The East Carolinian, October 12, 1995






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October 12,1995
Vol71,No. 15
1 he East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pages
ECU division negotiates lawsuit
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Around the State
(AP) - The National Cancer
Institute has extended funding for
a breast cancer research program
at the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill.
UNC's program is based at the
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer
Center and is staffed by faculty of
the schools of medicine and public
health. The program has three com-
ponents: molecular epidemiology,
public health intervention and gene
discovery.
Cooperating institutions in-
clude East Carolina University,
Duke University, the Mayo Cancer
Center, the N.C. Central Cancer
Registry and hospitals and health
departments in 24 counties.
(AP) - In Siler City, the work-
ers who may be the most power-
less, Hispanics struggling with lan-
guage and cultural barriers, are the
latest victims of repetitive-strain in-
juries.
David Gantt an Asheville work-
ers' compensation lawyer, said
Latino workers may be hurt most
by their strong work ethic, because
they don't report pain soon enough
or often enough, making it more
likely that their repetitive-stress
problems will worsen.
Some workers' advocates say
they believe employers are hiring
Latinos partly because tey think
those workers will file fewer com-
pensation claims.
Around the Country
(AP) - There may be no ben-
efit to giving cholesterol-lowering
treatment to women who have
high cholesterol but are otherwise
healthy.
Cholesterol-lowering
drugs and diets do not appear to
reduce the chances of such
women dying from heart disease,
according to two researchers in
Chicago who reviewed past stud-
ies on the topic.
(AP) - Four teen-age boys
admit building the illegal camp-
fire being blamed for sparking a
wildfire that destroyed 40 homes
and burned 12,354 acres in a
popular Northern California sea-
shore park.
The fire reportedly caused
$40 million in property damage,
burned 15 percent of the park and
cost $3.1 million to fight.
More than 150 families were
evacuated from their homes as
the wind-whipped blaze ate up
bishop pines and tinder-dry brush
for three days. Gentle, moisture-
laden breezes helped 2,000
firefighters gain the upper hand
last Friday.
Around the World
(AP) - Divers seeking old
Egyptian treasures have pulled a
headless sphinx, part of a statue
of a pharaoh and a red granite obe-
lisk from the Mediterranean Sea.
The French-Egyptian team is
mapping the sea off the port of Al-
exandria and removing about 30
statues and monuments scattered
amid the ruins of the Pharos light-
house, one of the Seven Wonders
of the ancient world.
Florida group
accuse educators
of fund misuse
Wendy Rountree
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Division of Continuing
Education has been accused by the
National Association of Peer Help-
ers (NAPH) of mismanaging the
association's national conference
and is currently facing a possible
lawsuit.
The NAPH is an organization of
administrators, counselors and pub-
lic school teachers. The organization
trains members how to teach their
students to be peer mediators.
According to a press release, the
NAPH contracted ECU's Division of
Continuing Education to manage
the organization's national confer-
ence in Orlando, FL this past sum-
mer. The organization claims the
division did not send information to
members in time for the conference.
As a result, only half of the expected
members showed up, and the orga-
Pirates
on the
Street
Photos by PATRICK iREWAf


Do you like
Pee Dee as
ECU'
mascot
Sherlta Young
"Yes, I sure do. He's
great, especially at
basketball games
Vinnie Brown
"Yes, he's my idol
John Stephens
"Yes, he helps promote
school spirit at the
football games
RHA Week ends soon
Stephanie Eaton
Staff Writer
Excitement filled the air this
week, as the Residence Hall
Association (RHA) celebrated its
annual RHA Week.
RHA Week gives students
the opportunity to become in-
volved with ECU's RHA. Members
of RHA are sponsoring events
around campus throughout the
week. These events were set up
to help students take time out
from their hectic schedules and
enjoy recreation, food and festivi-
ties.
Central Campus started off
the festivities on Monday when
Slay, Umstead, Cotten, Fleming
and Jarvis' Hall Councils spon-
sored "Come One, Come All, and
Have a Ball on the Mall Carni-
val games were set up on the mall,
Photo by KEN CLARK
Freshman Wesley Farris plays
Frisbee golf during RHA Week.
The fun ends tomorrow.
and students played shuffleboard, basketball and an assortment of other games.
Prizes were given away for students who played.
"We did not have a good turnout said Amy Moose, vice president of Slay
See RHA page 3
nization, which depends on the in-
come it receives from the confer-
ences to function, lost money.
Although the current president
of the National Association of Peer
Helpers, Dr. Judy Tindall, declined
to speak about the situation because
of current negotiations, the past
president, Dr. Elizabeth Foster-
Harrison, did speak to The Daily
Refflector in August
"In the past, whatever state
we've gone into, we've used the bot-
tom line as a $30,000 profit, because
NAPH has to have that to operate
Foster-Harrison said. "Our onlv in-
come is membership and conference
revenue. And in this case, the con-
ference in Orlanda, FL, we did not
yield a profit - no money at all
The NAPH has hired an attor-
ney, Joe Stallings of Howard, From,
Stallings and Hutson law firm in Ra-
leigh to handle its side of the case.
However, in a September inter-
view, Clayton Sessoms, associate di-
rector in the Division of Continuing
Education and Summer School, said
that the division had no knowledge
of an actual lawsuit.
"To our knowledge there is no
lawsuit Sessoms said.
At the time, Sessoms said the
university and the association were
in closed discussions over the situa-
tion.
"We are having a dialogue with
NAPH Sessoms said. "As a con-
sequence, it would inappropriate for
me to comment further
After three weeks, negotiations
continue.
"We still are talking said Ben
Irons, university attorney. "The situ-
ation has not changed.
"The parties continue to discuss
issues Irons said. "Our objective
is to resolve this dispute informally
Cardboard living
Photo by KEN CLARK
(Lto R) Members of Pi Lambda Phi Daniel R. Clawson, Michael Davis, Chris Feathers,
Steve Battifarano, Dwayne DeSerres and Delvin Vick are living on the campus mall
in cardboard houses to raise money for the Ronald McDonald House.
Freshmen get into trouble
Holly Hagey
Staff Writer
Everyone knows that carrying
a full course load can be challeng-
ing, especially for freshmen who
may not be used to the amount or
type of work required in college.
There are currently 1,864 out
of 4,211 freshmen experiencing aca-
demic difficulty in one or more sub-
jects according to Academic Diffi-
culty Reports. Academic interven-
tion workshops are being offered
to help students in areas of diffi-
culty.
Biology, math and chemistry-
are the three subjects which seem
to present the most problems for
students, according to Don Joyner,
assistant director of the academic
support center in the office of un-
dergraduate studies.
"We want to deal with students
as early as possible to assist them
Joyner said.
The Academic Support Center
mailed 1,568 academic difficulty re-
ports to 800 faculty members
across campus. Of the forms mailed
out, 82.91 percent were returned.
Faculty members assessed all
freshmen to determine whether or
not they were having academic dif-
ficulty. Anyone who was deter-
mined to be in academic difficulty
due to reasons such as low test
scores, poor homework grades or
excessive absences was sent an in-
vitation to attend an academic en-
hancement workshop.
"What we have discovered is
that faculty members enjoy inter-
acting with students Jjyner said.
"It encourages communication
Workshops for
Academic Support
Brewster B-102
Wednesday
October 11
2-3 p.m.
3-4 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
Thursday
October 12
3-4 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
Friday
October 13
2-3 p.m.
Monday
October 16
2-3 p.m.
3-4 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
Tuesday
October 17
3-4 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
Brewster B-104
noon-1 p.m.
11-noon
Workshops last about one hour
and are held in the Brewster build-
ing. Times and dates have been
scheduled to accommodate as many
schedules as possible.
During the workshop, students
are given a packet of information
to help them recognize their diffi-
culties and discover resources for
help.
One of the first sheets students
fill out is an evaluation of factors
contributing to academic difficulty.
This acts as a self-assessment tool
for students, Joyner said.
Students also learn how to
compute their grade point average
(CPA) and can make a prediction
of their GPA. Valuable tips and in-
sights on ways to succeed in col-
lege are given in the packet of in-
formation. Tips such as "under-
stand why you are in college" and
"try to have realistic expectations"
benefit the student in assessing
their college careers.
The Counseling Center and the
Academic Support Center offer aca-
demic enhancement workshops
throughout the semester in areas
such as career exploration, test-tak-
ing strategies and stress manage-
ment, along with various other ar-
eas of interest.
See HELP page3
Vftetde
NIN sizzles, Bowie fizzlespage CD
Perotians attack countrypage 4
Z Q
Pirates get gradedpage j
Thursday
Partly cloudy
�fc
High 80
Low 64
Weekend
Rain
High 80
Low 63
f?W t& xeocA eta,
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
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Thursday, October 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
CRIME S)ENE
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October 2
Larceny - A student reported that someone stole his pants from the
laundry room at Scott Hall.
Damage to property - An officer discovered the outer glass door of
The Student Stores was cracked while on routine patrol.
October 3
Possession of weapon on campus - A student was issued a campus
appearance ticket after a switchblade knife was observed in the rear seat
of his vehicle.
Assist rescue - A student requested rescue after complaining of an
ear injury. He was treated by rescue but not transported.
October 5
Noise complaint - Several residents of Fletcher Hall reported a per-
son at the dorm phone located outside of the building was yelling loudly
and disturbing everyone on the south side of the building. The person was
identified and issued a campus appearance ticket for possession andor
using alcoholic beverages, failure to present identification and violation of
trespass warning.
Fallen tree limb - A tree limb on three vehicles parked in the Fifth
and Reade Streets parking lot The three students were notified of the
damages.
Missing person - A resident of Aycock Hall reported his roommate
was missing. The missing person was last seen at 10:50 "t.m. in the library.
At 1:39 a.m. The missing person returned to his room.
October 6
Assist rescue - A resident of Scott Hall cut his foot on a broken
bottle on the grass south of the General Classroom Building. The injured
person was treated and released by Greenville rescue.
Damage to property - A staff member reported that someone pushed
over his motorcycle causing $150 damage.
Indecent exposure - A student reported that a white male in his early
20s with a bushy mustache exposed his genitals to her at the bus stop
near 10th Street
Dispute - A student reported that her old roommate had made false
and harassing statements about her to a faculty member.
October 9
Larceny - A student reported that the headlight trim kit from his car
was stolen while it was parked east of White Hall. He also reported that his
radio antenna was broken.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Tambra Zion
News Editor
The age-old art form of lace mak-
ing will be demonstrated in Greenville
this weekend.
The North Carolina Lacers Fall
Lace Day will be held in the Willis
Building at the corner of First and
Reade Streets this Saturday from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration will be held
from 9 to 10 a.m.
"It's going to be a great chance
Wrec
cleared
(AP) - Workers cleared wreck-
age Wednesday and prepared to re-
pair tracks where an Amtrak train
derailed on a remote desert trestle in
Hyder, AZ. The FBI, studying a letter
signed "Sons of Gestapo asked for
tips on the sabotage.
Cranes began lifting the over-
turned coaches so investigators could
look under them, said Robin Luke of
Midstate Trucking of Tucson, which
brought in the equipment and mate-
rials needed to repair the tracks.
Two flatbed trucks carrying sec-
tions of track began slowly moving
toward the derailment site this morn-
ing.
Investigators expect to wrap up
their work at the scene on Thursday,
said Larry McCormick, acting special
agent in charge of the FBI's Phoenix
office.
Fifty-five miles away in downtown
Phoenix, federal agents were seeking
two men who may have placed a de-
vice capable of derailing a train on a
freight track. The FBI refused to rule
out the possibility that it was a sec-
ond act of sabotage.
The first was Monday's derail-
ment of Amtrak's Sunset Limited,
which sent four cars hurtling off a 30-
foot-high bridge and into a gulch, kill-
ing a crewman and injuring at least
78 people. The culprit unbolted a bar
that held together two sections of rail
and installed a wire to disable a light
that would have warned the train's
crew of the break.
makers
to introduce some people to it (lace
making) for the first time said Gin-
ger Ausband, co-coordinator of the
event "It's a lot of fun, very relaxing
and you come up with some really
beautiful and personal artwork
Ausband said materials for mak-
ing lace are usually inexpensive and
will be widely available at Saturday's
event.
"It's held in different places in
North Carolina she said. "This is the
first time it's been in Greenville, it will
probably be five or six years before it
gets back here
The North Carolina Regional
Lacers is a state organization which
is comprised of local guilds.
Greenville's guild, the Down East
Lacers, meets twice a month in the
community building located on
Fourth and Greene Streets, and is
hosting this year's event
kage
"We're going to have mini classes
introductions and they are free and
open to the public Ausband said.
Four introductory classes are
planned for the morning and after-
noon from 10 to 11 a.m. and 1:30 to
2:30 p.m. respectively. These classes
will teach participants the art of tat-
ting, making your own lace pillow (the
old fashioned way) and Bobbins,
among other things. Birdcage Span-
gling will also be taught.
It's a special kind of bead
bangle Ausband said.
Sandy Craig is scheduled as the
keynote speaker and will inform par-
ticipants about turning flax into linen
from 11 to 11:45 a.m. Spinning dem-
onstrations are also planned through-
out the day.
"There's lots of different kinds of
See LACE page 3
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If You ve Ever Said, "I've Got Nothing to Wear
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We're havins a mid-semester, clear the
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Coupon not valid with any
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Student Stores Hours:
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Friday: 8 am - 5 pm
Saturday: 11 am - 5 pm
plus extended hours for special events!
Student Stores
where there's more in store for you than just books!
Centrally located on campus, in the Wrisht Building just off Wrisht Circle
ECU Student Stores: More than just oooks-your dollars support student scholars!
(919) 328-6731
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 12, 1995

Harnsfeercr
MEANS LOW PRICES
Sweet
Florida
ranges
J-AV-jtL from page 2 KHA from page 1
Fresh
Crisp
Cucumbers
ea.
Harris Teeter
iTV�? White
' Potatoes ib.
s2
Mote Value
Macaroni &
Cheese
lace, so it really is in its own category
Ausband said. "There's lots of differ-
ent types of ways to make it
Coordinators have been actively
planning Saturday's events for quite
some time.
"We started making reservations
about a year ago Ausband said.
"We're going to have vendors from
Colorado selling beggar's lace
She said several large supply ven-
dors from around the country are
planning to attend the event, includ-
ing Mayflower supplies out of Texas,
The Lace Lady and N. and M. Lace
Supplies from Virginia.
"Consignment items from around
the world will also be on sale
Ausband said. "North Carolina ven-
dors will be selling lace-making sup-
plies, but they will also have some vin-
tage lace and clothing
Among the specialty items avail-
able for sale will be braiding drums
for a type of Japanese lace.
Ausband said 60 guests are al-
ready registered for the event, and
more are expected to attend.
"We're not sure how many people
we expect to waik in off the street"
she said.
and Umstead's Hall Council. "Hopefully'
next year there will be more publicity.
Publicity will allow the turnout to be
better
West Campus kept the ball roll-
ing on Tuesday with Greene, Clement
Garret Fletcher and White's Hall Coun-
cils sponsoring "Are you ready for
Almost Downtown on the West Side
Students were permitted to participate
in a street festival held in West Cam-
pus' parking area. Students who took
part in these activities witnessed street
performers, ate some delicious food
and also received magnificent prizes.
College Hill continued the excite-
ment on Wednesday with Belk, Scott
Jones. Tyler and Aycock's Hall Coun-
cils sponsoring "The Royal Ball Ac-
tivities at this event included volleyball
and basketball. Students who attended
also received a vast assortment of food.
"West Campus' event gave a
chance for residents to come together.
This event helped residents meet other
people while having a good time said
Laurie Horwitz, hall council president
for Aycock Hall.
Closing out the week's events is
"Oktober Fest" which is being held
today in Mendenhall and Todd dining
halls. RHA is working together with
the dining halls to give students a little
taste of culture. Oktober Fest is a fes-
tival held in Germany that celebrates
the fall harvest The dining halls are
cooking up German cuisine for stu-
dents to enjoy. Games and activities
will be played in the dining halls dur-
ing dinner dining hours. RHA encour-
ages all students to participate in
Oktober Fest
"Hopefully RHA week will allow
students to open their eyes to RHA
and will allow the students to want to
become more involved in their resi-
dence hall's hall council Moose said.
"The main reason for RHA Week
is to get students to become aware of
the fact that RHA is fun said Susan
Bartlett president of White Hall Coun-
cil. "RHA Week shows students there
is more to RHA than boring, stuffy
meetings. Though there is work in-
volved in RHA, the work is fun
HELP
from page 1
Assorted Varieties
Top Ramen
Soup
3oz.
Jiffy Corn
JP0 Mufrm
MIX 8.5 oz. box
fA
Fresh Baked
Donuts
Ito.r wif1
The collectible card game of savage fury
Shu ill n;m- iVM-p-ai
ESP PLUS in Arlington Village
803A Red Banks Rd. Greenville
(919) 321-3946
"I think it is a most valuable
tool for ECU to intervene into a
student's academic life Joyner
said.
Many students do not realize
the extent to which various aca-
demic resources are offered on cam-
pus. This is another area the work-
shop addresses. Information is
given to students on who they can
contact for help in course work in
various subject departments.
Anyone who is having difficulty
in a subject and would like tutor-
ing is mailed information on where
they can receive free tutoring in any
subject
Through all of these resources,
the Academic Support Center
hopes to help students make the
most of their college careers and
resources offered on ECU's campus.
"The only way to change our
academic success is to use our re-
sources Joyner said.
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i





Ei1lH�ll 111 I IT
Thursday, October 12,1995 The East Carolinian
&r( The East Carolinian
W
r
4
Our View
Get ready!
Get set!
Next week
is
Homecoming.
But will we
be waiting
with bated
breath like
our
predecessors?
1
Break out all the purple and gold: Homecoming starts
next week. The entire week celebrates Pirate pride. Folks
will come from all over to celebrate ECU. Most of the
out-of-towners are people who were where we are now;
ECU students. They symbolize what we aspire to be one
day; ECU graduates.
In years past, Homecoming week was an event that
everyone looked forward to. Alumni traveled far and wide,
from the corners of the country to return to Greenville
to pay tribute to their alma matter. Parents of current
students made sure to save the weekend for the parade
and of course, the big game.
Months of preparation went into every detail of ev-
ery project for the single most important week at ECU.
The few weeks prior to Homecoming were reserved for
ironing out all the little things; not necessarily problems,
but just a little security blanket for the entire school.
Tradition also plays a vital role in Homecoming ac-
tivities. Some traditions have been aborted. One such
change to tradition started last year when, for the first
time, we elected a king and queen instead of just a queen.
A Homecoming concert was also supposed to be new for
'95 activities.
This year the university gave permission to use Will-
iams Arena at Minges Coliseum for a music concert for
Homecoming. Following in the footstep of schools like
Duke University with Cameron Indoor or the Dean Dome
in Chapel Hill, ECU was supposed to kick off a concert
series with a Homecoming band, but there will be no
band.
As far as musical entertainment, we'll have to settle
for whoever happens to be playing downtown next week.
Edwin McCain, who just got off the road with Hootie &
the Blowfish, is playing downtown next week. Maybe
that's the biggest concert we have to look forward to. Of
course we at TEC don't think that if we were already
alumni we'd travel from the far corners of the earth to
see McCain, but it's better than nothing.
As far as an entire event to organize, Homecoming is
no small organizational feat by any means. It's an event
that requires months of preparation, hundreds of hours
of work, but when the event runs smoothly those in-
volved can sit back and enjoy what they've each helped
to create.
Tambra Zlon, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editoi
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erik a Gohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Stephanie Lassiter. Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Ken Clark
Photo Editor
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
W. Jason Allen, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Lani Adkinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since X925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies even, Tuesday and Thursday. The lead edrtonaleach
edition is the opinion of the Editoria. Board. The East Carolinian weicomes letters to the editor, lirmted to 250 words. which
lor decency orbrevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be s.gned Letters sould
ZZZZZS to Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Building, ECU. Greenville, NC 2785M353. For ,nformat,on, cat. (919)
3284366.
Attack of the killer Perotians
Hail to the former chief
Are you like me? Do you miss the
great decade of the '80s, groups like
Frankie Goes to Hollywood, A Flock
�of Seagulls or Men Without Hats?
Movies like the Star Wars trilogy, E. T.
and War Games thrilled Americana,
while quietly disturbing the con-
science as to whether these possibili-
ties could happen to our powerful
nation.
Do you remember V, the great
, mini-series involving the mysterious
� yet suspicious Robert Englund, who
went on to play Freddy Krueger? And
.� how about the day that ABC shocked
the television-viewing world by airing
"The Day After the dramatic por-
trayal of our country's reaction dur-
ing the unfolding of potential nuclear
devastation and the Cold War?
Weren't those wonderful times?
Fashion was definitely at its best ever,
showing off parachute pants, skin
-tight and whole-tom clothes, espe-
-Cjally jeans ripped in the knees, the
-Seats or the crotches. Lear jets and
-Armani suits, diamonds and pearls
and the overall feeling of good hope.
.Right?
t Maybe, if you can relate to the
-tjme period and the man in control of
the United States, it would be easier
to understand why 1 miss '80s. I
couldn't help but read a Newsweek
article a few weeks ago on the failing
-health of our former President Ronald
-Reagan. It was important for me to
-&ad up on his family and their ability
:t� cope with his debilitating disease.
.� understand the effects of
A .iheimer's disease because my
grandfather was diagnosed with it just
a few years ago.
It's sad that the Reagan family
has no control over his actions; how-
ever, one good thing has resulted from
his diagnosis - his family is there for
him.
Eric Bartels
Opinion Columnist
No president
sinceFDR could
inform the
American public
as well as
Reagqn could.
s
:
Before marrying Nancy, Reagan
was married to movie actress Jane
Wyman, famous for her appearances
in "Falcon Crest" Their marriage did
not last long, although they had two
children: Maureen and Michael. In
1952, Reagan married Nancy, and
they also had two kids. Ronald, Jr
who's now a defunct television talk
show host in Seattle, and the ever-
controversial Playboy centerfold and
rebellious daughter Patti Davis, are
the children of that second marriage.
Although the Reagan family was
dysfunctional for a very long time, it
is great that the children can rally
around their father in this time of his
deteriorating health. Although the
memories of Reagan's children grow-
ing up will always remain with Reagan,
it is definitely difficult tor the family
to enjoy the final years of his life.
I miss President Reagan because
he was more than just a president -
he was a leader. 1 distinctly remem-
ber the day that he was shot by John
Hinckley, Jr. I came home from school,
and with my mother and sister in the
kitchen "shush-ing" me, I waited for
the CBS News Special Report. Now I
was only in second grade, but I knew
far too weli what was going on. All of
the different camera angles showing
James Brady and the president get-
ting hit by the bullets made me cringe,
but I knew deep down inside that he
would pull through the ordeal.
As a nation, we weathered a lot of
domestic and foreign enemies head-on
with our fearless leader at the helm.
From the invasion of Grenada to the
summits with Gorbachev, we were
there. The "Great Communicator
made more State of the Union ad-
dresses than our current and previous
presidents combined. We never had any
reason to fear the "Evil Empire" (the
former Soviet Union), nor would we
ever succumb to communism.
The overall feeling of the nation
was positive, and in a world that seems
so whimsical today, those days should
be cherished. Reagan instilled the
sense of American virtues and the
domineering persona of the United
States over other countries in every
aspect of life and sent us the message
that if the country faltered, it was be-
cause we failed the system.
President Reagan brought excep-
tional ideals to his presidency. No presi-
dent since FDR could inform the
American public as well as Reagan
could, nor could any president make
you feel that the United States was
moving into the future by propelling
both its space program and by limit-
ing the number of nuclear arsenals
around the world.
Plenty of Americans related the
red nuclear deployment button with
the tip of Reagan's finger striking its
head, and the United States military
deploying jets to cease terrorism and
potential nuclear assaults. However,
the only fear we had was in ourselves.
It has been seven years, Mr. Presi-
dent, and you are sorrowfully missed.
Hey boys and girls, it's flashback
time again. Let's look back to the
1992 election. There was this move-
ment of these little old first-genera-
tion upperclass newcomers to the
world of politics. They all rallied
around this self-made billionaire. His
message was plain and simple; battle
political partisanship that has been a
part of our government since the be-
ginning.
Well, many of us, including my-
self, quite simply wrote him off. It
seemed quite apparent at the time that
he would in fact go the way of all in-
dependent party representatives and
old soldiers by simply fading away.
Not so, he still has an enormous
amount of support These people that
we dismissed as over-driven moderates
are back, and there are a lot of them.
It's really not too hard to believe
when you look at the facts. Take into
consideration that in a recent CNN
Today poll many people expressed in-
terest in the idea of a new third party.
Okay, maybe this poll hit a lot of
people who don't vote. Anyway, we
can't stray away from the most alarm-
ing fact of all; an honest 20 to 30 per-
cent of the electorate has formed a
radical middle that quite simply is
unhappy with politics as they have
come to be practiced.
This radical middle is made up
of a group of people that don't really
like the way either of the two parties
are running things. This middle is no
longer just the older, first-generation
upper-class that I described above.
They have filtered down into the main-
stream by climbing down the socio-
economic ladder. They now include
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
These people are
patriotic and are
willing to
sacrifice their
own personal
interests.
the working class as well, an invalu-
able (dare we say the most important)
realm of support for any group that
wants to be legitimately recognized.
At the center of their Christmas
list are congressional term limits, fis-
cal responsibility and pork barrel poli-
tics. They are well-informed, and are
more concerned with the issues than
the leaders themselves. That's where
things get crazy. These people are
patriotic and are willing to sacrifice
their own personal interests for the
good of the nation. "How patriotic
you ask? One supporter stated that
you could put him in a room all by
himself, play the Star Spangled Ban-
ner 100 times consecutively, and he
would still not tire of it
I'll admit that aside trom my
birthday the Fourth of July is my fa-
vorite holiday, but that's definitely
out of my league. That kind of pas-
sion is the exact reason why this
bunch of self congratulating and prais-
ing group is a force to be reckoned
with and courted during the 1996
presidential election.
The Republicans are starting in
the outside lane with them already.
They have lost support by allowing
that they are conducting business as
usual. They aren't going after the lob-
byists that control spending and in-
fluence regulation. They loved the
Contract with America when it began,
but hate the amount of steam it has
lost in recent months. Republicans
also don't support the line-item veto,
the salsa that the Perotians always
make a point of serving with their
chips.
The Democrats stand to gain the
most from this movement for the time
being. The simple fact is that histori-
cally groups bent on change have al-
ways sided with them.
The fact that Ross Perot is look-
ing to get his own independent spot i
on the '96 ballots is not going to mat- ��
ter much. No serious candidate is in
any way, shape or form going to run
on his ticket. The money they stand
to get is phenomenal, but it's not
enough to hide the perception that
they will still be a puppet for Perot
To sum things up, we are talk-
ing about the single largest swing
vote party since the remnants of the
Bull Moose Party went the way of
the Dodo after losing Teddy
Roosevelt. Any party that can pull J
tnis group s support stands to be
making the State of the Union Ad-
dress in 1997.1 still think Perot is a
little nuts, but give the guy credit.
He said "I'll be back and he brought
20 to 30 percent of the electorate to
cheer him on while he plays in
Washington's back yard.
JST Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Discrimination in this country
has gone too far! The type of discrimi-
nation that I am referring to is reverse
discrimination. I am tired of my race
being trampled upon because of
crimes that my ancestors committed
200 years ago. I cannot change what
happened, nor do I believe that I
should have to pay for their wrong
doings.
It all began with the "affirmative
action" policy, a policy practiced by
this university. Any policy that gives
certain privileges to one group over
another because of their skin color is
wrong.
The O.J. Simpson trial was the
icing on the cake. If a white man had
killed two black people and been
found innocent the Los Angeles riots
would have happened all over again,
and with good reason.
The Rev. martin Lufher King, Jr.
wanted all people to be treated equally
regardless of their race so by God, let's
start listening!
Jason E. Hicks
Sophomore
Communications
"I find television very educating.
Everytime somebody turns on the
set I go into the other room and
read a book
� Groucho Marx, comedian
-r





Thursday, October 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
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�,��-��
Thursday, Octoher 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
Pirates return home
for purple festivities
The Wonders of Nature
� mmm
$?Mm

Jennifer Coleman
Senor Writer
It's that time of year again.
That's right - it's Fall. For many
ECU students, Fall is their favorite
season. Why? There are many reasons.
Fall is the season of shorter daylight,
colder winds, colorful leaves and, most
importantly, Homecoming! This year,
Homecoming festivities should be
better than ever.
Homecoming is more than just
an excuse to party. It's also a time to
support the Pirates as they continue
� miiia
Mll�.� III US
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, October 12
Faculty Jazz Band
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
Drivin' and Cryin'
at the Attic
Moon Boot Lover
at Peasant's Cafe
Biscuit
at Wrong Way Corrigan's
(wacked-out noisefunk)
Cravin' Melon with Bus Stop
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Movie: Jury Duty
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, October 13
Veldt and Breed 13
at the Attic
The Pondering
at Peasant's Cafe
Jupiter Coyote
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Buju Banton
at the Boathouse
in Norfolk, VA
in their so-far outstanding football
season. By attending Homecoming
events, however, students are doing
more than simply supporting the foot-
ball team. According to Tameika Mills,
Homecoming Committee representa-
tive, they are also supporting the en-
tire school.
"We're trying to get people to be
more supportive of their school with
their floats and banners and with the
voting for their Homecoming King
and Queen Mills said.
The Homecoming Committee has
planned lots of activities for this year's
celebration. Already campus organi-
zations have been working on their
entries in the spirit banner contest
and Homecoming Parade. Organiza-
tions who participated in these con-
tests are eligible for cash prizes, as
well as recognition for having an abun-
dance of Pirate Pride.
The Homecoming Committee will
sponsor Sports Night on Tuesday, OcL
17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Plaza Mall.
During this time, ECU students and
staff as well as the community can
meet their favorite ECU athletes and
get their autographs. Members of all
ECU athletics will be in attendance,
including the football, basketball, ten-
nis and track teams.
Movie: Jury Duty
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, October 14
Cold Gin
at the Attic
(Kiss Tribute)
� �
Drummie Zeb and the Razor Posse
at Peasant's Cafe
Big Head Todd and the Monsters
at the Boathouse
in Norfolk, VA

Movie: Jury Duty
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Sunday, October IS
Leftover Salmon
at the Attic
-
Billy Joe Shaver Band
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Piratefest, the ECU Homecoming
Pep Rally, will be held on Friday, OcL
20 at 6 p.m. on the mall. Pirate fans
can use this time to meet the Home-
coming candidates, see the banner
contest winners and support the foot-
ball team. Floats for the Homecom-
ing Parade will be judged at this time.
The ECU Marching Band and the ECU
Cheerleaders will be in attendance to
show their school spirit as well.
Students vote for their choice of
Homecoming King and Queen yester-
day, and the results of that voting will
be announced at the Homecoming
Game on Saturday, OcL 21. The game,
which starts at 2 p.m will be against
Temple University.
In addition to the game, the
Homecoming Parade is also planned
for Saturday. It will begin at 9:45 a.m.
at the Elm Street Gym and will travel
down Fifth Street past Chancellor
Eakin's house to finish at the Willis
Center.
The Homecoming Committee is
hoping there will be more students in
attendance at this year's functions
than ever. These activities are free to
students and are always a lot of fun
for those who attend. So come on out
and show your support for the Pirates
at Homecoming '95.
'2�
-I
-I
Photo by Ken Clark
This class stares intently at a slow-running stream on College Hill. Are they mesmerized
by the beauty of nature or merely lulled into a semi-catatonic state? You decide!
7f 3e
sitcoms
struggle, but shine
Bowie, NIN mesh
at Walnut Creek
Every paper has a TV critic, but
our critic is no normal couch potato,
no mere TV junkie. No, our man wil
watch anything, anytime, regardless
of quality or good taste. Truly, he has
no shame, and that is why we call
him "The TV Whore
Kevin Chaisson
Staff Writer
It has been said that imitation is
the sincerest form of flattery. I, how-
ever, disagree. The more something is
copied, the more certain imperfections
make themselves known. Xerox a photo
sometime and you'll see what I mean.
That's the way I feel about NBC's new
additions to its Thursday night line-up,
"The Single Guy" and "Caroline in the
Photo courtesy of Walnut Creek
David Bowie, rock's ever-changing chame-
leon of style, played Hardee's Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre in Raleigh last Saturday with
Nine Inch Nails.
Dale Williamson
Staff Writer
So I had this ticket to see Nine
Inch Nails and David Bowie at Wal-
nut Creek. I'd been bouncing around
three states by car for the better part
of two weeks and was completely ex-
hausted, but I had to travel on to Ra-
leigh anyway. 1 had to stay true to all
that is Rock-n-Roll.
Unfortunately, I arrived at Wal-
nut Creek too late to catch the open-
ing act, so I can't say anything about
them. As I sat in a seat that was not
made for my ass, I wondered why 1
was bothering at all. I just didn't want
to be anywhere but in bed.
Suddenly, the stadium lights
went out and Nine Inch Nails came
on. Dressed all in black and headed
by the angst-ridden Trent Reznor, NIN
pumped blood into my lethargic sys-
tem and I was quickly e ergized.
Reznor's angered voice and his seduc-
tive, sexual stage presence kept the
entire stadium on its feet. Backing
Reznor's angry young man personae,
NIN's heavy guitar
and thundering
drums sent a vibe
through me that City
made bouncing my
head up and down
just seem natural.
The first half
of NIN's set carried
the visual sense of
a minimalist artist.
Going against the
multi-million dollar
light show that a
Bon Jovi concert Mark Brett
would carry, each Lifestyle Editor
band member had �����������
his own set of white
lighting instru-
ments hanging di-
rectly overhead,
with no front light-
ing. This forced
shadows on the
band's face that
prevented the audi-
ence from clearly
seeing the demons
that were singing
such dark songs as
"Pinion" and the
seductive "Closer
where Reznor
boasts that he
wants "to fuck you like an animal
Indeed, the combination of the music
and the lighting had created one level
of hell on stage.
Halfway through the set, this
bare bones act transformed into a
multi-colored kaleidoscope as lights
from all angles flooded the stage. But
this did not detract from the music,
which maintained its throbbing edge.
In some bizarre way, the rainbowed
lights actually complemented NIN's
industrial nightmare.
Suddenly, the back area of the
stage was filled with a huge screen
projection that presented the audi-
ence with visuals of bees and sperm-
shaped images. While this occupied
the crowd, the music mellowed down
to a Pink Floyd-inspired rhythm. I
believed NIN to be gone.
A spotlight shot to the center of
the stage and the audience screamed
in exhilaration as David Bowie
emerged from the darkness like a
Christ figure to rescue us from the
hell NIN conjured. Bowie's deep voice
See NIN page 7
Every other reviewer on earth has
brought up the obvious comparisons to
that other NBC juggernaut "Friends
And truth be told, it's a pretty easy thing
to do. Keeping that in mind, let's look
at other, less-obvious things like plot,
character interaction, style and whether
either show is really funny.
"The Single Guy" (NBC Thursdays
at 8:30) features stage and screen actor
Jonathan Silverman as Johnny, a writer
in New York looking for his "big break
All of Jonathan's circle of friends are
married, and they would like to drag
him down the aisle with them. They
include couple one, Trudy (Jessica
Hecht) and Matt (Mark Moses), and
couple two, Sam (Joey Slotnick) and
Trudy (Ming-Na Wen).
"Guy" does feature some talented
and charming players. Silverman is
great, playing Johnny with a nice bit of
sarcasm to tain. as character's nice-guy
image. The other players are good too,
even though Slotnick and Vfen come
off at times as being a bit unbearable (a
surprise coming from Wen, who was so
good on "ER"). Also featured is Ernest
Borgnine as Manny the doorman. That's
right, Borgnine, last gracing us with his
presence on "McHale's Navy" some 30
years ago, is back. And honestly, he's
great! Who knew?
So with a talented cast, what is the
problem with "The Single Guy?" The
plots so far have just been dull, dull,
dull. And contrived. I mean, in three epi-
sodes, the basic plot has been "Johnny
is set up withmeets the girl of his
dreams, but his own overpowering neu-
roses ruin the relationship Listen folks,
I understand that this is the same plot
See WHORE page 8
Klingons arrive in deep space
Star Trek's black
sheep series gets
an alien facelift
"Deep Space Nine" has always
been the black sheep of the Star Trek
family.
Considering that its acting and
writing runs easy rings around the
rest of the Trek shows, I've never
been able to figure out why. The
show's detractors cite its dark, brood-
ing atmosphere as a problem, and
complain that it's too cerebral. They
also don't like the political intrigue
that "DS9" revolves around.
No, Trek fandom at large is ap-
parently only interested in spatial
anomalies and phaser fire. They want
action, and in
the world of
Star Trek, ac-
tion means
Klingons.
So the pro-
ducers decided
it was time to
add some
Klingons to the
"DS9" mix. By
bringing in fan-
favorite
Klingon charac-
ter Worf, they
hoped to cap-
ture the "Next
Generation" fans. By making the
Klingons bad guys again, they hoped
to interest fans of the original series.
The only people they didn't seem con-
cerned about pleasing were "DS9's"
loyal fans, who were less than thrilled
with the coming changes.
It looks like eveo one got a sur-
prise.
Last weekend's "Deep Space
Nine" season premiere was a block-
buster, one of the best Trek episodes
I've ever seen (and I've seen them
all). This one had something for ev-
See KLINGON page 8
CD. Reviews
Jay Myers
Staff Writer
Thee Shatners
Full Length Album
A current music magazine named
this album "Weirdo Record of the
Month and it deserves every bit of
that title. What Thee Shatners have
done is combine Star Trek themes
with surf instrumental to make one
of the most "warped" concept albums
ever heard. Available from Planet
Pimp Records on CD and vinyl LP,
Full Length Album is one of the
strangest, hippest, goofiest records
I've come across.
With songs like "Green Blooded
Love "Beam Big Daddy, Beam
"Klingon Boarding Party and the
ingeniously titled "Kirock (I Am) you
know this has got to be good. How-
ever, only a few of the tracks ("Stron-
ger Than Kirk" and "Damn Your
Fucking World) have any lyrics, so
mostly the record consists of your
basic surf instrumental.
But that's not so bad, because
Thee Shatners have spliced in dia-
logue bits from what sounds like an
old Star Trek Storybook & Record set
("I know Scotty, how do you fight a
microscopic joke?"), along with sound
effects from the original show (red
alert, phaser fire, warp speed, etc.),
to punch up the laugh factor in the
record. Boy, does it work!
The majoi drawback is the
record's length. Althoun there are
12 tracks on the album, it clocks in
at less than 20 minutes because the
instru mentals are so short. Of course,
this doesn't include the bonus 13th
"Mystery Track which is almost as
long as the other tracks combined. I
won't give away what this track is. but
it's worth the price of the record by
See TREK page 8
�������





The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 12, 1995
Get a grip on your health nggH
Heather Zophy
ECU Student Health
The ECU Student Health Service
(SHS) is in full swing so far this se-
mester. There have been some changes,
some continued services and processes
and some traditional data that goes
along with day-to-day operation.
As far as some of the changes at
the health center are concerned, some
of the costs have changed in the phar-
macy and in other areas (lab and X-
ray). Not to alarm anyone though, this
is still by far the least expensive health
care a student can receive. I mean,
where else can you get a prescription
for penicillin that costs less than $4?
Anyway, with the absence of a fee in-
crease, the changing economy and the
changing costs in paperwork (state
contracts), there are some slight dif-
a
ferences in costs at SHS from last year.
On to the next topic: continued
services and processes. The Student
Health Center is still operating on an
appointment system from 8-5 dur-
ing weekdays (like a doctor's
office), and urgent care fy
hours from 9-12 on the �,
weekend. 5
SHS is also cori-
tinuing a patient satis-
faction survey we insti-
tuted in the spring of
1995. If you are treated in the
health center, you may receive a
phone call later asking about your re-
cent visit The caller knows nothing
about the reason for your visit (except
for the date and doctor you saw), and
asks only generic questions about your
satisfaction with Student Health. Con-
fidentiality is always assured with the
Student Health Service.
Another continued service is the
Student Health Advisory Committee
(SHAC). This committee is composed
of students, faculty and staff (mostly
students) and serves as the liaison
between students and the Stu-
jr dent Health Center. Anyone
who is interested can call
Heather Zophy (328-
W 6794).
Now for the data that
is used tor day-to-day opera-
tion: immunizations are a big
J " concern. Many students did not
complete the requirements prior to
beginning classes and have now received
a letter stating that if they weren't prop-
erly immunized they would be with-
drawn from school. The 30-day grace
period for receipt of a satisfactory re-
port of medical history, including the
required immunization is over. Please
contact Suzanne Tumage at 32&6841
if you have any questions regarding your
required immunizations. Remember, TB
skin tests can be performed at the Stu-
dent Health Center for $5 every year,
not just when you are first enrolled.
Aside from some minor changes,
SHS is still operating in the same ca-
pacity as a doctor's office. Remember,
the Student Health Center is here for
you, the students. For more information,
just call.
This Week's Topic: Which Came
First?
1. Betamax was developed in
1975, two years before VHS was un-
leashed.
2. Space Invaders encroached on
us in 1976, one full year before we
reached out with the space shuttle.
3. Heathcliff debuted in 1973,
beating out the tardy Garfield, who
didn't show up until 1978.
4. The Moral Majority was
founded in 1979. six years after the
first rabies vaccine was developed.
5. Compact disc technology came
about in 1970, nine full years before
we even had a simple Walkman.
The heck with Spring Break,
Thanksgiving in New York City is
where it's at Partying with
Lettennan, checking out the Un-
derdog balloon at the Macy's Pa-
rade, Broadway, Greenwich Village
are all waiting courtesy of the ECU
Student Union. The Union is spon-
soring a four-day trip to the Big
Apple over the Thanksgiving holi-
day at prices students can afford.
Travelers will depart from
Mendenhall on Tuesday, Nov. 21
and will return on Sunday, Nov. 26.
To pick up a reservation appli-
cation and get information on
prices come by the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall.
SILVER
CjfeenucUc's only WO mM Mmm mmm mmm �
dxetlc fliqhlclub , J 9JbuC-(l (� OPw.ft
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam ffmk
CASH PRIZE
'Contestant need to call &. register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$ Dancers Wanted $
-INI .IN from page 6
eased into the soothing musical
rhythm that continued on unrelent-
ingly. The audience was hypnotized.
A slam on the drum and the flar-
ing of the lights revealed that NIN had
not left the stage. Bowie had joined
in with the demons. Bowie and Reznor
played off each other marvelously.
with Bowie even singing one NIN
(
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal
Showers, Corporate Parties, & Divorces
ECU STUDENTS SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30p.m. Stage Time 9:00 p.m.
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Are.
r (Behind John's Convenient Marl) �a
, vaiid.N.c ygyjgafogjbrz
ECU
MiDuuuld
r
� ABO&riOW

E&fiC�&
song. Oddly enough, the combination
worked.
Then NIN waved good-bye and
left. Bowie was solo now, with his own
band backing him. I admire Bowie and
fully acknowledge him as one of the
greats. But I' can't get into his stuff
once we cross from the '70s into the
'80s. I know his new concept album
Outside: The Nathan Adler Diaries
is a '90s attempt to return to form,
but (with a few exceptions) I feel like
he has said all he has to say.
Overall, Bowie's stage presence
was worthy of his classic status, but
something was lacking in his music.
Some of his new songs, such as 'The
Heart's Filthy Lesson do illustrate
the intensity of Bowie's earlier efforts.
However, this intensity quickly dies
out in other songs.
I applaud Bowie for not doing a
greatest hits show. He owes it to him-
self and his fans to experiment and
try new things. But I got the impres-
sion that he teamed up with NIN in
an attempt to win a different audience.
Therein lies the problem. The au-
dience was divided, and I am solid
proof of this. Not all NIN fans are
Abortions LjifdOTrVeeks
General Anesffiesia'
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Foclory Returns
Bowie fans, and vice versa. Bowie did
play a few older songs, such as "Un-
der Pressure" and "The Man Who
Sold the World which seemed to
appeal to most of the crowd. Unfortu-
nately, people were still leaving dur-
ing Bowie's set
But those who came to see Bowie
stayed; and from what I could tell, they
were pleased. Bowie centered his set
on his new album, so those unfamiliar
with it were lost Still, watching this
man bounce around on the stage in
his baggy outfit was a pleasure.
Overall, the Nine Inch NailsDavid
Bowie concert was a success. I'm still
not sure what the combination of these
two talents was supposed to mean, if
anything. However, I can say that my
tired, aching, biased self was happy to
have been part of the experiment.
9th & Washington75S-76Q9
COMIC BOOK
SHOW
SUNDAY OCT. 15
Ramada Inn
9am - 5pm
FREE ADMISSION
For more information call
The Nostalgia Newsstand
919 Dickinson Ave � 785-6909
Ramada Inn
203 W. Greenville Blvd.
Please inquire about catering.
"Experience the Excitement"
of ECU away games and other
sporting events on our TVs
Turnbury Square Shopping Center
(Bells Fork Area of Greenville)
355-7956
Open daily 11:30 am - 11:00 pm
Fri & Sat til 1:00 am
Sunday Brunch
11:30 - 2:00 pm
Featuring grilled entrees and
sandwiches
Also salads, appetizers and
freshly created soups
� Quaint, relaxed atmosphere
� Full service bar
It's What's
Between The Ears
That Counts
Where do you go to gain "real world"
experience in a college-level program?
Use your head.
Think Disney!
Representatives will be on campus to answer all your questions
about the WALT DISNEY WORLD College Program.
It's another WZMB ticket window week! When you hear us open
the ticket window be the third caller at 328-6913 and you're going to
see Big Head Todd & the Monsters at The Boathouse in Norfolk this
Saturday, October 14th!
For all you lucky listeners who registered to win the portable RCA
personal CD player, the time has come! We will draw a name at 8 PM
tonight on the Roots Rock show. That person will have 91 minutes and
3 seconds to call 328-6913 and claim the prize
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
W' 6W&
World Co.
� The Wall D.sney Company
Interviewing: All majors for positions throughout theme parks and resorts. Positions include attractions, food
& beverage, merchandise, lifeguarding, among many others
Presentation Date: October 18, 1995
Time: 7:30pm Location: 130 Rawl Building
For more information, contact: Cooperative Education, (919)328-6979
An Equal Opportunity Employer Drawing Creativity from Diversity
360 Degrees of Pride
MISS ECU NUBIAN QUEEN PAGEANT
OCTOBER 18,1995
HENDRIX THEATER AT 6:00PM
$2 ADVANCED
$3 AT THE DOOR
SPONSORED BY THE MINORITY
ORGANIZATIONS OF ECU
. � �





8
Thursday, October 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
KLINGON
from page 6
erybody: plenty of Worf and loads
of villainous Klingons, all wrapped
up in the brooding politics "DS'
fans love.
In fact, the whole reason for the
Klingons' presence is steeped in the
established politics of the show. Let
me try to explain. An alien empire
called the Dominion (from the other
side of the wormhole that serves as
a central plot element for "DS9") is
threatening the balance of power in
Trek space. Various battles have
been fought with Dominion forces,
including the Changelings, the race
of shape-shifters who rule the en-
emy.
Last season, the Dominion
crippled chief "DS9" baddies the
Cardassians (think Nazis) by pulling
that empire's intelligence arm. the
Obsidian Order (think CIA), into a
devastating ambush. The paranoid
Klingons claim to be infiltrating the
space surrounding the wormhole to
help protect their allies from the Do-
minion threat. But their real goal is
the conquest of the nearby
WHORE from page 6
"Seinfeld" uses week after week, but on
that show it's a subplot You have other
stuff going on with the other charac-
ters, and the subplots intertwine hys-
terically.
For "Guy this situation is the
whoie plot The only really interesting
thing has been to see who will turn up
as Silverman's woman-of-the-episode
(Olivia D'abo in the first. Heather
Langenkamp of the Freddy movies in
the third). For this show to survive, it
has to begin to make use of its unique
qualities, building up the relationships
between these married people and their
single friend. The creators of "Guy"
shouldn't have to rely on stunt casting
to promote interest in the show.
Comparing "Caroline in the City"
to "Friends" is really pushing the bound-
aries for me, even though it has been
done by some reviewers. "Caroline" fea-
tures film star Lea Thompson as the
perpetually-perky Caroline, a New York
cartoonist whose syndicated strip (called
"Caroline in the City" - go figure) has
the dishonor of being confused with that
comic harbinger of doom, "Cathy Ugh.
Caroline has just broken up with
her childish doofus boyfriend Del (Eric
Lutes), who is also her boss at a greet-
ing card company that promotes
"Caroline" cards. Enter Richard
(Malcolm Gets), the cranky colorist that
Caroline hires to help with strip pro-
duction, and you get an interesting love
triangle of sorts.
As with "Guy the actors and their
characters are all wonderful. Thompson
is great and I'm not just saying that
because I loved "Some Kind of Won-
derful Lutes hasn't quite hit a good
stride, but he is enjoyable. The real find
here is Gets' Richard, who plays like the
evil twin of Fraiser's brother Niles. Gets
is hysterical and ruthless, puncturing
Thompson's shiny, happy balloon when-
ever given the chance. However. Gets
still manages to show us deep feelings
for Caroline through his sardonic mask.
Talented actors aside, the plots on
"Caroline" aren't exactly original, either.
They are okay, but they rely too much
on the style and presence of the show's
lead actors to float them. So far, I can
see the on-again, off-again relationship
with Del coming from miles away. Same
with Richard's unrequited love. Still,
"Caroline" is better than "Guy enter-
taining and appealing to both women
(they can empathize! and men (hubba-
hubba).
What "Caroline" and "Guy" need
to do is take their interesting premises,
ignore all of the unfair comparisons to
other shows in the NBC hierarchy, and
come up with scripts that work for their
own particular idioms. I fear that they
will instead attempt to bottle the suc-
cess of "Friends" and think that they
can duplicate it on their shows. If that
is the case, see the Xerox comment ear-
lier.
On a scale of one to 10, "The Single
Guy" gets a six, "Caroline in the City"
an eight
ou Miss Mom's Homecooking?
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Cardassian empire, which has been
plunged into civil war by the de-
struction of the Obsidian Order.
On top of all this, the threat of
Changeling infiltration looms over
every scene. The alien shape-shifters
have already wormed their way into
the Federation, and anyone involved
in the story could have been re-
placed. In fact, the Klingons accuse
the Cardassians or being Changeling
pawns. The fact that the Klingons
could just as easily be the victims
of Changeling manipulation only
i rV-fc. IV from page 6
itself, even though it has nothing to
do with Star Trek or surf music. You
have to hear it to believe it.
With the resurgence of interest
iii surf instrumentals that the Pulp
Fiction soundtrack began, there's
hope that Thee Shatners will be able
to continue producing their bizarre
musical vision. They shouldn't be rel-
egated to a one album joke. Even
though the music they play is aver-
age as far as surf instrumentals go.
the concept is brilliant.
It's better in the long run to sup-
port a unique independent band like
this than to throw money away on big
label copycats. Diversity breeds cre-
ativity, and without diversity we'd all
be listening to Hootie and the Blow-
fish.
EAST
CAROLINA
COIN &
PAWN
INSTANT CASH LOANS- WE
BUY GOLD & SILVER
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Hours
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Corner of 10th & Dickinson
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heightens the tension.
Enter Worf. Assigned to Deep
Space Nine to help Captain Sisko
with Klingon Federation relations,
Worf is put in a tough position. In
good "DS9" tradition, he is forced
to make a hard decision: remain
loyal to Starflet, or join his war-
rior people in the conquest they
were born for.
And that's the Reader's Digest
version. There are subtle nuances of
racialcultural tension and charac-
ter history involved here that would
take days to explain. A seemingly in-
consequential bar scene between
Quark and Cardassian tailorspy
Garak speaks volumes to "DS9"
fans, but may seem to be just a funny
aside bv new viewers.
But that's the beauty of "Deep
Space Nine The ever-evolving po-
litical social situations add a depth
that Lhe other Trek shows simply
lack. The other series may have
more action, but "DS9" is a differ-
ent kind of show. Action's okay, but
action backed up by layer after layer
of plot is loads better.
That's why the season premiere
is the ideal "DS9" episode. Plot ele-
ments that have been brewing for
years come together and form new
situations. Characters are put
through the ringer, making tough
personal decisions that have real
consequences. Paranoia and in-
trigue build and build and build
until they explode into action.
I can only hope that all of
"DS9's" detractors are sufficiently
impressed. They'd better be: this is
the best Trek show since the classic
"Best of Both Worlds" episode (in
which Captain Picard is assimilated
by the Borg). I also hope they real-
ize that the things that made this
episode so good were already
present on "DS9 The arrival of the
Klingons only brought the show's
quality to their attention.
On a scale of one to 10, the sea-
son premiere of "Deep Space Nine"
rates a very satisfying 10.
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$1.00 Membership
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Thursday 19th
Edwin McCain
$1.50 HiBalis
$1.50 Bottle Beer
$1.00 Membership
No Adv.
Tix.
special guest From Good Jr&oines
Fri:
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Sat:
Captain Cook &
the Coconuts
Jimm
Buffet
Chairmen of
the Board
"V





Thursday, October 1 1995 The East Carolinian
Coaches ready for action
Z
pL .fr C
Pirate football mid-term report card
Craig Perrott
Staff Writer
Pratice begins
Sunday for
basketball squads
Brian Paiz
Senior Writer
The date OcL 15 has been in Joe
Dooley's and Ann Donovan's minds
since last spring, when they were hired
to take over their respective programs.
That date marks the official start of
the college basketball season, and
these two first-year head coaches are
ready to finally get down to business
on Sunday.
Dooley, who is the youngest head
coach in Division I men's basketball,
will have to replace three starters off
last year's squad. Dooley will be try-
ing to lead the Pirates to their third
straight winning campaign. Anton Gill
and Chuckie Robinson, the bulk of last
year's Pirate scoring have graduated,
and shooting guard Skipp
Schaefbauer transferred to Illinois SL
The Pirate offense will be led by
sophomore point guard Tony Parham
who averaged 9.1 poits and 2.7 re-
bounds last season and was also
named to the All-CAA rookie squad.
Tim Basham is the Pirates' leading
returning scorer. The junior from
Roanoke, Va. averaged 10.6 points last
year and was also 61 of 106 from three
point land.
A player Dooley hopes that can
fill the void at the center position is
Florida SL transfer Jonathan Kerner.
The 6-foot-ll Kerner is very mobile
for a big man. Veterans Vic Hamilton
and Chuck Jones will be vying for the
other forward spot. In the off-season
Dooley went the junior college route
in recruiting. He signed forwards
Morris Grooms, Chris Tiger and guard
Deron Rippey. Grooms is a 6-7 forward
from Pompano Beach, Fla. and should
Players to watch
Danielle Charlesworth
Tim Basham
contribute early. Rippey, sophomore
Othello Meadows and red-shirt fresh-
man Lawrence Thomas will be battling
it out at the shooting guard position.
Top reserves for the Pirates include
forward Von Bryant, center Don Dou-
glas and guard Damon Van
Weerdhuizen.
Coach Anne Donovan's Lady Pi-
rates return all five starters from last
year's 8-19 squad. This year's team
should be an exciting one as Donovan
brings her style of basketball to ECU
that made her a member of the Na-
tional Basketball Hall of Fame.
Donovan hired a completely new staff
which includes Ginny Doyle, the
NCAA record holder for free throws,
Charisse Mapp, a former UNC Tarheel
star and Gaynor O'Donnell an ECU
graduate who had an impressive ca-
reer as a Lady Pirate.
Tomekia "Fruiky" Blackmon is
the Lady Pirates top returnee. She
averaged 16.1 points a game as a jun-
ior last season. Danielle
Charlesworth, a 5-foot-3 senior, will
once again anchor the offense. The
Raleigh, NC native averaged 10.5
points per game and also led the
team in assists.
Tracey Kelley should also make
a big contribution. The 6-foot junior
will help the Lady Pirates in rebound-
ing. A big pickup in recruiting for
Donovan's squad is 5-9 guard Laurie
Ashenfelder. The Danville. Pa. native
had an impressive junior college ca-
reer. She should help at the shoot-
ing guard. Other key players for the
Lady Pirates this season will include
junior forward Shay Hayes and
guards Justine Allpress and Belinda
Cagle.
The Lady Pirates open up their
home regular season schedule on
Dec. 2 as they host the Lady
Wolfpack of N.C. State at Williams
Arena, while the men open up their
home season against Elon, Nov. 25.
It's open week for ECU, and the
break in the action couldn't come
at a better time for the Pirates.
ECU did the impossible in Sep-
tember, winning three out of five
games when most media outlets
only had the Pirates winning one
of those games in their pre-season
predictions.
The Pirates were blessed to
come out of that first month of play
virtually unscathed, but injuries are
now starting to plague the team. Of-
fensive tackles Charles Boothe and
Ronnie Suddith have nagging ankle
injuries stemming from the Syra-
cuse victory, and now fullback Jerris
McPhail has suffered a sprained
wrist at the hands of Cincinnati this
past weekend. McPhail was also ren-
dered unconscious in the contest,
and noseguard Travis Darden
sprained his ankle against the
Bearcats. With the open date on the
schedule, the Pirates have two
weeks to heal their wounds.
Perhaps coincidentally, the only
injuries suffered by the Pirates have
been on Astroturf fields. The con-
troversial playing surface has usu-
ally been favorable to ECU'S offen-
sive attack, but has now become a
hindrance.
Also, the loss this past week-
end to Cincinnati will be a bitter
taste in the mouths of the players
and coaches for the next two weeks,
who now must channel their ener-
gies toward preparation for Temple.
The Owls will visit Greenville for
Homecoming on OcL 21.
With six games under their belt,
and five remaining including three
home games, here's a look at how the
Pirates are faring so far this season.
OFFENSE: B-
The Pirate offensive unit has
struggled in the past three games.
ECU was shut out by Illinois, only
scored three points in the second half
against West Virginia and couldn't get
the job done against Cincinnati.
The offense shined, however, in
the second half versus Syracuse and
the first quarter against West Virginia.
The Pirates came back from 21 points
behind to defeat the Orangemen at
the Carrier Dome and jumped on the
Mountaineers early, creating a point
margin that they could not overcome.
These two brilliant offensive show-
cases display the team's potential. The
bottom line is wins, and you can't win
without points.
DEFENSE: A
The defense has definitely
outplayed their offensive counterparts
this season. ECU has previously been
known for its productive offense, but
that trend has swung the other way
this year, as the defense has kept us
in every game we have played this
season. The squad cannot be given
enough credit for their performance,
holding Illinois to seven points and
Cincinnati to 13 in losing efforts. The
27-7 loss to Tennessee was not indica-
tive of how close the game was.
The Phate "D" held overrated quar-
terback Peyton Manning in check for
the majority of the game. The only
breakdowns this season have occurred
in situations when the defense was on
the field for most of the game, due to
turnovers and stalls by the offense.
SPECIAL TEAMS: B
Chid Holcomb kicked the
game winning field goal against
West Virginia, but missed an extra
point in the same game. Holcomb
booted his best kick of the season
last weekend, a 42-yarder, against
Cincinnati. Matt Levine is punting
well, and credit should be given to
the blocking on the special teams,
without which the kicks would not
be gotten off.
Jason Nichols has assumed
the punt return role for the Pirates
this year. II took a couple of games
for Nichols to settle into the posi-
tion, letting a couple of returnable
punts go, but he is now playing in
outstanding fashion. The special
teams coverage of punts and kick-
off returns has been mediocre this
year.
OVERALL GRADE: B
The Pirates have been up and
down all season, and it's hard to
tell which team is going to show
up on Saturday. The team is moti-
vated to accomplish their "unfin-
ished business" of returning to the
Liberty Bowl and winning it, but
should not be content to just beat
enough Division-1 teams to return
to Memphis. The talent is there to
go above and beyond their imme-
diate goals.
Due to the loss Saturday at Cin-
cinnati, a showdown with Southern
Mississippi is likely to determine the
Liberty Bowl Alliance Champion.
The Pirates have performed well in
general, but need to take their play
to another level to be considered
for post-season play.
Lacrosse pulls
Chris Mitchell
Staff Writer
Recently, the ECU men's lacrosse
club traveled to Wake Forest for their
first game against the Demon Dea-
cons. With games against Appalachian
SL and N.C. State under their belt,
Wake Forest entered the game with a
record of two wins and no losses.
During last season N.C. State pulled
a last second upset victory over the
Pirates. This led to a belief that Wake
would have an easy victory over East
Carolina. The Pirates, however, had
something else in mind.
The game began with ECU look-
ing a little rusty and Wake control-
ling the momentum of the game. It
was in the first quarter that tragedy
struck, when defensive-man Greg
Daisey suffered a separated shoulder
while attempting to retrieve a ground
ball. Daisey suffered a third degree dis-
location of his right shoulder, tearing
ligaments and tendons. Due to the
extent of his injuries, Daisey is not
expected to play for the rest of the
year and will probably require surgery.
At the end of the first quarter,
the score was 5-1 in favor of the Dea-
cons. In between quarters the team
seemed frustrated, not because they
were losing but because they were not
playing to their potential. East Caro-
lina knew what they needed to do.
Captains Steve Padgett and Brandon
McLaughlin shouted orders to take
control of
ground balls and
for the offense
to step up and
give the defense
a break.
In the sec-
ond quarter
ECU seemed to
come together.
They started to
not only take
control of
SCORING RECORD
end of 1st quarter
end of half
end of game
ECU defense only allowed one goal in
the second half.
East Carolina then simply took
control in the second half. The mid-
field brought their level of play up a
notch, and the defense gave Wake al-
most no scoring
opportunities. On
the offensive side
of the field, the
Pirates also took
control. East Caro-
lina moved the
ball well and set
up plays that al-
lowed the Pirates
to outscore Wake
Forest four to one
in the second half.
WFU5
ECU1
WFU5
ECU 3
WFU6
ECU 7
Photo by KEN CLARK
Senior Kristi Tomasetti attempts to go after the ball during a recent
match with the Campbell Camals. The Lady Pirates were unsuccessful
in trying to gain a victory as they fell to an 8-0 loss. The team will travel
tonight to Wilmington for a 7 p.m. match with CAA rival UNC-W.
Semester exciting for intramurals
a ��,�� a tnn fivp winners in Frisbee golf wei
Erika Leigh Hamby
Staff Writer
ground balls but move the ball well on
offense. The defense knew what they
had to do as well, and showed it by
shutting out Wake in the second quar-
ter. It seemed that the momentum of
the game had started to change.
At the half, the score was five to
three in favor of Wake ForesL The ECU
offense had begun to wear down
Wake's defense. It was at half-time that
the entire team found out about Daisey.
Going into the second half, a veteran
attack-man (who wishes to remain
anonymous) said, "1 hate to be cheesy,
but let's win this one for Daisey The
The final score was ECU seven, Wake
Forest sue.
Following the game, the celebra-
tion was short-lived, when Daisey came
onto the field with his arm in a sling
and accompanied by a Wake Forest
police officer. It was here that team
president and goalie Brian Trail was
informed that Daisey's injuries were
too severe for the campus infirmary to
handle. Trail, accompanied by vice
president and defensive-man Theron
Goodson, took Daisey to a local hospi-
tal, where they were told the extent of
his injuries.
4tUete 4 t6 �"&6
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
Lady Pirate soccer player Barrie Gottschalk believes this season is
going to be one of rebuilding. This sophomore midfielder hopes to see
an improvement from last year's team which recorded only two wins and
sustained 15 losses.
Gottschalk. who started in ail but one game as a freshman, had two
goals and one assist during the 1994 season. She believes this season is
going to be better than last season's because there is more team unity
among the players. Everyone on this team now gets along on and off the
field
"We hang out together, and that is nice because you can go out on
the field and everyone can work together she said.
See WEEK paw 10
David Gaskins, assistant director of
rec services in charge of intramural
sports, is excited about this semester.
Because of so many different intramu-
ral activities going on right now, and
many more to soon start, there is never
a dull moment in the recreation depart-
ment
Mr. Gaskins commented that there
are many different intramural sports
going on at this time, and there are
many more planned for the rest of the
semester. Intramural activities are open
to all students, faculty and staff. Teams
can consist of fraternities, sororities,
residence hall residents, and indepen-
dent teams which may be campus
groups or any group of students that
would like to participate. To sign up,
either the team captain or the individual
needs to attend the meeting on the date
of registration and sign up in that sport
If you don't have an organized
team, that doesn't necessarily mean you
won't be able to play. Often there are
teams that are looking to pick up a few
more players. The only way to know is
if you attend the meeting. If you can't
attend the meeting, go by the intramu-
ral office and fill out a Need a Team
form.
Mr. Gaskins feels that the intramu-
ral program impacts the students of
ECU in a positive manner, because the
sports provide for out of the classroom
learning.
"Students have an opportunity to
experience success and failure said
Gaskins They have an opportunity to
leam rules and strategies of the game,
problem solving types of things
The most popular intramural
sports always seem
to be the team
sports such as bas-
ketball, flag football,
soccer, softball and
volleyball. Popular
individual sports are
tennis and Frisbee
golf. Some of the
more nontraditional
programs sponsored
are go-cart racing,
whiffleball, and
dodgeball. Gaskins
says that they are
always trying to
come up with new
ideas to build up in-
terest
Gaskins said the participation in
intramural sports is good. He realizes
there are other things happening on
campus so not everyone has time for
participating, but he also realizes that
often students do not always know
about the upcoming sports. Mr. Gaskins
admits that the department could do
more to promote their interests, but he
also says half of the responsibility rests
on the students being interested.
The most recently concludeu
intramurals were co-rec volleyball and
Frisbee golf. The top winners tor co-rec
volleyball were as follows: Gold league-
Anne's Animals. Purple league-Boink
top five winners in Frisbee golf were:
first place (tie) Brian Satterley and Joe
Fields, third place Chris Moran, fourth
place Jeff Anderson, and fifth place
Bryan Moore.
" They have an
opportunity to
learn rules and
strategies of the
game, problem
solving types of
things
� David Gaskins, assistant
director of rec services
.x-v.4 � �
and Residence Halls league-Woosh. The
Events still
in play at this
time are tennis
singles and flag
football. This year
there were a little
over a hundred
teams that signed
up for flag foot-
ball in about 10
different divi-
sions. At this
point there are 67
teams left. In
some divisions it
is down to the fi-
nal round,
whereas in other
divisions first round play has yet to be
completed. Also, an event that will con-
tinue throughout the semester is the NFL
P.ck ems contest This gives students a
chance to choose who they think will
win in the upcoming week's NFL games.
The students' choices are then put up
against a local celebrities choice and
whoever wins receives a T-shirt Pick ems
sheets are available at the intramurals
office. m
The intramural sports planned hr
the remainder of October are volleyball,
badminton singles, co-rec flag football
and 3on-3 basketball. For more informa-
tion on when and where the registration
meeting will be held, please contact the
intramural department at 328-6387.
HHHRI Mi �





10
Thursday, October 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
Tarheels outlast week�.
Lady Pirates
Avram Klein
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate Volleyball team
unfortunately lost an uphill battle this
past Monday night in Williams Arena
at Minges Coliseum. The UNC Tarheels
beat the Lady Pirates in three straight
sets of 8-15, 13-15 and 11-15.
At the beginning of the
game, ECU seemed ex-
cited and ready to
dominate the court
The stands were
active with a
good turnout of
ECU supporting
students and family
members of the team
as well as some fans
who had driven from Ra-
leigh to support the visitors. Al-
though support from the fans was over-
whelming for the Lady Pirates, the
team was unable to turn the cheers
into points.
The first set was highlighted by
senior forward Melanie Richards who
placed precise, yet powerful cross court
digs between the Tarheel players. Late
in the first set with the Tarheels up 8-
11, the head referee failed to call a
hands-over-the-net call on the Tarheel
team, sending the ECU stands into a
frenzy. Soon after this first failed call,
the referee failed to call a four hit rule
violation on the side of the Tarheels.
The Pirates were visibly discouraged.
Of course, Richards returned the fa-
vor with an extra hard kill.
In the second set ECU was able to
bring up the scoreboard from behind,
but not quite enough to take the game
point The set finished at 13-15.
The third and final set was
long and grueling. At 11-14,
the final point was not eas-
ily accepted by the lady
Pirates who returned
the volley over and
over again with an ex-
citing dig delivered by
junior Kristen Woodruff.
Afterwards, a dis-
couraged Head Coach Kim
Walker explained she was,
"Disappointed we lost but I think
we played well. We were outmatched
and outsized she laughs at her under-
statement "We got stuck in a couple
rotations and that hurts. Carolina is a
confident team. They beat us. we didn't
beat ourselves
The ECU Lady Pirates are travel-
ing to the William and Mary tournament
this weekend Oct. 13-14 in
Williamsburg, Va. ECU is scheduled to
play James Madison on Friday at 4:30
and Clemson on Saturday at 2 p.m.
The best part about soccer to
Gottschalk is the team sports atmo-
sphere.
"Working as a team to get a
job done is the best thing
It is that kind of attitude that
the 1995 squad is looking for. So
far the Lady Pirates have a record
of 1-10, and 0-4 in the CAA, which
they can only hope to improve upon.
Gottschalk goes on to say that the
team does have set goals and hopes
to do better than last season.
Because this season has been a
little rocky at times, the team must
pull together and look forward to
the future. "We have a very positive
coach and a positive team. "We all
believe in ourselves Gottschalk
said.
This year's tough matches will
come from opponents like James
Madison. George Mason and William
and Mary. Gottschalk feels that the
team knows what they are doing and
is confident they know what they
are capable of. As far as the season,
she simply says, "It's coming along
First year Head Coach Neil Rob-
erts thinks a lot of Gottschalk. "She
has proven to be a leader on and off
the field said Roberts. "She guides
us, leads us, and takes over the cen-
ter midfielder position
One of the strengths about this
team is the amount of communica-
tion between players and coaches.
"You lack something when you don't
have communication off the field,
because if you do have it, you can
carry it on to the field during a
game. Everyone tries to help one
another out and correct each other's
mistakes added Gottschalk.
So what about the weaknesses
of the team? Gottschalk says it is
having to playing the whole 90 min-
utes. During the first half, the team
goes out on the field and has a lot
of enthusiasm and is ready to play.
But then in the second half, after
about 10 minutes, the enthusiasm
is lost. "During the second half we
kind of lose it she said.
Last year Gottschalk believed
she had a lot to prove, being a fresh-
man. However, this year she feels
more mixed in with everyone and
believes she won't stick out as
much.
When Gottschalk isn't practic-
ing or involved in a game, you will
find her with good friends or spend-
ing a weekend with her parents at
home in Falmouth, Va. This health
education major hopes to go into
the field of sports administration.
She sees coaching or possibly be-
coming an athletic director in her
future.
m
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' �" ��
11
Thursday, October 12, 1995
The East Carolinian
Jf
iiipn
For Rent
For Sale
tf
Help
Wanted
AZALEA GARDENS.
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
;?ctvM I'VC I E.JSI ith Sli
- �On-yik' luunr y �
p iql Sludt?nt Lt'iss
alwj
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Attention Students!
Langston Park Apartments
(Beside Tak River Estates,
Near Campus)
DO YOU NEED MONEY?)
We Will Pay You
$ CASH $
We Also Buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA �
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
TV's.
VCR's
CD Player's
RLNGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Student Swap Shop
STUDENT SWAP SHOP DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
RESPONSIBLE, CONSIDERATE,
CLEAN female to share 2 bedroom, 1 1
2 bath townhouse. Great benefits: Large
beUroom, own phone, washerdryer, ?
Lots more. Call for more information 756-
5686.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED 2br, 2bth,
Kitchen, large Lvrm, all applicances. Clean,
quiet and economical. 10 min from ECU
(near Bells Fork) $150 per month, 12
utilities. 321-2397 (leave message)
HEY ROOMMATE NEEDED! To share
3 bedroom townhouse. Furnishings avail-
able, washer and dryer Call for Details!
355-2803
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3br.
townhouse, lmi from campus. Rent $188
plus 13 utilities. Call 758-1849 leave
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Looking for
male student to share half the rent. Have
own bedroom and bathroom. Contact Ja-
son at 754-2076, Dogwood Hollow Apts
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to share
brand new 4BR, 3 full bath apartment
home. $250 per month plus 14 utilities.
Swimming pool, exercise center, club
house, lighted tennis courts, and lots of
extras, including continental breakfast
each Friday morning. Call 321-7613.
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED. Spacious
house directly across from campus. In-
cludes washerdryer and alarm system.
$200 per monthut ilities. 752-1263. Ask
for Cami.
ROOMMATE WANTED? Male to share
new 4 BDR, 3 full bath apartment. $250
per month plus 14 utilities. Swimming
pool, tennis, volleyball, weight room and
more. Call 321-7613.
2 BEDROOM HOUSE only 3 blocks from
campus, appliances included, Pets OK.
$350. 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX, 5 blocks
from campus, appliances included, Pets
OK. $300. 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, new
floors, appliances, Pets OK, 5 blocks from
campus. $540. 3 BEDROOM DUPLEX, 6
blocks from campus, central air,
applicances, fresh paint Pets OK. $450.00.
MOORE REALTY 752-2533
Need CASH???
Wo Buy CD's, Cassettes and
lp's.
We'll pay up o $6 credit or $5
cash for CD's
Downtown 758-3026
For Sale
Largest Library ofnformaflon in U.S. -
at subjects
Order Caiaiog Today wiin Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
Or, rush $2 00 to. Rniarch Inlormatlon
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PAY IN-STATE TUITION? RESIDENCY
STATUS AND TUITION is the brochure
by attorney Brad Lamb on the in-state
tuition residency application process. For
Sale: Student Stores, Wright Building.
1994 HONDA CBR 600F2 purple
blackred. Nice looking bike! Runs good!
Asking $4900. Please call Nicole at 758-
5833!
FUTON, QUEEN SIZE TRI-FOLD, used
only 6 months, $100 O.B.O must sell. 830-
9516, ask for Lisa.
OAK DRESSER $100, Twin bed $60,
Desk wchair $60 Call 321-2922.
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE! Complete
solof lex with leg and butterfly attachment!
Free weights also included! Will deliver
and setup! $530 call George at 757-2935.
MORROW DRIVE SHOWBOARD
BOOTS size 10-10 12; Burton Bio-light
pants size large. Call Sean 830-5470 after
6pm
1988 BUICK SKYHAWK. Runs great! 4
door, tilt steering, AM FM casset te radio,
$1100 OBO call 752-7071. Ask for George.
WORD PROCESSOR (Cannon Star
Writer 60) compact, portable, includes
bubblejet printer, practically brand new.
very easy to use. Various print features
$350, Call Michelle 7564657.
BIKE FOR SALE! Raleigh M50 Full
Alivio, many extras. Kept inside. Under 1-
yr old. Asking $400.00 O.B.O. Call an y-
time. 328-8537.
VOLVO 740 TURBO SEDAN 1985.
98,000 miles. Excellent runner. No rust.
AC, Stereo, Sunroof. Manual Transmis-
sion. $5,500. Tel: 752-2958 or extension
6022
MOUNTAIN BIKE TREK 970 XT plus
shifters, DX deraileurs and h ubs. 752-2621
ask for Dave.
MUST SELL 21" Schwinn Mountain
Bike, aluminum frame, STX components,
many upgrades $200; Washburn Electric
Guitar, amp 35-watt Gorilla Amp $250
O.B.O. Kevin 551-6754.
MUST SELL! 1994 Nissan Sentra XE. Air,
AMFM Cass, Cruise, 33,000 miles. Will-
ing to work with you and negotiate. Call
anytime 355-7553. Great condition, good
gas mileage, perfect for college student
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
CRUISE! Early Specials! 7 Days $279!
Includes 15 meals & 6 Parties! Great
BeachesNightlife! Prices Increase 1121
& 1215! Spring Break Travel 1-80078-
6386
SPRINC BREAK! PANAMA CITY! Early
Specials! 8 Days Oceanview Room with
Kitchen $129! Walk to Best Bars! Key
West $259! Cocoa Beach Hilton $169!
Price Increase 1121 & 1215 1-80078-
6386
CANCUN & JAMAICA SPRINC BREAK
SPECIALS! 111 Lowest Price Guaran-
tee! 7 nights Air & Hotel From $359! Book
Early! Save $100 on FoodDrinks! Spring
Break Travel 1-80078386
Help
Wanted
I?
Help
Wanted
j
'$M Services
Offered

LEARNING DISABILITIES SPECIAL-
IST NEEDED for tutoring and testing
during afternoon hours. Degree in learn-
ing disabilities required. Contact Carol
Noble, Southridge Learning Center, 219
Commerce Street Greenville, 27858 call
756-5988
YOUTH BASKETBALL CO ACHES, The
Creenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the winter
youth basketball program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 9-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00pm until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 8304550 after
2 PM.
MANAGEMENT AND ENTRY LEVEL
opportunities available. Business overview
meeting being held on Th ursday, Oct 12th
at 3pm and 5pm. Contact Eugene Smith
at 758-6890.
ANDY'S CHEESESTEAKS at the Plaza
is accepting applicationsMusi be able to
work at least 11:30-3 T & TH. No phone
calls please!
WANTED ACOUSTIC ACT to paly BW-3
Patio on Wednesday and Thursday 10:30
- 2am. Pays $160 - $180 cash. Contact
Sean 758-9191 between 24pm.
LSAT AND GRE INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY! Local, part
time, mostly evenings. Must test in 90th
percentile. Teaching experience, excellent
communication skills, some graduate
school preferred. 1-800-251-7737.
HELP WANTED: WAITSTAFF DAY-
TIME AND NIGHT SHIFTS available.
Must be able to work at least two week-
day lunch shifts. NO CALLS, please apply
in person between 8am and 10am or 2pm
and 4pm, Professor O'Cools Winn Dixie
Market Place. NOW HIRING.
LARGE MULTI-OFFICE OPTOMETRIC
PRACTICE seeks an individual who is
quick on their feet and has excellent in-
terpersonal skills for front desk adminis-
tration leading to supervision and man-
agement of staff. Two or four year busi-
ness or related medical field degree is re-
quired. Salary commensurate with expe-
rience. We train the right person. We of-
fer competitive salary, major medical, 401-
K, and profit sharing. Send resume with
salary requirements to: Practice Adminis-
trator, PO Box 7396, Rocky Mount NC
27804
"HELP WANTED" creative-enterprising
students or campus organizations to dis-
tribute flyers for adventure travel and
spring break programs. FREE TRIPS-
Creat Commission and Experience-
BEACH OR ADVENTURE ECOTREKS in
Belize-Cancun-Jamaica-Hawaii. Call Kirk-
Student Adventure Travel 1-800-328-7513.
NEEDED, Reliable, Dependable, Labor
Workers. Full and Part time positions.
Contact Jeff Walker (Walker Roofing Qual-
ity Home Repairs and improvements).
(919)758-3198.
ATHLETIC ATTITUDE: New Office seek-
ing aggressive sales rep for top nutritional
line. New on East Coast. We've got the
Deal! Call 756324.
DO YOU HAVE INTERESTING TAT-
TOOS or body piercings? If so, please
contact TLC Entertainment at 758-2881
for more informaiton!
FREE TRIPS & CASH Find out
how hundreds of students are already earn-
ing FREE TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH
with America's 1 Spring Break company!
Sell only 15 trips and travel free! Choose
Cancun, Bahamas. Mazatlan. or Flor ida!
CALL NOW! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK!
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell 8 Trips & Go Free! Best Trips
& Prices! Bahamas. Cancun, Jamaica,
Florida! Spring Break Travel! 1-80078-
6386
ASHLEE & ASHLEY'S now hiring La-
dies for dancing & escorting, unlimited
income, flexible hours. Call 321-9295.
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to our expanding Business. Ear n
up to $1,500 plus per week, Escorting in
the Greenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758-0896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est 1990.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to National
Mailers PO Box 774, Olathe, KS 66051.
Immediate response.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being
broke, want to get paid everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage. Snow Hill. NC 747-7686.
EARN $180 Dollars weekly clipping cou-
pons at home. For more info send SASE
to 102 3 Brownlea Dr. Greenville NC
27858.
TLC ENTERTAINMENT is seeking ladies
for dancing, modeling, and escor ting. $50
to $120 per hour. Flexible scheduling.
Discretion and Confidentiality assured.
Call 758-2881.
S100O FUNDRAISER Fraternities. So-
rorities & Student Organizations. You
ve seen credit card fundraisers before, but
you've never seen the Citibank fundraiser
that pays $5.00 per application. Call
Donna at 1-800-932-0528 ext 65. Quali-
fied callers receive a FREE camera.
jW
sr
Services
Offered
YOUNG NATIVE GERMAN LADY TU-
TORS German all levels. Walking Distance
from campus. Monday through Saturday,
days and evenings. Call Anke at 830-9014
WILD RHINO SCREENPRINTING ! Call
today for the best T-shirt prices in North
Carolina! You'll get the best service and
best attitude! Daii 8309503 and ask for
Bud.
NEED TYPING? Campus Secretary offers
speedy, Professional Service; campus pick-
up and delivery. Familiar with all formats.
Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
THE PARTY IS ON! YOUR PARTY ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile
Music Productions is "the" disc jockey
service for your party or social function.
Widest variety of any disc jockey company
in Greenville. Specializing in the needs of
ECU Organizations and Greeks. Book a
Show Now and get a FREE Keg at
Graffiti s. Dates are filling fast so call
early. Ask for Lee 7584644.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263495 ext F53622.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOME-
THING MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services
is your ANSWER! We have the best selec-
tion of music in Greenville. Call 758-5026
ask for Sean and Book your Party Now!
DO YOU LIKE TO PARTY? Then Call
Diamond Dave's Retro and Dance Party
at 758-5711. Diamond Dave is a profes-
sional Disc Jockey with a first class sound
system. Call Diamond Dave for a price
quote with no obligation
FREE To Pursue Romance and NEW
Relationships? CALL NOW 1-900-255-
8585 EXT 1674 $2.99min 18yrs. T CH-
TN fone reqd. Serv-U (619)645-8454.
GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS are
available. Billions of dollars in grants.
Qualify immediately. 1-80O243-2435 (1-
80OA1D-2-HELP).
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING FOR
RAIN? Rent a canopy! Two peaked-roof
canopies for rent. $65.00 each per day as
is or $100.00 each per day set-up and de-
livered. 752 5533. Leave message.
&
Greek
Personals
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: Congratula-
tions to the pledge class officers. Sharon
Beamon, President; Jennifer Willis, VP;
Rhonda Crumpton, Secretary; Heidi
Limbrunner, Treasurer; Melanie Knox,
Historian; Monica Strickland, sister liason.
Congratulations to these additional
pledges; REBECCA RUTLOWSKI, JAIME
RACE. & MONICA STRICKLAND. The
TEC apologizes for the mix up.
DELTA CHI would like to thank it's
Founder's for 105 years of Botherhood.
Thank you!
TO ALL GREEKS, GET SYKED for
Gamma's ALCOHOL AWARENESS
WEEK! October 15-21. It'll be a big bash,
you may even win alot of cash!

w
Lost and
Found
LOST BLACK AND WHITE
DECLAWED CAT. Very loved and missed.
Missing on Sept 29 around City Market.
Any info please call Katie or Tracie at 752-
1651.
ANNOUN
ATTENTION: ALL FRESHMEN
If you received an Academic Difficulty Re-
port but were unable to attend a work-
shop last week, please note the additional
workshop conducted by the Office of Un-
dergraduate Studies listed:
Monday - October 16 - 2pm-3pm; 3pm4pm:
4pm-5pm in Brewster B-102. Tuesday - Oc-
tober 17 - 3pm4pm in Brewster B-102.
We look forward to seeing you there.
DEPT. OF HEALTH PROMOTION &
WELL-BEING
Is sponsoring "THE WALL" in recognition
of Alcohol Awareness Week. The Wall will
be in front of the Dowdy Student Store,
Tuesday, October 17 from 11:00-1:00.
Please stop by and fill in a brick regard-
ing how alcohol either directly or indi-
rectly has influenced your life. Your sup-
port is both needed and appreciated.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next Gamma Beta Phi meeting will
be on Tuesday, October 17 at 5:00pm in
MSC Room 244. If you have sold all of
your raffle tickets, please bring them to
the meeting. If you need more raffle tick-
ets please contact Tammy or Pam.
CAR WASHII
The ECU Chapter of the National Colle-
giate Middle School Association will be
having a car wash on Saturday, October
14 from 9am - 2pm. The car wash will be
held at the Texaco on the corner of
Greenville Blvd. and Evans Street. Dona-
tions will be accepted. Thanks for your
support
ATTENTION: OMICRON DELTA
KAPPA
We are having a meeting on Thursday, Oc-
tober 12. 1995 from 5:15:15pm in MSC
Great Room 3. Hope to see you there.
STUDENT NCAE
The next SNCAE meeting will be held on
October 12 at 4:30 in Speight 308. Please
bring teddy bears for the children at the
hospital. Also, come hear the exciting in-
formation and ideas from the Fall Confer-
ence.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
CR's will meet at the Bookworm Used
Book Store on Saturday 14th of Oct at
6pm. The Bookworm is at the intersec-
tion of Greenville and Hooker; next to
Substation II.
AMERICAN RED CROSS
Donation schedule for October sponsored
by ECU Club. Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter on Tuesday October 17 from 12:00 -
6:00.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENT S
October 10 through October 16: Events
scheduled for A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
and free: unless other wised noted. TUES,
October 10-CUEST RECITAL, Clifford
Leaman. saxophone, and Derek J. Parsons,
piano, from Furman University (8:00pm).
MON. October 16-PERCUSSION PLAY-
ERS, Harold Jone, Director (8:00pm). For
additional information, call ECU6851 or
the 24-hour hotline at ECU4370.
FREE CLIMBING, PRIZES AND
MORE:
Come to the Camp at the Tower, this event
has been rescheduled from Friday, Octo-
ber 6 to Thursday, October 12 at the
Climbing Tower. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328387.
COPING WITH LOSS AND DEATH
Anyone can experience the loss of a sig-
nificant person and often the grieving
person can benefit from the support of
others who have had a similar exper ience.
This continuing group will bring people
together under the direction of a skilled
counselor for mutual support and to lear n
healthy ways of grieving. Tuesdays at
3:30pm. Counseling Cent er. Call 328661
to register.
INTRAMURAL VOLLEYBALL
Volleyball players don't pass up your op-
portunity to get your team registered for
Intramural volleyball during the volleyball
Registration Meeting on Tuesday, Octo-
ber 17 at 5pm in 1031 General Classr oom
Building. For more information call Rec-
reational Services at 328387.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
BADMINTON SINGLES
Badnintion players get registerd befor
Wednesday, October 18 at 5pm in
Christenbury 204. For more information
call Recreational Services 328-6387
NATURAL LIFE AEROBATHON
Come to the most exciting Aerobics class
ever held at East Carolina University.
There will be all the aerobics instructors
on hand, food, prizes and more during the
Natural Life Aerobathon Tuesday, Octo-
ber 17 at 4pm on College Hill. For more
information call Recreational Services at
328387.
SECOND SESSION AEROBICS
Register for the second session aerobics
session from today thru October 13
9:00am-5:00pm in 204 Chr istenbury Gym.
Choose from aerobics, STEP. Low Impact
Hi-Lo, Funk, Funk Step, Aquarobics. Hi-
Lo STEP. Belly Busters, and Toning. The
session runs from October 16-December
8. For more information Call Recreational
Services at 328-6387.

RECREATIONAL SERVICES
WELLNESS 101 SERIES
Learn how to make healthy choices spe-
cific to your fitness goals during
Recreatinal Services Wellness 101 Series
Class on November 1,8,15, and 19 from
5:30pm:30pm in 102 Chr istenbury Gym.
The topics to be covered include basic
principles of exercise, goal setting, time
management nutrition, equipment selec-
tion and use. strength training, stretch-
ing, and stress management Registration
for this class wil be held October 16-31.
For more information call Recreational
Services 328387.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT
Learn Time Management Study Strate-
gies, Note-taking Strategies, Test Prepa-
ration. Test-taking Strategies, and how to
Relieve Test Anxiety in this five-part pro-
gram. Mondays at 1:30pm beginning Oc-
tober 16. Counseling Center. Call 328-
6661 to register.
UNDERSTANDING ROMANCE - THE
CRAZINESS OF DATING
How do you build and maintain a healthy,
satisfying relationship? Find out on
Wednesday, October 18 at 3:30pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328661 to register.
EATING DEFENSIVELY
October 16 12 noon- 1:00pm Brewster D-
101, Nutrition management is very impor-
tant to individuals with HIV and AIDS.
Come learn more about this issue.
AIDS QUILT: HISTORY, MEANING,
AND PROCESS
October 13 - ll:0O12:00am Ceneral Class-
room Building, Rm 1026. Come lear n
about the quilt and the process used in
developing a panel. Participants will learn
the procedures and specifications neces-
sary for the creation of a panel. For fur-
ther information contact the Office of
Health Promotion and Well-being (328-
6793), Student Health Services (328-
6794), or PICASO (8301600)
TECHNOLOGY IN THE
CLASSROOM
Academic Computing is sponsoring the
fourth annual Technology Fair which will
be held on Tuesday, October 24, 1995 in
the Multipurpose room at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center from 10:00am until 3:00pm.
Users should bring several diskettes to
make their own copies of PC Plus. Tin can,
NAV, SAM andor Netscape. A variety of
topics will be covered: Netscape. Virtual
Reality. Music and Voice-activated soft-
ware. CAD programs. Interactive Learn-
ing software. SPSS for Windows. Network
Educational Applications










Title
The East Carolinian, October 12, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 12, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1101
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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