The East Carolinian, September 28, 1995







September 28,1995
Vol71,No. 11
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pa3es
Around the State
(AH) - As many as 4 million
fish have died in the past week in
the lower Neuse River because of
a toxic algae.
Researchers believe the al-
gae, a dinoflagellate named
pfiesteria, is triggered by nutri-
ents in rain runoff and sewage
discharges.
Fish continued dying Tues-
day as the effect of the organism
intensified. Rick Dove of the
Neuse River Foundation said the
dead fish were found with open
sores on them in a thick oily sub-
stance with brown foam, The Sun
Journal of New Bern reported
Wednesday.
(AP - Narrow guidelines
have apparently prevented North
Carolina women from seeking
state funds to get an abortion, and
officials say the money may re-
main untouched.
Last year, the state's abortion
fund paid for 4,587 abortions. So
far this year, it hasn't paid for even
one.
To qualify for state funds
under the legislature's new rules,
a woman must be the victim of
rape or incest or face life-threat-
ening complications with her
pregnancy. Also, her family's in-
come must fall below the federal
poverty line.
Around the Country
(AP) - In Syracuse, New
York, the larger-than-life figures
are captured in their most private
moments - trapped in agony, an-
ger and grief.
Some have arms raised im-
ploring skyward, the fists of oth-
ers pound the ground, still oth-
ers are curled up in balls of help-
lessness.
The naked stone statues de-
pict the mothers of the 35 Syra-
cuse University students killed in
the 1988 terrorist bombing of Pan
Am Flight 103 over the Scottish
village of Lockerbie.
(AP) - A Continental Air-
lines jetliner developed cabin pres-
sure problems Wednesday and
was forced to make an emergency
landing at Miami International
Airport, officials said.
An airport spokeswoman said
three of the 112 people on board
were treated for minor injuries.
Around the World
(AP) - Police arrested 45
people Wednesday in raids or-
dered by the judge investigating
bombings that killed seven people
and wounded more than 100 this
summer, the Interior Ministry re-
ported in Marseille, France.
Thirty suspected arms and
document traffickers were ar-
rested in the southern port city
of Marseille, and 15 Muslim mili-
tants irom Algeria were arrested
in Carpentras, a Provence town
60 miles to the north.
(AP) - Heavy monsoon rains
flooded four coal mines in north-
ern India Wednesday, drowning at
least nine miners and trapping 64
others.
Professor charged with assault
Police serve
criminal summons
to Flanagan
Tambra Zion
News Editor
A criminal summons was served
to an ECU chemistry professor on
Sept. 20 in the Flanagan Building,
following an alleged assault on a stu-
dent.
Communications major Vince
Ronald Mercuri,21, filed a report with
ECU's Police Department against
David Lunney for allegedly pushing
him off a sidewalk on Sept 9.
Mercuri said he was walking with
a friend in front of the greenhouse at
the Biology building when Lunney
approached him on the sidewalk.
"He just gave me a shoulder, like
a forearm into my side, I thought it
was one of my friends Mercuri said.
Mercury said he was not hurt by
the alleged contact, but said he felt
something should be done.
"I'm certain the allegation is a
misdemeanor offense said University
Attorney Ben Irons. "This is a rela-
tively minor incident
What some might consider minor
has led to a student filing charges
against a faculty member and will
soon be in court Lunney chose not
to comment, but called the charges
"utterly unfounded
The trial date has been set for
Oct. 16.
"When Vince came to me. I
didn't spend enough time talking
with him about the incident and all
the options to help the parties in-
volved come to a reasonable solu-
tion Dean of Students Ronald
Speier said. He regrets not taking a
more active role in mediating the
situation. "As dean of students, I have
a responsibility to students "
Mercuri also regrets the matter
will result in a trial, but said he be-
lieved he had no other options. He
said Speier advised him to contact
ECU police who in turn told Mercuri
he could choose to press charges or
not.
"He didn't say he was sorry I
never would have thought about do-
ing something like this (going to
court). I was trying to find other ways
with the police Mercuri said.
Mercuri is planning to find rep-
resentation in the District Attorney's
office, or to represent himself.
According to Assistant District
Attorney Glen Perry, if found guilty,
the Class 1 misdemeanor carries a
punishment of up to 120 days in jail.
but rarely amounts to that.
"We have structured sentencing
now - it passed last October. If a per-
son has no prior record, he's sen-
tenced at a Level I. Under current
law all the judge could do would be
to give community punishment
Perry said. "If a person has one to
five prior convictions, he could get
jail
Perry said the courts take the
victim's desires into account but
added, "we generally do not dismiss
assault cases
School of Medicine
researches fat gene
Research may
lead to heart
disease treatments
Joann Reed
Staff Writer
Election results
Photo by KEN CLARK
Less than 500 of ECU'S 17,000 students voted in
Student Government Association's class officer elections
yesterday. No run offs are necessary. Above, students
cast their votes outside Joyner Library.
SGA Class Presidential Election Results
Clc
Graduate
�TV: nor
Ju,
Sophor
Freshman
President
Scarlette Gardner
Justin Conrad
Eric Rivenbark
Jessica Ginson
Richard Weir
of votes
11
91
84
141)
106
ot votes
100
53.2
100
;s.i
100
Results conpiled by Wendy Rountree
Want to lose some weight?
Researchers at ECU's School of
Medicine are conducting studies on
a gene that could help people suffer-
ing from morbid obesity and type II
(obesity related) diabetes.
The research team lead by Dr.
Stephen Usala, an assistant profes-
sor of endocrinology at ECU's School
of Medicine, recently received a grant
for $91,000 from the American Dia-
betes Association.
"This institution has a long his-
tory of doing premier research with
patients suffering from morbid obe-
sity and type II diabetes Usala said.
"What opened up doors in obesity
research was the discovery, less than
a year ago. of the obesity (ob) gene
The ob gene, a protein which
suppresses and controls appetite, was
cloned last December by researcher
Jeffrey Friedman at Rockefeller Uni-
versity. The research found that the
ob gene clearly causes obesity in a
strain of inbred mice.
According to Dr. Kirk Ways, as
sociate professor,
and director of the
ECU Diabetes Cen-
ter, "The research
grant was obtained
to see if the ob
gene is expressed
differently in hu-
mans
ECU'S re-
search will focus on
two areas.
"Our research
here at ECU is con-
centrating on two
candidate genes,
tumor necrosis fac-
tor-a (TNF-a) and
the ob gene Usala
said.
Usala studies
the levels of TNF-a
and the ob gene in
fat, which has been removed with
prior consent from the abdominal
area and subcutaneous (beneath the
skin) tissue of patients receiving gas-
tric bypass surgery or other surgical
procedures at the ECU's school of
medicine.
'Dr. Walter Pories and I take
samples of two types of human fat
tissues because the fats have differ-
ent effects on the body Usala said.
"The type of fat found in the abdomi-
Photo Courtesy of ECU School of Medicine
Dr. Stephen Usala sits in the Med School
laboratory pondering further research.
nal area makes humans more suscep-
tible to heart disease, diabetes and
other illnesses
According to Usala. the research
on the ob gene and its relation to
obesity and type II diabetes will be
useful in developing future treat-
ments for sufferers of these diseases,
and not for weight-loss treatment.
"There is still no evidence that
the ob gene can help regulate regu-
lar weight-loss Usala said.
Report conflicts with survey
Marguerite Benjamin
Senior Writer
A recent "Pirates on the
Street" survey conducted randomly
on campus suggests that students
are very environmentally aware and
believe recycling is a worthwhile
project, yet a detailed report pre-
pared by the North Carolina Office
of Waste Reduction in Raleigh
shows those students may not prac-
tice what they preach.
According to the most recent
annual report concerning recycling
among North Carolina state agen-
cies, ECU is ranked the highest (in
terms of the total number of
pounds recycled) of the 18 state
universities who reported having a
recycling pro-
gram, but a
closer look at
the report
shows that stu-
dents should
not take credit
for our ranking.
ECU's total
amount of mate-
rials recycled
from July 1 to
June 30 weighs
in at an impres-
sive 3,880.709
pounds. The
only other universities coming
close to this figure is N.C. State,
whose total is 3.675,060, and UNC-
"The fact is, there
are some real
problems with
ECU's recycling
program
� George Armistead,
manager of Hazardous
Wastes at ECU
Chapel Hill who reported 3,077,240
pounds.
George
Armistead. man-
ager of Hazard-
ous Wastes at
ECU's depart-
ment of Environ-
mental Health
and Safety said
that while the
figures alone are
impressive, there
are more things
to look at within
the report be-
sides numbers,
there are some
'The fact is
See REPORT page 2
Pirates
on the
Street
�;yo
recycle?
Jacob Coughlin,
sophomore
"Yes, we can't afford the loss
of our natural resources
Kirsten Harlan,
senior
"Yes, but it ticks me off that
there aren't enough places
to take your recyclables
Julie Passa tino,
junior
"Yes, in the residence halls
there is not much opportunity
to recycly but every little bit
helps
Photos by HEN CLARK
Michael Bonner,
Graduate student
"Yes, the environment
should be important to all
young people. Everyone
should pitch-in and do their
part to preserve their future
LIFiy&
Ittdtde
What's happening in Melrose "Space?page
ommmLudmy
What's next after the trial?page
What's the team behind the team?page
11
Thursday
Partly cloudy

High 74
Low 56
Weekend
Dry, sunny home game
High 75
Low 58
&�& t& veoe4
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
ffn "i y " x nS " CL ft
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner






Thursday, September 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
REPORT
from page 1
Medical fair offers career alternatives
real problems with ECU's) recy-
cling program Armistead said.
"When all you look at is the num-
ber of pounds we recycled, you
Student Recycling
2,000.000
1.500.000
1,000.000
Stale
Armistead said
"According to the report, about
3 million of the 3,880,709 pounds
we recycled came from construction
debris and
yard
wastes. So
if students
really are
recycling as
much as
they say
they are.
there is
something
terribly
wrong with
these fig-
ures
As far
as indi-
vidual ma-
overlook what percentage of each
material recycled makes up that
total
According to the report, the
material? students are most active
in recycling - aluminum cans, glass
containers and nlastic containers,
actually make up less than one per-
cent of ECU's total recycled mate-
rials.
"If you pay careful attention to
the charts in the report
Armistead added, "you can very eas-
ily see that students had very little
to do with why the university is
ranked so high
According to Armistead and to
report data, institutional materials
make up almost 90 percent of the
materials recycled by the university.
Institutional materials are defined
as those materials mainly handled
by the campus maintenance staff.
These materials include cardboard,
yard wastes, food service wastes
and other non-student recyclable
materials.
"What's peculiar about the
large amount of institutional mate-
rials recycled, is that 70 percent of
those materials are generated by
the construction projects on cam-
pus, and another large percentage
comes from yard wastes
terials recycled, those materials for
which students hold the most re-
sponsibility, are concerned. ECU re-
ported 416.675 pounds compared to
the 618,752 pounds reported by
N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hills re-
port of 1,854,860 pounds.
At 8,612 pounds, aluminum cans
make up the largest percentage of in-
dividual materials recycled at ECU.
while UNC-Chapel Hill reported hav-
ing recycled 45,920 pounds. In fact,
even Appalachian State, whose stu-
dent enrollment is nowhere near
ECU's. reported having recycled
13,667 pounds of aluminum cans.
Of the four other universities
mentioned, ECU recycled the least
amount of glass containers (only
5,720 pounds), while UNC Chapel
Hill recycled the most, outweighing
our total by about 280,000 pounds.
"So if our ranking was based on
what students recycled Armistead
added, "we would be pretty close to
dead-last
Residence Halls Housekeeping
Manager Patti Gullihur said that in
order to increase the amount of ma-
terials students recycle, the students
themselves have to put forth a little
more effort
"Basically what it all amounts to
is training ourselves Gullihur said.
"Sometimes it takes more effort than
we are willing to exercise because we
tend to get lazy. It's so much easier
to just throw everything into the
trash than it is to .separate plastic
from paper and so on.
"Housekeepers do a good job of
trying to separate the things that are
put into the trash cans in the resi-
dence halls, but it's really not up to
them. We each need to play our part
if we want to see an improvement
Gullihur also said more recycling
bins should be available, especially
for plastics and glass, but first stu-
dents should make sure they are us-
ing current bins.
"There's just not much incentive
among students to recycle said Joy
Hudson, the recycling coordinator for
Pitt County, it's just not very con-
venient since there are not bins for
plastics and glass in each residence
hall. Students would much rather
throw everything in the trash than
travel to another building to dispose
of plastics
Hudson said she feHs the uni-
versity needs to do more to encour-
age recycling, and that students
should be made aware of all of the
ways they can help.
According to Hudson, the
Greenville community is a leader in
recycling. The city's recycling pro-
gram has won awards on both the
regional and national levels.
Greenville currently recycles more
than 30 percent of its waste stream.
We're increasing the amount
we recycle all of the time Hudson
said. "And we will continue to look
for new ways to improve our pro-
gram
As a whole, Greenville is going
over and beyond the recycling speci-
fications set by the Department of
Environment. Health and Natural
Resources, but ECU has some im-
provements to make in order to reach
those standards.
For now, ECU remains at the top
of the recycling list, but when the
construction stops and the dust
settles, the university may find itself
at the bottom of the barrel.
A
Stephanie Eaton
Staff Writer
m the Pirates stomp allow the
test Virginia Mountaineers on
September 30th, show them your
Pirate Pride!
tudent Stores
3
Student Store Hours;
Monday - Thursday: 8 am - 8 pm
Friday: 8 am - 5 pm
Saturday: )am-5 pm
This Saturday, we'll open at 9am for all your pre-same needs!
Sale apparel selection and discount may vary dally. Otner
discounts wil net apply to sale prices, .
ECU students in the School of
Medicine will join thousands of other
medical students around the United
States in learning about primary care
as a career option during the second
annual National Primary Care Day.
National Primary Care Day is
being held today. Students at 141
allopathic and osteopathic medical
schools will participate.
"The response from the residents
and students towards the different
activities that were planned this week
has been good Fortner said. "I am
really pleased at the success of the
programs
Started in 1994. the event was
formed to increase awareness of medi-
cal students and society to primary
care medicine. This event helps medi-
cal students learn the advantages of
becoming generalist physicians with
skills in family medicine, internal
medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and
gynecology.
The goal of National Primary
Care Day is, "To get the word out
about what primary care really is.
People don't understand what pri-
mary care physicians do said Ami
Ingram, a fourth year medical student
at ECU, in a recent article in Medical
Center Mews.
To help students better under-
stand National Primary Care Day,
ECU's School of Medicine is present-
ing informative and interesting lec-
tures. Dr. Tom Irons, president of
Health East Inc. and associate vice
chancellor of health sciences at ECU
School of Medicine, is helping stu-
dents, faculty and other interested in-
dividuals by giving a lecture on "The
Future of Primary Health Care in
Eastern N.C at 12:30 p.m. today in
the Brody Medial Sciences Building.
Ten student organizations at ECU
See FAIR page 3
ECU Student Stores Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Building, just off Wright Circle919-328-6731
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Friday 929 and Saturday 930
from Midnight to 2 a.m.
BBWS:
Midnight Bowling:
$3 for 2 hours (includes shoes)
Purple head-pin bowling
Prizes; Sweatshirts, T-shirts, Hats (Thanks ECU Student Stores)
Midnight Billiards Tournament:
2 person co-ed 8 ball tourney
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 28, 1995
Political science conquers new territories
Jon Beckert
Staff Writer
A group of ECU and University
of North CaroPna Greensboro
(UNCG) political scientists are do-
ing something never done before.
They are working on the
world's first Central European Par-
liamentary Documents Center,
which will be a collection of parlia-

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menta-y documents from the 11
democratic nations formerly asso-
ciated with the Soviet Union.
The project is being coordi-
nated by David Olson and William
Crowther of UNCG and Maurice
Simon of ECU. Olson is one of the
foremost scholars on legislature
around the world: Crowther is a
specialist in East European, Roma-
nian and Moldovian politics and
Simon has been doing research on
published parliaments since the
late 1970s.
The idea began at a conference
in Prague, a Czech Republic, dur-
ing the summer of 1994. The con-
ference, chaired by Olson, was
working to develop a book on the
new parliaments of Central Europe.
The book is due to be published in
January, 1996, and will also appear
as a special issue of The Journal of
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Legislative Studies. Simon's work
on the Polish parliament will be the
opening chapter.
"We're really very pleased, be-
cause this is a good example of a.n
international team of scholars shar-
ing their insights, and trying to
break new ground Simon said.
While the group was working
on projects concerning the new par-
liaments of Eastern Europe and the
former Soviet Union, a troubling
thought occurred to them.
"We became concerned that
this valuable information about the
new parliaments would get lost
Simon said. "So we started propos-
ing to various parliamentary librar-
ians and scholars that we attempt
some kind of project to create a cen-
tral archive for those kinds of docu-
ments, so that scholars around the
world could use them.
"So the idea was essentially
one that came out of necessity, and
it turns out that it was a very good
idea, because the National Science
Foundation has very graciously pro-
vided us with funds to carry out
the project
Currently, the group is collect-
ing very basic documents about
parliament members and legislative
activities, including such things as
how many laws are passed, and how
many sessions are held.
The National Science Founda-
tion grant, which will support the
project for five years with
$145,000, was not easy to obtain.
"It's a lot of hard work Simon
said. "You have to come up with a
very good idea. The proposals are
very difficult to write. They have
to have some validity as research
projects, and they must have some
promise to break ground. There's
a lot of grueling, intricate writing
that has to be done.
"We received support from our
Offices of Sponsered Programs, but
in the end, you have to wait until
panels of outside reviewers decide
that the project is one that is more
meritorious than others that have
been proposed
For now. the project will cover
five years, beginning with the 1989
fall of communism, going through
the 1991 breakup of the Soviet
Union until the year 1994. Parlia-
mentary documents will be col-
lected from Poland, the Czech Re-
public, the Republics of Bulgaria,
Hungary. Moldova, Romania,
See POL page 4
A
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- 5 Discount for college Students -
have planned programs for each day
this week. On Monday. ECU's School
of Medicine community service orga-
nizations and generalists medicine
departments explained what role they
play in the community. Tuesday was
filled with a variety of activities; one
highlight was a guest speaker from
the Eastern Area Health Education
Center. The day's events concluded
with a Physician Recruiting Fair. On
Wednesday, Dr. Jim Berstein, direc-
tor of the N.C. office of Rural Health
and Development, stimulated his au-
dience with a lecture on rural health.
"Many students in the medical
field feel that they are alreadv com-
mitted to the primary care field said
Tom Fortner. director of the Medical
Center News and Information Office.
"For those who are less certain, this
provides them with the information
and helps them to raise their aware-
ness of their options. "
Fortner said many people do not
realize that primary care does not just
take place in a typical doctor's office.
Primary care occurs in inner city com-
munities, rural areas and Native-
American reservations.
Join us as we broadcast live from the "Celebrity Chef Cookout" this
Thursday beginning at 4:30 p.m. at the Dining Halls. Chancellor Eakin
and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick will be featured chefs.
Our hour-long sports call-in show PIRATE TALK airs Thursday nights
at 7 p.m. This week's guest is Woody O'Hara of the West Virginia Sports
Information Network. Call 328-6913 with your questions.
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�5





1
"T'T 'tl ' ill
��� I nil.
Thursday, September 28,1995
The East Carolinian
JTxJM-i from page 3
Slovakia, Slovenia and the Baltic
states of Estonia, Latvia and
Lithuania.
"The parliaments of Poland,
the Czech Re-
public, Hun- �
gary, and possi-
bly Slovakia are
much more de-
veloped in the
Western sense
of parliamen-
tary institu-
tions Simon
said. "They
have longer
democratic his-
tories, tradi-
tions and experience in parliamen-
tary functions. For the rest of the
parliaments, it's really an experi-
ment in parliamentary democracy.
Often they are starting from
scratch
Simon does not believe the
Documents Center will necessarily
"We hope down
the line to have
one archive set
up in a European
center
� Maurice Simon,
professor poUticdcjgnce
have a physical location. Rather, it
will be a computerized collection,
that can be quickly referenced from
far away via a motem.
"We hope
that things will
be available
through Internet,
but we will see.
There may be
something, when
we can find some
additional fund-
ing, that will be
more ambitious
Simon said.
The group
has already ap-
plied for additional grants, with
which they hope to expand the
project
"We would hope to have more
information about the political bi-
ographies of members, the activi-
ties of specialized committees
within parliaments, the structure
and activities of political parties
and information about public opin-
ion about the functioning of the
parliaments Simon said.
The group won't know the fate
of a grant proposal for a four-coun-
try survey until 1996, but they
hope to receive an answer to their
second proposal, to study members
of the Czech parliament, by the end
of this year.
"We hope down the line to
have one archive set up in a Euro-
pean center. Not necessarily a uni-
versity, it may be in something like
the Interparliamentary Union in
Switzerland, but that is something
we have some time to consider
Simon said. "We hope to have some
kind of workshop here next spring,
which would bring some people
here to ECU who are interested in
this comparative parliamentary re-
search
The project's future beyond the
grant is uncertain, but Simon re-
mains optimistic.
"We really do have some of the
leading political and legal scholars
in the countries that we're inter-
ested in, and of course the people
in their parliamentary libraries,
those are the crucial people
Simon said.
"I'm generally an optimist
about the development of democ-
racy, but democracy is a fragile
concept, and a fragile set of insti-
tutions and procedures Simon
said. "It will take at least several
decades before we will really know
how well parliamentary and demo-
cratic institutions take hold in
these countries, but there's a lot
of good people making very hon-
est efforts to transform the politi-
cal systems, and this is what's ex-
citing about the project, because
parliaments are the heart and soul
of any democratic government, and
we will be watching them very care-
fully
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Is





V
Thursday, September 28, 1995 The East Carolina
4
Our View
The
university's
doing its part
to recycle, so
now it's time
for you, the
student, to get
busy too. You
don't want to
live in the
Road Warrior
do you?
The world is getting old, and we've got to take bet-
ter care of it.
I know that's nearly a cliche these days. I must
admit, I'm damn tired of hearing about it. The mes-
sage is delivered so earnestly (and so often) that it's
almost as annoying as Sally Struthers starving kids
spot. I know the few occasions I've had to watch an
episode of Ted Turner's insipid "Captain Planet" car-
toon have made me want to go out and dump some
crude oil on a wildlife preserve.
Be that as it may, the anti-pollution message is true.
We've really got to watch ourselves. The more we pol-
lute the Earth, the closer we get to some kind of bi-
zarre Road Warrior style apocalypse, a world where
people fight over such precious resources as water and
oil.
One way everybody can participate in this effort to
save the nlanet is to recycle. Recycling cuts down on
both pollution and the waste of the Earth's resources.
But hey, ECU has a great recycling record, right?
Well, see, apparently that's only because of all the
construction that is going on. The construction com-
pany is recycling like a madman, dumping everything
it can into the recycling bin.
The students, however, are apparently just big slobs.
We don't recycle nearly enough, despite the fact that
we're all big-brain college folks who know all about
that Road Warrior pollution process. We're supposed
to know better.
You'd think, with all the beer that gets consumed
around here, we would be the kings of recycling.
Bottles and cans are two of the biggest parts of the
recycling business, and we the students of ECU are a
recycling gold mine.
I know, I know. When you're stumbling around on
clean-up patrol the morning after, the fate of the Earth
is the farthest thing from your mind. That's why you
prepare to recycle before your head feels like it's go-
ing to split open like an overripe melon.
Get an extra trashcan for recycling. Put a basket-
ball net over it. That wav, when you're crawling around
on all fours trying to collect stray cans, you can just
toss them in and make a game of it for your beer-addled
brain.
I won't even go into all the paper that gets wasted
around here, but suffice it to say we could all have a
better track record there, as well.
So get off your recycling butts, ECU! unless you
want to live in a Road Warrior world, you must change
your lazy ways. And no offense, but 1 don't think many
of us would look very good in those skimpy leather
bondage suits those post-apocalypse people favor
Letters to the Editor
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crtssy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
&S
Tambra Zlon, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
J. Miles Layton, Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erika Gohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photo Editor
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Xiali Yang, Systems Manager
W. Jason Allen, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Lani Adklnson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
The best way to screw up ideas
In the 1960s America was faced
with the biggest revolution it had
faced in almost 100 years. There was
a need of change. The purpose of that
change was to right the path our na-
tion had steered since the Civil War.
It was a chance to, once and for all,
protect the rights of all men and
women. At the center of this move-
ment was the Voting Rights Act of
1965.
The Act was originally con-
structed to protect minorities voting
privileges from the corruption of lo-
cal government. It outlawed discrimi-
natory policies such as literacy test-
ing. This type of reform is good and
definitely well overdue (almost 200
years to be more exact).
Unfortunately, in this day and era
people have a bad habit of abandon-
ing the spirit of the laws and replac-
ing them with their versions of the
letter of the laws. This is best seen in
what has been done with the above
mentioned Voting Rights Act of 1965.
When exercised as it was in-
tended, it was effective. Between 1964
and 1969 the number of blacks regis-
tered to was in the South more than
doubled. Up until 1963 less than 100
black officials had ever been elected
in the South, by 1973 there were 191
in Mississippi alone.
In 1982 Congress decided to re-
interpret it and thus manipulate the
letter of the law. Through this manipu-
Chris Arllne
Opinion Columnist
t is bad because
it takes large
portions of many
communities and
places them into
a single unit
lation they were able to show that
certain groups were in fact entitled
to political set asides, areas that they
were sure to win. Not only were they
given areas, but it was stressed that it
was the federal government's respon-
sibility to ensure that quotas for these
offices were met It was felt that the
only way to prove that the minorities
were effective in using their voting
rights was to have it proven through
electoral rights.
The problem with this is that it
forces the American people into the
ignorant belief that people of the same
race must all vote the same way. For-
tunately, the Supreme Court has seen
the light and shot down several of
these districts. In 1993 the Supreme
Court shot down the North Carolina
voter, redistricting a plan that created
a zone that was 160 miles long anc
for the better part of its length it was
no wider than the stretch of Interstate
85 which it followed.
This ruling, according to Justice
O'Connor, "Political Apartheid" was
being created.
The same was found in July when
they ruled against a similar plan from
Georgia. Justice Thomas, in agreemenl
with the majority, stated that it was
"an offensive and demeaning assump
tion that voters of a particular race
will, because of their race, have the
same political preference
If anything, this minority-major
ity districting can only hurt the
groups. In general, it is bad because
it takes large portions of many com
munities and places them into a single
unit where they can no longer affect
the other groups.
It is fair to assume that the GOP
would be well benefitted by this move
because it takes large predominately
democrat supporting sections of mi-
norities out of four or five districts
and places them in one. They lose the
one district but are allowed to carry
the others easily through the void
created.
The idea of doing away with mi-
nority-majority will not mean that
minorities will lose seats, it will mean
that there will be access to more of
them.
To the Editor:
Most of the stereotypes that Jus-
tin Conrad suggested Greeks have to
deal with are ones that they create
themselves - through their words and
actions. Not until some part of their
system is challenged do we hear the
positive qualities of their organiza-
tions. I live in a dorm for three years
and had numerous neighbors in so-
rorities. Although not everything I
heard was negative, most of it was. I
would hear women complaining about
upcoming charities and "stupid func
tions But the most common subjects
were drunkenness and sex resulting
from their socials. I simply think that
rather than attacking those who hold
the negative attitudes because of
these stereotypes, that it would be
more effective to go to the source of
the problem and have the members
of the organizations promote the
more positive aspects.
April Parnell
Junior
English
Gabbing about gossip
To the Editor:
This is a letter of official and
public apology to Coach Van Sant, Mr.
and Mrs. Leggett and all the people
who work so hard to make the East
Carolina Pirates football concessions
program the great success that it is.
First of all, I would like to apologize
for all the silly things I wrote in my
letter to the editor of The East Caro-
linian in the issue of Thursday, Sept
7. We, the concessionaires now have
the contract that is fair to all con-
cerned, thanks to the efforts of Coach
Van Sant who generously restructured
our contract for this football season
accordingly. We now are given 30
cents for the $2 selling price of every
soda we sell at the football games.
I am reminded of the great All-
American football player, George
Koonce who recently gave $10,000
to the Pirate Club. George, who has
gone on the NFL as one of the great-
est football players of all times, made
this sacrifice to help the East Caro-
lina Pirates athletics program, by so
doing, George has given back some-
thing to oui school that gave him such
an excellent start in his football ca-
reer. Think about what we as students
could do to help the East Carolina
pirates to be the very best in the Na-
tion!
Here's what you and I, and ev-
eryone here at East Carolina Univer-
sity can do at least four more Satur-
day afternoons this fall. Get the East
Carolina Pirate spirit of the East,
come to the football game to cheer
the Pirates football team on to the
Peach Bowl again this year. Buy a
soda of your choice from me, Rich-
ard Becker, of any of the young
people at he football game who work
there as concessionaires, and a bag
of peanuts. We sell large cups full of
America's most popular sodas such
as Coke, Pepsi, Sprite and Mountain
Dew along with large bags of deli-
cious roasted peanuts for your en-
joyment and, to help the East Caro-
lina Pirates build a winning athletic
program. So, here is your chance to
do your part as a loyal and true East
Carolina Pirate football fan. I am
looking forward to seeing you at
Ficklen Stadium on Saturday, Sept
30. Thank you very much for your
support.
Richard F Becker
Senior
Construction Management
terfif to the Editor must be limited
lew) or they will not be considered
to 250 words (or
for publication.
��
This article is about sex! Well,
in a way it is. Okay, this article is
actually about talk shows and their
topics. You might be thinking, "how
could he write an entire article on
talk shows Well let me put it to
you this way, have you ever turned
on the television in the morning
and not seen two or three different
shows all talking about sex?
There are so many talk shows
that I can not even list them all in
this article. I would have to have a
page devoted just to this article to
show you how many there really
are.
Talk shows began with pio-
neers such as Phil Donahue. And
now we have the Danny Bonaduce
show and that girl, Gabrielle, from
"90210 I can not turn on the TV
for one minute without finding
some talk show that has a topic
involving sex, sin or scandal.
What ever happened to "Leave
it to Beaver where the topic of
each episode might be where Beav
got caught bringing a frog to
school?
Talk shows are becoming det-
rimental to our brains. Do 1 really
want to know that Girl X's boy-
friend slept with Girl Y and then
Girl Z? NO! Entertainment can be
found on other channels. Here is a
Brian Burns
Opinion Columnist
Do I really
want to know
that Girl X's
boyfriend slept
with Girl Y and
then Girl Z?
prime example of how talk shows
go too far: The "Geraldo" show. I'm
not talking about his everyday
shows (which are bad enough as it
is), 1 mean the one specific episode
where he helped provoke a fight
This infamous episode in
Geraldo's second season brought
him international fame for having
his nose broken. These are the kind
of stunts that talk shows hosts do
to get the ratings.
I almost guarantee you that if
these "hosts" tried getting real act-
ing jobs, they would find them-
selves out on the street Real ac-
tors find themselves having to
study and research a certain part.
Then they have to rehearse a writ-
ten script.
These "hosts" come out with
these whacked-out ideas and then
bring on guests to grill them for
juicy gossip. A prime example of
this is when Geraldo brought on
news writers for The National
Enquirer. The sole purpose of this
episode was to pass on gossip about
the stars of today's movies and TV.
Can't these people get lives or
real jobs? I don't find it appealing
to sit down and watch a breast im-
plant on TV. If that interests you,
then watch the "Gabrielle" show.
Again, you might have a ques-
tion like this: "How do you know
so much about these talk shows if
you hate them so much?" That's
exactly what you were going to ask
next wasn't it? Well, the answer is
quite simple really, "Talk Soup
Perhaps the only true show on day-
time or any other time on television,
"Talk Soup's" sole purpose is to
preview and recap talk shows. Yet,
they do not just show you the high-
lights, they maKe fun of the shows
as well.
It is nice to see that someone
else in this world besides myself sees
that these shows go too far. I know
that 1 am not the sole believ n
this campus that thinks this

4'f�





SPARE TIME
5 Thursday, September 28, 1995 The East Carolinian
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Holy Order of Comic Artist
Thats right! HOCA!
OK, So it doesn't make any sense and what is the point?
THE POINT IS WE NEED ARTISTS That's righjJb
East Carolinian is looking for a few brave souls -gi,
to take on this awsome task, just look at these benifits
1. Deadlines, Deadlines, Deadlines!
2. Ink Stained Hands!
3. A real Bonified Paycheck!
4. Deadlines!
5. Perhaps vour own cult following!
So if you think you've got what it takes, THEN READ BELOW!
Make sure all comics are drawn in a 8" x 13" space
Make sure all your work is inked inNO PENCIL)
Make sure you turn your work in at the East Carolinian
Make sure you eat your vegetables
Scratch
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5 Unaccompanied
10 Exclusive
14 Latvian capital
15 Donated
16 Braid
17 Iraq's neighbor
18 Smallest amount
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20 Good buy
22 Pudding
ingredient
24 Illuminated
25 Oriental, e.g.
26 Stated as true
30 Scattered trash
34 Command to
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35 Mexican title
37 Skin
38 Retain
40 Cords
42 Underground
growth
43 Medgar � (civil
rights name)
45 Ohio or Iowa
47 American Indian
48 Describe
50 Raises
52 Water nymph
54 Goal
55 Mail carrier
58 Referred
62 Poker stake
63 Respond
65 Ditto
66 Heavenly object
67 Certain god
68 Ireland
69 Clothes
70 Unkempt
71 Matched
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28 Expensive
29 Son of Seth
31 Food fish
32 Overact
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41 Marked by
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Ji.lMBIlHU1 I1111?
-





Thursday, September 28, 1995 The East Carolinian
Travel without leaving home
Jennifer Coieman Senior WriterNational Geo-Was D.C era House and at me � Musk in Philad Iphia.temples, royal palaces and majestic mountains to its visitors. Walnut '�. naigrett ' �itl Pesto
S irragon Chicken
Having trouble deciding .�focus (HIongtb to l'e served prior
spend your sui irmudabut it will also feature his-to tl
EC1 s prepared INew. 'id a tour of tlie M.V.Already tins vear there has been
war. the Rud Alexandei ;which the iew to the Travel Adventure
Arts Series will be prewillel to Bermuda.Series. By invitation only, members
Travel-Adventure films to introducenenu for this adventure in-of the Pacesetter i i re treated to Thai
the Greenville community to the won-eludes such delicacies as Honey Gin-cuisine and a film narrated by Rudy
d rs of worldwide travel.Glazed Chicken, Grilled Fish withAlexander. The preview was incredibly
A person attendingngoClutney, (trance Glazed Greensuccessful, and season tickets have
adventure films can travel thtfBeans mid Coconut Milk Cognacalready begun to sell.
such places as Bermuda. Enl ake.Student admission is free to the
Alaska. Germany and Italy. But theNextup in the season is the filmmovie with a valid ECU II). Tickets
experience isn't just visual There isist Indwill b, �4 for everyone else.
an added treat in store for the die-io lias been with Ndinner are S 15. This
hard adventurer. In addition to thedandtl Film Unit sinceyear, students will be able to use their
films, there will be theme dinners serv-1957dience on a tourdeclining balance to pay for the din-
ing authentic cuisine fiof tl �iy islands found in thner. P more information, or to pur-
countries visited.Indiimie oi the East lndicall the Central Ticket
Photo courtesy ECU Student Union
Architecture imitates life. This building in Katmandu, Nepal
is only one of the mysterious sights from the world's only
Hindu kingdom that will be on display in the film Nepal: In the
Shadow of Mt. Everest.
The firs film f 1 n will
take the .leuer to Bermuda, with
guest host Doug Jones. Sea
travel-adventurers will remember
Jones from The Great Canadian Train
Ride, his last appearance at ECU.
Jones has been producing travel films
� � � fieri d - M
oconut Chicken.
: Bread with Macadamia Nuts
and Man
Tlie; toNe d here Dale
Smith will present In The Shadow ol
rest. A lunti tl 16 eth-
mice at 2X47:$ti.
Modern dance conies to ECU
since 19IS8. and has made repeated ' n
sacreJ
Beauty rules in
Melrose "Space"
Mark Brett
lifestyle Editor
Humanity's first, fledgling
steps into deep space. Hostile
aliens who want to make sure we
stay put on Earth. A team of young
hotshot space fighter pilots who
seem to be all that stands between
the Earth and utter annihilation.
Sounds good, huh? Sounds
like the stuff of great space opera,
the kind of premise that would
make really cooi sci-fi TV.
Unfortunately, this premise is
being wasted on a new FOX series
called "Space: Above and Beyond
Airing Sunday nights at 7 p.m
"Space" is the brainchild of former
"X-Files" producerwriters Glen
Morgan and Janes Wong. In star-
tling contrast to their intelligent,
moody work on that show. "Space"
is the retarded mutant offspring of
"Batdestar Galactica" and "Melrose
Place
The premise is basically
"Galactica" in reverse; instead of
trying to find Earth, humanity is
trying to escape it. Society is crum-
bling as the planet's population in-
creases more every year, and aew
space colonies are one answer to
our problems. Unfortunately, our
first two colonies are attacked and
destroyed by a mysterious alien
species.
Enter the Space Marines!
Whoo!
Our heroes are part of the
elite Marine Space Aviator Corps,
and it's with the actors portraying
these stalwart guardians that the
"Melrose" influence is most
strongly felt. Our heroes are all
amazingly beautiful young people,
gorgeous and plastic as the crappy
prop helmets they wear. These
people are just too perfect, walk-
ing talking Barbies and Kens with
all the personality and acting abil-
ity that implies.
But 1 can forgive that I refuse
to hate them because they're beau-
tiful: that's too easy. There's plenty
of other things to hate about
"Space without having to resort
to that
One thing would be the stock
characters. Nathan West our main
character, wants revenge for the
nwi11 mum mi � 11 mi w hi �Mwm.wwaw.ri ���w i �� n ,mim�mmi
See SPACE page 10
Photo courtesy Collectively Speaking
Here the dancers of Collectively Speaking (l-r: Marelle Carter.
Sandra Tillett and Terri Winchell) perform "Labyrinth The
company will appear on campus this weekend.
Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
MMHHMHHMIflBi
If you want to see better danc-
ing than what goes on downtown,
you're in luck. Collectively Speak-
ing a Greenville-based modern
dar.e company, is presenting its
premier performance at ECU'S
hepv ot Theatre Arts Studio The-
atre. Sept and Oct 1.
Co ectively Speaking was
formed two years ago. but now has
enough dancers to perform its own
show. The concert is entitled
"Weeks' Works: A Retrospective
and features five pieces choreo
graphed by Collectively Speaking's
artistic director. Patti Weeks
In addition to Weeks, other
company members include two ECU
graduates that are now public
school educators iJane Atkinson
Peele arid Terri Winchell). one that
is teaching in a private studio
(Christi Warreni and, four Kef
dance majors i Marelle Carter. Done
Geissler, Tara Martinelli and
Sandra Tillett).
The group will perform five
dances in a variety of choreo-
graphic approaches. "Bach Suite"
is a lyrical movement piece sec-
tioned into three solos and a trio.
In "From Whence I Came the au-
dience hears the inner dialogue of
a woman who expresses her inse-
curities related to living in a male-
dominated world.
"Crooked Sky is an abstract
dance built around images of the
rugged canyons of the southwest-
ern U.S. and the ever-changing
landscape. "Fields of Vision" is a
statement on lookism: that is, judg-
ing people (and often ourselves)
solely on the way they look. The
concert ends with a section from
"Labyrinth which highlights the
technical skills of the dancers in
this highly energetic excerpt.
Collectively Speaking has per-
formed in informal concerts at ECU
and across the state. Their goals in-
clude performing in various venues
throughout the state and conduct-
ing residencies in schools and com-
munities in eastern North Carolina.
There will be three perfor-
mances: Saturday, Sept. 30 at 6:30
and 8:30 p.m. and Sunday. Oct. 1 at
2 p.m. The concert will be in the
Messick Theatre Arts Studio Theatre
on the corner of 5th and Eastern
Street.
The suggested donations are $5
for the general public and S3 for stu-
dents and seniors. Sealing is limited,
so get your ticket in advance or
make reservations. If performances
are not sold out. tickets will be avail-
able at the door. For ticket reserva-
tions or more information, contact
Patti Weeks at 1919) 328-1198.
cming
ttra
NoieS From Trie Undcrground
��������������nm
Offensive mythology highlights Urotsukidoji
Dale Williamson
Staff Writer
"Mankind, yot
race With tl
words. rots -
Overftendtakt � ;�
ward spiral into an i
rs on down
believable apoca-
lyptic nightmare. It's an unsettling trip
that, in a bizarre way, still manages to
offer a pi s I
Urot � � �
must admit that 1
entire
two-hour - '
first in . the
filled v
demon � lulgi
Sudden
. right oi
the Magumo kemi relationship, demonic qualities. Thus, an intrigu-
but the filmmakers keep layering the ing battle ensues where two god-like
storyline with other essential elements beings tight not only for the universe
until it explodes into a universal war hut also for the object of their desire.
bet the three dimensionally-sepa- Akei H by the end ot the
� : of the demons, the film i � � solved is awakened
to the fact that
the (Ivertiend is
not what they
had expected
While the
story is an inno-
vative concept
and the film is
pel it Ctly paced.
Urotsukidoji is
not for the faint
hearted nor any-
on who is
ended. The
� -uai imagery
around the plot and the ex-
ilem e inherent in
� pt lorced all St. 17
releasi I 11
legend, the Chojin,
nd will ap-
itopia"
Even some of my
close friends are
offended by
U rotsukidoji,
and believe me
that's not an easy
thing to do.
the he
ike the
men
� pi irtrayed in relation
: �
� I by this film.
CD. Reviews
and believe me that's not an easy thing
to do.
Still, this is one of the finest
Japanimation films ! have yet to en-
counter. The animation is up to the
standards of the genre, characters are
well-developed and the action se-
quences are quite mind-boggling.
But what pushes 'rotsukidoji up
to the status of greatness is the simple
fact that the concept and the storyline
take mythic qualities and blend them
with every day human dynamics. The
audience is introdu ed with a harrow
ing narration o the Overfiend, then
carried through the struggle to bring
the Overfiend into reality and discovei
by the end that to give birth to a uto-
iociety some sacrifices hive to
he made. The result is a film filled with
ng origin i
I 'rotsukidoji is an unm
P"nence that many may not be ible
to stomach la irtoons are not
known for pulling their punches, and
this film is no
� thishvrfiei'd will
helming ignorant

On a om
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, September 28
Faculty Jazz Band
at Staccato Cafe and Grille
One Step Beyond
at the Attic
(80's retro)
Movie: Bad Boys
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
free:
Friday, September 29
Special Event Jazz at Sight
in Mendenhall
Mother Nature
at the Attic
(classic rock)
Blues Old Stand
at Peasant's Cafe
Flyin' Mice
AIDS Benefit Show
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Alabama
with Kenny Chesney
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
(country)
Movie: Bad Boys
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, September 30
Amateurs
at the Attic
(reggae)
Natalie Merchant
with Jimmie Dale Gilmore
at Ovens Auditorium
in Charlotte
Movie: Bad Boys
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Sunday, October 1
Gravity's Pull
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
SEND LS INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event that you'd
like listed in our Coming Attractions
column? If so, please send us information
(a schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville. NC
27858
Urge Overkill
Exit The Dragon
Jay Myers
Staff Writer
I'n the Evil that's in this
I I m the Evil in you" are the
first words that you hear on Urge
a album. Exit The
� i ml stuff, eh�
Slayer" at
p ol youi lungs, doesn't it?
Well, that's where Urge Overkill
gets you. The Evil they're talking
about is "Jaywalkin the title of the
first track. You see, at one time or
another we've crossed 10th street to
get that sub sandwich from Mike's
Deli, or get cash from the ATM. and
every time we become a little more
evil.
Whether they're ripping off AC
DC or Neil Diamond or Bill Withers,
Urge Overkill does it with style and
panache and with tongue-in-cheek
It's easy to tell that a fun time was
had by all who participated on this
record. Even though the band mem
bers use such pretentious pseud-
onyms as Nash Kato. "King" Roeser,
and Blackie 0, and wear outfits right
off the cover of a trendy fashion
magazine, the truth is it's all part of
the act, much like the characters.
costumes, and make-up used by KISS
(who they tend to emulate musically
as well). The only difference is that
Urge Overkill is in on the joke.
The ability to laugh at them-
selves is something most hands lack.
but not this one. And that is to he
respected because, even though they
come off as a Spinal Tap for the hip
See URGE page 10





8
Thursday, September 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
"SNL" faces changes
for new Fall season
NEW YORK (AP) - Dying is
easy. Comedy is hard. Fixing "Sat-
urday Night Live?" That could be
the hardest one of all.
"It's time to reinvent the
show NBC Entertainment Presi-
dent Warren Littlefield said he told
Lome Michaels, producer of
"SNL after its beyond-dismal,
critically clob-
bered 1994-95
season ended
last May. "That is
exactly what he
has done So
which is it?
"Reinvent"
or "tweak"? Is
"reinvent" too
much to hope
for? If so, will
"tweak" suffice?
"We began
to examine ev-
erything at its
most
level
basic
said
MMHHHHMHiHHi
Michaels, explaining the recovery
process that began once the show
went on summer hiatus. After iden-
tifying "what we thought as a core
was the best of 'Saturday Night
Live " he said, "we tried to build
from there
One major result: a half-dozen
new cast members, including David
Koechner and Nancy Walls (from
Chicago's Second City comedy
troupe), Wiil Ferrell and Cheri
Oteri (from the Los Angeles-based
Groundlings), standup comedy-im-
pressionist Darrell Hammond, and
standup comic Jim Breuer.
They will join just five return-
ees in the "newer and fewer" en-
semble: David Spade (who will have
his own weekly department), Norm
MacDonald,
Mark McKinney,
Tim Meadows
and Molly Shan-
non.
Gone are
other longtime
players, includ-
ing Al Franken,
Kevin Nealon,
Mike Myers,
Chris Farley,
Adam Sandier,
Chris Elliott and
Michael
McKean.
There will
be lots of new
writers, new co-musical directors
and a new director, Beth McCarthy
(replacing veteran Dave Wilson).
Much will stay the same: guest
hosts and musical guests (for the
season premiere, Mariel Hemingway
and the artist formerly known as
Prince), commercial parodies, and
Weekend Update once again an-
chored by MacDonald.
This sense of tradition became
"It's time to
reinvent
'Saturday Night
Live
� Warren
Littlefield, NBC
Entertainment
President
clear at the news conference, which
took place in Studio 8H on the
show's brand-new set. This back-al-
ley "home base" is handsome
enough, but it sticks so closely to
the downtown look the show has
always had that viewers might not
notice any difference.
While "SNL" has much to
prove during the 1995-96 season,
it has even more to disprove: That
it's worn out and irrelevant, an in-
stitution past its prime and its time.
That it stands for nothing other
than its own accumulating years
and shrinking stature. That
Michaels, "SNL's" mastermind, has
of late mostly pandered to a
younger, dumber constituency for
whom he has no affinity nor re-
spect. That the show exists mostly
to spin off movies and launch stars.
Perhaps the show's first gen-
eration of "SNL" devotees will
See SNL page 9
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while you wait
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K





I 3
77ie East Carolinian
Thursday, September 28, 1995
TkeyVe Each
The Greatest Shrimp Around
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3001 S.EVANS STREET
756-2011
Natural life I �
Walking burns approximately the same amount of calories
per mile as does running.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter
This message this been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
from page 8
never settle for anything short of
turning back the clock. For them.
the first few seasons retain a
specialness that might be likened
to the Beatles, whereas too much
about the show ever since is Paul
McCartney and Wings.
To be in 8H and hear Michaels
recall that on "the very, very first
"Saturday Night' show in 1975, we
did a sketch called 'Bee Hospital
just over there and see him ges-
ture toward a certain corner of the
studio - well, that's got to give you
a little charge, at least if you remem-
ber seeing "Bee Hospital" that
night of Oct. 11 in your living room
a thousand miles away.
When the show began, there
was little if any other topical com-
edy on the tube. There vas no origi-
nal cable programming, no satellite
transmission, no home VCRs, no
camcorders, no Internet. "SNL"
was just about it, and it surprised
us week after week.
;�Ar
�NATURAL
bccreationaI
In a media-overstuffed world
two decades later, "SNL espe-
cially with its own past echoing in
nightly reruns on Comedy Central,
has long since lost its capacity to
startle.
These days, it takes O.J.
Simpson in his Bronco to shake a
nation of jaded, satiated viewers.
"SNL" can't be blamed for that.
"We did bad shows in every
season with every troupe
Michaels noted in an interview in
April. "But some years there's just
great good will from the audience,
because they know that we're try-
ing
WoodWorks
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Bring this ad with your
student I.D. and receive
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210 W. 10th St. Greenville
Open 7 days
M-F 10-7, Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5
752 � 6863
$uper-Obscure
Jtfrivia nswerj
Today's Topic:
TV Spin - Offs
1. "All in the Funnily" spawned
both "The Jeffersons" and
"Maude
2. "The Danny Thomas Show"
gave birth to "The Andy
Griffith Show
3. "The Dukes of Hazard"
shoved "Enos" into the light of
day.
4. "Diff'rent Strokes" gave us
both "The Facts of Life" and
"Hello, Larry
5. "Maude's" housekeeper
Florida spun off into her own
show, "Good Times
6. "Love, American Style" un-
leashed "Happy Days" on an
unsuspecting world with an
episode starring Ron Howard
and Cindy Williams.
7. "Barney Miller" let retired
police detective "Fish" loose on
his own.
8. "The Flintstones" nurtured
"Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm"
into their own series.
9. "Happy Days" was quite a
prolific show, spinning off no
less than three separate series:
"Laverne and Shirley "Mork
and Mindy" and the ever-popu-
lar "Joanie Loves Chachi
10. "Hawaii Five-O" didn't tech-
nically have a spin-off, but
"Magnum, PI" comes close. De-
buting the year after "Five-O"
went off the air, "Magnum" was
made by the same staff, had the
same location, and made occa-
sional references to the activi-
ties of "Five-O" leading man
McGarrett. So it's a trick ques-
tion. So sue me.
Hours
9-6 M-F
9-5 SAT
752-0322
Touching, Moving Dramatic Comeclv
SOMEONE WHO'LL WATCH OVER ME
by Frank McGuinness
November 9, 10, 11, 12V 13 and 14. 1995
A Bewitching Legend of the Mysterious Smokey Mountains
DARK OF THE MOON
by Howard Richardson and William Bcmey
FebruarvS. 9,10,11, 12 and i3, 19
March 28, 29, 30. 31. April 1 and 2, 1996
A Galvanic Evening of Dance
Easl Carolina
DANCE THEATRE
EAST
CAROLINA
COIN &
PAWN
INSTANT ("ASH LOANS- WE
BUY GOLD & SILVER
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All Transactions Strictly Confidential
Corner of 10th & Dickinson
April 18, 19, 20. 21, 22 and 23. 1996
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
1995-1996 Season
A Rip-Rorin Piatol-Shootin RootinTootin' Wcifcro Mwiul Hit
DESTRY RIDES AGAIN
b Harold Rome and Leonard Geishe
October 5,6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. 1995
Or, by mail:
Easl Carolina Playhouse
East Carolina University
Greenville. NC 27858-4353
Charge by phone:
328-6829
Or, come by:
McGinnis Theatre
Monday - Friday
10:00 am until 4.00 pm
Matinee performances av2:00 p.m all other dale& aie al 8:UO p.m.
SI SO TICKETS AVAILABLE BfGINMNG AUGUST M. I9V5 AT ONLY S3
i





10
Thursday, September 28,1995
The East Carolinian
URGE from page 7 SPACE from page 7
crowd most of the time, there are
moments when they present them-
selves seriously. These moments,
such as "View of the Rain" (about
everyone's search for identity) and
�Digital Black Epilogue" (about
hope in times of trouble), tend to
resonate more because of the laugh-
ter that surrounds them.
Back to the KISS connection,
over half the songs on this album
("JaywalkinV -The Break 'Need
Sorr Air "This Is No Place "Take
Me "And You'll Say and "Tin
Foil") sound like they came out of
the Destroyer sessions, full of
cheese and guitars. I guess this is a
generational thing, but I'll be the
first to admit that I loved KISS when
I was a kid.
We all knew that KISS wasn't
the be all, end all of bands, but for
a time they made life fun and excit-
ing. Gene Simmons was like some
comic book character come to life,
with his forked tongue that dripped
blood and his Dragon outfit.
Well, exit the Dragon, and en-
ter Urge Overkill. This album isn't a
masterpiece, but it sounds great, it's
fun. and there's substance under-
neath the flashy surface.
death of his one true love at the
hands of the aliens.
Shane Vansen, tough-as-nails
female cadet, fights to exorcise the
demons of her tortured past.
Cooper Hawkes, ex-con and
product of a military genetic en-
hancement program, who hates nor-
mal humans for their prejudice
against his kind, called "Tanks
Let's face it, these are all people
we've seen before. There's also a
cartoonish drill sergeant, the obliga-
tory nervous guy. a reserved Tank
officer who becomes our heroes'
commanding officer and a bland fe-
male character who says she "lacks
direction" (no kidding!).
There's even a guy with "Dead
Meat" stamped on his forehead. Ca-
det Pagodin 'or Pag) befriends the
surly Hawkes, thus sealing his own
fate. Hawkes, after all. needs to find
a reason to fight, since his hatred
for humans makes him less than
eager to risk his life for them.
Killed literally minutes after
reaching out to Hawkes, Pag be-
comes the rebellious young Tank's
single motivation.
But all these sci-fi and war
movie cliches aren't even the biggest
problem with "Space: Above and Be-
yond
No, that honor goes to the
botched handling of the cool science
fiction concepts that are the show's
real underpinning.
In one scene, the cadets unex-
pectedly encounter and capture an
alien. This is an encounter with a
race they know nothing about, a real
first contact situation. This could
have been a really good creep-out
scene, as our awe-struck heroes re-
move the alien's space armor and
uncover some hideous alien physi-
ognomy.
Unfortunately, all they do is
stare at it, and eventually kill it. In
the most ludicrous scene in the epi-
sode, the young cadets show amaz-
ing communication skills as they in-
terpret the creature's every vague
gesture with stunning accuracy.
Then they stupidly try to pour
water through some obvious breath-
ing vents in the side of its head!
When the alien convulses and dies
minutes later, they assume it com-
mitted suicide.
Yep, that must be it. Couldn't
have had anything to do with that
foreign substance you shoved into
its lungs!
But the worst sin of all for
"Space" is that its dogfight se-
quences lack any choreography or
sense of excitement. The computer-
generated ships look nice, but the
maneuvers they execute are
yawningly boring. Even "Galactica"
had better space battles than this!
"Space" creators Morgan and
Wong need to go back and watch
Star Wars again, or at least some of
the old World War II fighter plane
movies they claim to be emulating
in the first place. Maybe then we'd
get the action this show promised.
With poor scripting, bad acting,
lame battle scenes and missed op-
portunities for cool sci-fi thrills,
"Space" fails at every turn. Let's
hope this show gets an overhaul
soon; it would be a shame to let such
a good concept go to waste.
On a scale of one to 10, "Space:
Above and Beyond" rates a lame
four.
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(919) 355-5510
We want to welcome back all
ECU students by offering a new
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Tuesdays @ 4:00 p.m.
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on the lanes
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8:30-12 MIDNIGHT
$1.79 per game
$5 per person (shoes included; 3 people per team) j sce
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will be announced. For more info, or rides call 758-9902
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11
Thursday, September 28, 1995 The East Carolinian
Cheerleaders: the
team behind the team
Craig Perrott
Staff Writer
When the football team takes the
field on Saturday afternoons, there is
another hard-working, dedicated team
right alongside them: the cheerlead-
ers.
Cheerleaders in general have
been stereotyped again and again, but
the word "dedication" sums up what
cheerleading is all about If you were
among the Pirate faithful who stuck-
out the wet conditions during ECU's
thumping of Central Michigan two
weeks ago, you saw the cheerleaders
pouring their hearts out to the end.
"You have to like the game to
cheer said varsity cheerleader and
senior, Taemi Gilley. "We were in a
pour-down in the rain, but we had a
good time. We're a close squad
The cheerleaders practice seven
days a week. Sundays being optional,
so when Saturday rolls around it's
their time to have fun.
��When
people actually
look at us up
front, I guess
they don't real-
ize how much
work is put into
this Gilley said.
Beside prac-
ticing every day,
the cheerleaders
have mandatory' weight-lifting twice
a week, as well as a timed run once a
week. Some of the cheerleaders also
have jobs. This extracurricular stress
combined with schoolwork makes for
a difficult schedule.
"You have to like
the game to
��
Many different aspects make up
the sport of cheerleading. Gymnastics,
flexibility, and dance are important for
the girls while strength and technique
are crucial to the guys. The physical
i demands are great
for the ladies, as
their knees are
heavily stressed
during jumps,
drops and tum-
bling. As for the
guys lifting the
girls with one
hand, it's not what
it seems to be.
"It's a learned technique varsity
captain TJ. Sawyer said. "It's more
technique than muscle, I can tell you
that It takes a lot of practice; I've been
See CHEER page 13
cheer,1
�Taemi Gilley, varsity
cheerleader
Break
time!
During a hard
workout, these
football players take a
quick break before
going back to
practicing for the
game against the
WVU Mountaineers
this Saturday in
Dowdy-Ficklen
stadium.
Photo by KEN CLARK
Swim teams stroke
for season victories
J. Miles Layton
Sports Editor
The swim and diving team is
gearing up again for a champion-
ship season. With a four to six-mile-
a-day workout in the pool, the
women's team reigns as last year's
champion of the Colonial Athletic
Association (CAA) and hopes for a
repeat performance. The men's
team has dramatically improved
and is stroking ahead towards its
goal of winning another (CAA)
championship.
Coach Rick Kobe is the man
who is training the team to make
all this possible. His hard regimen
consists of two workouts a day. Ev-
ery other day, the team swims a
couple miles in the morning and a
few more in the afternoon for a two
Photo by J. Miles Layton
These cheerleaders toss each other around in preparation for a winning Pirate season.
Saturday at noon they will cheer the team to victory against West Virginia University.
Volleyball team digs in for win
Avram Klein
Stmff Writer
Tuesday night, the Lady Pi-
rates turned Williams Arena from
a volleyball court into a battle field.
After five intense matches of play,
the Pirates finally won a victory
from the UNC Wilmington visitors.
While the players waited for
the first match to begin, they seem
relaxed and were smiling. The team
had a definite feeling of confidence
in themselves as players and as a
team that comes through in their
attitude towards one another.
With the completion of the Na-
tional Anthem, Head Coach Kim
Walker collected the Pirates for a
quick pep-talk The coach took on
an air of seriousness, a more tran-
quil, focused, hawk-like character
than the easy-going coach I've in-
terviewed over the phone and be-
fore practices.
The first initial volley landed
in favor of Wilmington, but the Pi-
rates struck back and took control
of the ball with the second serve.
Each time the Pirates won a vol-
ley, the team exploded in unison
with a loud "Yeah Their yells
served as an invigorating pat on the
back as well as a means to intimi-
date their opponent.
The Pirates were fresh and
powerful in the first match. As soon
as the team began to show a lack
of control on the ball, they recoiled
and struck back across the net with
fierce precision. The Pirates were
personified by their spirit and cel-
ebrated each score with high fives
and they scream, "Out together
when the Wilmington ball flew over
its estimated mark.
The Pirates took the first
match with considerable ease, win-
ning 15-5.
The second match took off at
full speed. The Pirates were forced
to dive for attempted kills sent over
by Wilmington, and they returned
the favor, earning the first point.
With a victory under their belt,
Walker began to shed a few smiles
and was not afraid to visibly show
displeasure for inaccurate line calls.
After an initial lead by the Pirates,
Wilmington was able to bring it to
6-6.
With a grueling struggle for
power on the score board,
Wilmington called a time-out with
10-11 on the board in order to bring
in a new server. Possession of the
volley changed hands four times
without a point scored, until ECU
was able to tie it up before taking
an additional time out. Unfortu-
nately, the match ended quickly
with a loss for the Pirates at 11-15.
By the third match, players on
both teams were beginning to tire.
ECU began to have trouble with
their serve. The Pirates had a frus-
trating struggle to catch up to
Wilmington, who stood at ieast five
points ahead for the majority of the
playing time. After a streak of mis-
takes, ECU began a fierce climb up
the score board and took a time out
with 9-11.
As the score tottered at 13-12,
coach Walker sat tentatively, as if
she were a scientist watching and
waiting over a delicate experiment.
Then, with 13-14 on the board.
Wilmington took a 'time out' and
came back to win in the next vol-
ley.
The Pirates knew they had to
win the next set to stay in the
match and that's what they did. The
score was evenly weighted through-
out most of the match with ties on
the board at 7-7 and 12-12 that took
a long time to break: ECU eventu-
ally won the match with 15-12.
The fifth and game winning set
was a rally-scoring match in which
each play could mean a score for
either team. The excitement of the
match doubled as the playing be-
came a mixture of frantic and pre-
See DIG page 13
or three hours. Weightlifting and
running are part of the Kobe phi-
losophy of winning through hard
work and conditioning.
"There are two things that
make a great swimmer Kobe ex-
plains. "One is conditioning. The
other is tech-
nique and we
work on both
A veteran
swim coach with
over 16 years ex-
perience, Kobe
believes talent
isn't enough to
take a person to
the top.
"You've got �����������
to have the talent, but you've got
to work consistently to win Kobe
said.
Since 1982, Kobe has been
head swim coach where his philoso-
phy has compiled an impressive
record filled with several men's and
women's conference champion-
ships. In 1994, he was voted the
CAA coach of the year.
"I want to see the girls repeat
last year's championship he said.
"The talent is there. They are com-
mitted
Kobe is confident about the
men's success.
"The guys are looking to move
back up to the top three in the con-
"Swimming fast at
meets makes me
want to get up in
the morning
� Mex Vitier, swimmer
ference he said.
With such a demanding coach,
the 62 athletes on the team work
hard but get a sense of accomplish-
ment.
"Swimming fast at meets
makes me want to get up in the
morning said
�������� Alex Vitier, a
junior who has
been on the
team three
years. "Going to
all those prac-
tices makes me
swim faster
Vitier pre-
dicts success
������������� this year.
"The guy's team is going to sur-
prise a lot of people he said. "I
predict we are going to win. I think
we are going to give James Madi-
son and UNCW a run for their
money
McGee Moody, a senior veteran
with four seasons under his belt,
motivates himself in the mornings
by thinking about winning.
"The best part is winning
Moody said.
He predicts a good season be-
cause of the level of strength the
team is at now.
"So far this year, we are much
See SWIM page 13
4t6Ute elite cee&
Athletes in the making
Chris Padgett
Amanda Ross
Staff Writer
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Competition was fierce last weekend in the King and Queen of the Hill competition which
pitted residence hal! against residence hall to see who had the best athletes on campus.
For junior Chris Padgett, soc-
cer has been a way of life from a
very early age. This 5-foot-9, 145
pound, midfielder from
Swansboro, N.C has been playing
the sport since the age of four, and
has been playing for the ECU team
for three years.
This two-time letter winner
and co-captain of the men's 1995
soccer team was last season's lead-
ing scorer with six goals and three
assists. Coaches will look to this
creative and skilled player to be
the leader on offense once again
in '95.
However, this season he has
remained scoreless, but Padgett
still remains optimistic. "I'd love
to come back this year and score
10 goals he said.
His scoring drought could be
due in part to a tough schedule,
that so far has included three na-
tionally ranked teams: North Caro-
lina, James Madison and Old Do-
minion.
"It's been a rough year so far
said Padgett. "We've played qual-
ity teams from traditionally good
soccer schools. We'll have to take
those losses as learning experi-
ences
Padgett is playing the same
position as midfielder as he did
last season, but believes his role
is a little different from last year.
He thinks the team seems to be
taking on a different style than the
'94 season. This could be due to
the a new head coach, Will Wiberg.
As a freshman, Padjett started
in every game. He was the teams
second leading scorer during his
first season. Coach Wiberg said
Padgett is one of the best hustlers
on the squad and never gives up.
He demonstrated his tough will by
See WEEK page 12
t
jrr
11- � J.IMH����
.I.JJJLJUUL

.






� Ai
12
Thursday, September 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
This week's Associated Press lines
THURSDAY
No. 17 Maryland (minus 1 12) at Georgia
Tech
Terps 4-0 for first time since 1978 MARY-
LAND 28-24.
The Buckeyes are favored by 6 12 points
OHIO ST. 31-21.
SATURDAY
Washington St. (plus 29) at No. 2 Nebraska
Huskers have won 29 straight regular-sea-
son games NEBRASKA 38-10.
Mississippi (plus 28) at No. 3 Florida
Gators averaging 50 points and 578
yards FLORIDA 50-21.
No. 4 Colorado (minus 2 12) at No. 10 Okla-
homa
Injured Detmer won't play for Buffs
COLORADO 24-21.
Arizona St. (plus 21) at No5 Southern Cal
Sun Devils have won last three at
Coliseum SOUTHERN CAL 41-17.
Wisconsin (plus 15) at No. 6 Penn St.
Close call for the Lions PENN
ST. 31-28.
Miami, Ohio (plus 30) at No. 8 Michigan
Wolverines should be 10-0 going
into Penn State MICHIGAN 35-7.
Wake Forest (plus 32) at No. 11 Virginia
Cavs have won 11 straight against
Wake VIRGINIA 48-7.
Oklahoma St. (plus 31) at No. 12 Tennessee
Vols and Cowboys meet for first
time TENNESSEE 51-14.
No. 13 Auburn (minus 16 12) at Kentucky
Tigers end Wildcats' two-game win streak
AUBURN 35-14.
No. 14 LSU (minus 7 12) at South Carolina
Gamecocks have horrible defense LSU 28-24.
Northern Illinois (plus 27) at No. 16 Kansas St.
Wildcats coming off 67-0 win over Akron KAN-
SAS ST. 44-10.
No. 18 Washington (minus 7) ut Oregon St.
Huskies have won 17 of last 18 in series
WASHINGTON 24-14.
No. 20 Alabama (minus 3) at Georgia
Two struggling teams GEORGIA 20
17.
No. 21 Texas (no line) at SMU
Longhorns rebound from loss to Notre
Dame TEXAS 34-21.
No. 23 Arkansas (minus 8) at Vanderbilt
Vandy scored 3 points in last two games
ARKANSAS 24-10.
No. 24 Texas Tech (plus 1 12) at Baylor
Tech nearly beat Penn State TEXAS
TECH 21-17.
WEEK from page 11
playing part of the '94 season with
two broken toes.
Padgett believes he can help
contribute certain values to the
team.
"Lead by example and show
the hard work ethic to the younger
guys he said.
During his junior and senior
years at Swansboro High School,
he earned all-conference, all-region
and all-state awards. That same
dedication he had in high school
has carried over into his playing
years here at ECU.
To date, the men's soccer team
is 1-7. with 12 regular season
matches left until the start of the
Colonial Athletic Association
Championships which begin Nov.
9.
For this urban and regional
planning major, he would just like
to continue playing soccer for this
season and next season, (which
will be his last year of eligibility).
"I'd like to finish playing soc-
cer here at ECU and from there
see where my degree takes me
Padgett said.
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This week's TEC line
West Virginia at East Carolina
Pirate offense
explodes. ECU moves
closer to a winning
season. ECU 30 -17.
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The East Carolina University Student Union Presents
CULTURAL AWARENESS WEEK
MONDAY, OCTOBER 2 - FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6
HiUpest 11 12 'Stuck 7Zab
Vgs -Hti, V.C
Coming SaniRPav
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Receae esenD
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� only stop between
Florida and New York
Tickets only $12 in
advance, $15 at the door.
Order Your ticket today by
phone!
Call (919) 2614998
Attention Students
Langston Park Apartments
(Beside Tut River Estates, Near Campus)
Free Cable
Free WaterSewer
New Ownership
2 Bedrooms
Appliances, Dishwasher
Laundry Connections
Cats with Fee
Moore Realty
752-2533
Monday, October 2
Cultural Fair
Located In Front of The Wright Place
11:00 AM- 1:00 PM
Tuesday, October 3
"A Day with Your Heart"
Located In the MuW-Purpose Room - MSC
11:00 AM-2:00 PM
MSC Tri-athlon Kickoff -
Billiards, Bowling, and Fun
Mendenhall Student Center at 7:00 PM
Recreation Area - Ground Floor
Wednesday, October 4
XzihMic Ha
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For More Information,
Call the SU Hotline at
328-6004.
FIHplno-Chlnese
African-American,
Native American
a German-Danish
but grew up in Japan!
FRIE with valid
ECU l.D.HI
Hendrtx Theatre
at 8:00 PM.
Friday, October 6
JAZZ AT HIC4IT
MSC - Great Room at 8:00 PM
71
HOW 'BOUT A
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UINCIP I. I. S of SOUND K I. T I It I M I NT IN V I S I I (
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Downtown Greenville (Across from U.B.E.) 757-1666
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��' �
The East Carolinian
Thursday, September 28, 1995
13
KOULJOf
j
Toach ofc C�as�
"Greenville's
ONLY
�Twill i
Nightclub
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers l lpm-lan
CASH PRIZE
�ConiCNtanb neeO in call & register in advance
Mum arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
KCl STVDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
(behind John's Convenient Marti
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
CHEER from page 11
on the squad for four years and I'm
just getting those things down
There is another facet to
cheerleading than leading the football
team to victory, and that's competing
with other cheerleaders.
The Pirates are involved with the
Universal Cheerleading Association
(UCA). and compete with cheerlead-
ers from universities around the na-
tion annualy. The first round of
competetion submits a videotape of
the team's performance. The teams
are then ranked regionally, (the Pi-
rates placed sixth in the southeast last
year), and a certain number of quali-
fiers make it to the finals.
Last year the finals were held in
Orlando. Florida. ECU placed 14th in
the nation among such schools as
Tennessee, Kentucky and South Caro-
lina who offer full scholarships for
their cheerleading teams. ECU pro-
vides no financial support for it's
cheerleading squad.
"The best thing about
iSV
AH EXPLOSIVE
IllAIIMS THB1LL If BE!
-1� Mum�(aw - �mm
ITSIEVEMrilLLSCir
times twit
- mmm MM. MMOTif fM) - Map
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"��k wi�sr�iWaM�a
MARTIN LAWRENCE WILL SMITH
BAD BOYS
THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 � FRIDAYSEPT. 29 � SATURDAY, SEPT. 30
All films start at 8:0Q PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Facultyand Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
For More information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
tNr0
Mm
i&ft

1
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� u'We Center
4MAP
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Grand B
The Guggenheim Museum fe
Pack Tour Bags!
There's only one place where you can find all of this, and
YOU COULD BE THERE!
The Student Union's Annual New York City Trip, November 22-26.
Spend the Thanksgiving Holiday in the Big Apple for as little as $140.
To reserve your space or for more information, call J b
the Central Ticket Office at 328-4788, or stop by the 6$ Jg
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall today! $�
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline - 328-6004
cheerleading is the trips you get to
go on said Sawyer.
Besides going to Orlando last
year, the squad traveled with the foot-
ball team to Auburn. Trips to Ten-
nessee and Illinois highlight the sea-
son for the cheerleaders in 1995.
Pee Dee the Pirate is also a vi-
tal part of the cheerleading team.
Brian Barbour is one of four people
who make Pee Dee come to life ev-
ery week.
"It takes a lot of dedication
Barbour said. "It's really hot inside
that suit, you can't see, and it's hard
to breathe. But, it's worth it. Pee Dee
represents the school and he is the
number one fan for East Carolina
Besides physical endurance, it
takes a lot of creativity to be a mas-
cot. You have to pump up the crowd
when the team is winning, and en-
tertain them when they're losing. Ac-
cording to Barbour, Pee Dee is the
personification of fun.
"If it wasn't for Pee Dee, I
wouldn't be in school said Barbour
For all the hard work that Pee
Dee and the cheerleaders put into
what they do, all they ask for in re-
turn is a little respect
"I wish people would give us
more respect, from the students to
the administrative officesaid TJ.
Sawyer. "I don't think we get what
we deserve
SWIM from page 11
better off than we were last year at
this time
Rachel Atkinson, a senior, has
swam for four years and hopes to
repeat last year's conference perfor-
mance in her final year.
T hope we win the conference
again because it is my senior year
she said.
Atkinson does the Kobe regi-
men because of the satisfaction she
gets through winning.
Sandra Ossmann, a sophomore,
is in her second season with the
team.
"I think the best part is win-
ning Ossmann said. "Last year we
won the conference and I hope we
do it again
Being surrounded by a lot of
seasoned talent does not intimidate
Ossmann.
"It makes me admire Rachel for
sticking with it all these years she
said. "I hope I can do that also
The team has to get up three
mornings a week and swim from 6-
8 a.m. to get in extra miles before
the more rigorous afternoon work-
out.
"It's not my favorite thing to get
up at 5:30 a.m. in the morning and
jump into a cold pool Ossman said.
Vitier is not a morning person.
"The worse part is waking up
when it is all cold outside and get-
ting into freezing water instead of
staying in a warm bed Vitier said.
Moody says the worst part of
swimming is the extra laps.
"Probably the worst part is to
try and convince yourself that you
can go one more set when you don't
have the energy to go any further,
but you do anyway Moody said.
The team's first meet is Oct. 3
where they will compete against
each other in a pentathalon. Each
swimmer will predict his or her own
time in five events. In between each
100 meter set, the swimmer will get
a 12 minute rest Before finishing,
each athlete will have to do the but-
terfly, freestyle, breast and back-
stroke. Points will be awarded to
those who come closest to their
goals and beat them. The one clos-
est to predicting his or her perfor-
mance will win. The pentathlon
starts at 3 p.m. at Minges pool.
KJL 3 from page 11
cise. Time-outs changed from a re-
laxing break away from intense
playing, into a swarming hive with
the energy of a NASCAR pit stop.
ECU held Wilmington on the
board at 13, climbing from 9 to 14
with three real points and took a
time out. Wilmington then tied it
up at 14-14, leaving the next volley
to win it all. The crowd and side-
lines moved to the edge of their
seats as the last serve is made and
Wilmington hits the ball out of
bounds. The crowd exploded to
their feet screaming for the victory.
After the game, Melanie
Richards, who totaled 33 kills, said,
"It's tough to play five game
itt County 9-fm
264 gast
Bungee Jump
$10 off w valid
ECU Student ID
All next week
Biggest Fair
East of Raleigh
matches, but that's the true test of
team work. And I think we showed
everyone that we are a team
Carrie Brne, who added 23 digs
said, "We hustled our butts, pulled
together as a team and came out
on top
Freshman Kristin Warner who
recorded 55 assists, said, "We
played aggressive. We knew we
wanted it, so we went for it and got
it
Walker seemed happy after the
game, but was "a little shaky
"It was a fantastic match, with
a real strong first set Walker said.
"In the fifth set, to come back and
score three real points-served
points-is extremely difficult in a
rally scoring match
The Lady Pirate Volleyball
team play next at the UNC Greens-
boro. On Oct. 3, the Pirates will be
playing Campbell in Williams Arena
at 7 p.m.
Mickey Gut
Si Style Skap,
compUt Uai aaA fa
cuut I
WmIm "RaSrart !
IS2.00off Deep I
conditioning treatment J
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waves j
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IacaUiatm H. Q�mtfa
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atalog
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Division Of TOYJ"
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�T� -
14
Thursday, September 28, 1995 The East Carolinian
DT3m
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
� i and 2 Bedrooms ��
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quite one bedroom
turriished opoirnenis $0 a month
6 month lease
ALSO UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
23W2V01 Eqst 5th Stieet
On site Laundt
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
J I or Tommy Williams
756-7815 758-7436.
ROOMMATE WANTED: FEMALE
wanted for semi-private room. Townhouse
located 2 blocks from Campus, $143 plus
14 utilities. Please call Deb. Dawn, or
Jim at 758-8362.
NEED TWO CREATIVE, CONSIDER
ATE ROOMIES for 3 bedroom house.
Close to school, central air. fireplace, loft,
music room, patio, wooded lot. Excellent
place for excellent people. Call today 758-
7993.
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX FOR RENT
$335 month. 6 blocks from campus,
washer dryer. Nice, Excellent Deal, Call
758-7531.
FREE RENT HALF OF SEPTEMBER:
WESLEY COMMONS. 1 & 2 Bedroom,
Range, Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer
Hookups, Decks & Pat ios in most units,
Laundry Facility. Sand Volleyball Court
Located 5 blocks from campus. FREE
WATER & SEWER. WYNDHAM COURT:
2 Bedrooms, Stove RefrigeratorDish-
washer Washer & Dryer HookupsPatios
on first floor. Located 5 blocks from cam-
pus. These and Other fine properties Man-
aged by Pitt Property Management, 108
A Brownlea Dr. 758-1921
ROOMMATE WANTED: Looking for
male student to share half the rent. Have
own bedroom and bathroom. Contact Ja-
son at 754-2076, Dogwood Hollow Apts
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to share
brand new 4BR, 3 full bath apartment
home. $250 per month plus 14 utilities.
Swimming pool, exercise center, club
house, lighted tennis courts, and lots of
extras, including continental breakfast
each Friday morning. Call 321-7613.)
NONSMOKING ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share two bedroom, 12 utilities, and
12 rent Three blocks from campus. Avail-
able ASAP. Please call 752-4912.
ROOMMATE WANTED? Male to share
new 4 BDR, 3 full bath apartment $250
per month plus 14 utilities. Swimming
pool, tennis, volleyball, weight room and
more. Call 321-7613.
DOGWOOD HOLLOW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedroom1 & 2 bath. 2 blocks from
campus. Water & basic cable included
752-8900. Professionally managed by Pro
Management of Greenville.
FEMALE NEEDED for one bedroom,
share bath. $225 per month. Utilities in-
cluded. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234.
TOWNHOUSE: 2 Bedroom 1 12 bath.
2 blocks from campus. $475 per month.
Pro Management of Greenville, 756-1234.
KINGSTON PLACE CONDO 2 bedroom
2 bath. Partially furnished. $500.00 per
month. Pro Management of Greenville.
756-1234.
HOUSES FOR RENT near campus. $450-
$550. Call Cindy. Pro Management of
Greenville. 756-1234.
For Sale
Need CASH???
We Buy CD's, Cassettes and
I p's.
We'll pay up to 5b credit or 55
cash for CD's
Downtown 75s-502o
FOR SALE: Queen size water bed with
linens, microwave, dressers, refrigerator.
Call 746-4426, leave message.
FOR SALE: Queen size matress and
boxspring $300.00. Trek 930 Mountain
Bike Like New $400.00, purplegreen
brushed finish. Kenmore Washing rr
chine $100.00. Call Jason 752-7107.
FOR SALE: Mongoose Hilltopper SX. gr ip
shifts, rock shocks, bar ends. 19 12"
frame, three months old. still under war-
ranty $400.00 758-1849 Ask for Rich.
1992 SUZUKI KATANA 600 MOTOR-
CYCLE - Excellent Condition! Purple and
Black - Includes two helmets - Asking
Payoff � Please call 758-1393 Ask for Lisa.
DRUG RAID SEIZURES: BUY DIRT
CHEAP! Houses, Cars, Computers, Fur-
niture. "Free details" Seizures, Dept.
NC121, Box 3573, Wilson, NC 27893 "En-
close $1.00 for postagehandling
If
Help
Wanted
Help
Wanted
Gumby s
Drivers Wanted Earn
$50 -$100Per Night
Make Your Own Schedule Ideal
For Colfege Students
Call 321-4862
RESEARCH WFORMATWN
Largest Library of information in U.S. -
all subjects
Order Catalog Toflay with Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
or (310) 477-8226
Or. rush $2 00 to Research Information
li322KJah.oAve �206A Los Angeles CA9002
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Students
Needed! Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206) 545-
4155extA53621.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2.000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
Travel. Seasonal & full-time employment
available. No experience necessary, for
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53621.
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Guard - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy Work, Flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to National
Mailers PO Box 774, Olathe, KS 66051.
Immediate response.
ATTENTION LADIES Tired of being
broke, want to get paid everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
EARN $180 Dollars weekly clipping cou-
pons at home. For more info send SASE
to 102 3 Brownlea Dr. Greenville NC
27858.
TLC ENTERTAINMENT is seeking ladies
for dancing, modeling, and escor ting. $50
to $120 per hour. Flexible scheduling.
Discretion and Confidentiality assured.
Call 758-2881.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As
semble products at home! Call Now! 1-919-
243-9305 24 hours, ext NCI21.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt County
Memorial Hospital is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic classes
through its Employee Recreation and
Wellness Deptartment. Persons will con-
tract to teach on a part-time basis. Inter-
ested candidates should contact: Mary
Brirnmage between 8am-4:30pm at (919)
816-5590.
f� Services
f � Offered
YOU CAN FIND YOUR SPECIAL SOME
ONE NOW 1-900-255-1515 EXT 6333.
$2.99 per minute. Must be 18 years. Touch
Tone Phone Required. Serv-U (619) 645-
8434.
FREE To Pursue Romance and NEW
Relationships? CALL NOW 1-900-255-
8585 EXT 1674 $2.99min 18yrs. T CH-
TN fone reqd. Serv-U (619)645-8454.
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING FOR
RAIN? Rent a canopy! Two peaked-roof
canopies for rent. $65.00 each per day as
is or $100.00 each per day set-up and de-
livered. 752-5533. Leave message.
LET ME VIDEO YOUR BAND, WED
DING, honeymoon, reunion reasonsable
rates. Also, seeking models for studio so-
licitation. Photos, phone & letters to:
Videolmages, POB 8663, Greenville
27835.
r�-
tk
Greek
Personals

Greek
Personals
Personals
AND IN THE PINK CORNER: Weighing
in at 8lbs, 6ozs and standing at a resound-
ing 21 inches: New Born Haley Arelia Hoy.
Congratulat ions Jonathan and Angela. We
love all three of you.
m Lost and
Found
LOST: EYEGLASSES, wire frames, grey
case, in Student Store area on Sept 21.
Contact 328-6914 or 757-3799 after 6:00.
TO THE NEW MEMBERS OF A OPI, Are
you looking forward to finding you BIG?
Tonight is the nite. Love your Alpha Sis-
ters!
SIGMA NU, AOPi would like to say
thanks for a crazy heaven and hell social.
You guys are awesome. Lets do it again
soon!
PI KAPPA PHI, Thanks to you PREF was
awesome. AOPi sisters and new members
would love to do it again really soon. Love
AOPi
MELISSA GENTRY, President; Jenny
McRoberts, V. P Carrie Peters. V.P. Schol-
arship; Mary Paige, Early Treasurer; Amy
Sutton. Rec. Sec; Jennifer Bumpass, So-
cial; Lisa Woodlief, Asst Social; Michelle
Serra, Pan. Del Molly Wilkinson, Pan.
Rep Stacey Cole, Philanthropy; Leigh
Anne Whitley, Historian; Laura Benfield,
Lockout; Kristen Anderson, Scrapbook;
Monica Lopez, Asst Scrapbook; Laurie
Codfrey, Fundraiser. Way to go pledge
class officers! You will do a great job. Love
the sisters of Alpha Phi.
DEAR AOPI. THE SIGMA NU pledge
class would like to thank you for the in-
credible time Thursday night Heaven was
great, but Hell was better. Thanks, Sigma
Nu.
THE SISTERS OF EPILSON SIGMA
ALPHA would like to welcome the Eta
pledge class! Gloris Arroyo, Wyndee Bess.
Becky Brown, Rondica Brown, Andrea
Coward, Beth Davis, Cindy Foy, Tina
Hughson, Susan Price, Kristi Sealey,
Michelle Slate, and Ellen Wrisley. Love the
Sisters.
THE SISTERS OF PI DELTA welcome
perspective members and look forward to
seeing you tonight!
PI DELTA: The sisters of Pi Delta would
like to thank Delta Sig for their help with
rush. We really appreciate it guys!
DELTA CHi - Thanks for the great social
Saturday night! We had a blast! Lets do it
again sometime! Love, Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETA NEW MEMBERS We
hope you are having a great Greek Week!
We love you all! Love, the Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE TAU
PLEDGE CLASS OF ZETA TAU AL-
PHA! Amanda Garner, Karen Osborne,
Christina Godfrey. Lee Ann Vaughn, Kim
Carson, Jill Kamarek, Jenna Bry ant Dena
parrish, Shelly Branch, Crystal Smith, Erin
Riley, Whitney Drawdy. Kristy Salem,
Marti Mills, Ki isten Wheeler, Jennifer
Toderick, Shannon Peterson, Angela
Morris, Allison Pearl. Liz Gibson. Tanya
Narron, and Crissy Muscarella.
PI KAPPA PHI - We had a great time at
your Bid Party and are really looking for-
ward to our next social! Good luck to y our
pledges. Love. Zeta. P.S. No more table
dancing!
PHI TAU - Thanks for the Mai Tai Pref
Party. We really appreciate you making
our New Members feel welcome! Love,
Zeta.
(I
For Sale
ART SUPPLIES, BOOKS, POSTERS 10
cents and up. 6am-6pm 355-1699.
GUITARS WILL BUY OR TRADE good
quality guitars. Have 3 electric and 3
accoustics for sale. $100 to $200 637-
6550.
BRASS BED, QUEEN SIZE wDeluxe
orthopedic mattress set, in factory box.
Never used. Cost 750; 300.00 cash. (919)'
637-2645.
DAY BED WHITE IRON AND BRASS,
2orthopedic mattresses, Pop Up Turndle,
in box, never used. Cost 700; 325.00 cash.
(919) 637-2645.
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S. Evans St
Experienced wait staff needed. No phone
calls please. Apply in person between
2:00pm and 6:00pm.
FULL & PART TIME SALES POSI-
TIONS: Pizzaz Jewelry & Gifts. Located
in Arlington Village. No Phone Calls; Come
by for interview appointments. Hours 10-
6 Monday - Saturday.
STUDY PARTNER for Mgh school boy,
English or liberal arts. Time and fee open.
Call 321-6745.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell 8 Trips & Go Free! Best Trips
& Prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
Florida! Spring Break Travel! 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK! TRAVEL FREE with
SunSplash Tours. Highest commissions
paid, at lowest prices. Campus Represen-
tatives wanted to Sell reliable tours. Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas, Daytona,
Panama City and Padre. 1-800426-7710.
INTERNSHIP - POSITIONS OPEN for
students who want to earn money while
they learn. Five positions available for Fall
Semester. Call 355-7700 and ask for
Bonnie or Cassie.
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to- our expanding Business. Ear n
up to $1,500 plus per week. Escorting in
the Greenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc
at 758-0896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est 1990.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $25-45hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian
Languages required. For information call:
(206) 632-1146 ext J53621.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING Seasonal
& full-time employment at National Parks,
Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits
bonsuses! Call: 1 206-545-4804 ext.
N53621.
I
f Services
Offered
NEED HELP ON GETTING THOSE
PAPERS TYPED? 'Affordable Rates.
Call Glenda today - 758-7653 and eve-
nings (919) 527-9133.
NEED TYPING? Campus S ecretary offers
speedy, Professional Service; campus pick-
up and delivery. Familiar with all formats.
Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
NEED A PLACE TO HAVE A BIRTH-
DAY OR PRIVATE PARTY??? We have
everything you need to make yours a suc-
cess Call 7584591 or John at 7524715.
THE PARTY IS ON! YOUR PARTY ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile
Music Productions is "the" disc jockey
service for your party or social function.
Widest variety of any disc jockey company
in Greenville. Specializing in the needs of
ECU Organizations and Greeks. Book a
Show Now and get a FREE Keg at
Craffiti's. Dates are filling fast so call
early. Ask for Lee 7584644.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53621.
DO YOUR PARTIES NEED SOME-
THING MORE? Wax Revolver DJ Services
is your ANSWER! We have the best selec-
tion of music in Greenville. Call 758-5026
ask for Sean and Book your Party Now!
DO YOU LIKE TO PARTY? Then Call
Diamond Dave's Retro and Dance Party.
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave for a price quote with no
obligation
SPORTS ENTHUSIASTS HAVE FUN
with our SportsEntertainment Line To-
day 1-900-378-1800 EXT 5053. $2.99 per
minute. Must be 18 years. Touch Tone
Phone Required. Serv-U (619) 645-8434.
NPNC GREEKWEEKEND
Come out and get your GROOVE ON!
NPHC Greekweekend @ MSC, September
28th - 30th!
ATTENTION GAMMA BETA PHI
MEMBERS!
Our next meeting will be Tuesday, Octo-
ber 3 at 5:00 in Speight Auditorium of
Jenkins Fine Art Bldg. Please br ing a new
teddy bear for a service point Contact
Mike if you are interested in attending the
State Convention before October 1.
EXSS MAJORS
The EXSS Majors club will uold a meet-
ing Tuesday, October 3 at 7:30pm in the
Pat Draughon room in the Sports Medi-
cine Building.
EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
East Carolina Playhouse is offering Fac-
ultyStaff Discounts this year on Season
and Individual Tickets. Just show your ID
when purchasing tickets
"A DAY WITH YOUR HEART"
"A DAY WITH YOUR HEART" is a health
awareness program consisting of nutrition
education, blood pressure screenings, ex-
ercise training, and information associated
with weight, smoking, and how all of the
above are effected by culture. The aware-
ness program, sponsored by the East Caro-
lina University H.E AR.T. Committee, will
provide hands on demonstrations related
to treatment and care for cardiovascular
desease. hypertension, stroke and diabe-
tes, all of which a. � leading killers of mem-
bers of minority groupsA day with your
Heart" is designed to increase the
community's knowledge of the tremen-
dous problem of cardiovascular disease in
culturally diverse populations. Healthy
recipes, food samples, and prizes will be
available. Please join us on October 3,
1995 from 10:00 until 2:00 in Mendenhall
Student Center Multipurpose Room to
learn more about these important issues.
ECU CERAMICS GUILD
PRESENTS:
The Annual Mug Sale on Oc tober 5-7. The
event will be held in the lobby of the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts Center from 8am-5pm
on the 5th and 6th and at the Percolator
Coffee House from 10am-6pm on the 6th
and 7th. Both are located on East 5th
Street in Greenville. ECU Ceramics Guild
is a non-profit campus organization.
PERSONALITY - WHAT "TYPE"
ARE YOU?
Examining personality is one way of un-
derstanding yourself and your interactions
with others. This ninet y minute workshop
will introduce you to one method of per-
sonality assessment the Myers-Brigs Type
Indicator. Find out how personality affects
your work in groups, your time manage-
ment your career choice, and your inti-
mate relationships. Friday, October 6 at
lpm. Counseling Center. Call 328661 to
register.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
September 26 through October 2. All
events are located at A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall and free, unless otherwise noted.
SAT, September 30-SENIOR RECITAL,
Jeff Baines, Tenor (7:00pm). SUN, Octo-
ber 1-FALL EVENT OF THE FRIENDS
OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, An event
of the Friends of the School of Music for
members and their guests. For more in-
formation. Call ECU-6851
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in serving as a
university marshal for the 1995 Fall com-
mencement may obtain an application
from Room A-12 Minges. Student must be
full-time classified as a junior by the end
of Spring semester 1995 and have at least
a 3.0 academic average to be eligible. Re-
turn completed application to Carol-Ann
Tucker, Advisor, A-12 Minges by Monday,
October 2, 1995. For more information
call 3284661.
SOCIAL WORK AND CRIMINAL
JUSTICE MAJORS
Social Work and Criminal Justice Alliance
will be sponsoring a picnic on October 9,
from 11-2. Come meet your classmates
outside Ragsdale for food and fun!
ECU UNDERWATER HOCKEY
CLUB
Looking for something to do? Join the
ECU Underwater Hockey Club! Practices
are Mondays and Wednesdays at 9:00pm
in Minges Pool. This club is sponsored by
ECU Recreational Services. For more in-
formation call 758-6278.
SOFTBALL PLAYERS!
Softball players will need to sign up for
this year's Last Chance to Pitch Softball
tournament by Wednesday, October 4 at
5pm in Christenbury 204. For more infor-
mation call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
TRAVEL TO THE COAST FOR A
DAY!
Paddling in and among the cypress trees
and open water of the areas during Rec-
reational Services Sea Kayaking Day Trip
Saturday, October 14. Interested individu-
als will need to register in 204
Christenbury by Friday September 29. For
more information call Recreational Ser-
vices at 328387.
LEARN HOW TO USE A MAP
AND COMPASS
During Recreational Services Basics of
Map and Compass Class on Wednesday,
October 4 from 5-8pm at the Climbing
tower. Interested individuals will need to
register in 204 Christenbury Gym by Mon-
day, October 2. For more information call
Recreational Services at 328387.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Approximately $19,000 will be awarded in
scholarships to School of Business majors
(those students already in the School of
Business). Studnets interested in making
application for these scholarships should
secure forms from one of the following
department: ACCOUNT1NG-GCB 3208;
DECISION SCIENCES-3418: FINANCE-
3420; MANAGEMENT-3106; MARKETING
3414. All applications must be submitted
to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarship Commit-
tee, by October 12, 1995. Students may
anplv for one or more of the scholarships.
NOTE CRITERIA FOR'EACH BEFORE
APPLYING. Final selection will be made
by the ECU Student Scholarships, F ellow-
ships and Financial Aid Committee upon
recommendation of the Dean of the
School of Business. The Dean's recommen-
dation will be made from candidates se-
lected by the School of Business Scholar-
ship Commit te.
VIDEO YEARBOOK!
Have you seen it? Are you in it? Have you
picked up your FREE copy? ECU'S pre-
mier edition of our video yearbook - THE
TREASURE CHEST! To get your FREE
tape, bring your ID by the Media Board
office, 2nd floor, Student Publications
Bldg (across from Joyner Library). Hurry!
While supplies last
Circulation and Distribution
FALL AND SPRING
Tuesday and Thursday
12,000 copies per issue
Office hours aref
FALL AND SPRING
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Fnday
For more information, call ECU-6366





Title
The East Carolinian, September 28, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1097
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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