The East Carolinian, August 31, 1995






THURS
August 31,1995
Vol 71, No. 03
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
WZMB caters to mainstream
Around the State
(AP) - Two men reported
missing after they went canoeing
in the rain-swollen Rocky River in
Cabarrus County were found alive
Tuesday and rescued, while other
residents across North Carolina
cleaned up damage from weekend
floods.
Darryl Watkins. 31, and Barry
Lee Stevenson, 18, both of Rowan
County, went canoeing late Mon-
day afternoon. WBTV in Charlotte
reported that the two men were
stranded on an island in the middle
of the river.
(AP) - The House Ethics
Committee will meet next week to
consider sexual harassment allega-
tions against Rep. Ken Miller, R-
Alamance, legislative leaders said
Tuesday.
Committee Chairwoman Julia
Howard, R-Davie, said the commit-
tee will meet at noon next Wednes-
day to consider allegations that
Miller made inappropriate ad-
vances on a 16-year-old page last
month while the legislature was in
session.
(AP) - A chemical disinfectant
used on some medical and dental
devices can fail to kill the AIDS
virus, posing a potential risk of in-
fecting patients, a study suggests.
Researchers, in New York,
found that in the laboratory, the
disinfectant did not kill the AIDS
virus in blood lodged in lubricants
commonly used in dental equip-
ment and in medical devices called
endoscopes, which are inserted
into the body to allow an interior
view.
(AP) - A postal worker from
Palatine, Illinois, described by co-
workers as a "beautiful guy"
walked into work Tuesday and
shot and wounded two men he
regularly joked and ate lunch with,
police and fellow employees said.
Dorsey S. Thomas, 53, was
arrested 20 miles away near his
home in Northlake.
He is charged with attempted
murder of two federal employees
and ordered held until a bond hear-
ing today.
Thomas' attorney, Terry
Gillespie, said his client had been
under a doctor's care and on medi-
cation for physical problems and
depression. He didn't know what
type of medicine Thomas was tak-
ing.
(AP) - Palestinian police
have arrested dozens of suspected
Muslim militants in the Gaza Strip,
the latest crackdown on armed
opponents to Israel-PLO peace
talks, PLO chief Yasser Arafat said
Tuesday.
Sources in the Muslim mili-
tant group Hamas said more than
30 activists were arrested in the
(AP) - At least 17 people died
on a banana plantation Tuesday
when suspected leftist rebels
opened fire on workers in the third
massacre this month in northwest-
ern Colombia.
The gunman stopped a truck
carrying workers to the plantation
in the Uraba region, a soldier at
the local army brigade said in a
telephone interview.
Subtle changes
ensure harmony
over air waves
Miriam Brooks
Staff Writer
The practically universal principle
that one person's pleasure is another
person's pain is particularly applicable
to the realm of music.
WZMB 91.3. the university radio
station, which is run by students for
students is attempting to create a bal-
ance between these extremes in order
to draw as many listeners in as pos-
sible. Brad Oldham, program director
for WZMB, is overseeing slight changes
that will veer the station onto more
mainstream territory.
"Last year there was a big rumor
that we were going to have this over-
whelming format change that never
even really took place, at least not many
people noticed it Oldham said. "What
can be loosely called our current for-
mat change is that we are going to-
wards a more mainstream type of mu-
sic that more people would recognize.
"We're definitely going to have a
place for college music that is not main-
stream Oldham said. "The thing that
we were concerned with is the fact that
we had a very low listenership in the
past couple of years, and the low
listenership was because people were
not recognizing the music we were play-
ing
Oldham plans to intersperse ob-
scure tracks with bands that are more
well-known in an attempt to increase
WZMB's audience.
"What's the point if we are play-
ing a whole bunch of different bands
nobody's heard of if no one is listen-
ing Oldham said.
Shawn McCrossin, who works at
CD Alley agreed with this tactic.
"I really don't see any problem
with it McCrossin said. "They may
need to make changes to draw in more
listeners
Over the last few years, WZMB has
conducted three or four surveys which
indicated that ECU students were
rarely tuning in, although more recent
surveys have shown an upswing in
numbers of people who aie listening
and enjoying what they hear, Oldham
said.
According to Oldham, the major-
ity of students surveyed favored that
strange genre of music which can be
designated as "MTV alternative While
WZMB is catering to the tastes of these
students, very few people have noticed
any changes in WZMB's format
WZMB DJ Jim Matheson said, "It
really hasn't changed that much. Maybe
it is a little more mainstream, but that's
about it
Last year, there was heated con-
troversy over WZMB's proposed format
changes.
"We had problems not only with
Help!
This crack is one of many
found in Erwin Building
(across from Mendenhall).
Foundation repair was at-
tempted five or six years
ago, but the building ap-
pears to be doomed. Meters
(L) are located throughout
to measure the decay.
Photos by KEN CLARK
Administrator runs for council
J. Miles Layton
Staff Writer
City council candidate Inez
Fridley, also an associate director
of ECU housing,
vows to support
ordinances and
programs that
make Greenville
a better place to
live.
An incum-
bent of 10 years
experience in the
third district,
Fridley supports
noise ordinances,
parking and oc-
cupancy codes.
Anything
louder than 60
decibels is a vio-
lation of the city noise ordinance
Fridley supports.
"I support the noise ordi-
nance, I think it makes life easier
for everyone Fridley said. "I
think noise ordinance levels are
reasonable
During the late '80s the ordi-
nance was up for review. Con-
cerned students, faculty, adminis-
trators, student government and
the city worked together to set the
standard.
Fridley's
committment
to this stan-
dard goes back
to her own
hometown ex-
perience in
Richmond. She
said she was
taught that if a
person can
hear their
neighbors,
then they are
too loud and
unfair to the
other residents
of the neigh-
borhood.
Fridley said that, despite the
myth about the ordinance only af-
fecting certain parts of town,
"noise problems are citywide
The councilwoman also ac-
tively supports the occupancy or-
"The assumption
is that this (the
university
community) is a
safe
environment, and
it is not
� Inez Fridley,
city council incumbent
dinance which states that no more
than three unrelated people can
live in the same dwelling, even if
the place has more than three bed-
rooms.
"I support the occupancy or-
dinance Fridley said. "When
three unrelated people live to-
gether, there are three sets of cars,
friends and animals whereas a fam-
ily operates more as a unit. The
people that don't support the or-
dinance are the ones that it af-
fects
Fridley thinks Greenville's en-
vironment is not suited for a
higher occupancy standard.
"It is an environment that was
built back in the '20s, '30s and
'40s, when parking for three or
more cars was not an option be-
cause people just did not own that
many in one place like they do to-
day she said.
Fridley said the city did not do
any zoning until 1969 which meant
houses could be built inches apart
on lots smaller than 6,000 square
feet. She recalled a two bedroom
See FRIDLEY page 4
the music being played, but there
wasn't a very healthy working environ-
ment" Oldham'said. "Last year and the
year before that, it really turned into
some shouting matches and it was not
a good scene. That has been eliminated.
I see no reason why we should be fight-
ing over college radio
Despite the fact that everyone
seems to be satisfied with incoming
sounds, recent format changes, com-
bined with the closure of the down-
town club O'Rocks do not bode well
for some students whose musical tastes
will have to exist in a more restricted
environment
"With O'Rocks closing, it means
that there is one less place where you
can see live music which is really a
shame Oldham said. "I don't know
where those people are going to go to
see live music because O'Rocks defi-
nitely had their own audience
WZMB does plan to give more air-
time to local bands.
"It seems like WZMB hasn't paid
very much attention to bands that play
locally, "Oldham said. "One of my goals
this year is to focus attention in this
area. There is really some good music
in Greenville and WZMB is the perfect
place to get the word out
Expanded labs
allow surfing
Computer labs
hook students into
on-line services
Jennifer Hunt
News writer
�r
Looking for a cheap way to
"surf the net?" Netscape is a form
of the Internet available FREE right
here at ECU.
This opportu-
nity and much more
awaits all ECU stu-
dents. New net-
worked computer
labs have been
added across cam-
pus and many al
ready existing labs
have been up-
graded. Currently,
ECU has a total of
20 labs on campus.
New labs added
are located in the
General Classroom
Building(GCB),
Speight and
Mendenhall Student
Center. The MTC
lab, located in Aus-
tin 208, is the largest. This lab is
networked and has The Worldwide
Web (WWW) and Netscape, which
permits access to the Internet. The
new campus fiber optic network in-
stalled during the summer enables
students, staff members and faculty
to activate numerous sites in Wash-
ington D.C The Smithsonian and
other resources not readily available
on campus.
If you are interested in graph-
ics, then the Macintosh Graphics
Lab (Art) in Jenkins 208 is designed
for you. The software available in the
art lab include: Adobe Illustrator,
MacPaint, PhotoShop, Quark.
Pagemaker and Archicad. The Mac
PC Stats Lab in Belk 206 or Math
Lab in Austin 204 will help students
enrolled in Statistics or any other
mathematics
course.
The com-
puter systems
available
throughout
campus
dorms have
also received
recent up-
grades in
technology.
The newly
renovated
Umstead resi-
dence hall re-
ceived a fully
networked lab
including 16
new comput-
ers with an
equal number
of Macintosh and IBM computers
available. Blake Price, director of
computing and information systems
would eventually like to install labs
simi'ar to Umstead in all campus
dorms if funding permits.
See NET page 5
The computers
across campus
have been a great
asset to our
students, and a lot
of other
universities are
jealous of our
technology
�Blake Price, director of
computing and
informationsystems
Grant recipients suffer
(CPS) - The U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives this month approved a bill
to restructure the federal Pell Grant
program and eliminate small grants for
an estimated 250,000 college students.
House Republicans said their plan
will re-focus the program to target
those students most in need of finan-
cial aid. The bill would increase the
maximum Pell Grant by S100 next year
but terminate aid to less-needy stu-
dents who do not qualify for grants of
at least $600. The current minimum
grant is $400.
"The committee believes that
funding for these small grants, which
support individuals with relatively less
need, should be better targeted to
those students with relatively greater
financial need a report accompany-
ing the bill. H.R. 2127, stated.
The 250,000 students affected by
the cut "will have ready access to addi-
tional loans of $400 - $600 necessary
to supplement their education ex-
penses the report stated. The change
is needed to "better target limited re-
sources to those students with the
greatest needs it stated.
Overall, the plan would cut total
funding for Pell by $500 million next
year. However, the maximum grant
would increase from $2,340 to $2,440.
A bitterly divided House approved
the bill in early August by a vote of
219 to 208. with most Democrats op-
posing the measure.
"This bill is simply a monster of
inequity said Rep. Vic Fazio (D-Ca-
lif.) of the bill, which would fund fed-
eial education, employment and hu-
man-service programs. "One-half of the
cuts in this bill are stolen from the
single-best investment we can make in
our future - education
Other democrats charged the cuts
will fund tax breaks for business and
the wealthy. "These cuts far'exceed
what would be necessary to balance
the budget" added Rep. David Obey
(D-Wis.), senior Democrat on the House
Appropriations Committee that drafted
See PELL page 3
Stray bullets found undergroundpage O
What happened to brotherhood?page O
S PO KTfkcvuday
Pirates prepare for V olunteerspage I C.
5
Thursday Weekend
Mostly sunny
High 92
Low 75
Partly cloudy
High 90
Low 72
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Buildingjacross from loyner
s
-��





��� ,J"
Thursday, Ausust 31 1995
The East Carolinian
CRMEb)ENE
August 22
Damage to Property - A former employee of Bay Mechanical Com-
pany damaged copper pipes and an air handling unit after he was fired.
The incident occurred at the Joyner Library construction site.
August 25
Littering - A student was issued a campus appearance ticket for
littering after she threw a beer cup into the chancellor's yard.
Augilst 26
Weapon, marijuana, alcohol possession - Anon-student was arrested
for the above offense after being observed drinking beer in the Fifth and
Reade Streets parking lot. Brass knuckles, a lock- blade knife and 12
ounce of marijuana we seized in a search.
August 27
Larceny - The left rear tire of a vehicle belonging to a student was
found missing south of Belk Hall.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of her bicycle which was
parked near Fletcher Hall.
Public inebriate - A non-student was transported to the detention
center after being found in an extremely intoxicated state in the recre-
ation center construction site.
August 29
Assist rescue - A resident of Scott Hall fell off his skateboard after
attempting to jump the steps on the southwest corner of the General
Classroom Building. Greenville rescue responded and checked the student's
leg, but he refused to be transported.
August 30
Possession of marijuana - A Scott Hall resident was issued a state
citation and a campus appearance ticket for possession of marijuana in
his room. Another student in the room was issued a campus appearance
ticket.
Assist PCMH police - Two officers assisted Pitt County Memorial
Police in locating three subjects running toward the loading dock of Brody
Building. PCMH police suspected the suspected were armed; one person
was found and arrested by police. The subject was banned from campus.
An guard later found a handgun at a department entrance in the building.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Hall council has full calender
Officer elections,
conference get
students involved
Stephanie Eaton
Staff Writer
HMMMMi
ECU's Residence Hall Associa-
tion (RHA) has started the fall se-
mester off with a bang.
Hall council encourages stu-
dents who live in any of EC I"s resi-
dence halls to take an active part in
the decision making process of their
hall.
"Hall council is a liaison be-
tween residents and school offi-
cials said Molly Worth, resident
adviser of Umstead Hall.
RHA's calendar is filled with
new and exciting activities. The first
function that falls on RHA's agenda
is elections of officers for individual
residence halls. Candidates were
elected by their peers on Wednes-
day. Aug. 31.
RHA is preparing for another
extremely exciting event. ECU will
be hosting the South Atlantic Affili-
ate of College and Universities Resi-
dence Halls (SAACURH).
Over 800 students involved in
their campus' RHA will come to ECU
in November. Students are coming
from as far as Florida and Kentucky.
Those who participate in SAACURH
will receive lectures on positive net-
working, alcohol awareness, leader-
ship skills and a vast majority of
other topics.
ECU won the right to host
SAACURH last year at a regional
conference in Kentucky. RHA is ac-
tively seeking an organization or in-
dividual interested in helping pre-
pare for SAACURH. RHA is also
looking for volunteers to show stu-
dents around campus during
SAACURH. If interested, RHA asks
you to contact them at the RHA of-
fice in Jones Hall.
Joe Boehman, adviser for RHA,
would like to see more residents get
involved in hall council this year.
Even if a student does not wish to
run for election within their hall, he
still encourages students to become
an active member in hall council.
"Hall council brings power to
the people he said.
Former Cotten Hall Council
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS

PER MONTH
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President, Angelina Pavone believes
hall council is the best way to get
out and meet people. Pavone was
also facility chair for SAACURH, and
plans to be an active participant in
the 1995 Cotten Flemming Jarvis
(CFJ) Hall Council. She believes hall
council is an excellent program. She
eagerly encourages all residents to
get involved with hall council.
Pavone continued by saying if
people don't get actively involved in
RHA. their residence halls cannot
plan successful activities for stu-
dents to enjoy.
"Hall council makes living on
campus feel like home Pavone said.
"Hall council is a peer group resi-
dents can turn to, and can make an
enormous difference in life
New desks offer late-night assistance
Community desks
offer variety of
residential services
Mary Luebke
Staff Writer
Moving to campus and starting
a new life at college often proves
to be a difficult and bewildering ex-
perience for many first year stu-
dents. To make the transition as
smooth as possible, University
Housing Services provides much
needed assistance by having trained
staff members available on a 24
hour basis at each residence hall.
"We are committed to offering
personal and affordable services
said Amelie Brogden, service man-
ager. "We also support the aca-
demic mission of the University and
initiate opportunities for individual
growth within a comfortable, car-
ing environment
Community Service Desks lo-
cated at three different Residence
Halls are a prime example of the
benefits and facilities supported by
UHS. They furnish help in a vari-
ety of ways and are in operation
from 7:45 a.m. until 2 a.m seven
days a week. Staff members assist
with checking in or checking out
new students, showing rooms to
visitors, answering numerous ques-
tions, providing phone numbers as
well as loaning keys and vacuum
cleaners.
The Communiv Service Desks
also accept UPS packages and mail,
so students living in the residence
halls no longer have to walk a mile
for a package. In addition, they act
as dispatchers for the Residence Ad-
ministrators and take care of sev-
See SERVICE page 5
Greenville's
Only COFFEEHOUSE
COFFEES � EXPRESSOS � BAKED GOOD
SUN - THUR 7-MIDNIGHT � FRI & SAT 7-1AM
THE STUDENT UNION LECTURE COMMITTEE PRESENTS
�AG R
111 5fc:
oi5
5 o
X V z�i
3 00a: �u.
ROWING UP
B
i WAS a teenage GREG
A

a lecture by:
Barry Williams
FREE WITH ECU STUDENT, FACULTY, OR STAFF ID.
$2.00 GENERAL PUBLIC - $2.00 AT THE DOOR ON THE
EVENING Or THE SHOW. NO A0VANCE TICKET SALES.
Wednesday, September 6,1995
8:00 PM in Hendrix Theatre
A Behind the Scenes Look
at the 1970's Hit TV Series
The Brady Bunch
Y
MICHAEL MUtYANEY
Wednesday, September 6, 1995
1:30 - 3:00 PM � Mendenhall Brickyard
Co-Sponsored By ECU Dining Services and ARAMARK
The SU Presidential Office Presents the
UEHlMIfiS �PEtf JAOlJSE
September 1395 from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Great Room - Mendenhall Student Center
This is youropportunity to join one of the Student Union's committees
and chamth committee chairpersons, jfftEE tr�OJ!I!
Followed by Craig Karges at 8:00 PM in Hendrix Theatre!
The Student Union Marketing Committee Presents the 2nd Annual
TMmi,
September 13,1995 at Get a Clue on (Student) Life
Buy Posters for le, Cassettes for 50, Video Tapes for 10, and CDs for 25c
The ECU Popular Entertainment Committtt Presents
Tickets are on salt at the Central Ticket Offic. In W wAMJ I SP t J KW9 WY&T. J � �
M.ndervhatistwUiitCent,EastCaroiiwUniversity. With Special Guest "THE SHADY GROVE BAND'
s,UD�, m� m Tuesday, September 19,1995
-w. 'n Wl tickers ore General Admission, � ' �MtM��MmjNMNNpNii
, Av Doors � �"7:00 I Wright Auditorium � JtVIKWHUrililMmill'l
pbw we're M$re Th?w barefoot!
� ��f. For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.





The East Carolinian
Thursday, August 31, 1995
Ding
dong!
This concrete structure
may be an eyesore now,
but with completion of
Phase III of the Joyner Li-
brary addition, it should be
a beautiful clocktower. It
may also signify a new en-
trance to campus by the
year 2000.
�Ni
Photo by KEN CLARK
ATTENTION All SIUDENIS
Come Join Us Each Thursday
Night For Friendship, Fun, &
Bible Study at 7pm General
Classroom Building Room 1017
For More Information Call Eddie and
Kathryn Hilliard at (919)321-6262
HOW 'BOUT A
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THIRSTDAY
$1.50 Sangrias
$2.25 Bloody Marys
12 Price Draft, Ole
.950 Mugs
$2.50 Lime Margaritas
$1.50 Mexican Imports
$2.25 Tequila Sunrise
Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Downtown Greenville (Across from U.B.E.) 757-1666
AIDS services available
Joann Reed
Staff Writer
MNMMMMMMMMMMi
AIDS is the leading cause of death
for Americans between the ages of 25-
44. Pitt County has the third highest
amount of reported cases of AIDS in the
state and the highest amount of reported
cases in eastern North Carolina.
The Pitt County AIDS Service Or-
ganization, better known as PICASO. has
not only been busy providing services
throughout eastern North Carolina, they
are also working with the ECU commu-
nity as well.
"PICASO is very active on the ECU
campus said Gregg Allinson, executive
director of PICASO. "We provide educa-
tion about HIV infection and transmis-
sion. We also hold programs on campus,
provide speakers, hold forums and put
out a news letter
In addition to providing education,
PICASO offers services for HIV and AIDS
affected communities.
"Services such as the Buddy Pro-
gram and hospital visitation provide com-
panionship for people in need said
Heather Oakland, a senior social work
major at ECU and assistant of program
services at PICASO.
"There are also a lot of volun-
teer opportunities at PICASO Oak-
land said. "Volunteers help with com-
mittee work, fund raising, nutrition,
outreach and many other areas
The organization also provides a
special food bank that is donated to by
the community. "We get a lot of help
with donations to the food bank from
ECU communities, especially sororities
and fraternities said Amy Adams, HIV
coordinator and ECU student intern.
Free, confidential AIDS testing
is provided by the Pitt County Health
Department at 919-413-1403.
PICASO is also taking applications
for the national service program
AmeriCorps, which provides scholar-
ships for students helping in service
organizations such as PICASO.
"We encourage people not only to
be tested, but to be educated about this
disease Gregg Allinson said. "Denial will
not stop this disease from spreading
wmmmKmmmmmBmmmmmi
f EiLfLi from page 1
the measure.
Critics say the bill, if enacted into
law, would mean cuts of $4 billion in
federal education spending next year.
President Clinton vowed to eto
the measure shortly after it cleared the
House. "What is being done to the
college programs and the job training
program is simply unacceptable he
said.
The jobless training cuts include
termination of an $800 million pro-
gram offering summer jobs to at-risk
youth.
Though the bill does increase the
maximum Pell Grant. House Republi-
cans fell short of Clinton's own goals
for the program in 1996. Earlier this
year, he proposed a maximum of
$2,620 in 1996 to make up for past
cuts in the maximum grant
Elsewhere in education. H.R. 2127
would eliminate many graduate pro-
grams such as Patricia Roberts Harris
Fellowships that help recruit
underserved minorities for graduate
education. Other fellowship programs
include Javits fellowships for doctoral
study, Byrd honor scholarships for high
school students, Douglas teacher schol-
arships, national science scholars and
faculty development fellowships.
Support for these graduate fellow-
ships totaled $50 million in 1995.
The Republicans' plan also elimi-
nates all funding for State Student
Incentive Grants (SSIG), in which the
ferWal government provides matching
iunds for state grant programs. SSIG
received $63 million this year.
Another provision in the measure
ends new capital contributions for
Perkins Loans, a campus-based stu-
dent-aid program. Last year's Congress
allocated $158 million for new contri-
butions.
Obey said eliminating federal con-
tributions would deny aid to 150,000
college students. The average grant in
the Perkins program is about $1,400.
Democrats sought unsuccessfully to
restore some of the Perkins funds dur-
ing debate on the measure.
Elsewhere in student aid, the bill
Deals!
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would freeze funding for college work
study programs at the current level of
$616 million. Support for Supplemen-
tal Educational Opportunity Grants
would remain at $583 million under
the legislation.
H.R. 2127 also would freeze fund-
ing for TRIO programs that recruit dis-
advantaged and minority students into
higher education. Funds for historically
black colleges would remain frozen,
while a small program to support His-
panic-serving colleges and universities
would face a 10 percent cutback.
Another provision of the spend-
ing bill would limit administrative costs
in the new direct Loan program, in
which the federal government through
schools, makes educational loans di-
rectly to students without the help of
banks, many Republicans want to scale
back or curtail the program, claiming
it will not reach its anticipated savings.
Democrats defended the program say-
ing it will save money by cutting out
subsidies to financial institutions.
The action now moves to the Sen-
ate, where members will mark up their
own version of an educationhuman
service spending bill by mid-Septem-
ber. A HouseSenate conference com-
mittee then would resolve any differ-
ences between the bills before send-
ing a final package to the White House.
The government's fiscal year be-
gins Oct 1. although delays and a presi-
dential veto could leave education pro-
grams with firm funding at the start
of the new year. Congress, now in ad-
journment will return to work after
Labor Day.
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,�?
��' 111111 im�!
Thursday, August 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
FRIDLEY
from page 1
bungalow that housed at least 17
people before the ordinance.
"We began to work on how to
prevent these sort of problems
Fridley said.
She said the ordinance is the
result of a compromise between
various interests in the community
in an effort to make everyone
happy.
"The students want the ordi-
nance set higher at four or six. and
the old people want it set at two.
Three seemed to be the perfect
compromise Fridley said.
The associate director of hous-
ing of ECU supports "reasonable
development" in Greenville but ac-
tively opposes new apartment com-
plexes like that of Wyndham Court.
"I support reasonable develop-
ment and when we go past that, my
vote will be no Fridley said.
"These new developments are
crackerboxes that stack tenants
knee deep and try to get as many
people as they can to move in. 1
don't think trying to get the high-
est density is good planning.
"It is the quality of life state-
ment for me
Crime is an important issue to
Fridley.
"The assumption is that this
(the university community) is a
safe environment, and it is not
Fridley said.
Fridley said areas where only
students live, have increased crime
because theives know when to hit.
Through a diverse setting of older
residents, families and students
this problem can be eliminated be-
cause theives aren't likely to hit
with a neighbor watching. Fridley
said.
"I think the more diversity we
have, the less attractive we are to
being ripped off Fridley said. "If
you turn an area over to students,
ou will see a huge crime increase.
vVhile our 70 year old neighbors are
sleeping at night, they are looking
)ut for us during the day
Fridley believes in more com-
�nunity involvement with an in-
crease in bike, foot and cruiser pa-
trols. She actively supports the
community watch programs initi-
ated in the last five years.
If elected. Fridley will continue
to reluctantly support Halloween.
"We will continue to do it (Hal-
loween) and as long as it happens
we have no choice Fridley said.
"It is not a city sponsored event but
the taxpayers pick up the tab. It
costs thousands of dollars for po-
lice, patrols and clean up.
"This is something we manage
to deal with and our responsibilty
is to make sure no one gets hurt
Fridley thinks Halloween has
come a long way since the city
banned downtown celebrations in
the late '80s.
"I think it has come a long way
from the days where violence was
common Fridley said.
Due to its close proximity to
the unversity, parking is a problem
in the district. The city has reacted
by zoning certain streets for two
hour parking. Fridley supports this
measure because she feels people
that don't live in the community
can park all day locking out resi-
dents.
Those living in the zones can
go downtown to pick up an 'A'
sticker for $5.
Fridley describes her philoso-
phy as building a neighborhood
people want to live in. She feels that
too often people move to the sub-
urbs to escape the problems of the
city. By bringing a safe environ-
ment to her district through ordi-
nances, she contributes to making
her neighborhood a better place to
live.
"I hate the idea that you have
to move to the suburbs to maintain
an equal quality of life Fridley
said as she looked out the window
on to Fifth Street. "You ought to
be able to do it right across the
street
She feels current rules main-
tain that environment.
"Things like the occupancy,
noise ordinance and the historic
district give reassurance to resi-
dents that their neighborhood will
be a good place to live Fridley
said. "When folks feel like the qual-
ity of life is lost, we will move on
Fridley got her graduate de-
gree at ECU. She is married and
has lived in Greenville since 1974.
Student Leaders Meeting
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, August 31, 1995
NET
from page 1
"The computers across campus
have been a great asset to our stu-
dents, and a lot of other universi-
ties are jealous of our technology
Prici' said
Richard Kerns is the lab direc-
tor in charge of computers within
the School of Business. The major-
ity of computers used by the busi-
ness school are purchased with
money funded by the business
school. These computers are not
available to all students.
Students may ask where is the
funding coming from. The ECU com-
puter technology fee paid by all stu-
dents each semester pays'for all new
computer purchases and upgrades.
Yes. the $27 dollar fee adds up
quickly. Initially, there was a five
year plan to improve academic com-
puting.
"We closed out that plan in
three years and have been spending
a little over 5800,000 dollars per
year Price said. "This funding is
restricted in that we require every-
thing to be spent on things students
are using
Many students receive satisfac-
tion seeing their dollars put to good
use. Diane Marx, a nursing student
enjoys sending electronic mail (E-
mail) to her family in Las Vegas.
"1 send mail at least twice a
week, because it is so fast and close
to mv classes
Marx uses the Learning Re-
source Center in Nursing 107. The
center is networked, meaning access
to the academic mainframe. VAX,
telnet and Internet is available. This
lab contains 14 IBM 486's. eight
Macintosh SE computers, a HP la-
ser printer, color scanner and much
more. Students interested in receiv-
ing an E-mail address need to go to
Austin 208 and fill out a short Aca-
demic Computing CMS (ECUVM1)
Userid form.
Students all over campus can get
connected in their dorm rooms. All
they need is a new model computer
(no modem needed) and a free copy
of the software, and they can hook
onto the WWW through a hook-up
very similar to a cable line or
phonejack. Off-campus students may
soon have this same chance to get
on-line. Ernie Marshbum. manager
of Academic Computing, and Blake
Price are in the negotiating process
with a major commercial phone com-
pany concerning a dial-in servirp rrf
internet usage. Students would pay
a fee for an allotted number of hours
on the Internet. This service would
not cost the university. Students
would be responsible for the cost
depending on usage. This program
is in planning stages, and not yet
available, but keep your eyes open.
English graduate student,
Faydra Womble is using the new GC
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(2017 and 2018) computer labs to
teach her English 1100 and 1200'
classes. She uses the Daedalus Pro-
gram (DIWE) one day a week. The
program allows students to respond
to literature and class assignments.
This hands on computer resource is
a valuable experience for all students.
However, many students approach
the course without a prepared knowl-
edge for computers.
"I think the drawback is getting
students over the initial fear of be-
coming computer literate Womble
said.
Microcomputer seminars and
workshops are available throughout
the semester, to register call 328-
6438. Marshburn is excited about
the new changes on campus.
"I'm after academic excel-
lence she said.
He would be happy to answer
any question concerning the new
computers, internet and E-mail. For
more information call 328-6401.
from page 2
eral different problems including
maintenance and repairs.
Students assigned to Cotten,
Slay, Fleming. I'mstead or Jarvis
are asked to check in at the Cen-
tral Campus Community Service
Desk located in the lobby of Cotten
Hall. For those assigned to Clem-
ent. Greene, Fletcher, White or
Garrett, the desk is situated in the
lobby of Fletcher Hall. College Hill
Community Service Desk, located
in the lobby of Aycock Hall serves
students who wish to check in at
Aycock. Scott, Belk, Tvler and
Jones. The phone numbers for Cen-
tral. West and College Hill service
desks are (919) 328-4033, 4022 and
4044 respectively.
The first impression one gets
of the West Campus Community
Service Desk at Fletcher Hall is
that of cheerful friendliness. A
brightly lit work area highlighted
by colorful posters and manned by
eager students gives it an unique
atmosphere.
"I love working here said
Rebecca Turner, service assistant.
"The idea of coming in contact with
so many different people is what
makes it very interesting
Approximately 35 students
work part time at all three service
desks. According to Amelie Brodgen,
they received close to 100 applica-
tions for job slots that became avail-
able during the Fall semester.
"We look for people who are
outgoing yet mature and who know
the campus inside out Brodgen
said. "It is an excellent facility that
supports and benefits many stu-
dents and various university depart-
ments too
Hews writers' meeting "CuesDap
at 4 p.m. Be here or else.
Tlie ECU Popular Enterfoinment Committee Pr
e s e n t s
STUDENT
0 N
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University.
MasterCard and Visa9 accepted.
For more information,
call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
or 328-4788 (TDD 328-4736).
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM
HOTLINE 328-6004
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Macintosh Performa" 636 wCD
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15" color monitor, keyboard, mouse and all
the software you're likely to need.
Being a student is hard. So we've made buying a Macintosh easy. So easy,
m fact, that prices on Macintosh personal computers are now even lower than
their already low student prices. And with the Apple'Computer Loan and 90-Day
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HOI) bOI)7XOHorTnnOO 755 0601





mfi-
Thursday, Ausust 31,1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
You are driving down Fifth Street on a Friday night
and accidentally bump into the back of another car. The
driver of the car forces you off the road then drags you
from your car and begins to beat you - in front of a crowd
of 30 that has gathered to watch.
Hypothetical situation? Here maybe, but unfortunately,
for Doletha Word of Detroit, it was not. Her story made
international headlines and raised questions about citizen
involvement and societal violence.
Word was involved in a minor traffic accident. She
crashed into a car. As a result, the driver forced her off the
road then he and two other passengers got out of their car
and dragged Word from hers. She was then beaten with a
crowbar and stripped. To escape her attackers, Word jumped
over a bridge and into the Detroit River, knowing she could
not swim; she drowned.
This story is horrific in and of itself, but what makes it
worse, what caught the international community's atten-
tion, was the fact that a large group of people, possibly up
to 50 people, watched this incident and did nothing.
Granted, two men attempted to help Word and even
dove into the Detroit River after her, but out of 50 people,
only two were willing to help one woman, who was being
attacked by three men.
Something doesn't add up here.
Today, we live in a society that fears getting involved.
"That's their business" or "I'm protecting mine, you can
try to protect yours" could be catch phrases of the times.
Gone is the sense of community that our grandparents talk
about. Society has gotten so individualistic that no one
wants to look out for his or her neighbors - let alone feel
any sort of responsibility towards them.
No one's saying that a person should jeopardize his or
her own life by jumping in front of a bullet or into the
middle of a fight. That's not realistic or practical, but the
police are usually a phone call away.
In Word's case, the attackers could have been over-
powered by a number of the 50, or someone could have
called the police soon instead idly standing around.
Another frightening aspect of this incident is the fact
that the three attackers seemed unafraid of beating Word
in the presence of a crowd. It was as if they knew no one
would or wanted to get involved and did not have to worry
about the consequences of their actions. Did they feel pro-
tected by community apathy?
That's a frightening thought, but Detroit is a large in-
dustrial city. An incident like that could never happen here.
Well, to be on the safe side, we should start looking out for
each other more often - or never step on anyone's toes,
have car accidents, or get into arguments.
The American
people have
been groomed
to protect
themselves in
moments of
crisis. It's a
frightening
thought to
think you may
be the next
person to be
beat to a pulp
in front of a
group of
spectators.
Get fraternites back to the basics
Attention all fraternities! This is
an article devoted purely to you. You
may be wondering how you earned
the distinction of having an entire
column devoted just to you, well
Let's travel back in time when frater-
nities were getting started.
Imagine, a group of friends who
all believe in the same goals and ide-
als. Sounds great doesn't it? They
decide to formalize their group and
give it a name. Next thing you know
their ideals spread throughout the
country from campus to campus. Fra
ternities are popping up left and right
It's great; everyone believing in the
same things.
Yet, somewhere along the lines
the ideals skewed just a little bit. Now
instead of being concerned in just the
individual, the fraternity begins to
concern itself with the individual and
their family. Questions begin to arise
about the families' history. Brothers
begin to wonder how much money an
individual earns. And as history has
shown everyone, the domino effect
began and now your fraternity has
stepped away from the whole ideals
from which it was founded.
Okay, it's present day again and
here we are discussing how fraterni-
ties lost touch with reality. I will bring
fraternities back to reality with two
words - friendship and group. This is
a reminder about a promise that each
of you made in your past and I wish
to rehash it. A promise to be loyal
Brian Lewis Burns
Opinion Columnist
All I can see are
groups of people
concerning
themselves with
quantity not
quality
brothers and friends. Fraternities were
formed to help bring together a group
of people with the same ideals into a
tight knot brotherhood. When did that
change?
All I can see are groups of people
concerning themselves with quantity
of brothers and not the quality broth-
ers. I would much rather be in a group
of 15 to 20 people who I can bond
with than to be part of a group of 70
or more and have to spend a whole
semester just learning every one's
names.
Yet, this is not the worst of it!
Not only are some of the fraternities
losing touch with their founding prin-
ciples, some are even more interested
in the individuals' family background,
or how much your family income is.
Get real! There are actually fraterni-
ties out there that have questionnaires
they hand out during Rush Week.
My friend and I rushed last year
and there were actually questions re-
garding our parents' incomes. Why is
your parents occupation so impor-
tant? Shouldn't they be more inter-
ested in what your interests are or
what you can offer the fraternity as a
whole?
It's not too late though; fraterni-
ties can still get back on track. I'm
not trying to bash fraternities. I'm
actually trying to help in a situation
that I see needs help. Simply put, you
were founded on the goal of friend-
ship and leadership. Stick to just that.
It's not too difficult Forget who does
what or who earns how much. Why
should one's financial portfolio deter-
mine who they are? Just be friends.
Instead of trying to complete and see
who has the most brothers on cam-
pus, why not try and see who has the
best brothers.
When I say brothers I mean who
contributes the most to the fraternity.
Just think about how wonderful it
would be to have a few great friends
who you would be proud to call your
brothers, than a whole lot of acquain-
tances who you reluctantly call broth-
ers. Brotherhood can be one of the
strongest relationships you will ever
make. If it's that important to you,
then wouldn't you want it to stay what
ways forever? Brothers and friends
forever!
if �
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
W
Tambra Zion, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Erika Gohde, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Darryl Marsh, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photographer
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Jack Skinner, Photographer
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
W. Jason Allen, Copy Editor
Lani Atkinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel.Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
The art of procrastination
Are you a chronic procrastinator?
Every year at New Year's Eve, and ev-
ery semester, do you jot down a little
note to yourself, maybe in your list of
goals for the year, to "get organized"?
You're going to really get it to-
gether this semester, right? Going to
turn over a new leaf. Yeah, right You
probably should just write down "grow
a third leg or "unlock the secrets of
the universe Because if you're any-
where near as bad as 1 am, you've got
about as much chance of doing those
things than you have of getting orga-
nized.
It's just not going to happen. The
'second coming' will happen before your
getting organized happens. But don't
feel bad. At least not yet not until some-
thing really, really big and important
(say. a mid-term exam, or a big research
paper) is due in the next few hours, and
you sit staring at a blank computer
screen, the cold, sick sweat beginning
to stream down your face, or you sit
looking at that big, hefty textbook, the
dust on its cover still untainted by the
touch of human hands. Then, my
friends, and ONLY then, should you feel
bad, really bad, because that is the art
and Zen of practicing true, pure pro-
crastination. Follow me.
So you procrastinate. What are we
going to do with you, shoot you? There's
always at least a zillion other things you
could be doing besides whatever really
needs doing, right? Sure, I mean, if
something's due. just think about it in
no time, in seconds, you'll think up
something, anything, to do besides what
you should do.
Patrick Hinson
Opinion Columnist
There's a least a
zillion other
things you could
be doing besides
whatever really
needs doing
Why does what we should do al-
ways rank so low on the list of cool
things to possibly do? Maybe because
the things we're supposed to do are
usually so damn boring. They usually
have nothing to do with fun. And to
top it off, they're usually something
good for us. something we really should
do, like to get paid, or so we'll be more
enlightened, stronger or smarter people.
What a buzz-kill.
Leam t'rom the master. First you
must practice the Zen technique of com-
pletely clearing your mind (and con-
science) of whatever it is you should
probably be taking care of at the mo-
ment Disregard the panic, extreme pain
and fear you will soon feel when the
things that you should probably already
have done REALLY need to be done,
when the ticking hands of the clock
begin to boom like thunderheads, faster
and faster. Clear your mind of the stern
and disappointed image of you parent's
and professor's faces looming down o
you larger than life. You will face thej
demons when the time is right Many,
not most of you have probably alread
reached this stage in your academ:
development This is good.
Next you must hold this clarit
this emptiness of cranial space, for Ion
periods of time. In order to maintai
this emptiness, you must fill your min
with shallow, really worthless stuff, lik
prime time television, various narcotic
and hallucinogens, Substation II ke;
beer, and long, disciplined hours c
Nintendo. Do you now hear the gras;
hopper at your feet?
Then, the dreaded night before, yoi
must steel yourself for the most pain
ful, anguishing time, the time for tht
weeping and gnashing of teeth, the tim
for intense self-hatred and pity. This i:
the price we procrastinators all must pa
for our long, languid hours of lelaxauor
and gluttony. This is the true art of pro
crastination, the down-side to the type
B personality.
What we give up for the sake ol
long hours of relaxation and inactivity,
we must make up in very short periods
of intense panic, pain, mind-numbing
fatigue and exhaustion, but the creation
of true genius, and the joy of produc
ing these masterpieces when they are
most desperately needed, and always
always, under the cold, blue steel of the
gun, locked and loaded.
Editor's Note: Rumor has it
Patrick Hinson was seen minutes be-
fore his deadline, ghostly white with
marble size sweat beads tolling down
his face
Bigger isn't better
While waiting in line at the gro-
cery store a few days ago, curiosity
got the best of me and I peeked into
someone else's cart ahead of me. Well
to be as polite as possible lets just
say that there was not a package in
the cart that graced the words "no"
and "fat" on the same wrapper.
While the above may not be
enough to warrant calling the Weight
Watchers Emergency Hotline over, it
acts as an indicator of an ail too com-
mon problem facing American soci-
ety. Arm rica is overweight.
According to research done at
the federally supported Center for
Disease Control and Prevention over
one third of all Americans are over-
weight.
There are two main problems
contributing to America's losing
battle to obesity. The first is poor
eating habits. The second problem is
inactivity.
Eating poorly is a problem most
Americans are faced with and don't
even know it. With the price of beef
falling in the past few years Ameri-
cans sucked down about 64 pounds
a piece. The federal government does
its share of help by handing out
$50,000 to each state annually in or-
der to promote better eating. A noble
gesture but nothing compared to the
$36 billion spent annually by the food
and restaurant industries on adver-
tising.
For all you people bent on blam-
ing the world's ills on TV violence,
chew on this � the average child sees
over 10,000 food ads on television
before the age of 10.
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
The averge child
sees over
10,000 food
ads on television
before the age
of 10
Simply eating a large butter pop-
corn at a local movie theater gives
you 840 calories and your daily fat
content for the next four days. Tough
to swallow? Try washing it down
with a 7-11 double big gulp768
calories).
The second cause of being over-
weight is inactivity. Americans sim-
ply don't exercise. No longer are side-
walks jammed with joggers like they
were in the mid '80s.
American s are actually consum-
ing far less than they were at the turn
of the century. The problem is that
technology has taken the bulk of the
work force out of the fields and fac-
tories and put them behind desks.
Unfortunately its going to take evo-
lution a little while to catch up to
where we can consume mass quanti-
ties of calories, do nothing ,and not
have it go to our guts.
A recent issue of the Journal of
the American Medical Association re-
ported that only about 30 percent of
Americans work out on a regular ba-
sis. Think that its just the adults hav-
ing trouble staying in shape? Guess
again.
Schools, which once forced even
the chubbiest little student to sweat
it out a couple of times a week, are
backing out. A mere 36 percent of
American schools still offer daily gym
classes.
Each year about 80 million
people go on some form of a diet, 95
percent gain it back in five years.
Ever wonder why there are so
many pot holes in the roads these
days? I'd venture to guess that it has
something to do with the sheer num-
ber of people falling off the Richard
Simmons band wagon.
Simply working out
cardiovascularly for 20 minutes in the
morning three days a week can make
a big difference. It can wake you up
for class and set your metabolism
higher for the day.
By increasing your metabolism,
you increase the chances of creating
a negative calorie intake. This is nec-
essary in order to effectively lose
weight.
There is nothing pleasant about
being plump. With heart disease be-
ing the leading cause of death and
diabetes, hypertension, cancer and
even arthritis being related to lack
of exercise and poor diet, there is no
reason not to change an unhealthy
lifestyle. Ignorance in this case could
truly be painful.
RS. "All you can eat" in the
dining halls is just an option.
ATTENTION LETTER-WRITERS!
Letters to the Editor must include your name, year, major, address AND TELEPHONE
NUMBER! Absolutely no letters will be printed unless we can verity the author's very
existence. Drop your letters by the Student Pubs. bldg. (across from Joyner) or mail
them:
The East Carolinian, to the Editor, Student Pubs, bldg ECU,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353.





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The East Carolinian
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to take on this awsome task, just look at these berufits!
1. Deadlines, Deadlines, Deadlines!
2. Ink Stained Hands!
.1 A real Bonified Paycheck!
4. Deadlines!
5. Terhaps vour own cult following!
So if you think vou've got what it takes, THEN READ BELOW!
Make sure all comics are drawn in a 8" x 13" space
Make sure all vour work is inked inNO PENCIL)
Make sure vou turn your work in at the East Carolinian
Make sure you eat your vegetables
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7. Baseball assist
10. Destroy the beauty of
11. Environmental watchdog
12. Pinna
34. Club; resort
35. Small crude dwelling
38. Place away from the wind
39.on; encourage
40. Your consciousness
of your own identity
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1. Doctors' group
2. Actors' group
3. Districts
4. Hammer end
5. Unexpected win
6. Ancient Persia ruler
7. Makes full again
8. Group qualified to practice law
9. Anger
17. Addicts
18. Assumed name
19. Mimic
20. Computer group
22. Company that rings receipts
23. Your
25. Declared
28. Mournful poem
31. Boundary of a surface
32. Fisherman's lure .
33. River in NE Scotland .
36. Exclamation: yuck!
37.the line (obey the rules)
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13. An indefinite period marked by specific
attributes
14. Eastern Standard Time
15. "Before" prefix
16. Ritual of mourning
19. Brews
21. Innate ability
24. Walked back and forth
26. A small amount
27. Main course
29. Breezy
30. Serving no purpose
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8
Thursday, Ausust 31,1995
The East Carolinian
Journal earns respect
Albright proud of
eastern North
Carolina heritage
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
"Chapel Hill UNC is not the
center of the universe says ECU
English professor Alex Albright of
his alma mater. It is true that many
of North Carolina's premier writers
are Tarheels. But, as Albright ex-
plains, "they aren't from all from
the Chapel Hill area; many are from
eastern North Carolina
Albright came to ECU in 1981
as an English department lecturer.
After living in New Orleans and
working in the public school sys-
tem there, he was glad to return to
this area. He received his bachelor's
degree from UNC Chapel Hill and
master's from UNC Greensboro.
With a long-standing interest
in regional literature, Albright ed-
its ECU'S own North Carolina Lit-
erary Review. The annual publica-
tion is a compilation of poetry,
short stories and non-fiction pieces
with a single theme as its backbone.
Albright takes pride in the fact
that the writers featured in his pub-
lication are either North Carolin-
ians or have written a piece that
follows the forementioned thematic
regional spine.
"It's important to stay focused
on North Carolina explained
Albright. He also believes that east-
ern North Carolina writers are per-
ceived as trivial by their counter-
parts in Chapel Hill. Albright be-
lieves this publication will help to
dispel these myths. But the effort
is meeting with some resistance.
The first volume of the North
Carolina Literary Review was pub-
lished last year with an eastern
North Carolina theme. Though it
was given praise on both the na-
tional and international level in-
cluding design awards, The News
and Observer did not publish a
critical analysis of the publication
even though they received a copy.
"North Carolina Literary Re-
view has been reviewed from ev-
erywhere in the state except The
News and Observer and has been
tremendously well received stated
Albright. He speculates that it
hasn't been reviewed because of the
old stereotypical party school im-
age the tri-city area colleges have
of ECU.
"The Black Mountain College
Issue" is the most recent edition of
the North Carolina Literary Re-
view. Published in association with
the North Carolina Literary and
Historical Association, this publica-
tion is a feather in the cap of ECU.
"The Black Mountain College Is-
sue" is available at retail book out-
lets and has subscribers in 33 states
and five foreign countries.
Photo by KEN CLARK
ECU English professor Alex Albright stays hard at work in his
campus office editing the North Carolina Literary Review.
Keanu Reeves goes for
A Walk in the Clouds
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
CD. Reviews
Liz Phair
Juvenilia
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Juvenilia. It sounds like
some perverse pre-teen sexual
practice, doesn't it?
Well, maybe that's not too far
off the mark. After all, this is a
Liz Phair album we're talking
about here. Phair became the
critic's darling last year by sing-
ing about all grades of perverse
sexual practices. Her song "Fuck
and Run" lead to plenty of dis-
cussion about sex roles in the
review columns of major music
industry magazines.
Phair's first two albums, Ex-
ile in Guyville
and Whip-
Smart, were
marked by
frank sexual-
ity and a take-
no-crap atti-
tude. She was
a breath of
fresh air in the
sea of earnest
young female
pop singers
that America
has been
cur?ed with
for most of the
last 30 years.
Her latest
bag of stuff, some of it silly,
some of it mellow, but none of
it Phair's best.
Juvenilia opens with "Jeal-
ousy originally released on
Whip-Smart. It's just as good
here as it was on that album. I
just don't see why it's here.
Second is Phair doing a
cover of the early80s mastur-
bation classic, "Turning Japa-
nese Note for note, it sounds
exactly like the original, with
the exception of Phair's slightly
higher-pitched vocals. It's kind
of neat to hear a woman sing-
ing this particular tune, but it
has the same problem many cov-
ers have. If you're going to play
it this close to the original, why
bother?
As Juvenilia continues,
things look up a bit. In "Cali-
fornia Phair tells us a dirty
joke. I'll spare you the sordid de-
tails, but it involves bulls dis-
cussing how many cows they're
going to copulate with. Then
Phair says, "And that's why I left
California
This cow-sex motif contin-
ues in "South Dakota In this
one, Phair drones over and over,
"I was born in South Dakota
But that's okay, because this is
a song about how drop-dead bor-
ing South Dakota really is. It's
so very boring, in fact, that the
favorite sporting event for the
locals (according to Phair) is go-
ing to "get drunk and fuck some
cows And thus we return to
that sexual perversion motif
The only other song of note
on Juvenilia is "Batmobile
Alfonso Arau may not be a house-
hold name even though he recently
directed the most successful foreign
film ever released in this country, Like
Water for Chocolate, but he is cer-
tainly a common name in Hollywood.
Based on the novel by Laura Esquivel,
Like Water for Chocolate was a sen-
suous, sexual cinematic treat that
Arau directed with flair and vitality.
Arau's first Hollywood film is
entitled Walk in the Clouds. A film
has never been more aptly named. The
Northern California vineyard that
serves as the setting of the film has a
name that means "The Clouds" in
Spanish. The film is also a love story,
so the young lovers of the film figu-
ratively and literally take a walk in
the clouds. Plus the viewer who gets
swept away with the magical romance
on the screen will also feel that they
have taken a walk in the clouds.
The filmic elements that combine
to make A Walk in the Clouds the
cinematic equivalent of walking on air
include a wonderful cast, magical spe-
cial effects, exquisite cinematography
and of course
Arau's tender, yet
assured, direction.
A Walk in the
Clouds opens
with sailors re-
turning home
from World War
II. One such
sailor, Paul
Sutton (Keanu
Reeves), returns
to find that his
war bride was not
wine manufacturer (Giancarlo
Giannini). Paul and Victoria first meet
on a train, then run into each other
again on a bus. Finally they wind up
on the same dirt
road, Paul be-
cause he has
been thrown off
the bus for de-
fending Victoria
against some
rude men, and
Victoria because
she must walk
from the bus stop
to the vineyard.
Victoria ex-
plains to Paul
The film is also a
love story, so the
young lovers of
the film
figuratively and
literally take a
walk in the clouds.
quite as wonder-
ful as he remembered when marrying
her just before leaving for overseas.
So Paul sets out on a journey, nomi-
nally to sell chocolates, to find him-
self and decide what to do with his
life.
Paul's fate has him destined to
meet with Victoria Aragon (Aitana
Sanchez-Gijon), the daughter of a
that she fears to
go home because she is pregnant with
a child whose father refuses to marry
her. Victoria comes from a traditional
family, she continues, and her father
will surely kill her for her disgrace.
Paul volunteers to pose as her hus-
band then run away from her in a day,
See WALK page 11
mini?
ttracticm
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, August 31
Everything
at the Attic
(funk-reggae)
Friday, September 1
Van Halen
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
(rock)
Mother Sound
at Peasant's Cafe
Faculty Art Exhibition
at Cray Gallery
Saturday, September 2
Travis Tritt
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
(country)
Sunday, September 3
Boys II Men with Montell Jordan
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
(r&b)
Wednesday, September 6
Lecture:
Barry Williams
(Greg Brady)
Noon Day Tunes:
Michael Mulvaney
outside Mendenhall
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If
so, please send us information (a
schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
Noies From THe UNPeRgRouNP
David Lapham clipped by "Stray Bullets"
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Phair's first two
albums, Exile in
Guyville and
Whip-Smart, were
marked by frank
sexuality and a
take-no-crap
attitude.
release is actually not new mate-
rial; it's an eight-song ep featur-
ing a collection of demo record-
ings previously available only in
California. As such it's a mixed
which is
about the
freedom of
loading up a
big honkin'
car and get-
ting the hell
away from
everything.
Escape
is the pri-
mary theme
of Juvenilia,
which is ap-
propriate
considering
the light na-
mmmmmmmmmmmm ture of most
of these
songs. As I said, it's not Liz
Phair's best, but it is fun. And it
really whets my appetite for her
next full-length effort. Liz scares
me when she's really trying.
It's already becoming a bit of a
cliche to say that something will ap-
peal to fans of Quentin Tarantino's
Pulp Fiction. But that's exactly
what I've got to say about David
Lapham's "Stray Bullets
This new comic book series
does for crime comics what
Tarantino's films do for crime mov-
ies: it humanizes them. We all know
the typical crime story formula:
criminal commits crime, cop tracks
criminal, criminal commits more
crimes, cop confronts criminal,
criminal is brought to justice. Lots
of people die along the way, and we
all feel morally superior at the end.
Tarantino and Lapham ignore
that formula entirely. They're more
interested in telling stories about
real people who get caught up in the
violence inherent to a life of crime.
And they do it well.
I'll drop the Tarantino refer-
ences here, because I don't want
anyone to come away from this re-
view thinking that Lapham is just
some kind of Tarantino clone. Noth-
ing could be further from the truth.
No, in "Stray Bullets Lapham is
blazing his own trail of death, de-
struction and innocence lost.
It's not the movers and shakers
of crime that Lapham focuses on.
It's the people whose lives are
touched by the actions of those
movers and shakers who get the
spotlight. Each issue of "Stray Bul-
lets" is self-contained. That is, ev-
ery issue tells a story that can stand
alone, but is part of a larger, over-
reaching story that spans (at
present) 20 years.
In the first issue we meet Joey,
a young member of the criminal or-
ganization around which "Stray Bul-
lets" revolves. The year is 1997, and
Artwork Courtesy of El Capitan! Press
This cute little cherub, just priorto this picture, stabbed another child with a pencil for licking
her cupcake. She's just one of the lovable characters in the comic book Stray Bullets.
ber five, we meet high school honor
Joey is responsible for disposing of
bodies for the enigmatic crime lord
Harry (who is mentioned often, but
whom we never see).
Joey goes a little nuts, imagin-
ing that his latest corpse is really
his girlfriend (who may never have
even existed). He kills first a police
officer, then an entire diner full of
people, and finally his partner. Left
at the end with a car full of bodies,
Joey is last seen stalking off into the
night to find and kill Harry. Fun!
Issue two opens in 1977, with
a little girl named Ginny leaving her
12th viewing of Star Wars and wit-
nessing an execution. This leaves
her emotionally scarred and leads
her to stab a classmate in the back
with a pencil after he licks her cup-
cake. On Halloween, Ginny is vi-
ciously beaten by that boy and two
of his friends. She is last seen lying
unconscious and bleeding in the
woods.
Issue three takes us to 1980,
and a wild party being thrown by a
group of Harry's underlings. At this
party, we see Joey again, this time
as a young child. But our focus here
is Led, a young punk who wants des-
perately to join Harry's gang. In the
course of the evening Led meets and
falls in love with Nina, who turns
out to be Ah, but that would ruin
the best ending in the series to date.
In issue four, we are taken back
to 1978, and a return visit to Ginny.
Having survived her Halloween at-
tack, she now bears a nasty scar
across her left cheek. In this issue,
Ginny runs away from home and is
picked up hitchhiking by a kindly
middle-aged man. By now familiar
with the kind of sick world "Stray
Bullets' depicts, we assume the
worst: Ginny is about to be molested.
Again, I can't bear to give away the
ending, but let's just say that Dave
Lapham is one tricky bastard of a
writer and leave it at that.
In the most recent issue, num-
student Orson in 1981. Orson wit-
nesses another killing by Harry's
men, this one a hit-and-run opera-
tion, and gets involved with an older
woman (Joey's mother). He ends up
having a bad trip at another of the
wild parties held by Harry's people.
When the driver of the hit-and-run
truck shows up, Orson panics and
passes out.
An excellent portrait of teenage
angst, this issue illustrates the kind
of character study Lapham is at-
tempting here. Orson is a nervous
"good boy" who wants to break out
of the mold he's spent his life in.
The problem is, he's so utterly in-
nocent that he doesn't know how
to break that mold, and this inabil-
ity causes him tremendous distress.
This innocence make the
change in Orson all the more strik-
ing at the story's end, when he
See STRAY page 10





-
Mmmmmmmm
The East Carolinian
Thursday, August 31, 1995
Patients Wanted for
Asthma Research Study
fy yxt Mff&r fan
�tfti�Mt, jw snap A
W. James Metzger, M.D.
Clinical Investigator
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy 3E-129
Greenville, NC 27858-4354
If you:
TeT JW?MbV yef
�&& I'm
� are 12 years of age or older
� are male or female
� have mild to moderate asthrru
� are a non-smoker
� have persistent nighttime asthma symptoms
� are not pregnant & practicing an acceptable method of birth control
� are not a lactating female
Benefits to Patient:
� Asthma medication, tests, examination, medical care free of charge
� Reimbursement
� Possible that patient's asthma may respond favorably to treatment
Location of Research:
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy
Module D
!f interested, please contact:
Cathy Critchfield, RN
Study Coordinator (816-3426)
Jackie Chan shares his pain
After 20 years,
Hong Kong action
star is still fighting
HONG KONG (AP) - Listening
to Jackie Chan list the fractures and
wounds he has picked up as Asia's
favorite movie star is like touring
a hospital emergency room.
Starting with his hands. Chan
begins to count about five broken
fingers, both elbows, a shoulder,
collar bone, hip, nose, both ankles,
assorted vertebrae and toes.
There's also a coinwide hole in
his head from the time he jumped
onto a tree but missed because he
turned his head to ensure fhe cam-
era caught his face.
Pain is an occupational hazard
for this muscular 5-foot-9 bundle of
energy with a baby face and mop-
top haircut.
With a potential audience of
more than two billion Asians, Chan
could claim to be the world's most
visible movie star, and his appeal
is enhanced by his insistence on do-
ing his stunts himself, even if that
makes him uninsurable.
"The more a movie is a success,
the more the audience likes it. the
more it makes me crazy Chan said
in an interview.
Chan says he's used to injury.
Besides, he makes up for it in
wealth and legions of fans who
stake out his office in northern
Hong Kong, hoping for a glimpse
of Shing Long, or Become a
Dragon, as Chan is known in Chi-
nese.
Chan's assistants say he
doesn't really relax, but instead
amuses himself with sideline busi-
nesses - sportswear, shops and his
latest project, bottled mineral wa-
ter.
He also runs a charity, acts as
a guide for other actors, and
starred in an AIDS awareness cam-
paign on television.
Until recently, Chan hid the
fact that he's going steady and has
a son because when he said he had
a womanfriend, "a girl committed
suicide on the subway. Another girl,
in front of my office, took poison
Instead, he decided that when-
ever he was asked about romantic-
attachments, he would answer: "1
have no sex life
Born Chan Kong-sang in 1954,
Chan was seven when his par ents
moved to Australia, leaving him at
a Hong Kong theater school which
drilled him in "everything - acro-
batics, kung fu, karate, judo I
liked fighting
After stints as a child actor and
stuntman. Chan was picked for
"New Fist of Fury" in 1976. More
straight kung fu films followed, but
they flopped against the over
whelming dominance of the late,
great Bruce Lee. So Chan decided
to break out of Lee's shadow and
develop what are now his hallmarks
� spectacular stunts, acrobatics
and slapstick.
Bruce Lee kicked high. I
kicked low Chan explains. "Bruce
Lee punched with an AAHH Af-
ter I punched, I made a funny face
He let himself be beaten up by a
grandmother. He would hit an op-
ponent and shake his fingers in
mock agony.
The recipe was a hit. At 41.
See CHAN page 10
n
at tast Carolina tSowl ?oo & ganks Koaa
(919) 355-5510
For students wishing to join our
student bowling league an organiza-
tional meetingYparjy will be held on
Tuesday, Sept. 12
from 3 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Included in the meetingparty will be free
bowling, shoe rental, and use of bowling
balls. League play begins Sept. 19 at 4 p.m.
FREE
GAME
Return this coupon to
East Carolina Bowl
for a free game to be
USED AT A IATER DATE.
Catch 'Em At The Creek!
W3Q QJ
SATURDAY � OCT 7
TH E IMfdBET PAVILION AT
WALNUT CREEK
AMPHITHEATRE
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BLOCKBUSTER MUSIC � MARSHALLS
Select SCHOOL KIDS RECORDS � SOUND SHOPS
Charge By Phone (919) 834-4000 � (910) 852-1100 � (9101 722-6400
Convenience & Other Charges are added.
f





0mMnf�imm
,r��
�au�i�H
10
Thursday, Ausust 31,1995
The East Carolinian
New York exhibits the art of war
NEW YORK (AP) - It was 3
a.m. and Art Weithus. a World War
I illustrator and photographer,
waited in a foxhole to go on patrol
with the troops.
It was 1945 and Weithus was
stationed with U.S. forces at
Corregidor, an island in the Philip-
pines.
Weithus dozed off. When he
woke up, it was silent. He crawled
out of the hole and looked around.
Bodies of dead Japanese soldiers
covered the ground.
"I had fallen asleep through
the battle Weithus said. "I didn't
contribute a hell of a lot
Weithus may not have known
how to use a gun, but armed with
a pen and a camera, he contributed
tc the war effort by providing im-
ages of battlefields and enlisted life
for thousands of soldiers stationed
throughout the world.
The artist, now 84, was art di-
rector for "Yank the Army weekly
for enlisted men, Weithus spent
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time in Hawaii, Australia and the
Philippines before returning home
to New York.
"Yank" was the concept of
Egbert White, an advertising execu-
tive who had been on the staff of
Stars and Stripes during World
War I.
The magazine began in the art
department of the women's maga-
zine "Mademoiselle" on March 12,
1942.
A motley crew - a songwriter,
an author, a cartoonist, an ad ex-
ecutive, and Weithus, an art direc-
tor for the Elizabeth Arden account
at an advertising agency - worked
for 30 hours straight before com-
ing out with a blueprint of the pub-
lication.
The blueprint, complete with a
full-page pinup, was presented to
Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson
the next day. Everything in the
magazine, except for the full-page
pinup, met with his approval.
"Mrs. Stimson objected
Weithus said.
The first edition ultimately ran
with the picture. As time passed,
the magazine published from 21 dif-
ferent locations around the world,
its pinups featuring Betty Grable,
Esther Williams and Rita Hayworth
reaching 2 million enlisted men.
Weithus said that many of the
wartime illustrators would either
work directly in the field, take
notes and reconstruct the scene
later or work from photographs of
the scene. Sometimes the drawings
were based on the illustrator's
memory since there was no time to
draw during a battle.
"Yank" survived for 3 12 years
and was published for the last time
on Dec. 28, 1945. It boasted a full-
time staff of 350 members and more
than 1,000 stringers who worked
as artists and writers.
Over the years Weithas has do-
nated some of his World War II pic-
tures to museums and the armed
forces.
One ink sketch, entitled "A
Scarf of a Thousand Stitches
shows an American soldier holding
a Japanese scarf in his hands. The
scarves were made by Japanese
women and worn around the waists
of soldiers to protect them from
harm.
The picture, which was drawn
from a photograph Weithas took in
1945, is now a part of the archives
at the U.S. Army Center of Military
History in Washington D.C.
"Lone Tree on Canton Isla.id
is a watercolor finished in less than
a half hour after his arrival on the
island located in the Pacific,
Weithas said.
Weithas still paints and is plan-
ning an exhibition in New York City
in the fall.
After the war, Weithus received
for his services the Legion of Merit,
the fifth highest award given by the
Army.
He collaborated with James
Jones, the author of "From Here
to Eternity to produce the book
"WWII which recounts the saga
of the war with illustrations and
photographs. Weithus also com-
piled the stories of "Yank" corre-
spondents in the book, "Close to
Glory
mt.
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, Ausust 31,1995
11
TkeyVe Bacls
The Greatest Shrimp Around
STRAY from page 8
leaves the party the next morning.
Witnessing another hit-and-run ac-
cident (this one, apparently, an ac-
tual accident), Orson snaps and
lunges for the woman driving the
car. We last see him frozen in mid-
air, his fist drawn back and ready to
punch the weeping face of the
driver.
"Stray Bullets" is not a nice
story. In following the activities of
Harry's organization, we are wit-
nessing a loss of innocence. Each
of Lapham's main characters expe-
riences this loss in one way or an-
other. As Harry's power grows over
time, we may also be seeing the loss
of innocence in the series' setting,
Baltimore.
The stray builets of the title are
the random, accidental instances
when Harry's criminal activities
reach out and touch the lives of nor-
mal people. It's through the eyes of
these people that Lapham tells his
story.
COMMITTEE PRESENTS
i WASq teenage GREG
To comics fans, "Stray Bullets"
is an amazing piece of work. David
Lapham's previous work was on a
bunch of uninspired science fiction
and s"ner hero titles. No one who
saw that stuff could ever have pre-
dicted he was capable of something
like this.
As good a story as this is, how-
ever, the artwork is even better.
"Stray Bullets" shows a mastery of
the comics medium that few artists
ever achieve. Translating cinematic
storytelling to the comics page is dif-
ficult, but Lapham succeeds at it
again and again.
"Stray Bullets" is not only one
of the best comics being published
today, it's some of the best crime
fiction too. It deserves a much wider
audience than it's getting, as it's
crowded off the shelves by super he-
roes. The self-contained stories make
it easy to start reading any time, so
search out a copy today. And tell 'em
Harry sent you.
WALK from page 8
leaving the father to believe that Paul
is to blame and not his daughter.
Sparks fly between Paul and
Victoria from the very beginning of
their relationship. Only slowly do they
realize their attraction but must some-
how confront their difficult situation.
Paul plans to leave several times
but is continually thwarted by
Victoria's grandfather (Anthony
Quinn). Eventually Paul helps to pro-
tect the grapes from the frost, har-
vest the grapes and crush the grapes
(in the most glorious scene of the
entire film). Only the overblown end-
ing detracts from an otherwise beau-
tifully magical story.
The cast members add magic of
their own to the already charming
story. Anthony Quinn has never been
more charismatic. He tells Paul of the
family history, drinks wine with him
and eats all Paul's chocolates. Paul
could fall in love with Victoria's grand-
father as much as her.
Also wonderful is Sanchez-Gijon.
With a radiant smile and winning
warmth, she wins over both Paul and
the audience.
Keanu Reeves has received nega-
tive press for his performance but I
found him to be a good fit for his role.
Paul is written as being a little stiff.
He is hard-working and honest but not
extremely charismatic. Reeves works
well in the role and adds his own
charm to the film.
The special effects and cinema-
tography that give an orange glow to
much of the film soften viewers'
hearts by pleasing their eyes. The or-
chard scenes look so achingly beauti-
ful that the viewer gets swept away
with the setting as much as Paul does.
And holding together the magi-
cal story, charming cast and wonder-
ful cinematography is Arau's direc-
tion. He seems to conduct the film
more than direct it. His orchestrations
make music for the eye. He allows
Paul and Victoria to fall in love slowly
in a glorious surrounding that makes
the soul long for more. The vibrations
resounding in the viewer's heart are
akin to those vibrations produced by
a good symphony.
Though Clouds is not as good as
film as Like Water for Chocolate, Arau
is allowed to weave enough magic into
the fabric of the tale to make this
Hollywood film seem more palatable
than most
On a scale of one to 10, A Walk
in the Clouds rates an eight
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12
Thursday, August 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
McPhail ready for A?
bust-out season
Vols have talent, balance
Offensive line
leads the way for
the Volunteers
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Orange, orange and more or-
ange, the color of choice for nearly
100.000 Tennessee Volunteer fans
who will fill General Neyland Sta-
dium Saturday to watch their foot-
ball team take on the Pirates.
The stadium is so loud that ECU
head coach Steve Logan installed
loudspeakers at practice this week
to simulate the crowd noise. But it
isn't the noise that should concern
Logan the most his team must con-
tain Heisman Trophy candidate
sophomore Peyton Manning who
operates behind a veteran offensive
line.
The Volunteers are ranked eight
by the Associated Press and 11th in
the QHHUSA TodayCoaches poll
after finishing 18th in 1994. They
capped their season with a 45-23 win
over Virginia Tech in the Gator Bowl.
With the return of 15 starters and
47 letterman expectations for this tal-
ented group are sky-high. Talk of na-
tional championships are discussed
daily.
The Vol. fans believe in this
group and why shouldn't they with
offensive game breakers like Nilo
Silvan and Jay Graham running be-
hind a huge offensive line with three
pro prospects. The defense features
the linebacking core and it is a good
one with Scott Galyon and Craig
King. They get aftei the football and
create turnovers out of defensive
coordinator John Chavis' 4-3 scheme.
Sounds like an unbeatable team,
right. Not quite, the Volunteers did
lose four games last season, includ-
ing a 31-0 shutout by the Florida
Gators, close defeats to Mississippi
State, Alabama and UCLA. Common
opponents for the Pirates and Vol-
unteers were Memphis and South
Carolina. ECU soundly defeated both
teams, putting up big offensive num-
bers. UT edged Memphis 24-13 and
defeated the Gamecocks 31-22.
An offseason credit card scandal
involving several players unautho-
rized use of a athletic department
staffer's phone card has seen All-
American free safety Jason Parker
dismissed from the team and live
other starters will miss the opener
as well. Head coach Phillip Fulmer
has suspended starting fullback
Chester Ford, All-SEC linebacker
Tyrone Hines, center Brent Gibson,
wideout Andy McCullough and defen-
sive back James Smith.
All of the Vols hopes ride on the
strong right arm of 6-foot-5 Peyton
Manning who threw for 1.141 yards
and 11 touchdowns as a true fresh-
man last fall. The son of Hall of
Famer Archie Manning he also had
a 61.8 completion percentage. He is
firmly intrenched as the starter with
little depth behind him in Jeremy
Bates and Shawn Snyder. If Manning
goes down the Vol's will be in a simi-
lar situation as ECU was when
Marcus Crandell broke his ankle a
few seasons ago.
At tailback they feature Jay Gra-
ham who gained 275 yards behind
NFL draft pick James 'Little Man"
Stewart and Aaron Hayden a year
ago. The former Parade All-American
See VOLS page 14
Jerris McPhail
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
The Ward Sports Medicine Build-
ing is guiet on this day. No heavy traffic
of athletes moving from the locker room
to the practice fields, to the weight
rooms. The resonant sound of shoulder
pads and helmets are absent
Monday is the Pirates' day off from
practice, a day to relax and unwind from
the pressures of school and football.
Most of the football players are at home-
resting for the long week ahead. In a
dark film room on the second floor,
though, one senior is preparing, plot-
ting for success on Saturday. Sept 2 in
a decidedly unfriendly environment.
General Neyland Stadium, home of the
Tennessee Volunteers and nearly
100,000 fans clad in orange.
The senior's name is Jerris McPhail,
a 6-foot, 210 pound tailback considered
the best athlete on the team. He runs a
4.37 40-yard dash, has a 40.5 inch verti-
cal leap and bench presses 360 pounds.
Impressive numbers, but McPhail is
more than your average computer num-
bers. He has a distinct attitude and work
ethic that makes him a standout Perse-
verance and extra work like today's is
what has got him to this point
Look back a few years to Winston-
Salem, NC, Wake Forest University.
Among some heavy competition, the All-
State tailback has arrived for fall camp
and expected early playing time. Suc-
cess on the field came easy to him but
he didn't like the city, never felt like he
quite fit in, thought it was sort of "stuck
up" in McPhail's words.
He left and went back to Clinton, a
small town in eastern North Carolina
known for its high school football and
tobacco crops. He contemplated his next
move and decided to play basketball at
a small college called Mount Olive. He
averaged 12 points a game at shooting
guard, with several crowd-pleasing slam
dunks. Still, something was missing,
football and his time to play the game;
his first love was slipping away.
"1 missed the game McPhail said.
"Football is something 1 was born to
play. Basketball is a lot of fun but it won't
bring me the things I want for myself
and my family
The NBA isn't home to many six
foot guards so McPhail's eyes turned
toward a school that recruited him back
UT sophomore looks for Heisman
Peyton Manning
Amy Mceshaney
Dagy Beacon Sports Editor
���Mam
Heisman Trophy talk is once again
swirling around East Tennessee.
The reason is UTs sensational
sophomore quarterback Peyton Man-
ning who is looking to pick up right
where he left off last season when he
earned SEC Freshman of the Year hon-
ors.
After being forced into the start-
ing lineup last year because of injuries
to Jerry Colquitt and Todd Helton,
Manning displayed maturity and lead-
ership abilities rarely seen in a fresh-
man. He completed 62 percent of his
passes for 1141 yards and 11 touch
downs.
"It was a slow process Manning
said. "The more games 1 played, the
more experience 1 got 1 feel I gained
more leadership with the players. 1
could see them looking at me with a
different look which made me feel good
1 felt like I had to earn their respect
The 6-foot-5,215 pound Manning
will be the signal caller again for a po-
tent offense that returns two starting
wide receivers and one of the best of-
fensive lines m the nation
Manning is expecting a big year
from his experienced, yet young group
of receivers. Senior tight end David Horn,
back at full strength after shoulder sur-
gery, should improve on his 11 catches
last year and provide another solid
Mocker for UTs quarterback
He is also confident that receiver
Joey Kent and senior Nilo Silvan will both
have big years in 1995. .And the talented
but unproven group of sophomores, in-
cluding Marcus Nash and Maurice Staky,
will need to step up and provide that 3rd
and 4th receiver for Manning
"It's a young group Manning said.
"Nilo and David Horn are the only guys
we'll lose next year. They're all quality
receivers, if s Wide Receiver U. for a rea-
son. For a quarterback to have the five
senior linemen we do and the receivers
it makes for a quarterback's dream. So
thaf s why its a good year for Peyton
Manning to make a run at the title
With his knowledge of the UT sys-
tem in addition to being in the best shape
of his life, Manning is ready to take full
command of the huddle and be the team
leader on and off the field. He hopes the
UT coaches will find more ways to ex-
ploit b:s natural abilities and his new
found familiarity of the offensive system.
"I hope we do more of the five-wide
stuff and put in some of the offense they
had when Shuler finished his junior
year Manning said. "Last year we didn't
get to the whole package. In the bowl
game last year I felt like I had a pretty
good command of what we had in. But
the reps in spring football really helped
me out"
With the offensive line intact and
the number of receivers returning Man-
ning and the entire IT football squad
are preparing to make a run at the na-
tional title in 1995. His supporting cast
helps but doesn't make him.
The quarterback from Louisiana is
one of the best prepared athletes on the
squad. He thrived in spring drills and
has kept up the pace by working out with
some professional football players this
summer.
"I worked out with some guys from
New Orleans that play pro ball Man-
ning said. "Some defensive backs from
the Patriots and Cardinals, and receiv-
ers from the Colts and Buccaneers It's
really helped me out because I've been
playing with the same level of speed we
have here at UT. It's helped me stay in
shape and keep my timing this sum-
mer. If s paid good dividends for me
Manning has been studying game
film to get ready for this season as well
as lifting, throwing and running to pre
pare himself for the start of the 1995
season.
See UT page 13
Wide receivers: strength of team
Photos Cour tesy of UT SID
Peyton Manning, sophomore Heisman Trophy candidate,
is poised for a great season with the Volunteers.
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
This is the second part of a serie
on Pirate football positional outlook.
Wide Receivers: This is the deep
est and most talented position on the
team.
Jason Nichols returns at flanker af-
ter catching 42 passes for 450 yards and
two touchdowns. A former high school
quarterback from Norcross, Ga. he
threw ECU's lone touchdown in the 10-
7 loss to Duke. Nichols is a blend of
speed and possession receiver who was
extremely effective a year ago. Look for
him to expand on his 1994 numbers
and gain postseason honors.
Mitchell Galloway returns at H-
Black after gaining All Liberty Bowl
Alliance honors and Second Team All-
Independent a year ago. He led the Pi-
rates in receiving with 566 yards on 36
catches and doubles as an outstanding
kickoff returner returning a kick 97
yards versus Tulsa.
"Mitch is an impact player Berry
said. "Whenever he catches the ball
Mitch can make something happen be-
cause he can run. You can do an awful
lot with him
The most impressive physical speci-
men is 6-foot6, 205 pound Larry Shan-
non. Shannon caught six touchdowns
on just 17 catches. His 40-inch vertical
leap and great size allows him to get
position and outleap smaller defensive
backs for scores. Shannon has improved
his speed considerably and should re-
turn as a starter at split end.
Fighting hard tor playing time be-
hind Shannon is former starter Linwood
DeBrew. The steady possession receiver
from Homer Ferguson High School in
Newport News. Ya. has the best hands
on the team according to Pirate coaches.
He caught 10 passes in four starts a
year ago before suffering a neck injury.
DeBrew is fully recovered and should
be a significant contributor.
Senior Derrek Batson is back af-
ter a disciplinary suspension and should
see action as well. Batson caught 26
passes as a freshman and returned a
punt 97 yards at West Virginia I le runs
a 452 40-yard Jash and bench presses
345 pounds.
Mike Sellers, a former high school
option quarterback, has outstanding
size and ability at 6-foot-3. 190 pounds.
He is fully recovered from shoulder in-
juries suffered this spring and should
be able to help the depth at this posi-
tion.
Perez Mattison who started as a
true freshman at quarterback before
switching to receiver last year will
redshirt this season.
True freshmen Troy Smith and
Lamont Chappell of Greenville Rose and
koxboro Person high schools, respec-
tively, have made quite an impression
on Head Coach Steve Logan, who calls
them the best two receivers to come
Out of the Tarheel state a war ago.
Smith was recruited by Notre
See OFF page 13
See MCPHAIL page 15
Richard R. Eakin. chancellor
ECU 13
UT 10
"East Carolina surprises the volun-
teers
Brian Bailey, VVNCT TV sports
caster. Pirate Chest columnist
ECU 38
UT 31
"Pirates lose late in shootout
Jeremy Leftwich, WZMB general
manager
ECU 24
UT 21
"1 hate that Rocky Top' song
Olayta Rigsby, ABLE president
ECU 27
UT 20
"After a marked improvement last
season, the Pirates will continue to
get better by outhustling their big
name opponents. The Volunteers
have volunteered' to be the firts
victims of the Pirate raid
Jennifer Gooch, sophomore
ECU 28
UT 21
"Pirates fall short, but keep it close
Brad Oldham, Program Director at
WZMB, (will cover ECU-UT- game
Saturday for TEC Sports)
UT 21
ECU 10
"Games like this and last year's game
with Auburn prove that Pirates are
close but not ready to play with the
big boys
Women ready
to kick off
Eric Bartels
Senior Writer
One year later, the Lady Pirates,
younger and perhaps more talented (2-
15, 1-5 CAA), will be heading in a new
direction under the guidance of head
coach Neil Roberts.
Roberts, a first year coach and
1987 graduate of Delaware, will have
plenty of responsibilities as he aims to
improve the Lady Pi-
rates' attack from 1994.
A fpw bright spots
for Roberts will be the
return of 1994's scoring
leader, senior midfielder
Stacey Schott
(Reistertown, Md.). who
contributed five goals
and three assists while
playing and starting in all
seventeen games. Also
back is senior midfielder
Rebecca Tiesler (Boca
Raton, Fla.), who partici-
pated in every game a
season ago.
With the question of
leadership responsibili-
ties this season, and be-
sides Schott and Tiesler,
Roberts will look towards
Barbara "Barrie"
Gottschalk, and Maureen
Corcoran to guide the
team especially early on
in the season. Gottschalk
will bear a majority of the
responsibilities from
coach Roberts, as she continues this
season at midfield. The Fulmouth. Ya.
native just finished another summer
playing in the demanding VISTA soc-
cer league in northern Virginia.
Anchoring the defense this sea-
son, Roberts will look to Corcoran, a
senior from Greensboro. NC. After play-
ing and starting in all seventeen games.
Corcoran will be looked after to head
the defensive corps.
Although, the ladies lost their sea-
soned goalkeeper of 1994. Jamieson
Pierce, a battle for goalkeeper this sea-
son may mean Roberts will have to do
some juggling of his own. Junior Beth
Crutchfield, a Greensboro native; se-
nior Joanna Clark from Los Angeles.
Calif; and sophomore Jennifer Venters
of Jacksonville. NC, are all vying for a
astrating position. Roberts has another
difficult task of choosing who will
guard the nets.
With a young team come new
faces and plenty of talent. Freshman
Heather Good of Bloomfield Hills.
Mich will step up as either a midfielder
or a striker. Putting pressure on the
opposing team is what Roberts will like
to see. Coming from northern Virginia
and adding that pressure to the Lady
Pirate arsenal will be freshman Jenni-
fer Maglioccetti. Both of their previ-
ous soccer accolades have assur ��' their
immediate impact on the young team.
Looking at the Lady Pirate's over-
all schedule, many teams with the same
collegiate status (first or second year
women's soccer programs) have been
slated to ease the pain of being a sec-
ond year program in the powerhouse
Colonial Athletic Association (CAA).
The University of Florida, Mt Olive
College, Jacksonville University, Mt.
Photo by KEN CLARK
The Lady Pirates' soccer team pre-
pares for its scrimmage today at 4
p.m. against Barton College.
Saint Mary's and Virginia Common-
wealth are all starting their inaugural
seasons.
The women will open their season
at the ECU Soccer Field in a scrimmage
with Barton College today at 4 p.m. The
season opener at home will he held
against Lenoir Rhyne on Saturday. Sept.
2 at 5 p.m.
in
GOING TO TENNESSEE?
Planning on heading to Khn-
ville for the Pirates' matchup with
the Volunteers? If you are counting
on using a Tennessee students'
ticket - don't. .According to a press
release issued by the University of
Tennessee, the procedures for ad
mission in Neyland Stadium have
changed.
An electronic process tor veri-
fying student ID cards will be ii
at student ticket gates. Vdmission
will require a current, valid UT stu-
dent ID card.





The East Carolinian
Thursday, August 31, 1995
13
1
"Greenville's I
ONLY
CASH PRIZE
IJUcaiMCl "i jJ
Exotic
Mlilcliili
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers llpm Ian ya
km
Mi. U
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic Dancers
$D oncers wante(IS
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission An) Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
I Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Xe.
SILVER
It I II I I
OFF from page 12
Dame. Texas and South Carolina artcr
catching 134 passes lor 2.088 yards and
27 touchdowns in his three year career.
He was ranked among the Top 15 pass
catchers in the nation last year by sev-
eral recruiting publications.
Chappell caught passes from North
Carolina State signee Jamie Bamette
to the tune of 80 catches tor 1.262 yards
and 14 touchdowns. Chappell is also an
outstanding punt returner.
Joe Humphlett. 6-foot-2. 210-
pound transfer from NE Oklahoma
Ai&M JC is a good blocker with speed.
He has solid hands and good strength
in the weight room. He should see ac-
tion on special team coordinator Doug
Martin's special teams this fall.
Brad Salin (6-foot 175-pound) from
Raleigh's Millbrook High School and
Durham Riverside's Travis Newkirk (5-
foot-7. 147-pound) both had strong
springs and showed good potential
redshirting a year ago. Salin has good
hands and Newkirk has good quickness
and speed.
P
We are looking for ambitious, hardworking individuals for
the following positions for the year 95-96:
Advertising Director (1)
Advertising Representatives (2)
Illustrator (1)
If you want to gain some valuable experience while in
school plus earn some extra cash, please come by the
Expressions office to fill out an application. Applications
will be taken until August 31st.
Expressions is located on the 2nd floor across from The
East Carolinian in the Publication Bldg.
and our Phone is 328-6927
ECU-UT
Matchups
OFFENSE
Quarterbacks: This posi
tion is dead even: both QBs
have equal talent and ability.
Running Backs: Slight
edge to ECU with McPhail s ex
perience.
Wide Receiver: ECU -
talented position overshadows
the Vois. receivers.
Tight Ends: Tandem of
Richards and Richardson supe-
rior to Horn and Pfeiffer.
Offensive Line: Vols. start-
ing five may be the best in the
nation. No contest.
E&
TENNESSEE
DEFENSE
Defensive Line: Volunteers
speed and experience outshine re-
vamped I'irate I Mine.
Linebackers: Close call, but
with I lines out Pirate trio of Libiano,
Foreman and Burke wins out
Secondary: Opportunistic and
experienced Pirate DBs will make
the diffrence in this game. A-A Safety
Parker is suspended.
SPECIAL TEAMS
Game experience of
Ho'comb and Levine wins out
over Vols. untested talent of
freshman Hall and transfer
Binion.
UT
from page 12
�- Barber & Style
men's hair styling shoppe
28BB E. 10th St. r
Eastgate Shopping Center 9 t)�lJU
Across from Highway Patrol H�ijXUt
-Behind Car-Quest � nin4TpC
Mon-Fri. 9-6 Sav PLATES
UJalk-ins Anytime &Get Hair Cut for
752-3318 $6Evervtime
Certainly, there is alwaj -
tor the IT football to do the
elusive win over rival Alabama and win
the bowl game at the end i t the seas in.
The pressure last year was in many v.
more with the rash if injuries to the sfc
ers. especially at quarterba
The tremendous responsibility of
the starting quarterback position was
suddenly thrust onto two true freshmen
who would compete most of the season
lor the job. Manning became the appar-
ent front runner because of his prepara-
tions and his ability to l am quickly. He
was soon taking snaps a� the regular
starter for the Vols.
Manning will continue to lead the
Volunteer football team in 1995. The
pressures are different but still there.
"I think there's a lot of pies
Manning said. '�Everybody's expect
lot out of this team this year. We have
very high expectations for ourselves
One of those goals includes earn-
ing a a illege degree aiong with a natii mal
championship. The question of the va-
lidity of the "student-athlete" has heen a
recent topic around college campuses.
Someone can make a case for the con-
cept with the example set by Peyton
Manning. He takes academics at IT wry
seriously and strives to do as well in the
classroom as he does in the football field.
He currently has 3.0 plus grade point
average.
The heralded sophomore quarter-
back cannot be seen only as the son of
NFL great Archie Manning or the tre-
mendous athlete he is on the football
field. Peyton Manning is an athlete, a
serious student and a leader tor the IT
football team. He expects a lot from him-
self including a SEC championship and
a national title for the Vols in 1995.
Hl&MHx PfiffrR
MNr
They're Back To
Save America
From The '90s
Juneh
MMft
All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE
to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed)
with valid ECU ID.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 7
FRIDAY, SEPT. 8
SATURDAY, SEPT. 9
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
WELL GIVE YOU 10 WEEKS.
ken h time t prove you recapeh-
mart and determined, ten weel nd alotof
Officer of Mann
:� I !ne chance to prove)
� �. f challenge, hi
: � i leader wi live ten � i vrov t
Marines
The r�. Thf PuhmJ. The Wjtnnes
MARINE
'atulations to Byron Sullivan
on his outstanding job .1
Oif'u eiandidate s hool.





�JQT �Tg
14
Thursday, August 31,1995
777e East Carolinian
VOLS from page 12
from Concord, N.C. is a junior and
should be ready for a great season.
There is little depth behind him with
the arrest of heralded JUCO transfer
Travis Cozart and freshman Shawn
Bryson was not admitted to school.
Mark Levine should see playing time
behind him. Eric Lane, a former
tailback is a strong blocker and will
play in place of the suspended Ford.
At tight end the Volunteers are
solid with a nucleus of senior David
Horn (11 catches) and junior Scott
Pfeiffer. They are primarily used as
blockers in this offense. Both have
good size and hands.
The offensive line is the stron-
gest part of the squad led by seniors
Bubba Miller, Leslie Ratliffe and Ja-
son Layman. Depth and strength are
the buzz words for this unit All three
should be early selections in the
1996 NFL draft They are equally
adept at run and pass blocking.
Wide Receiver U is what NFL
scouts call UT and this group is no
exception. Speedy senior Nilo Silvan
and steady junior Joey Kent lead this
group. Youngsters Marcus Nash and
Greg Kyler are tough to contain as
well. Silvan was quoted yesterday in
a Knoxville paper that their receiv-
ers were significantly faster than the
Pirate secondary.
On the defensive line quickness
not size is emphasized. Leonard
Little, a JUCO transfer weighs only
220 pounds but runs a 4.54.6 40
yard dash. He is a accomplished pass
rusher. Steve White had seven sacks
last year at the opposite end. Big
Shane Burton and Billy Beron hold
down the tackle spots. Their respon-
sibility is to keep blockers off of the
linebackers. Freshman Ron Green
has big play capabilities. Ron Suddith
and company have to stay on their
blocks.
At linebacker they are led by
team captain Scott Galyon who made
93 tackles last year. Tyrone Hines is
replaced at middle linebacker by the
intimidating Craig King. King is one
of the hardest hitters in the country
and should make running up the
middle difficult for ECU. Jesse Sand-
ers and Anthony Hampton hold down
the other outside spot Jerris McPhail
will have to find a way to get outside
against this speedy group.
The secondary, even without Ja-
son Parker, is rock-solid. Raymond
Austin, DeRon Jenkins, Terry Fair
and Corey Gaines combined for nine
interceptions a year ago. Austin must
take up the slack in a supporting role
for Gaines at free safety. This group
is very fast with several track and
fit'J performers among this group.
The loss of Parker may be just what
the Pirate receivers need to get open.
On special teams the Vol's de-
pend on Silvan for both kickoff and
punt returns. He is very dangerous
in the open field. Jeff Hall, a fresh-
man is the place kicker and Larry
Binion, an Ail-American JUCO trans-
fer is solid at punter.
The Pirates must use their short
passing game to open things up for
McPhail. Quarterback Marcus
Crandell is a big game performer and
should rise to the occasion. If the re-
vamped Pirate defensive line can put
a rush on Manning and the
linebacking trio of Morris Foreman,
Mark Libiano and Marvin Burke can
shut down Graham then this game
should remain close going into the
fourth quarter. This team is not un-
beatable but they are the best team
the Pirates will face in 1995. Matchup
wise this game is closer than the Ve-
gas handicappers would have fans
think. They have the Pirates as a 16
point underdog.
e knead an copyeditor to fix
hour mistakes.
Most have a 2.0 and be an ECU student. You must have excellent
grammar skills. Stop by the Student Pubs. bldg. to fill out an application.
A Matter Of Taste
kw
We offer a creative, variety of entrees including vegetarian dishes.
Our chefs distinct flair and ingenuity zvill delight even the
finickiest of diners. We lookjorward to helping you discover the
most whispered about place in toufn.
Located on the corner of Arlington Blvd. & Red Banks Rd.
355-1 111 � Mon-Sat Lunch 1 1:30-2:30 � Tue-Sat Dinner 5:30-9.30
Rush
at East Carolina ftowl 700 Ked &wks Koaa
(919) 355-5510
We want to welcome back all � �,� 1
ECU students by offering a new f�U HI IGHT
Student Collegiate mmetams
Bowling League m. 8:30-1210 n
Tuesdays @ 4:00 p.m. $1,79 per game
$5 per person (shoes included; 3 people per team) �? �
SEE OUR AD ON PACE 36 OF THIS ISSUE FOR INFORMATION ABOUT A FREE BOWLING PARTY
Alpha Phi Omega
Co-Ed
National Service Fraternity
Help provide service to the Nation, Community,
and Campus. Meet others that are interested
in helping people. Take part in the annual Relay For Life
that is held by the American Cancer Society.
Be a part of the Leadership, Friendship, and Service that
makes up Alpha Phi Omega.
You are invited to attend our interest meeting:
Where: Multi-Purpose Room, Mendenhall Student Center
When: Tuesday, September 5 or Wednesday September 6 at 8:00 PM
For more information please conlael Kevin Buck 321-7037
A B r A
E
EPS.10N
Z
ZETA
H
0
I
IOTA
V
v x $
ETA PSI CHI
Sorority Rush Schedule
E
EPSILQN
Fall 1995
ZHt'XOYT I
ZETA ETA PSI CHI PHI UPSILON TAU SIGMA
t
CONVOCATION- Information F;iir Tuesday, August 29, 1995
4:00-600 pm Great Room in Mendenhall Student Center
A
LAMBDA
M
N
Thursday, September 7, 1995
Friday, Septembers, 1995
RUSH Orientation
;00-6:00pm Wright Auditorium
1st Round INTRODUCTION Dnv
�J: 00-10:00 pm I! panics
1 4:00-4:30
2 4:45-5:15
3 5:30-6:00 'food ill be provided
4 i:15-6:45
5 7:00-7:30
5 7:45-8:15
7 8:30-9:00
8 9:15-9:45
2nd Round HOUSE TOUR Dav
10:00-4:00 pm 6 panics
1 10:00-10:45
2 11:00-1-1:45 �
3 12:00-12:45
4 - 1:00- 1:45
5 2:00- 2:45 �
fi 3:00- 3:45
Rushccs to computer terminals at S 00 pm Saturday night
Saturday, September 9, 1995
Sunday, September 10, 1995
Fall Formal Rush 1995
East Carolina University
September 7-12
3rd Round SKIT Day
1200-4:00 pm 4 panics
1 12:00-12:45 �
2 1:00- 1:45 �
3 2:00- 2:45 �
4 3:00- 3:45 �
Rushccs to computer terminals at 8:00 pm Sunday night
4th Round PREFERENCE Night
4:00-7:00 pm 3 panics
1 4:00-4:45 �
2 5:05-5:50 �
3 6:10-6:55 �
Rushccs fill out pref cards at 7:00 pm
BID Day
4:00-5:00 pm University Mall
Monday, September 11,199:
Tuesday, September 12, 1995
East Carolina University Rush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied by a check for15, non-refundable, made payable to the ECU Panhellenic
Association. Rush dates are September 7 - September 12,1995. The established check-in times for students regis-
tered to go through rush has been set for September 7 between 6:00 and 8:00 pi. immediately following the con-
vocation session. Transfer and new-to-ECU freshmen must send a transcript with this application. You musl
also supply 8 photos of yourself at the beginning of rush. (Only one pose is necessary.)
. Sorority Rushes Datal
LAST NAME FIRSTKIDDLE SOCIAL SECURITY t AGE
FATHER'S NAME:
LASTFIRST MIDDLE
MOTHER'S NAME:
LASTf:sstMIDDLE
HOME ADDRESS:
"IT?
HOME RHONE:
HIGH SCHOOL:
HAKE
HIGH SCHOOL GPA:
LOCAL ADDRESS:
CFF-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
ON-CAHPUS ADDRESS:
ROOM
CURRENT ACADEMIC STANDING:
HOURS:
DORM
GPA:
cnpnpiTV RUSH INFORMATION
M
u '
n
Pi
Sororities participating hs Sept. 7-Sept. 12 Rush
are:
Alpha Delta Pi Chi Onega
Alpha Xi Delta Deita Zeta
Alpha Omicron Pi Sigma Sigma Sigma
Alpha Phi Zeta Tau Aiph3
Sororities choosing to hold Rush either late
Septemoii" or in the early Spring are:
Pi Delta
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sigma Gamma Rho
Deita Sigma Theta Zeta Phi Beta
Rush Week is simply the method sororities use
to meet students interested in joining. On Sept.7
there is a convocation meeting to give you the
basic sorority information; you will also meet-
your Rush counselor who will help you through
the Rush process.
Q B r A E Z
TA 0N ZETA
Rush Fee (non-refundable) should be sent in
with application in the amount of $15 made
payable to ECU Panhellenic Association.
Rush Registration will be arr.epted until Sept.1.
� Mail to: ECU Panhellenic Association
204 Whichard Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Financial and Social Requirements:
Each sorority will review grades and cost during
rush. Sororities grade requirements begin at 2.0.
(Some sororities require higher GPA's). The
average cost is S50-S60 per month during the
school year. There is also an additional pledge and
initiation fee.
Questions: Please contact Laura Sweet,
Panhellenic Advisor, at 328-4235 or
204 Whichard.
H � - X O E
IS THERE A SORORITY AFFILIATE IN YOUR FAMILY? (Y ' N)
RELATIONSHIP:NAME:SORORITY:
SORORITY:
HIGH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
OTHER COLLEGES ATTENDED:
NAME:
PREVIOUS COLLEGIATE ACTIVITIES:
HOBBIES:
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, I hereby grant the
Office Student Services at East Carolina University the right to release the needed academic
information for sorority pledging and initiation to Panhellenic or the appropriate sorority
when necessary. My termination from rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE
Go Greek!
A
ALPHA
0
THETA
I
IOTA
K
KAPPA
A
LAMBDA
M
MU
N
NU
M
i�
XI
O
0MICR0N
n
pi
ZHXOYTEQ
PSI
PHI

ZETA
ETA
PSI
CHI
PHI
UPSILON TAU
SIGMA
OMEGA
f '





�?�
The East Carolinian
Thursday, August 31, 1995
15
� JK,
ill
Open 7 days A week � M- Sat 9a-2a � Sun 12-12
Tuess $1 Domestics
All Day & Night
Wedt Ladies Might
Ladies Play All Day Free
Everyday: 32 oz. Bud draft $2.25
JVICP11AIL, from page 12
in high school. East Carolina University.
After sitting out one year, leading the
team in receptions at wide receiver in
another and playing understudy to
record-setting tailback Junior Smith last
year the spotlight is finally his at last
Not to say McPhail hasn't had some
SGA JUDICIAL
BRANCH
The Following Positions are available:
1. Student Attorney General
2. Student Public Defender
All applicants will be screened by
the SGA Executive Council.
Requirements:
2.0 Grade Point Average
Good Standing with the University
Applications Available At:
Dean of Students Office (210 Whichard)
Deadline For All Applications
WED. 5:00pm Aug. 30,1995
exciting moments, the 34 catches and
four touchdowns in 1993, 326 yards
rushing yards last season, plus the two
longest offensive plays of the season (67
yard TD catch versus Central Florida,
62 yard catch against Southern Miss)
and being named Outstanding Special
Teams player by coaching staff for his
work on kickoff coverage.
Still, something was missing. He
has yet to start a collegiate game at
tailback, backing up in all 12 games last
season. The expectations and media
attention grows by the day, excited by
the potential of McPhail. the package
of size, speed and a unique running style
that is both flashy and hard nosed all
at the same time. The preseason hype
isn't something that he pays much at-
tention to at all but still he doesn't want
to let himself, his team or Clinton down.
"If I don't piay up to my standards
and expectations then I will be very dis-
appointed McPhail said. "That's why
I'm here today because I want to get a
jump on my opponents. 1 feel like every
time they are resting 1 should be work-
ing. Hard work is what I'm about It is
something that Junior impressed upon
me.
"Every chance he had to be over
here, either running, lifting or watch-
ing film, he was here. He set a example
that me and the younger backs are try-
ing to carry on
Hard work is a way of life for the
Pirates, a team that gets little national
respect and has been snubbed by both
Conference USA and the Big East Con-
ference. Despite two bowl appearances
in the 90s and one top 10 finish they
get very little respect To say McPhail
has a chip on his shoulder is a big un-
derstatement
The clicker hits play and the Ten-
nessee defense is there live and in color
and their attacking 4-3 alignment.
Butkus Award candidates Tyrone Hines
and Scott Galyon are flying around the
field making plays against QB Steve
Taneyhill and the South Carolina Game-
cocks. Their steady defensive line makes
a new line of scrimmage and the sec-
ondary is lightning fast On paper, they
appear to have no whole but McPhail
sees weaknesses for Steve Logan's in-
tricate offensive sets to exploit
"Look at this McPhail said. "They
jump the play action and aren't in posi-
tion to cover the pass. The linebackers
are real fast but they miss a bunch of
tackles. I don't think they are close to
as good as Mark Libiano and Morris
Foreman. We can run and pass the ball
on this team. I just have to run hard
and follow my blocks
The film whirs on and we see the
Volunteers versus Washington State,
the Bulldogs of Mississippi State,
Florida Washington State has suc-
cess with the zone running plays, a
basic part of every college team's of-
fense.
"This is one of our plays McPhail
said. "A Tiger Left 33, 34 cuts it up
and outruns their contain defensive
GEAR UP FOR
aMPu
SurV'VaL
IN THE DORM
49"
Voice-activated
micro answerer
Don't miss important calls
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43-752MB
Upright cordless phone
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CCT circuitry provides excellent
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Basic trim phone
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Lighted keypad for dialing
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White. 43-585MB. Almond.
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Shielded die-cast
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Great for use near PC
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Black. 40-2048MB. White. 40-2059MB
AMFM cassette music
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Compact speakers let you share
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Indoor TVFM antenna
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Fine-tuning control for clearer
picture and sound.
"15-1808MB
IN THE CLASSROOM
39"
Microcassette
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Great for recording class
notes. Easy one-hand
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49"
Scientific calculator Advanced thesaurus
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Stores up to 12 frequently used
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just a few keystrokes. �65-808MB
Small enough to carry in your
backpack or purse. �63-2homb
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Franklin Electronic Publishing. Inc
Survival
check list
j Phone cords and accessories
j Alarm clock or clock radio
Li TV, VCR and video accessories
j Security devices
' j Computer and accessories
j Batteries
j Stereo equipment, speakers
and audio accessories
j Heavy-duty flashlight
j Smoke alarm
-J Part-time job (see the manager of
your local Radio Shack store)
; � i
AC accessories to power your dorm
4-outlet adapter. 2-prong. 6i-2kimb2.99
6-outlet surge protector in metal housing. mi-2�mb . 22.99
6-outlet adapter. For 3-prong outlets. 6i-2622mb3.99
6-outlet power strip. Master onoft switch. mi-215bmb8.99
Single-outlet spike protector. 6i-279imb6.99
6-ft. 3-OUtlet eXt. COrd. White. 61-2744MB. Brown. 61-2745MB1 .99
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15-ft. 3-outlet extension cord. �6i-278mb3.49
Prices apply at participating Radio Shack stores and dealers Items not available at a participating store
can be special-ordered (subject to availability) at the advertised price A participating store will offer a
comparable value if the product is sold out Independent Radio Shack dealers and franchisees may not
be participating in this ad or stock or special-order every item advertised Copies of applicable war-
ranties are available upon request at stores tor inspection before sale, or by writing Customer
Relations. 1400 One Tandy Center. Fort Worth TX 76102 FedEx trademarks used by permission
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end. I am faster than that guy, they do
that Saturday and it will be six points
for us
I mention new defensive end
Leonard Little, the surprise of spring
football and SEC Newcomer of the Year
by The Sporting News after transfer-
ring from Coffeyville JC in Kansas.
Little, a 6-foot-3, 225 pound speed
rusher is known for getting in the
backfield and disrupting offenses, ala
Simeon Rice of Illinois.
"I heard about him McPhail said.
"Kid from Asheville, NC, kind of tall
and fast, a finesse player, we will run
right at him. I can't wait to play this
game, my offensive line will show the
country how good they are, They can
block these guys and we will run it
enough to keep them off balance
Teams try to pass the ball on the
'Vols with little sucess with the excep-
tion of Florida and QB Danny Wuerffel.
They pick apart the men in orange with
screens, crossing routes, out patterns,
posts, flies, you name it A Pirate fan
can almost see Marcus Crandell and
the rest of the Pirate offense march-
ing down the field. McPhail can see it
too.
The preseason Doak Walker
Award candidate and NFL prospect is
fired up now. It is time to get out of
this dark room and change out of his
school clothes. A few minutes later
McPhail emerges from the locker room
in his 'Unfinished Business' T-shirt with
23, his jersey number across the front
He races past me to the weight room,
throws heavy weights on the bar and
begins to push metal, up and down,
up and down. Somewhere he knows a
Volunteer linebacker is waiting for him.
He will be ready.
Ca
EAST
CAROLINA
COINS &
PAWN
INSTANT CASH LOANS-WE BUY
GOLDS SILVER
�VCR'S
� DIAMONDS
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MasterCard
FACT:
Each day, an average
femily of four will use
100 gallons of water
in toilet flushing.
TIP:
Place a bottle in the
tank to decrease the
volume per flush.
Check for leaks by
placing food coloring
in the water tank.
This Green Tip is sponsored by:
Heron Bay
Trading Co.
"Greenville's Exclusive
Nature Store"
in The Plaza � 321-6380
BRING TIP IN FOR
20 OFF PURCHASE
� 1995 Kevin A. McLean, Tampa, FL





16
Thursday, Ausust 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
Help Wanted
��� �
PBbI
For Rent
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-781 5758-7436
For Sale
�, � -� S
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
PRIVATE PARKING SPACE. 1 block
from campus. $20 mont hly, call 830-9125.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED, for
apt 1,2 block from campus, 3 blocks from
downtown. 2 blocks from supermarket
laudramat. Rent includes utilities, phone
& cable. 757-1947.
FEMALE COLLEGE STUDENT
WANTED TO SHARE 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath.
12 Rent and utilities. Call 752-0533 leave
message.
1 BEDROOM, QUIET. Extra Clean. Cats
OK. $335mo. Call anytime 321-2675.
RESPONSIBLE NON-SMOKING FE-
MALE needed to share condo at
Breezewood. $265.00 per month, 12 utili-
ties. Call 321-2969.
ROOMMATES WANTED 2 blocks from
campus, 3 blocks from downtown, air con-
ditioning, enery efficifent $14314 utili-
ties. Please call Debbie or Jim at 758-
8263.
ROOMMATE WANTED - $187.50 per
month, plus $125.00 deposiL and 12
utilities. Non-smoker. Close to campus
Langston Park Apts. Call 756-5747.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED Fur
nished Bedroom with Private Bath - ECU
Bus Route - Washer-Dryer Priveleges, Lei-
sure atmosphere Call 321-1848.
ROOMMATE WANTED: male or female,
2 br. 1 12 bath townhouse. Rent $205
12 utilities, smoker or non-smoker. Call
Christie at 757-0482 anytime.
FREE RENT HALF OF SEPTEMBER:
WESLEY COMMONS, 1 & 2 Bedroom,
Range, Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer
Hookups, Decks & Patios in most units.
Laundry Facility, Sand Volleyball Court.
Located 5 blocks from campus. FREE
WATER & SEWER. WYNDHAM COURT:
2 Bedrooms, StoveRefrigeratorDish-
washerWasher & Dryer HookupsPatios
on first floor. Located 5 blocks from cam-
pus. These and Other fine properties Man-
aged by Pitt Property Management, 108
A Brownlea Dr. 758-1921
ROOMMATE WANTED: 3 Br. 2 12 bath
FULLY FURNISHED Apt 1 block from
campus on Woodlawn Ave. Rent - 200 mo.
? utilities. Call AS AP 757-1313-Home, 355-
7833-Work, Ask for Chris or Brandon.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE walking
distance from campus and downtown.
Large room (15' X 15) $175 per month
utilities. WasherDryer included. Private
phone line. Call Mike: Daytime-830-5577,
Evening-752-2879.
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. One bed-
room Apt. located on Riverbluff Rd. New
Carpet and Cabinets. Call POTAMAC
PROPERTIES at 752-9722. No pet s.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: to
share on-campus apartment. 200$ plus 1
2 utilities. Call 752-6079 in the morning
or after 10pm.
For Sale
DO YOU NEED MONEY?)
We Will Pay You
We Also Buy
gold
silver
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED with all ac
cessories, Passive EQ & Amp, 321-2675.
IBANEZ BASS $250.00. Kramer bass
$75.00, Mattress and Boxspring $200.00.
TREK 930 mountain bike - like new
$500.00. Call Jason 752-7107.
HONDA INTERCEPTOR 750 V4 engine
in great condition, new reartire. 2 helmets,
low miles. Call 756-3393.
SOLOFLEX FOR SALE: Soloflex w leg
extension and butterfly attachment. Ex-
cellent condition. $650. Call 830-3826 af-
ter 2pm.
1992 GENERAL 14 X 70 $19,750 IM
MACULATE CONDITION. Very comfort-
able. Special built. Many extras, ready to
move in. Located in nice mobile park in
Creenville. Ideal for students or family.
Suitable for NC Coast. Interested parties
call 919-778-8553 or 919-731-6075 for
more information.
FUTON FRAMES FROM $79. Black iron
frames from $129. Futon mattresses from
$69. Compare and save Bedroom Con-
cepts 756-3161.
WATERBEDS FROM $239. Compare and
save M-F 11 to 6 & Sat. 10 to 2. Bed-
room Concepts 756-3161.
BRASS BED, QUEEN SIZE wDeluxe
orthopedic mattress set, in Factory Box ,
Never Used. Cost 750: 300.00 cash. (919)
637-2645.
DAY BED WHITE IRON AND BRASS.
2 orthopedic mattresses. POP UP
TRUNDLE, in Box Never Used. Cost 700;
325.00 cash. (919) 637-2645.
ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS
Peel N' Stick Return Mailing Labels Avail-
able. Choose from over 200 full color
graphics. 300 only $4.95. 600 only $6.95.
Call for FREE SAMPLES. 1-800-662-5984
Ext 2
We Boy CDS,
Cassettes, and Lp�
Well pay up to $S eaak for
ay.
ALLEY
Downtown 758-5026
Services Offered
�����! " � . ,���� �� � � .�
MINI STORAGE AUCTION SEPT. 9,
10AM - DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS AUC-
TION for non-payment. 33 different units
scheduled for sale. Items to numerous to
list. Includes, but not limited to Beds,
Chest. Dressers, Couches, Coffee tables.
Kitchen boxes, heaters, AC units, Stereo
Antiques, Entertainment Centers, mirrors,
pictures. TV's, VCR's misc. household
items. LOCATION @ 1528 S. Evans St
Evans Street Centre, Directly Across from
Fort Henrys Army Navy Surplus Store,
355-7443
FOR SALE! Dorm size refrigerator. $50.
Full size mattress. $30. Call Chan 757-
1818.
��W" wn i m
NEED HELP ON GETTING THOSE
PAPERS TYPED? Call Clenda at C. S.
Typing Services. "Affordable Rates. Call
Today - 758-7653 and Evenings (919) 527-
9133.
NEED A PLACE TO HAVE A BIRTH-
DAY OR PRIVATE PARTY??? We have
everything you need to make yours a suc-
cess Call 758-4591 or John at 752-4715.
THE PARTY IS ON! YOUR PARTY ain't
thump'n until MMP is pump'n. Mobile
Music Productions is "the" disc jockey
service for your party or social function.
Widest variety of any disc jockey company
in Greenville. Specializing in the needs of
ECU Organizations and Greeks. Dates are
filling fast, so call early. Ask for Lee 758-
4644.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53621.
DO YOU LIKE TO PARTY? Then call
Diamond Dave's Retro and Dance Party
at 758-5711. Diamond Dave is a profes-
sional Disc Jockey with a first class sound
system. Call Diamond Dave for a price
quote with no obligation

-� -sJmm m�
Charting
t y�ur
future?
You'll find lots
of options in our
classifieds.
Welcome Back
Students!
Why not work where you
Love To Shop!
Ability to schedule
around school hours
15-29 hrwk. options
Merchandise discount
� Great Way To Gain
Experience
Apply with Store
Manager
Tuesday, l-6pm
The Plaza or
Carolina East
Gumby s
Drivers Wanted Earn
$50 -S100Per Night
Make Your Own Schedule Ideal
For College Students
Call 321-4862
JLAUDIO 10" SUB in 1.5 Ported Box,
Dynamat Lined. Monster Cable Powerline
Internal Wiring. Black Carpeted. Fits
TrunkHatch. Honda Accord, Acura
Integra, $200.00. Call John 752-2000 LV
MSC.
TREK 800 ANTELOPE 18" 1994,
MUST SELL, Black 21 Speed, EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION. Call 7584850.
LIKE NEW 93 VW FOX. Wolfsburg Edi-
tion. ONLY 18K Miles. Red w Immacu-
late Interior, New Brake padsshoes;
$8500 O.B.O Call 752-3054. Please lea ve
message.
FOR SALE: MONGOOSE HILLTOPPER
SX, 2 months old. all top components.
Rock Shocks, Bar ends, grip shifts. Not a
scratch. $500.00. 758-1849.
BLACK LAB FREE TO GOOD HOME 1
am leaving for grad school and need to
find a good home for my 17 mo. old Fe-
male Lab. She has AKC papers and is v ery
loving. Serious inquiries only! 757-3318.
FOR SALE: TWO TICKETS FOR THE
ECU-UT game. $40.00 for both. Call 756-
7126 after 6pm.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DEVELOP-
MENT, DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS,
is now accepting applications for tutors.
A minimum 2.5 GPA is required. Please
call 328-4550 for more information.
MALE DIVERS NEEDED ECU SWIM
TEAM needs Guys Who Like to Flip and
Twist. A chance to be a Varisty Athlete!
Contact Coach Rose at Minges Pool
A.S.A.P.
1995-96 POSITIONS AVAILABLE with
the Student Patrol Unit. Help keep your
campus safe while earning money for
school. Additional students also needed
for football games. Interviews will be com-
pleted by Sept. 6. Stop by the ECU Police
Department for more information.
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED. Must be
able to shoot, develop, print black and
white photos. Sports and action photos
desired. Portfolio required at interview.
Hours are M-Th afternoon and evenings
10-15 per week. Contact Recreational Ser-
vices at 328-6387.
STUDENTS: Looking for part-time work
with flexible hours? ECU is looking for a
few good Pirates to contact alumni for the
Annual Fund program. $5.00 per hour
plus bonus. Contact the Telefund Office
at 3284215.
GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS DEPARTMENT: FALL SOCCER
COACHES: The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting for 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches for the
fall girls and boys soccer programs. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 5-16,
in soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00pm until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This program will run
from September to mid-November. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James at 830-
4567 or Michael Daly at 8304550.
GYMNASTICS TEACHERS WANTED
Experienced males and females -for local
Gym School - Good pay - Call Darlene at
321-7264.
SITTER NEEDED for two boys ages
seven and twelve on Monday. Tuesday and
Thursday afternoons. Sitter must be able
to pick up at 2:30 from School. Call 355-
6485.
CHILD CARE - Need Responsible person
with own transportation for after school
care 2-6 week days. Please call 830-0750
and leave message.
SPRING BREAK '96 SELL TRIPS,
EARN CASH & GO FREE Student
Travel Services is now hiring campus rep-
resentatives. Lowest rates to Jamaica,
Cancun, Daytona and Panama City Beach.
Call 1-800-6484849.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell 8 Trips & Go Free! Best Trips
& Prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
Florida! Spring Break Travel! 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK! TRAVEL FREE with
SunSplash Tours. Highest commissions
paid, at lowest prices. Campus Represen-
tatives wanted to Sell reliable tours. Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas, Daytona,
Panama City and Padre. 1-800426-7710.
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S. Evans St
Experienced wait staff needed. No phone
calls please. Apply in person between
2:00pm and 6:00pm.
INTERNSHIP - POSITIONS OPEN for
students who want to earn money while
they learn. Five positions available for Fall
Semester. Call 355-7700 and ask for
Bonnie or Cassie.
COURTYARD TAVERN is now accepting
applications for Wait, Bar, and dishwash
staffs. Please Apply in PERSON ONLY
between 24pm daily. Located at 703
Greenville Blvd SE A across from The
Plaza Mall in Greenville Square Shopping
Center.
ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICE is
looking for college students wishing to
gain valuable work experience with a rap-
idly growing company. Ideal applicant
would be energetic, efficient, willing to
learn, and have excellent communication
skills. We are looking to hire 35 to 40
people for our collections, credit report-
ing, and customer service departments.
Available working hours are from 8am to
9pm. We will work around school sched-
ules. Please apply in person at 1206
Charles Blvd.
NEED DRIVERS AND INSIDE PER-
SONNEL for Papa Olivers Pizza, 316-C
E. 10th St. Greenville. Must have own
transportation, be 18, and be able to work
nights and weekends. Apply within.
HELP WANTED: Experienced Waitstaff
needed immediately, part and full-time.
Apply in person. Ming Dynasty. Rivergate
Shopping Center East 10th Street
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Bring
your outgoing personality, transportation,
and 35mm SLR camera and become one
of our professional photographers. No
experience necessary; we train. Good pay,
flexible PT hours Call 1-800-722-7033 M-
F 12-5pm.
HAVING A PARTY? CALLING FOR
RAIN? Rent a Canopy! Two 18x20'
Peaked-roof canopies for rent. $65.00 each
as is, $100.00 each delivered and set up.
752-5533. Leave a message.
24hr. SPORTS HOTLINE: ScoresPoint
Spreads Trivia Games 1-900484-6000 Ext.
7042 $2.99min. Must be 18 yrs. old
Procall Co. (602) 957-7240
CAMPUS SALES REP wanted for part-
time job. WORK AT YOUR CONVE-
NIENCE! T-Shirts. sweatshirts, huggers,
cups & Advertising specialities. Call 1-800-
758-5646 for information.
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Guard - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy Work, Flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210.
PRE-MED AND NURSING STUDENTS
wanted for growing ophthalmic practice.
Must be enthusiastic and a people person.
We will train the right person. Hours are
Mon-Fri afternoon and early evenings.
Send resume to: Eastern Carolina Eye
Center: Att: Clinical Director. 2573
Stantonsburg Rd. Greenville, NC 27834.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
TLC ESCORTS is seeking ladies for danc-
ing, modeling, and escorting. $1000
weekly. Flexible hours. Discreet & confi-
dential. Health Insurance available. Call
9am-2am 758-2881.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to National
Mailers PO Box 774, Olathe, KS 66051.
Immediate response.
EARN $500 or more weekly stuffing en-
velopes at home. Send long SASE to:
Country Living Shoppers. Dept S32, PO
Box 1779, Denham Springs, LA 70727.
TWO UNDERGRADUATE LAB TECH
NICIANS NEEDED: One person to work
34 hours per day in the morning and the
other 34 hours per day in the afternoon.
Send resume along with class schedule
to: C. Lynis Dohm, Dept. of Biochemistry,
ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC
27858.
KOREAN c"EAKING STUDENT sought
to tutor our Korean-born son in his na-
tive language. Child is familiar with
Hangul: needs spoken language and gram-
mar lessons. Fee and times negotiable. Call
Ann Zellmer 321-7051.
PART-TIME TUTOR needed for Rose
High School Senior. Prefer graduate stu-
dent in the School of Education. Must be
well versed in Math, English, Science, &
History. Please send resumeprevious
experience, references and preferred
houriy rates to: Brent Schulz, 119 Asbury
Road. Greenville, NC 27858.
INTERIOR DESIGNER NEEDED part
time or full time. Experience needed in
furniture layouts, presentation boards and
cad system. Call 931-6904 and leave mes-
sage.
NEED EXTRA $? Help sell pretzels at
ECU Home Football Games. Call Kim at
321-7539 for more information.
CASHIERSERVER ANDY'S
CHEESESTEAKS @ The Plaza is now
accepting applications for dayshift. Must
be available either TTH 11:30-3 or MWF
11:30-3. No phone calls please.
COURIER: Part-time. Must have depend-
able car. 21 years oldolder. Be mature &
responsible. Send resumes to: Courier. PO
Box 8188. Greenville, NC 27835-8188.
Warehouse Help
NEEDED
MWF mornings,
TTH afternoons
Apply in person
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER
1009 Dickenson Ave.
Personals
LOOKING TO C ARPOOL WITH SOME-
ONE. Would like the person to be reli-
able and female. Willing to negotiate on
price and time schedule. Live near the
Brentwood area of Greenville. Call 756-
8022
tk
Greek
Personals
THE SNOOTY FOX: ladies clothing,
seeks part-time help, 10-20 hours: Store
hours, Mon-Sat 10-6. Apply in person.
ITS FUN AND EASY making Extra Cash
and selling your own hours, selling T-
Shirts. Call 931-1192 for info.
ATTENTION LADIES: Greenville's Old-
est and Largest Escort Service is now hir-
ing due to our expanding Business. Ear n
up to $1,500 plus per week, Escorting in
the Creenville and surrounding areas. You
must be at least 18 years of age, Have own
phone and transportation. We are also
hiring Male and Female Dancers for Pri-
vate Parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758-0896 or Emerald City Escorts at
757-3477 for an Interview. Est. 1990.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian
Languages required. For information call:
(206) 632-1146 ext J53621.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING - Seasonal
& full-time employment at National Parks,
Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits
bonsuses! Call: 1-206-545-4804 ext.
N53621.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Students
Needed! Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! .Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206) 545-
4155 ext A53621.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
Travel. Seasonal & full-time employment
available. No experience necessary, for
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53621.
PARTTIME SALES POSITION: ME
LANGE CONTEMPORARY WOMEN'S
CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES BOU-
TIQUE. Located at the Lynndale
Shoppes(next to Staccato Cafe) Hours 10-
6:00 Mon-Sat. Call 355-8771.
NOW HIRING: Waitresses, Waiters, Bak-
ery attendants, Cooks, Buffet attendants,
meat cutters, utility. Apply at Golden Cor-
ral. 504 SW Greenville Blvd.
WELCOME BACK GAMMA SIGMA
SIGM! Congratulations to our new offic-
ers: Catherine Hawley, President Adrienne
Jones, Service-VP. Diane Morgan, Member-
ship-VP. Jenn Crafts, Historian. Kelly
Scheele, Parliamentarian. Jenni Campbell,
Alumni Liason. Becky Tyson, National
Representive. Amanda Carver, Chapter
Betterment Michelle Scott Corr. Secre-
tary. Melissa Hinkle, Recording Secretary.
Don't forget Sisterhood Monday, Sept 4,
7:15 in General Classroom.
PI LAMBDA PHI congratulates Brother
Chris Feathers on his return to
Cheerleading, and to Brother Brandon
Haines on his Advancement in the pro-
gram.
PANHELLENIC gives a warm welcome
to freshmen and transfer students and
welcomes back returning students: Don't
forget to register for SORORITY RUSH
by Friday September 1st at noon. For more
information call 3284235 or stop by 204
Whichard Bldg.
tue&day,
GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olymics will be conducting a Soccer
Coaches Training School on Saturday,
September 23rd from 9am-4pm for all
individuals interested in volunteering to
coach soccer. We are also looking for
volunteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics, powerlifting,
rollerskating, and bowling. No experi-
ence is necessary. For more information
contact Dwain Cooper at 8304551.
ATTENTION GAMMA BETA
PHI MEMBERS
The first meeting of Fall 1995 will be
held on Tuesday. September 5 at 5:00pm
in the Mendenhall Great Room. Any
questions, please contact Michael Marsh
at 7524075.
MAKE YOUR STAY AT ECU
SAFE
Make you stay at ECU as safe as pos-
sible by attending the FREE Personal
Safety and Self Defense Class Wednes-
day, September 6 at 7:00pm in
Christenburty Gym. For more informa-
tion call Recreational Services at 328-
6387.





Title
The East Carolinian, August 31, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 31, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1089
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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