The East Carolinian, December 5, 1995







TUEft
Decembers, 1995
Vol 71, No. 27
Around the State
RALEIGH (AP) - It will be
more than just another argument
before the U.S. Supreme Court
wnen parties square off over con-
gressional districts that were drawn
to ensure minority representation
on the U.S. House.
Oral argument is scheduled for
today before the nation's highest
court
At stake are the seats of Reps.
Mel Watt and Eva Clayton, both
Democrats. Watt represents North
Carolina's 12th District and Clayton
represents the First District both
drawn to elect minorities.
RALEIGH (AP) - A slaughter-
house big enough to kill and carve
millions of hogs a year can gener-
ate thousands of new jobs in East-
ern North Carolina but also add
costs that promoters won't discuss,
says a Bladen County commis-
sioner.
IBP Corp. wants to build a
hog-slaughtering plant on a 323-
acre parcel near Tarboro.
Edgecombe County commissioners,
who met Monday night must ap-
prove rezoning the land for that
purpose.
Around the Country
NEW YORK (AP) - An Ameri-
can kidney dialysis patient is twice
as likely to die in a given year as a
patient in Japan and parts of West-
ern Europe, The New York Times
reported Monday.
The newspaper said it investi-
gated the American dialysis busi-
ness, particularly National Medical
Care Inc the most influential com-
pany in the field. It said it found an
industry that uses equipment and
procedures that cut costs and raise
profits, often at the expense of pa-
tients' health.
SAN ANTONIO (AP) - A man
burst into a home looking for a
teen-age girl he claimed had given
him AIDS and opened fire, killing
two people and wounding three
before shooting himself to death,
police said.
The man reloaded his semiau-
tomatic pistol and went back into
the house to shoot several times
Sunday as children and others fled
through windows and back doors,
witnesses told police.
Around the World
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia
(AP) - Bones, teeth and other arti-
facts of several U.S. servicemen miss-
ing in Cambodia during the Vietnam
War were handed over to American
officials in Phnom Penh Monday.
An undetermined number of
remains were given to U.S. officials
in six coffins draped with American
flags. They were recovered in two
separate operations in cooperation
with Cambodian officials.
PARIS (AP) - A man took stu-
dents and a teacher hostage at a
primary school for about two hours
Monday before he was captured.
The man entered Louis Aragon
School in the northern Paris sub-
urb of Clichy as classes were ending
and seized 30 students and their
teacher, police said.
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
African dance highlights festival
Pre-Kwanzaa
celebration
strengthens
African American
heritage
Miriam Brooks
Staff writer
The second annual Pre-
Kwanzaa festival, which featured
The Cultural Movement African
Dance Company, was celebrated at
7 p.m. on December 1 in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center.
Kwanzaa is an African Ameri-
can holiday celebration which be-
gins on December 26 and ends on
January 1. The celebration was cre-
ated in 1966 by Dr. Maulana
Karenga. The ceremony draws its
symbolism and expressive forms
from African agricultural festivals.
The word Kwanzaa is Swahili, mean-
ing "first fruit"
According to Anne Hurrey, di-
rector of The Cultural Movement,
the strengthening of the African-
American community is the primary
aim of the festival.
"We as African-Americans must
measure where we came from and
where we are going Hurrey said.
"Kwanzaa symbolism serves as a re-
minder
Hurrey explained the symbol-
ism of Kwanzaa to the audience in
Jenkins Art Building as a steady
drum beat expanded in the back-
ground.
"Ears of corn are representative
of children Hurrey said.
Each family is supposed to have
as many ears of corn as there are
children present or hoped for. The
unity cup, another prominent sym-
bol, has two basic functions. The
first is to pour forth libations for
the ancestors.
"It is also drunk from as a sym-
bol to promote unity in the family
Hurrey said.
The dancers then lit the seven
candles of Kwanzaa representing the
See DANCE page 5
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
The Cultural Movement from "Goldsboro perform a native Guinea dance during a pre-
Kwanzaa celebration which was held in Jenkins Art Builing last Friday night.
Rights, Responsibilities
mark World Aids Day
Local activities
raise awareness,
hope and money
for community
Holly Hagey
StaffWrtter
Many activities were held
throughout Pitt county in recogni-
tion of World AIDS Day on Friday,
Dec 1. Among these activities were
an interdenominational church ser-
vice which looked at the issue of
AIDS and how churches can be-
come involved, an open house at the
Pitt County Aids Service Organiza-
tion (PICASO), a candlelight vigil
and a play performed by students at
ECU.
"We had a good response said
John Beieutz, director of PICASO.
"The vigil went well also. Over 100
people came and we walked from
Jarvis Memorial to the Town Com-
mons. It helped energize people to
continue education about AIDS
The play, sponsored by Gary
Faircloth, was performed directly af-
ter the vigil and dealt with the im-
pact of AIDS on families.
Since the emergence of AIDS in
the early 1980's, the number of
people infected by the illness has
been steadily increasing. As of June
30,1995,1,169,811 cumulative AIDS
cases have been reported to the
World Health Organization world
wide.
AIDS affects people everywhere
and Pitt County is no exception.
There have been 187 reported
cases of AIDS in Pitt County. This
number is only inclusive of cases
that were reported and does not
include anonymous testing and
does not include people who have
come to the area for treatment
To help make people every-
where more aware of the problem
and to help educate people about
AIDS related issues, the World
Heath Organization began World
Aids Day eight years ago.
The theme for this year's
World AIDS Day was "Shared
Rights, Shared Responsibilities"
which strengthens the idea of
equality and solidarity in the world
response to the HIVAIDS cause.
See AIDS page 5
Pro-life message
creates discussion
Student protests T-shirts
Student Stores
continues to sell
remaining
merchandise
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
After shopping in the Student
Stores, an ECU student believes she
has been discriminated against.
Nicole Lewis, a senior at ECU,
was shopping at the Student Store
in August when she ran across a T-
shirt stating "The Top Ten Reasons
Why I did not go to Carolina On
the shirt it gave 10 reasons why a
student would prefer to go to ECU
over UNC.
The shirt states for the sixth
reason why a student should not
go to Carolina as "There are no
weight limits for sororities
When Lewis read this she be-
came upset. She felt this shirt
should not be sold in the Student
Stores because it discriminated
See T-SHIRT page 4
EMMS"7
sngramswaInT
� nmva.
jYHAVE A HIGH SCHOOL
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
An advertising supplement in
last Thursday's issue of TEC, has a
lot of people talking. The insert an
in-depth pro-life argument, was
printed by the
Human Life Alli-
ance of Minne-
sota, Inc and
has become the
topic of many
student and fac-
ulty discussions.
The 12-page
insert contained
pictures of
aborted fetuses,
statistics docu-
mented from
various sources
and vivid testi- emmmmmmmmmawm
monials from women who have had
abortions.
Because of the pictures and
some of the graphic details contained
in some parts of the argument many
students said they found the insert
"If you want
someone to listen,
you have to wake
them up and get
their attention
first
� Regan Buzzell,
sophomore
alarming and in poor taste while oth-
ers said the insert was just a strong
presentation of a legitimate argu-
ment
Among those students who
found the article informative and fair
were sophomores Regan Buzzell and
Calvin Stephenson.
"I thought it
was about time
said Buzzell. "We
hear so much
about pro-
choice
Stephenson
agreed and said
he was very
happy to see that
someone took the
time to write an
in-depth, pro-life
argument.
Buzzell
1'1 added that al-
though some of the pictures were a
bit extreme, she felt they were highly
effective and made the argument
stronger.
See PRO-LIFE page 5
College endorsed
Nontraditional students given new
option to earning degrees
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
Photos by KEN CLARK
This controversial shirt remains on sale in the Student
Stores. Managers do not plan to reorder the item.
Due to the increasing number of nontraditional students, members
of the faculty senate reviewed and endorsed a new concept that will
allow students to earn a degree even if they are unable to keep a regular
Monday through Friday schedule.
During its Nov. 7 meeting, the senate approved the motion of stu-
dents earning degrees at ECU by attending classes on Friday nights and
Saturdays.
The new weekend college plan will primarily benefit nontraditional
students and should be in effect by the beginning of the Fall 1996 se-
mester, according to Chancellor Richard Eakin.
"The idea originated with a group of individuals on campus and was
subjected to a series of reviews before the endorsement was granted
akin said. "It is designed to provide educational opportunities to stu-
dnts who cannot attend classes at the regular time
Eakin added that by enrolling less than part time, having a course
load of about six hours per semester, weekend college students would
take more than twice as long as regular students to earn a degree.
See DEGREE page 4
Ufjftfe
y�4idt
Don't cram for examspage
OPINION
UUf
Ideas for keeping the holiday spiritpage D
Coach has home tiespage I dL
Tuesday
Partly cloudy
ft
High 64
Low 40
Wednesday
Fair skies, mild
High 62
Low 40
3rW t tetc4 et4
Ph�ne
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner






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I i -i iriliiiu.
Tuesday, December 5, 1995
The East Carolinian

Click it" campaign starts Campus housing and dining
Grace Sullivan
Staff Writer
"Click It or Ticket" campaign
has been launched for Greenville.
The state wide program, which
encourages motorist to buckle up,
began three years ago and is al-
ready having surprising results. The
campaign has cut deaths and seri-
ous accidents by 12 percent. The
reduction of fatalities caused by
drivers buckling their seat belts has
saved taxpayers almost $164 mil-
lion in health care costs and lower
insurance rates, according to a
press release by the N.C. Highway
Safety Initiative.
"Auto insurance companies
also reduced their rate increase re-
quests by $33 million said Insur-
ance Commissioner Jim Long.
Commissioner Long has
teamed up with Gov. Hunt in the
"Click It or Ticket "campaign,
which is bringing together the N.C.
Department of Insurance and the
National Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration.
"The aim of 'Click It' was to
save lives and health care dollars -
and it's working Long said.
Commissioner Long is also
pleased with the savings that are
being attributed to the success of
the 'Click It' campaign.
"This is the first time in North
Carolina history that a prospective
saving has been attributed to a traf-
fic safety program" Long said.
The 1995 campaign has been
expanded to target seven new ad-
ditional cities; one of them being
Greenville. As part
of the new cam-
paign, Greenville
motorists can ex-
pect to see new
check points set
up to enforce the
safety belt regu-
lation laws.
Gov. Hunt has
issued a warning
to motorists urg-
ing them to
buckle up or they
will receive a
ticket and pay a
fine of $25. The
ticket does not af-
fect the motorists'
driving record or
insurance points.
However, on a
positive note, the
money received
from the fines
goes to support
local public schools. The "Click It
or Ticket" campaign has already
raised over $2.4 million for local
public school districts
Since the campaign first began
in 1993, North Carolinians have
made a conscious effort to comply
with the seat belt regulations, the
release stated. The rate of motor-
ists who buckle up has climbed
from 65 percent to 81 percent. Hunt
believes this year's new campaign,
which began Nov. 21, will continue
to increase the percentage of mo-
torists buckling their safety belts.
In addition to setting up more
than 2.000 check points through-
out the state, the new campaign
GREENVILLE
SEAT BELT USE
LAST WEEK U.
RECORD 83
Photo by KEN CLARK
This sign on Charles Boulevard will be
updated each week during the campaign.
will post seat belt feedback signs.
The signs will show motorists the
weekly percentage of seat belt use
in the city. Greenville has already
posted one of these signs on
Charles Boulevard, near Minges
Coliseum.
The signs are designed to
prompt motorists to buckle up, and
remind them "Click It or Ticket" is
in operation.
In addition to looking for driv-
ers violating the seat belt laws, law
enforcement officers will be crack-
ing down on impaired drivers, es-
pecially during the upcoming holi-
day season, the release stated.
Total for the State Employees Campaign
$150,401 thus far, and some dollars continue to
trickle in. (That's 100.3 of stated goal of $150,000!)
MAKE
TOR
BOOKS
We Buy More Used BooksThan
Anyone Mown. Period
516 S. Cotanche Street, 758-2616
Open 9:00-6:00 Monday-Friday- 10:00-5:00 Saturday
Open 8:30am-7pmDec 11-14; 8:30am-6pmDec. 15; 9am-6pmDec. 16
services ask students to jam
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff K.iter
ECU's dining and housing ser-
vices is sponsoring a pajama party.
On Thursday, Dec. 7 students will
be given the opportunity to partici-
pate in Jammie Jam at Todd and
Mendenhall Dining Halls.
"It is free to all students said
Chris Warren, marketing manager
for ECU's Campus Dining. "It will
help students relax before exams.
They will be able to take their minds
off their worries
Warren states the event was set
up to give students on campus the
chance to participate in a non-alco-
holic activity. He feels that the stu-
dents need this activity since there
is no reading day this semester.
The night will be filled with mu-
sic, games, prizes and food for all
those who attend.
"There will be a pajama contest,
pillow fight, cereal bowl grab game
and a butterfly dance contest War-
ren said.
Activities are planned in indi-
vidual residence halls to get stu-
dents prepared for the big event.
Warren states that the residence
halls will be having contests to see
which of their residents have the
craziest pajamas. The winners from
these contest will compete in the
finals on Thursday night.
"Dining and housing services
hopes this event will help break up
the monotony of everyday life War-
ren said. "I would like to see the stu-
dents become more involved. I want
the students to get the whole expe-
rience while attending ECU. I think
many times a student feels that din-
ing and housing services are just
there to take your money for dining
and housing. This is our chance to
See JAM page 5
Eye in the sky
Photo by KEN CLARK
This camera located in Speight Building watches traffic (and people) as they pass.
The camera relays images to an Internet hook-up which updates parking information.
ALL VARIETIES EXCEPT I. INDIVIDUALLY QUICK
GARDEN SALAD
FROZEN BONE-IN
Fresh Express Split Chicken
Salad Mix Breast
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
Gold W Krlspy
Fried Chicken
9.5-12-oz.
Pound
' Sold in
4-lb. Pkgs.
Items & Prices Good Through December 9,1995 copyright 1995. The Kroger co
Items & Prices Good in Greenville
We reserve the right to limit qunnt
ties None sold to dealers
tP9r �� ��





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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995
University employ-
ees can pick up
December pay-
checks Dec. 15
andor Dec. 22.
Cramming with caffeine causes side effects
Carver Music
Now open giving you the best in
music gear and the best prices
around! Looking for guitars,
amps, drums, p.a. (installed) or
musical accessories? carver
Music is the place for deals on:
Mackie; qsc � soundtech � shure
mesaboogie � marshall � laney �
tama � ibanez � washburn � jack-
jjoncharvel � godin � korg
products.
1645 West 5th (HWY 264)
Washington, N.C. 27889
Its worth the 20 min. drive
Call! (919) 975-1030
Come in and register for our
Ibanez Guitar & Amp giveaway
CPS - A third-year University of
Florida exercise and sports science
major, slept a total of four or five
hours during finals week last semes-
ter between studying for general
chemistry and qualitative analysis,
human anatomy and personal growth.
During that time span, Gordon
Braun said he went through two boxes
of Vivarin and about 20 cans of Moun-
tain Dew or Dr. Pepper.
"I was just so so wired he
said, describing how his knees and
hands shook from all the caffeine.
Eric Bragger, a second-year UF
microbiology major, described how an
all-nighter actually helped him pull off
a B on a western civilization exam
for which he said he had "no clue
"It's so quiet, and it's so dark, and
you've got your desk lamp on or some-
thing, and you're concentrating so
hard Bragger said. "But then on the
other hand, you're so tired and all
of a sudden your brain just stops and
you're like, 'I need another soda
Most students have at one time
or another used caffeine to pull them
through a long night of studying. Ac-
cording to Loran Chastain, a student
in UF's pharmacy program, caffeine
is a stimulating drug that when taken
in moderation can improve awareness,
performance and mood.
"The system is acting on an in-
creased level in carrying out its nor-
mal functions he said, describing the
drug's effects.
Though caffeine is primarily
found in coffee, tea, Coke and choco-
late, according to a Food and Drug
Administration consumer report It is
also found in baked goods, frozen
dairy desserts, gelatin, puddings, pie
fillings and soft candy.
Presbyterian Church )SA.)
First Presbyterian Church
invites ECU students
for an evening of Christmas
Celebration.
Excessive caffeine intake, a dos-
age of 500 to 600 milligrams pe. day
for an adult, can cause headaches,
insomnia, irritability, dizziness, sud-
den tremors, anxiety and loss of ap-
petite.
In addition, it can cause racing
and irregular heartbeat, facial flush-
ing and gastrointestinal problems
such as nausea and vomiting.
Gretchin Erwin, an elementary
education sophomore, said she felt she
had such symptoms. When she was
in the 10th grade, she and a friend
each took Vivarin, an over-the-counter-
caffeine-based stimulant
"We've gotta be really cool and
do this she said, describing their
reasoning at the time, "we heard
about how awesome it was
After taking just one pill each,
she and her friend began to feel sick.
"It felt like my heart was pound-
ing out of my chest it was painful
I seriously thought I was having a
heart attack
"We couldn't believe what I did,
but we both vowed never to use it
again she said.
Over-the-counter medications like
Vivarin offer the same effects as soda
or coffee, only more intense, Chastain
said, usually causing an upset stom-
ach and nausea.
"You're dumping a lot of caffeine
on the body at once Chastain said.
"It tends to shock the body
Caffeine is addictive and can in-
duce withdrawal symptoms including
irritability, nervousness, restlessness,
drowsiness, headaches and lethargy,
Chastain said.
However, Dr. Michael J. Huey,
director of Student Health Care at the
UF Infirmary, said it is possible,
though difficult, to eliminate caffeine
from the diet It is important to do it
slowly in order to avoid withdrawal
effects.
Caffeine, unfortunately, is found
in some unlikely places, Huey said. For
example, he said that Anacin brand
aspirin used to include caffeine. The
company found that most people
drink more caffeine during the week
to get them through. As a result, they
got more headaches on the weekend
from caffeine withdrawal.
It is difficult to assess exactly how
dangerous caffeine can be because
some people are more sensitive to it
than others. Huey said people espe-
cially at risk are those who suffer from
irregular heartbeats of any kind, se-
vere hypertension, stomach problems
including ulcers or migraines.
Caffeine increases activity in the
systems of the body. It causes the
stomach to secrete more acid, the
heart to beat more quickly and the
blood to flow faster to the brain. An
increased amount of blood to the
brain is what causes that thumping
feeling associated with migraines,
Huey said. Using caffeine to get
through an all-nighter won't help on
any exam, Huey said.
"Just because caffeine is a stimu-
lant doesn't mean it'll make you at
your best in processing information
Huey said.
Although caffeine can increase
brain activity, sleep deprivation will
still slow the clarity and precision of
thinking.
L
The annual lov Gift Service. December 10, 5:00 PM, an
informal service of music to open the Christmas season.
"This Day is Born Emmanuel
A Christmas Cantata offered by the Gallery Choir,
Children's Choir, and the Greenville Youth Orchestra.
Sing in the Christmas Season, and then join us for Chili!
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water �Sewer -Cable �Draperies �Self-cleaning Oven �Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections -Utility Room -Patio with Fence
�Living Room -Ceiling Fan �Deadbolt Locks �Walk-in Closets
FEATURING
�Swimming Pool �Basketball Court �Tennis Court 'Laundry Facilities
�located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service -Yearly Lease -Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN
FIVE MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
"Now Leasing for Spring Semester 1996"
" "Bring this coupon in to"receive $200 Security Dep.
Applies only to leases beginning in January
752-0277
()))ortumt
BAH DEfmmm 3AK
Featuring Comedians From HBO's Def Comedy Jam
REGGIE
McFADDEN
T A I FMT Guest Comedian on FoxsMartin andI1 Uytog Color
Guest Comedian on BET's Snaps and Comic View
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1995 � 8:00 PM � HENDRIX THEATRE
GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS - ONLY$4.00
TICKETS ON SALE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
8:30 AM - 6:00 PM M0N-FRI � CT0 PHONE - 1-800 ECU ARTS OR 328-4788
tf
Immediately Following the Show in the Mendenhall Social Room
FREE for ECU Students with Comedy Jam Ticket Stub
$3.00 Admission without Comedy Jam Ticket Stub
Tickets Available At the Door Following Exam Def Comedy Jam
Sponsored by the Student Union Cultural Awareness b Popular Entertainment Committees and the National Pan-Hellenic Council
�- .
9� ,





1
��- , r � . �:�
4
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
T-SHIRT from page !
against overweight people.
"ECU has a responsibility to its
students Lewis said. "I would not
have a problem with this shirt be-
ing sold anywhere off campus but
ECU is an equal opportunity
school. The comment is offensive.
I would expect ECU to accept any
individual. It should not matter
whether a person is short, tall,
black or white
Lewis went to the merchandise
manger, Steve Jepson, and com-
plained about the T-shirts. She
wanted the T-shirts to be removed
from the store. Lewis contends that
Jepson told her that he would call
the manufacturer and have the line
changed or would cancel the con-
tinuation of ordering these shirts.
"I sympathize said Wanda
Scarborough, manager of the Stu-
dent Store, "I do not want to sell
anything that would offend some-
one
Lewis was happy with the
agreement made between Jepson
and herself in August and thought
that the problem had been resolved.
She said that the Student Store
took the shirts out of the display
case. When Lewis went back to the
Student Stores recently, however,
she realized that the shirts were
still hanging on the racks and now
feels that her rights as a student
have been violated.
"That was a very popular
shirt Scarborough said. "We have
not reordered them since Ms. Lewis
has come up to us. We are now try-
ing to deplete the last shipment of
these shirts that we ordered. We try
to represent the whole student
body. We do not want anyone to feel
discriminated against"
Scarborough states that the
Student Stores cannot take the
shirts that were already ordered
before the complaint was made off
the shelves.
"We lose money if we do not
deplete what we already have in
stock Scarborough said. "All the
profits that the Student Stores
make go to scholarships. Taking the
shirts that had been previously or-
dered would take away scholarships
from deserving students
Jepson stated that the Student
Stores had just placed an order
when the complaint was brought to
his attention.
"We normally receive 144
shirts in an order Jepson said. "It
can take up to three to four months
to sell that amount of shirts. I can
promise that we have not reordered
any more T-shirts. The Student
Stores is just trying to deplete what
they had already ordered. I ex-
plained this to the student and she
seemed to be happy with this ar-
rangement"
Scarborough states that the
Student Stores tries to represent
every minority and majority group.
"The Student Stores tries to
represent all individuals on cam-
pus Scarborough said. "We are
getting new T-shirts in which Pee-
Dee will be black. The black Pee-
Dee will help represent the African
American culture
Lewis was not the only one on
campus who was offended by the
T-shirts though.
"These T-shirts were targeting
minorities said Rachel Lawson, a
freshman, "It is not necessary
The BAGEL STORE
On the Corner of "More Than Just Bagels'
10th & Charles bakery, deli, cafe
Behind Krispy Kreme
830-8804
Open:
MON-THUR7-9
FRI& SAT 7-10
SUN 7-3
Buy one Bagel sandwich,
get second for only
12 Price
of equal or lesser value
May Not be combined ilh any other offers
WMh coupon only Expires 12-15-95
ir
ii
ii
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ii
ii
� Muffins,
Belgian Waffles,
A variety of salads,
Mediterranean
Specialties, Espressos,
Cappuncinos, Lattes
3 free bagels
w Purchase of 1 doz.
(12) bagels
. � � � ��
ii Breakfast special
Coffee & Bagel
w cream cheese
II
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Only $1.29
�i
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May Not be combined with any other
With coupon only Expires 12-15-95
May Not be combined with any other offers I
With coupon only Expires 12-15-95
DEGREE frontpage 1
"More than likely, those stu-
dents who will be attending week-
end college will be coming in as
transfer stu-
dents and will "
have most of
the basic gen-
eral college re-
quirements, so
they will be
completing
their education
instead of be-
ginning it
Eakin said.
Vice Chan-
cellor of Aca-
demic Affairs
T i n s 1 e y
Yarborough
agreed that
most of the mmimmmmttmmm
weekend col-
lege students will be seeking a firs,
degree and will be transferring
from other universities and commu-
9
"It is designed to
provide
educational
opportunities to
students who
cannot attend
classes at the
regular time
- Chancellor Richard Eakin
nity colleges.
"Several units have expressed
interests in having their majors
included in the
' l,r ' new concept
Yarborough said.
"I see it as a great
opportunity for
nontraditional
students, and the
program should
be successful
Both Eakin
and Yarborough
expressed con-
cerns over some
aspects of the
weekend college
concept. They
said there are
some issues that
����������� have to be re-
solved before the
plan can be put into action.
"First, we have to make sure
that all of the courses and degree
programs being offered are clearly
defined Eakin said, "and we have
to be sure that the quality of offer-
ings are the same as in traditional
college
"More importantly
Yarborough added, "we have to be
sure staff members will be available
to meet with students at these
times
The senate is currently work-
ing to make sure all of the normal
services will be available. Accord-
ing to Eakin, in order for this new
concept to run as smoothly as the
traditional college concept, services
must be equal, including food ser-
vices and regular book store privi-
leges.
No news writers'
meeting today.
Haue a great
vacation.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995
JAJV1 from page 2
give back to the students
The Jammie Jam js planned for
the students, but some students are
not interested in attending. They
feel this event is childish and does
not represent the student body.
"I think the Jammie Jam is stu-
pid and a waste of time said Annie
Bommer, a student.
Other students feel that this
event is very helpful and is impor-
tant for students to get involved
with campus activities.
PRO-LIFE from page 1
"I think all campus activities
are a good thing said Charles
Barchuk, a student. "I think stu-
dents who do not belong to a Greek
organization many times feel they
have nothing to do. This will help
get students who are not involved
in a Greek fraternity or sorority
more involved. I also think this
helps students acknowledge alcohol
awareness. It shows students they
can have a good time without hav-
'ing to drink
THE PLAZA MALL
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Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
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"If you want someone to listen,
you have to wake them up and get
their attention first Buzzel said
"I thought the pictures were
wonderful Stephenson said. "So
many people don't realize exactly
what it is they are aborting Page
three of the insert had a section en-
titled "Chronology of a New Life"
which explained the levels of fetal
development from fertilization
through the ninth month.
Another section of the insert
which prompted some shocked re-
sponses stated abortion is wrong
even in cases of rape and incest In
one of the articles, David C. Reardon
wrote: "When the needs of pregnant
rape victims are carefully examined,
it can be shown that) abortion is not
necessary and is very likely to hinder
recovery by increasing feelings of
guilt, shame, and low self- esteem
Stephenson said he agrees with
the writer of that article and said the
unborn child had nothing to do with
the act of violence and therefore
should not be punished.
"Even if the mother decides she
cannot look beyond the child's con-
ception, she should opt for adoption,
a wonderful alternative Stephenson
said.
Many students expressed oppo-
sition to the validity of the argument
Vanessa Monroe, a junior major-
ing in political science said the in-
sert might have been more appropri-
ate if it had been accompanied by an
equally strong pro-choice argument.
"What was presented in the in-
sert was one very biased side of the
story Monroe told TEC, adding that
the idea of subjecting a victim of rape
or incest to giving birth to the child
is ludicrous and insensitive.
Sophomore Denise Heptig said
the most disturbing thing about the
insert was the assortment of pic-
tures.
"I don't think it was right at
all Heptig said. "And I don't think
the pictures gave an accurate pic-
ture of what an unborn fetus looks
like in certain stages of develop-
ment"
Many readers said the insert
contained some completely false
statements.
An article on page thifee, with
no listed author, stated a compan-
ion case to Roe v. Wade which
passed a ruling that "permitted
abortion-on-demand in all fifty
states right up until birth for any
reason
According to Dr. Tammy
Conner-Moore, MD an ECU School
of Medicine graduate and practic-
ing family doctor, in North Caro-
lina and most other places, doc-
tors will not approve abortions af-
ter six months unless it is medically
necessary.
"I don't know of any place that
would do it up to full term
Conner-Moore said. "Unless a doc-
tor has decided that giving birth
would endanger the life of mother
or child, an abortion would not be
approved
Another section of the insert
condemned the use of the I.U.D (In-
trauterine Device) as a method of
contraception because its primary
mode of action is to repeatedly in-
duce abortion by "creating a hos-
tile and inflammatory environment
in the womb so that a newly con-
ceived child cannot implant and
grow there
"That statement is untrue
Conner-Moore said. "That's not the
way an l.U.D. works at all Accord-
ing to the doctor, the I.U.D. is a
true from of contraception because
it works by preventing the sperm
to unite with the egg in the uterus.
"No conception no abortion
Dr. Yolanda Burwell of the
ECU School of Social Work said the
use of half-truths and one-sided ar-
guments are just a form of carefully
calculated propaganda.
"Like most proponents of any
group, they tend to slant their
communication toward their own
interests Burwell said. "They
know that people read what is di-
rectly in front of them and accept it
without contest. Presenting an in-
sert that is well-prepared but not
necessarily factual is just another
tactic they use to gain an audience.
"I feel what is really missing
here is balanced representation. In
order for us to get both sides of this
very serious topic, a comparable pro-
choice argument should have been
introduced also. As human beings
we should have the basic right to
hear two factual sides of an argu-
ment and decide for ourselves which
holds the most validity
A.JLIO from page 1
Some of the central ideas gener-
ated by this theme are the rights of
people world wide to be treated with
dignity and respect to receive care
and support if infected and the free-
dom to carry on a normal life. Shared
responsibilities include the need for
individuals to protect themselves,
families and communities by educat-
ing their members about HIVAIDS,
government responsibilities to imple-
ment preventive measures and ensure
equal access to care services and in-
ternal community responsibility to
support global causes and help poorer
countries to benefit from gained
knowledge in the fight against HIV
AIDS.
Another of the activities held lo-
cally on Friday to recognize World
AIDS Day was a fund raiser sponsored
by the Percolator. The Percolator
sponsored a breakfast and donated 10
percent of their profits from the day
to PICASO.
"As it happened, Friday was one
of our biggest nights. We were able
to contribute a lot more than I
For Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni
TRIP INCLUDES:
� Round-Trip Bus Transportation
� Liberty Bowl Game Ticket
� ECU Pre-taUgate Breakfast
� Hotel Accommodations for Two Nights at Ramada Inn
SCHEDULE:
Thursday, December 28
� Departure at 6:00 PM from Mendenhall Student Center
� Meals and rest stops on the way
Friday, December 29
� Arrival at Ramada Inn in Memphis at 2.00 PM
� Transportation to downtown Memphis for Liberty Bowl Parade
� Overnight stay at Ramada Inn
Saturday, December 30
� 11:00 AM - Liberty Bowl Game
�Depart for return trip after game
�Overnight stay at Ramada Inn in Nashville, TN
Sunday, December 31
�Trip Home - Arrival in evening at Mendenhall Student Center
COST PER PERSON:
$175 - Quad Occupancy Room
$180 - Triple Occupancy Room
$190 - Double Occupancy Room
$250 - Single Occupancy Room
oDeyr
Contact Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
328-4788 or 1-800 ECU ARTS
Student Union Hotline - 328-6004
Surprise your folks.
ItYhei, you stay awake in class, you tend to learn more. (Unless you have an uncanny
talent of learning through osmosis.) So don't let fatigue get in the way of your A, Revive
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thought we'd be able to and I was very
happy that we were able to do that
said Tina Cowan, manager of the Per-
colator. "The breakfast we sponsored
was also very successful. We had ap-
proximately 3040 that came
As well as contributing money,
the Percolator also worked with
PICASO and distributed flyers and
condoms throughout the day. Music
related to AIDS and performed by an
artist fleeply involved with the AIDS
cause was played to add to the theme
of the day.
PICASO has been in the area for
nine years and provides services such
as helping individuals to find housing,
finding resources and money to obtain
medicine, nutrition education and pre-
vention services to the community. In
addition to the work PICASO put into
World AIDS Day, the organization also
sponsored a canned food drive during
AIDS awareness month in October.
This drive helps to keep the food
shelves full during the year and enables
PICASO to continue providing services
to the community.
1AJM KjMu from page 1
seven days of the festival and the
Nguzo Saba, The Seven Principals.
According to Hurrey, "the candles
are symbolic of our parent people
on the continent of Africa
The lighting of the candles is a
daily ritual performed by those who
celebrate Kwanzaa in their homes.
Finally Anne Hurrey announced
the "the calling together of the com-
munity" and the drums exploded
while brightly colored dancers filled
the stage. The first dance presented
by The Cultural Movement has its
roots in Guinea, West Africa where
the dance is performed during rites
of passage. Hurrey decided to "test
the rhythm in the room" by encour-
aging the audience to join in the
dance. "This is not a theater, this is
a celebration she said. Most adults
and all of the children began to
dance.
The second dance called
KouKou comes from the ethnic
group in Guinea known as the Sou
Sou. Kou Kou is performed by this
group whenever a child is born or
when there is a birthday, Hurrey
said. Part of the dance was per-
formed by The Children of Koinonia
Christian Center of Greenville who
participated in a workshop spon-
sored by The Cultural Movement.
The dancers of The Cultural
Movement are all females, the
youngest being eight years old. The
drummers boast a little boy of only
four years who beats on a drum as
large as his body. The lead drum-
mer, whose rhythm called everyone
toward the dance, further pulled the
audience by signaling to his head,
heart, and the people between beats.
The Cultural Movement African
Dance Company of Goldsboro, N.C.
was founded in 1977 and travels
throughout the U.S. They have also
performed in Japan and Portugal
and are currently planning a trip to
Europe. The Cultural Movement is
celebrating their ninth annual
Kwanzaa festival in Goldsboro, N.C.
on December 29. Thirteen musical
groups, numerous dance companies
and storytellers will be present to
continue the expression of Kwanzaa
through drums, dance and drama.
Its a feeling, a matter
of style, a way of life.
GORDON'S
GOLF & SKI
9am - 7pm Monday - Saturday flDCDRICVCD
Open Friday 9am - 9pm UBCniVIC I Cll





.� - T
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
Once again ECU
has been
smashed by a
newspaper that
supports our
sister UNC-
system schools.
They claim it was
all in jest �
we're not
laughing.
Chip Alexander is at it again. The sports writer from The
News and Observer is notorious for slandering the good name
of Greenville and ECU.
Most notably, Alexander had this to say about the 1991
Peach Bowl Pirates.
"The Peach Bowl will belong to N.C. State on New Year's
Day, and there's no need to burn down Atlanta when you lose.
Just peacefully pack up all those 72 Fairlanes, souped up
Camaros and pickups, throw away the empties and head back
to the sticks
Now, four years later and with the Pack staying at home,
he continues to take shots at ECU.
In the Thursday, Nov. 30 edition of the N &0, Alexander
compared ECU with Liberty Bowl opponent Stanford. He used
an analogy involving the movie Twins, saying Stanford was
the genetically weak Danny Devito.
An excerpt from the article proposed the question "Which
diploma would you want to see on your surgeon's wall - one
from East Carolina or one from Stanford? Me too
We at TEC believe that this remark blatantly insults one of
the top medical schools in the state, and one which has been
ranked no. 1 nationally in the percentage of graduates enter-
ing primary care fields.
Alexander goes on to state how high tech and high brow
Stanford is, and that Andy and Barney ("The Andy Griffith
Show") went to ECU before turning to law enforcement
Chip has obviously not done his homework on ECU, who
has the largest and most comprehensive fiber optics network
in the nation.
ECU has the largest teacher education program in the state
and the 15th largest in the nation. ECU has the no. 1 art
school on the East Coast, and the only art program in North
Carolina accredited by the National Association of Schools of
Art and Design. The School of Business has the second oldest
accredited MBA programs in the state.
The music education program in the School of Music is
among the largest and strongest in the southeast, and the music
therapy program is the only one in a state-supported school in
N.C.
Accompanying Alexander's article was a chart depicting
the "dissimilarities" between Stanford and ECU. The chart
showed that residents of Greenville and students at the uni-
versity are barbeque-eating, Camaro-driving "Roseannewatch-
ing, beach music fans and Stanford's elite eat sushi, drive Jag-
uars, watch "Nova" and read Architectural Digest.
Sounds like sour grapes to us. Alexander's precious N.C.
State Wolfpack will be castrating bulls and planting tobacco
in Raleigh while the Pirates will be bowling in Memphis.
And to think, all this trash-talking from an adult named
"Chip HaHa.
m Letters to the Editor
This is in response to the article
you published on Tuesday entitled
Peace" (I don't have it with me to
check the title). What was the whole
point of that article, to blame the
white man for more of his victimiz-
ing? It is no secret that African-Ameri-
cans were treated unfairly and inhu-
manely in our nation's history, but it's
time to move on and quit bitching
about it That is a part of American
history; that means it is over! The Cau-
casians of this country should not
have to feel guilty for what their an-
cestors did years ago. Blacks and
whites both have the same opportu-
nities to advance in today's society. I
know that there are still racists out
Let's move on
there, but not enough to really! -er
the success of today's African-Ameri-
can. It's ludicrous to believe that any-
one is holding the majority of black
Americans behind today. We just had
a potential African-American presiden-
tial candidate and if he would have
ran I would have voted for him. We
also have a black Supreme Court
Chief Justice. But oh yes, somehow,
they are still being held back from
true success in this world of the white
man! I don't want anyone to abso-
lutely forget about what has happened
in our country's past, but to have a
successful future we all need to let
things go and quit looking for
crutches. If someone is not getting
what they feel they deserve in life then
they should not sit around and blame
people that have been dead for 100
years. And about black criminals be-
ing convicted three more times that
white ones. Well, maybe its (sic per-
haps that black criminals tend to be
repeat crimes and get punished more
because of that or because of many
other possible reasons; you can't just
throw it off on their skin color. I would
think that some amount of common
sense would be required before one
is hired to write for an institution of
higher learning's periodical?
Steven Starling
Sophomore
Hfftory
SUBSCRIBE TO
The East Carolinian
Support student-run media by subscribing:
To receive The East Carolinian, check the length
of subscription desired, complete your name
address, and send a check or money order to
Circulation Dept The East Carolinian, Student
Pubs Bldg ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
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Address
�atf 77,e jEf Carolinian
Stephanie LassKer, Editor-in-Chief
Crlssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Tambra Zlon, News Editor Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Wendy Ronntree, Assistant News Editor Ken Clark, Photo Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor Rick Lucas, Copy Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor Patrick Hlnson, Copy Editor
Cralg Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor Lani Adkinson, Copy Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Erika Gohde, Production Assistant Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed, letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
3284366.
'
Spread the cheer
Who loves Christmas? I love
Christmas, and due to the nature of
this country, I get to celebrate it from
the day after Thanksgiving up until
the day before New Year's. Can you
smell it in the air?
Christmas is many things to
many people. It is the job of those of
us who feel the most cheer for the
longest amount of time to share this
with everyone. Here are a few sug-
gestions as to how we might send our
friends into Christmas overdrive.
Learn all the words to the Christ-
mas songs and use them in your regu-
lar speech by sliding them between
the words in your sentences. If any-
one asks what you are talking about
simply act dumb and convince them
that they are hearing things.
Set your alarm to wake you up
in the middle of the night for every
night up until Christmas. Leave cook-
ies and milk out so your roommate
can see them, then get up and eat
them every night while your room-
mate is sleeping. Every morning tell
them that Santa came. This will ei-
ther drive them insane or it will con-
vince them that they need to get into
the spirit.
Make your friends eat their ce-
real with egg nog.
I have heard that if you can grow
a long white beard and laugh a lot
that people might be more inclined
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
Wear red and
green everyday.
Never let them
see you with ciny
other colors
to throw away their everyday stress
and become happy.
Get Home Alone stuck in the
VCR of that special friend that needs
the Christmas cheer. Every time they
turn on the tube they will see and
feel that warm fuzzy feeling that one
gets from watching those holiday
movies.
You might offer that special
someone a roll of HO, HO, HO toilet
paper.
Whenever you are sharing a car
with that person you should spend
the entire time pointing out trees
that would not look good with Christ-
mas lights. Imagine spending Christ-
mas morning around a bush. They,
after hours of this kind of stimulus,
might run out and buy a tree.
Sneak a couple of poinsettta
leaves into the salad.
If you really want to spread the
Christmas spirit around to your
friends you might try painting their
car to look like a sled, then tie a bunch
of reindeer to the front or rear
bumper.
Wear red and green everyday.
Never let them see you with any other
colors on except for red and green. If
they do catch you, flog yourself and
remind them that you have been bad.
When you are hanging around
make sure they see you looking
around the room. Pretend that you
are looking for elves and then jump
out of your chair and dive to the
ground. Then say "I missed him and
sit back down. Repeat this at random
times during the day.
Tell them that you have back
stage passes to the Nat King Cole
show. If they get excited tell them that
the show is after Christmas and they
wont get to go unless they get into
the Christmas spirit
Tie jingle bells around their feet
in a 3-to-4 foot strand.
Invite them to go sledding
Finally, no joke, go to a mall and
get your picture taken with Santal
Follow these instructions and you are;
sure to have a more jolly friend then
ever before. !
HNMhHhHmH
ATTENTION STUDENTS
If you have a complaint or comment write a
letter to the editor. Letters must be typed, 250
words or less and include name, major, year,
and telephone number.Drop your letters by
the Student Publications bldg. across from
Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us know what
you think. Your voice can be heard!
HHHM 00 x ?? xfcx
mm





wmKBatmmmmammutm
� � 'i -ii � ' " ' '
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
Cramming hurts
exam performance
Planning ahead
beats that endof-
the-year crunch
Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
It's that time of year again. No,
not Christmas time, exam time!
Most students feel an all-encom-
passing dread when the week of ex-
ams looms near. Although cramming
the night before an exam is the study
method of choice, pulling all-
nighters may actually be working
against you. There are any number
of study methods, however, that stu-
dents follow.
"Usually I cram, but recently
I've started studying ahead of time
with a small group says senior
Jenny Garner.
Another senior, Troy Hudson,
has a different method. "For mul-
tiple choice tests, I cram the night
before, but for tests including essays,
I try to start reviewing a couple of
days in advance he says.
Junior Kyle Gustafson lists a
Photo by KEN CLARK
John Herring and Jonathan Bascom get in some study time
surrounded by nature outside of Howell Science Building.
few approaches. "I usually start
studying at least two nights before
the exam and I try to ask my teach-
ers what will be on the exam. I also
make notecards for myself
Whatever your approach may
be, cramming the night before is not
the best. Dr. Lynn Roeder, who
See EXAM page 9
Charities need support
Many local aid
groups look for
holiday donations
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writ
It's the holiday season once
again, and for most of us that means
vacations, good food and lots of pre-
sents! Christmas lists are made, re-
vised, copied, revised again and
mailed, faxed or e-mailed to relatives,
friends and good old Saint Nick.
Many of us can count on getting at
least one of our favorite Christmas
wishes, including anything from
money to a computer or a stereo.
There are some people, however,
,who are not so fortunate. Their
Christmas lists don't include any
luxury" items - no CD players or
Nintendo Entertainment Centers. For
many, Christmas wish lists are the
same as everyday wish lists: a hot
meal, warm clothes and someplace
to sleep at night
For those of us who don't have
to wonder where our next meal is
coming from, it's easy to get caught
up in the material aspects of Christ-
mas. For those of us who spend
weeks decorating our homes, it's dif-
ficult to remember that there are
those who don't have a home to deco-
rate. For those of us who spend hours
cooking Christ-
mas dinner, it's
hard to remem-
ber that there
are those who
don't have
Monday dinner,
much less a
Christmas
feast
And while
no one should
feel guilty for
the luxuries
they have, it is
important to
remember, especially in the holiday
season, that there are people right
here in Greenville who could use a
helping hand. Countless charitable
organizations exist whose goal is to
make the holidays enjoyable for ev-
eryone, but they need support
One organization which relies
There are many
ways to help
others this holiday
season besides the
traditional
charitable
contributions.
heavily on community support is the
Salvation Army (756-3388). Every
year the Salvation Army collects
warm clothes, food and even used
toys in good condition to make
someone's holiday a little brighter.
Donations can be dropped off at any
L number of collec-
tion spots here in
Greenville. Mon-
etary donations can
also be given either
to the office di-
rectly or to one of
the bell ringers lo-
cated at area stores.
Social Services
has set up an "an-
gel tree" in the
Plaza Mall to col-
lect gifts for area
children. Donations
of new clothes and
toys go to children living in foster
care or orphanages, as well as to chil-
dren who may be separated from
their families due to illness or other
circumstances. There are also angel
trees set up in Carolina East Mall and
See CHARITIES page 11
TIHEJ
PfUT
It's drop-add, 1980, in
our Times Past file
today. This mad press
of bodies was the result
of the feeding frenzy
caused by the old, less-
streamlined drop-add
process. Just remember
this shot when you're
standing out in the cold
next month, kids, and
thank your parents for
not giving birth to you
15 years earlier.
File Photo
Pirates
on the
Street
Shawn Southgate,
freshman
"Yes, because I'm the
biggest procrastinator
Vance Harritan, senior
"Yes. I do my work better
at the last minute
Ethan Hazelrlgs, Junior
"Yes. Because I'm
usually too busy to study
ahead of time
Natalie Smith, freshmen
"Yes. Because my friends
drag me out to party every
weekend
Photos by Ken Clark
f
t?ttwie 'Review
I
DeNiro and Stone
cash in with Casino
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
Robert Redford has won an Oscar for best director. Even Kevin
Costner can brag about his directorial awards. Ironically, the years that
both these men won their acclaim, Martin Scorsese created two modern
day masterpieces, Raging Bull (1980) and Goodfellas (1990). Raging
Bull is typically listed as one of the best 50 films of all time. Still, golden
boy Oscar eludes Scorsese.
Scorsese once stated that he would not win an Oscar for his best
work, but who cares? His worst work is at an artistic level that most
directors can only hope to achieve. His latest achievement Casino, is
not his best, but it still beats anything else out in mainstream Hollywood
at the moment.
Casino continues in Scorsese's gangster genre by detailing the dark
See CASINO page 10
CD. Reviews
Replicants
Replicants
Jay Myers
Staff Writer
As we all learned from the film
Blade Runner. Replicants are not
what they appear to be. Replicants
are artificially constructed forms
that seem so real they are mistaken
for the real thing. The same is true
here, for this band is an amalgam
of members from other bands. In
this instance our Replicants are
really guitarist Paul D'Amour from
Tool, vocalistbassist Ken Andrews
and drummerguitarist Greg
Edwards from Failure, and
keyboardist Chris Pitman.
Tool and Failure have known
each for a while, since they both
started in and around Los Angeles.
After Tool made it big at
Lollapalooza, they went on a tour
to support their album, Undertow.
For that tour, they invited Failure
along to be their opening act. Be-
cause of the increased wait while
working on another Tool release,
D'Amour decided to use his free
time to work on this side project
with Andrews, Edwards and Pit-
man. It didn't start as a band re-
ally, more like a way to waste time.
But the replication doesn't
stop there. Not only is the band a
See REPLICANTS page 11
ADr�P
Cft
t6e
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
lifestyle Editor
Overheard recently: "Dude,
it's the best video game ever! I
mean, you start playing it, and two
hours just disappear. I've never
seen a better way to waste time
Or something like that Ap-
parently, this guy was really ex-
cited about some new Sega game
he'd gotten hold of (I didn't catch
the title) and was recommending
it to his friends. That's cool; I've
logged a few hours in front of
video game screens myself, so I
could understand his enthusiasm.
But then I realized that he
wasn't so much excited about the
game itself as the role the -$ame
was playing in his life. Let me ex-
plain. When I was part of the
video game culture, we talked
about tough boards or cool hid-
den point tricks or watching some
guy who had an ungodly ability
to play some game we all sucked
at
But this guy wasn't inter-
ested in any of that He didn't care
about playing the game, he cared
about how much time he could
waste playing the game. All that
mattered was how the hours just
melted away. He was waxing meta-
physical about it, for God's sake.
This took me aback. I realize
that all I was doing when I played
video games was, in fact, wasting
time. But I didn't look at it that
way. I actually cared about win-
ning the games; I wanted to fig-
ure out the puzzles and beat the
snot out of the bad guys. And if I
spent a couple of hours doing
that, it was alright by me.
But, on the other hand, if I
only spent one hour plugging
away at whatever game I was in-
fatuated with that week, I didn't
sweat it I had other stuff to do. I
could read, check out a movie or
watch TV. I could get together
with friends. I could play cards or
Dungeons and Dragons. Or some-
thing.
I suppose that was "wasting
time" as well, but again, I didn't
look at it that way. These were
things I enjoyed, things that I was
interested in doing. I did them
because I liked doing them, not
just as a means of wasting time.
But this guy's whole reason
for living was, apparently, to waste
as much time as possible. He
sounded willing to do just about
anything to make the day go by
faster. Living is so dreary to him
that he just wants to get it over
with. That goes beyond boredom
into serious depression. It strikes
me as a pretty desperate existence,
and it started me thinking Are the
rest of us any different? Or is this
guy just a more honest breed of
depression baby?
In the final analysis, anything
we do that's not essential for sur-
vival could be considered wasting
time. Anything. It's all a colossal
waste of time. I'm not just talking
about hobbies, either. Romance,
cooking, sex for pleasure it's all
wasting time. But we cling to our
time-wasting activities like we'll
die without them.
Take my brother for example.
He's got a job out in the real
world, and for him there's a time
for work and a time for play. He
pursues both with a kind of des-
perate passion that I sometimes
envy, and am sometimes glad I
don't share. If I went as hard as
he does all the time, I'd spend
most of my life exhausted.
But then, I've always been
the quiet one. While my brother
was out playing high school bas-
ketball and racing muscle cars
with his buddies, I was at home
reading books and playing Dun-
geons and Dragons with my
friends. But even though my pas-
times tend to the quiet side, that
doesn't mean I cling to them with
any less desperation.
Is this desperation really any
See DROP page 11





8
Tuesday, Decembers, 1995
Tne East Carolinian
uper-01cur?
!frivia Qwt
This Week's Topic:
TV Christmas
Specials
1. What was the only stop-
motion animation special with
a religious story?
2. Who was Kris Kringle's
adoptive mother in "Santa
Claus is Coming to Town?"
3. What stop-motion special
featured Heat Miser and Coid
Miser?
4. Fill in the blank: "No
child wants to play with a
in the box
5. What does Herbie the elf
do to the dolls in "Rudolf the
Red-Nosed Reindeer?"
6. Name the Who that finds
the Grinch stealing her Christ-
mas tree.
7. What was the sequel to
"Rudolf the Red-Nosed Rein-
deer?"
8. Name the real villain of
"Santa Clauas is Coming to
Town
9. Name the Grinch's dog.
10. What special involves
mice, a pissed-off Santa and a
broken clock?
Answers In Thursday's issue
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Depp thrills in Nick of Time
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
In Nick of Time Johnny Depp
plays a public accountant who finds
himself enmeshed in a conspiracy to
kill the governor of California (Marcia
Mason). Within 90 minutes he must
find a way to save the governor, him-
self and his young daughter.
Depp's daughter (Courtney
Chase) is kidnapped early in the film
by a malicious Christopher Walken,
looking like the epitome of true evil.
Walken wants Depp to kill a woman
in exchange for sparing the life of
Depp's daughter. Walken gives Depp
a gun and a photo, explains that the
intended target will be in a hotel a
block away and menacingly implores
Depp to not just put a bullet in her,
but to empty the entire revolver.
The hook in Nick of Time is that
the film transpires in real time, i.e. a
minute of film time will equate to a
minute on the viewer's watch. The
kidnapping occurs at 12:10 in the af-
ternoon and Depp is informed that
he will have until 1:30 to commit the
murder. The action on the screen cor-
responds to real time, although some
edits are made between different
characters so that the film does not
stay with Depp for the entire 90 min-
utes.
Depp slowly learns that the plot
to kill the governor extends all the
way through the political ranks. He
bravely confides in a security officer
that he is being forced to assassinate
the governor, only to find out that
the security officer already knows!
Every time Depp tries to make
a phone call or thinks about running
for help, Walken shows up to remind
him of the little girl who is about to
die. Nick of Time does serve up its
share of uneasy scenes as Walken's
glowering countenance seems to be
omnipresent. The viewer, like Depp,
begins to feel genuine unease.
The main trouble with Nick of
Time is that a plot to kill the gover-
nor of a state requires careful plan-
ning. If so many people, including
Walken, are involved, why doesn't
one of them just shoot the gover-
nor? The script offers no plausible
explanation as to why any conspira-
tor would go through so much
trouble to force someone else to kill
the intended victim. Depp's partici-
pation in the killing only compli-
cates matters. And why would Depp
even agree to commit the murder
when he knows he will never be al-
lowed to live afterward? He has seen
the faces of the conspirators and
knows of all their plans. Plus, kill-
ing a major political figure is no easy
task for a professional, let alone
someone who has never fired a gun
before.
Other problems in the film are
the complete lack of character de-
velopment. 90 minutes imposes con-
straints on a filmmaker, but the lim-
its are not insurmountable. Depp
never emerges as a three-dimen-
sional person. The viewer never
quite knows what he is thinking or
why. Some insight into his psycho-
logical state would have made the
film more interesting.
The people Depp engages to
help him prove to be intriguing. A
shoe shine man (Charles Dutton)
becomes Depp's main ally in the
film. With his help Depp also gets
assistance from maids and bellhops.
The maneuvers engaged in so that
Depp can meet with the governor
provide some of the most entertain-
ing parts of the film.
Director John Badham consis-
tently makes uninspired yet enter-
taining films. Short Circuit, Blue
Thunder and Stakeout are all dull
ideas given a modicum of razzle-
dazzle by Badham. He is a blue-col-
lar filmmaker whose work will never
be mistaken for art.
Nick of Time presses hard
against the limits of believability but
still provides a mildly entertaining
film. The gimmick of real time
(which pays homage to High Noon
by starting at noon: the earlier film
ended at noon) is moderately suc-
cessful and gives the viewer some-
thing to concentrate on besides the
gaping plot holes.
On a scale of one to 10, Nick of
Time rates a six.
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The ECU Student Union Barefoot Committee is now accepting
applications for committee members to help plan and organize
Barefoot on the Mall next spring. v) D E i
Applications are available in the Student Union Office, �
Room 236 - Mendenhali Student Center.
Deadline to apply is Friday, December 8th.
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,�





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995

MST3K" enters new season EXAMfr�7
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) -
Even a glutton for bad movies should
have been stuffed by the end of this
year's Turkey Day marathon of "Mys-
tery Science Theater 3000" on Com-
edy Central.
"When Roger Whittaker releases
an album and calls it 'AH My Best'
that's what I like to think of this as,
'Mystery Science Theater - AH Our
Best said head writer Michael J.
Nelson.
After taking time out to write and
produce their own movie (a big-screen
savaging of the 1954 science-fiction
epic This Island Earth"), the quick
wits behind "MST3K" are back for a
seventh season.
The show started on a Twin Cit-
ies UHF station in 1988 and later found
a national audience on cable. Hodgson,
a comedian and toymaker, left the show
in 1993 and Nelson took over as host
'It's still fun this season. I thought
it wouldn't be, actually, but it is
Nelson said. He plays Mike, a ma-
rooned-in-space temp forced to watch
bad movies as part of a mad scientist's
fiendish experiment
He copes by making fun of the
movies' visible strings and rubber-
suited monsters, so "MST3K" viewers
get to see the movies and hear Nelson
and his sidekicks quipping nonstop.
For the new season, Nelson, 31,
and robot pals Tom Servo and Crow
will suffer through such bottom-of-the-
barrel films as:
-Brute Man (1946), starring
Rondo Hatton, a once-handsome man
whose face became grotesquely en-
larged by the disease acromegary.
Hatton didn't need makeup to play
monstrous roles, said puppeteer Kevin
Murphy, the voice of Tom Sero, "so
they exploited him until he died
"At first you feel sort of funny
making any light of a man who has
Every Wednesday
this disease Nelson said. "But then
you realize it's the whole point of the
movie - he's a guy with a big ugly
face
"And he is a terribly bad actor
Murphy added.
�Night of the Blood Beast (1958):
A male astronaut returns from outer
space, apparently dead, then wakes up
and finds the Blood Beast has impreg-
nated him with shrimp-like alien em-
bryos.
The Blood Beast looks like "a
parrot in a space suit" Murphy said.
Somehow the beast eats a scientist and
assumes his voice, but sounds like
Humphrey Bogart when he speaks.
-The Incredible Melting Man
(1978), another tale of a space mission
gone horribly wrong. "The plot is a guy
is melting. That's the plot" Nelson said.
Instead of the 24 two-hour epi-
SeeMST3Kpagell
752-7303
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
LADIL6
FRLL APM53ftJ
TILL I I
Tonight
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World's most powerful Hypnotist
Coming Friday Dec. 8th
1 I and smi�UUa��m�gUAj Sii ad-lix
Aquarium Rescue Unit
far Tec Jcnes
Nil Lara
works at the ECU Counseling Cen-
ter, explains why staying up all
night hinders your performance.
"Cramming is typical behavior
for students because they have
other obligations besides studying.
Basically, you're not going to be
able to think as clearly than if you
had (gotten) a good night's sleep.
It's definitely more difficult to re-
call information if you're tired
As far as caffeine is concerned,
Dr. Roeder says, "Too much Vivarin
or coffee will make you jittery and
that in turn will make it harder for
you to concentrate. A little anxiety
is good, but too much caffeine will
take that anxiety to an extreme and
that will work against you
There are many methods that
could pro'e very beneficial to stu-
dents, however.
"First of all, students need to
figure out what time is good for
them to study, but try to stay as
close to normal daily routine as pos-
sible
Dr. Roeder also suggests hav-
ing a daily planner and "doing
things in small amounts, taking
breaks in between for mindless
things It is definitely advised that
students get a good night's sleep
before the exam.
"Don't forget to ask the faculty
for help on what you don't under-
stand. And study groups tend to be
more social, so they're best for re-
viewing material
There are also things that stu-
dents can do the day of the exam to
help a little bit further. "Keep some
distance from the other students be-
cause their anxieties can wear off
on you. But the most surprising tip
that I can give is that if you go in
there feeling confident you will do
better Dr. Roeder advises.
Pamphlets are available at the
Counseling Center for more guide-
lines on studying and how to pre-
pare for deferent types of tests. Also,
throughout the year, the Center of-
fers study skill programs. For more
information call 328-6661. Good
luck and keep alert the safe way
(with lots of rest)!
Natural life I �
;�Ar
Tobacco is the only consumer product that when used as
directed causes death.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
I ALF
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FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday, Dec 5
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theater
Pick up Free Passes at
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& ECU Student Store
Presented By
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Student Union Films Committee
KNOW THE CODE" I
Always costs less than 1-800-COLLECT
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EAST CAROLINA
AT&T BIG GAME
SWEEPSTAKES
Win 1 of 4 Grand Prize Trips
To The Big Game That Could Decide The
College Football Champion
20 FIRST PRIZES: AT&T TelephoneClock Radio
100 SECOND PRIZES: New Music CD
250 THIRD PRIZES: T-Shirt
0
MAIL IT TODAY!
Abbreviated Rules � No Purchase Necessary
Prizes: (4) Grand Prizes: Trip for two to the January 2,1996 college football game in Tempe, AZ.
Approximate Retail Value (ARV) $3500 ea. (20) First Prizes: AT&T TelephoneClock Radio (ARV$43). (100) Second
Prizes: Compact Disc (ARV$12). (250) Third Prizes: T-Shirt (ARV$8). In the event a winner cannot be contacted or take
the trip on designated travel dates, he or she will forfeit the prize and an alternate winner will be named. Sweepstakes subject
to full official rules which may be obtained by sending a stamped self-addressed 10 envelope for receipt by 1231 95 to:
AT&T Big Game Sweepstakes Rules, P.O. Box 3065, Milford, CT 06460-2088. Open to legal US residents 18 years of age
or older. Void in Florida and where prohibited. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received.
Two Ways To Enter: Complete the official entry form available in your college newspaper or at one of the Premiere movie
screenings of Sense and Sensibility. You may give the completed official entry form, or a plain 3" x 5" piece of paper including
your: hand printed name, home and school addresses, corresponding ZIP codes, e-mail address, school name and
telephone number where you can be reached on the date of the drawing (121895) to one of the student representatives
at the screening or mail it to be received by 121595 to:
AT&T Big Game Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 3500, Milford, CT 06460-2088
Entries must be received by 121595
Please Print
Name (FirstLast)
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Mail to: AT&T Big Game Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 3500, Milford, CT 06460-2088
Entries must be received by 121595
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School Name
Phone number where I can betfeached
on date of drawing (121895) (
)
Sense And Sensibility
Hogan Communications
M l �M .
' � �





10
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
CASINO from page 7
underworld of Las Vegas, where
gaming teamsters make their
money even if it means murder.
Sam "Ace" Rothstein (Robert
DeNiro, back in top form) is the big
cheese at the Tangiers Casino. He
oversees the operation of his
goldmine with the passion of a true
artist. However, wild card Nicky
Santoro (Joe Pesci) wants to run
L things his way, and this causes
problems within the otherwise con-
trolled crime environment
To make matters more compli-
1 cated. Ace falls for and marries the
materialistic Ginger McKenna
(Sharon Stone), who has her own
problems with drugs and her old
pimp boyfriend Lester Diamond
- (James Woods).
One can gripe about its simi-
larities to Goodfellas and its three-
hour length, but Casino is its own
animal, and it only occasionally
' slows down. The story is wonder-
' fully told through the voice-over
narrations of DeNiro and Pesci. By
not simply following the standard
form for telling a story, Scorsese
not only engages his audience but
also allows for interesting perspec-
tives from each character.
Scorsese's storytelling method
calls for a lengthy film. The plot un-
folds one layer at a time. However,
- the marital problems between Ace
and Ginger could be less tiresome
if trimmed down a bit. Still, it is
the relationship that allows Stone
to turn in a career-turning perfor-
mance. Outside of the marriage,
! Stone's character doesn't really
serve a purpose in the film. But her
tortured performance redeems her
' for any wrong she did with Sliver
' or The Specialist
Scorsese is an actor's director.
! Therefore, as usual, this film is
; filled with solid performances.
Pesci is pure dynamite. How can a
! short, pudgy guy like Pesci exude
I such violence and terror? Siue, this
� character is basically the same one
he played in Goodfellas, but that
I doesn't hold Pesci back.
I
though, is Scorsese himself. He is
a master who knows his art. The
screenplay (co-written by Nicholas
Pileggi, who also wrote the book)
is not on the level of Goodfellas,
but technically Casino is an ad-
vancement. Scorsese is one of the
few directors working in Hollywood
who has not forgotten that film is
meant to be a visual pleasure. This
film is simply beautiful to watch as
the camera magically glides
through the money-hungry crowds
of Vegas.
But what pushes Casino over
the edge is the child in Scorsese.
He plays around with the filmic na-
ture of his craft like a kid with an
Erector set. Frames freeze in the
middle of a scene, lighting is occa-
sionally overexposed to create a
glowing sensation, certain scenes
are grainier than others, and some-
times certain areas of the screen
are intentionally darkened to high-
light other areas. If anything,
Scorsese is getting better at work-
ing with his tools.
Admittedly, you have to have
patience and tolerance with Ca-
sino. As brilliant a filmmaker
Scorsese as is, his films are not for
everyone. They tend to be brutal,
disturbing, and extremely violent
This is no exception. But, staying
true to the Scorsese mentality,
Casino is also perversely funny.
These are the trademark dynamics
that make a Scorsese film a
Scorsese film.
After branching out with Cape
Fear and The Age of Innocence,
Casino is a welcome return to ba-
sics for Scorsese. He is completely
at home within his world of greed,
violence, and betrayal. He doesn't
need some naked, bald, golden guy
sitting on his mantelpiece to prove
that he is indeed one of the greats.
We already know it On a scale of
one to 10, Casino rates a nine.
Natural life I �
;�Ar
College students spend more money for booze
than they do for books.
-Antonia Novello, U.S. Surgeon General
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�wwi'�i.�WiivwtiiBiiWP' '����� " I
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995
11
DROP from page 7 CHARITIES from page
REPLICANTS from page
different than that of our video game
time waster? Our time on Earth
might seem short, but that doesn't
mean we don't feel the humid press
of days. To an active mind (such as
the one possessed by even the most
dull-witted human), boredom is
death.
And that's the catch. We fill our
every waking moment with hobbies
and love, we spend all our free time
doing stuff that really just amounts
to crap in the grand, Darwinian
scheme of things, because we'd die
if we didn't. We'd die of boredom.
So I ultimately don't understand
our video game slacker. Granted, I
waste a lot of time, and sometimes I
do just like to let time pass unfilled.
But at least I enjoy it. If all you get
out of your relaxation, ever, is a sense
of time passing, there's something
seriously warped going on. This bears
further thought, but that's a topic
for another column
Wal-Mart.
There are many ways to help
others this holiday season besides
the traditional charitable contribu-
tions. For example, in 1987 the Spe-
cial Olympics Inc. released a Christ-
mas album entitled A Very Special
Christmas. In 1992, they released
A Very Special Christmas 2. The
songs include traditional carols such
as "O Holy Night "White Christ-
mas "Winter Wonderland" and
"Silent Night as well as new songs
written just for the albums. The car-
ols are sung by artists such as Boys
II Men, Whitney Houston, Bon Jovi,
Madonna, U2, Sting and Wilson
Phillips. Not only is this a great col-
lection of holiday songs, but all pro-
ceeds go to benefit the Special Olym-
pics.
Another idea would be to do-
nate blood. The American Red Cross
(355-3004) always welcomes blood
donors, and it's an easy way to earn
some extra cash to buy presents.
If money is tight, there are many
groups who would be grateful for the
valuable donation of time. The Boys
and Girls Club of Pitt County (355-
2345) and the Little Willie Center
(752-9083) have many opportunities
for hardworking volunteers. Tne Lit-
eracy Volunteers of Pitt County (752-
0439) also rely heavily on community
support to succeed.
While these are not the only de-
serving charities in Greenville, they
are in need of assistance this holi-
day season and year round. So gather
up those old coats that don't fit any-
more and give them to someone who
could really use them. If you have an
extra can of soup, drop it in a collec-
tion box and help feed a family. Or
just spend time with someone who
could use a friend this Christmas. It
doesn't take a lot of effort to share
the Christmas spirit, and the rewards
last all year long.
Check out "For Locals Only" on Thursday nights from 10-12
"For Locals Only" not only spotlights bands coming to Greenville
and the region, but also features local bands as well.
We will be signing off the air for the semester on Sunday, Dec. 10
at midnight. (We don't want to sound grouchy because of final
exams, so we're taking that week off!)
Thanks for listening this semester. Remember to keep rock and you
alive don't drink and drive! Happy Holidays from
East Carolina's Alternative!
mJ
01.3 FM
r East Carolina University
false construct, but all of the songs
on the album are covers of previ-
ously released hits. See, it's more
than a one-liner, see. It's a joke and
a concept.
However, this is not to say that
the band didn't make some good
choices on what to cover. Lennon
and McCartney, Barrett and Pink
Floyd. Neil Young, The Cars, Steely
Dan. David Bowie - all are given
the Replicant treatment, as well as
some other lesser-known acts such
as Missing Persons, T. Rex and Gary
Numan.
What does the Replicant treat-
ment sound like? Imagine what
playing an electric sheep would
sound like. Fuzzy sure, but think
of the static that would come off
that sucker. Now add some key-
boards and an electric drum kit and
you've got the Replicant sound. It's
not quite human, but almost.
Where this interpretation
works best-are on the tracks "Are
Friends' Electric?" by Gary Numan
and "Silly Love Songs" by Paul
McCartney. The former sounds as
if it could be a demo for a fancy
electric keyboard, everything mid-
80s music was about. The latter is
the real gem of this album, though.
Never has there been such a
radical reinterpretation of this song,
and bringing in Tool's Maynard
James Keenan for it (on guest lead
vocals) didn't hurt either. They make
it seem as though this song is a big
T-bone steak that has to be beaten
with a hammer and then run
through a grinder before you can
chew and swallow it, otherwise it
would be too meaty. I just wish
McCartney could challenge his own
material this way and keep it fresh.
Replicants have turned in a
good first album. Although their
versions of Neil Young's "Cinnamon
Girl" and Pink Floyd's "Ibiza Bar"
aren't much different than the origi-
nals, most of the record is fresh,
especially for being all covers. It's
definitely better than Guns N'
Roses' The Spaghetti Incident, but
of course that album wasn't in-
tended to be a joke, it just ended up
that way.
MST3K from page 9
sodes the "MST3K" cast was crank-
ing out each of the last four seasons.
Murphy said, the new season will con-
centrate on six "quality, select, hand-
picked" shows.
"We've been able to sink our
teeth into these and just have as
much fun as possible. We've gotten
pretty good at it after all this time
he said.
Viewers also will be introduced
to a new character this season who
will replace the departed TV's Frank,
the stooge to mad scientist Dr.
Clayton Forrester. It will be
Forrester's mom.
Comedy Central shows "MST3K"
reruns at midnight EST Monday
through Thursday, at 5 p.m. Saturday
and 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sunday. The
new episodes will debut at 5 p.m. on
Saturdays starting Feb. 3.
"MST3K" also is reaching new
fans in syndication to commercial sta-
tions. "It's my dream that we will
someday outperform 'Baywatch
Nights Nelson said.
"Dream big Murphy shot back.
"Dream REAL big, Mike
The Honors Program of
East Carolina University
takes pleasure m congratulating
the following fCU jraduates of December 1995
r who hm earned jeneral education honors
V; BiifaLenBwas
(Bryan 9pd�nnis
Cynthia Lynn Qeronimo
Wendy TiCar Jones
y ttiairt1
su
Jie �tuhents (Zhelce
tQishes Reason tfteetings
Staffed 2
ite
�Wi .�� � '
�ev(sw tnmatry hiree
amencan standard
mammOth
LAVA
1Z13WIN McCAIN
�'(oior . intona -77iicocs
EL3VIN McCAIN
f(tmot fnbity iffltiettet
m
Currency Exchange
Bring us your used books
and we'll exchange them tor cash.
Buvbacfc hours in Wright Bldg.
Fri December 8: 8 am -5 pm
Sat December 9: 9 am - 3 pm
Mon December 11 through
Tburs December 14:8 am - 7 pm
Fri December 15:8 am - 5 pm
A Remote Locations.
Monday through Friday.
December 6.11-15: 9 am - 5 pm
. On the Hill
On tie Malt
: Mendenhall Bus Stop
Speight Dus Stop
F.�utinj: "Alive" "Sorry to a Friend"
AiWMZBIEfu� "Solitude to duttwHhOtriui .
Student Stores
RECYCLE
FOR CASH
m bin books that cab be nuseb
heroor on other campuses
More than jus books- your dolars support student scholars!
Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Building, just off Wright Circle
(919)328-6731





ammammamm
12
Tuesday, December 5, 1995
The East Carolinian
Lady Wolpack punish
Donovan's players
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Here we go again. Some-
one is bashing ECU. But hey
what's new, right?
The lasting bashing comes
from Chip Alexander, a News &
Observer journalist. Poor Mr.
Alexander. He never thought
his article would cause such a
stir.
The whole article was
meant to be written in good
humor, but Alexander took
some painful stabs at ECU, its
students and surrounding com-
munity.
Alexander compared ECU's
lifestyle to Stanford's. Bad idea.
First of all, west coast living is
more expensive than east coast
living, so for him to compare
the two was like comparing
apples to oranges.
He also went on to poke
fun at the fact that ECU had
gone to bowl games that
weren't as prestigious as
Stanford's past bowl games.
Well, considering the fact that
we aren't in the Pac-10 or Big
10 Conference, it would be hard
for us to attend the Rose Bowl
like Stanford has in the past.
That brings up another in-
teresting point. ECU posted the
best record out of any of the
N.C. ACC teams. UNC-Chapel
Hill barely made it to the
Carquest Bowl. However, ECU
was in the bowl picture with
one regular season game still
left. I guess to some people that
doesn't account for anything.
One of the biggest put
downs in the whole article was
Alexander degrading our medi-
cal school, which is highly ac-
credited in the state and coun-
try. That was taking things too
far, and that's when the article
turned from bad taste to just
plain nasty. Here is what
Alexander had to say.
"As one guy in the office
put it, if you had to have an op-
eration, which diploma would
you want to see on the
surgeon's wall - one from East
Carolina or one from Stanford?
Me too
Needless to say, he wasn't
thinking ECU's medical school
Alexander portrayed ECU
as a school where its students
are a bunch of drunk hicks who
attend a no-name school with
no class. Come on Chip. ECU
may not have the alumni
Stanford has, but we are pretty
damn proud of our students
and their accomplishments.
ECU students do like to
party and have a good time, but
what college students don't?
I'm sure even Stanford in all its
high-class surroundings still
enjoys a little partying here and
there.
Alexander makes the point
that ECU fans will be going to
the Liberty Bowl only to party,
eat the barbecue, drink some
beer and travel to the almighty
Graceland. while the Stanford
visitors will be checking out all
the fine museums and sipping
on some Zinfandel. Pass me a
Budweiser and some barbecue
any day.
I would like to think that a
N.C. paper would want to sup-
port one of their own teams.
Support is necessary no matter
what team you are or what bowl
you are attending. Maybe all
this ripping Alexander did was
because of ECU's poor showing
in last years Liberty Bowl. Yes,
it was embarrassing and the
players know that, but they are
SeeVIEWpagel5
Stanford coach
has N.C. ties
Kinston native
leads the Cardinal
in Liberty Bowl
Craig Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
When ECU fans fill Liberty Bowl
Memorial Stadium, there will be a fa-
miliar face to some on the opposing
team's sideline. That face is Stanford
Head Coach Tyrone Willingham. Fans
of the Cardinal and the people of
Stanford, Calif, may not even know
where Greenville is, but Willingham
does, and the Pirates are certain not
to be overlooked.
Willingham was born in Kinston,
N.C. on Dec. 30, 1953. and will lead
the Cardinal against ECU on his 42nd
birthday. He played quarterback at
Jacksonville High School before earn-
ing a degree at Michigan State in
physical education with a minor in
health education.
Willingham was a walk-on in both
football and baseball at MSU, and
earned three letters in each sport. As
a QB, he was named the team's Most
Inspirational Player in 1976. In 1977,
Willingham was awarded the Big Ten
Medal of Honor as the Outstanding
Scholar-Athlete of the conference.
"When people say you can't do
something and you accomplish it, it
gives you a great sense of achievement
and self-confidence Willingham said.
"It lends itself to believing there is
nothing you can't accomplish
After graduation in 77,
Willingham continued with the Spar-
tan program as a graduate assistant
under Head Coach Darryl Rodgers.
From 1978-79, Willingham served as
defensive secondary coach at Central
Michigan University.
From 1980-82, Willingham re-
turned to-his alma mater of MSU to
coach the defensive secondary and
special teams under Head Coach
Muddy Waters.
He then moved back home to
North Carolina to coach DB's and
special teams at ECU rival N.C. State
for three seasons, so he knows what
Pirate football is all about, having
coached during one of the most corn-
See NC page 15
The Lady Wolfpack of N.C.
State came to Minges Coliseum and
proved why they are ranked 15th
in the country.
Saturday's game was neck and
neck in the first half, with the Pi-
rates playing aggressively and run-
ning the floor well. The second was
a different story.
The Wolfpack opened up the
game by winning the tip off and tak-
ing the ball down to score. ECU's
first points came from center
Tomekia Blackmon. who hit a shot
down low, less than a minute into
the game.
Blackmon and forward Tracey
Kelley led the Pirates scoring in the
first half, each contributing six
points.
Although the Wolfpack had a
considerable height advantage over
the Pirates, ECU still crashed the
boards and grabbed 19 rebounds,
just two shy of the 21 N.C. State
had in the first half.
Turnovers hurt both teams
early on with ECU creating 13 turn-
s&itsl
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Danielle Charlesworth drives around a Lady Wolfpack
defender. The Lady Pirates were defeated by the no. 15
team in the country.
GameTotals
ECU-N.C State-
Points- 49Points- 74
Rebounds- 33Rebounds- 52
Assists-12Assists- 15
Turnovers-25Turnovers-23
overs for N.C. State, while the
Wolfpack created 15 turnovers for
the Pirates.
By the end of the first half the
Wolfpack led
the game 31-
23.
N.C. State
Head Coach
Kay Yow said
she was disap-
pointed with
the way her
nationally
ranked team
played in the
first half.
"I felt East Carolina had a
greater effort than we did, however
right down the stretch at the end
of the first half we found something
that was working for us a little bit
better said Yow.
What worked for the Wolfpack
was the trap they put on ECU. Im-
mediately after the ball was over
half court, two Wolfpack defenders
converged on the ball, double team-
ing whoever was bringing the ball
up. Each time this happened ECU
See LADY page 15
Streakers?
,�-��� ��� i ' �' .
r
SPORTS INFORMATION ?
DEPARTMENT
SID-The Pirate swimming and
diving squads traveled to Charleston,
S.C. to face the College of Charleston
on Saturday morning.
The Pirates earned their fourth
sweep of the season when they de-
feated the Cougars 108-85 men and
118-92 women. Both ECU teams im-
proved their ��.
Broughal swam 22.26, while freshman
Richard Chen seized first in the 200
fly with 1:57.24. Patrick Kesler won
the final individual meet of the day
when he swam 2:12.11 in the 200
breast
Amanda Atkinson won the
women's 1000 free with 10:42.44 to
earn ECU's first

Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Freshman swimmers get initiated into ECU'S swim team with its annual run across
campus in their bathing suits. Looks pretty cool, doesn't it?
SCogitate
mmwmtamimiMm
Kerner's performance not enough
Jonathan Kerner
Staff Reports-Despite a 19 point
performance by junior transfer
Jonathan Kerner. ECU fell to the 49ers
of UNC-Charlotte 80-65 on Saturday.
Kerner hit 8 of 13 field goals,
including one from beyond the 3-point
stripe, pulled down five rebounds, and
blocked a shot in the losing effort.
"I was relieved to come out and
play well Kerner said. "But like I said.
it doesn't mean a whole lot if you don't
get the victory. I got into early foul
trouble in the Elon game so I just
came out and relaxed and just tried
to do what 1 could do
Kerner had to basically do it all
himself, as the Pirates' perimeter play-
ers were non-existent.
Guards Tony Parham and Othello
Meadows and forward Tim Basham
combined for 22 points on 9-of-27
shooting. At the half, the three were
3 of 11 from the field. Meadows scored
eight of his 11 points in the second
half.
" It was just one of those days that
everybody has sometimes Parham
said. "We just had an off night
Kerner and senior power forward
Von Bryant picked up the slack for
his teammates, keeping the Pirates in
the game until a 9-0 run gave L'NCC
(3-0) a 62-51 lead with 5:11 left. ECU
(1-1) never cut the lead to single dig-
its the rest of the way.
Despite the sub-par perimeter
play, the Pirates made a final push
midway through the second half.
Down 36-28 at the break, ECU
used a 15-6 run to pull within 49-47
with 10:34 left to play. A couple of
key mistakes kept the Pirates from
taking the lead for the first time since
18-17 with 8:32 left in the first half.
Senior Vic Hamilton missed a
dunk attempt in transition and then
threw the ball away with the Pirates
trailing 4l�-47 VNC-Charlotte scored
off of both miscues for a possible eight
point swing.
We made some bad decisions
first-year ECU Head Coach Joe Dooley
said. "We'll learn from it and won't
let it happen again
record to 4-1 over-
all and 2-0 in the
CAA with that
win.
The Pirates
won 16 total
events. Melanie
Mackwood had two first-place finishes
for the Lady Pirates. Her first win
came in the 50-meter free with 27.85
and later she won the 100-meter free
with 59.90. For the men's diving team,
ECU newcomer Tony Novak earned
his first win as a Pirate on the 3-meter
diving board with 200.92 total points.
The Pirates then traveled to
Statesboro.Ga on Sunday to face
Georgia Southern University.
They were victorious in their fifth
sweep of the season with the final
scores 139-98 men and 149-94 women.
Currently, the Pirates are 5-1 overall
and 2-0 in the CAA.
The Pirates had 16 first-place fin-
ishes against the Eagles. For the men,
Mike Donovan and Lee Hutchens won
the distance freestyles. Donovan re-
corded a time of 10:12.49 in the 1000
free and Hutchens recorded 4:49.09
in the 500 free. In the 50 free, Jim
We did really well
on our first trip
� Coach Rick Kobe
�mmm
first-place finish.
Juniors Elizabeth
Browne and Mel-
issa Phillips re-
corded wins in
the 200 IM
(2:14.34) and the
200 fly (2:11.06), respectively. Lesley
Hawley followed with a win in the 200
back with 2:08.59. Newcomers
Mackwood and Niki Kreel assisted
with a win each; Mackwood in the 50
free (24.84) and Kreel in the 200
breast (2:29.99). Claudia Iltis placed
first in the 500 free with 5:16.37.
Also for the Pirates, ECU won the
men's one (212.00 pts) and 3-meter
(220.00 pts) diving events and the
men's (3:19.56) and women's (3:14.19)
400 free relay events.
"We did really well on our first
trip said Head Coach Rick Kobe.
"We knew better than to underesti-
mate the Eagles. They were able to
score on some events, but we kept on
going and earned the victory
The Pirates' next meet is Dec. 9
when they travel to Durham, N.C. to
face the Duke Blue Devils. The meet
is scheduled to begin at 2 p.m.
Game Stats
PLAYER
Basham
Bryant
Kerner
Meadows
Parham
Douglas
Rippey
Grooms
Hamilton
Jones
Totals
FG

2-9
3-7
8-13
5-11
2-7
0-0
2-4
1-1
1-2
1-2
25-56
FT
0-0
6-9
2-4
1-2
0-0
0-0
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
10-17
1
5
5
4
6
12
19
11
55
00
25
02
22
13
3265





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995
13
Hornets winless in Houston Golfer wins challenge
0
Rockets win over
Charlotte puts
them in first place
(AP) - Clyde Drexler made sure
the Charlotte Hornets' winless
streak in Houston remained intact.
Drexler scored a season-high
41 points as the Rockets beat the
Hornets 113-98 Saturday night to
climb into a first-place tie with Utah
in the Midwest Division.
"A smart team always goes to
a guy who's on fire and we're a
smart team Drexler said. "I felt
real good tonight
Charlotte, losing for the eighth
time in 10 road games, never fig-
ured out how to stop Drexler, who
finished 17-of-23 along with six as-
sists, six rebounds and a couple of
steals. He also had five 3-pointers
and at one point had hit 13 con-
secutive shots.
"The beauty of it is, he's so
consistent said Hakeem
Olajuwon, who added 19 points for
the Rockets. "He's got such great
energy and intensity levels. What I
admire about him is his work
ethic
Drexler went to work early, top-
ping his previous season-high of 27
in the first half alone, scoring 28
and keying a 12-0 Houston run mid-
way through the second period as
the Rockets broke open a close
game in the first half. Drexler was
8-for-8 in the second quarter, in-
cluding two from 3-point range.
"Clyde did it tonight
Houston's Mario Elie said. "He set
the tone for us in the first half
The Hornets are now 0-9 in
their history in Houston, the only
NBA city where they have failed to
win.
"Scoring I'm not really con-
cerned about as much as our de-
fense Hornets coach Allan
Bristow said. "The defense is what
I worry about the most
Charlotte, paced by Larry
Johnson's 23 points, is allowing its
opponents to shoot a league-high
49 percent, and the Rockets added
The32@wP')s
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crthrti
was
to that dubious statistic by hitting
at a 57 percent clip for the game.
"You want to come out and es-
tablish yourself as quickly as you
can Drexler said. "We ame out
and put it on them early
The Hornets were coming off
an overtime loss Friday night at Mi-
ami and it showed.
"We played hard but made
some mental mistakes and it looked
as though the team was tired
Bristow said.
The Rockets had lost three of
their last four going into Saturday's
game. They shot 61 percent in the
first half to lead by as many as a
dozen points and only the 3-point
shooting of Scott Burrell kept the
Hornets in the game early.
Burrell had 16 in the first half,
including 4-of-5 from behind the
arc, but had just one point in the
second half to finish with 17.
Kendall Gill also had 17 for the
Hornets.
"I'd rather have a win against
the world champs than me having
a great night Gill said.
Charlotte got to within nine,
92-83, with 10:17 to go, but the
Rockets reeled off seven straight
points to rebuild and keep their
double-digit advantage.
Chucky Brown, among the
NBA leaders in shooting percent-
age at nearly 61 percent, was 6-for-
6 from the field and had 14 points.
"He takes good shots and
makes his shots, and he gets lots
of rebounds Houston coach Rudy
Tomjanovich said.
Houston was playing without
starting forward Robert Horry, who
did not dress because of an illness
described as viral syndrome. Sam
Cassell also was feeling ill but
chipped in with 17 points.
"Because of Horry being out
and Sam being under the weather
Clyde came out and had a phe-
nomenal game, right on time
Tomjanovich said.
THE ECU STUDENT UNION PRESENTS
HbNUKlX h
a�t"Houston, we have a problem APOLLO 13
8:00 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9
For Students, Faculty, Stuff, and Alumni
TRIP INCLUDES:
� Round-Trip Bus Transportation
� Liberty Bowl Game Ticket
� ECU Pre-tailgate Breakfast
� Hotel Accommodations for Two Nights
at Ramada Inn
COST PER PERSON:
$175 - Quad Occupancy Room
$180 - Triple Occupancy Room
$190 - Double Occupancy Room
$250 - Single Occupancy Room
Contact Central Ticket Office � Mendenhall Student Center � 328-4788 or 1-800 ECU ARTS
MtefoOt '9.6; ,
The ECU Student Union Barefoot Committee is now accepting �
applications for committee members to help plan and organize
Barefoot on the Mall next spring. Applications are available in the
Student Union Office, Room 236 - Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply is Friday, December 8th
V)DEV
Thursday, December 7, 1995 at 4:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
ECU Gospel Choir Performance-FREE Food & Beverages
The ECU Student Union Board of Directors is now accepting applications for
Student Union President for the 1996-1997 Term.
Any full-time student with a minimum GPA of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union Office - Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline to Apply: January 12,1996
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
(AP) - American Corey Pavin
felt like, well, a million dollars af-
ter winning golf's richest top prize
by five strokes over Zimbabwe's
Nick Price.
The U.S. Open winner shot to
the top of the money table with his
victory Sunday at the Million Dol-
lar Challenge, the $1 million pay-
check bringing his earnings this
year to $2,773,000.
"I feel - can I say it -1 feel like
a million dollars before taxes
Pavin joked afterwards.
Starting even with Price after
a third-day 210, Pavin carded six
birdies for a 6-under par 66 and a
four-day, 12-under 276 in a text-
book performance of consistent,
flawless golf.
The disappointed Price, who
won in 1993 and appeared headed
for a second victory until Pavin
overcame a three-stroke deficit Sat-
urday, finished Sunday at 281 to
reap a relatively paltry $250,000.
Germany's two-time winner,
Bernhard Langer, closed at 283 for
a prize of $200,000. Sam Torrance
of Scotland ended a stroke back to
bring him $175,000, while Ameri-
can Tom Lehman took fifth at 287
and $150,000.
The tournament over the par-
72, 7,597-yard Gary Player Coun-
try Club course brought 12 of the
world's best players to battle for the
richest top prize in golf. And they
had to earn it.
Difficult wind on the first two
days was coupled with a ball-stop-
ping rough and deviously placed
pins. Straying from the fairways
See GOLF page 14
Country
kids
The Newport Dance
team entertains at
Saturday's Lady Pirates
vs. Lady Wolfpack
basketball game. The
group did a number of
country line dances.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Sports writers, last meeting of this semester
Thursday at 4:30. Happy holidays!
ZOJZLXl J
�ll32a
9
At the Plaza Mall in Front of
Victoria's Secret
The Area's
Best Selecton of
Sterling Silver
and Gold






'
Mtt-K
14
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
Redskins find
new home in Md.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Maryland,
which lost one NFL franchise, may soon
be home to two teams.
The Washington Post reports that
the Washington Redskins will be mov-
ing to a 78,600eat stadium built in sub-
urban Maryland.
In today's editions, the newspaper
said Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke
has signed an agreement with Prince
George's County Executive Wayne
Curry and Maryland Gov. Parris
Glendening to build a stadium on a 300-
acre tract known as the Wilson Farm
site.
"I think if s a wonderful thing
said Prince George's Councilman
Marvin Wilson, who represents the area
where the stadium is proposed to be
built, about five miles east of RFK Sta-
dium in Washington, where the
Redskins have played since 1961.
Cooke, 83, has been searching for
a new home for his team since 1988,
when he told Washington officiafs that
RFK, which has the smallest seating
capacity in the NFL, was no longer ad-
equate. He first attempted to build a
new stadium containing the revenue-
producing luxury boxes that he said are
needed to keep the Redskins competi-
tive on a parking lot north of RFK.
When that plan ran afoul of federal
and city officials, Cooke then shopped
the team to Alexandria, Va, and Anne
Arundel County, Md, without success.
No he appears to have found a home.
"I'm glad (Curry) signed it he told
the newspaper. "I wish he would have
signed it weeks or months ago when he
should have, but I'm happy
Curry, who has questioned whether
the project would truly benefit his con-
stituents, had been the last obstacle for
Cooke to clear.
The executive said he did not op-
pose the project in principle, but did not
want to contribute any of the cash-
strapped county's money for the $78
million Cooke said he needed for site
preparations or roads.
Curry could not be reached for com-
ment on Sunday night
The Redskins' owner had pledged
throughout his quest to build a new sta-
dium that he would pay up to $160 mil-
lion of the estimated cost
Glendening agreed the state would
pay most of the cost for roads, parking
lots, water and sewer lines and other fa-
cilities, with the county contributing the
$4.1 million purchase price Cooke will
pay for the property on which he will
build.
In addition, the Redskins' ownerwill
donate 100 acres adjacent to the stadium
site, valued at $2 million, for a county-
operated recreation center.
The agreement means Maryland,
which has not had an NFL team since
the Colts left Baltimore for Indianapolis
1984, may soon be the home to two fran-
chises.
Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell
is attempting to shift his team to Balti-
more to play in a new $200 million sta-
dium adjacent to Camden Yards in down-
town Baltimore.
GOLF from page 13
proved to be disasterous.
Pavin's steadiness paid off. He
played within his abilities but also
to the course - shooting high into
the greens, an approach that he
feels uncomfortable with - and
avoided the sort of errors that saw
Price's lead fizzle Saturday with a
bogey and double-bogey.
"I just didn't make any mis-
takes Pavin said. "That's the only
way to beat a guy like Nick, to beat
a field like this. You just have to
play solid and wait for mistakes
The final round opened with a
furious duel for dominance.
The American went ahead on
the first hole, his second shot on
the par-4 hole stopping a yard from
the pin for an easy birdie. But Price
came back over the next two holes,
firing birdies and regaining a one-
stroke lead, a margin that remained
through the fourth and fifth holes.
Disaster struck Price on the
par-4 sixth hole. The Zimbabwean
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outdrove Pavin by 30 yards, but his
second shot overflew the green and
found sand. He chipped to the edge
of the green and was forced to
double-putt, ending with a bogey.
Pavin's shot was long and
straight onto the green. He then
sank a 10-yard putt for a birdie, giv-
ing him a one-stroke lead. Price
never got wemt ahead again as
Pavin birdied the short seventh
hole and Price missed a 6-foot putt
on the eighth for a bogey.
The key, in Pavin's view, came
when he birdied the par-5 14th. A
four-stroke lead stretched to five
when Price bogeyed. But even that
far in front, Pavin felt that Price
remained a danger.
"I never feel Nicky cracks
Pavin said. "That's why I was never
comfortable until the 14th hole. He
nearly birdied 15, nearly birdied 16.
He didn't give up. He never gives
vp
What's he going to do with his
recently expanded fortune? After
the taxman gets through with him,
Pavin hopes to start building a lake-
front house near Orlando, Fla.
The bottom six finishers have
smaller takings to worry about.
South Africa's David Frost - a
three-time winner - shot a 68 to
jump from ninth place to sixth with
a 289 total worth $125,000.
Hometown favorite Ernie Els,
the 1994 U.S. Open winner,
Costantino Rocca of Italy and
England's Nick Faldo walked away
with $103,333 each. Prizes of
$100,000 each went to Vijay Singh
of Fiji, Scotland's Colin
Montgomerie and American Phil
Mickelson.
BOOK
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117 W 4th St
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758-2183
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�I ' ' I





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, December 5,1995
15
LADY from page 12
turned the ball over, and the
Wolfpack took control.
That momentum the Wolfpack
took into the locker room with
them carried through the second
half.
ECU came out sluggish and
did not score until the 16:13 mark.
Justine Allpress was fouled and
took two shots at the line and sank
them both. Belinda Cagle shot a
baseline jumper to make the score
27-41 in favor of the Wolfpack.
ECU slowly watched the game
fall out of their control. The team
that came out and hustled and ran
the Wolfpack in the first half, fell
apart in the second half. ECU was
out rebounded 3114 in the second
half alone and 52-33 for the entire
game.
The Wolfpack's shooting per-
centage dominated the Pirates per-
centage. For the game, N.C. State
shot .441 to ECU'S .333 for total
VIEW from page 12 NC frontpage 12
field goals. ECU shot 1-9 for three
pointers for .111, while N.C. State
shot 2-8 for a .250 mark. One cat-
egory ECU kept close was free
throw percentages. Out of 24 at-
tempts, ECU hit 14 for .583 and
N.C. State took 20 shots and made
12 for an even .600 mark.
At one point ECU trailed by
30 points. However, at the end of
the game Danielle Charlesworth
hit a three pointer and Cagle
added two jumpers to end the
game. !t was too little too late and
ECU was defeated 7449.
Kelley led ECU scorers and
rebounders with nine points and
seven rebounds. Coach Anne
Donovan felt Kelley did a nice job
and played hard.
"She works every time she
steps on the floor said Donovan.
Cagle had six points in the
game all coming in the second half.
She felt her and her teammates
didn't stay in the game like they
could have.
"We do seem to get excited if
we think we're doing really well
said Cagle. "We were excited be-
cause we were playing well and we
were executing and we went away
from that and that's when we
started getting behind
Donovan was pleased with the
performance her girls put forth es-
pecially in the first half, but was
disappointed with the second half.
"I think we came out and
played real hard in the first half
and hung tough with a very good
basketball team said Donovan.
"The second half we didn't come
out strong enough and got in a
hole too big to get out of
The Lady Pirates will be on
the road this weekend against
Coastal Carolina. Their next home
game is Dec. 19 against Purman.
going there with something differ-
ent in mind.
This year's team is more focused
and determined to avenge last year's
loss. Tasteless articles, like the one
written by Alexander, put down a
football team that has worked so
hard to get where it is today.
Nobody can say ECU had an
easy road to Memphis, because it
was anything but that. But
Alexander's poor judgment in words
pits lowly ECU against the mighty
Cardinal of Stanford. At least that's
what Alexander wants you to think.
All-in-all t thought the column
was tasteless and unnecessary. It's
a shame all the hard work our foot-
ball team has put in seemed to be
taken away in a one story.
Let's just hope that one day,
when Alexander is ill, he will look
up at the wall and see a diploma
from ECU. Then we will see who will
get the last laugh.
You are cordially invited to a
Thursday, December 7,1995
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
Starts at 4:00 PM
Gospel Choir Performance - Food Will Be Served
Presented by the ECU Special Events Committee
For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
&&
petitive in-state rivalries in college
football.
Willingham then coached receiv-
ers and special teams at Rice before
going to Stanford as running back
coach. Willingham coached under
Stanford head man Dennis Green for
three years before coaching under him
for three more seasons with the NFL's
Minnesota Vikings.
"I think rushing the football is a
very important part of being a suc-
cessful team Willingham said. "But
1 believe it has to be art offensive
scheme based on balance, you must
be able to run the ball, but at the same
time he very effective passing the
ball
Witlingham's trademarks are his
character, leadership and the ability
to turn programs into winners in short
order. He did just that with the Cardi-
nal and the Vikings.
While at Stanford as an assistant
coach, the Cardinal went 3-8 in '89,5-
6 in '90 and 84 in 1991, culminating
in a berth in the Aloha Bowl.
The '91 squad, known as the
"Now Boys began the season 1-3, but
came back to win its final seven regu-
lar season games to finish 8-3 overall,
6-2 in the Pac-10. It was Stanford's
best season in five years and its first
bowl appearance since the 1986 Gator
Bowl.
Willingham coached two of the
top running backs in Stanford foot-
ball history during his tenure as a
running back coach at Stanford: Clyn
Vlilburn and first round draft pick
"Touchdown" Tommy Vardell.
Milburn (now with the Denver
Broncos) is the third leading rusher
in Stanford history with 2,178 yards,
and he is second in the Cardinal
record book in all-purpose yards with
a three-year total of 5,857. Milburn
earned First-Team All-American hon-
ors as an all-purpose player in 1992.
Vardell is fourth all-time at
Stanford with 1,789 and is first on
the all-time career touchdown list with
37. Vardell went on to be named the
Academic All-American of the Year
and is now with the Cleveland Browns.
In 1991, the Minnesota Vikings
finished with an 8-8 record.
Willingham came in the following
year, and during the next three sea
sons the Vikings won two NFC Cen-
tral Division Championships and ad-
vanced to the playoffs all three of
those seasons.
By 1994, Willingham had earned
a reputation as one of the top young
assistant coaches in the National Foot-
ball League, and was a logical choice
to fill the void left by the resignation
of legendary Head Coach Bill Walsh.
Just 11 days after Walsh's resig-
nation, Cardinal Athletic Director Ted
Leland named Willingham the
Branford M. Freeman Director of Foot-
ball at Stanford University on Dec 9,
1994,
"I feel that I continue the lineage
from Bill Walsh to Denny Green to
Tyrone Willingham Willingham said.
The one thing that Willingham
wants to be most known for at
Stanford is winning.
"When people talk about our
team, I want them to know we pro-
duce winners Willingham said. "Win-
ners on the field, in the classroom and
in their social and spiritual develop-
ment If we can win in those areas,
then I believe that will give us our
! Afoooovs oh ooe id a

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16
Tuesday, December 5,1995
The East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
For Sale
fits.
For Rent
111 77
For Rent
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENTS
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club, close
to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2 Bedroom.
Townhouses over 1000 sq. ft 1 12 baths, private patios,
dishwashers, all electric, water furnished, swimming pool,
volleyball court, cable TV available and on site laundry. No pets.
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
� 1 md 'l .Bedrooms �
AZALEA GARDENS
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aSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
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MOBILEHOME RENTALS
" 1 Olomm, Williami
756 78157i8 74 36
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
CHEAPER THAN RENT. Buy a 1977 2
bedroom and 2 bath trailer. Payments and
lot rent run about $250.00 a month. In-
cludes blinds, deck, refrigerator and stove.
$500.00 OBO 752-0307
FOR SUBLEASE UNTIL MAY! 2 bdrm,
1 bath apt $405mo. Please call! 551-6920
NICE ONE BEDROOM. WasherDryer
and cable hookups. Full Kitchen with dish-
washer and small bar. Central heatair
condition. Watersewer included. Avail-
able December 15th 758-8984.
EXCELLENT CONDO FOR RENT, start-
ing mid Dec. or Jan. 1st Two bedrooms,
two baths. Deck and laundry room. Cable
included, rent $450.00 monthly. Call 758-
4986.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED JAN.
1st for great condo! Two story, two
bedrms, two and 12 baths, fully fur-
nished! Rent $250, 12 utilities. Cable
included. Please call 7584986.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: Two people to
share rent for three bedroom house. Rent
$200 mo. Walking distance from campus.
Non-smoker preferred. Needed ASAP. Con-
tact Jody at 830-2664 or leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for three bed
room apartment at Wilson Acres. To share
13 rent and utilities. Please call 830-
1334.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share 4 bedroom apt Private bedroom
bathroom $250 per month14 utilties.
Includes dishwasher, washerdryer, pool,
weight room plus more. Needed ASAP call
Karen at 3530966.
LOOKING FOR A MELLOW FELLOW
to share 3bdrm duplex on Willow St Ex-
cellent neighborhood. No deposit needed.
Call Matt at 551-3108 for details.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
to share 2 bedroom, 1 bath house, close
to campus, $200 rent, 12 utilities, 12
cable. Call 758-8244 leave message.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE NEEDED to
share two bedroom 112 bath townhouse
at Sheraton Village, pets allowed, for more
information call 756-9064.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
townhouse. Private bedroom and private
bathroom. Close to campus. Call any time.
$225 per month and 13 utilities. 830-
1359 leave message.
SUBLEASE WYNDHAM COURT DU-
PLEX Spring semester. 2 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, dishwasher, washer and dryer hook-
ups. Close to campus. Great condition call
Elke at 752-7465.
ROOMMATE NEEDED BY JANUARY 1;
$16712 utilities; own room; call Jody
at 551-7624; leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED - OUTGOING,
non-smoking female to share fully fur-
nished one bedroom apartment in Tar
River. $200 a month12 utilities. Call
April at 754-2288.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE two bedroom, two bath Apt in
Dogwood Hollow. $245.00 per month
half utilities. WasherDryer, cable and
water included. Call Brandee at 7524914.
fib
For Rent
NONSMOKING, RESPONSIBLE FE-
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP.
Tar River. Own room, $165.75, 14 utili-
ties and 14 phone. WasherDryer. Call
757-0406.
ROOMMATE WANTED. NONSMOKER
to share 2 Bdrm Apt 1 mile from campus,
on bus route. Low rent Call Kim @830-
9036 after 6:30pm.
STUDENT TO SHARE 3 BDRM APT. 1
12 blocks from campus. 13 rent 13
utilities. No Pets. Please call 758-8067.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR APART-
MENT in Downtown Greenville. Quiet and
Clean. Key location. $230 month. Call 758-
9962 leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 br 2
bath apartment in Dogwood Hollow for
Spring Semester. Cable, water, washer
dryer included. Call Melanie at 830-8926.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male nonsmoker
to share 2 bedroom furnished duplex.
Walking distance to campus and down-
town. Sublease for Spring Semester. Avail-
able Dec. 15th. $190.00 rent 752-6738
Frank
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: to
share 2 bedroom apartment across street
from campus. $227.50 and 12 utilities.
Water and cable included in rent ASAP.
Call Amy at 8306149.
2, 3 Bedroom 2 !2 Bath, 1500 Square
feet. Apartments FOR RENT ABOVE
BW3's for $775.00 a month. Please con-
tact Yvonne at 758-2616 M-F �6.
SEEKING MATURE LAID-BACK PER-
SON to share Large House close to cam-
pus. Private Bedroom & Study. Great place
to live. Rent $310. Call Tom at 757-3566.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ASAP 2BDR
Apt, 5 blocks from campus. $175 Utili-
ties. Fum except Bedroom. CableWasher
hookup. Responsible person. Call Kelley
830-3885.
ONE BEDROOM TAR RIVER. Assume
Lease. Available near end of December.
$360 a month. First floor unit with patio.
Beside Bus-stop. Call Eddie at 757-3128.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FEMALE non-
smoker to begin next semester Kingston
Place Apts. $215 per month. Call if inter-
ested 830081.
GRADUATING IN DECEMBER! Need
person to take over lease at PLAYERS
CLUB APT. in January. Own Room, 2 Full
Baths, Washer & Dryer Lighted Tennis
CourtsBasketball & Volleyball Courts
Weight RoomPool. Call Kyle 353-0668.
ROOMMATE NEEDED! Three bedroom
house on Library St within walking dis-
tance of campus. Washerdryer hookups.
Prefer another student Rent $200 per
person. Ask for Todd or Will. Phone 758-
5261.
FOR RENTBRAND NEW 2 Bedroom
2 Bath Duplex, Fireplace, Patio, Fenced-
In Backyard. $575 month, located on Old
Stantonsburg Road, Five (5) minutes from
Hospital, Call 747-3136 (day or night)
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 & 2 Bedroom,
Range, Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer
Hookups, Decks & Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility, Sand Volleyball Court,
Located 5 blocks from campus. Free Wa-
ter & Sewer.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 Bedrooms
Stove Refrigerator Dishwasher
Washer & Dryer Hookups Patios on first
floor. Located five blocks from campus.
These and other fine properties managed
by Pitt Property Management, 108 A
Brownlea Drive, 758-1921.
LANGSTON PARK APARTMENTS, 2 BR
with free water, free cable (Beside Tar
River Apts.) $355 month rent Call 758-
9977
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW STUDENT
RECREATION, Rent $225 month at 810
Cotanche St Call 758-1921.
RESPONSIBLE, NON-SMOKER needed
to share 3 bedrm duplex ASAP until June
30, 19. $190.00 rent & 13 utilities.
Please call Monique or Danyelle at 758-
6625
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS 2
bedroom1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Water & basic cable included. 752-
8900. Professionally managed by Pro Man-
agement of Greenville.
TOWNHOUSE 2 bedroom 1 12 bath.
2 blocks from campus. $475 per month.
Pro Management of Greenville. 756-1234
KINGSTON PLACE CONDO 2 bedroom
2 bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per
month. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234
HOUSES FOR RENT near campus. $450-
$550. Call Cindy. Pro Management of
Greenville. 756-1234.
For Sale
MEET
NEW PEOPLE
THE FUN WAY
TODAY!
1-988-388-0580
EKt. 7714
$2.99 per min.
Must be 18 yrs.
Touch-tone Phone Required
Serv-U (619) 645-8434
94 CANNONDALE DELTA V 1000 with
Headshock. 19" polished aluminum frame.
EC Ridden little. Asking $1000. Call Ja-
son for more information. Leave message.
413-0504.
JVC 6-DISC CHANGER For Home. Re-
mote and single tray. Excellent Condition.
$150.00 OBO ask for Chad 8304052.
TREK 850 For Sale, Barends, Bike Com-
puter, metal pedals and toe clips. Excel-
lent Condition. $175.00 OBO Ask for Chad
8304052
CONDOMS! Wide selection! Shop from
the privacy of your own home. No mail-
ing lists. Discreet packaging. Help stop the
spread of AIDS. Send for a free brochure.
Francie's, 312 Crosstown Road, PO Box
178, PTC, GA 30269.
If
Help
Wanted
&
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to our expanding Business. Earn
up to $1,500 plus per week. Escorting in
the Greenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7584)896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est 1990.
GIFT GIVING: Puzzled by what to give
Mom or Aunt Suzy for Christmas? Select
a beautiful hand-crafted stained glass an-
gel. Select from many styles and colors.
Prices range from $6.50 - $22.50. Order
now for Christmas. Call Janet 756-8061
for showing.
MUST SELL! Full size sofa in Perfect
condition. $75 please call 551-6920
GRADUATING MUST SELL Queen size
mattress and boxspring with bedframe
$65, Microwave $45 Word Processor with
Printer $50 Call Julie 758-1968.
MUST SELL CRUISE FOR 2 to the
Bahamas for four nights, hotel included.
Only $275. Also, a FREE stay in Orlando
for three nights bonus. I can't go, so I
need to sell it! Tickets good until May. Call
Peyton 328-7224. Paid $350, worht $699,
selling for $275 negotiable
'95 FLEETWOOD SW 14X76 2BR. 2
bath. All options. 10 min. from ECU. Take
over pmts, plus cash back from owner. 1-
919-556-6905.
RETRO YARD SALE. 1970's clothes. Big
Pile 2$l. Mod coats. Saturday Decem-
ber 9th All Day. 100 S. Summit St Cor-
ner of 1st and Summit
FOR SALE TWIN BED with Head Board
75$. Dresser 25$, Full size bed, Two dress-
ers, 2 night stands and mirror 150$. Call
758-3320.
ATTN: LADIES CLUB FOR WOMEN.
Free membership. Pregnant Will pay 1st
month's fee of $39.00. Includes tanning.
Call Tammy, Day-7561135, Night-946-
1438.
'87 DODGE ARIES. 4DR, silver,
70.800MLS, AC, very good condition,
$2499, Call Claudio ASAP 756-9562
OLYMPIA FAX-MACHINE, plus paper,
instruction manual, $220; excellent
sleeper couch $110. Have a look! Call 752-
8004
"FUTON FRAME, maple finish. Reason-
able price. Call 355-2113, after 5:00PM
GRADUATING AND MOVING! Lots of
furniture. Kitchen table and chairs, couch,
dresser, desk, lamps and more. Call Tim
758-5676.
84 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE, V6.3.8L,
108U, MLS, Mint Cond, AC, PS, AT, Safety
Insp till 0896, $1400, NEC. Call Michael
756-2865.
VERY DEPENDABLE PRINTER! Great
for papers. $150 Panasonic KX-1124 Dot
Matrix. Comes with paper. 24 PIN. Call
Tom or Jen 758815.
MEMBERSHIP TO THE CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY, with unlimited tanning
for only $39.00 a month. Work out and
tan while getting ready for Spring Break.
Call 355-6354. Ask for Ashley.
If
Help
11 Wanted
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largett Library of Information In U.S. -
a'l aubjaeta y
Ordar Catalog Today with ViaaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
7A
g Services
" Offered
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTOR: Indi-
vidual capable of teaching basic gymnas-
tic skills, floor exercises, and tumbling to
children 3 to 7 years of age. Mondays thru
Thursdays 3:30 to 7:00pm - Previous work
with children necessar6y. Contact: Carol
T. Power, Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department at 8304542.
ARE YOU SITTING OUT FOR THE
SPRING SEMESTER or available during
the day? Brody's is accepting applications
for Warehouse Associates. Unload trucks
verify shipmentstag merchandise. Lifting
required. Excellent daytime work hours.
Applications accepted Wednesday, Decem-
ber 6. 3-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza.
STUDENTS NEED A JOB? ROADWAY
PACKAGE SYSTEM is looking for PACK-
AGE HANDLERS to load Vans and un-
load Trailers for the AM and PM Shift's
hours 4:00am to 9:00am. $6.00hour,
tutition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations
and management possible. Applications
can be filled out at 104 United Drive
Greenville 752-1803.
JOB OPPORTUNITY: PROGRAM CO-
ORDINATOR Full-time Position - Respon-
sible for planning and administering ac-
tivities for a council on aging. Occasional
e"�nings and some travel. NC DrLic own
transportation and high school grad or
equivalent required. Prefer four-year
degree in communications, public work;
or an equivalent combination of education
and experience. Excellent organization
skills, positive, energetic personality and
desire to help the elderly a must Salary:
$12,000 to $18,000 per year. Qualifica-
tions necessary include: ability to coordi-
nate a variety of taks and people within
set deadlines, and considerable knowledge
of computer operations, marketing, pub-
licity, the English language, and public
speaking techniques. Resumes and state
applications will be accepted until De. 15,
1995. Send to Director, PO Box 547,
Kinston, NC 28502. No phone calls please.
EOE.
WANTED Individuals, Student Organi-
zations and Small Groups to Promote
SPRING BREAK '96. Eam MONEY and
FREE TRIPS. Call the Nation's Leader,
Inter-Campus Programs, http:
www.icptcom 1-800-327-6013
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED: $5 hour
plus bonuses. Day or evening shifts, full
or part-time. 355-0210
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian
languages required. For information call:
(206 632-1146 extJ53622.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel. Seasonal & full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53622.
TROPICAL BEACH RESORT JOBS
Luxurious hotels are now hiring seasonal
positions. Lifeguards, food service, house-
keepers, hosthostess, and front desk staff.
Call Resort Employment Services 1-206-
632-0150 ext R53621.
FREE TRIPS & CASH Find out
how hundreds of students are already earn-
ing FREE TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Choose
Cancun, Bahamas, Mazatlan, or Florida!
CALL NOW! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK!
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being
broke, want to get paid everyday. Call
Playmates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-
7686.
13E
Travel
Spring Break!
Bahamas Party Cruise
$279
It's Better In The Bahamas
15 Meal � 6 Parties
800-678-6386
Cancun $3591
Jamaica $419!
7 Nights Air & Hotel! Partiei &
Discounts!
Florida $119!
1-800-678-6386
Ski Sr.owioar't
inrtsicouiGun ski mats t I
KJanM!
Greek
Personals
A QUIET PLACE TO STUDY? First Pres-
byterian Church open during exam week
7pm-7am, 1211 to 1216. Corner, 14th
& Elm. snacks and quiet Wednesday mid-
night Breakfast served!
THE PARTY IS ON! Your party ain't
thump'n until MMP is pnmp'n. Mobile
Music Productions is "the" disc jockey
service for your party or social function.
Widest variety of any disc jockey company
in Greenville. Speicaliqing in the needs of
ECU organizations and Greeks. Dates are
filling fast so call early. Ask for Lee 758-
4644.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS To lose 10-
30lbs Next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough Guarenteed. $35.50 visa
mc 1-800-211-6382
SINGLE GUYS & GIRLS: Meet someone
special on The New Date Line leave &
retreive messages 24 hrs a day. 1-900-255-
8585 ext 7726 2.99 per minute. Must be
J8 yrs Touch Tone Phone Required Seru-
U-(619) 645-8434
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53623.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOME-
THING MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services
is your ANSWER! We have the best selec-
tion of music in Greenville. Call 758-5026
ask for Sean and Book your Party Now!
FOREIGN STUDENTS-VISITORS. DV-
1 Greencard Program available. Tel: 1-800-
660-7167 & (818) 772-7168. 20231
Stagg St Canoga Park, CA 91306
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING FOR RAIN?
Rent a canopy! Two peaked-roof canopies
for rent $65.00 each per day as is or
$100.00 each per day set-up and delivered.
752-5533. Leave message.
ALPHA XI DELTA NEW MEMBERS:
you guys are doing a great job, keep up
the good work. Love the Sisters.
THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO
PARTICIPATED IN THE ALPHA XI
DELTA ALL SING. CONGRATS TO THE
WINNERS: SIGMA AND ZTA.
MICHELLE MATTHEWS: Thank you for
making All Sing such a success. Love the
Sisters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta.
THANKS FOR THE SOCIAL NOAH.
Let's do it again! Love AOPi
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI: Kristen
Anderson, Laura Benfield, Jennifer
Bumpass, Stacey Cole, Kathryn Dengler,
Mary Paige Early, Amy Frank, Melissa
Gentry, Camille Glenn, Laurie Godfrey,
Erin Kulbieda, Jujlie Lewis, Monica Lopez,
Melinda Mann, Jennifer McRoberts, Liz
Null. Carrie Peters, Melissa Schwartz,
Michelle Serra, Missy Sutter, Amy Sutton,
Stephanie Sutton, Heather Tilley, Cindy
Tragle, Amy Whitley, Leigh Anne Whitley,
Molly Wilkenson, Lisa Woodlief, Noni
Wright We are very proud of you. Wel-
come to our Sisterhood. Love your Sis-
ters o( Alpha Phi.
PI LAMBDA: The Pre-downtown was full
of fun, song and dance - we are looking
forward to another chance! Thanks for a
good time! Love Gamma Sig.
VALERIE & SOCIAL COMMITTEE:
Thanks for a great cocktail! We appreci-
ate all of your hard work! Love your
Gamma Sig Sisters.
BRIDGETTE CONGRATULATIONS on
your engagement! Love Gamma Sig.
DELTA CHI, we had a great time between
the sheets. Thanks again. Love AOPi.
ZETA TAU ALPHA � Thanks to all 1995
EC members! You have done an outstand-
ing job! We love you Edy, Hillary, Amy
W Cathryn, Alicia, Audra, Sheila, Susan,
and Taia!
ZETA TAU ALPHA - Thank you every-
one for your support! You know who you
are, I love you guys, Doubietary.
rrw Personals
LJ
LOOKING FOR A RIDE TO MARYLAND
FOR CHRISTMAS VACATION. IF YOU
ARE GOING ANYWHERE ABOVE
NORTH CAROLINA PLEASE CALL 328-
7589, ASK FOR KATHLEEN, CAN LEAVE
DEC. 11TH.
FREE PHONE CARD - NOT JUST A FEW
FREE MINUTES - Unlimited Useage with
any phonesystem. Other incentives-in-
cluding cash-just for using it Call 355
3789
Wanted
BARBIE DOLLS WANTED paving cash
for dolls, clothing and accessories from
the 1950's and 10's. If you mon, aunts,
etc are 3045 and still have their dolls,
give me a call - 328-7338.
ANNOU
Campus Reps
Needed
?fREETrirr CMH o�i
New, Ski & SxovufcoarJ Equif
L �II - - mM -�
r mt ummmw ror nwi jjiiuri iiwoon
SJo mnw iwrnvnVw
HrwMMtJritra yeZ.com
� 1-800-999-Ski-9
SPRING BREAK, Bahamas or Florida
Keys. Spend it on your own PRIVATE
YACHT, one week only $385.00 per per-
son. Including food and much more. Or-
ganizers go for FREE! Easy Sailing Yacht
Charters. 1-800-7834001. See us on the
Net http:www.shadow.net-ezsail
FREE TRAVEL! SPRING BREAK '96!
Party in Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,
Florida, Padre. Guaranteed lowest prices.
Organize Group, Travel Free! Call for free
information packet! 1-800426-7710.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now! JamaicaCancun $359, Baha-
mas $299, Panama CityDaytona $129.
Sell Trips, Earn Cash, Go Free! 1-800-234-
7007.
SKI & SNOWBOARD - WINTERBREAK
& SPRINGBREAK '96 Intercollegiate Ski
Weeks, ONLY $219. Includes: 5 day lift
ticket 5 nights lodging (luxury condo)5
days intercollegiate activities(drinking age
18), Sponsors Include Molson & Labatts.
MT. ORFORD, CANADA (just across the
Vermont Border) Group LeaderRep. Dis-
counts. Call Ski Travel Unlimited. 1-800-
999-SKI-9.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
On Wednesday, December 6th at 5:15pm
in Ragsdale room 218A we will have our
Christmas meeting. The meetings are open
to all majors. We will have Christmas
snacks and a movie.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
The Annual Christmas ROCK AND MIN-
ERAL SALE will be held on December 6,
7. and 8 from 10am until 3pm on the first
floor of the Geology (Graham) building.
Come early for the best selection. Spon-
sored by Sigma Gamma Epsilon.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
Friday, December 8, is the Feast of the
Immaculate Conception. Masses for this
day are: Thursday, Dec 7 (Vigil Mass):
5:30pm. Friday, the Feastday itself: 8am,
12:10pm & 5:30pm. All Masses are at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street - 2
houses from the Fletcher Music Building.
ADVENTURES IN HEALTH
CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
Is sponsoring its 4th Annual Christmas
Magic Home Tour on Sunday, December
10, 1995 from 1:00 - 5:00pm. Advanced
tickets are available for $10.00 or $12.00
on the day of the tour. For more informa-
tion, Contact Erin Spence at 752-7231.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Please join us for our last meeting of the
semester at 3:30 on Tuesday, Dec 5 in
room 1022 General Classroom. Agenda
includes: Raffle Drawing, Secret Shopper,
SGA Funding, and a Christmas Party. If
you have been helping us with Raffle Tick-
ets, we need money and tickets no later
than 3:30 Dec. 5. Thanks!





Title
The East Carolinian, December 5, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 05, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1113
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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