The East Carolinian, November 2, 1995






X 5

November 2,1995 �
Vol 71, No. 20 "
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville. N C
14 pases
Halloween tradition continues
Tambra Zion
News Editor
� � � � &SWS������'�
Around the State
I Vi'i - The law student
charged with I fie on a busy
college ' - leased b
a judgi despite a
psychiatrist ' he should
he committed for treatment.
Wendell J. Williamson was
released from the University ol
North Carolina hospital mental ward
Oct. 9, 1992, days after he was
picked up because he was seen howl-
ing and hitting himself. �'
Williamson. 26, of Clyde, is
charged with two counts of first-
degree murder in the deaths of res-
taurant worker Ralph Walker 2,
and Kevin Reichardt, 20. a I'NC la-
crosse player from Maryland.
(AP)-The Department of Pub-
lic Instruction is adjusting to
organization mandated by the Leg-
islature, and local superintendents
also must adapt to the change, Su-
perintendent of Public Instruction
Boh Etheridge said.
The Department of Public In-
struction staff will be cut by 300
people come December, and the re-
gional technical assistance centers
tor schools will be closed by next
June under a reorganization i irdered
this year by the Legislature.
Around the Country
(AP) - School children who
read the Weekly Reader between
1989 and 1994 were treated to an
unhealthy dose of tob u ndustry
views on smoking in irl
were often illustrated with Joe
Camel, researchers said in San Di-
et i
At the time the articles ap-
peared, the Weekly Reader's largest
shareholder was RJR Nabisco. Joe
Camel's creator.
Joe Camel, a promotional car-
toon character lor tame! cigarettes,
has been widely criticized fi r appeal-
ing to children.
(AP) - A jury in Fort Worth.
Texas convicted a man of kidnap-
ping and killing a teen-age girl who
was raped and buried alive, and
must now decide whether he should
entenced to death.
Jurors took about two and a
half hours Tuesday to convict Or-
Hall of killing 16-year-old Lisa
fl in the firsl
kind filed under the 1994 Crime Bill
The jury returned to court
: to consider Hall's pun-
nt a death sentence or life in
I : without parole.
Around the World
1 pi - A powerful earthquake
capital. Hurricanes lashed
' Another quake killed
: people at a resort hotel.
e ere onlv the natural di-
this ountr ol 90 million
isday's
:e Dead celebrations, many
lering il recent
' �' weren't a sign
i'oiid.
traditi.
blockei
the do-
F
persed an and 4
�When '
we eve told to L
them
Greenville police
Besides
a bomb threat at
several arrests, o
nothing out of tr
mcers
e ordi
i center
students
ght Mad-
-nt were
� free goodies, as well
. � b iffel of French
g hotdoj gg salad,
cupcakes and more.
Participants of Midnight Mad-
ness could choose from a variety ot
tiding fortune telling.
karaoke, ask the wizard, psychic
hotlines and tarot readings. Several
dents chose to dip their arms into
range mush for prizes,
while others simply took in the view
of the elaborately decorated build-
ing and observed the pumpkins
which hid been caned for a con-
test sponsored by the event.
While students were safe inside
Mcndenhall around 11:30 p.m a gas
See HALLOWEENpage 3
Halloween memories
??
(Top left). The
crowd was large,
but maintained
its composure in
front of The
Cellar. (Top
Right), Will Bud-
Man John Boone
replace the
frogs? 'Bottom
left), Dan
Chisolm may
have only known
a few tunes, but
he sure did a fine
job entertaining
this festive
crowd. (Bottom
right). Winners of
the pumpkin
carving contest
as well as entries
were on display in
Mendenhall.
Photos by KEN CLARK
Health careers explored today
Holly Hagey
Staff Writer
�� tfw. ����: ��� v
(AP)-Q
irtei ii. Lira
ation of Premier Jacques
Are you interested in a career in
health services Lunous auoui
tunities in this field? If the an-
yes, then you need to attend the
Health Career Day I I
The Health Career I
held on the first and secoi d
the Ulied Health building from 10
mtil p in. There will
running back and for! I
nig building to the Belk build
help students with tran
during this event.
There will be tal
from 80 different emplo
such as pi using.
occup itional therai
ere is no cost tor studi I
nd students
employers from around �
n their
ive sti
Schedule for the shuttle bus
Thursday, Nov. 2
Leaving nursing building
10:45,11:15,11:45,12:15
Returning to nursing building
11:00, 11:30, 12:00,12:30
See HEALTH page 3
ECU, Duke unite
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
Recently ECU and Duke University began the first phase of its project
which is designed to improve the quality of health care in eastern North
Carolina counties.
(�n Oct 1. the two universities began the developmental phase of
the pi ter being chosen as two of 12 institutions to receive a Rob-
Aood Johnson Foundation grant in the amount of 5300,000.
�ct. dubbed "Partnerships for Training aims to recruit and
train d level practitioners, which collectively includes nurse prac-
:i ms' assistants and certified nurse mid-wives.
i loug Boyd at the Office of Medical Center News and
. start of the planning phase, emphasis is placed on
gauging how many students will be participating so plans for the curricu-
lum can K
"The 12 organizations will present their completed plans to imple-
ment their programs Boyd said, "and at the end of a two-year evaluation
pri the 12 will be chosen to put their plans into action
: . 1 School of Nursing. Phyllis Horns, and Mary Cham-
nursing school, are working together as the direc-

Hoi rt by ECU and Duke should prove to be a good
See ECU page 3
LIFfce
Ittitcte
Peasants host hard-core, hoedown.
Bank machines, where are they?
Pirates prepare to slaughter Army .
.page
5
12
Thursday
Rain
?nec�i2t
Weekend
Mostly cloudy
High
I QW

High 82
I ow 45
f�aw to &oc& uj
Phone
; newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 6558
The bust Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building:
a ross from lovner





Thursday, November 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
-�Ml 1111
CRMiSENE
October 23
Prank phone calls - Two students received a prank phone call from
a person claiming to have struck their vehicles. Neither party received
repeated calls.
October 24
Assault by pointing a gun - A student reported that an unknown
black male pointed a gun at him while he was riding his bicycle northeast
of Jenkins Art building. The subject did not fire the gun.
Possible suicide attempt - A non-student reported that a friend of
hers may have taken an overdose of sleeping pills. Officers contacted the
student at her residence hall and she advised that she had not taken the
pills and gave them to the officers. The coordinator and counselor spoke
with the student The student will follow up with the counselor at her
earliest convenience.
October 25
Possession of weapon - A student was arrested for possession of a
weapon on campus after officers observed a rifle in his vehicle. The rifle
was unloaded and secured in the gun rack. The incident occurred north
of White Hall.
Damage to property - An art sculpture located on the southeast
corner of Jenkins Art building was damaged when an unknown person
pushed it over.
October 26
Assist rescue - A non-student was found in an intoxicated state in
the road at the northeast corner of the Brody Building. Due to his intoxi-
cation and several abrasions he received when he fell down, he was trans-
ported to the hospital by Greenville Rescue.
October 29
Drug possession - An officer stopped a vehicle at Jones Hall for a
one-way street violation. During a consent search of the vehicle, con-
trolled substances and drug paraphernalia were found. Four non-students
were cited.
October 30
Drug possession - A non-student was issued a state citation for pos-
session of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. She was arrested for pos-
session of Acetaminophen Oxycodone or "Percoset" that was not dis-
pensed to her. The incident occurred in the commuter lot south of Fletcher
Music building.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
SGA funds, plans debate
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) focused on funding as
usual during their third and fourth
meetings.
Student fees were also a topics
of interest: an informative meeting
debating student fees will be held
on Nov. 13 in room 213 of
Mendenhall and is open to the pub-
lic.
In a period of questions and
privileges during the Oct. 16 meet-
ing. SGA President Ian Eastman an-
nounced a Board of Trustees meet-
ing for Dec. 8, pointing out that stu-
dent fees cannot be raised more than
5 percent.
Two new applicants were sworn
in under oath: Chris Hardee and
Fabiola Price.
The Oct. 23 meeting was called
to order at 5:09 p.m.
"From now on committee mem-
bers need to be here by 5 so we can
get started earlier said Harry Bray,
SGA speaker. "We are going to be
here for a while today, we have a lot
to cover
Joyner goes
interactive
During a period of questions
and privileges, Angie Nix, SGA trea-
surer, explained how graduate
groups now have a separate fund-
ing board. For the academic year
they have a total of $10, 530 to ap-
propriate to graduate organizations.
During new business two new
members were sworn under oath: Jo-
seph Sottile and Sarah Wright.
Concluding old business three
out of four bills passed:
Student Occupational Therapy
Association requested $805. After
voting to amend, $365 passed.
Kappa Beta Pi Honor Society
requested and was approved
$974.34.
The Society of Manufacture of
Engineers had $110 pass.
The Investments Club for the
Schooi of Business requested money
for a computer software database.
"Software is dangerous to get
involved with because of the ex-
penses Bray said.
He emphasized not to favor the
bill; it did not pass by committee.
Nix has compiled a first-time
funding packet.
"It is so groups have a better
understanding of how we do our
funding, that way they don't feel lost
in the shuffle Nix said.
The packet is available in room
255, the SGA office, in Mendenhall.
The financial report, as of Oct.
30, had a total revenue of $262,433,
including actual and estimated rev-
enue. Total appropriations made
were $176,068; which leaves a total
available balance of $86,360.
The meeting was adjourned at
6:35.
Students become
more computer
oriented
Stephanie Eaton
Staff Writer
Students using the computer
network in Joyner Library this se-
mester may have noticed some in-
teractive changes.
Joyner Library has given stu-
dents a better opportunity to be-
come more knowledgeable about
computers by offering several dif-
ferent services. Through these pro-
grams, students are given more out-
lets to turn to when working on as-
signments.
Joyner offers students the
Internet, a library home page, CD-
ROM, Horizon catalog for the
stacks and an ample amount of
other computer services.
"Our new computer system
makes it easier and faster for stu-
dents to retrieve information said
Nancy Shires, information grants
officer for Joyner Library.
Students can now access the
Internet in Joyner Library. The
Internet allows students to talk to
people around the world. Not only
does the internet provide a source
of information, it also allows a per-
son to share ideas. Students can
use the Internet at computer sta-
tions in the main lobby, the refer-
ence department, document depart-
ment and mediateaching depart-
ment.
"The Internet is good said
Correai Moore, a student. "I enjoy
it. Sometimes I enjoy it a little too
much
The Home Page is another ref-
erence students can turn to when
See COMPUTE page 3
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Homegrown Bond
Re-elect
Inez Fridley
District 3
Tuesday
November 7, 1995
The community leaders listed below are endorsing Inez Fridley for
Greenville City Council, District 3, beacuse she is concerned about
important quality of life issues that affect all Greenville
residents, including students.
Tims. � Mugnite � Bring o Mug. we! fill for 100 pennies.
Sun. Sunday Bloody Sunday � 150 Bloody May, & 100 Dan. Beer
The unconscious,
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Buy and read
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$6.99 paperback.
Get your copy today at
the Student Store,
East Carolina
University
10.
TOP TEN REASONS FOR VOTING FOR INEZ FRIDLEY
FOR CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 3
Inez is a proven leader. In 1987 and 1988 she was selected
Greenville's Best Fublic Servant in a Greenville Times reader
survey.
Inez fought hard for our present recycling program,
implemented in 1993, which is environmentally friendly and
saves landfill space.
Inez believes in public involvement. The noise ordinance
critized by her opponent was adopted in 1985 and updated in
1990, both times with input from the SGA, fraternities and
sororities. University officials, and the general public.
The ordinance has served as a model for other university
towns.
Inez believes in strong towngown relationships and has been
involved in a National League of Cities Task Force for
University-City Relations.
Inez is concerned about the environment and is a member of the
Sierra Club, served on the advisory board of the Pamlico-Tar
River Foundation, and has been Council liaison to the City s
Environmental Advisory Commission, the Planning and Zoning
Commission and the Greenville Utilities Commission.
Inez is a believer in greenspace and was instrumental in the
establishment of the new Green Mill Run Greenway being
dedicated October 29th, which extends from the ECU campus to
Greensprings Park.
Inez believes in strong code enforcement and does not believe
that students should pay exorbitant rent for minimal housing.
Inez believes in sound fiscal management and is committed to
creative financial solutions that offer long-term advantages
over short term fixes.
Inez believes in stronger police protection and has supported
innovative policing techniques such as bicycle patrols, police
substations, and lap-top computers in patrol cars to improve
efficiency.
Inez is also an ECU graduate, who has been proud to represent
the needsof students, neighbors, businesses, and the entire
University Community.
Alex Albright
John Anema
Or. Judith Arias
Dr. Alice Arnold
Dr. Nicole Aronson
Dr. Lessie Artis
Bea Behr
Dr. Vince and Ann Bell is
Dr. Scott and Kristin Below
Dr. Mary Jo Eratton
Tracey Brown
Mrs. Hartwell Campbell
Lena Carawan
Dr. Myron Casoar
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cavenaugh
Robert Caprio
Dianna Coble
Tr. Charles Coble
Betty Congleton
Dr. John Cope
Michael Cotter
Noel B. Cox
Everd and Shirley Day
Dr. Hal Daniel
Leonard and Catherine Darby
Pat Daugherty
Dr. Frank Deane
Dr. Robert Dietrich
Dr. Ed and Carol Doty
" Mrs. F. D. Duncan
Elizabeth Edgerton
Michael and Lone Elbeck
Brenda and Michael Ernest
Sara Evans
Mary Holt Faircloth
Jeanette Fishell
Karen Frye
Dr. Elizabeth Gamble
Dr. Paul and Peg Gemp-rline
Dr. Umesh Gulati
Trish Hayes
Ginger Hulbert
Dr. Malene Irons
James Kilburn
Dr. Libby Knott
Mary Jo Larkin
Jane Lawrence
Nan Lee
Dr. Thomas Long
Dr. Jean Lowry
Dr. Mel and Betsy Markowski
Hap and Ann Maxwell
Dr. William and Susan Spring Meggs
Mrs. Clell Moore
Nancy Kayberry
E. B. Kunson
Elaine Mayo Paul
Margie Pearsall
Dr. George and Betty Poehlman
Jake and Martha Postma
Jim and Francme Rees
Dr. Stan and Ann Riggs
Peg Rosett
Terry Shank
Mrs. Elva Smiley
Archie Smith
Dr. Scott Snyder
Dr. Ralph Steele
Helen Steer
Dr. Nergesh Surti
Kay Sutton
Mrs. Kamia Ruth Taft
Mrs. Virginia Thompson
Drs. Rebecca and Frank Wartman
Edith Webber
Dr. David white
Dr. Nathan Williams
Mrs. Virginia Williford
Paid for by Friends and Neighbors for Fridley
iWIWfm






1m �
������
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 2, 1995
1
COMPUTE from page 2
looking for information. Computer
users who have Netscape or Mosaic-
on their home computers can re-
ceive information from Joyner Li-
brary by simply typing in a code.
The Home Page allows students to
access videocassettes, manuscripts.
North Carolina periodicals, govern-
ment business, employment infor-
mation, electronic journals and
other lull text sources. Computer
users can also receive information
from different universities.
Another service available on
the computers is CD-ROM. A stu-
dent can find CD-ROM on only a
few of the work stations in the li-
brary. If a student has a question
about the location of a CD-ROM
title, they should ask the reference
or documents department.
Although Joyner had some dif-
ficulty with the CD-ROM program
this summer, the library contends
that most of the CD-ROM has been
restored.
"We had a problem with the
CD-ROM this summer, but now
Joyner is looking for a new com-
pany to help up with our problems
Shires said.
Horizon in the Stacks is a
Joyner on-line catalog that helps
students find information they
need throughout the library. Sev-
eral new Horizons in the Stacks
terminals have been added in the
east wing stacks and one on each
floor. Several Horizons in the
Stacks were placed in the west wing
during the summer.
Some students have expressed
that added computers and new pro-
grams are a positive step but may
not benefit the students.
"The resources in the library
are really confusing. It is hard to
find what you are looking for
Moore said.
Despite the increased technol-
ogy, the library may still have a few
bugs to work out.
"The computers are helpful
and beneficial but sometimes it
takes entirely too long for an en-
try to come up said Tammy Boyd,
a student.
to achrcrti � in f tC,
e-ll! 328-2000
Transsexuals' brains tend to differ
Some men may
already have
"female" brain
structure
(AP) - Men who want to be-
come women may have key brain
structures that are biologically fe-
male already, a small study of male-
to-female transsexuals in New York
suggests.
"It might be an explanation for
the fact that those people feel fe-
male although genetically they are
male said researcher Dr. Dick F.
Swaab.
The cause of transsexualism is
a mystery that scientists have
sought to attribute to psychology
or biology. Experts say that the con-
dition is rare but that there are no
reliable figures on how common it
Swaab and his colleagues ex-
amined brain samples from dead
people. They reported that on av-
erage, the size of a certain brain
structure in six male-to-female
transsexuals was about the same
size as what they found in women,
and smaller than what they found
in gay or heterosexual men.
Other scientists cautioned that
the result may have been produced
by the sex-change treatments the
transsexuals went through.
Still, the study is "opening up
a whole new area of questioning
and it's adding to all the studies
that have come out in the past 10
years pointing to biological factors
that influence human sexual be-
havior said Sandra Witelson, a
professor of psychiatry and bio-
medical sciences at McMaster Uni-
versity in Hamilton, Ontario.
Swaab is director of the Neth-
erlands Institute of Brain Research
in Amsterdam and a professor of
neurobiology at the University of
Amsterdam. He and Dutch col-
leagues present the work in tbo
journal Nature.
Roger Gorski, a professor of
neurobiology at the University of
California at Los Angeles, said that
going from the finding for one tiny
brain structure to an explanation
for a person's sexual identity is "a
big leap
But the study is "a step in
that direction, and I think an im-
portant one he said.
The study focused on a brain
structure called the BSTc that
plays an important part in rodent
sexual behavior and may do the
same in people.
Researchers found that on av-
erage, the structure was 31 per-
cent smaller in 11 heterosexual
women than in 12 heterosexual
men. The BSTc in transsexuals
was on average about the same
size as it was in the women's
brains. Nine gay men had about
the same average size as the het-
erosexual men.
Swaab said he doubts the
BSTc itself is responsible for
f�Tticm Instead, it ap-
pears to be part of a larger brain
network that makes a man feel
like a woman, he said.
Dr. Thomas Wise, director of
research at the sexual behaviors
unit at the Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity School of Medicine, said he
is not convinced that the study
showed an innate difference in
transsexuals.
The reduced size of the BSTc
might be due to the estrogen
treatments they took to expand
their breasts and otherwise femi-
nize their bodies, or from the
drop in their testosterone due to
sex-change surgery or medication,
he said.
Swaab and colleagues argued
against that, saying data from sev-
eral of the brains in their study
indicated that varying sex hor-
mone levels in adulthood don't
affect BSTc size.
They cited data from two
post-menopausal women, two
people with tumors that raised
hormone levels, two transsexuals
who had stopped taking estrogen
before death and two men cas-
trated because of prostate cancer.
Wise said the hormonal expla-
nation still can't be ruled out.
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ECU
from page 1
match of talents. Both schools have
valuable resources to add to the
project as ECU currently has the only
nurse midwifery program in North
Carolina, and the country's first
physician's assistant program was es-
tablished at Duke University.
"This project gives us an excel-
lent opportunity to strengthen our
programs by establishing community
partnerships in which to train and
better serve these communities
Horns said.
Both ECU and Duke offer mid-
level practitioner training and nurse
practitioner programs on their cam-
puses in order to encourage more stu-
dents to become involved. Still, infor-
mation gathered before the study
showed a large demand for mid-level
practitioners.
According to a study conducted
during the research phase of the pro-
gram, the eastern North Carolina re-
gion has only one primary care physi-
cian for every 2,571 residents. This
number is twice the average of pa-
tients per doctor in the nation as a
whole.
The "Partnerships for Training"
project will rely on teamwork by ECU,
Duke and the two area health educa-
tion centers affiliated with the
schools. Pembroke State University
and community hospitals and doctors
in the region are also joining in the
effort to keep students in their com-
munities.
"If we educate the students
here, they are more likely to stay and
practice here Champagne said.
"There's a beauty to t fining people
in their own communities - if they
live there, they know the community,
and have ties
HEALTH from page 1
Ireer Services.
.As an extra incentive for students
to participate in Thursday's Career
Day, there will be eight $100 awards
given to randomly selected individu-
als who attend. These awards will be
credited toward tuition.
Until You Graduate to Learn
Experience, Attend
ss � Sun
'��'���
Ms; Linda Thompson,
OwnerManagerEntrepreneur
Man ks Home made I ce C rea m.
7:30 am - 8:30 am
Tuesday, November 7, 1995
MSC Great Boom 3
Share a free breakfast with a national and local leader and
entrepreneur. Hear Ms-Thompson's leadership philosophies and
success storfas Registration includes awake-up call; free ride
frqm locWresidence to MSOrahdfree breakfast, Gail 3264796
by noon, Monday, November 6, 1995, to attend.
Sponsored by Student Leadership Development Programs, 109 MSO.
vXv-v. . yy.y.y.v
"i
a
"The Career Day is a wonderful
opportunity for our students to meet
many employers and ask questions
about interviews and what to expect
in interviews Westmoreland said.
There will be more career days
targeted toward other majors during
the semester including communica-
tions. The Career Day is sponsored by
the department of Career Services.
Anyone with questions about this
event or any other activity sponsored
by Career Services is encouraged to
call the office at 328-6050.
HALLOWEEN from page 1
leak was reported in the parking lot
in front of the center and west of
the Student Publications Building.
Officer I. Hill of ECU police noticed
a gas leak coming from a lue Mer-
cury Sable in the parking lot and
immediately reported the spill to
Greenville firefighters.
"(A gas leakj has the potential
to be very dangerous Hill said. "All
it would have taken was somecne
walking by smoking and that whole
line of cars (surrounding the Mer-
cury) would have gone up
Student patrol officers blocked
traffic into the parking lot while
firefighters spent around an hour
hosing down the leak.
Home & Brown
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Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam �
CASH PRIZE Jk
'Contestants need to call & register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal-
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
ECU STUDENTS SPECIAL
ECU
I VUDmiuUr
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
V Dickinson Avc.
(Behind John's Convenient Marl)
conv.
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Thursday, November 2,1995
Finally
you worit mind
being
darded.
Mjfwr
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It's everywhere you want to be!
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The East Carolinian
1 mT TAKE 15 OFFI
TX3p THE BASICS AT
OutfW&RS AMERICAN EAGLE
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! Enjoy the Perfect Clothes for the Perfect Day Present this certifi- ,
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US Cash value 1100 cent Note to employees dfMM 9 '
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fre1
1





Tuesday, November 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
ECU has
four bank
machines
for over
17,000
students.
Is there
one that
suits your
needs, or
are you
constantly
having to
take road
trips to
withdraw
cash?
Out with the old and in with the new - ECU's bank
machine problems may almost be over.
First Union has replaced one out-of-service teller ma-
chine outside of Mendenhall Student Center and Wachovia
never left its original spot which leaves one void to fill.
While two machines might seem appropriate to handle
ECU's student banking needs, service charge is not a pretty
word. Competitive banks, such as Triangle, have chosen
to install machines elsewhere because parking spaces be-
side Mendenhall are no longer available due to the rec
center construction. At one time, students could drive up
to the bus stop and park their cars for a few minutes (in a
metered spot) in order to use the machines - not any more.
The lack of parking leaves the machine available only to
those who happen to be on campus or who live nearby.
Let us not forget the Cash Points machine located be-
side the Student Stores on central campus. Students can
still drive up to that spot, but a minimum of $20 has to be
taken out (possibly more than most students have). These
three machines cover central and west campus, but what
about College Hill? The Wachovia teller located on 10th
Street beside the Post Office sees more than its fair share
of business. An ATM added to the top of College Hill (pos-
sibly in Todd Dining Hall) might alleviate some of the con-
gestion students often face when trying to get money from
the 10th Street location. But as we all know ideas can
take years to escalate into projects, especially completed
projects.
Who decides what machines get a spot on campus any-
way? Competitive bidding allows banks to hold the supreme
space of ECU, but why can't all banks be allowed to share
in fair competition? The university is planning to install
information kiosk machines across campus and there is
certainly room for as many banks as the university wants
to allow.
With downtown seeming to be the favorite nightlife
spot for many students, one would think downtown would
be an ideal location for banking machines. But, there's
only one available - in the parking lot for Chico's and
Bicycle Post. This dark lot is not the ideal locale for stu-
dents, primarily female students, to be withdrawing money
on late weekend nights.
So to retrieve money, these patrons are expected to
either carry a wad of cash downtown, drive intoxicated to
a bank machine, walk to Mendenhall (in hopes that one of
the machines may be working) or simply do without (which
can only hurt downtown establishments and banks).
So, once again, it seems as though the needs of the
students are being overlooked for the convenience.
-
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Tambra Zion, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erika Gohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photo Editor
Patrick irelan, Photographer
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Rick Lucas, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Lanl Adkinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
1
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville. NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Bowling for dollars
Who says that college football is
made up of amateurs? Okay, the play-
ers might be, but when it comes to
coaches it's business as usual. With
big money waiting in bowl berths, the
stakes are high, and this is where
sportsmanship is left at the stadium
gates.
There are two main problems fac-
ing college football seasons. One is
that it needs a playoff system to elimi-
nate controversy. The second is that
there needs to be better regulation
of the way polls are conducted.
I warn you that at no point will
I be placing any sort of blame on the
players for these problems. I thirjk
that as a whole, they do a good job
of fulfilling their obligation - to do
as they are coached.
The chief problem facing col-
lege football is that there is not a true
playoff system. The great poll con-
troversy of the 1994 season involved
a dispute between the two unbeaten
teams, Nebraska and Penn State, and
who was really the national cham-
pion. They both had the same record
and won their bowl games, respect-
fully, but the decision was left up to
pollsters.
This situation has been partly
remedied since that point, but not to
the degree to which it should.
There was an alliance formed
that stated that when it came to the
number one and two teams in the
nation that all deals between their
conferences and the various bowls
were off. This would be almost flaw-
less except for the fact that the teams
of the Pac 10 and the Big 10 didn't
sign on, and, thus, still remain com-
mitted to the Rose Bowl.
Fortunately, this shouldn't be a
problem this year because the high-
est team in either of these two con-
ferences is Ohio State, coming in at
number four. But who's to say in the
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
There are two
main problems
facing college
football
seasons.
near future, with a very young and
talented USC in the ranks, that a
problem won't arise.
This is where the second prob-
lem rests. It's the pollsters that make
the decisions as to who is ranked
what.
The problem with this is that
so many of the people making these
decisions don't actually watch the
teams they are voting on. This is
largely due to the fact that the votes
have to be in early Sunday morn-
ing. The coaches and writers don't
have enough time to do anything
more than look over the stats be-
fore faxing in their decisions, and
this leads to the problems with
sportsmanship.
With stats determining the way
the voting goes, the only way for
coaches to give their teams a fight-
ing chance is by running up the
score. In doing this they assure
themselves favorable responses (i.e.
higher ranking). In a business sense
this is all fine and dandy when big
money is on the line, but what about
those higher standards of simply
being a good sport and saying
enough is enough?
The solutions are pretty simple
when it comes to handling these two
problems.
The first solution is for the
NCAA to reform the bowl situation.
Step number one is the toughest
Tell the Pac 10 and the Big 10 that
they no longer have the option to
go wherever they want. This will put
everyone back in the same race.
Step number two is to take the top
four teams and have them play the
week after the regular season is
over. This will still fall before exams
and keep university presidents, con-
cerned about academic schedules
happy. The winners of these two
games will then go to the highest
bidding bowl to play for the title.
The two losing teams can play for
third in the number two bowl.
The bids for the bowls' payoffs
will be due at the beginning of the
season so that plans can be made
accordingly. With the rewards of
championship games being offered
to the highest bidder, the corporate
investment will skyrocket and so will
payoffs. With most conferences hav-
ing a distribution clause that re-
quires their schools to share the
money, the take in many schools will
benefit. Students stand to benefit
because with more money coming
in their fees stand to be offset.
The second solution is to wait
until Monday for the pollsters to
place their votes. This would give
the voters a chance to research their
decisions a little mo-e and allow for
more validity. This also allows top
contention teams to have the oppor-
tunity to let some of their younger
players get some play time without
being penalized in the polls for not
running up the score.
Let them play with a little good
sportsmanship while in college.
There is plenty of time for the other
side of the coin in the pros.
Down with Wal-Mart
To the Editor:
Global Transpark's suggestion
that ECU implement a School of En-
gineering shows keen appreciation
of the critical resources that future
development of Eastern NC requires.
A School of Engineering can well
have an impact of similar magnitude
to that of the ECU School of Medi-
cine.
As in medicine, a distinguished
engineering faculty and related re-
search will lay the foundation for a
host of area high tech activities. No
other ECU programs have this po-
tential.
Several Piedmont schools cur-
rently control engineering education
in North Carolina, and will surely op-
pose an engineering school here.
They, and those controlled by them,
will tell us North Carolina doesn't
need another engineering school
Greenville is too remote there is no
local support, etc. The same chorus
was raised against the medical school
vision of Dr. Leo Jenkins and other
local leaders. The naysayers have been
proven wrong - the ECU School of
Medicine is a national standout pro-
viding major services to the region!
So, too, can be the School of Engi-
neering. As CEO of a fast-growing high
tech engineering group in Greenville,
1 know how hard we have to work to
attract qualified engineers to the area.
We must compete with the campus
related engineering resources of the
Raleigh-Durham area. Eastern NC
risks becoming a technology backwa-
ter without these resources.
From my perspective as a direc-
tor of the National Association of
Radio and Telecommunications Engi-
neers, I know about the huge short-
age of engineers to supports the wire-
less communications revolution now
underway, and substantial shortages
in other areas as well.
Now is the time for local leader-
ship to grasp the initiative and press
forward with School of Engineering
support for the future good of
Greenville and all of Eastern NO
Lawrence Behr
Chief Executive Officer
LBA Group, Inc.
As many readers know by now,
when I get an idea stuck in my head,
it is best to just ride it out and listen
to what I have to say. Today's article
is on Wal-Mart. That store over on
the other side of Greenville that
seems to be competitively knocking
stores out of business.
Perhaps there is some trance
that fixates customers into believing
that Wal-Mart will always be the best
store to shop. I have news for you, it
will not. When something seems too
good to be true, then it probably is.
Wal-Mart is the prime example
of this cliche. Wal-Mart has racked
up most of the purchases made by
the ECU students lately. This is how
I see it. Every time you go to shop at
Wal-Mart, you save a few pennies here
and there.Of course you are just a
customer to them and your feelings
are actually on their priority list,
number 10.
I have worked in the retail busi-
ness before, and I know that cus-
tomer satisfaction should always be
the number one priority. When deal-
ing with a store as large as this one,
there is usually no interaction be-
tween employees and the customers.
The little interaction there is happens
to be when a customer asks for help
and the employee looks far off into a
realm that only they can see and says.
"Uh I think it's on aisle three, or
perhaps four, I know it can't be any
further than five
Yeah, this is where I want to do
my shopping. Sure by shopping at
other stores I may lose a few pen-
nies, but I know in my heart that the
difference also pays for the quality
of service I receive from these smaller
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
Sure by
shopping at
other stores I
may lose a few
pennies.
stores.
What is going to happen is that
as soon as Wal-Mart has taken over
most industries in Greenville, the
prices will go up and now we, the con-
sumers, will have no choice but to
continue to shop there. If you do not
believe me, then ask yourself, "Where
is Roses?" You sure won't find one in
Greenville, or in most other areas.
Roses was one of the first big victims
to fall prey to Wal-Mart.
It is already happening and it
will get worse. Wal-Mart is not only
trying to control the retail indus-
tries, they now have moved into the
food chains and the beauty salons.
If you get hungry at 3 a.m. and hap-
pen to be shopping at the aforemen-
tioned store, all your fears can go
away, because they now are a gro-
cery store as well.
I know you must be saying to
yourself, "But when I go shopping
for all my necessities and my grocer-
ies, when will I have the time to get
my hair cut Fear not, you can also
have your hair cut, styled or what-
ever at this store.
All these things may sound
great now, but what about the fu-
ture when the idea of a monopoly
will be an everyday occurrence, and
price comparison will be a thought
of yesterday.
Monopolies are illegal in this
country for the mere fact that to
control a market with prices is an
unfair business practice. Well, Wal-
Mart has found its way around that.
There would obviously be no need
for this practice if there is simply
no competition, right? Once all of
Wal-Mart's competitors have been
eliminated from this planet, the
prices will rise, the hatred towards
this form of business will rise and
the only thing that will fall will be
the little respect that residents have
for that store.
There are two solutions to this
problem, one - to boycott the store
and give your business to stores who
care about you, the customer, and
are willing to help you. Or, two -
try to write letters to the heads of
this company and express your con-
cerns about how area businesses are
being put out of business due to
their practices and that you do not
wish to become a slave to their
prices.
The decision is up to you, the
reader. 1, on the other hand, have
become quite accustomed to the
words, "Blue light special and will
continue to do so until I see that
the other store learns how to exer-
cise good business practices and
begins to care about me, the -us-
tomer.
i
'





Thursday, November 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
'l"KIfed
SPARE TIME
SPARE TIME PRETE
9
BY ANDY FARKAS
lrCcMrij
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rtcSGRcwNS A y�Asr
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Thursday, November 2, 1995 The East Carolinian
LIFe
Visit The Second City
� IIHIIU
Attractions
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, November 2
Faculty Jazz Band
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Roily Gray & Sunfire
at the Attic
(reggae)
Moe
at Peasant's Cafe
(roots rock)
Movie: Congo
at Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
(adventure)
Friday, November 3
Gibb Droll
at the Attic
(blues rock)
(Gibb Droll Interview on WZMB
91.3 at 4 p.m.)
Flyin' Mice
at Peasant's Cafe
(roots rock)
Movie: Congo
at Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
(adventure)
Saturday, November 4
Pippi Longstocking
at Wright Auditorium
Cold Sweat
at the Attic
(R&B)
Stem
at Peasant's Cafe
Movie: Congo
at Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
(adventure)
Tuesday, November 7
An Evening With
The Second City
at Wright Auditorium
(comedy)
Urge Overkill
with The Geraldine Fibbers
at the Ritz
in Raleigh
(rock)
Wednesday, November 8
Cozy Sheridan
at the Wright Place
(Noon Day Tunes)
Moon Boot Lover
at Peasant's Cafe
Comedy Zone
with Bill Tucker
and Joey Brian
at the Attic
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like listed in
our Coming Attractions
column? If so, please send us
information (a schedule
would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858
The Unsound
moshes it up
Local heavy metal
favorites satisfy at
Peasant's Cafe
Brandon Waddeli
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
What are you going to do this
weekend?
Oh, I think I'll go drink some
warm, flat beer, eat soggy chips and
buy a $20 ticket to see Hootie and
the Blowfish. Follow up that intellec-
tually stimulating event by going to
(dramatic pause) a downtown dance
club and dance, dance, dancing the
night away.
Tired of the same tired old rou-
tine every weekend?
It seems a couple of downtown
club owners were, too.
While the vast majority of stu-
dents were at home on Fall Break,
busily convincing their parents that
the semester was going great and ev-
erything was running smoothly, it was
open mic weekend downtown.
Both the Attic and Peasant's have
had their fair shares of bigger name
bands in the last few weeks, but this
weekend was set aside for the locals.
And in this corner, the defend-
ing local heavyweight champions at
Peasant's to defend their title - The
Unsound.
The lights slowly went down in-
side Peasant's and anxious locals be-
came giddy as Unsound prepared
themselves for yet another vivacious
Greenville appearance. Though the
band initially had a few soundboard
problems, the kinks worked them-
selves out by 12:30 a.m. and the quar-
tet was ready to slug it out.
Just like the three other Unsound
shows I've attended, the small but
mighty legion of Unsound fans and
friends packed themselves into a
downtown club to mosh it up and get
a little crazy. Several people gathered
directly in front of the stage prepar-
ing themselves for the pit.
The lead vocalist, known to all
only as Mark, grabbed the mic and
the band ripped into their opening
song. The crowd became enthused
quickly. Before the band finished their
third song, Unsound had to slow the
set down. The furious circle of
See UNSOUND page 9
TKwiclAceuA
Joffe sins against
The Scarlet Letter
Dale Williamson
Staff Writer
"Not many people have read
the book sayeth Demi Moore.
No, Demi. Only you and your
idiotic HoUywood friends haven't
read The Scarlet Letter. The
people behind the film version of
Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel try
to cover their butts by stating in
the opening credits that the
movie is "freely based" on the
book. Hell, if you're going to be
this free with a text, then why
don't you just cast Sylvester
Stallone as Dimmesdale, Richard
Roundtree as Chillingworth and
Suzanne Sommers as Hester
Pryne.
1 would love to believe that
Roland Joffe's Scarlet Utter is a
revisionist adaptation of a clas-
sic work, but "re-vision" requires
vision to begin with. Joffe and
scriptwriter Douglas Day Stewart
both need some very thick
glasses.
Almost anyone who went
through high school at least
knows the story of Hester and
her illegitimate child, Pearl. If
you haven't read the book, don't
trust the film. If you want to con-
sider the film on its own as a
film, it's still pathetic. Stewart's
script is filled with all those
things Hawthorne intentionally
left out, or never even consid-
ered.
Such things include Hester
drooling over Dimmesdale's bare
ass as he skinny dips; Hester's
female slave secretly watching
Hester bathe herself; a satanic
red canary that looks like a
muppet when it flies; and sex in
corn juxtaposed with candle mas-
turbation in a tub.
As for Joffe, the man needs
to retake some film classes. He
See LETTER page 9
Photo Courtesy ECU Student Activities
Ladies and gentlemen presenting the future of comedy! The Second City comedy troupe,
which has spawned numerous stars, will be performing at Wright Auditorium on Nov. 7.
Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
Authority figures beware! The
Second City comedy troupe is com-
ing to ECU.
This historically influential com-
edy gang hails from Chicago afid
started way back in 1959. Soon after
the club first opened, it became a
"must see" for everyone around.
The Second City features around
six or seven actors on average who
perform comedy sketches that are
planned and improvisational. First
originated in 1951 by Paul Sills and
David Sheperd, the ensemble has al-
ways poked fun at the political, social
and cultural aspects of the time.
After word got around, the com-
pany opened branches in New York,
and later London and Toronto. A 10-
week tour of campuses followed, in-
cluding cities like Detroit, Cincinnati,
Philadelphia, Cleveland, Boston, Pitts-
burgh, St Louis and New Haven. Tele-
vision came next, and The Second City
became an institution.
Many famous actors once dis-
played their talents in The Second
City, including Dan Ackroyd, John
Belushi, Gilda Radner, Bill Murray,
John Candy, Martin Short, Rick
Moranis, Chris Farley, Mike Myers,
George Wendt and Julia Louis-
Dreyfus.
Pat McCartney spoke to TEC in
a recent phone interview, and we got
the chance to ask some burning ques-
tions about The Second City.
What made the success of The
Second Ctiy possible?
"The Second City was invented
to satirize the political situations of
the time McCartney said. "There was
a lack of comedy clubs in the Chicago
area at that time too, and the anti-
authoritarian attitude of the troupe
appealed to many people.
"People want to see their true
and hidden feelings acted out for
them. There is an intelligence behind
the satire that makes it thought pro-
voking as well as funny. Laughter is
universal
McCartney describes the type of
comedy performed by The Second
City as "mostly satire and political
material, but we also include the ab-
surd and Python-esque types of stuff
How does the process of getting
the material together work?
"We do a lot of touring
McCartney said, "so most of our ideas
come from being in a van together,
entertaining each other. Of course we
always include "best of" material.
"Right now we're reestablishing
ourselves as the center for satire. The
keys are talent and point of view. We
are also getting a lot harder and stron-
ger with all the Generation X anger
Students who go to see The Sec-
ond City, according to McCartney, can
expect "to laugh, to see some great
improv, and to think a little bit. Hu-
mor is very important, especially be-
cause of the people in charge and our
situation; for example, the Christian
Right and Unemployment. But of
course it has to be smart humor
The Second City will be at Wright
Auditorium on Nov. 7 as part of the
"An Evening With series. Tickets
are $4 for students, $7 for faculty
staff, $10 for the general public, and
$12 at the door. Come see some great
comedy, sit back and just laugh.
CD. Reviews
U
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
The Dead Milkmen
Stoney's Extra Stout
(Pi3)
Long ago and far away, when I
was first getting into alternative mu-
sic (back when that term meant
something), I discovered the Dead
Milkmen. They were weird, funny
and just a touch angry. "This I
thought, "was written for me They
became my favorite band, and held
that spot for a long time.
Now, eight years and five al-
bums later, they're calling it quits.
The final Dead Milkmen album,
Stoney's Extra Stout (Pig), was re-
leased last week. And boy, am I de-
pressed.
Stoney's isn't the Milkmen's
best work, but it's a far cry better
than than their last couple of efforts
(the weakest of their career). They
seem to have lost some of their vi-
tality in recent years, which is prob-
ably why they're breaking up. Still,
this new album hearkens back to
The Dead Milkmen at their height,
and it's a good farewell for the mas-
ters of kiddie punk.
The Dead Milkmen have devel-
oped a style all their own over the
years. Musically, it's fairly simple
fare; they tend toward guitar pop
melodies. But they play those melo-
dies slightly off-key, producing a
sound that well, it doesn't exactly
sound good, but it's at least unusual.
It's not for everybody, but if you feel
the call of the Milkmen as I have
from the moment 1 first heard them,
you'll understand their appeal.
Things get off to a good start
with "Peter Bazooka a spoken
See PIG page 9
Pippi Longstocking
WWfote
Baywatch offers
bad TV challenge
Every paper has a TV critic but our critic is no normal couch potato, no mere 7V
Junkie. No, our man will watch anything, anytime, regardless of quality or good taste.
Truly, he has no shame and that is why we call him "The T V Whore
Kevin Chaisson
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy ECU Family Fare Series
The story of Pippi Longstocking, the strongest girl in the world, will unfold on-stage
Saturday at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium as part of ECU'S Family Fare Theatre series.
So I was sitting outside of Spago in LA, sipping on vanilla cappuccino
and talking to George Lucas about my part in the next three Star Wars
films when my editor came over to me and said, "Wake up. I need to talk
to you
I jolted, almost spilling my General Foods microwave cappuccino in
my lap. My editor was standing over me, smiling with wicked glee.
"Yuh-huh?" I said.
"Well he said, "we have a little problem with your column.
My mouth gaped open. "It's not the writing, is it?"
He smiled a practiced, placating smile (the one he uses for his writ-
ers) "No, no. That's fine. The openings are a bit long-winded, but we 11
See BAYWATCH page 8
yy
'





8
Thursday, November 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
BAYWATCH from page
discuss that another time. It was
brought to my attention that even
though your column title is "TV
Whore" and we say you'll watch
anything, you really haven't had to
watch anything, well bad. So, we
have this new assignment for you
I steeled up, ready for the blow.
"We the editor said, "would
like you to review 'Baywatch
Aha! So the die had been cast,
the gauntlet thrown. I was up to this
challenge. In fact, though I didn't
tell him this, I have caught a couple
of full episodes of "Baywatch I had
my finger on the pulse of this inter-
national hit, watched by more people
than any other show in history. I was
completely aware of the show's star
and co-producer, David Hasselhoff,
and how he is revered in Europe.
Not that I've ever really watched
the show.
However, the few times I've
caught it, the basic plot formats can
break down into these three sce-
narios. First, there is some environ-
mental problem threatening the
beach that puts people in jeopardy
(offshore drilling, erosion, what-
ever). Second, Mitch (Hasselhoff)
and Co. get to use some new-fangled
lifeguard toy (an episode I remem-
ber featured a hovercraftjet ski
thing) to save the world. Before they
can do this, though, there is a seven-
minute music video-style masturba-
tory scene where all characters in-
volved get to take their new toy on
a "test run" and examine its sleek
body styling and contours Third, is
the character subplot of the week,
attempting to show the audience,
"Hey! These hunky guys and gals
have a life outside of the beach
Not that I've ever really watched
the show.
Anyway, the episode in particu-
lar I decided to watch and review
for this assignment featured a re-
union of the Beach Boys - with
Brian Wilson! To all those unfamil-
iar, the story goes that Boys founder
and songwriter Brian Wilson de-
cided to quit the band and. more or
less, lie in bed and sleep for a year.
In fact, Wilson hasn't been heard of
much at all until this last year when
he put out an autobiography. So,
there they were, all of the Beach
Boys, except the drummer who died
and was replaced with John Stamos
from "Full House I was rather in-
terested to see how this episode
would pan out.
The environmental issue of the
hour was bacteria in the water,
brought to everyone's attention by
the Surfrider Foundation, an envi-
ronmental group spearheaded by
Hasselhoff. The Beach Boys figure
in when they are asked by Mitch to
play a benefit concert to correct the
problem.
This is a noble cause and okay
storyline, except that every third line
from a character's mouth is wordy
exposition that sounds as if they're
reading from the back of a brochure.
The scripts for this show are pretty
threadbare, but this is scary.
Skipping the second step in
above formula for now, we come to
the personal subplots. In this epi-
sode, the subplots really blew. They
hinged on a past love of Stephanie's
(Alexandra Paul) who was a bad boy,
now gone worldly-conscious after
joining Surfrider. This was particu-
larly embarrassing to watch because
Paul normally serves as the show's
anti-bimbo, intelligent character.
Also, there was some bit with
Caroline (Yasmine Bleeth), insanely
jealous over studboy Cody (David
Chokachi) and bad girl Neely (Gena
Lee Nolin) that was just plain silly.
"Faust" this isn't.
Coming back to the second
part, the masturbatory music video
sequences, this episode was chock-
full of them - except they didn't fea-
ture cool lifeguard gadgetry. No, this
time it was just hard, tanned, barely-
clothed bodies. You see, you've got
the Beach Boys, so you have to play
as many of their tunes to half-na-
ked, wiggling-in-s!ow-mo bodies as
possible. Right? This episode plays
six complete Boys tunes in its 45
minute running time, four of which
are purely music videos that have
nothing to do with a plot whatso-
ever.
Hasselhoff has repeatedly
scoffed at the press calling his show
"Babewatch stating that a series
that takes place on the beach will
certainly have a lot of barely-covered
bodies. Uh-huh. Say, David, how
come your opening credits feature
four breast shots, six butt shots, and
a whopping ten shots of hardbodies
running in slow-mo, the camera
ogling all their curves?
Not that I've ever really watched
the show.
To sum up, 1 believe I have
proved my worthiness as your TV
Whore. "Baywatch" is an embarrass-
ment to television, punctuated with
non-existent plots and beautiful
people. It is not even remotely as
entertaining as "Melrose Place
which features the same elements.
My advice is, if you want to stare at
male and female bodies mostly na-
ked in slow-mo without a lot of
"plot" to get in the way, either rent
a porno or watch "Kiana's Flex Ap-
peal" on ESPN like any respectable
citizen.
Not that I've ever really watched
that show, either.
On a scale of one to ten,
"Baywatch" rates a one.
this week's topic:
Horror Movies
1. Bela Lugosi played Dracula
only twice. He made the role
famous in the classic 1931 film
Dracula, but he had to wait 17
years before playing the
Transylvanian nobleman again
in 1948's Abbott and Costello
Meet Frankenstein.
2. Jamie Lee Curtis appeared in
the first two Halloween movies.
3. Vampire Hunter D is a
strange character, even for
Japanimation. The talking face
in his palm is never explained.
4. The nefarious Count
Dracula fooled everybody in
Son of Dracula by calling
himself Count Alucard.
5. Ray Milland and Rosy Grier
starred as The Thing With Tzoo
Heads. Thing's advertising
asked the burning question
"What happens when a white
bigot's head is grafted to a soul
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you don't wanna know!
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Grand Central Station
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David Letterman
The Empire State Building
The Subway
Greenwich Village
Chinatown
The World Trade Center
The Statue of Liberty
International Shopping
Central Park
Broadway
There's only one place where
you can find all of this, and
YOU COULD BE THERE!
The Student Union's Annual
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the Big Apple for as little as $140.
To reserve your space or
for more information, call the
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Deadline: November 3
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� MMHI MM





(!���
The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 2, 1995
LETTER from page 7
needs to take courses in pacing,
subtlety and engaging visuals.
SeeCet Shorty for intelligent pacing,
Seven for intriguing subtleties, and
Dead Presidents for dynamic visu-
als. A scene where Hester inspires
Reverend Dimmesdale (profession-
ally played by Gary Oldman) to de-
liver a fiery religious sermon to his
congregation could have been good
Unfortunately. Joffe gets "artsy'
by superimposing Hester's glamor
ous image next to Dimmesdale's im
passioned countenance. The scene
poignant in its own right, might
work well on his resume if he ever
has to apply for a job at MTV.
During this scene, I finally lost
faith in the film and those involved
FACT:
10 percent of air
pollution is generated
by operating lawn
and garden equip-
ment.
TIP:
Use an electric
mower. Those with
cords or batteries are
cheap. Or use a push
mower and don't
pollute at alL
MHHHIHSHHHHHHHBHBmMlilMil
This Green Tip is sponsored by.
Heron Bay
Trading Co.
"Greenville's Exclusive
Nature Store"
in The Plaza'321-6380
BRING TIP IN FOR
20 OFF PURCHASE
O 1995 Kevin A. McLean, Tampa, FL
with it. 1 wanted to leave. Then, to
my glee, a good friend of mine
handed me a box of Milk Duds.
Those soft, sweet sugar balls re-
freshed me and gave me incentive
to stay in the theater.
So, I endured. I endured Demi
Moore struggling to meet the de-
mands of her role. Instead of a scar-
let "A Demi should have worn a
sign that read, "Please take me seri-
ously. I am a dramatic actress
Demi, Lee Van Cleef outacted you
in Master Ninja. You're only going
to seem silly when you're pitted
against the likes of Joan Plowright,
who plays the devilish Mistress
Hibbins.
Furthermore, I endured
Chillingworth (Robert Duvall) being
reduced to a vengeful husband who
dresses like an Indian and shaves his
belly. I endured a painful voice-over
narration from an adult Pearl, who
tells us that the Puritan community
tried to destroy her parents' true
love. 1 endured Demi telling us, the
ignorant audience, that a repressive
society cannot extinguish the flames
of passion and the fire of true love.
I thought 1 was going to be sick.
Fortunately, those sweet Milk
Duds eased my stomach. I don't fault
Demi for taking on this role. I even
admire her ambition to face such a
challenge. I, however, do not forgive
Joffe. By publicly stating that
Hawthorne's novel, which he called
a "badly thought-out polemic
against adultery was only "gather-
ing dust on the shelves Joffe set
himself up for criticism.
He may have had some higher
purpose stuck in his head when he
literally rewrote Hawthorne's story,
but the presentation of his purpose
isn't worthy of a Kate Jackson TV
movie.
Hawthorne did not actually
show us sex, but sexual tension runs
throughout his work. Joffe shows us
sex. Why not? Sex sells. But Joffe
needs to watch77je Piano again to
understand eroticism. I bet I looked
more erotic picking Milk Duds from
my teeth than Hester and
Dimmesdale did rolling around in
the barn. Man, those Milk Duds were
good.
The Puritan community placed
all the blame on Hester for sinning
against God. I place all the blame
on Joffe for sinning against
Hawthorne and anyone who spent
money on this bloated project. As
far as I'm concerned, Joffe should
be forced to wear his own scarlet
letter for the rest of his career.
I thought about being kinder
toThe Scarlet Letter, but no! The
gloves come off! If you play with fire,
you're gonna get burned! On a scale
of one to 10, The Scarlet Letter gets
nothing! It rates a zero! My Milk
Duds, however, rate a tasty 10.
WIN A PAIR OF
TICKETS TO THE
ALLMAIM BROTHERS
�� CONCERT!
Register during our remote broadcast on
Thursday, Nov. 9 between 11 a.m. and
2 p.m. in front of Student Stores.
Well draw the winners at 2 p.m. that
day for 5 pair of tickets to the concert.
Sponsored by
Student Leadership Development Programs
and The DSL Staff Development Committee
Thfe AU-Campus Leadership Conference
Features
with Dr. Susan Baile, Covey Leadership Center
Thursday, November 16,1995
4-8pm, 244MSC
Participants will receive for FREE:
?The Book The 7 Habits of Highly Elective
People by Stephen Covey, a $1200 value
?Personal Leadership Application Workbook
?Dinner
Space is limited so call 328-47 or stop by 0?jg
MSC to register. Registration runs Oct. 30,
1995 through noon, Nov. 14,1995.
This conference is limited to ECU Students and DSL stall'
&��&��
rlVJ from page 7
word piece in the tradition of such
Milkmen classics as "Stuart Vocal-
ist Rodney Anonymous rants and
raves over a familiarly nauseous
Milkmen riff about congressmen,
strip joints and government cheese,
placing us firmly on familiar ground:
whacked-out conspiracy theories.
Later, the Milkmen give us an
honest-to-God love song, "I'm Flying
Away This song's simple and
straightforward lyrics are a bit of a
departure for this band, reknowned
for their cynicism and evil wit (many
older critics simply call them
"bratty"). It's a little jarring to hear
stuff like, "Absense makes the heart
grow fond But I can't take it any
longer coming out of the mouths
of the men who recorded "If You
Love Somebody, Set Them on Fire
But there it is. I'm not sure I like
this song, but it is sweet and hon-
est; it makes me wonder if I haven't
become too hip and detached for my
own good.
One of the big highlights of
Stoney's is "The Blues Song Both
an homage to and a nasty jab at the
blues, this tune is complex and
funny. "The blues isn't an art form
Anonymous shouts, "The blues is a
product, not unlike computer chips
or tampons. The blues is a way for
white kids to feel that they under-
stand the feelings of black people
without ever actually having to meet
any. The blues is all these things and
more, available for only $19.95
Though bitingly cynical, "The
Blues Song" also manages to cap-
ture the raw, bloody-throated feel of
real blues. Slick blues rockers like
Blues Traveler owe more to Stevie
Ray Vaughn than Muddy Waters, but
the Milkmen give us the real thing
here.
The Dead Milkmen's best mate-
rial was released on Beelzebubba
and Metaphysical Grafitti (two of
the best albums recorded by any
band, ever). On those albums, they
explored bizarre ideas in complex
songs with a little philosophical
meat on their bones.
On Stoney's. those glory days
are represented by "The Man Who
Rides the Bus In the former song,
we're introduced to a very impor-
tant person. As Anonymous croons
with backing vocalists Dean Clean
and Joe Jack Talcum, "The man who
rules the world travels on the bus,
staring out the window making
things happen It's a great image:
this sad little man sitting lonely on
a bus, riding around the city affect-
ing the outcome of everything
around him. Even if he's just a mad-
man, it doesn't matter: in fact, that
might even make it better.
"Big Deal the last song on the
album, is as good a farewell as the
Dead Milkmen could have given us,
summing up their whole musical ca-
reer in one three-minute song. 1
leave you with their words.
"Life sucks And then you die
Your sou! gets sucked into the sky
The birds sing I wonder why
You eat a bowl of cereal and sigh
Big deal
UNSOUND from page 7
moshers knocked down a few on-stage
audio monitors and a few beers were
spilled on their equipment
They slowed down, dead silent,
for fifteen seconds, then exploded
back into their set with "Raike It's
the one released song for admirable
Greenville natives who need Unsound
in the privacy of their own homes in-
stead of live downtown.
Recorded'music is all fine and
good, but you've got to see these
musicians live to fully appreciate the
kind of show they produce. You need
to get a little sweaty and thrash
around. It's nothing evil, but I got out
all my aggressions out and didn't een
get arrested for it.
Yes, the normally tranquil check-
erboard floors at Peasant's were jam
packed with, as Mark put it, "people
who were also stuck in Greenville over
Fall Break
Unsound once again successfully
defended their heavyweight title. They
ended the show at about 1:45 a.m
after a 90-minute set When it was
time to leave, there was a subtle feel-
ing of satisfaction amongst the angst-
ridden crowd.
Peasant's was the place to be
Saturday night. No one in Greenville
had a better time than Unsound
crowd.
COLLEGE
flfl It STUDENTS
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East Carolina Playhouse
presents
"TAUT AND BRILLANT, WITH A HEART, A SOUL AND A
SENSE OF HUMOR
New York Post
SOMEONE
WHO'LL WATCH
OVER ME
by
Frank McGuinness
November 9, 10 U, 13 and 14, 1995 at 8:00 p.m.
November 12,1995 at 2:00 p. m.
Call-328-6829
General Puhlic:8.00
ECU Students: S 5.00
Children: $5.00
T
9M (HNM �
��





2MK.MM��ft4NMi
-��
10
Thursday, November 2, 1995
7"he East Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
EQhl
For Rent
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Clean find Quiel. one bedroom-
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WESLEY COMMONS: 1 & 2 Bedroom,
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Hookups, Decks & Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility, Sand Volleyball Court,
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These and other fine properties managed
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LANGSTON PARK APARTMENTS, 2 BR
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ROOMMATE NEEDED: Starting in Janu-
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home. $250 per month plus 14 utilities.
Swimming pool, exercise center, club
house, lighted tennis courts, and lots of
extras, including continental breakfast
each Friday morning. Call 321-7613.
ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 bedroom Du-
p'ex. Walking distance from campus. Non-
smoker requested. Includes WasherDryer
and Dishwasher. $250mo. plus 12 ut il.
Call 758-2232.
SUBLEASE WANTED! Female, at Wilson
Acres. Only one other roommate; your own
bedroom. $250.00 month and half of ut ili-
ties. One block from campus. Call joli at
758-9708.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share one bedroom apt. in Tar River. Lo-
cated close to campus, for more informa-
tion Call Celeste or Melodie at 931-3751.
2 BEDROOM DUPLEX, 1 12 baths, nice
yard for outside pets, quiet couple,
$365.00; 2 bedroom quads, Bryton Hills
area, $340.00 call 353-0070.
ROOMMATE WANTED? Male to share
new 4 BDR, 3 full bath apartment. $250
per month plus 14 utilities. Swimming
pool, tennis, volleyball, weight room and
more. Call 321-7613.
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS 2
bedroom1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Water & basic cable included. 752-
8900. Professionally managed by Pro Man-
agement of Greenville.
TOWNHOUSE 2 bedroom 1 12 bath.
2 blocks from campus. $475 per month.
Pro Management of Greenville. 756-1234
KINGSTON PLACE CONDO 2 bedroom
2 bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per
month. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234
HOUSES FOR RENT near campus. $450-
$550. Call Cindy. Pro Management of
Greenville. 756-1234.
Need CASH???
We Buy CD's, C.issettes .md
We'll p.vv up In Sh credit or S5
DowntovVri 751-5026
VACATION AND CRUISE FOR TWO.
Florida and the Bahamas for 10 days. Only
$199 per person or best offer. Please call
Pamela at 830-0828.
BIKE FOR SALE! 21" Giant with Trek
shocks, Good condition! $165.00. call
Chris or Brandon at 830-6811.
CONDOMS! Wide selection! Shop from
the privacy of your own home. No mail-
ing lists. Discreet packaging Help stop the
spread of AIDS. Send for a free brochure.
Francie's, 312 Crosstown Road, PO Box
178, PTC, GA 30269.
FOR SALE: Personal Computer. 1C Turvo
XT 4.7710.640K. 30mb Har d drive. EGA
monitor. Enhanced click keyboard.
Panasonic KXPT180 Printercable.
$800.00. Call 830-1428.
CLUB FOR WOMEN ONLY: Save $150
enrollment fee, $39.00 monthly. Take over
payments, includes tanning bed, contact
Tammy at (919) 756-1135 day, (919) 946-
1438 nights.
PROTECT YOURSELF DAY & NIGHT.
Patio door lock bar with built in alarm
that alerts you to an intruders presence.
$24.95, FREE BROCHURE Call 800-881-
7345.
FOR SALE: Ladies Ski Set includes Skis,
boots, poles. Dynastar Integra Skis.
Nordica 658 Boots. Call Jenny at 355-
7686.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? RESIDENCY
STATUS AND TUITION is the brochure
by attorney Brad Lamb on the in-state
tuition residency application process. For
Sale: Student Stores, Wright Building.
EDDIES GUITAR LIST: Two Yamaha
Ace. $165 each, Ibanez 12 string $165.
Call (919) 637-6550.1 buy alot of Guit ars.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S. -
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VlaaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
Or rush $2 00 to RMwch Information
11322 Idaho Ave 206-A Los Angeles, CA 90025
Iff
Help
Wanted
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES, The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the winter
youth basketball program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 9-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00pm unt il 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550 after
�PM.
PART-TIME Shipping and Receiving
Clerk needed for small local company.
Must have good driving record. Call 756-
1111 for appL
CHRISTMAS HELP NEEDED: Full or
part-time. Flexible hours, good pay. Plaza
Mall, Call 1-800-979-7120.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES is
looking for college students wishing to
gain valuable work experience with a rap-
idly growing company. Ideal applicant
would be energetic, efficient, willing to
learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are looking to hire about 1215
people for our collections department.
Working hours are from 5pm to 9pm
Monday through Friday and 8am-12pm on
Saturday. Extra hours are available from
8am to 5pm. We will work around school
schedules. Please apply in person at 1206
Charles Blvd. or call Brian at 757-2127.
STUDENTS, NEED A JOB? ROADWAY
PACKAGE SYSTEM is looking for
pPACKAGE HANDLERS to load Vans and
unload Trailers for the AM and PM shift's.
Hours 4:00am to 9:00am. $6.00hour,
tutition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations
and management possible. Applications
can be filled out at 104 United Drive,
Creenville 752-1803.
CAR PREP needed, clean driving record,
part-time work needed. Must be 21 years
old. Call Enterprise Rent-A-Car 355-0504.
GUITARIST LOOKING FOR SINGER to
play in acoustic act at BW-3. Call Mike
758-2294. Earn up to $180.
STUDENT TO KEEP CHILDREN one
afternoon a week, workdays and holidays.
Must be majoring in a related field and
have a desire to Tutor. 931-6904.
NIGHT SUPERVISOR: PT 14 hr. shift
available on Saturdays 6pm to 8am at the
Greenville Community Shelter. $5.00 to
start kA great resume addition to those
with or needing human service back-
ground. No calls. Apply at 207 Manhat-
tan Ave. between 12-7pm weekdays.
WANTED Individuals, Student Organi-
zations and Small Groups to Promote
SPRING BREAK '96. Earn MONEY and
FREE TRIPS. Call the Nation's Leader,
Inter-Campus Programs, http:
www.icpt.com 1-800-327-6013
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian
languages required. For information call:
(206 632-1146 extJ53622.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel. Seasonal & full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53622.
TROPICAL BEACH RESORT JOBS
Luxurious hotels are now hiring seasonal
positions. Lifeguards, food service, house-
keepers, hosthostess, and front desk staff.
Call Resort Employment Services 1-206-
632-0150 ext R53621.
DO YOU HAVE INTERESTING TAT-
TOOS or body piercings? If so, please
contact TLC Entertainment at 758-2881
for more informaiton!
FREE TRIPS & CASH Find out
how hundreds of students are already earn-
ing FREE TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Choose
Cancun, Bahamas, Mazatlan, or Flor ida!
CALL NOW! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK!
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to our expanding Business. Ear n
up to $1,500 plus per week, Escorting in
the Greenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758-0896 or Emerald Citv Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est 1990.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being
broke, want to get paid everyday, Call Play-
mates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
5 Services
Offered
EMPLOYMENT DESIRED PART-TIME
near campus. Afternoons, evenings and
weekends. Hard working, Reliable adult
student with broad work history and clean
record needs a job. 754-2561
WANTED 100 STUDENTS lose 10-
30lbs. Next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough Guaranteed. Dr. Recom-
mended. $34.95 mcvisa. 1-800-211-6382.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53622.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOME-
THING MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services
is your ANSWER! We have the best selec-
tion of music in Greenville. Call 758-5026
ask for Sean and Book your Party Now!
GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS are
available. Billions of dollars in grants.
Qualify immediately. 1-800-243-2435 (1-
800-AID-2-HELP).
mk Lost and
Found
REWARD OFFERED! FOR RETURN of
Cannondale M400 stolen from bike rack
west of Flanagan. Any information given
that results in return of bike would be
subject to reward. Call Ken at 7584890
EVERYONE GET READY for the 1995
GREEK ALL SING. Thursday November
16. Any Questions? Call Michelle 931-
0207.
CONGRATULATIONS to the New Sisters
of Alpha Delta Pi, Keira Ailken, Emily
Bowen, Tara Brown, Betsy Bullock,
Caroline Cameron, Ashley Danner, Laura
Holcomb, Tonya Jackson, Tracy Jones,
Nicole Lathan, Becky Lockemann, Carlyn
Lupton, Christine Naiklus, Laura Lynn
Owen, Anne Parker, Amanda Parrott Lind-
say Peeler, Margaret Price, Jennifer
Radcliffe, Sarah Rowland, Courtney
Siegal, Carolyn Teel, Renee Thornton,
Kristen Trull, Cameron Ward, Kelly
Warfield, Jennifer Wienke, Jennifer
Westcott
ALPHA DELTA PI hopes everyone had a
fun HALLOWEEN!
PI DELTA SISTERS would like to wel-
come our new pledges. We hope you have
a great semester and we look forward to
getting to know all of you!
SIGMA NU! Thanks for the social Thurs-
day night! The stench of animals and the
sight of the Sigma Nu models have made
a lasting impression. David and Julie, you
both did a great job. Until next time
Love, Delta Zeta
Delta
Personals
JPM, 1 already miss you! See you on Sun-
day. MCW
ANNOUN
DDITIONAL PARTICIPANTS NEEDED
FOR A STUDY ABOUT HPVGENITAL
WARTS. Unmarried female college students
are invited to participate in a study that
explores their experiences and thoughts
about living with HPVGenital Warts. If
you have been diagnosed with HPVGenitla
Warts within the past 2 years and are will-
ing to participate in private, confidential
interviews, please contact the reseacher,
Mary Browder, ECU Dept of Health Ed
3284316 (afternoons) or 7564599 (eve-
nings).
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL
COLLEGE STUDENTS
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of November 6-10
to make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for Spring Semester 1996. Early regis-
tration week is set for November 13-17.
"SGAJAM-A-THON"
Students and Musicians are needed Nov 4
to play and sing originals and unplugged
music from the Vietnam Era: Jimi Hendr ix,
Doors, CCR etc at Carolina East Mall. All
funds raised will benefit Disabled Vietnam
Veterans. Call Rob Lewis at 7564916 for
reserved space and time.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
STUDENTS ADVISING
Early registration for spring semester will
be Wednesday November 8th from 5:30-
7:30 and Thursday November 9th from
5:30-7:30 in room 203 of the Beik Build-
ing Other advising hours will be by ap-
pointment only.
ATTENTION: ORTHODOX
STUDENTS
Greek, Russian, Romanian, Serbian, all
Orthodox or those interested in the Ortho-
dox religion are invited to attend Ortho-
dox liturgy this Sunday! We are interested
in forming an Orthodox student group and
would like anyone interested to attend lit-
urgy at 10:00am at the Baptist Student
Center on 10th Street and remain for so-
cial hour following. This is a good chance
to meet other Orthodox on campus and
those in the community. If you cannot at-
tend but are interested in another meet-
ing, please call 756-7846 in the evenings.
SPRING REGISTRATION IS
COMINGDON'T WAIT IN LINE
TWICE!
Don't be turned away from pre-regisiration
because of an upaid parking ticket! Check
with Parking and Traffic Services to be sure
your record is not tagged for an outstand-
ing citation. Visa and Mastercard now ac-
cepted for payment of fines and permits!
Call 3286294.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS
All General College students who intend
to major in Communication Sciences and
have Mr. Robert Muzzarelli or Mrs. Meta
Downes as their adviser are to meet on
Wednesday, November 8 at 5:00pm in
Brewster C-103. Advising for early regis-
tration will take place at that time. Please
prepare a tentative class schedule before
the meeting
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS
Meeting TODAY, Nov 2nd at 4:00pm in
GCB 1019. Meet honorary members, get
involved in great activities, order a t-shirt
and have a great time! Any questions? Call
Jacqie at 328-3302. See you There!
B-GLAD
B-GLAD (Bi-sexuals, Gays, Lesbians, and
Allies for Diversity). Next Meeting is Tues-
day, 7 November, 1995 at 7:30pm in the
Underground of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Topic is T.B.A. Please bring food for
the PICASSO food drive. See you at the
meeting.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
The next meeting of ECHO will be held on
Nov. 7th at 5:30 pm in GCB 3006. A11 mem-
bers are encouraged to attend. Anyone
owing Fall semester dues should pay at this
meeting.
ATTENTION PLANNING STUDENT S:
SPAN
Will meet Tuesday, November 7th 8:00 at
BW3's. All members and non-members
encouraged to come. Members bring your
dues or answer to Bruce.
THE ADULT STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting will be held on 11-
9-95 at 4:00pm in CC 2006. For all adult
students who want to have a voice on cam-
pus. This organization is for your benefit
We will elect officers for the 95-96 academic
year and discuss programs of interest to
Adult Students. Make your wants & needs
known to the University. There are over
4000 adult students at ECU. We need a
united voice to speak for us and that is the
purpose of ASA.
MASSAGE CLINIC TONIGHT!
Physical Therapy students will be giving
massages tonight from 6-9pm in the ECU
Back & Limb Clinic, Belk Building. Tick-
ets $2.50 per 10 min. at the door. Come
relieve your stressl
. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
Who: International Student Organization;
When: November 8, 95 5:00pm; What At-
traction in NC and VA; Where: GC 1015
CAREER RESOURCES ON THE
INTERNET
Get the inside scoop on "surfing the net"
for jobs, company information, graduate
schools and much more. Jeff Henley, Assis-
tant Director of Career Services, will con-
duct this workshop on how to access the
Internet to expand your job search on Fri.
Nov. 3 at 3:00pm in Austin 206. Sign up at
Careeer Services. Seating is limited to 20.
JOB SEARCH STRATEGIES WORK-
SHOP
This workshop, sponsored by Career Ser-
vices, includes networking, using current
technology via the Internet, and traditional
job search methods to identify job oppor-
tunities. It will be held on Mon. Nov. 6 at
2:00pm in the Career Services Building.
701 E. Fifth St
CAREERS WITH THE IRS
Learn about the types of job oppor tunities
that the Internal Revenue Service offers
and how to apply on Tue. Nov. 7 at 4:00pm.
mr. Terrance Dawson, Revenue Agent will
give the employment outlook and t he quali-
fications his office seeks in new candidat es.
please register for this program by noon
Nov. 6 at Career Services.
CALLING ALL MENTORS
If you are an adult student who has at-
tended ECU for one or more semesters and
would like to be a mentor for a new adult
student we need you There will be a train-
ing session for prospective mentors Thurs-
day, November 2, 1995 from 4:006:00pm
in room 224 of the Mendenhall Student
Center. Information will be presented on
how to be an effective mentor and where
to find needed information. It is important
for the program that you receive the infor-
mation to be provided and to g ive your own
input If you want to be a mentor, but can-
not attend this training session, please con-
tact the Adult Student Services Office at
328-6881 and let us know when you are
available for training and to pick up the
information on Mentee(s).
HEY EVERYBODY!
COME OUT AND JOIN THE EAST CARO-
LINA ULTIMATE TEAMS AS THEY CEL-
EBRATE THE SILVER ANNIVERSARY OF
ULTIMAX, sponsored by Recreational Ser-
vices. Watch as the Two Defending National
Champions, The East Carolina Irates de-
fend their crown along with the Nationally
ranked women's team, The Helios. Sixteen
Men's Teams and Ten Women's Teams from
around the nation will battle for the title
of Ultimax Twenty-five! Thaf s Saturday and
Sunday, November 4-5,1995, on the Intra-
mural fields, pool play on Saturday and
semis and finals on Sunday! Be there and
see for yourself what the fuss is all about!
Two days of fun in the sun with the na-
tional champions! Sponsored by Rec. Ser-
vices.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be held on Monday,
November 6th at 5:15pm in Ragsdale room
218A. Our guest speaker will be an envi-
ronmental specialist Refreshments will be
served and the meeting is open to all ma-
jors.
SOCIAL WORK HONOR SOCIETY
Chi Zeta, ECU'S Social Work Honor Soci-
ety, is now accepting applications for mem-
bership. Criteria for qualification is a 3.5
GPA in social work courses and an overall
GPA of 3.0. Applications are available at
the Ragsdale Building, Room 104-B. Sub-
mit applications as soon as possible but
not later than November 21, 1995.
ECU ECONOMICS SOCIETY
The ECON Society is holding a meeting
Thursday, November 2nd in Brewster D
Room 305 at 5:00pm. Please come and join
us. We will be discussing upcoming ev ents.
If you have any questions contact Prudence
Woo at 3286006. Members, nonmembers,
all majors are welcome! Please join us!
VISITING SCHOLAR: LATIN AMERI-
CAN POETRY AND LITERATURE
Eugenio Suarez-Calban of Madrid, Spain.
Fall Semester 95, Visiting Professor Dept
of Romance Studies, Duke University. The
Language-Cultural Heritage Controversy;
Modern Puerto Rican Poetry in English.
Thursday Afternoon, November 2,4:00pm.
Room 1001, General Classroom Building.
Lezama Lima; A Modern Cuban Poet in
the Tradition of the Twentieth Century
Narrative. Thursday Evening, November 2,
7:30pm. Room 306 D, Brewster Building.
An informal Reception in Brewster 303 D
will follow the evening program.
NOON TIME LECTURE SERIES
Monday, November 6 12:30-l:30pm Brody
2W-50. "Genetic Testing and Children:
From Newborn Screening to Research"
Ellen Clayton, M.D J.D. Department of
Pediatrics & School of Law Vanderbilt
University
MMaHmi
L
i





LET THE SECOND CITY CHALLENGE
TAKE YOU TO THE FIRST CITY!
econ
IE 35th ANNIVERSARY TOUR
Tuesday, November 7, 1995
Wright Auditorium � tt1IU!ilh7llKUmim
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TICKET PRICES: ot4 S
Mudenl S4.00 40
FacultyStaff S7.00
General Public SI0.00
At the Door SI2.00
Tickets ore on sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University.
All tickets are General' Admission. Doors oper. ol 7:00 PM.
Visa and MasterCard accepted
WHOEVER CAN NAME THE
MOST FACES CORRECTLY IS
ELIGIBLE FOR:
. 2 TICKETS TO THE SECOND CITY
. 2 TICKETS TO THE ALllMN BROTHERS
. 1 QUAD-OCCUPANCY ROOM FOR THE
NEW YORK CITY TRIP OVER
THANKSGIVING
� TURN COMPLETED LIST IN TO ROOM 210
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
� DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOV. 3 -12:00 NOON
� MUST HAVE VALID ECU ID
1
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12
Thursday, November 2,1995
The East Carolinian
BOATS,
ECU declares war on Army
Craig Perrott
Staff Writer
In the wake of a huge 36-34
last second victory over Southern
Miss last week, the 1 irates must
now turn their at-
tention to the Black
Knights of Army.
ECU will face Army
for the first time in
history on Saturday
at West Point.
Looking at the
schedule at the be-
ginning of the year,
any fan would tell
you that the Army
game would be an
automatic win.
Now, going into
week 10 of the foot-
ball season, that is
not the case.
The Cadets' powerful wishbone
offense has tallied 2,632 yards on
the ground this year, and averages
66 rushes per game. It is an offense
that ECU Head Football Coach
Steve Logan says that no one has
been able to stop so far this sea-
son.
"The defining thing about
Army is that they have run the
wishbone all year long and they
have six total
turnovers
Logan said.
"They're not
going to beat
themselves
Army's
offensive at-
tack ranks
second na-
tionally, just
behind Ne-
braska. The
Cadets aver-
age 359.4
yards on the
ground per
game and are
number seven in the nation in turn-
over margin. The Black Knights are
at 11 for the year in turnovers,
forcing 17 and giving up six.
"The defining
thing about Army
is that they have
run the wishbone
all year long and
they have six total
turnovers"
� Coach Logan
Army has ranked in the top 10
nationally in rushing offense each
season since installing the wish-
bone in 1984.
The wishbone backfield uti-
lized by the Cadets employed 13 dif-
ferent players in a 49-7 thumping
of Boston College earlier this year,
and 18 different ballcarriers in a 56-
14 rout of Colgate last week.
"They've always got one mid-
line fullback from which the offense
emanates Logan said, it's just a
mess. The Boston College kids - lit-
erally, on one piece of film, 10 play-
ers tackled the fullback while the
half back was in the end zone with
the ball. It's frightening. Our de-
fensive players have never seen any-
thing like this
Army's wishbone attack is also
designed to eat the clock. The Ca-
dets have dominated the time of
possession in every outing this sea-
son, holding a nine-minute advan-
tage over their opponents.
"We've got to go score points
See ARMY page 13
Youth key to golf team success
Underclassmen
lead golf team
toward future
Dill Dillard
Staff Writer
In building and maintaining a
strong program of any sorts, young
talent must step up to keep the fu-
ture bright for the program. If this is
the case, then things are looking good
for ECU'S golf team.
The Pirates returned home after
finishing 13th in a field of 20 teams
at the Old Dominion Seascape Clas-
sic on Tuesday. The Bucs shot their
way into the 13th position at the clo-
sure of the first round of the two
round tournament with a team score
of 303. The Pirates first round effort
was led by the youth of the program
placing three underclassmen in the
Pirate's top five scores at the end of
both rounds of play. Sophomore Kevin
Williams led the team in the first
round, shooting an impressive 72
which is an even par. Along with
Miller, freshman Daniel Griffis and
sophomore Scott Campbell worked
the r way into ECU's top five perform-
ers.
"We were excited that some of
our kids played well despite their lack
of experience said first year coach
Kevin Williams after the opening
round.
The Pirate youngsters performed
above expectations registering mid to
high 70 stroke rounds including
Miller's tie for 12th place in the indi-
vidual standings going into the finial
round.
"This is the first time that they
were able to compete in a major tour-
nament, and they played great Will-
iams added.
This growing experience for the
young Pirate squad included match-
ups with top area golf programs like
UNC- Creensboro, UNC-Charlotte, and
fellow CAA member Old Dominion.
In the final day of competition,
it was the Spartans of UNC-Greens-
boro who stole the show as well as
the team championship. The Spartans
led the whole way finishing with a
score of 571 ahead of UNC-Charlotte
and host team Old Dominion.
The Pirates game improved ever
so slightly from their previous perfor-
mance, only shaving two strokes from
their first round score. This slight
improvement, however allowed ECU
to finish 13th in the team standings
in front of CAA opponent American
as well as the Old Dominion two
squad. Stepping up for the Pirates in
the final round of the tournament
was senior leader Brent Padrick.
Padrick went into the final round
four strokes behind Miller, but im-
proved six strokes to lead the team in
the final standings and move into a
tie for 21st in the individual race.
The Bucs' first round "Young
Guns" also turned in a solid final
round of golf with Miller, Campbell
and Griffis finishing as three of the
top five on the Pirate team.
William's hackers will travel
south to Summerville, S.C. for the
Charleston Southern Invitational at
Pine Forest Country Club, Nov. 13-
14. The two round contest will be the
Bucs' final match before what could
be a promising spring season.
StaMltote
Photo Courtesy of Kip Sloan
The Greenville streets will look sirriiliarto this come Sunday's Piratechase 5K Road Race.
Hosted by the ECU Cross Coun-
try teams, the third Annual
"Piratechase 5k" Road Race will be
held in Greenville this Sunday next to
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. Now in its
third year, the "Piratechase" race will
cover a new, all pavement, double loop
course in the neighborhoods next to
the football stadium. Race organizer
Charlie "Choo" Justice expects about
150 area runners to participate in the
5K (3.1 mile) race, and the one mile
"Fun Run All runners receive T-shirts
and are eligible for prizes and awards.
Proceeds from the event benefit the
ECU Cross Country Men's and
Women's teams, who also serve as race
volunteers. An awards ceremony and
party follow the event at the Pirate
Club.
If you have never run a in running
race, but can jog three miles, here's your
chance for a great new experience. Even
if you can't run the whole distance, but
can run or walk part of the way, come
out and see what road racing is all about
The one mile "Fun Run" starts at 1 p.m.
followed by the 5K race at 1:30. regis-
tration will be held at the Pirate Club
building behind the football stadium up
to 15 minutes before each race. For
more information and entry forms, con-
tact Charlie Justice at 3284611.
Champions!
Photo Courtesy of Rec Services
The "Super Ho's ECU'S 1995 Intramural Flag Football Champions competed in an
invitational in Chapel Hill last weekend. The team was upset by the Tortfessors of UNC.
"Super Ho's" compete in invitational
David Gaskins
Rec Services
"Guts & Glory" from NC State
soundly defeated "Sigma Nu" of UNC-
W 44-7 to win the championship game
of the first North Carolina Collegiate
Flag Football Tournament hosted at
UNC-Chapel Hill over the weekend of
Oct 27-29.
Teams from UNC-Chapel Hill won
the Women's and Co-Rec titles. A to-
tal of 18 teams participated in the
three divisions.
ECU's championship team, the
"Super Ho's participated in the tour-
nament as well and completed the
round-robin phase of the tourney un-
defeated, receiving a bye in the first
round. Derrick Harris, Rodney Young
and Chris Pressley dominated play in
18-0 and 33-6 victories over the UNC-
Chapel Hill "BS Maniacs" and Shaw
University respectively.
However, in the first round of the
playoffs, they were upset 14-12 by the
UNC-Chapel Hiil "Tortfessors" and
eliminated from the event. Young and
David Campbell scored touchdowns in
the loss with a valiant comeback but
fell short on the final play. After
Campbell's touchdown with 1:27 re-
maining, the defense held and forced
a punt by utilizing their time-outs. The
"Ho's" got the ball back with one sec-
ond remaining and QB Daniel Finn
lofted a long pass down the middle of
the field which was caught by Matt
Snyder. Snyder was downed short of
the goal line but a holding penalty on
the runner moved the ball to the 3-
yard line and gave the "Ho's" one
more untimed down. The last play
misfired, however, and the game
ended.
ECU was also represented by a
strong contingent of flag football of-
ficials who were recognized for their
outstanding performance. Eighteen
officials worked the event represent-
ing six different institutions (ECU,
UNC-W, Appalachian State, NCSU,
UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC-G). ECU's
Steve Roberson, Chris Nunn, Kevin
Hinnant and Russell Duvall all re-
ceived championship game assign-
ments while Nunn, Hinnant and
Duvall were recognized among the six
officials selected as All-Tournament.
These four individuals will also travel
to another intramural event on the
weekend of Nov. 17-19 in an attempt
to qualify for an invitation to the na-
tional invitational flag football tour-
ney in New Orleans.
Volleyball team suffers defeat
Avram Klein
Staff Writer
Whether it was the curse of the
ghost-net or the angry spirits of the
women's volleyball team whose bus
exploded back in '63, Halloween dealt
an evil hand to the Lady Pirates. Their
last home game of the season was
their shortest and most disappointing.
ECU, who is now (15-13) for the sea-
son, lost to UNC Greensboro (21-3) in
three straight sets of 15-9, 15-8 and
15-7.
As the regular Williams Arena
fans tried to keep their heads up and
remember the victories of past
matches, the Pirates struggled
throughout the night. ECU slammed
a flickering 23 kills, which was nearly
matched in committed errors. Al-
though the team locked down their
serves and seemed to work with the
usual fluid teamwork that they are
known for, their errors and lack of
effective attacks hurt them. The Pi-
rates went into the match with a .207
team attack percentage, but ony hit
.010.
The ECU squad was lead by Car-
rie Brne who iced 12 kills and 15 digs.
ECU senior Tara Venn, led the squad
with four total blocks. Over the net,
Venn blocked one attack solo style
and assisted in the other three. Fresh-
man Kristin Warner, helped straighten
the Pirate's backbone with 17 assists
and added 10 digs and three block
assists.
Halloween was the last home
match for the team captain Melanie
Richards from West Henrietta, N.Y. as
well as co-captain Kristy Blair form
Woodbridge, Va Tara Venn from
Hendersonville, N.Y. and Gwynn
Baber from Scottsville, Va.
Kim Walker, Head Coach for the
Lady Pirates of ECU, was visibly dis-
pleased after the game which quickly
dissolved into an empty coliseum. The
team was not much for words and ex-
ited to their locker room.
"We didn't play well at all tonight"
Walker explained. "Now we need to get
back to playing the way we are capable
of playing and prepare for this
weekend's tourney and the rest of our
schedule, since the remainder of our
matches are on the road
The Lady Pirates travel to Annapo-
lis, Md. this weekend for the Navy Invi-
tational, beginning on Friday, Nov. 3.
Mourning, Hornets still negotiating
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - The
Charlotte Hornets were hoping the
upcoming season would be when
they finally became one of the NBA's
best teams. What they didn't plan
on was it being the year they lost
their best player.
Alonzo Mourning, the 6-foot-10
center who last season led the Hor-
nets in scoring, rebounding, blocks
and field-goal percentage, is locked
in a contract squabble that could
lead to him being traded.
As Charlotte approaches its sea-
son opener Friday night against the
Chicago Bulls, Mourning and the
Hornets remain S3 million apart on
the question of his annual salary.
Various reports have Charlotte
talking with up to eight teams about
the services of Mourning, who is due
to make $4.35 million this season,
his fourth in the league and the last
under his current contract.
The Hornets are said to have of-
fered Mourning a seven-year, $70
million deal; he is said to want $91
million for seven seasons with an es-
cape clause after four seasons. One
report also said he wants a share in
the ownership of the Charlotte Coli-
seum.
It's not the kind of distraction
a team wants when it's coming off a
franchise-record 50-victory season
and has made what it believes are
several offseason acquisitions that
will strengthen the club. Manage-
ment has talked optimistically about
going to the next level with the 7-
year-old franchise, which has yet to
advance past the second round of
the playoffs.
"This is something for he and
management to try to work out re-
serve center Robert Parish said
Tuesday after the Hornets worked
out at their practice complex in
neighboring Fort Mill, S.C. "We've
got to stay focused and not worry
about the business part of it
Parish and the rest of the Hor-
nets seemed somber as they walked
out of the gym and into a cold rain
on the way to their cars.
"We'd really hate to see him
go forward Scott Burrell said,
shaking his head.
"He's upbeat guard Kendall
Gill said. "He doesn't like the possi-
bility of leaving, but he knows that
in this business, there's always the
possibility of that happening
Mourning wasn't speaking to re-
porters, who staged a 3 12-hour
vigil after practice. He enlisted the
aid of two team employees to twice
switch the location of his sport util-
ity vehicle so he could get away from
the sprawling facility without being
confronted by the media.
Mourning, an NBA all-star se-
lection in each of the last two sea-
sons, is revered in Charlotte. A huge
likeness of him is painted on the side
of a building in uptown Charlotte,
and jerseys with his number 33 are
one of the team's most popular sou-
venirs.
But the Hornets, for whom
Mourning has averaged at least 21
points a game each season since
they took him with the second pick
in the 1992 draft, didn't sound cer-
tain Tuesday that he would remain
with the franchise.
"We're still trying to work
things out. We're trying to get
there said Bob Bass, Charlotte's
vice president for basketball opera-
tions.
Bass said the team had been in
contact this week with David Falk,
Mourning's agent.
"I really don't know whether
there will be another meeting or
when it will be Bass said.
Messages left by The Associated
Press at Falk's office were not re-
turned.
Charlotte, already saddled with
Larry Johnson's $84 million contract,
has been talking with teams for sev-
eral weeks about trading Mourning.
One possibility has Mourning
going to the Los Angeles Lakers for
7-1 center Vlade Divac, another
player and a first-round draft pick.
Also said to be under serious consid-
eration is a deal with Boston 7-0 cen-
ter Eric Montross, another player and
two first-round draft picks, or send-
ing Mourning to Portland for point
guard Rod Strickland and possibly
forward Cliff Robinson.
Parish, a member of three NBA
championship teams while with the
Celtics, said the Hornets face a tough
road trying to win a title without
Mourning.
"You just don't replace Alonzo
Mourning he said. "They don't
come along very often
.� �jr"HinUi
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, November 2, 1995
13
Harris f
feeler
WlLUE ftflCED Low!
Assorted
Cereals
0
YslaCQ. Frozen
3S& ���
12oz.
13-20 oz.
Fresh
Butter
Crispy Rice,
Honey Nut
Oat Os,
Frosted
Flakes
16 oz.
1
09
Soft
Drinks
AlvJVlY from page 12
Logan said. "1 don't care ii they
have the ball 50 minutes, you give
me 50, 60, or 80 points. 1 don't
want to control the clock. 1 want
to control the scoreboard and win.
We haven't controlled the clock in
any game I've ever coached here,
and never will
The Pirate offense will face an
Army defense which has caused
their opponents to commit 15
fumbles this season. Prior to last
season, the Black Knights adopted
the "Desert Swarm" defensive-
scheme made famous by Arizona.
The Cadets (3-3-1) have had a
EAST
CAROLINA
COIN&
PAWN
INSTANT CASH LOANS- WE
BUY GOLD & SIL.VHR
�VCR'S
'�DIAMONDS
�GUNS
�TELEVISION
�STEREOS
�GOLD & PAWN
BUILI0N
�JEWELRY
�GUITARS
�COINS
�CAMERAS
All Transactions Stiictty Confidential
9-6 M-F
9-5 SAT
frustrating season this year, having
four straight games decided in the
final 40 seconds, three of which
came down to the last play of the
game. Army suffered last minute
losses to Duke. Washington and
Notre Dame while tying Rice on the
final play. Four out of seven of
Army's games have been decided by
a total of 11 points.
The Pirates enter the game
riding the momentum created by
last week's win at Southern Miss.
ECU quarterback Marcus Crandell
was named both the ECAC and Con-
ference ISA Player of the Week for
his performance against the Golden
Eagles. Crandell completed 28 of
51 passes for 312 yards and three
touchdowns, while rushing for 56
yards and an additional TD.
"The resourcefulness that he
displayed and the execution that
was there was really a thing of
beauty Logan said. "1 really like
our quarterback. I've said it before
and I'll say it again - I wouldn't
trade him for anyone in the coun-
try
Crandell could overcome Pirate
stand-out Jeff Blake as ECU's all-
time career passing leader in
Saturday's game at West Point. He
needs just 244 yards to move ahead
of Blake's 5,133 yard career total.
Crandell currently has 4,890 yards,
and has thrown for 587 of those
yards in the past two games.
Mitchell Galloway caught a ca-
reer best nine passes against South-
ern Miss for 106 yards, and leads
the team in receptions with 36.
Tight end Scott Richards had two
of his three TD catches of the sea-
son against USM. upping his recep-
tion total of the year to 26 snags.
ECU cornerback Emmanuel
McDaniel recorded his sixth inter-
ception of the season against the
Golden Eagles, and it was the fifth
consecutive game he's had a pick.
Linebacker Mark Libiano had an
interception of his own against
USM. the third of his career.
NO
EDITORIAL
BOARD
MEETING
TODAY.
NEXT
WEEK'S
MEETING
WILL BE
HELD AT 4.
. 'z�k 2 Itr.
B XJi
Decadent
Ice Cream 12 gai
t
Light Microwave
Popcorn io.5oz.
752-0322
Comer of 10th & Dickinson
ffl p �g
0 zcQa-A a 0�c-ftH
Decadent
Cookies
2I00
12oz.
Soft Drink Feature
r Don't let an
unpaid parking
ticket hold up your
registration for spring
semester!
Students with uncleared parking citations
have a tag placed on their record and
are not permitted to register until S "Did you say i have to
the tag is cleared. Please pay any f come back alter clearing
outstanding fin� so you will not ggSSSm.
be delayed during registration.
Walk in Hours:
Monday Friday
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Phone inquiries accepted until 5:00 p.m.
uu
Parking and
Traffic Services
305 E. Tenth Street
CAROLINA
iMMKNin 328-6294
Visa and MasterCard
now accepted!
Cran-Juice
Cocktail
21'
2 Liter
Pepsi Or Diet
Pepsi
Extra
i
Ihite
3i
48 oz.
White
Detergent 42-47
?D4d2 Smooth
Peanut W
Butterjs oz. �
Prices Effective Through Nov. 7,1995
YQ.d White Cheddar
Macaroni &
Cheese7.2oz
YDt c0. Butter Pecan
Shortbread
Cookies
2SIO
12 oz.
'4'
o
Pnces ,n This Ad Effective Wednesday, November 1, Through November?, 1 995 In Our Greenville Stores
,nlv We Reserve The R.qht To L,mit Quantit.es. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
We're Your Best Shot
At Getting Through The
Flu Season
Flu Shots ��
Employee � Family � Individual
Providing Adult & Pediatric Care � Women's Health � X-Rays and Lab
� Physicals � Flu and Tetanus Vaccinations � Drug Testing
� Occupational Health & Workers' Compensation Needs
Participating With
�Principal PPO Network
�Provident PPO Network
�PHS
�BCBS
�Medicare
�HealthSource
DOCTOR'S
URGENT CARE
CENTRE
HI! Major Credit Cards and
Personal Checks Accepted
507 E. 14th Street, at Charles Blvd.
(919) 830-2900
Mon-Fri 8am - 8pm, Sat 9am - 4pm
MMfMMMM
mPMWHnH ��
'vmmmmmmmmmmm mm mmmm
�HNMMMH





14
Thursday, November 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
1995 ECU Basketball Schedules
Dav Date
Sat
Wed.
Fri.
Sat
Wed.
Sat.
Sat
Tue.
Thu.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
Fri.
Nov. 11
Nov. 15
Nov. 24
Nov. 25
Nov. 29
Dec. 2
Dec. 9
Dec. 19
Dec. 28
Dec. 31
Jan. 5
Jan.7
Jan. 12
Jan. 14
Jan. 19
Opponent
Latvia of Russia (EXH)
Athletes in Action
at Cornell Tournament
(St Francis College)
at North Carolina A&T
North Carolina State
at Coastal Carolina
Furman
Appalachian State
at Winthrop
James Madison
Va. Commonwealth
at George Mason
at American
Old Dominion
Time
Women's Schedule
Dav
8 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
5:307:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
3 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
7 p.m.
Fri.
Sun.
Wed.
Fri.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
Tue.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
Wed.
Date
Jan. 26
Jan. 28
Jan. 31
Feb. 2
Feb. 4
Feb. 9
Feb. 11
Feb. 16
Feb. 18
Feb. 20
Feb. 25
Mar. 1
Mar. 3
Mar. 6-9
Opponent
Time
at William & Mary7:30 p.m
Richmond2 p.m.
UNC Charlotte7 p.m.
at UNC Wilmington7:30 p.m
at Old Dominion2 p.m.
at Va. Commonwealth7 p.m.
at James Madison2 p.m.
George Mason7 p.m.
American2 p.m
Campbell7 p.m.
at Richmond2 p.m.
William & Mary7 p.m.
UNC Wilmington2 p.m.
CAA TOURNAMENTTBA
(Norfolk, Va.)
The men's schedule will be in next Thursday's issue.
HENDRIX FILMS
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 � FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10 � SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11
All films start at 8:00 PH
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed)
�h valid ECU ID.
For More information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
BiBEiaiBjaBiaaBEiBiBiaaiBiBMia'BiBjaBMaaBiaBraiBiac
VOTER RECTSTRATTON
Congressional Cuts
of Student Loans
City Restrictions on
Off Campus Housing
N.C. Legislative
Tuition Increases
if you want a VOICE in government outside of ECU
f
I
I
Wednesday November 8th
From 9am Until 3pm
College Hill
Student Store
Joyner Library
General Classroom Building
Sponsored by SGA
If It Dosen't Say
Jiffy Lube � It Just
Isn'? Jiffy Lube
Every 3000 Miles
SERVING YOUR
NEIGHBORHOOD
FOR OVER
8 YEARS
!$19.99j
(most cars)
Complete
Oil
Lube And
Fluid
Service
With Coupon Only � Not
Good With Any Other Offer �
Bottled & Synthetic Oil Extra
GREENVILLE � 126 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD
756-2579 READY IN MINUTES �
NO APPOINTMENTS
Offer Expires 12-4-95
NON-BINDING CAMPUS WIDE
REFERENDUM ON WHETHER
OR NOT TO RE-ESTABLISH
THE PRINT YEARBOOK!
The Student Government Association would
like your opinion on:
Would you like the print year-
book revived at ECU?
Would you support a $2.00
student fee increase
to re-establish
the print yearbook?
Would you be intersted in
purchasing a print yearbook if it
were in the
$30.00 to $40.00 price range?
bring your student ID and voice your opinion on
Wed Nov. 8th at these locations
. Bottom of College Hill
2. Joyner Library
3. Student Store
4. General Classroom
a
m
allBEEiaBlBllBia'BMgjBigjBlBlBiaBl
1
1
I
1
1
1
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 2, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 02, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1106
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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