greenville
community was
treated to "Destry
Rides Again a
musical comedy-
western, and
"Someone Who'll
Watch Over Me a
dramatic comedy.
Both plays were well received by the
co.nmunity, no surprise to those who
have seen the Playhouse in action in
the past
Anyone who enjoyed last year's pro-
duction of "Blood Wedding" is in for a
treat this year with "Dark of the Moon
Also directed by John Shearin, "Dark
of the Moon" is a bewitching folktale
set in the Appalachian Mountains, which
makes the story very close to our Caro-
lina heritage. It is the story of John, a
witch-boy who falls in love with a girl of
the village named Barbara Allen. John
asks Conjur Woman to make him a hu-
man man so that he can properly "woo"
Barbara. This she does, with one condi-
tion: Barbara must be faithful to John
for one full year.
CD. Reviews
Off-campus students
live with regulations
"Dark of the Moon" began rehears-
als earlier this month, and will be per-
formed Feb 8-13.
Next in the season is a production
of Moliere's famous comedy "Tartuffe
Moliere has been called "The French
Shakespeare and for good reason. This
wacky comedy is a rival to the best of
Shakespeare's mistaken-identity plays.
In "Tartuffe however, it is-not mistaken
identity but mistaken intentions that
provides the humor. Tartuffe is a cler-
gyman, as honest
and humble as
the day is long -
or so everyone
thinks. The true
hilarity of the situ-
ation unravels as
we watch Tartuffe
go from house-
hold advisor to
"Lord of the
Manor" despite
the protests of
those whom he
replaces.
"Tartuffe" will be performed March
28 - April 2.
To close the season, the Playhouse
will present the East Carolina Dance
Theater. This show combines all types
of dance, from ballet to modern, and
showcases the best dancers ECU has to
offer. All choreography is the original
work of the faculty. This is the major
production of the dance department and
is a must see for all arts enthusiasts.
The East Carolina Dance Theater
will be performed April 18-23.
There are a few changes in the mak-
ing for the ECU Playhouse which should
See PLAY page 14
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
As winter's bitter chill bears
down on the entire
eastern seaboard,
many students are
found reevaluating
their current living
situation. Heat
problems, dis-
gruntled room-
mates and inflated
winter electricity
bills are but a few
obstacles standing
in the way of a suit-
able living and
learning environ-
ment But look be-
fore you leap. Don't
jump out of a cur-
rently awkward liv-
ing arrangement
and land in a worse
situation.
Students liv-
ing off-campus
must be aware of
the Tar River
Neighborhood As-
sociation (TRNA).
The TRNA is a
group whose pur-
pose is "to protect
the quality of life in residential neigh-
borhoods The area of specificinter-
est to the TRNA is the R6 (historic
district) and R6N zone. The neighbor-
hood between 3rd Street and 5th
Street is zoned R6 and the rest of the
neighborhood between 3rd Street and
the Tar River is zoned R6N; both are
residential zones. In the R6 zone,
single family, duplex and multifamily
dwellings are all that is permitted. The
R6N zoning district is the same as the
R6, but it limits the amount of multi-
Group Home
LMn' Proof
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
family dwellings and duplexes to 14
percent.
"Greenville's zoning ordinances
are designed to protect the quiet na-
ture of residential neighborhoods and
"Our newsletter is delivered to 625
addresses we keep track of zoning
violations
There are several Greenville zon-
ing ordinances the TRNA publishes
I kept grinding this lump of coal
between my super-powered hands hop-
ing I would find a diamond. From the
"Intro with its slowed down acoustic
rhythm (taken from what sounds like
the Beatles' "Yesterday"), my expecta-
tions were high for this debut record
from Group Home. I knew fhat the
group was connected to GangStarr, for
whom I have much respect However,
no diamond was to be found. Only one
track, "Supa Star saved Livin'Proof
from going straight into the dumper.
Group Home, made up of two
young men, Lil Dap and Melachi the
Nutcracker, got their start back in '84
when Lil Dap spent his afternoons
breakdancing and rapping with his
high school buddy Jeru (later Jeru the
Damaja). From this connection, Lil Dap
was able to make an appearance on
GangStarr's second album, Daily Op-
eration, on the track, "I'm the Man
Melachi and Lil Dap met when
GangStarr was in the studio making
Hard to Earn, where each performed
on "Words from the Nutcracker" and
"Speak Ya Clout" respectively.
Because of this association, it
comes as no surprise that GangStarr's
DJ Premier produced this album and
that Guru makes a guest appearance
on the track "Serious Rap Shit" But
even the influence of these two es-
teemed rap artists couldn't save this
record from mediocrity.
What makes this record so bad?
Well, first the beats. Although those
that Group Home and DJ Premier have
laid down for this record come off well
at the beginning of each track, as an
individual track progresses there is no
variation and each one becomes excru-
ciatingly repetitive. The only exception
is "Supa Star where a little singing
and a bridge between raps goes a long
way towards making these guys into
potential "supa stars" themselves. It's
no wonder that this track is their first
single. I only wonder if the rest of the
album was built around it
The record also isn't helped by the
fact that Lil Dap just can't rap. Melachi
has to carry most of the album and
unfortunately he's not up to the task.
For an example of this, check out "Se-
rious Rap Shit" When Guru busts in
on guest vocals, he immediately takes
control away from Group Home and
reminds the listener of how good rap
can be. But even Guru is hamstrung
by the dullness of the incessant beat
Graphic courtesy Tar River Neighborhood Association
This map shows the Historic District (light shading w outline), and the
R6N zone (dark shading), where extra housing restrictions are in place.
prevent the development of blight and
slum conditions according to a
TRNA newsletter. The TRNA has been
criticized as biased against the over-
whelming percentage of students who
live in their neighborhood.
"Anyone who has an interest in
the neighborhood can become a mem-
ber of the TRNA stated Frank
Wartman, TRNA Board member in a
recent phone interview. However,
Wartman also stated that he is unsure
if any students are currently members.
in their newsletters. One in particu-
lar is the ordinance which states, "no
more than three unrelated individu-
als may reside in a single family dwell-
ing" The TRNA newsletter examined
by TEC states: "Frequently, rental
property in our neighborhood is oc-
cupied by more than three unrelated
students If you have any reason to
believe this situation exists in part of
your neighborhood, please call the
See TRNA page 15
The Army of the Twelve
Monkeys invades theaters
Mark Brett
Ufes Editor
Terry Gilliam's new film, Twelve
Monkeys, presents an unusual challenge
for re jwers. It's a brilliant and com-
plex film, but if I give away too much of
the plot I'll ruin part of what makes it
so good. But I think I can pull it off
Twelve Monkeys is great filmmak-
ing. For my money, Terry Giiliam is.
among the best directors working to-
day, and this film is up to his usual high
standards. If you liked his previous work
(Brazil, The Fisher King, etc), you'll
probably like this.
All the Giiliam trademarks are here.
Brutal reality is juxtaposed with bizarre
surreality. The attention to detail is
nearly insane, threatening to overwhelm
the audience just from the sheer amount
of stuff on the screen. Surprising per-
formances are turned in from unusual
actors. Movie cliches are turned on their
ears. And, finally, the film explores two
of Gilliam's favorite themes: the nature
of reality and what it means to be sane.
The film stars Bruce Willis as James
Photo Courtesy of Universal Pictures
James Cole (Bruce Willis) searches for evidence of the Army
of the 12 Monkeys, who bring about the fall of mankind.
Cole, a man from the future bent on
saving the human race from the ravages
of a deadly virus that he knows will wipe
out 5 billion people at the end of 1996.
Willis' performance is stunning; leave
whatever preconceptions you have
about the man at the door. His charac-
ter is complex (uneducated but intelli-
gent childlike but horribly violent), but
Willis handles the apparent contradic-
See 12 page H
TiriEJ Pd JT
File Photo
Uh Well, it was the mid80s, see, and well, everybody dressed like this Oh,
hell. Is it just me, or do these guys look like they belong in three entirely different
bands? And why are they holding up a bartender? Ah, the wonders of the past
� ii � "





Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
The cinematic year has been a
lackluster one. In my four years writ-
ing this list for the paper I have yet to
experience a year without a perfect film
until now. Schindler's List, The Pi-
ano, Quiz Show and Unforgiven have
all earned 10s on my rating scale. The
best Hollywood could muster up this
year is four nines and even those were
not very solid ratings. My rating Pulp
Fiction with a nine last year was one
made with the certainty that the film
would withstand the scrutiny of time.
Hardly one film in '95 seemed to have
the resonance for its story to be heard
for years to come.
Below I have listed the top 10
films of the year followed by an award
system that lists some other films that
deserve mention, although usually not
in a positive sense. Films that have not
opened in Greenville have not been
included, which excludes many films
that otherwise might have made the
list: Leaving Las Vegas, To Die For,
The Brothers McMullen, Persuasion
and Crumb. Luckily we had a few
quirks in the cinematic world of
Greenville: Babe, a film that did not
open here initially, wound up at The
Park after it had left most other the-
aters across the country, and Sense
and Sensibility, which has yet to open
here, was shown as a sneak preview
on campus (thank you Student Union
Film Committee!)
Without further ado, 1 give you
my list of films for '95 (The rating 1
gave the film is in parentheses).
1. Dead Presidents - The Hughes
brothers directed the best film of the
year. No sophomore slump for the
makers of Menace II Society. The
brothers crafted a gritty, realistic por-
trayal of a life in decline. Their straight-
forward storytelling provided powerful
dramatic tension. The heist at the end
of the film, the showcase of the pic-
ture, was filmed to perfection. One of
the rare films that actually got better
as it unfolded, reaching a believable but
sobering climax. (9)
2. Seven � I would have never
thought Alien 3 director David Fincher
had a film like Seven in his future. This
seemingly cliched story of two homi-
cide detectives, one just beginning, one
on the verge of retirement, looked like
no other film I have ever seen. T.�e
story of a psychopathic killer who
chooses his victims to exemplify one
of the seven deadly sins takes place in
a dark, foreboding city where it always
rains. Morgan Freeman gave the per-
formance of the year as the veteran
cop: Brad Pitt gained renewed respect-
ability as the rookie and Kevin Spacer
proved again that he is one of the best
supporting actors in Hollywood today.
A gut-wrenching, hypnotizing cin-
ematic experience. (9)
3. The Bridges of Madison
County � So many people complained
about this film that I almost felt I had
been deceived into liking it. But in the
end I realized that the complaints rang
false for one reason or another. Clint
Eastwood directed the rare adult love
story free from most of the pap of the
overrated, poorly written book. Meryl
Streep deserves another Oscar for her
portrayal of Francessa Johnson. A
deeply moving romance that dealt with
adult issues far beyond those of simple
romance, it was the one film that
caused me to break down sobbing this
year. (9)
4. Babe - Easily the best family
See MOVIES page 13
Drop-ad with:
� No lines.
� No waiting.
� No headaches.
Classified ads the easy way. A sendee of The East Carolinian.
JOIN THE
GRAND REOPENING
AT
WE'VE EXPANDED!
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All Day Every Day,
NOW thru Jan 14th
Catch The AFC & NFC Championships
On Our Big Screen While You're
Enjoying Our Specials
We have been experiencing severe difficulties with
our transmitter and antenna in the past few days.
The ice and continued cold temperatures have put
us off the air this week.
We apologize for the inconvenience. We thank you
for your patience while we rectify-the situation.
91.3 FM
East Carolina Un&ersity
RIVERSIDE
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SUNDAY LUNCH SPECTACULAR
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Sunday Buffet Served 11-3
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The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the postition of
cJ i It
for the Spring v96 semester.
Fill out an application
in the Student Pubs building.
LADIES IN FREE ALL NIGHT
S1 FOR GUY MEMBERS .
. S3 FOR GUESTS
$2.50 TEAS AND SEX ON THE
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BAR AND DRAFT SPECIALS ALL
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LADIES YOU CAN PLAY THE ALL
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FRI
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JANUARY SPECIAL EVENTS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18TH MEN'S BEST CHEST ON
CAMPUS CONTEST
TUESDAY JANUARY 30TH LADIES LINGERIE CONTEST





mmmmmmmmmm
The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 11, 1995
13
Get reacquainted with ECU Student Health
Heather Zophy
Student Health
Happy New Year and welcome to
ECU's Spring Semester '96! We hope
everyone had a happy and healthy
holiday. Just a few reminders concern-
ing your health care at ECU. First of
all, for all new students or returning
students, make sure your immuniza-
tion records are updated, completed
and turned into the Student Health
Center. Tetanus boosters and TB skin
tests are available at the Student
Health Center from 8-10 a.m. every
weekday except Wednesdays until Feb
9. No appointments are needed for
these immunizations through Feb 9.
There is, however, a $5 fee for each
immunization. For more information,
call 328-6841. We want to make sure
all of these required pre-entrance
records are complete and corrected
so your records will not be tagged.
Some of the changes at Student
Health Service (SHS) consist of park-
ing, coupons and the Health Educa-
tion Resource Room. First of all, pa-
tient parking is no longer between
OPEN YOUR WINDOW
OF OPPORTUNITY
BEANRA
INFORMATION MEETINGS - Mandatory for all candidates.
Applications are distributed at these meetings only. For More info call 3284264.
Monday January 15 8:00pm Tyler Hall
Tuesday January 16 7:00pm Fletcher Lobby
Wednesday January 17 4:30pm Greene Lobby
Thursday January 18 4:30pm Gotten lobby (tnII
Thursday January 18 8:00pm Belk Basement iill�8M2�
Joyner Library and the Health Cen
ter. There are now six park-
ing spaces designated
for patient parking
in front of the Stu-
dent Health Cen-
ter, facing the
mall area. Passes
are required for �
these spaces and '
can be obtained
from the front of-
fice at SHS. Just a re-
minder that no one is '
guaranteed a parking space,
just like on other parts of cam-
pus.
Coupons, another addition at
CAMPUS REP
WANTED
he nation's leader in college marketing
is seeking an energetic, entrepreneurial
student for the position ot campus rep.
No sales involved. Place advertising on
bulletin boards for companies such as
American Express and Microsoft.
Great part-time job earnings. Choose
your own hours; 4-8 hours per week
required. Call:
Campus Rep Program
American Passage Media Corp.
215 W. Harrison, Seattle, WA 98119
(800) 487-2434 Ext. 4444
a
n u
��oO'it.H
Carver Music
Save 25-40 on most of our fine products!
pmalech MesaBqqgie
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Lowest pricesExcellent Customer Satisfaction
1645W 5th St. (on 4-lane Hwy. 264) Washington
Ph. (919)975-1030 Hours 10am-6pm MonSat.
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TOTALLY FREE TRIP TO
KNOXVILLE,TENN
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS spades
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 23-25, 1996. AH expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Tuesday, January 16, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, January 17, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus SpadesTournament
Monday, January 22, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
jjflAll-Campus Chess Tournament Wednesday, January 24, 1996 6:00 p.m. Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Thursday, January 25, 1996
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room

HERES THE FINK PRINT
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms arc available at the Mendenhall Information
Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the
Student Activities Office. 328-4766, for more information.
SHS, are available to students living
on campus through their
Residence Hall Packets.
Each coupon en-
titles students to a
free trip to the
i Self-Medication
Clinic, where
a you can choose
three non-pre-
scription items
Qj from the phar-
j macy. The pharmacy
� is open Monday
through Friday from 8-5.
Remember that every student can
purchase medications at a reduced
price at Student Health.
Another adjustment made at the
Student Health Center involves the
Health Education Resource Room.
The Resource Room is now located
in the old Ledonia Wright building
directly behind the Health Center.
Health-related educational materials
can be obtained from this building at
any time. There is a huge variety of
brochures, videos, pamphlets, posters,
books, etc. on sexuality, nutrition,
substance abuse, mental health, etc.
Students can drop by or make an ap-
pointment with the Health Educator
(328-6794). The Resources Room is
also the location for the Health Issues
Classes. These classes are required for
anyone wanting a prescriptive form
of birth control, or for any female com-
ing in for a first time Pap smear. The
classes are held every Monday at 2
p.m Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Thurs-
day at 3 p.m. For more information,
please call 328-6794.
We hope everyone has a great
semester. Remember to keep your-
selves healthy. Eat a well balanced
meal, exercise, get adequate sleep,
refrain from using alcohol or tobacco
products and take time to relax. If you
do need our help at Student Health,
just call 328-6317 for an appointment.
We're at your service!
MOVIES from page 12
film to be made in several years. Re-
plete with talking animals, computer
animation (to help the animals look like
they are speaking) and a nifty, engross-
ing story. Babe won the hearts of many
a child. Australia continues to provide
some of the most innovative, original
films today (see also 9). (9)
5. Crimson Tide � Gene Hackman
can do no wrong (see 6 also)! As a
stern, domineering submarine captain,
Hackman created incredible tension
aboard the USS Alabama when his
executive officer Denzel Washington
disagrees with an order to launch a
nuclear weapon. Tony Scott shocked
the world by directing a great film filled
with lots of action contained within a
metal tube. Easily the best action film
of the year. (8)
6. Get Shorty - John Travolta,
Renee Russo, Dannv DeVito and Gene
Hackman have a great time in Holly-
wood. Travolta works for the mob and
goes looking for the man who stole
money from Travolta's boss. But the
subplots and double dealings keep the
story complex and fun from beginning
to end. Barry Sonnenfeld directed a
great film that should be watched for
years to come. (8)
7. Devil in a Blue Dress - The
most underappreciated film of the year.
Denzel Washington turns in a stellar
performance and Carl Franklin directs
with calm self-assurance. This quiet film
dealt more effectively with race issues
than most films that claim race to be
their main subject Don Cheadle has
already won a fpw awards for his role
as one of Washington's friends and it
will be a crime if he does not get an
Academy Award nomination. (8)
8. A Walk in the Clouds - Alfonso
new shipments
have
arrived
atalog
Connection
Division Ot W2&
�2IE. 5th Street MonSat. 10-6 Sun. I-S
758-86121
I
Arau directed, maybe choreographed
provides a better verb, a sumptuous
feast for the eyes and heart A wonder-
ful romance that captured the soul with
its charm, this little film deserves a
renewed life on video. (8)
9. Muriel's Wedding - Fun, fun,
fun! This quirky Australian film fea-
tured a main character whose main
escape was Abba songs. Toni Collette
turned in one of the performances of
the year as the title character. The film
is an absolute delight. (8)
10. Kiss of Death - Though criti-
cally blasted, 1 found this Barbet
Schroeder film to capture the atten-
tion of the audience and hurl it head-
long into a vortex of greed and betrayal.
Helen Hunt gave a great performance
against type as David Caruso's wife,
and Caruso and Nicholas Cage were
stellar in their respective roles. This
film deserved much more praise than
it originally received and I have a hunch
that time will be kind to this film. (8)
Also notable for the year: Nixon,
Clueless, Mallrats and The American
President.
Finally the other awards for '95.
Most overrated films of the year
- A three way tie for Batman Forever
(holy boring story, Batman!), Apollo 13
and Toy Story.
Most expensive - This one's a no
brainer. Waterworld cost almost $180
million but since it might yet break even
more films might have inflated budgets
like this one.
Worst of the year -Jade, Congo,
Last of the Dogmen.
Worst sequel - Ace Ventura:
When Nature Calls.
And that's it A rather dull year
with a few interesting films. As in
sports, one can always hope for next
year.
NEWMAN CA'
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Would like to welcome
new fe returning students
and invite you to join us in worship
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CAMPUS MASS
�W?'w&m&ftfMM
Sundays at 11:30 am wd 8:30 nm at the V
Wednesday 3:30 pm at the
Followed bv a fellowship meal
In the new chape! at 953
757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For more information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the Canter daily between 8:30am & 11pm
J
CARE ABOUT YOUR PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH?
INTERESTED IN HELPING OTHERS DO THE SAME?
Be A
PEER HEALTH EDUCATOR
Come join us and learn more about wellness, program development and
presentation, contribute to health fairs and other campus-wide events, serve
on committees that make a difference. Get experience making presentations
about topics like sexuality, drugs, weight and body image, and stress man-
agement.
Training meetings are every Monday, 10:00 a.m. -12:00.
You could take the class for credit!
For more information contact Health Promotion and Well-Being,
303 Ervvin, 328-6793.





14
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
h
12
from page 11
tions effortlessly.
Madeleine Stowe holds her own
with a fine, understated performance
as Dr. Kathryn RaiOy, Cole's psychiatrist
Though the doctor makes some unlikely
decisions, Stowe makes it all believable
by making sure we see Railly's options
play out across her face.
The biggest surprise of the film
comes from Brad Pitt as nutcase Jef-
frey Goines. Pitt, shock of shocks, dem-
onstrates genuine comedic talent in the
kind of role that typically goes to Robin
Williams. His manic performance under-
scores the heavy drama of the film won-
derfully. While his legions of adoring
female fans may be disappointed (let's
just say that personal hygiene is not
among young Goines' primary con-
cerns), he is a lot of fun to watch.
And so is Twelve Monkeys. Gilliam
has said that his film is like a jigsaw
puzzle. Each new piece of information
is like a piece of the puzzle, and the
picture doesn't completely take shape
untii the final piece is in place.
On the surface, Twelve Monkeys
is a srifi thriller aiong the lines of Blade
Runner or The Terminator. Willis' Cole
has come back in time to gather data
on a deadly virus so that scientists in
his own time can devise a cure. But
here's the twist (the first one, anyway):
he hasn't come back to stop the dis-
ease from spreading. In point of fact,
he can't "Ifs already happened he tells
Railly. In this film, you can't change his-
tory.
So this is not a "save the world"
movie. It's too late for the world. Sure,
if Cole is successful, the people of his
time will have a much better standard
of living But our way of life is doomed
to die. The suspense has to come from
somewhere else.
Where it comes from is the funda-
mental question of Cole's sanity. When
he arrives in our time, he starts spout-
ing off stuff about this deadly virus and
the "Army of the 12 Monkeys" who
supposedly released it Naturally, he is
put in an insane asylum There he meets
Railly, who at first tries to convince Cole
he's insane, but slowly begins to realize
that he might be right
But as the movie progresses, de-
tails start to pile up which seem to indi-
cate that Cole might very well be in-
sane despite Railly's growing accep-
tance. Visual images from Cole's expe-
riences in the present begin to crop up
in his visits back to his own time. A
brainscan tube that Cole sees in the
asylum, for example, looks very much
like the contraption that sends him back
in time in the next scene. Then there's
the matter of the voices in his head
There's little concrete evidence that
Cole is actually from the future, and
even that evidence is made suspect by
the fact that Cole and Railly could both
be insane. Though the dark tone of the
movie suggests heavily that things are
ultimately what they seem, I wasn't sure
what to believe by the time the credits
rolled.
This ambiguity is what keeps the
film going While the plot is certainly a
puzzle, it's the question of Cole's san-
ity that makes the puzzle worth the ef-
fort of putting it together.
Twelve Monkeys is an incredible,
cerebral movie experience. Be patient
with it Give the story time to unfold.
Expect to leave the theater distracted
and disoriented. Make time for discus-
sion groups afterward. This film may
not change your life, but it's sure to give
you one hell of an evening
On a scale of one to 10, Twelve
Monkeys rates an intriguing nine.
PLAY from page 11
attract a larger audience. One of the
changes which will go into effect with
the 19 summer theater and will re-
main in effect for the regular season is
what is known as "scaling the house
In this process, ticket prices vary accord-
ing to the seating area. This is good
news for college students, who will now
be able to purchase tickets despite lim-
ited budgets by choosing less-expensive
seating Announcements of this year's
summer theater season will be out soon,
so keep your eyes open.
Another way to save money on tick-
ets is to purchase a season pass in the
fall semester. This allows you to have a
seat reserved for you for each play on
the night of your choosing before the
box office ever opens to the public, and
all for a one time price. All you have to
do is show up on the night of the per-
formance.
For questions about showtimes,
ticket prices, or upcoming events please
contact the McGinnis Theater Box Of-
fice, located in McGinnis Theater on the
corner of Fifth and Eastern streets, or
call at 328- 6829.
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Applications are available
at the Student Union Office -
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that prices on Macintosh personal computers are now even tower than their already a single payment for90 days!Just call the reseller below to find out howyou can qualify,
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 11, 1995
15
Harris teeter
Harris Teeter Brand Sale
Harris Teeter
Split
Chicken
Breast
Harris Teeter
Beef
Hot Dogs
.16 oz
1
Harris Teeter
Honey
Ham
4 Lb. Bag
t
6 oz.
Harris Teeter
Canned
Vegetables
14.5-
15.25 oz.
Harris Teeter
. Harris Teeter
Assorted Nonfat 4� 00 Frozen
Yogurt80z. I Taters
2A
24 oz,
2
00
Harris Teeter
Potato
Chips
6 oz.
Harris Teeter
4 Pack Bathroom
Tissue i574�H.
4& ft� Homestylc
0S Wattles
4
2 Liter
Pepsi Or Diet
Pepsi
MB
99
TRNA from page 11
Building Inspections Department or
the TRNA Action Committee The
TRNA Action Committee files com-
plaints on behalf of individuals who
do not want to complain themselves
to the appropriate investigative
agency.
"The city doesn't see the students
who live here (the applicable neigh-
borhood) as a separate entity it sees
them as adult citizens who live in the
community concluded Frank
Wartman.
Another ordinance to be aware
of is the noise ordinance. Greenville
has a noise ordinance which specifies
the maximum allowed sounds levels
in different areas of the city. In resi-
dential neighborhoods, from 7 a.m. to
11 p.m the noise level from any prop-
erty is not to exceed 60 decibels at
the property line. After 11 p.m sound
is not to exceed 55 decibels. The
TRNA uses the reference of a "mod-
erately emphatic conversation at 20
feet (from the property line would
probably exceed these limits Permits
to exceed are availble to fraternities
in residential areas, one per semester,
but they must apply for a permit, hire
off-duty police officers to "moniter"
the function, and are required to no-
tify the owners of all adjacent proper-
ties about the planned event.
There are many considerations
to take into account when making
your next move. Don't expect a land-
lord to freely inform possible tenants
of all the zoning ordinances. When
students are evicted from a dwelling
for violations of such ordinances, the
landlord simply keeps the security
deposit and searches for new prospec-
tive tenants
It is apparent that the TRNA has
the interest of property value in mind
as they have banded together in help-
ing the city enforce zoning regula-
tions, but there is no organization
with the interests of the students in
mind. Therefore the best we can do
is be aware of the : regulations so
we aren't put out in the cold this
winter. More zoning ordinance infor-
mation can be obtained by calling the
Greenville Zoning office at 830-4466
Harris Teeter
11 oz.
Harris Teeter
49 Hot Cocoa
Mix
Harris Teeter
Ultra Liquid
Detergent wo oz.
Prices Effective Through January 16,1995
4.24-
10 oz,
99
� . :
jnesday.
ycminti
ttractiens
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, January 11
East Carolina Vocal Quartet
at Fletcher Recital Hall
Roily Gray and Sunfire
at the Attic
(reggae)
Andrew Vladick and Big Matilda
at Peasant's Cafe
Ben Folds Five
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Movie: Come to the Castle
at Hendrix Theatre
5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
(Travel-Adventure Series)
Friday, January 12
The Breakfast Club
at the Attic
(retro 80s)
Agents of Good Roots
at Peasant's Cafe
(roots rock)
Movie: Pocahontas
at Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
Runs through Sunday
(Animated)
FREE!
Saturday, January 13
Jupiter Coyote
at the Attic
The Pondering
at Peasant's Cafe
Knocked Down Smilin'
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
MAIL BOXES ETC'
It's Not What We Do.
It's How We Do It
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH. FLORIDA
PER PERSON PER WEEK
5c Copies for ECU Students
5c Copies for ECU Students
5c Copies for ECU Students
5 Copies for ECU Students
740 Givem tile Blvd. .
Suite 400
.Greenville, NO
TKL 321-6021
SANDPIPER BEACON
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DISCOUNTS TO AREA CLUBS, RESTAURANTS & ATTRACTIONS
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INFORMATION 1-800-488-8828
0A" NT 'OTIoTOi SSISTANTS
Orientation & Tiir. 'irst-Kear Experience � 203 �rwin � 328-4 173
NOW HIRING
ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS FOR SUMMER 1996
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in Room 14 at the Mendenhall Student Center:
December 5 (Tuesday) 4 p.m.
January 8 (Monday) 4 p.m.
Applications are now available in Room 203 Erwin
Deadline for completed applications is January 12, ll)Q6 at 5 p.m.
Mondav: Featuring Pitchers
12 Price Chicken Wmgs(5-1O.00 pm)
NTN Trivia Playoffs (9-11:00 pm)
Teams of 2-4 (4 Rounds - Honest
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Tuesday: Micro Madness
Saturday: Live Entertainment
Late Nite Breakfast (2:00-3:30 am)
Sunday: House Bloody Marys
12 Price Wings (5-10:00 pm)
Micro-Brews (12 oz. Only)
3 for $1.00 Oysters (5-10:00 pm)
Wednesday Nicht: Dollar Nite!
Thursday: Karaoke
3$1:00 Oysters (5-10:00 pm)
Margaritas
Late Nite Breakfast (2:00 to 3:30 am)
Friday. Live Entertainment
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AND
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Late Nite Breakfast (2:00 to 3:30 am;
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(ACE.56 fE.6M U &L!





16
Thursday, January 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
9
verton s
Inventory Blowout Continues
SELECT STOCK OH
ATHLETIC APPAREL
30 OFF
Overtoil's Price
Nike�Big Dogs�Adidas� Champions
Russell AthlethicAntiguaUmbro�Reebok
hotfingers
SNOW SKI
GLOVES
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
HOODED
SWEATSHIRTS
FROM RUSSELL
AND CHAMPION
40 OFF
Overtoil's Price
;sell Athlethic-Antigna-Umbro-Reebok Uverton s mce
WINTER SNOW SKI APPAREL
LITTLE BIG HORN SHIRT CO.
POLAR FLEECE
T A rFTTTC
J iv JVUrf JL i3
40 OFF
Overtones Price
UB SPORTS
WINTER SKI JACKETS
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
CONVERT
BY COLUMBIA SPORTSWEAR
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
SELECT STOCK
POLAR FLEECE
FROM COLUMBIA HELLY HANSEN PERIGEE
WHITE SIERRA NIKE
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
INVERSION
SNOWBOARD WEAR
50 OFF
Overtoil's Price
COLUMBIA
DENALI PULLOVER
OMNITECH WATER PROOF
BREATHABLE
SALE $99.95
REG. $139.95
HUNTING AND FISHING
10-X BRAND
HUNTING APPAREL
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
JACKETS PANTS VESTS
OVERALLS BIBS
OUTDOOR SHIRTS
FROM BROWNING COLUMBIA DUCKS
UNLIMITED
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
SIZES AND COLORS LIMITED
SPORTING GOODS
ROCKY BROWNING BLACK ROCK
HUNTING BOOTS
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
STYLES AND SIZES LIMITED
MONTEREY GOLF CLUB
SET
1 3 5 DRIVERS 3 PW IRONS
SALE $159.95
REG. $299.95
ENTIRE STOCK OF
GOLF BAGS
20 OFF
Overtoil's Price
SEVERAL STYLES AND COLORS TO
CHOOSE
ENTIRE STOCK OF
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT BAGS
25 OFF
Overtoil's Price
ALLEN GUN CASES
FOR SHOTGUNS OR RIFLES
$9.95
EACH
FOOTWEAR
SELECT STOCK OT
ATHLETIC FOOTWEAR
25-50 OFF
STYLES AND SIZES LIMITED
NIKE REEBOK ASICS NEW BALANCE K SWISS
DIADORA ADIDAS
SALE PRICES NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER
DISCOUNT . APPLIES TO IN STOCK MERCHAN-
DISE ONLY. NO SPECIAL ORDERS OR
RAINCHECKS. DOES NOT APPLY TO PREVI-
OUSLY PURCHASED MERCHANDISE. OVER-
TON S RESERVES THE RIGHT TO INTERPRET
SALES OR DISCOUNTS.
OUTDOOR FOOTWEAR
TIMBERLAND MERRELL NIKE REEBOK NEW BALANCE
TIMBERLAND TREKKER
$67.48 REG.S134.95
MERRELL LARAMIE IF
$42.48 REG. $84.95
NIKE MAKALUII
$32.48 REGJ64.95
STYLES AND
SIZES ARI
LIMITED
Overtoil's
111 RED BANKS ROAD
GREENVILLE
(fate
SALE ENDS JANUARY 13, 1996
9AM-XPM MON-FR1 9AM-7PM SATCI I SED SUN
SHOWROOM PHONE NUMBER 555-5782





17
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
Proud to be a Pirate
Liberty Bowl win
makes statement
Pirates hope to
continue
successful football
program
CraigPerrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The 1995 St Jude Liberty Bowl
and its accompanying activities was a
tremendous success for the economy
of Memphis. The big winner, however; -
is the ECU football program.
Since being shunned by Confer-
ence USA when the new league was
forming, the Pirates have made two
straight Liberty Bowl appearances, in-�
eluding this year's championship vic
tory. jJJ
Conference or no conference, the
future of ECU's independent program jj
is very encouraging.
"Everybody wants to talk to us
about our program Steve Logan
Pirate's Head Coach said. "As long as
we've got a television contract with
ESPN, which we've got, and we've got
bowl access into this Liberty Bowl, we're
as healthy as any college program in
the country
"We've got
good players and
good coaches and
we won't apologize
to anybody for any-
thing about that"
Conference
USA officials were
in Memphis in full
force last week,
and talk abounded
about ECU's
chances of joining
the league in foot-
ball. Presidents
Howard Schellenberger, who is no
longer at the school and was recently
fired after one year at Oklahoma.
Conference USA will begin play
next fall. The Liberty Bowl Alliance
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Champion will be
either the Confer-
ence USA Champ
or ECU, depend-
ing on who has the
better record.
With the lib-
erty Bowl win over
Stanford, the Pi-
rates have once
again gotten na-
tional exposure
that could lead to
a conference invi-
tation, possibly the
Big East, who is
"We've got good
players and good
coaches and we
won't apologize to
anybody for
anything about
that
� Coach Logan
Photo by KEN CLARK
Wendy Levin, Tracy Zivin, Susan Crumpler and Misty Petty show their ECU spirit and
tneir ESPN sweatshirts in hopes of being put on television during the Liberty Bowl.
JMU Dukes ruin
conference opener
from each of the six Conference USA
schools are expected to discuss the
matter next month in Dallas at NCAA
meetings.
ECU campaigned long and hard to
get into the conference, but were
blocked by Louisville Head Coach
reportedly looking to replace Temple.
"You saw a first class institution
and a first class football program beat a
first class institution and a first class
football program Logan said following
See BOWL page 20
Swimmers train
down south
Tomekia Blackmon
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
I have a new love. No, it
isn't a guy, in fact it's a city. I
have fallen for a town that could
be called the Pirates home-away-
from home. Yes, it's Memphis.
Throughout my stay, I real-
ized that many of the Memphis
natives had adopted ECU as
their own team. Many knew of
our players and coaches and a
few decided to tell me how the
Pirates should run their offense.
I informed them that I had no
say in those kind of decisions,
but I was still impressed with
their knowledge of our team.
During my flight to Mem-
phis, many ECU fans packed the
plane and proceeded to chant
ECU cheers to the dismay of
some passengers who probably
thought we had crowed the bars
before our flight It was at that
moment I knew Memphis was
going to be a trip I would never
forget
The day before the game
the Pirate Club held their pre-
game social at Silky O'Sullivans.
Pirate fans packed Silky's and
chowed down on some of the
best Cajun shrimp around. This
was where most of the ECU
crowd gathered and socialized
while Silky himself got on the
microphone and pumped up the
fans.
He talked about how ECU
was going to kick Stanford's,
well, you know what And he
was right He is himself a pro-
claimed ECU fan, and is ponder-
ing whether he will open a
Silky's here in Greenville.
After the social. Pirate fans
and even a few Stanford fans,
lined the street for the parade.
Even though it was a bit chilly,
everybody bundled together and
showed why ECU has the best
fans in the country. Enthusiasm
was high and everybody was
looking forward to the game the
next day.
One factor 1 was pleased
about, that bothered me
throughout the entire season, is
how our fans hung in there till
the end of the game, despite the
See MEMPHIS page 19
Trip to Florida
prepares team for
conference meets
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
While most of us spent our holi-
day break somewhere relatively cold,
the ECU swim team spent the sec-
ond half of break in West Palm
Beach, Fl.
However, the trip was not just
for pleasure, it was a time to get away
and conduct intense practices to pre-
pare for upcoming conference meets.
This is an annual trip the swim
team takes to improve each
swimmer's skills. It also allows the
team to concentrate and focus on
swimming without any outside dis-
tractions. A typical day consisted of
three different workouts, and swim-
ming 11,000-15,000 meters.
Most of the team agr that this
year's trip was harder than in years
past. Not only were the workouts
tougher, but some believed mentally
it was more difficult The workouts
done in Florida are different than
what the swimmers do when they are
interested ii
jlaying soccei
try outs will be!
held for spots od
the men's and
women's teams.
Call for further
info.
Women's coach-
Neil Roberts
328-4672
Men's coach-
Will Wiberg
328-4626
back here in Greenville.
Rachel Atkinson, a senior who
made her final Florida trip with the
team this year, believed her training
was easier than the past years.
"Mentally it was easier, and more
relaxed said Atkinson.
As a whole the team didn't work
out together. The team was split into
three groups for the training ses-
sions. This allowed the coaches to be
able to work on a more individual
basis. The women trained with Head
Coach Rick Kobe, while the men were
divided into two groups. One group
was headed by Assistant Coach Jeff
Pishko and another by Asst Coach
Bill Roberts.
Junior Brendon Vermillion be-
lieves that the team accomplished the
goals they had set for themselves be-
fore heading down south.
"We were going down there to
train as hard as we could, and get
into the best shape that we could be
for the rest of the season said
Vermillion. "I guess we pretty much
did it, but we were hurting
But not everything was all work
for the swimmers. During their free
time, the team would relax and hit
the beach in between workouts. They
See SWIM page 18
The smell of an upset was in the
air. But for the Lady Pirate basket-
ball team it wasn't to be their night.
ECU opened their conference
season Friday against the Dukes of
JMU. A major factor for ECU's de-
feat was the lack of shots made from
the free throw line. Shooting only
.300 from the line during the sec-
ond half haunted the team down the
stretch when they needed them the
most.
Coach Anne Donovan was
pleased with the way her girls hung
tough with the Dukes who were
picked to finish second in the pre-
season CAA poll.
"We came out and showed the
conference that we mean business
said Donovan. "We are not a team
to be taken lightly, and that if we
take the lessons we learned tonight
and continue to improve on them,
we're only going to get better
At the beginning of the game,
the Lady Pirates had trouble trying
to stop the Dukes' game down low.
ECU gave up 12 points before cut-
ting the lead to one and eventually
pulling ahead after a Danielle
Charlesworth jumper to make the
score 13-12.
ECU continued to build on that
lead by positioning themselves for
better shots in the paint It paid off
until the end of the first half when
JMU took a short lived lead by three,
only to have ECU come back to tie
the ball game at 32 a piece at half-
time.
ECU played aggressively in the
See JMU page 20
Mountaineer's
leave disappointed
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
The weather just didn't cooperate with Appalachian State. A little more
snow and ice and their trip to Minges Coliseum might have been canceled.
After losing 63-39 to the ECU men's basketball team, ASU probably
would have liked to have forgotten the whole trip.
ASU's Head Coach Tom Apke said the weather did inhibit their practice
schedule in preparing for Tuesday night's non-conference game. Apke told
the press after the game that his team didn't get a chance to practice on
Sunday or Monday, and their trip to Greenville was behind schedule. There-
fore, they were on the bus longer than they had hoped.
See ASU page 18
Fundamentals prove key to win
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
After a heart breaking loss to JMU,
the ECU women's basketball team was
ready to come back and avenge the
loss. The unfortunate victim of ECU's
vengeance was VCU, who lost 71-57 to
the Lady Pirates.
Sunday's game saw VCU take the
early lead, only to have ECU cut the
lead and eventually take control the
rest of the game. The last time the Lady
Pirates trailed in the game was with
14:14 remaining in the first half when
VCU led 10-12.
The Lady Rams never regained
the lead after that and the closest they
came was a 22-22 tie late in the first
half. But a pair of Belinda Cagle free
throws put the Lady Pirates up for
good the remainder of the game.
ECU was tough down low in the
paint in forcing turnovers and creat-
ing their own points in the paint Coach
Anne Donovan's players moved the ball
around quickly and found open shots.
The shot selection and ball movement
was far better than that of the JMU
game.
Donovan has been working hard
in practice stressing the fundamentals
of the game; shot selection, rebound
ing and free throws.
"Some of the things we really con-
centrated on and had steadily improved
on tonight we really took care of busi-
ness and that really made the differ-
ence in the game said Donovan.
At half-time ECU was ahead 31-
28. First half totals were in favor of
ECU. The Lady Pirates dominated in
rebounding pulling down 20 rebounds
to VCU's 15. The field goal percentage
was almost double that of VCU's. While
the Lady Rams shot 6-24 (.250), the
Lady Pirates shot 11-24 (.458).
The leading scorers during the
first half were Tomekia Blackmon with
eight points. Cagle and Justine Allpress
each had six points and Danielle
Charlesworth contributed four points.
Charleswoth realizes the impor-
tance of reeling out conference wins.
"We knew we could play with any-
body in the conference, but a win is
always good said Charlesworth.
The half second proved to be all
ECU. Many of the 40 points in the sec-
ond half came from shots down low.
That is something Donovan and her
players have been working on, because
compared to the other conference
teams, the Lady Pirates are relatively
small. They battled their way into the
paint and it paid off with easy lay ups
and short jumpers.
Free throws also proved to be a
help in the second half. The Lady Pi-
rates were 11-14 in free throws. They
posted a percentage of .750 for free
throws for the game. Free throws cost
it for ECU against JMU, but against
VCU the shots from the line were made
allowing Donovan to breath a little
easier about the way her team could
shoot the foul shots.
For two ECU players the second
half was their time to shine. Allpress
exploded for 15 points in the second
halt She posted impressive numbers
for the game. Allpress was 7-14 in field
goals, 4-9 in three pointers and 3-5 in
free throws. She ended the night with
Stephanie Lasslter
Guest Colunnlst
Nebraska, national champs?
No way. They're more like national
losers, in my eyes anyway. When
the coach of the top rated foot-
ball team in the country allows a
player accused of beating his girl-
friend to compete in the national
championship, we begin to won-
der when the game ends and the
true competition begins.
Nebraska coach Tom
Osborne "punished" Lawrence
Phillips by suspending him from
regular season play. While many
fans think that was punishment
enough, others wonder why he
was allowed back in the game sim-
ply for the national championship.
But on Tuesday, Jan. 2, television
viewers found out Phillips led the
Cornhuskers to a 62-24 stampede
over Steve Spurrier's Florida
Gators. What was supposed to be
the game of the year (for college
football fans, anyway) turned out
to be Spurrier's worst nightmare.
Newspapers, magazines and
news stories told Phillips's story
prior to the game and after the
Husker's win, but what many
failed to publicize was the history
of the Nebraska Cornhusker's
football program. This team has
shown the truest example ever of
succeeding despite any cost
Osborne said Phillips should be
allowed to play in the Fiesta Bowl
because he needed the "struc-
ture" of the Nebraska football
program. But according to Time,
Osborne didn't mention that in
the past four years, six Nebraska
players, from that same "struc-
ture" have been charged with
crimes, but never served any jail
time.
Well, the article didn't men-
tion just why these players never
looked out from behind bars, but
I think we can figure out that one.
So Osborne put Phillips back on
the gridiron, long enough to win
the bowl game, and then encour-
aged him to forgo this senior year
of college to enter the NFL draft
Hey Tom, what happened to that
old stability of the Nebraska team?
Osborne said allowing
Phillips to continue play would
only encourage more media atten-
tion. At this point why stop?
We've all read the stories, seen
the news. The only thing Phillips
can do from here is beat some-
one else. But with that Nebraska
"structure" he must be reformed,
right?
Unfortunately, we know
that's a joke. Osborne wanted to
win the bowl at any cost but what
it cost him was the respect that
should go hand-in-hand with a
national champion.
Now the Nebraska squad and
its faithful followers are looking
for a three-peat but this time
they'll have to do it without
Phillips and senior QB Tommie
Frazier. So next year Osborne will
See BALL page 19
See FIESTA page 20
n&m





mmmmmsmmami
Ti�i�.
18
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
ASU
from page 17
However, Apke said that was no
excuse for his team's poor perfor-
mance against the Pirates.
"Our offensive timing and all the
little things you need to do to be ef-
fective were really off, especially early
in the game Apke said. "That's aw-
ful to do anytime especially against
a team that plays as aggressively at
the defensive end as ECU does
ASU's offense was certainly off
in the first half. The Mountaineers
were just 4-23 (.174) for field goals
in beginning play. That number im-
proved slightly in the second half
when ASU was 10-28 (.357). Their
total field goal percentage was .275.
Poor offense, combined with an
explosive ECU defense, shut down
the Mountaineers throughout the
night.
ECU took control early, building,
a 15-2 lead at the 12:24 mark when
Tony Parham nailed a three point bas-
ket ASUs shot selection was poor
from the perimeter and when they
did manage to get it down low, ECU
players were there to deny them the
easy basket.
ECU'S biggest lead in the first
half, 20-4, came with 7:33 remaining
in the first half. The Pirates took a
28-13 lead going into the locker room
at half-time after a Vic Hamilton slam
dunk that sent theHof 4,187 fans into
a fury.
At half-time seven ECU players
had gotten into the scoring action
while only four ASU players produced
any points.
Hamilton led the way with six
points, while Jonathan Kerner and
Tim Basham each contributed five.
Kerner also pulled down four re-
bounds and Damond Van
Weerdhuizen grabbed three in the
first half.
Too bad nobody told ASU they
wouldn't even come close in the sec-
ond half, because they could have
warmed up the buses and gotten an
early start back to Boone and beat
the weather.
But they stuck around and the
closest they came was within 12
points, 32-20. From there ECU
opened up the margin and rolled to
victory.
The word for the second half
was threes. Othello Meadows
drained three threes in the second
half and finished the game 3-4 in
three pointers. Basham added two
threes of his own in the second half,
while Parham added one in the sec-
ond half and finished the game 2-3
from behind the arc.
Team chemistry was important
for the Pirates. Dooley utilized much
of his bench and players had to work
together even more to produce
points.
"I thought one of the plays of
the game was when Chuck Jones
gets the ball, has the shot, makes
an extra pass, sets a screen for "0"
(Meadows) and "0" bangs another
three Dooley said.
Dooley knows the importance
for players to work well together, es-
pecially when a coach pulls guys off
the bench who don't have a lot of
playing time yet.
The leading scorers for the
night were Meadows with 13 points,
Basham and Kerner each with 11
points and Hamilton with eight
points.
ECU improves their record to
8-3 overall and are still 1-1 in the
CAA after beating James Madison
but then dropping one to George
SWIM from page 17
did find time to manage a few friendly
practical jokes on one another, but
it was all in good humor.
"We just kind of relaxed during
our free time and got away from the
pool said McGee Moody, a senior
on the squad.
The pool used for the training
was an outdoor pool, and the weather
didn't always cooperate. The tem-
perature was cold at times and that
made the water feel cooler than nor-
mal. Sometimes it was so cool the
swimmers could see their breath. Ac-
cording to Moody the night practices
were the coldest
If you ask senior Hilary Stokes,
she'll also tell you the worst thing
about the trip was the weather. Be-
cause it was cold, standing out in a
wet bathing suit wasn't anybody's
idea of fun.
"I think I had more fun in previ-
ous years because the weather was
always better Stokes added.
The team had to endure each
other for the week and a half they
were in Florida. However, many say
it wasn't that bad considering they
were staying in such close quarters.
"It's one thing to hang out with
everybody at school, but when you're
down there and those are the only
people you know, and those are the
only people you see 24 hours a day,
you're going to leave disliking some
people said Moody. "But it doesn't
carry over when we get back to
Greenville
Everybody had their thoughts
on the best and worst thing about
the trip. Although the answers var-
ied, most people believed the best
thing was everybody working to-
gether and just being together.
"The best thing was New Year's
Eve on the beach with everybody to-
gether, and the worst was training
in the cold weather said sophomore
Lee Hutchens.
The team agreed the trip was fun
but they were there for a purpose. It
was hard work, but they know it wiil
pay off come conference time.
"The main point of the trip is to
break you down as much as possible,
so you can better yourself when you
get back to Greenville added jun-
ior Jay Noles.
One downfall for the team was
on the way back, one of the four vans
was involved in a pile up and skid-
ded on the icy pavement. Although
the van was damaged, nobody was
seriously injured.
The swimmers will put their
training to the test this Saturday
against American University, in what
will be their final home meet of the
season. This weekend will be special
for the swimmers because it is par-
ents weekend. The time of the meet
has been moved up to noon from 1
p.m. at the Minges Pool.
Mason. The Pirates next challenge
is newcomer to the CAA, Virginia
Commonwealth University. VCU
comes to town this Saturday in what
will prove to be a battle for another
victory in the CAA.
Kerner believes the inside game
against VCU will be very important.
However, VCU's tallest player still
comes up three inches short of
Kerner, ECU'S tallest player at 6-11.
"We're working on taking it in-
side and working inside out Kerner
said.
The match-up begins this Sat-
urday at noon in Minges Coliseum.
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All films start at 8:00 PM
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and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 11,1995
19
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
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YOU WONT
A MAP TO FIND THE,
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YOU PROBABLY WON'T NEED A CAR,
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BALL from page 17
21 points to lead the Lady Pirates in
scoring.
Freshman newcomer Beth Jaycees
posted a career high 10 points and nine
rebounds against VCU. Jaynes was al-
most perfect in shooting categories
throughout the night. For the game
she was 3-3 in field goals. 1-1 in three
pointers and 34 in free throws. Jaynes
played a total of 27 minutes and proved
that even being a freshman she could
still produce points and rebounds
needed in obtaining victories.
"1 really don't know that much
about the conference but 1 knew that
every team was going to be a chal-
lenge said Jaynes. "We've been work-
ing so hard in practice and it really
came through in the game today
Tracey Kelley who usually starts
for the Pirates, played a minimum
amount Sunday due to a knee injury
sustained against JMU. Therefore
Jaynes stepped up and helped out in a
big way.
"I am so proud of that kid said
Donovan. "We had a big need to fill
Kelley's position, and Beth came in
confident and aggressive. 1 don't know
where we would have been without
Beth's effort"
Sunday's effort proved to be a
team effort with everybody contribut-
ing in various ways.
"When we play as a team, we are
much stronger said Charelsworth. "It
started last year in the CAA Tourna-
ment when we lost to James Madison,
in which we played the best as a team
that we've played ever and it carried
over. We realize that is how we are
going to get thinf done
The Ldy Pirates will be on the
road this Friday night against Ceorge
Mason. ECU will look to move up in
the conference and improve on their
1-1 record in the CAA. Tip-off is slated
for 7:30 in Fairfax, Va.
MEMPHIS from page 17
1109 CHARLES BLVD
758-4251
OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT
EVERYNIGHT
light drizzle that began to fall.
Now I know this season I com-
plained how fans left, even in the
best of weather, but during the
season's most important game.
ECU fans saw the whole game
through till the last second of play.
Many even stayed and watched the
team get their trophy afterwards.
It's just too bad the team didn't
get championship rings for their
victory. Many players were disap-
pointed that they wouldn't be sport-
ing Liberty Bowl championship
rings. However, there is still some
talk that players may be receiving
rings, but it is still up in the air.
I was extremely proud of our
team and was glad they finished
iast year's "unfinished business
Some fans left after the game but
many stayed around for New Year's
Eve. You could still see purple and
gold on Beale Street at the stroke
of midnight to bring in the new
year.
But as in any case all good
things must come to an end. Even-
tually the fans left and Memphis
was restored to the way it was be-
fore all the ECU fans packed the
streets and hotels.
I am looking forward to my
next trip to Memphis where all the
Pirate fans can again gather and
support our hard working football
team and its coaching staff. I ex-
tend a sincere congratulations to
all the players and wish them con-
tinued success for the next season.
BEST MUSICS VIDEO SELECTION IN TOWN
Tfte Media goard
is seeking
graduate assistant
applicants.
The person selected will serve as a
businessmarketing assistant for the
Student Media, answering to the
Media Adviser.
The position requires an average of
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All applicants must be currently enrolled
graduate students in good standing.
A Businessmarketing education andor
experience is a plus.
For more information, call 328-6009.
CJteenoiiU's enltf
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Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
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Call 7566278
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January 10-12,1996
Student Store Entry, 9am-3pm
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January 25,1996
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Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Reception following in Gray Art Gallery
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4-





iii-fir tm, � i. �
20
Thursday, January 11,1995
The East Carolinian
BOWL from page 17
the Liberty Bowl victory. "I'm very
proud of our fans who drove over here
to support us. I'm proud of our players,
who sat on a bitter defeat for one solid
year and came back to rectify it And
I'm proud of our coaching staff; we've
been focused all week long
Logan evened his overall career
coaching record at ECU at 23-23 with
the win over Stanford.
The Pirates finished with a 9-3
record this year, breaking into the USA
Today CNN Top 25 at no. 23. ECU
barely missed the AP Top 25, coming
in at 26. Everyone knows that polls are
a popularity contest especially Steve
Logan who also realizes the voting is
out of his control.
"I'll tell you what I tell our fans,
coaches and players he said. "What
we have control over is trying to win
the next game. If we're in a conference,
out of a conference, people accept us,
don't accept us, just win the nert game.
We've got a game next September, we're
going to show up and try to win it"
JMU
from page 17
The Pirates finished with 111 AP
votes, 22 behind no. 25 Iowa, who fin-
ished &4. ECU can officially claim to be
the best team in the Carolinas now; UNC
finished 29th and Clemson 30th.
In the N.Y. Times computer
rankings, a system which rates teams
on their performance, strength of sched-
ule and other variables, ECU finished
14th.
"There's no doubt we're a Top 25
team junior tight end Scott Richards
said. "We've dealt with not being in the
Top 25 year after year, and it's some-
thing that's expected. What we did to-
day (Dec 30) makes a statement and it
will carry this team and this program
into next season
Quarterback Marcus Crandell
knows it takes victories to get where
the Pirate's are looking to go.
"We'll get there sometime or an-
other as long as we just keep winning
Crandell said. "That's how we're going
to earn our respect also, is to just keep
winning
first half and the only real problem
they faced was a lack of ball move-
ment. The passes weren't quick
enough around the perimeter to
look for the open jump shot. When
the ball was moved quickly many of
those passes were forced down low
and JMU took over possession.
The Lady Pirates out shot their
opponent in every category in the
first half. ECU posted percentages
of .524, .400 and .727 for total field
goals, three pointers and free throws
respectively. While JMU only shot
.467, .333 and .500 respectively.
Tomekia Blackmon led the Lady
Pirates scoring in the first half with
10 points, while Charlesworth added
nine. Blackmon also led the way in
rebounding grabbing five in the first
half.
JMU came out in the second
half ready to down the Lady Pirates,
but ECU was not going to make it
easy for the Dukes. ECU took the
second half lead after a Blackmon
shot in the lane but then the lead
slowly diminished. JMU began to
pull away with a two point lead then
a five point lead and eventually
JMU's biggest lead was 13 in the
second half. Around the eight
minute mark ECU started to make
a comeback. JMU saw their 13 point
lead slowly fade to a one point lead
after a Justine AHpress lay up. How-
ever, that was the closest the Lady
Pirates would come before eventu-
ally losing 61-66.
Donovan attributes good defen-
sive play for the comeback by the
Lady Pirates.
"I think defensively we really
stepped it up and didn't give them
any easy shots. We made a few ad-
justments on their plays with our
man-to-man defense
What really cost the game for
ECU was the lack of free throws
made at the line. During the second
half, ECU shot only .300 from the
line. The 3-10 shots made in the sec-
ond half were a big disappointment
than the 8-11 shots made in the first
half.
Two of the Lady Pirates scored
in double figures for the game.
Blackmon contributed 17 points and
Charlesworth added 11 points for
the night. ECU pulled down 34 re-
bounds for the contest. The four
leading rebounders for the night
were Laurie Ashenfelder and
Blackmon who pulled down seven
boards each, AHpress with five
boards and Tracey Kelley with three.
This was ECU'S first CAA con-
test of the season and Donovan
hopes now that other teams in the
conference will not take ECU lightly.
"Our kids have had a rough
time in the CAA the past couple of
years and we're here to play this
year Donovan added. "I think if
anything we've walked away with
confidence and determined we're
not satisfied, and we are determined
to keep stepping it up
FIESTA from page 17
have to find two new stars to defend
his national championship. If he suc-
ceeds ethically, then maybe our
doubts of his program may soon dis-
sipate, but unfortunately it's doubt-
ful. You know it's hard to break old
habits.
Athletic programs who encour-
age the philosophy of winning at any
cost are becoming the wave of the
'90s. It's only been four months since
half a dozen Tennessee Volunteers
were accused of misusing the tele-
phone and another accused of rape.
Clean cut quarterback Peyton Man-
ning can't even change the reputation
Tennessee has established for itself.
So those little leaguers, who have
become a fixture of NFL half-time
commercials, have new role models to
look to. Posters of players like
Lawrence Phillips will adorn their
walls. They'll never know the true
meaning of greatness in players like
Lynn Swan when all they have to look
to are criminals like Phillips.
The ECU Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
t�2
TICKET PRICES
Student $8.00
FacultyStaff $10.00
General Public $12.00
At the Door $15.00
O 7A5�,8H�ik.O
AND THE FLECKTONES
Wednesday, January 24,1996
Wright Auditorium �
MasterCard� and Visa9 accepted. All tickets are General Admission. Doors open at 7:00 PM.
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhoil Student Center, ECU.
For more information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
There's an easier way
than this to reach the
ECU Student Media
Send your information via the campus E-mail
system or the Internet to The East Carolinian at:
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or to WZMB at:
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or to The Rebel at:
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or to Expressions at:
UUEXPRES@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 11, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 11, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1115
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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