The East Carolinian, November 30, 1995






November 30,1995
Vol71,No. 26
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Around the State
RALEIGH (AP) - North
Carolina sheriffs may need the
full 90 days a new state law gives
them to approve or reject appli-
cations for concealed-weapon
permits.
State officials warned Tues-
day that it could take up to two
months to complete required
background checks once sheriffs
start taking applications Friday,
the day the new law takes effect.
The main reason for the de-
lay is a backlog at the FBI fin-
gerprint lab, which is supposed
to screen for national criminal
records.
UVVHARRIE, N.C. (AP) -
More than 100 years have passed
since miners first descended into
the Tebe Saunders mine in what
is now the Uwharrie National For-
est and returned to the surface
with gold.
Now the same hope that
drove those miners under the
earth has prompted a new genera-
tion to take up their work.
Tom Morris and friends be-
lieve the mine, dug after the Civil
War, hasn't given up all its secrets.
If they're right, they would own
North Carolina's only gold mine
on federal land. The state has no
active commercial gold mines.
Around the Country
MIAMI (AP) - Nineteen
people have been charged with
importing and selling more than
7,700 pounds of Colombian co-
caine, sometimes smuggling it into
the United States in shipments of
frozen fish.
Police put the street value of
the cocaine at more than $61 mil-
lion.
NEW YORK (AP) - Rats with
a spinal cord injury recovered
some physical ability from a treat-
ment that helps damaged nerve
fibers regrow, scientists reported.
One expert called the result
a modest but significant step in
developing new treatments for hu-
man spinal cord injuries
Around the World
����ii � ��
CAPE TOWN. South Africa
(AP) - President Nelson
Mandela's African National Con-
gress on Tuesday proposed allow-
ing gays and lesbians to serve in
the military.
The National Party, which
governed under apartheid, ob-
jected to the proposal on the
grounds that recruiting people of
different sexual orientations
would undermine the effective-
ness of the army.
WARSAW. Poland (AP) -
Four people including three
Amway distributors were killed
when a private passenger plane
crashed in a Warsaw suburb early
Wednesday, the official PAP news
agency said.
A spokeswoman for Amway
Polska. Katarzyna Piekarz, said
three of the victims were distribu-
tors for the U.Sbased direct-sales
corporation Amway. based in Ada,
Mich.
Crime increases
across campus
Wendy Rountree
Assistant News Editor
The ECU police department has
seen an increase in a number of crimes
on campus this semester.
"This semester has been very ac-
tive said Teresa Croc .er, directorchief
of ECU police. "We have had a lot of
things going on on campus
So far statistics on criminal activ-
ity from August to October reveal
progress as well as setbacks for the de-
partment
"Our larcenies have gone down,
and that's the number one problem on
campus. They have gone down a good
percentage Crocker said. "The simple
assaults have gone down a good per-
centage
However, while the number of lar-
ceny and simple assault incidents have
gone down, other crimes like burglary,
aggravated assault possession of weap-
ons and disorderly conduct have in-
creased.
"Where we've seen the biggest in-
crease, obviously, is in vandalism, as well
as the drug arrests Crocker said. "Both
of those are up tremendously
The number of activities on cam-
pus and downtown are possible reasons
for the increase in crime, namely the
downtown weekend celebration last
September that ended with Greenville
police macing the crowds.
"At the beginning of the semes-
ter, we had all of the things going on
downtown like Thursday, Friday and
Saturday night which brought in a lot
of people Crocker said. "Some of those
numbers in vandalism are because you
had all those people, and a lot of those
cars in those parking lots (near the
downtown area) got damaged
Actualh, the majority of vandalism
cases this semester have been car re-
lated.
The other large crime increase on
campus has been alcohol andor drug
arrests.
Because of the increased activities
on campus, Crocker said more students
have been staying out late at night As
a result, students who have been drink-
ing or using drugs heavily and walking
around campus late at night have in-
creased their chances of being attacked,
which has increased criminal activity.
Also, many drug andor alcohol offend-
ers have been arrested, processed and
sent to the Greenville magistrate's of-
fice.
Crocker said every year is a new
challenge, because new students, who
have to learn university policies, are al-
ways entering the campus community.
"Each and every year we're bring-
ing in a new group of students Crocker
said. "The freshmen on this campus
come here from everywhere, and their
experiences may or may not be the same
as last year's students. There are a lot
See CRIME page 4
Four arrested for assault
Garrett resident
attacked, hall
mates charged
Tambra Zlon
News Editor
Four Garrett Hall residents were
arrested yesterday following an as-
sault that occurred on Nov. 16. ECU
Police said the students were ex-
pelled from school immediately.
"(The victim was taking a shower,
the lights went out and he was attacked
by males dressed in baggy clothes and
wearing Halloween masks said ECU
Police Officer Elizabeth McDaniel.
"One of them had a baseball bat"
The incident occurred on the first
floor of Garrett but all of the parties
involved lived on the second floor.
McDaniel responded to a call from
the victim and after an investigation,
police arrested Jason Smith of 24�
Garrett Hall from Charlotte, Phillip
O'Connel of 231 Garrett Hall from
Oak Ridge, Karl Mount of 242 Garrett
Hall from Summerset. NJ. and Ryan
Mason of 252 Garrett Hall from
Newburg Md.
"He didn't know who it was. he
took the mask off one of the guy's
head, but it was so dark he couldn't
see McDaniel said.
She questioned the four resi-
dents because they were accused of
communicating threats to the victim
See FOUR page 4
Annual show begins today
zv ECU Crime Stats M
CrimeNo. ReportedIncidents
19951994
Rape10
Robbery1O
Aggravated Assault32
Burglary85
Forgerya0
Weapons148
Prostitution10
Sex Offenses33
Drugs4225
DWI1223
Vandalism5329
1995 result reflect AugOct. 1995
from the Unifrom Crime Report, submitted annually to the FBI
Photos by KEN CLARK
Fine artwork such as this cabinet (right) and modern dress (left) can be seen and bought
at the Art School's annual Christmas Sale in Gray Art Gallery today through Saturday.
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
The ECU student art sale has become an annual event,
and this year students from every division of the art depart-
ment will be offering original works just in time for the holi-
days.
The sale is scheduled to begin today at 8 a.m. and will
be held in the Gray Gallery of Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
Students will be able to browse and choose from a wide
selection of crafts until 5 p.m. today and tomorrow. Saturday's
sale hours are from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Howey McAuley is the president of Craftsman East and
has participated in the annual art sale for several years. Ac-
cording to McAuley, the sale is an opportunity for art stu-
dents to present some of their best work while raising funds
to benefit the art department
"A lot of the money goes to the separate guilds in the
department" McAuley said, explaining that every division is
seen as a separate guild. "For example, there is a ceramics
guild, a pottery guild, and so on
I l �fcw����
See ART page 4
Hopeless cause
Photos by KEN.CLARK
Elaine Montalban blows leaves (left) from
around the fountain at Wright. Golden
hues adorn the picnic area outside
Christenbury (above). From the looks of
these leaves (top right), there must be a
bare tree outside GCB. (Bottom right),
The Greenway at Elm Street is covered
with the splendidness of Fall.
TV Whore goes madpage O
Memphis, here we comepage O
Getting down with Marcuspage I O
Pt��ajf
Thursday
Mostly Sunny
High 52
Low 44
Weekend
Partly Cloudy
High 60
Low 45
�&�& fo �ZC4 UJ
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
40P�
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Thursday, November 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
Students exchange schools
November 18
Harassing phone call - A resident of Garrett Hall reported a harass-
ing message was left on his voice mail.
Driving while impaired - A student was arrested for driving while
impaired and driving while alcohol remained in the system of a provisional
licensee. The incident occurred on East Fifth Street
Possession of marijuana - A student and non-student were issued
state citations for possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia in the
Harrington Field lot. The student was also issued a campus appearance
ticket.
Intoxicated, disruptiveresisting arrest - A student was arrested for
being intoxicated and disruptive. He was also charged with resisting an
officer after running in an attempt to elude the officer. The incident
occurred on the west end of campus.
November 19
Driving while impaired - A student was arrested for driving while
impaired. He was stopped for driving with no headlights on Cotanche
Street west of the new rec center. A campus appearance ticket was also
issued.
November 21
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of her purse was
recovered in a men's restroom in the General Classroom building. Nothing
was missing from the purse.
November 22
Weapon possession - A student was arrested for felony possession of
a weapon (a loaded .45 caliber semi-automatic handgun) on campus. He
was arrested during a traffic stop north of the Flanagan Building.
November 28
Damage to property - A student reported that the paint on the right
rear quarter of his vehicle had been scratched and chipped.
Larceny - A student reported that his vehicle had been stolen from
the bike rack west of Mendenhall.
Larceny - A staff member reported that her wallet was taken from
her purse in her office in the Austin building.
Larceny - A student reported that her bicycle was stolen from the
bike rack between Slay and Umstead residence halls.
Incendiary device - An unknown person threw an incendiary device
out of a window from a room in White Hall. The device was a plastic bottle
with unknown contents. It exploded a few seconds after hitting the ground.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
Students from ECU and beyond
have an opportunity to travel the world.
International Affairs allows stu-
dents from ECU to travel to other uni-
versities around the United States and
the world and permits students from
other countries and other parts of the
United States to experience life at ECU.
"The exchange program broadens
students' experiences said Linda
McGowen. overseas opportunity coor-
dinator. "It expands their opportuni-
ties
ECU students can attend a uni-
versity in almost every state. There are
over 100 universities that accept ex-
change students.
Students who wish to travel inter-
nationally also have a vast amount of
opportunities. Students may attend
Effort pays with award
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
An ECU student and campus
employee was recognized and re-
ceived an award for his outstand-
ing dedication to campus resident
life and security.
On Friday. Nov. 17. Charles
Don. (DJ.), Gregory, Jr an ECU
telecommunicator of Team Dis-
patch, was presented the Excep-
tional Service Award for his ex-
cellent service and job perfor-
mances.
Gregory's nomination for the
award resulted from his volunteering
countless hours of involvement in the
Residence Hall Liaison Program and
Operation ID.
"The Residence Hall Liaison Pro-
gram involves the ECU
telecommunicator volunteers, assigned
to specific residence halls, to gear up
and greet students at the beginning of
the year, as they are moving in said
Annette Parker, telcommunicator su-
pervisor. "It also allows us to hand out
information packets and medical forms,
introduce educational programs of
safety and crime prevention and start
the Operation ID project Operation ID
uses students' driver license numbers
to engrave their property. It is a way
of preventing theft"
The award was presented at the
ECU Police Department, located on
10th Street at noon, by Police Chief
Teresa Crocker. The only outside offi-
cial present was Leslie A. Craigle, di-
rector of marketing for business ser-
vices.
"I am very impressed with your
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Chief Teresa Crocker congratu-
lates DJ. Gregory on his award.
efforts and with the manner that the
word 'volunteer' is still alive and well
in your community said Michael Rich-
mond of Team Dispatch during the
commendation ceremony. "The profes-
sionalism from your department is out-
standing. The citizens and students in
your area are lucky to have such dedi-
cated people
Team Dispatch is a nationally rec-
ognized organization that promotes
standard achievements to
telecommunicators and emergency
medical dispatchers around the coun-
try. It is also beneficial to the popular
television program, "9-M
Aside from working a full-time
week, 7 p.m. to 7 a.m for the univer-
sity police department and volunteer-
ing assistance to Aycock Residence
Hall. Gregory is a full-time student at
ECU. He is a junior majoring in chem-
istry.
schools in Tanzania. Togo. Argentina,
Spain. France. Australia, Canada, the
United Kingdom and points beyond.
"The majority of the responses we
have received from East Carolina stu-
dents who have participated in the pro-
gram have generally been positive
McGowen said.
McGowen also said that students
who come to ECU on exchange tend
to enjoy their experience as well.
"I have enjoyed my time here at
ECU said Ann Valta, an exchange stu-
dent from Finland. "I was shocked
when 1 first came here. It is a lot differ-
ent from Finland. 1 am used to it now
Valta said the exchange program
has given her the chance to meet a lot
of nice people. She also has been able
to travel the country. She admits the
United States is nice, but there are sev-
eral places she does not care to see
again.
Valta also feels classes are easier
at ECU. She says classes are a little
different than what she is used to be-
cause she does not get homework in
Finland.
Sophie Aumonier. an exchange
student from France, also finds classes
easier at ECU.
"My classes are interesting
Aumonier said. "There is more personal
work, but they are a bit less difficult
Aumonier has also gotten the
chance to travel. She has been to
Myrtle Beach, New York, Atlantic
Beach, Charleston and plans to spend
New Years with Mickey and friends at
Disney World.
"I have really enjoyed the people
at ECU Aumonier said. "They are re-
ally kind
Though Aumonier and Valta are
from two different countries, they share
many common ideas.
"1 like the weather both said af-
ter they were asked what their favor-
ite thing about Greenville was.
McGowen encourages all students
who are interested in broadening their
horizons to get involved in the ex-
See ECU page 3
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 30,1995
air is feeler
HOUDflY SAVINGS!
Chiquita
Regular Or Junior
Chiquita
ananas
YOU
SAVE
IFC Executive Council '9596
results from Tuesday's elections
PresidentBill BurnetteTau Kappa Epsilon
Executive VPGeorge DavisThetaChi
Administrative VPChris ArlineSigma Phi Epsilon
TreasurerReidGriffenPi Kappa Alpha
SecretaryMicah RetzlaffPhi Kappa Psi
Rush ChairmanBrandon HainesPi Lambda Phi
Sports ChairmanMatt DrummondTheta Chi
ECU
from page 2
Fresh Express
Salad
Mix
Naturally Fresh Reg. Or
Fat Free Salad
Dressing
12 OZ.
Stouffer's
Party Size
sauna
change program. If you wish to learn
more about the program, Dr. McGowen
asks students to stop by the International
Affairs office which is located on East
Ninth Street The office is open from 8
am until 5 p.m
For students who are interested in
becoming involved with the exchange
program but cannot financially afford it
scholarships are available.
The Thomas W. Rivers Foreign Ex-
change Endowment fund provides schol-
arships to help support foreign study for
ECU students and students from other
countries. Mr. Rivers and his wife believed
that exposure and comprehension of
other cultures is education in its truest
form. And by making the world our cam-
pus, students will build friendships and
enlighten other rudents, universities and
nations around the world.
"I am glad that I am taking part in
the International Exchange program
Aumonier said, "I believe it is good to
see new cultures. It has helped my lan-
guage skills. One day I hope it will help
me in my job
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Get InVoiM!
The ECU Student Union Barefoot Committee is now accepting
applications for committee members to help plan and organize
Barefoot on the Mall next spring.
Applications are available in the Student Union Office, �
Room 236 - Mendenhall Student Center.
AVDfA
Deadline to apply is Friday, December 8th.
For more information, call the Student Union Office at 328-4715
Stamper Gift Shop is Proud to Present:
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Thursday, November 30,1995
The East Carolinian
ART
from page 1
Each student participating in the
sale must belong to a guild.
According to McAuley, the money
from 'he sale is used to fund trips and
pay for special visitors to the school of
art during the school year.
Jeanne Brady, a graduate student
in textiles, said the sale is more than
just a fund-raiser.
"The sale is a way for art students
to learn how to market (their goods
Brady said. "We have been having these
sales for quite a long time, and we've
had a lot of success. The sale is well
received by the public"
McAuley and Brady said students
shoud expect to see a wide range of art
works including jewelry, tapestries, ce-
lamics and greeting cards.
"The students produce very high
quality work said McAuley. "You can
expect to see some of the same things
at the sale that you can find in major
department stores. Our sale will just
have more reasonable prices
According to McAuley, each stu-
dent will price his or her own merchan-
dise, and price ranges vary from guild
to guild depending on the amount of
time spent on each item.
"An example of what you can find
at the sale McAuley said, "is the as-
sortment of silk ties that will be offered
by the textiles guild. Prices on the ties
range between $10 and $17
CivlM.li from page 1
of things that change with each group
of students that come in. I don't know
if this group of students that we have
this year have brought in these elements
of vandalism to make the numbers
higher. I haven't looked into that, but
they are higher
The department uses programs on
such problems as stolen bikes, drug
problems, underaged drinking, DWIs
and stolen property to get information
to students before they get into trouble.
"We started out the year by going
to the dorms and doing operation ID
said Officer LaFrance Davis. "That was
when we engraved student ID numbers
and, driver's license numbers on prop-
erty which was over $100 in value, or
whatever the person (owned) that was
valuable and (possibly) stolen
Davis said that officers tried to reg-
ister as many bicycles as possible, and
had alcohol awareness programs. At
times, the department has done pro-
grams that show the entire process a
student would go through if caught
drinking and driving, and has even dis-
played drugs and shown how they are
used in a controlled environment
Crocker and Davis agreed that the
programs do help decrease potential
criminal offenses, but unfortunately,
they can also increase them. By train-
ing RAs what marijuana smells like,
they can report students to the police.
However, some students use the pro-
grams like the one on drunk driving
and the campus drinking policy to see
how far they can go before they would
be arrested, which increases the of-
fenses.
The department of about 35 of-
ficers is straining to keep up with the
increase in crime and is even finding it
difficulfto maintain security at events.
Lack of sufficient funding has been one
of the main obstacles.
More officers would increase se-
curity and safety not only in campus
parking lots but at football and bas-
ketball games and other crowd draw-
ing events as well. Crocker said that
as the university continues to grow and
the stadium expands, ECU is going to
have to hire more officers.
"We have an obligation to the
university to protect the property and
to protect the people and to provide
service Crocker said. "We need to be
able to do that and not have to over-
tax our staff, so are we looking forward
for this semester to end, yes
fUUK from page 1
on the previous night She believes the
motive for the attack came from a false
rumor that the victim had informed
police about drug activity in Garrett
Two arrests were made early
Wednesday morning and the other two
were arrested by noon Wednesday. Po-
lice reported that all of the students
arrested yesterday had been released
on bond by last night
She said police have been work-
ing with the dean of students' office
in the investigation.
"We had several interviews with
several people involved McDaniel
said. "The victim has been moved to
another residence for safety reasons
She said the victim had been
kicked, punched and beaten with a min-
iature bat but refused transportation
for medical assistance, despite the
bruises and knots he received along
his shoulders and back.
The residents were charged with
assault with a deadly weapon. A court
date has been set for Dec. 20.
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The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
EDITOR
I u
The East Carolinian
during the Spring 1996 term
Application forms are available from the Media Board
office on the second floor of the Student Publications
Building.

The deadline for submitting a completed application is
Thursday; November 30 at 4 p.m.
For more information, call the Media Board office at
328-6009.
"Join the Team Behind the Team "
STUDENT PIRATE CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE
1. Priority on Bowl and Away
Game Tickets
2. The Pirate's Chest
26 Issues of Stories and
Features on ECU athletics
3. Invitation to all Student
Pirate Club Activities
4. Membership Cards
5. Bumper Stickers
6. Window Decals
Join When You Purchase Your
f Liberty Bowl Tickets on Dec. 1st
or Call Pirate Club to Join
328 - 4540
Pay $25 and Receive a Crew Membership ($50 credit) in the ECU Education
Foundation (ThePirate Club) and Help Make an Investment in support of
ECU Student Scholarships.
dJ
iii
-�"�� fB





The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 30, 1995
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY DECEMBER 1 &2 1995
WINTER JACKETS
From White Sierra
SALE PRICED
25'OFF
OVERTONS PRICE
mens & womens styles
POWDER SHELL
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AAgl AH OVERTONS PRICE $19,95
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OVERTONS REG PRICE $79.95
FLEECE LINED SIZES M-XXL
SEVERAL COLORS
SIZES M-XXL
IN-LINE SKATES
FROM BAUER
F-3 WITNESS SKATE
UNISEX SIZING
onlv$99.95
-4 FITNESS SKATE
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
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25 to 50 OFF
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ROSSIGNOL LTD CAP SKI
SALE
$149.95
REG 299.95
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CLOSE OUT STYLES ONLY
OLIN XTE SPORT SKIS
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CUFF ACTIVATED BRAKE SYSTEM
VENTED BOOT ADJUSTABLE CHASSIS
OUTDOOR FOOTWEAR
25 OFF
OVERTONS PRICE
TIMBERLAND MERRELL NIKE ACG REEBOK
BASEBALL GLOVES
10 OFF
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FRANKLIN WILSON RAWLINGS LOUISVILLE
RUSSELL ATHLETIC
5050 NUBLEND SWEATSHIRTS AND PANTS
SALE $1276 each
OVERTONS PRICE $15.95
S-XXL
RAWUNGS PLAYMAKER
BASKETBALL
onlyS 14.95
REG $19.95
in
T
3TIT7
REVERSE WEAVE SWEATSHIRTS
SALE $29.95
OVERTONS PRICE $39,95
ENTIRE STOCK
BACKPACKS
FROM JANSPORT EASTPACK SUNSHINE MTN
40 OFF
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daypacks only
RUSSELL FOR HER
sweatshirts and sweatpants
- designed for women
30 OFF
REMINGTON 870
EXPRESS 12 GAUGE PUMP SHOTGUN
only &� ljnZt)
26 & 28 inch barrel
WOOD STOCK ONLY
10X
GAMESMAN COVERALLS
OVERTONS PRICE $99.95
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BLACKTAIL INSULATED JACKET
OVERTONS PRICE $84.95
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Q-BEAM SPOTLIGHT
MAXMILLION CANDLEPOWER DESIGN)
only Q�.OalJ t)
23924
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FOR SHOTGUNS OR RIFLES
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several lengths available
WINCHESTER AMMOL, - � �
270 SUPER X BOX OF 20 �bU.UU Urr
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ENTIRE STOCK OF
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ROCKY BROWNING DANNER LACROSSE BLACK ROCK
CASE-GUARD
SHOOTERS BOX
100 ROUND CAPACITY
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ON ANY SWAROVSKI
RIFLE SCOPE OR
BINOCULARS
HUNTING SOCKS
BY RUDDY DUCK
TIGER SOCK 6040 WOOL-NYLON
OVERTONS PRICE $6.95
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RUGER 1022
STAINLESS RIFLE WITH
SCOPE
OVERTONS PRICE $249.95
sale $219.95
10X HUNTSKIL OR WATERFOWLER
INSULATED WATERPROOF JACKETS
YOUR CHOICE
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rryvvi
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OFFER. GCXT ONLY ON INSTOCK ITEMS.
VOID ON PREVIOUSLY PURCHASED
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SALE ENDS DEC. 2
111 RED BANKS RD
GREENVILLE
Overton s





S Thursday, November 30,1995 The East Carolinian
opmm
Our View
1
While we
were out
having fun,
the football
team and
coaches
were
sweating on
the practice
field. Let's
show them
how proud
we are to
call them our
Pirates and
march our
way to
Memphis.
Like Logan
said, it
doesn't
. matter if it's
sleeting
sideways �
be there!

Here we bowl again
We probably don't need to remind you that the Pirates
were crushed in last year's bowl mismatch against the Univer-
sity of Illinois, but, now we're back!
Once again the team, coaches and fans of ECU will march
into the town of Memphis for the Liberty Bowl on Dec 30 this
year, following a winning season for the Pirates.
TEC's prediction Stanford will fall to the mighty Pirates.
ECU will win the Liberty Bowl and our school will wallow in
its victory. Stanford is better suited than Illinois to play the
Pirates and, with the help of our diehard fans, we believe ECU
will stomp all over Stanford's ivy league attitude. They key is
to believe.
Many students were disappointed with last year's outcome
and vowed to never make that 15-hour drive to Memphis again.
Don't give up. Rethink your position and pack your bags -
you won't be disappointed this time around. Besides, what
else were you going to do for New Year's, bang pots and pans
together outside of mom and dad's house?
Memphis has a ton of tourist attractions and even activi-
ties for those who like to stay away from crowds. You can visit
Graceland or any of the othe- activities our special tabloid
(complete with map) will offer when it's inserted into next
Thursday's paper. Our team needs you, and in some ways, you
need our team.
For those of you who plan to eventually graduate, ECU's
Liberty Bowl win could be the perfect conversation piece to
getting better acquainted with an attractive stranger, or it could
even land a job in the networked world. "Yeah, I remember it
like it was yesterday, we had all of Memphis covered in purple
and gold you'll say. That's what happened last year and we
need to do it again.
Showing spirit says a lot about our school - people will
remember us and the team thrives on it Because Stanford is
coming from California, the odds are better that ECU will pack
the stands at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, and Stanford
will wish they had never heard of East Carolina University.
Besides, this could be your last chance to see the Pirates
win a nationally televised game. "1 was there you'll say, and
the pride will ooze out of every pore of your being. But, before
we got off on too much of an ego trip, let's remember that the
nation judges our school through the Pirate's performance.
That puts quite a bit of pressure on the players who've en-
dured long hours of sweat and pain to get us where we are
now, but your support in the stands can only help their goal.
And to the players and coaches responsible for this great
season - we are proud to call you the East Carolina University
Pirates. While the rest of us were enjoying our summer, you
were training. It probably seems like years ago, not months,
when the summer sun beat down on the practice field. Each of
you picked yourselves up when you were down, and pulled the
mud out of your facemasks. You were hurt and practiced any-
way, you were tired, but stuck it out, you picked yourselves up
and carried on. Two-a-day practices, hitting drills, drills on the
fundamentals-over and over until you got it perfect Only to do
it again just because the coach said to.
This season you've really pushed yourselves and sacrificed,
both mentally and phy:ally. You went to bed early while the
rest of us didn't. You stayed in while the rest of us went out
You came home from practice tired and hurting but studied
for your classes anyway, even when you had something else on
your mind. You endured being a member of the Pirate football
team. In good times and bad, as winners and losers, you made
it through the rough times, the times when no one expected
you to come up victorious. But you did it You are already
winners; both as individuals and as a team.
Good luck to the Pirate football team in this year's Liberty
Bowl. WE BELIEVE you can complete your UNFINISHED
BUSINESS!
FIGURE DRAWlKfr C-AtLErVf

lH
�tup �eW Af
6UIVC-I
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Tambra lion, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Crakj Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erlka Gohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photo Editor
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Rick Lucas, Copy Editor
Patrick Hlnson, Copy Editor
Lani Adkinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves ttie right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Where's my beef?
I d n't ask for very much in life.
Perhaps a little peace, harmony and
my money's worth, that's all. Yes, again,
I find establishments, fast food restau-
rants, here in Greenville that do not
give the consumer their money's
worth.
When I drive up to the drive-thru
and order a Double Quarter Pounder
with Cheese, I expect something big-
ger than a silver dollar. Unfortunately,
that is all I got when I visited
McDonald's. Now, does that seem like
I am getting my money's worth? This
is not the first time this has happened
to me.
It seems to me that when a re
taurant like McDonald's begins to cut
back their quality in product there is
no future for fastfood restaurants, or
is there? Though McD's may be one of
the, if not THE, largest fastfood chain
in the world, they need to improve their
quality.
However, my gripe does not end
with McD's. There are so many fastfood
chains here in the emerald city that
need to think more of their customer
satisfaction and less about how to
make a quick buck here or there i.e.
Wendy's. Yes good 'ol Wendy's, the
square burger that pours grease all
over you.
I hope that if you plan on buying
one of their burgers, that you do not
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
There has to be
some place here
in town where I
actually get my
money's worth.
intend to keep your clothes clean for
very long With the first bite of that
nice juicy burger, out squirts grease
and ruins not only your nice neat
clothes, but your entire day. What ever
you do, do not try this in your car. You
will be cleaning upholstery for days,
trust me!
Well, if I can't go to McD's for lack
of beef, and I can't go to Wendy's for
overabundance of grease, then perhaps
I can go to Burger King Well, that's
what 1 thought at first, until
1 went through the drive thru, as
usual, hoping to get the Double
Cheeseburger value meal, i gave my
order to the box and stated, "Ketchup
only As I pull up, I ask if it was
ketchup only, I was assured that it was,
and so I drove off, foolish me. As 1,
opened the bag to enjoy my nice:
scrumptious Double Cheeseburger, I
was surprised to find a Whopper with
lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise - but no
ketchup. Where did 1 go wrong here? I
thought my order was pretty explicit;
There has to be some place here in
town where I actually get my money'sj
worth, right7 Well, I must sadly report,
that in not one instance did I find that t
actually got what I paid for. If it wasn't
too much grease here, it was too little
beef there, or "ot the right kind of
burger at all.
What does this tell us? Has cus-
tomer satisfaction gone down the drain?
Are the fast food restaurants beginning
to practice poor business ethics like a
certain super store here in town?
1 have to admit when the restau-
rants actually get my order right the
food is quite good, and so I am appeased
for the time being This is not always
the case though. I suppose going to
these restaurants is like gambling you
may win, you may lose, but you will
never know until you try.
So, for now, happy hunting and
good trails, and if you find that mystic
burger place that gives you what you
paid for (your money's worth) let the
world know, we sure would like to know
ourselves, good luck!
Extreme Inefficency
Throughout history there have
been all sorts of extremists in poli-
tics. The ones 1 wish to comment on
this week are terrorists. "How are ter-
rorists involved in politics?" you ask.
Well, the definition of an extremist is
a person who advocates extreme po-
litical measures. Terrorism is rooted
in political agendas and uses extreme
measures (thus advocating), to say the
least so there you have it By defini-
tion terrorists are in the politics busi-
ness. There are countless examples of
this, but the ones I choose are in re-
cent history.
My first goal is to show how ex-
tremely inefficient terrorism is in get-
ting what it wants addressed. My sec-
ond goal is to show how often the end
result is just the opposite of what the
objective was.
In proving my fist goal, that ter-
rorism isn't efficient in getting what
it wants addressed, we'll look at two
recent incidents. First we'll look at the
Oklahoma City bombing and secondly
at the Amtrak derailment near Santa
Fe.
The Oklahoma City bombing
took the lives of scores and injured
hundreds. The underlying reason was
for a retaliation against federal law
enforcement agencies. The culprits
wanted to bring the agencies into the
limelight for their roles in the deaths
of Branch Davidian members near
Waco, Texas. It was hoped that the
American people would back them in
their crusade.
The second incident was the re-
cent deliberate derailment of the
Amtrak train Sun Line near Santa Fe,
Ariz. Of the 255 passengers and crew
members on board only one died.
Ironically, the last thing that the em-
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
Terrorists' acts
often get just
the opposite
of what they
wanted.
ployee that perished was heard to say
was that everything would be fine, and
they would be arriving safely on time.
Around the scene there were letters
scattered blaming the federal law en-
forcement agencies for the incident
near Waco, and for not investigating
the murder of a policeman's wife who
was allegedly killed because she found
out about a ring of officers getting
kickbacks from drug dealers. The
group that claimed responsibility for
the act was a previously unknown
group calling themselves The Sons of
Gestapo. The definition of gestapo is
"a secret-police organization employ-
ing underhanded and terrorist meth-
ods against persons suspected of dis-
loyalty
The fact is that the acts only
brought up other topics. The bomb-
ing of the Murrah federal building in
Oklahoma City brought out a federal
and public witch hunt against militant
groups in the midwest, and also
turned public sentiment against new
and progressive religious sects. The
train derailment only brought out the
idea that travel companies should beef
up security when they announce lay-
offs. You see, the line that the trag-
edy occurred on was due to be shut
down, about a thousand people were
due to be laid off and, according to
experts, only a person who knew the
route very well would know that the
point where the incident occurred was
the best spot on the over 500-mile
route.
The second goal is showing that
the terrorists' acts often get just the
opposite of what they wanted. For
this, I offer the recent assassination
of Israeli Prime Minister Rabin. The
student who confessed to assassinat-
ing him and his group of followers
stated that he needed to be stopped
because he was trying to give away
the whole country.
In trying to end the return ot the
West Bank to the Palestinians they
killed the most loved man in Israefc
and created the ultimate martyr. The
move has caused even some of thei
most right-wing members of the Israeli
Parliament to support Rabin's ideas
that they previously fought against
There is now a movement to allow the
Palestinians a say, and allow them
representation on Parliament itself.
The terrorist is polities' answer,
to theater's heckler. The heckler does!
his best to have his input into th��
show, and in the end he just gets car-
ried out with the audience disrespect-
ing and valuing his beliefs and con-
cerns even more than they did in the ;
first place.
My advice is to get a picket line �
going. It won't make CNN World Wide'
edition, but it won't land you in jail'
and make your group and objective-
less respected than before. �j
r
ATTENTION STUDENTS
3D
If you have a complaint or comment write a letter to the editor.
Letters must be typed, 250 words or less and include name, major,
year, and telephone number.Drop your letters by the Student
Publications bldg. across from Joyner Library (2nd floor). Let us
know what you think. Your voice can be heard!
"earn





111 i iii n ii in i hbumh
Thursday, November 30, 1995 The East Carolinian
irB&CoMrtf
mmmm �gaga
By Karl Trtlenberg
BY: PAUL HAGWOOD
V
7
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AN A SENTENCE ONVJHY
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THEN SEND �TTO:
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27. Spaghetti, e.g.
28. Attendant
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
35.
38.
39.
41.
Brown ermine
Porker pens
Agreeable
Mapp and,
ACROSS
DOWN
1.Port Said's locale39.Worm's length1.Verve
6.Pundit40.Herbal brew2.Baum's Dorothv
10.Be fresh41.Al and Tipper3.log Be'ore: prefix
14.Petrarch's inspiration42.Craze4.
15.Kin of PDQ43.Channels5.Colorful bird
16.Concert solo45.East Indian fig tree6.
17.Type of screw or46.Like baby shampoo7.Applies Stadium sound
wrench47.Industrial cauldrons8.
18.Going over the same48.Indian tent9.tree
material51.Posted10.Expansive and locale
20.Birth name mdicatoi52.British bar11Onassis and Meyers
�.Calculates55.Floods12.Torpedo
26.Chores58.Cream of society13.Hangs loosely
24.Dreadful monster60.Composer Alban19.Flat
2b.Surf sound61Lord. r22.Surgeons: abbr
21.Shoves(2 wds.l24.Jack Nicklaus' home
30.Part of a word62.Subleasestate
34.Movingfi.3Actress Sommer25Granny Irene and
3dActing locale64.Speedy jetsfamilv
3b.Not home65.Dip for tortilla chips26.Character in Kafka's
il.Pie flyThe Castle
38.Mao's home
(E.F. Benson)
First name in Green
Mountain Boys
Rip to pieces
Spring
McShane and
McKellen
'Good
Charlie Brown
42. Concerns
44. Come into view
45. Interdict
47. Waistcoats
48. Director Hooper
(Poltergeist)
49. Knievel of stunts
50. Incentive, informally
51. Alda's "M-A-S'H"
costar
52. Tablet
53. Indian tribesmen
54. Second of a series
56. Lily, in Lille
57. CIA's parent
59. Grazing spot
SH3ASNY





8
Thursday, November 30,1995 The East Carolinian
LiRye
Indian author shares
cultural experiences
Dale Williamson
Senior Writer
717V&oe
J
We're mad about "Mad"
Every paper has a TV critic, but
our critic is no normal couch po-
tato, no mere TV junkie. No, our
man wil watch anything, anytime,
regardless of quality or good taste.
Truly, he has no shame, and that is
why we call him "The TV Whore
Kevin Chaisson
Staff Writer
Just in case some of you didn't
realize it, "Mad About You" is still
on TV. Yeah, you remember that
show, don't you? It came on before
"Friends" last season, kicking off
NBC's Must See TV Thursday night
line-up. Remember? Paul Reiser and
Helen Hunt? You used to love them!
What happened?
I'll tell you what happened. NBC,
in an attempt to set up some sort of
beachhead on Sunday nights (and
create more magic like it did on
Thursday), has put "Mad About You"
on at 8. Opposite "The Simpsons
"Ah-hah you say, "That's why I
haven't seen it in a while - I've been
watching The Simpsons Well, too
bad. I like 'Mad but 'The Simpsons'
reign supreme. Oh, well But I'm say-
ing this to you now - tape "The
Simpsons" and start watching "Mad"
again!
There is no way I'm going to sit
here and tell you �
that "The
Simpsons" should
be denied. I love
the show myself! I
look forward to
each and every epi-
sode. But let's face
facts: "Mad About
You" is one of the
best-done sitcoms
produced today
and deserves your
renewed interest.
Let me refresh your memory.
"Mad About You" follows the lives of
Paul and Jamie Buchman (Reiser and
Hunt), married thirtysomethings that
live in New York. He is a documen-
tary filmmaker for a PBS-type chan-
nel, she, an English graduate stu-
dentPR executive. Throw in kooky
best friends and relatives, and you've
got the workings of a great show.
"Mad About You" began when the
Buchmans had been married one
year. Three years later, Paul and
Jamie are debating going off into
"that final frontier" and attempting
to have a child. Problems ensue.
Funny prob-
lems.
Ill admit it
Sometimes the
show does drift
off into sitcom
conventional-
ity: Paul being
trapped out on
the fire escape
in the rain to
avoid being
seen by his bad-
"Mad About You"
is one of the best-
done sitcoms
produced today
and deserves your
renewed interest.
gering mother,
Sylvia (Cynthia Harris), for example.
These scenarios pop up in most
sitcoms anyway, but "Mad" does a
pretty good job of twisting them
around out of the norm and into a
bit of the bizarre.
The "wife gets jealous of other
woman" episode was done with Paui
See MAD page 11
The Art of Maintenance
After bringing such esteemed writ-
ers as W.D. Snodgrass and Joy Harjo
to ECU, the 1995 Writers Reading
Series will come to its logical conclu-
sion. On Wednesday, Dec 6, Bharati
Mukherjee will round out the semes-
ter when she reads from her own work
at Jenkins School of Art
Mukherjee, who was born in
Calcutta, India, received her MFA at
the University of Iowa in 1963 and has
since gone on to become a highly suc-
cessful fiction writer. Tackling both the
short story and the novel, she has re-
ceived several professional recogni-
tions, including awards from the Na-
tional Magazine Awards and the Na-
tional Book Critics Circle.
With the current thrust in
multiculturalism, Mukherjee's work is
particularly important. Living in
America with an Indian background,
Mukherjee incorporates a unique life
perspective within her fiction. Her
work does draw from her own personal
experiences, but it also stands on a
more universal level. Mukherjee's char-
acters tend to struggle with issues of
displacement within their own world
as they attempt to blend into a society
in which they do not neatly fit
Her first book, The Tiger's Daugh-
ter (1972), focuses on a woman who
returns to her native India after hav-
ing lived in the Western world for sev-
eral years. Upon her arrival in her home
country, the heroine is thrust into a
world very different from the one she
remembers. She now sees India
through Western lenses, and this pre-
sents a very different picture.
Mukherjee's second novel, Wife
(1975), once again centers on displace-
ment but this time the setting is New
York City. In this novel, Mukherjee il-
lustrates how the ideals of proper be-
havior set for Indian women do not
translate well within the frantic de-
mands of American society.
Jasmine, published in 1989, fol-
Photo courtesy Writers Reading Series
IBharati Mukherjee, a native of India, will be reading at
Jenkins from the novels and short stories of her more-than-
20-year career next Wednesday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m.
lows the struggles of a young Indian
girl as she runs from her home world
to seek a new self in America. While
Jasmine did receive its criticisms,
Mukherjee's writing style was still
praised for its honest portrayal of the
harsh realities existing within "the
Land of the Free
Mukherjee has also proven to be
a strong talent within the short story
form. The collections Darkness and
The Middleman and Other Stories are
both prime examples of this talent
Dealing with the immigrant experience,
both of these collections continue in
Mukherjee's tradition of providing
unique perspectives on cultural
clashes.
While Mukherjee does value her
non-Western heritage, her intention is
not to simply paint an ugly picture of
America. Her writing is a critique and
Sec INDIA page 11
TfooLie Review
Politics weaken American President
Comedy should
have focused on
romance
Ike Shlbley
Senior Writer
Photo by KEN CLARK
ECU Maintenance worker Horace Godley beautifies the campus as he lays down a paint
job on this electrical transformer that even the art school would have trouble matching.
M- NOTgS FteM THe UNPeRGBPUNP
Repulsiveness attracts in Tom Thumb
What if the president of the
United States was a widower and
wanted to date? This intriguing ques-
tion is explored in a new film by Rob
Reiner entitled The American Presi-
dent.
Andrew Sheppard (Michael Dou-
glas) has been the US president for
nearly three years as The American
President opens. For his entire presi-
dency he has been a single father.
Upon meeting a lobbyist for an envi-
ronmental group named Sydney Ellen
Wade (Annette Bening), he entertains
thoughts about asking her for a date.
President Sheppard's character
has never been questioned during his
term in office, but this new develop-
ment in his personal life causes a com-
motion. Sheppard's main opposition
in the upcoming election will be Sena-
tor Bob Rumson (Richard Dreyfus, in
a well modulated, unbilled appear-
ance). Senator Rumson questions the
family values espoused by the presi-
dent when he spends the night with
Wade.
Unfortunately the relationship
between Sheppard and Wade receives
only cursory treatment from the film-
makers. And Wade is inconsistent She
has scenes highlighting her tough, di-
rect style that forces politicians to lis-
ten to her, yet she fumbles like a little
girl around the president even before
she dates him.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
It's easy to become jaded as a reviewef. So much
mediocre crap is spewed out from the world's enter-
tainment capitals that a cynical, smirking, insectoid
shell is often a good reviewer's only defense against
the tidal wave of excrement he must wade through on
a daily basis.
I can smell crap at a hundred
paces, and show it no mercy. Crap
offends me; it actually pisses me off
that somebody would try to peddle
inferior goods to me. Bad entertain-
ment is an insult to my intelligence,
and I don't take kindly to insults.
That's why, to me, it's always
so refreshing to see something that
not only makes it past my protec-
tive shell, but shatters it com-
oletely. Something that's so very
good or so incredibly strange that
it leaves me defenseless, a cower-
ing pink blob, an exposed nerve ending unable to ward
off the charms of this amazing piece of entertainment.
That's what happened when 1 saw The Secret Ad-
ventures of Tom Thumb earlier this week. Within the
first 30 seconds of this repulsively delightful British
film, my sleek, deadly reviewer's carapace was lying in
shards at my feet. A hook had been deftly inserted
into my raw, exposed flesh and I was yanked right in.
The surgeons responsible for my capture are the
A hook had been
deftly inserted
into my raw,
exposed flesh
and I was yanked
right in.
men and women of Bolex Brothers Studios. None of
them are actually brothers, you understand, and there's
not a Bolex in the bunch. Actually, the main creative
force behind Tom Thumb is Dave Borthwick, who's cred-
ited as writer, designer, editor and director of the hour-
long film. What Bolex Brothers offered, apparently, was
a state of the art stop-motion animation facility to bring
Borthwick's creations to life.
Just released on video, The Secret Adventures of
Tom Thumb is part fairy tale, part sur-
realist dystopian science fiction alle-
gory, and part stop-motion spectacu-
lar. The classic story of Tom Thumb
remains intact at the film's core. Tom
is a six-inch-taH man born into a world
of normal humans who overcomes his
height difficulties and goes on to be-
come a great adventurer.
Where Borthwick deviates from
the fairy tale is in the seating: a to-
talitarian future world slum con-
trolled through genetic engineering.
This Tom is a genetic freak, ripped
away from his loving (if semi-retarded)
parents by government agents and sent to the labs for
experimentation.
Freed from his cage by a hyper-intelligent, skinless
lizard-bat, Tom discovers a society of little people living
in a junkyard, beneath the feet of "normal" humanity.
There he meets Jack the giant-killer and begins a quest
to be reunited with his father.
CD Reviews
Director Rob Reiner spends more
time on the president's political deci-
sions than on his developing relation-
ship with Wade. And he spends more
time on Wade's personal idiosyncra-
sies than on developing a consistent
personality. The script by Aaron
Sorkin (who worked with Reiner on
A Few Good Men) never gives the
couple a chance to get to know each
other. They never sit down to discuss
past relationships, job aspirations or
expectations about their relationship.
The relationship that emerges on
the screen feels forced. The film never
makes clear when Wade gets past the
awe she feels about dating the Presi-
dent Several cute scenes show their
first date at a state dinner, their ini-
tial kiss (which is disturbed because
of an attack by Libya on US soldiers),
See PRES page 10
Root Doctors
No Bones About It
See THUMB page 9
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Instead of a press release and a
snappy little folder to put their CD
in, the Root Doctors should have
overnighted me a prescription of
painkillers; No Bones About It hurt
more than a root canal. Yes, another
band of former University of South
Carolina students who played frat
parties all over Columbia, SC have
raised their ugly heads to infect the
entire eastern sea-bored.
The second track, "No Bones
About It" sounds hauntingly similar
to the Talking Heads classic "Once
in Lifetime" being performed by Mr.
Mister. The Doctors better hope
David Byrne hasn't listened to it.
Lyrics like "Ain't got no bones about
it Tell you time and time again
I'd give my left and my right just to
be the man" would force Byrne to
give the Doctors a flurry of fore-
arm chops followed by head slaps.
Byrne may even be forced to burn
down their house for theft of his
bassline.
Byrne won't be the only one in
line to challenge these musicians to
a cage match. The "whoomp there
it is" guys are setting up the Root
Doctors for a belly-to-belly suplex off
the top rope (the most lethal move
in wrestling) for recording "the booty
song "Everyday I hope and pray
that lots of booty would come my
way Nuff said.
Let me regress.
It's not that the Root Doctors
have no talent, it's just that there is
no originality. They bite at different
song styles that have become popu-
lar in the last decade or so and add
shallow lyrics. Sure it's a safe move
to ensure at least meager record sales
and club attendance, but not one that
will win any critical praise.
It's a good thing that each mem-
ber of this quintet has their own day
job, because No Bones About It is
something they'll all laugh about a
few years from now. My mother al-
ways told me if I don't have anything
nice to say then I should keep quiet.
For once 1 think I'll take her advice.
�mm
f





iinir irrmi-
mmiwimmmwmmmmmmmmmmmm
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 20,1995
We knead ewe to fics hour misteaks!
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for the
position of Copy Editor for the
Spring '96 semester.
Fill out applications in the
Student Pubs building.
Winter Break!
Means Big Mountain Skiing At Snowshoe!
January 1st thru January 6th
Winter Break is
likeuhhfun or
something up on top
of our big mountain
Well gang, it IS FUN!
Skiing, parties, skiing,
partiesreally the kind
of winter break you
deserve as a hard
working struggling
college student! Now,
we know that funds are
sometimes hard to
come by, so we've
made an effort to make a Winter Break at Snowshoe
VERY AFFORDABLE! Here's what you'll get
y
Welcome Aboard Party on Monday or
Thursday with great action ski flicks,
munchies, and of course your favorite
liquid refreshment!
Free NASTAR clinics and racing tickets
Grand Finale celebration featuring a fun
race and an Apres ski party with plenty of
live music at The Connection Nightclub.
Plus games, prizes and freebees!
Special lift ticket rates for college students
showing valid college ID$63 for 3 days or
$84 for 4 days.
33 savings on lodging rates
A special 3 day ski rental package for $36
($48 for 4 days).
50 savings on adult group ski lessons.
Three, Four or Six DayNight Lodging Packages Available!
Here are three options to choose from
� Option 1 - Lodge Monday night, January 1 thru
Wednesday, January 3, and Ski January 2-4.
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THUMB from page 8
Tom and all the tiny creatures
he associates with on his adventure
are stop-motion puppets. Stop-mo-
tion is a pain-staking animation pro-
cess made famous in a variety of
Christmas specials from the '60s
("Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer
etc.). The technique involves mov-
ing specially-jointed puppets in tiny
increments, animating them one
frame at a time. Bolex Brothers are
masters of stop-motion, and it
shows. The Secret Adventures of
Tom Thumb looks incredible; it's
every bit as well-animated as Tim
Burton's Nightmare Before Christ-
mas, and a lot more repulsive to
boot.
The skinless lizard-bat, for ex-
ample, is a genuine work of art. With
exposed bone and muscles grafted
messily into wires and diaphanous
membranes, the creature makes
your skin crawl, but at the same time
manages somehow to come off as
cute. And despite its freak show fas-
cination, the thing still manages to
display character, intelligence and a
whole array of emotions. Its exit
from the film is a traumatic moment
that lingers in the mind for a long
time.
Much less cute are the "normal"
humans. Played by real actors (not
puppets), these characters are
filmed as if they, too, are stop-mo-
tion creations. Moving with a rigor-
mortis twitchiness, the humans are
much harder to watch than even the
most disgusting lab freak. Greasy
and despicable, these characters
(with the exception of Tom's par-
ents) are perhaps the most horrify-
ing thing about the film. The stop-
motion effect is downright creepy.
But there's more to The Secret
Adventures of Tom Thumb than just
a bunch of acid-trip visuals. The
story being told by those visuals is
engaging, funny, intelligent and
even heart warming in some twisted
way. Though the dialogue is sparse,
Tom's story deals with political, sci-
entific, religious and sexual issues
along the way. The simple image of
a crucified Santa Claus hanging
next to a male Madonna (a porce-
lain statue of Joseph cradling the
baby Jesus) covers more thematic
ground than whole days of dialogue
ever could.
Forgive me if I'm being a bit
vague here. This is a many-faceted
story that's best revealed in the view-
ing. I would be doing it an injustice
to go into too much detail.
This film sparks thought and dis-
cussion long after its final frame
leaves the screen, and only the very
best entertainment can do that. It's
not for the closed-minded, or the faint
of heart, but little that's any good is.
On a scale of one to 10, The Se-
cret Adventures l fTom Thumb rates
a repulsively fascinating 10.
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10
Thursday, November 30, 1995
T7e East Carolinian
PRJbo from page 8
the morning after their first night to-
gether, and a few minutes on the
couch at Camp David.
Reiner and Sorkin try to balance
the two aspects of the presidency, as
the leader of the most powerful na-
tion on Earth and as a man trying to
find personal fulfillment They err of
the side of political leadership. They
introduce a gimmick to help propel
the film but instead their gimmick
stalls the story. Sheppard promises
Wade's organization, the General De-
fense Fund, that he will introduce a
bill that requires a 20 Percent reduc-
tion in fossil fuel emissions but then
has to waffle on the issue. This thorny
issue could have been entirely avoided
in lieu in investing more film time on
the relationship itself.
When Sheppard is at work,
Reiner films the president amid a con-
stant flurry of activity. Lewis
Rothschild (Michael J. Fox), the Se-
nior Domestic Security Advisor, con-
stantly pumps the president for infor-
mation on the relationship. The At-
torney General, A.J. Maclnenerny
(Martin Sheen), is constantly trying
to offer advice about presidential de-
cisions. The president's secretary,
Janey (Samantha Mathis) keeps re-
minding the president about his next
appointment.
The entire cast turns in top notch
performances. John Mahoney and
David Paymer also provide support as
the head of CDF and the presidential
pollster, respectively.
Michael Douglas turns in a believ-
able, if unremarkable, performance.
The true star in this film is Annette
Bening. Of all the actresses working
in Hollywood today, she seems to have
the most star quality. She can transfix
the screen with a smile. A glow sur-
rounds her on screen that lights up
everything around her. She has confi-
dence, charm and charisma. If The
American President succeeds at the
box office, Miss Bening will deserve
much of the credit
The American President does
contain its share of witty lines. When
discussing Wade's tough lobbying tac-
tics, Maclnenerny observes, "She'd
lobby the Carolinas to the American
Lung Association And when Wade
first enters the White House grounds
she comments that she wants to savor
the Capraesque quality of the moment.
Her friend tells her that the security
guard does not even know who Frank
Capra is, nor does he care. But the
friendly guard assures Wade that he
knows exactly who Frank Capra is. This
is also a nice homage to Afr. Smith
Goes to Washington, a film similar to
this one.
In another funny scene Wade's
sister listens to Wade's hesitancy about
dating Sheppard, a handsome, intelli-
gent, articulate man who is also the
leader of the free world. Her sister flatly
asks: 'is possible your standards are a
bit too high?"
The American President tries so
hard to convey the harried lifestyle of
the executive-in-chief of the nation that
it neglects the core of the story. This
film is quite good but it could have
been great A slight shift in focus and
Sheppard would have become more of
a moan and less of a political leader.
On a scale of one to 10, The
American President rates a seven.
Do you
have a
knack for ife3

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1 creative?
Well we'll we have got
the job for you. You
can become one of
our production
assistants. Our
production assistants
design ads using
1 QuarkXpress and
Pagemaker. If you
think you have the
know-how then apply
at our office on the
second floor of the
Student Publication
i building.
SILVER
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The �ast Carolinian
�ffif.itTriniT-iTi
�mmmwmM
Thursday, November 30,1995
11
FREE PREGNANCY TEST iNDIAfrompage8 MDfrompage8
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
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Greenville, NC
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Expires 113095
The Plaza, Greenville NC ONLY
I
at the same time a celebration of
America and what it means to be Ameri-
can. A reviewer for New Republic once
stated that Mukherjee is herself unique
in her ability to "not succumb to guilt
or to maudlin memories about the past
Instead her work soberly celebrates
resilience. Like most of her characters,
she has no thoughts of turning back
Mukherjee reveals her love for
America when she defines what she
means by American. "By American
she said, "l mean an intensity of spirit
and a quality of desire. I feel American
in a very fundamental way, whether
Americans see me that way or not
Bharati Mukherjee's reading will
be at 7 p.m. and will be followed by a
reception and book signing in Grey Art
Gallery. The event is free and open to
the public. The Writers Reading Series
will not be offered next semester but
organizers plan to resume the program
in the fall semester of 1996. So be sure
to catch this unique opportunity while
you can.
fr -SUU Week it
Hui5xmt
TOBCAHMOmCED
IHUKDW
i
Homebrew
involved with a virtual reality repre-
sentation of Christie Brinkley instead
of a real woman (And honestly, would
any guy in his right mind cheat on
Helen Hunt? 1 thought not.). Jamie
was recognized as a popular evil bitch
comic book villain in the typical
' havr-n't I seen you somewhere be-
fore?" episode. The "trying to make
peace with the in-laws" episode cul-
minated with Paul and Jamie at
Paul's parents' house, trying to have
sex in Paul's childhood room Uhink
tiny single bed) while his mother kept
knocking at the door!
And speaking of sex. I don't
know if you remember, but "Mad
About You" actually features some
of the funniest, wittiest and sexiest
sex on TV. Paul Reiser and Helen
Hunt have wonderful chemistry to-
gether, an important, yet mostly for-
gotten, quality for a romantic com-
edy.
One of my all-time favorite epi-
sodes deals with Paul and Jamie ar-
ranging their schedules so that they
both have the day off to do nothing
but "bang the drum slowly Of
course, problems ensue. Interrup-
tions from everyone fall like rain,
TBA
TO BE ANNOUNCED
Twos Mugnite � Bring o Mug, well � for 100 pennies.
Sun Sunday Bloody Sunday � ISO Bbody Mays & 100 Dora Beer
including Jamie's sister, Lisa (the
amazing Anne Ramsay), to Paul's
cousin, Ira (the equally-good John
Pankow), and all the way through the
family (try geUing back into the
mood after talking to your mom) to
even the dog. Murray. Murray the
dog gets, easily, the funniest bit in
this episode-chasing an invisible
"mouse" into its "hole and smack-
ing his doggy head into the wall each
time. The effect is something like:
making out, kissing, fondling, dog
scurries, THUMP, move here, kiss
that THUMP. It's hysterical! Trust me
on this!
The other actors (besides the
dog) are all equally strong. Reiser and
Hunt have been nominated for
Emmys the past two years. Candice
Bergen of "Murphy Brown who has
won the Lead Actress Emmy for the
past hundred years, confessed on
national TV twice that Hunt deserved
the Emmy more. Cyndi Lauper, after
two guest-starring turns on "Mad" as
cousin Ira's ex, won herself an Emmy
to put on the mantle beside her
Grammys. Needless to say, the act-
ing is top-notch, and the list, of guest
stars and cameos are pretty cool, too.
Some of the more interesting ones
have been Yoko Ono, Eric Stoltz (as
Jamie's ex-boyfriend), Andre Agassi,
Car! Reiner, "Star Trek's" Brent
Spiner. and many others.
1 understand your problem! "The
Simpsons" have had some amazing
guest stars, too. You want to be loyal
to both camps, but you feel that "The
Simpsons" is the better show. I say
to you, not necessarily better, but dif-
ferent. "Mad About You" deserves
recognition, despite some conven-
tionality.
"Mad" gives a sweet and realis-
tic portrayal of a couple in love week
after week, arguments included, and
that's good. If you are in a similar
loving relationship, you can empa-
thize with Paul and Jamie. If not. it
can remind you of what that kind of
relationship is like. It shouldn't be
ignored because the stupid network
wanted to float "The Single Guy" in
the ratings for awhile (and trust me,
"Mad" kicks "Guys ass any day of
the week). Remember those VCRs.
and give "Mad About You" another
look.
On a scale of one to 10. "Mad
About You" rates a nine.
I ALF
College Night I Sundays
jonjas
2 Slices Hopping & Drink
A A �(-Daily Lunch Special
&&wl DMon-Fri
Tues. 990 slices 990 32oz draft
Wed. large deluxe pizza
$5.99 til 1am
pick up or carry out
EDO'S II
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Sun. 1 c Bloody yiarys
Mon. K Draft
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Wed. Dollar Nile
Thurs. 99C 32oz draft
Fri. 2" 32oz draft
Sat. 2 32oz draft
LIVE entertainment
Tonite
BREED
L
time for the Ho, Ho, Ho-lidays!
ECU Student Stores' Annual Holiday Sale
Monday, December 4th
8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
ReSKter to
Win an
AMFMCD
Alarm Clock
to Win a
Portabte 4
Rc9istcrto
IftOOKS
1 quired te�nW
Buy
HALF
Get 2nd
40 r
Store Hours:
Monday � Thursday: 8 am - 8 pm
Friday 8 am � 5 pm
Saturday: 11 am -5 pm
w
Sale applies to regular priced apparel only. Reduction will be taken on second item of
equal of lesser value. Not vlid with any other offer or discount.
Extra 95 OFF already
discounted sale apparel!
95 OFF General Books!
(Does not apply to textbooks or nursing references)
OFF Gift items!
BMMBffSro
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FREE
Stocking Staffer
Offer good while supply lasls(approximately 150 pieces).
Coupon required. One per person. No purchase necessary.
(value under 50c)
m
Student Stores
Ronald E. Dowdy
Centrally located on campus, in the Wrisht Building919-328-6731
More than just booksyour dollars support scholars!
Door Prize Entry
Name:
Address:
Phone Number:
Student ID Number.
Drawings will be held throughout the day. Monday. December
4. 1995. Need not be present to win. Nc purchase necessary.





12
Thursday, November 30,1995 The East Carolinian
Iff
jnEL
For Rent
� l and 2 Bedrooms �
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quite, one bedroom
turmshed apatmenls $250 a month,
6 month lease
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street .
� �Located nea ECU
� ECU Bus Serv,ce
?On-site Laundi y
Special Student leases
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
J I or Tommy Williams.
756-7815 758-7436
ffBm
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sha.e 2 br 2
bath apartment in Dogwood Hollow for
Spring Semester. Cable, water, washer
dryer included. Call Melanie at 830-8926.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share two bed-
room, 1 12 bath, townhouse style apt.
Rent is $340.00 total. Either male or fe-
male can apply to share half utilities and
rent 3214871.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male nonsmoker
to share 2 bedroom furnished duplex.
Walking distance to campus and down-
town. Sublease for Spring Semester. Avail-
able Dec. 15th. $190.00 rent 752-6738
Frank
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: to
share 2 bedroom apartment across street
from campus $227.50 and 12 utilities.
Water and cable included in rent ASAP.
Call Amy at 8306149.
2, 3 Bedroom 2 !2 Bath, 1500 Square
feet. Apartments FOR RENT ABOVE
BW3's for $775.00 a month. Please con-
tact Y�onne at 758-2616 M-F 9-6.
SEEKING MATURE LAID-BACK PER-
SON to share Large House close to cam-
pus. Private Bedroom & Study. Great place
to live Rent $310. Call Tom at 757-3566.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ASAP 2BDR
Apt, 5 blocks from campus. $175 Utili-
ties. Furn except Bedroom. CableWasher
hookup. Responsible person. Call Kelley
830-3885.
2 Bedroom, 1 12 Bath, Gas logs,
WasherDryer hook-up, many extras.
Quiet location, near Medical Facilities.
Excellent Condition, Can leave message
321-8711.
ONE BEDROOM TAR RIVER. Assume
Lease. Available near end of December.
$360 a month. First floor unit with patio.
Beside Bus-stop. Call Eddie at 757-3128.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FEMALE non-
smoker to begin next semester Kingston
Place Apts. $215 per month. Call if inter-
ested 830-6081.
GRADUATING IN DECEMBER! Need
person to take over lease at PLAYERS
CLUB APT. in January. Own Room, 2 Full
Baths. Washer & Dryer Lighted Tennis
Courts- Basketball & Volleyball Courts
Weight RoomPool. Call Kyle 353-0668.
ROOMMATE NEEDED! Three be'droom
house on Library St within walking dis-
tance of campus. Washerdryer hookups.
Prefer another student. Rent $200 per
person. Ask for Todd or Will. Phone 758-
5261.
TWO ROOMMAATES NEEDED for 3BR
duplex 5 blocks from campus, available
now. $17313 utilities. Call Tim 758-
4145.
AVAILABLE JANUARY 1, 1996! Tired
of parking woes? Fed up with residence
hall life? SUFFER NO MORE! One bed-
room, fully furnished apartment available.
Closer to campus than most residence
�tafr plus free water sewer, and PARK-
ING! A steal at just $275 per month, plus
January' rent U FREE! Call Jason @752-
9493 anytime and leave a message.
FOR RENTBRAND NEW 2 Bedroom
2 Bath Duplex, Fireplace, Patio, Fenced-
In Backyard. $575month, located on Old
Stantonsburg Road, Five (5) minutes from
Hospital. Call 747-3136 (day or night)
FOR RENT: 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house
on comer of Eastern & Willow. Available
January 1st Spacious rooms. In excellent
condition, close to campus. Please call 757-
1510 ASAP.
SUBLEASERS NEEDED - Two bedroom
apartment Wilson Acres. $505.00month
Starting December 16 or January 1 thru
August Call 830-5360
For Rent
For Sale
ROOMMATE WANTED: FEMALE to
share 2 BR townhouse, 12 rent & utili-
ties. ASAP. Call Tracey at (919) 321-5963
(919)321-1818.
FEMALE TO SHARE 2BR Apt, Great
location near campus. $175.00 per month.
Available ASAP or for Spring. Please call
anytime 752-9482 Lori.
WESLEY COMMONS: 1 & 2 Bedroom,
Range, Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer
Hookups, Decks & Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility, Sand Volleyball Court
Located 5 blocks from campus. Free Wa-
ter & Sewer.
WYNDHAM COURT: 2 Bedrooms
Stove Refrigerator Dishwasher
Washer & Dryer Hookups Patios on first
floor. Located five blocks from campus.
These and other fine properties managed
by Pitt Property Management, 108 A
Brownlea Drive, 758-1921.
LANGSTON PARK APARTMENTS, 2 BR
with free water, free cable (Beside Tar
River Apts.) $355 month rent. Call 758-
9977
1BR ACROSS FROM NEW STUDENT
RECREATION, Rent $225 month at 810
Cotanche St. Call 758-1921.
RESPONSIBLE, NON-SMOKER needed
to share 3 bedrm duplex ASAP until June
30, 1996. $190.00 rent & 13 utilises.
Please call Monique or Danyelle at 758-
6625
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to share
brand new 4BR, 3 full bath apartment
home. $250 per month plus 14 utilities.
Swimming pool, exercise center, club
house, lighted tennis courts and lots of
extras, including continental breakfast
each Friday morning. Call 321-7613.
ROOMMATE WANTED? Male to share
new 4 BDR, 3 full bath apartment. $250
per month plus 14 utilities. Swimming
pool, tennis, volleyball, weight room and
more. Call 321-7613.
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS 2
bedroom1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Water & basic cable included. 752-
8900. Professionally managed by Pro Man-
agement of Greenville.
TOWNHOUSE 2 bedroom 1 12 bath.
2 blocks from campus. $475 per month.
Pro Management of Greenville. 756-1234
KINGSTON PLACE CONDO 2 bedroom
2 bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per
month. Pro Management, of Greenville.
756-1234
HOUSES FOR RENT near campus. $450-
$550. Call Cindy, Pro Management of
Greenville. 756-1234.
For Sale
NeeJCASHm
We Boy CDS,
Cassette, and Lps
Well pay op to $5 cash tor
CD
,� � l
)i iiti.w ti 75S Oar
Wanted
Cdo you need money?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR U5ED
We also buy TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER
JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken Gold
Pieces
&
Stereo's
TV's
VCR's
CD players
S i.i di i S w
roWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5 SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown,
v rlrivp fn hrV J- - -�� t jf
IT HC,P
� Wanted
GIFT GIVING: Puzzled by what to give
Mom or Aunt Suzy for Christmas? Select
a beautiful hand-crafted stained glass an-
gel. Select from many styles and colors.
Prices range from $6.50 - $22.50. Order
now for Christmas. Call Janet 756-8061
for showing.
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE: Excellent con-
dition. Includes Butterfly and leg attach-
ments. Like new. Great Christmas gift!
$1400 new; only asking $600. Please call
931-1064 or 972-9667.
GRADUATING AND MOVING! Lots of
furniture. Kitchen table and chairs, couch,
dresser, desk, lamps and more. Call Tim
758-5676.
CANNONDALE DV1000, and Thule roof
rack with Unisport carrier. Great deal at
$750 for both. Call 752-9850 and ask for
Rich. Call ASAP, won't last long.
84 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE, V6,3.8L,
108U, MLS, Mint Cond, AC, PS, AT, Safety
Insp till 0896, $1400, NEC. Call Michael
756-2865.
VERY DEPENDABLE PRINTER! Great
for papers. $150 Panasonic KX-1124 Dot
Matrix. Comes with paper. 24 PIN. Call
Tom or Jen 758-8815.
MEMBERSHIP TO THE CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY, with unlimited tanning
for only $39.00 a month. Work out and
tan while getting ready for Spring Break.
Call 355-6354, Ask for Ashley.
94 CANNONDALE DELTA V 1000 with
Headshock. 19" polished aluminum frame.
EC Ridden little. Asking $1000. Call Ja-
son for more information. Leave message.
4134504.
FOR SALE. Sears Lifestyler 500 XC-
SkierRower. Like new. $100 Cash only.
Call 355-7691.
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED. dark wood,
six drawers, heater included. In great
shape. $100. Call Beau at 551-0573.
JVC 6-DISC CHANGER For Home. Re-
mote and single tray. Excellent Condition.
$150.00 OBO ask for Chad 8304052.
TREK 8S0 For Sale, Barends, Bike Com-
puter, metal pedals and toe clips. Excel-
lent Condition. $175.00 OBO Ask for Chad
8304052
CHEAP SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Per
sonal representative to organize your
group. Daytona, Panama City, Bahamas,
Cancun, Negril and more! As low as $109.
For info call Taia at 752-8490.
BYUNG LEE TKD Membership (2 for 1)
and Pro-form Home Gym. Call Todd at 355-
8944.
CONDOMS! Wide selection! Shop from
the privacy of your own home. No mail-
ing lists. Discreet packaging. Help stop the
spread of AIDS. Send for a free brochure.
Francie's, 312 Crosstown Road, PO Box
178, PTC. GA 30269.
FREE RENT: Free room and board in
exchange for part-time babysitting. Lisa
or David 75&0461.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTOR: Indi
vidual capable of teaching basic gymnas-
tic skills, floor exercises, and tumbling to
children 3 to 7 years of age. Mondays thru
Thursdays 3:30 to 7:00pm - Previous work
with children necessar6y. Contact: Carol
T. Power, Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department at 8304542.
CHRISTMAS GIFT OR FUNDRAISING
OPPORTUNITY: Hotel Express card, save
on airfare, car rental, cruises, condo-
minium rentals and 50 off regular rates
at over 2,700 hotels worldwide. $49.95
price of one year membership will pay for
itself after one stay in hotels listed ir. ho-
tel express directory. Great fund, oising for
organizations, sorority, fraternity and
clubs. Call Paradise Travel for more infor-
mation (919) 638-8638.
WANTED Individuals, Student Organi-
zations and Small Groups to Promote
SPRING BREAK '96. Earn MONEY and
FREE TRIPS. Call the Nation's Leader,
Inter-Campus Programs, http:
www.icptcom 1-800-327-6013
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED: $5 hour
plus bonuses. Day or evening shifts, full
or part-time. 355-0210
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian
languages required. For information call:
(206 632-1146 ext J53622.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel. Seasonal & full-time employment
available No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53622.
TROPICAL BEACH RESORT JOBS
Luxurious hotels are now hiring seasonal
positions. Lifeguards, food service, house-
keepers, hosthostess, and front desk staff.
Call Resort Employment Services 1-206-
632-0150 ext R53621.
FREE TRIPS & CASH Find out
how hundreds of students are already earn-
ing FREE TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Choose
Cancun, Bahamas, Mazatlan, or Florida!
CALL NOW! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK!
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to our expanding Business. Earn
up to $1,500 plus per week, Escorting in
the Greenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 7584896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est 1990.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being
broke, want to get paid everyday. Call
Playmates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-
7686.
Services
Offered
MEET
NEW PEOPLE
THE FUN WAY
TODAY!
1-989-388-8588
EHt. 7714
$2.99 per min.
Must be 18yrs.
Touch-tone Phone Required
Serv-U (619) 645-8434
BARBIE DOLLS WANTED - paying cash
for dolls, clothing and accessories from
the 1950's and 1960's. If you mom, aunts,
etc. are 3045 and still have their dolls,
give me a call - 328-7338.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS To lose 10-
30lbs Next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough Guarenteed. $35.50 visa
mc 1-800-211-6382
SINGLE GUYS & GIRLS: Meet someone
special on The New Date Line leave &
retreive messages 24 hrs a day. 1-900-255-
8585 ext 7726 2.99 per minute. Must be
18 yrs Touch Tone Phone Required Seru-
U-(619) 645-8434
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-2634495 ext F53623.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOME-
THING MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services
is your ANSWER! We have the best selec-
tion of music in Greenville. Call 758-5026
ask for Sean and Book your Party Now!
GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS are
available. Billions of dollars in grants.
Qualify immediately. 1-800-243 2435 (1-
. 800-AID-2-HELP).
FOREIGN STUDENTS-VISITORS. DV
1 Greencard Program available. Tel: 1-800-
660-7167 & (818) 772-7168. 20231
SUgg St Canoga Park, CA 91306
Personals
FREE PHONE CARD - NOT JUST A FEW
FREE MINUTES - Unlimited Useage with
any phonesystem. Other incentives-in-
cluding cash-just for using it Call 355-
3789
PENPALS WANTED: For two English-
Speaking young women in Argentina. For
more info, call Laura at 758-7118.

Greek
Personals
&
CONGRATULATIONS TO SIGMA AND
ZETA for 1st and 2nd place in the All Sing.
We had a great time. Love AOPi.
PI DELTA is sponsoring a FRATERNITY
BOXER CONTEST at the ELBO TONIGHT
from 9-12:00. Cash prizes will be given
away! For more info contact Amy at 328-
3377 or The Elbo at 7584591.
PI DELTA: Get ready for formal girls! It's
o.dy two days away. The party will be big
as we celebrate five years!
PI DELTA PLEDGES: Finally by the end
of the night the string guided you in the
right direction and at the end was your
Big Sis! We're glad you found us, Love
your Big's!
Travel
Spring Break!
Bahamas Party Cruise
$279
It's Better In The Bahamas
15 Meal � 6 Parties
800-678-6386
Cancun $359!
Jamaica $419!
7 Nights Air & Hotel! Parties &
Discounts!
Florida $119!
1-800-678-6386
Ski Snowboard
IHTtRCOUXClATt SHI WHKS 96
rUmnH!
Campus Reps
Needed
New Ski & S�owfco3rJ Equlf
)S7
UMm3i
1-800-999-Ski-9
Attention Spring Breaker!
Book Now! JamaicaCancun $369,
Bahamas $299,
Panama CityDayton $129
Sell Trips, Earn Cash, Go Freet
i-800-234-7007
SPRING BREAK, Bahamas or Florida
Keys. Spend it on your own PRIVATE
YACHT, one week only $385.00 per per-
son. Including food and much more. Or-
ganizers go for FREE! Easy Sailing Yacht
Charters. 1-800-7834001. See us on the
Net http:www.shadow.net-ezsail
FREE TRAVEL! SPRING BREAK '96!
Party in Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,
Florida, Padre. Guaranteed lowest prices.
Organize Group, Travel Free! Call for free
information packet! 1-800426-7710.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now! JamaicaCancun $359, Baha-
mas $299, Panama CityDaytona $129.
Sell Trips, Earn Cash, Go Free! 1-800-234-
7007.
SKI & SNOWBOARD - WINTERBREAK
& SPRINGBREAK '96 Intercollegiate Ski
Weeks, ONLY $219. Includes: 5 day lift
ticket 5 nights lodging (luxury condo)5
days intercollegiate activities(drinking age
18), Sponsors Include Molson & Labatts.
MT. ORFORD, CANADA (just across the
Vermont Border) Group LeaderRep. Dis-
counts. Call Ski Travel Unlimited. 1-800-
999-SKI-9.
49 fair
"Fte-Holiday Specials
Waves, Scrunches, Frenchrolls,
Buns, Ponytails, Wrapps,
Blow dry. Press & Curl,
Sculpture nails
JUST $20.00
Reg. Roller Set Perms, Curl,
Highlites, Foiling, Men's Wet Cut,
Women's Wet Cut, Relaxer Retouch
AT SUPER DISCOUNT PRICES!
Make appointment today or stop by and take
advantage of our "Super Angelic Prices"
514 E. 14th Street near King Sandwich
Phonc 752-970 or 752-9707
prices good through Dec 31,1995
ANNOUN
ECU LAW SOCIETY
On Wednesday, December 6th at
5:15pm in Ragsdale room 218A we will
have our Christmas meeting. The meet-
ings are open to all majors. We will have
Christmas snacks and a movie.
1996 HOMECOMING
COMMITTEE
If you are interested in getting involved
with Homecoming, now is your chance.
Applications for Chair-Elect are now be-
ing accepted. Applications may be
picked up in 210 Mendenhall Student
Center. Please attach a detailed resume.
Apply Today.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
The Annual Christmas ROCK AND MIN-
ERAL SALE will be held on December
6, 7, and 8 from 10am until 3pm on
the first floor of the Geology (Graham)
building. Come early for the best se-
lection. Sponsored by Sigma Gamma
Epsilon.
CONFERENCE, -CURRENT
ISSUES IN BIOETHICS"
Friday, December 1, l:00-5:30pm,
Brody 2E-100. Featured Speaker: Joel
Frader, M.D Dept of Pediatrics and
Center for Biomedical Ethics University
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Jonathan Moreno, Ph.D Division of
Humanities in Medicine, State Univer-
sity of New York Health Science Cen-
ter at Brooklyn. John C. Moskop, Ph.D
Dept. of Medical Humanities, ECU
School of Medicine. Registration re-
quired. For more information Call 816-
2797
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
invites you to worship with them. Sun-
day Masses: 11:30am and 8:30pm mass
at the Newman Center. 953 E. 10th St,
two houses from the Fletcher Music
Building. For further information,
please call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
COPING WITH LOSS AND
DEATH
Anyone can experience the loss of a sig-
nificant person and often the grieving
person can benefit from the support of
others who have had a similar experi-
ence. This continuing group will bring
people together under the direction of
a skilled counselor for mutual support
and to learn healthy ways of grieving.
Tuesdays at 3:30pm. Counseling Cen-
ter. Call 328-6661 to register.
DEAR EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
On behalf of Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization (PICASO) and our clients.
I would like to thank the East Carolina
University community for their out-
standing participation and support of
AIDS Awareness Month (October). With
the cooperation of the Office of Health
Promotion & Well Being and Student
Health Services, PICASO was able to
help organize a variety of workshops
on HIVAIDS issues, as well as the cam-
pus wide CAN AIDS food drive. Over
1200 can food and personal items were
donated to our food pantry, with spe-
cial donations made by Health 1000
classes, Jones Hall, Phi Sigma Pi, and
other sororities and fraternities. This
generous donation will help keep the
food pantry shelves full for the year to
come. Many of the services PICASO
provides to our clients and the com-
munity would not be possible without
ECU students, faculty, and staff. I
would again like to thand East Caro-
lina University for continously playing
a role in providing HIVAIDS educa-
tion and prevention to our community
and challenge you to continue in the
future.
"SINCLELICHT" CHRISTIAN
SINGLES FELLOWSHIP
Is an Exciting Monthly, Christ-Centered
Singles Fellowship where hundreds of
Christian Singles thoughout the East-
ern NC Area gather for fun, interaction
and fellwoship with other Christian
Singles. College students, Military.
Business Person. Never Married.
Single-again or perhaps new in the
area. "SINGLELIGHT" is the place
where Christian singles gather to meet
new friends. For more information just
call 1-800-ITS TYME (487-8963) Mon-
day-Thursday between 9-5 and Friday
9-12 (3Hrs.) SEE YOU THERE!
"P m
rTemra





.
��iHr " ���-����� ������� �Sv; � CV - � .
13
Thursday, November 30,1995 The East Carolinian
One on one with Crandell
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Quarterback Marcus Crandell
has been the main gun offensively
this year. He has set three new
records, two of which former quar-
terback Jeff Blake, now with the
Bengals, had set
Crandell became ECU's career
passing yardage leader with 5,691
yards and all-time total offense leader
with 6,026 yards. He also set a school
single-game record against Syracuse
this year with 392 yards passing and
453 total offensive yards.
Recently, I sat down with
Crandell, and this is what he had to
say about his performance this sea-
son and the upcoming Liberty Bowl.
Q: How does setting new
records this year boost your confi-
dence for the Liberty Bowl and next
season?
A: It will boost my confidence as
far as helping to get the team to the
point where we can accomplish our
goals that we set for the season. We'll
go to the Liberty Bowl, and hopefully
we will win. It makes me feel good to
break those records, and at the same
time be able to accomplish part of
our goals.
Q: Do you put past games be-
hind you and look forward or do you
look back and see what you can do
to improve?
A I look at my mistakes I made
in the previous game. I try to watch
�' the film and see what made me do
this and do that Throughout the
game I try to focus on not making
those same mistakes, and that's how
I prepare for the next game.
Q: Talk about the chemistry be-
tween your receivers and running
backs.
A: Our offense is demanding for
our receivers to not drop passes. It's
a lot of pressure put upon them on
running perfect routes and having
Photo by KEN CLARK
Only sitting back when the Pirates are ahead by a large
margin, Crandell watches as his backup quarterback plays.
them catch the balls. Jerris McPhail
has to run the ball about 20 or 30
times, and sometimes he has to catch
the ball out of the backf ield so often
he becomes tired. They all play an
important role and help me out
Q: ECU seems to be rushing the
ball a lot more, so how has that af-
fected your personal style of play,
which is the passing offense?
A: In previous games I felt like I
had the chance to open up the of-
fense a little more using my abilities
to run. It's helped out throughout
the season, and it's given us a lot of
aspect as far as other teams and the
way they defend us.
Q: How do you feel about not
being ranked in the top 25?
A: I feel that we deserve to be in
the top 25. We have beaten quality
opponents this season, but I think
we're not ranked because we lost to
Cincinnati. They came ready to play
and we weren't, so that cost us not
being in the top 25.
Q: In 1993, you suffered a bro-
See CRANDELL page 16
Coming
your
way!
Junior guard Justine
Allpress, looks to
pass the ball against
recent opponent
Latvia of Russia. The
Lady Pirates wiii host
N.C. State's Lady
Wolfpack this Satur-
day at Minges Arena
at 3 p.m.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
ECU students may purchase their tickets to the 1995
Liberty Bowl beginning tomorrow Dec. 1. The Pirates will
play the Stanford Cardinal of the Pacific-10 Conference in
the Dec. 30 game at Memphis, Tenn. The game will kick off
at 12 p.m.
To purchase tickets, ECU students must present a valid
University I.D. The Athletic Ticket Office will open tomor-
row morning at 7:30 a.m. and will remain open until 5 p.m.
The cost of a student ticket for the Liberty Bowl is $30.
LBBEKH
BOWL
Pumping up
f
Photo by KEN CLARK
ECU football players use the weight room in which this sign hangs to get pumped up
forthe season. The "Iron Pirates lift weights in order to build strenghtforthe games.
Soccer season winds down
Cralg Perrott
Assistant Sports Editor
The 1995 season was an up and
down one for the Pirate soccer team, at
times both frustrating and rewarding.
The team finished with a 4-18
record, but two of those wins were
against conference opponents, which is
more than any ECU soccer team, previ-
ously fielded, has ever won.
"I thought we had a good season
said Head Coach Will Wiberg. "I think
we accomplished a lot more than our
record indicated. We were very competi-
tive in some games that we didn't win"
The Pirate booters displayed a new
attitude in the ECU soccer program,
that of a "never say die" approach to
the game.
Seven games were lost by one goal,
and another five were lost in overtime
or by two. All four wins were by shut-
out, and the Pirates won their first ever
CAA Tournament victory by knocking
our in-state rival UNGWilmington in the
first round.
ECU had lost six games to end the
season, including a 7-1 loss to Ameri-
can the Friday before the tournament,
but the Pirates found a way to beat the
Seahawks. They then fell to eventual
CAA champions William and Mary in
the next round of play.
"That was great for the program,
and I'm especially glad for the team
Wiberg said. "There are no regrets as
far as the tournament went"
Wiberg a first year head coach at
ECU, came into town 12 days before
pre-season camp began, giving him no
time for recruiting. Walk-on players try-
ing out for the team had as good a shot
as anyone to contribute to the squad,
but the veteran returning players
stepped up and made the difference.
Senior and All-CAA second teamer
Marc Mullin, along with junior Chris
Padgett led the team as cocaptains.
"If I had 11 Padgetts and Mullins.
we wouldn't lose many games Wiberg
said.
Senior Dan Staton, filling in at
sweeper for the first time in his career,
sacrificed his mid-fielder position for the
good of the team and did a credible job.
Fellow senior Eddie Stephens, be-
set by nagging injuries, was a versatile
weapon for the Pirates, playing in the
back and mid-fields.
Dusty Belk, another senior stand-
out lead the team in scoring with five
goals.
"Those four seniors we're really
going to miss Wiberg said. "Someone
will really have to step up to fill in for
them
Will Wiberg
In preperation for next season,
Wiberg will incorporate a number of
measures to get his squad ready. The
team will train together a certain num-
ber of days per "week, and will spend
some time in the weight room, some-
thing Wiberg opts not to do during the
course of the season.
A tryout will also be held for play-
ers transferring into ECU, as well as for
players who tried out in the fall.
"I'm also recruiting heavily now,
looking for some good players that will
fill some holes we have and some real
See BALL page 15
a
Super Ho's" claim victory
Flag football team
beats UNC-W 32-
0 in final game
David Gaskins
Rec. Service
The "Super Ho's ECU's 1995
Intramural Flag Football champi-
ons successfully defended their title
at the Third Annual Southern At-
lantic Flag Football championships
in Wilmington.
This regional tourney held Nov.
17-19, involved 17 men's and two
women's teams from N.C, S.C. and
Virginia.
The "Ho's" dominant run
through the tourney came on the
heels of a surprising upset suffered
three weeks earlier in Chapel Hill
at the North Carolina Collegiate
Tournament. However, on this
weekend the "Ho's" were anything
but impostors to the throne. They
ripped through Campbell 47-6 and
won by forfeit over South Carolina
State in poole play.
In the first round playoff game
against UNC-W "Lambda Chi the
"Super Ho's" overcame an early 12-
0 deficit kept their poise and dis-
mantled their opponent 37-12. In
the final three rounds ECU de-
stroyed UNC-C 40-6, crushed North
Carolina State "Guts & Glory" 40-
13 and defeated UNC-W "Sigma
Nu" 32-0 in the final game. The win
over "Guts & Glory" came against
a team that cruised through the
North Carolina State Tourney with-
out a close game.
For the second year in a row,
ECU's diminutive Chris Pressley
won the Most Valuable Player
award with his relentless pass rush
and lightning quick open field run-
ning abilities. Derrick Harris won
one of the primary receiving
threats and was selected to the All-
Tournament team along with quar-
terback Daniel Finn, who sparked
the offense with nifty running and
pinpoint precision passing.
Other members of the regional
champion "Super Ho's" included
Bud McAdam, Matt Joyner, Rodney
Young, Geouf Anderson, Antony
Gelardi, Matt Synder, Jerrod
Jenkins and David Campbell, the
veteran captain and six-year mem-
ber of the team.
The "Super Ho's" will now be-
gin final preparations for the na-
tional Invitational Flag Football
Championships to be held in New
Orleans from Dec. 27-30. This an-
See VICTORY page 15
� . �
� ECUvs. Stanford�
Regular season totalsECU Stanford
First Downs
Rushing241233
Passing83103
Penalty136116
Rushing Attempts2214
Yards Gained Rushing397469
Yards Lost Rushing17712080
Net Yards Rushing226261
Net Yards Passing15451819
Passes Attempted28122545
Passes Completed457337
Had Intercepted239197
Total Offensive Plays149
Total Net Yards854806
Fumbles: Number-Lost43574364
Penalties: Number-Yards27-1214-7
Number of Punts-Yards101-78371-575
Average Per Punt62-224853-1946
Punt Returns: Number-Yards36.336.7
Kickoff Returns: Number-Yards23-20125-216
Interception Returns: Number-32-58339-1024
Yards19-20614-124
Possession Time5:18:465:24:58
Third-Down Conversions167-70163-70
Sacks29.520





TfflTrwirn�T"p
14
Thursday, November 30,1995
The East Carolinian
Inaugural season tough for Panthers
(AP) - The scene is becoming an-
noyingly familiar for the Carolina
Panthers.
They head into Sunday's home
game against Indianapolis trying to
rebound from a 34-26 loss to New
Orleans in which they had six turn-
overs.
"We've been here before
coach Dom Capers said Monday.
"Two weeks ago we were in the
same situation, and we came out and
played an outstanding game against
Arizona
The Panthers had six turnovers
in their Nov. 12 loss at St Louis,
then followed it up with their best
overall game of the season, a 27-7
victory over Arizona the following
week.
If the Panthers (5-7) are to
bounce back this time, they'll have
to do it against what is shaping up
as the toughest stretch of their in-
augural season. After Indianapolis,
Carolina plays San Francisco and
Atlanta. All three teams are at least
two games over .500 and are legiti-
mate playoff contenders.
Nonetheless, Capers said he's
expecting good things from the Pan-
thers the rest of the way. To sup-
port his point, he points to
Carolina's rebound from an 0-5 start,
a comeback that has already made
the Pamhers the most successful
first-year franchise in NFL history.
"I think we have a group of
guys who are
accountable for
the way they
play he said,
"and they have
a sense of re-
sponsibility
But they
also have a prob-
lem holding
onto the ball.
The Pan-
thers went to
New Orleans
having won five of their previous six
games, a run that put them in posi-
tion to become the first expansion
team to qualify for postseason play
in its inaugural season. Instead, the
Panthers' playoff chances were se-
riously damaged by four intercep-
tions by rookie quarterback Kerry
Collins and two lost fumbles.
Ten teams in the NFC have bet-
�I think we have a
group of guys who
are accountable
for the way they
play"
� Coach Dom Capers
ter records than the Panthers, who
fell into a last-place tie with New Or-
leans in the NFC West.
"You can't turn the ball over as
much as we did and win Capers
said. "You just can't do that
Turnovers weren't Carolina's
only problem. The
Panthers, who
went into the
game with the
NFL's sixth-
ranked defense,
gave up a season-
high 180 rushing
yards. The Saints'
point total also
represented the
most given up by
Carolina this sea-
son.
The Panthers also had an un-
usually large number of missed tack-
les. Capers said they appeared to be
the result of technique problems and
possibly fatigue, but not a lack of
effort.
"We weren't as efficient as we
need to be he said, "and all you
need is for one or two guys to not
be where they need to be, and that
2- or 3-yard gain can turn into a 5-
or 6-yard gain
Carolina received some varying
news on the injury front Monday.
The bad news had to do with the
right'ankle that fullback Howard
Griffith sprained early in Sunday-
night's contest.
"Right now, I'd say he'd be
questionable for Sunday Capers
said. "He'll miss some time this
week
The good news is that Derrick
Moore, Carolina's leading rusher, is
expected to return this week.
Griffith had been filling in at half-
back during the three-game absence
of Moore, who suffered a sprained
right knee near the end of the Pan-
thers' victory Nov. 5 in San Fran-
cisco.
"I think Derrick feels very good
about coming back Capers said. "I
know he's very optimistic
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i II nrI II I 111 '
in -ilirir -n i lin'Tlf.
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 30,1995
15
VICTORY from
page 13
atalog
Connection
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nual event, now in its 18th year,
brings together over 200 of the top
teams in flag football to compete
for titles in the Men's Collegiate,
Women's Collegiate, Co-rec Colle-
giate and Men's Open Division. The
winners and runner-ups receive the
opportunity to play in an exhibition
game on the floor of the
Superdome immediately prior to
the Sugar Bowl game.
In addition to the success of
the "Super Ho's ECU was also rep-
resented at the Southern Atlantic
by four of their finest flag football
officials. Stephen Flippin, Chris
Nunn, Greg Laurie and George
Hollen officiated into the later
rounds of the event and all per-
formed very strongly. At the con-
clusion of the tourney, Hollen was
recognized for his performance
through an invitation to officiate
at the nationals, an honor reserved
for the top four officials at the
event. This will be Hollen's third
consecutive year as an official at
the national tourney.
A total of 21 officials worked
the even from ECU, UNC-W, NCSU,
UNC-Chapel Hill, Appalachian State
and Campbell University.
While this group of ECU's best
was in Wilmington, another contin-
gent was in Atlanta working the
Georgia Collegiate Flag Football
Championships. ECU has been in-
vited to send top officials to this
tourney for the past seven years
due to the recognized quality of the
officiating program.
Recreational Services and ECU
was represented by David Pate,
Zina Briley, Russell Duvall, Aaron
Sauls, Allison Kemp and Steven
Roberson. This tourney is the larg-
est stateregional flag football tour-
ney in the country and is second
only to the Nationals.
There were 62 teams that
squared off in competition and 42
officials came to work the tourney
representing ECU, University of
Alabama. Appalachian State Univer-
sity, Georgia Southern University,
Georgia Tech, Mercer University,
Middle Georgia College, University
of Georgia and Valdosta State Uni-
versity.
Roberson claimed top honors
among the ECU officials by being
selected as one of eight All-Tour-
nament officials, being given an in-
vitation to work the Nationals and
being selected to officiate the
men's championship game. Allison
Kemp was selected to officiate the
women's championship game and
Duvall was a crew chief for both
days of the tourney.
The national tourney is ex-
pected to assemble approximately
120 officials from across the nation.
ECU will have their largest group
ever making the journey this year
as Lynda McCormick, Nunn,
Roberson, Duvall, Hollen and
Laurie will work the event.
JD.fvLf.Li from page 13
needs we have Wiberg said.
The NCAA allows Division 1-A pro-
grams 22 weeks of competition, and the
Pirates have only used up 15 or 16 of
those weeks. Wiberg plans to hold a
tournament (possibly in round robin
format) on his remaining playing dates.
As for his first year as head coach,
Wiberg believes he has learned a lot
"I learned what a good conference
we're in Wiberg said. "I have a lot of
respect and admiration for the other
coaches in the conference, and I think
that East Carolina has earned the re-
spect of a lot of those programs
With only five home games this year,
the constant road travel cost the Pirates
some of their endurance that they
worked so hard for during the summer.
Wiberg also learned a lot about his
players, and believes they learned a lot
about him.
"It's been very positive for me, and
next year I'll be a little wiser and know
what to expect Wiberg said. "I'm not
going to be in for any surprises next year.
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Friday, December 29
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Saturday, December 30
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16
Thursday, November 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
CRANDELL from page 13
ken ley and had to sit out the rest of
the season. How did that affect you
mentally?
.V It was heartbreaking to go out
there and see Perez (Mattison) put into
the position he was put in. He was a
freshman and was very young and he
didn't know what to expect To see the
look on his face, I knew exactly how he
felt because he was a freshman, and I
can imagine how 1 would have felt as a
true freshman playing quarterback.
Q: Compare this season's Liberty
Bowl team to last year's team.
A: 1 think last year we had definite
leaders on the team with Junior Smith
and Damon Wilson. This year I think
we are starting to get some of those
leadership skills from the players, but
the coaches have been the leaders for
us this year. We're still getting the job
done, but I think they would like to see
players step up and be leaders.
Q: Stanford is ranked 30th and
ECU is ranked 29th. Do you think this
will be a better matchup than last year?
A; I haven't really seen them play
this year, but what I've been hearing is
that they are tough. I hope it's not go-
ing to be a game like it was last year.
We are going to try to give our fans
something worth seeing.
Q: Do you think the players are
more focused this year for the bowl
yame than they were last year?
k. Yes, I think they are. I know,
definitely, they are because of what hap-
pened last year. We don't want to get
embarrassed like we did against Illinois.
Q: The team s motto this year has
been "unfinished business Are you
going to finish that business this year
in Memphis?
A: We're going to try our best
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Nevada vs. Toledo
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SEC 5 or 6 vs. At-large
Colorado State vs. Kansas State
East Carolina vs. Stanford
Syracuse vs. ACC 4 or SEC 5
Virginia vs. SEC 4
SEC 3 vs. Penn State
Tennessee vs. Ohio State
Clemson vs. Big East 2
Colorado vs. Oregon
Southern Cal vs. Northwestern
You are cordially invited to a
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Thursday, December 7, 1995
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
Starts at 4:00 PM
Gospel Choir Performance - Food Will Be Served
Presented by the ECU Special Events Committee
For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004

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Title
The East Carolinian, November 30, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 30, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1112
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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