The East Carolinian, August 22, 1995






day
Ausust 22,1995
Vol 71, No. 01
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
40 pases
Photos by KEN CLARK
(Top) ECU students are welcomed to the Emerald City by
various means. This water tower located near WalMart is a
sign of Pirate Pride. (Right), It won't be long before students
are gathered around this electronic sign on the corner of
Greenville Blvd. and Charles Bled, to celebrate home football
matchups. (Bottom), ECU student Jennifer Hart swelters in
the summer heat while moving into her new abode.
ttteitOxtf
Between the resignation of
Assistant Police Chief John Taylor
and the alleged SGAElbo scandal,
ECU'S suffered a wild and crazy
summer. Check out the
details
page L
tote&cUuf
TEC opinion columnist give some advice
on how to survive your college years. Will
you burnout, turn into a hippie or hit the
books? It's up to
you
ztcfte
Downtown will be packed this weekend, so
why not head to the movies. Find our what
the TEC reviewer thinks is hip on the bid
screen. Also, don't miss out on Super-
Obscure Trivia
tueidatf
page
15
21
The countdown to Pirate football
begins. What are the chances against
such powerhouses as Tennessee and
Illinois? See what Chancellor Eakin has
to say about the future of Pirate
athletics
32





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Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
ECU sizzles with
hot summer news
Staff Report
Summer in review
May 17 - TEC reported that
2,100 students graduated during the
May 6 commencement exercises.
Two students were injured in an
auto accident that occurred on 10th.
Street The accident happened on May
31, when the driver struck an open
manhole and plowed into a wall in
front of the new Slay and Umstead
residence halls.
May 24 - A fire at Ringold Tow-
ers caused residents to evacuate the
building for more than an hour while
firefighters extinguished flames on
the Fifth floor. The fire was started
4y food left unattended, minor dam-
age occurred and no injuries were re-
ported.
� May 31 � A three part series
-explored the new technological
growth ECU is experiencing. Part of
Jhe campus's new capabilities include
2i fiber optic network which ill allow
;lhe university to be its own phone
: company with a 10,000 line switch-
" ing system. The network allows video
� transmissions and is linked with a new
.student database to help with faster
; jecord retrievals. Kiosk information
access machines will also begin to
appear around campus this fall.
The ECU Police Department re-
covered two bicycles stolen from their
front steps after an intensive investi-
gation which reached as far as Cali-
fornia.
June 7 - A new entrance is in
the works for campus. Two projects
were approved to begin construction
on an extension of College Hill next
year and to construct a road between
:he ECU police Department and the
Slay and Umstead residence halls. The
lew road will be named Library Drive
uid will make the library more acces-
sible than it is at present
June 14 - A non-student transit
passenger was arrested for harassing
a female driver. Two other passengers
were banned from campus.
A pay change for student employ-
ees went into effect Students were
being paid on the 15th of every month
and will now be paid on the 31st
June 21 - ECU Police began to
investigate an alleged break-in of the
Student Government Association
(SGA) office. A list of freshmen mail-
ing labels in the office were later
found reproduced in a mailing sent
out by a The Elbo Room, a down-
town club. The investigation was
later concluded with no charges filed.
June 28 - A new Kidney Cen-
ter is planned for the medical school.
The facility will be built in conjunc-
tion with a private health care com-
pany and will assist treatment and
educating patience about kidney dis-
ease.
ECU tracked a link to the OJ.
Simpson trial through a former alum-
nus. Shoe expert William Bodziak
graduated from ECU with a biology
degree in 1976. He is now a special
agent for the FBI.
July 5 - SGA turned up the heat
with a call for the publication of fac-
ulty evaluation results. The evalua-
tions help determine such factors as
promotions, raises and tenure for pro-
fessors. SGA President Ian Eastman
said he would work with the faculty
senate in trying to publish the evalu-
ations for student use.
July 12 � Minority scholarships
went under the magnifying glass for
evaluation following a supreme court
decision that ruled against race-based
scholarships. Administrators are
working to reorganize any programs
the decision may have affected.
ECU Police Department's Assis-
tant Police Chief John Taylor re-
signed follow alleged sexual incidents
within the police department.
July 19 - Lott Constructors In-
corporated, the contractor hired to
build ECU's $17.9 million recreation
center, went out-of-business. The
project is ensured and ECU's facili-
ties planning is currently working to
find a new contractor.
A cable channel will broadcast
medical news to the community
through a project between the ECU
School of Medicine and Multimedia
Cable vision. The programming will
include rehabilitation and care pro-
cedures and may not be available to
the genera public.
July 26 - A three-year-long in-
vestment fraud was uncovered by the
Common Fund, one of the invest-
ment groups that manages ECU's
money. The scandal cost ECU noth-
ing, but the university will receive a
lower return on a $2.5 million invest-
ment than expected.
Burroughs Wellcome, one of
Greenville's largest industries, an-
nounced they will be closing their
doors within the next two years as a
result of a merger with Glaxo, a ma-
jor pharmaceutical company.
Phone bandit rings alarm
Foreign messages
linked to Jersey
penetentiary
Tambra Zion
News Editor
A phone bandit rang alarm
across campus last week, prompt-
ing computing and information sys-
tems employees to send out a cam-
pus-wide message via E-mail.
"We have an individual who
has been calling several depart-
ments on campus and identifying
himself as an AT&T technician and
asking to be transfer) ed to an of-
fice campus operator the message
stated. "This person has also been
using an AT&T announcement re-
corded in Spanish as a lead in as
well. At the end of this announce-
We're back!
Photo by KEN CLARK
Long lines outside financial aid, the book stores and the
cashier's office can only mean one thing: a new semester.
ment, you are asked to push 1 on
your phone.
"The announcement is actually
stating that by pushing 1, you are
accepting a collect call
ECU's telecommunications de-
partment spent a week working
with Carolina Telephone and'
AT&T's security divisions tracing
the call to a penetentiary in New
Jersey.
"We've been able to stop it
said Thorn Lamb, associate direc-
tor of systems and communications.
"We've spent a lot of time and ef-
fort in tracking the individual it
cost us in time and productivity
The pay phone located in the
penitentiary will no longer be able
to make collect calls to the 919 area
code.
"We had to go through some
legal and policy issues in New Jer-
sey to get their telephone company
to actually block calls from that
prison
Lamb said that prison pay
phones are not regulated, so track-
ing the calls to an individual per-
son was not possible.
. "What would they do, put him
in jail?" Lamb asked. "This indi-
vidual, I'd say he's pretty intelli-
gent
Lamb said it is common for
penetentiaries to have automated
bilingual phone systems. He said
the phone calls should no longer
be a problem for ECU.
Lamb said he does not remem-
ber anything like this happening at
ECU before, but believes it has hap-
pened at other universities.
Appalachan University experi-
enced similar problems around
three years ago, when an inmate
from central prison called with the
same fraud. Officials at the school
were also able to stop the caller
within a matter of days.
Lazy days
Photo by KEN CLARK
Summer days can make anyone lazy, but is this the
reason library construction is a month behind schedule?
Telemedicine
saves money
ECU School of
Medicine reaches
rural areas, prisons
Stewart King
Staff Writer
Frequent visits to the doctor
caused by unknown ailments may
soon be a thing of the past due to
recent leaps in medical technology.
Prison populations and many
rural areas are already benefiting
from a new telemedicine program
implemented by
the Center of
Health and Com-
munication right
here at ECU.
The North
Carolina Depart-
ment of Correc-
tions first ap-
proached UNC
Chapel Hill with
the concept of
medical screening
for potentially
dangerous in-
mates using mod-
ern telecommuni-
cations.
"They didn't want to do it said
David Balch, director for the Center
of Health and Communications. "And
I'm happy that we did do it because
it gave us the experience to build the
program
The consultations are done over
a high speed phone line called a T-l
which is the equivalent of 24 regular
phone lines combined. The equip-
ment is costly, so don't hurt your eyes
looking for it too soon.
"There are economics of scale
Balch said. "And as more and more
people are doing telemedicine, the
tools will get smaller, more developed
and cheaper, and yes - I think one
day, in the future, that a lot of people
will have links in their home
Small town family practitioners
need not worry about loss of revenue.
Tele-links will make their jobs easier
as well as more efficient People in
rural areas will be able to consult
with ECU, determining whether the
need of a lengthy and costly trip to
Greenville is actually necessary,
Balch said.
Balch admitted he was worried
about how patients would react at
first to the relatively impersonal na-
ture of the system, which includes
simultaneous audio and video links.
In other words, patients are sur-
rounded by electronic equipment
during their examinations.
"We were surprised to find
people like it, out of 500 patients,
only one has not liked it they're
getting the phy-
"It's much more
than a prison
project, it's turning
into a rural
telemedicine
project
David Balch � director of
the Center for Health and
Communications
sicians undi-
vided attention,
they like being
on TV
ECU is cur-
rently linked to
hospitals in
Williamston and
Ahoskie, and
will have links
in Belhaven,
Edenton and
Faison within
the month.
Balch
stressed that
the system,
"does not fit for all medical situa-
tions but they are working on new
applications for the technology, in-
cluding psychiatry.
During its inception in 1991,
the project was strictly a prison op-
eration. The cost of transporting an
inmate to see a doctor is approxi-
mately $700 compared to $75 for a
telemedicine consultation, saving
the state (and taxpayers) a consid-
erable sum.
In the past four years, expan-
sion has changed the face of the pro-
gram.
"It's much more than a prison
project, it's turning into a rural
telemedicine project Balch said.
Beyond the exploitation of new
technology, Balch said, the real im-
portance lies in, "making the deliv-
ery of health care more efficient"
Business fanfare
Photo by KEN CLARK
Layton Getsinger (R) presents Charles Harris (L) with a
door prize at the business services kick-off rally on Aug. 16.
-�
Around the State
(AP) - There was some-
thing feline about Hurricane
Felix, and it wasn't just the
name. Like a housecat, it went
its own way, dawdled when it
felt like it and toyed with those
it cornered.
What it never did was
pounce.
Felix stalked the Outer
Banks of North Carolina for the
better part of the week, hover-
ing menacingly offshore and
spinning off vicious waves and
sultry winds. Forecasters on
Friday gave it only a six percent
chance of hitting Cape Hatteras
through the weekend.
(AP) - Two instructors ac-
cused of sexual misconduct
with their students have re-
signed from the N.C. School of
the Arts.
Richard Kuch and Richard
Gain stepped down Thursday
just days before a faculty com-
mittee was scheduled to hear
evidence against them. On
Wednesday, the head of the
UNC Board of Governors said
he would appoint a special com-
mission to investigate allega-
tions of misconduct at the
school.
Around the Country
(AP) - Although Shannon
Faulkner is no longer in the
fray, the battle continues over
women in the all-male corps of
cadets at The Citadel.
Ms. Faulkner announced
Friday she was withdrawing as
the first female cadet in the
military college's 152-year his-
tory because of the stress of her
2 12-year court fight to get in,
and her isolation as the only
woman among 2,000 male ca-
dets. But as John Banzhaf, a
law professor at George Wash-
ington University, pointed out
She did get in.
(AP) - A moderate college
president who called on
Lutherans to be active in a
world starved on "spiritual junk
food" was elected Saturday to
lead the nation's fifth-largest
Protestant denomination.
The Rev. H. George Ander-
son, president of Luther Col-
lege in Decorah, Iowa, received
698 votes to become only the
second presiding bishop in the
short history of the Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church in
America.
He defeated Wisconsin
Bishop April Ulring Larson, the
denomination's first woman
prelate. She received 334 votes
at the church's biennial assem-
bly.
Around the World
(AP) - Three top U.S. dip-
lomats heading to peace talks
in Sarajevo, Bosnia-
Herzegovina were killed Satur-
day when their armored vehicle
plunged 100 yards off a muddy
road, hit two land mines and
exploded.
A French peacekeeper was
also killed in the accident, and
five people were injured: three
Americans and two French
peacekeepers.
(AP) - Computer hackers
broke the security on a
Citibank cash management sys-
tem and stole nearly $400,000
before being detected, the
bank said Friday.
The hackers, including a
Russian math graduate, then
attempted to transfer another
$2.8 million out of Citibank
accounts into other banks.
MBBB8





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
hatting
hancellor
On the upcoming football season
"I look forward to the season and I believe that we will have one
of the best teams we have had in a number of years. They will face a
very difficult set of teams in September that will be quite a trial for
them to play four teams that are ranked in the top 30, but 1 hope that
the tans will give them their support. Steve Logan and his staff have
assembled a very fine team
On the resumed rivalries with NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill
"That is of course something that has brought a new sense of
enthusiasm to our athletics program generally but clearly to
ball program.
On the newly compiled Board of Visitors
"The Board of Trustees clearly represent the public and they bring
to us that public perceptions. They have a governance rule. The board
of visitors play a very similar role, albeit they do not havi
nance role. It gives us a much broader spectrum of tlu . i
lie
On the Shared Visions campaign
The campaign will continue through 1995. Thus far the campaign
has surpassed its goal of $50 million. Today, nearly $60 million has
been raised.
"After $50 million our plan was to get funding for things that
had not been funded fully or had not been funded at all. Mfe continue
in that effort; however, people, when they give their money to the
university many times will have an objective that may not match
of those additional programs
On the library construction
"The library is about five weeks behind schedule, although 1 was
told the contractor believes he can make up that time. There is rea-
son to be encouraged by that ascertion tha.t he can make up the time
because, at an earlier time in the process, they fell way behind and
made it up. If they did make up the time then the addition would be
finished in December. That would be greatly to our advantage be-
cause that would allow us to transfer materials as students! are at
home celebrating the holidays
On the new fiberoptic network
"As with any complicated system like this, it's like bringing up a
telephone system for a town or city, so with any of those kind of
situations we've had some problems - we've been overcoming them.
We may have some more as students arrive in their residence halls
and as faculty come back to their offices. There may be another week
or two of correcting. We had some difficulties when we brought up
the new mainframe computer in terms of response time. We have re-
sponded to that by increasing the size of the central processing unit
rs
Alumnus runs
for city council
j. Miles Layton
Staff Writer
ECU graduate and lormer se-
nior class president Bill Gheen is
running in a tou
sent Creel
council
If elected ' i will rep-
resent the I which in-
clude most t campus and I
;it ,ind faculty popula-
tion.
Cheen plans to better promote
the neighborho �
ing more of ' it ma-
jority of
residents . ho feel left oul
litical process.
We need i representative that
will speak out for the entire
munity Gheen said. "City go rn
Bill Gheen ment cannot continue to ignore the
needs of our citizens who feel no
one is listening to them
Gheen plans to have his door
pen to evervon ,1IV or night if
See ALUMNUS page 18
Lindsay
Insurance Agency
We "Major" In Medical Insurance
GREENVILLE'S SOURCE FOR STUDENT
MAJOR
MEDICAL &
LIFE INSURANCE I
Council for
Affordable Health
Insurance
For Prices
756-9496
1612 SULGRAVE ROAD GREENVILLE, NC 27858
Call This Number
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1322 E. Tenth St.





"
ii 1111 ii 1111rf�wwTTiiuiuiiiunni
g
LECTURE
BARRY WILLIAMS
Growing Up Brady: I Was a Teenage Greg � Hendrix Theatre � 8:00 PM
A Multi-Media Presentation by Barry Williams � Books and Book Signing
in Hendrix Theatre Lobby
CHEW ON THIS
North Carolina to Nova Scotia-23 Days by Motorcycle � Monday, September 25
J. Marshall, Assistant Director of Student Activities
How to Get a Great Date � Monday, October 30
Carol Woodruff, Director of Marketing, Dept. of University Unions NJ
Love My Heart, Love Myself � Monday, November 27 QJ
Laura Hartung, Nutritionist, ARAMARK
VISUAL ARTS
Exhibition
TRI-State Cultural Exhibit � October 5-28
Reception TBA
OBNr
11:30 AM - MSC Underground
Bring Your Own Lunch - Free Refreshments & Desserts
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
NOON DAY TUNES
Wednesday, August 23
Wednesday, September 6
Wednesday, September 20
Wednesday, October 11
Wednesday, October 18
Wednesday, November 1
Wednesday, November 8
Location: MSC Brickyard
Rain-site: The Wright Place
All Programs at 1:30 PM - 3:00 Pm
HI
VICTOR HUDSON
MICHAEL MULVANEY
P.J.& KELLY
STANLEY CREENTHAL
KELLER WILLIAMS
VICKY PRATT KEATING
COSY SHERIDAN
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
CULTURAL AWARENESS
CUbTUftAb AWAKEMESS WEEK
October 2-6 � Events to be Announced
AN EVENING WITH
Don McLean � Tuesday, September 19 at 8:00 PM � Wright Auditorium
The Second City � Tuesday, November 7 at 8:00 PM � Wright Auditorium
For Ticket Information, Call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
Monday-Friday from 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM. We Accept MasterCard and Visa.
4th Annual Saber Slash Sun Splash Concert � Friday, September 15 � 8:00 pm
Risse, Mother Nature, Bottom of College Hill
HENDRIX FILMS
FALL '95 FILMS SCHEDULE
August24-26 LEGENDS OF THE FALL
September7-9 THE BRADY BUNCH MOVIE
September 14-16 TOMMY BOY
September21-23 THE BASKETBALL DIARIES
September28-30 BAD BOYS
OUTBREAK
JURY DUTY
DON JUAN DE MARCO
CONGO
THE CURE
BATMAN FOREVER
APOLLO 13
October 5-7
October 12-14
October 19-21
November 2-4
November 9-11
Nov. 30 - Dec. 2
December 7-9
R
PC-13
?c-n
R
R
R
P6-13
PC-13
R
PC-13
PG-13
PO-13
AHfilms are free to students, faculty, staff, and one guest
with valid ECU ID.
SPECIAL EVENTS j
CKAIG KAKGES: HWNOTIST X
Wednesday, September 13th � Hendrix Theatre 8:00
JAZZ JIT NKJIM
Friday, October 6th � MSC Great Room � 8:00 PM
ALL CAMPUS COLLEGE BOWL TOURNAMENT i
Wednesday, November 1 � Room 244 - MSC � 4:00 PM
ALL CAMPUS COLLEGE BOWL TOURNAMENT n
Wednesday, November 8 � Room 244 - MSC � 4:00 PM
ALL CAMPUS COLLEGE BOWL TOURNAMENT tn
Wednesday, November 15 � Room 244 - MSC � 7:00 PM
Seasonal &ee6ration
Thursday, December 7 � MSC Gallery � 4:00 PM





The East Carolinian
ECU
Tuesday, Ausust 22,1995
transit
c5
HjWi
ICOASTALCASUAPCITHINO.COMPANYI
(400 9TG&m4m �j8v.
ShotyM'tn Getite"
The Gold Line departs:
Mendenhall 20 after 10 till
lQth & Coll. Hill 23 after 7 till
Top College Hill 25 after 5 till
Minges Col.
Stratford Arms
Allied Health
Greenville Sq.
Plaza Mall
Green. Athletic
30 afterhour
29 till 1 after
28 till 2 after
25 till 5 after
24 till 6 after
20 till 10 after
The Silver Line
Christenbury
Dogwood Hollow
Woodcliff Apts.
10th & Heath
Cedar Ln. &10th
Eastern Elementary
University Cond.
Breckenridge Suare.
Laura Ln. & David Dr.
Twin Oaks
Oakmont Square
departs:
30 after hour
29 till 1 after
28 till 2 after
27 till3 after
26 till 4 after
25 till 5 after
25 till 5 after
23 till 7 after
23 till 7 after
22 till 8 after
18 till 12 after
Routes begin at 7:20 & 7:30 a.m and end at 10 p.m.
A11 transit service ends at 5 p.m. on Fridays
The Purple
Mendenhall
Speight
Village Gr. 5th
University Apts.
Cannon Court
Eastbrook
Pinebrook
Kings Row
Village Gr. 10th
College View
Cypress Card.
Christenbury
Umstead Hall
Line departs:
22 after 8 till
30 after hour
28 till 2 after
27 till 3 after
25 till 3 after
20 till 10 after
17 till 13 after
17 till 13 after
15 till 15 after
15 till 15 after
14 till 16 after
12 till 18 after
11 till 19 after
The Brown Line departs:
Mendenhall 20 after 10 till
Speight
Ash & 3rd
3rd & Forr. Hill
Wesley Comm.
Wyndham Ct
Willow & Ash
Ash & 1st
Oak & 1st
Oak & Willow
Oak & River
Elm & Willow
1st & Holly
Cotanche & 1st
30 after hour
28 till 2 after
27 till 3 after
26 till 4 after
25 till 5 after
25 till 5 after
24 till 6 after
24 till 6 after
23 till 7 after
22 till 8 after
21 till 9 after
19 till 11 after
17 till 13 after
L
WjJJjani
Lowe
"alpine
and Sign cl(f xFm
facati'on" (fiHttwNj
New Services:
The Red Line departs:
Mendenhall
5th & Elizabeth W
Brody PCMH
5th & Elizabeth E
Speight
Christenbury Gym
Monday
30 after hour
27 till 3 after
20 till 10 after
15 till 15 after
10 till 20 after
8 till 22 after
Friday 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Gold Weekends departs:
Mendenhall � 20 after 10 till
College Hill & 10th
Top College Hill
Greenville Square
Plaza Mall
East Carolina Bowl
Red Banks Rd. (Overton)
Wal-Mart
23 after 7 till
25 after 5 till
1 till 29 after
29 till 1 after
27 till 3 after
25 till 5 after
20 till 10 after
Sat. 9:20 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun. 12:50 p.m. - 6 p.m.
ount Down
Dance and Active wear
Greenville's Choice Fob
Quality Dancewear
At Affordable Prices
10 Discount vi-t-h
ECU Student l.D.
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon-Sat 10-9
Sun 1-6
Photo by RYLAND WALTERS
Info, booths will be at the bottom of College Hill, in front of Spilman and in the Ficklin parking
lot Wed Aug. 23 and Friday, Aug. 25. Bus maps, schedules will be available in Mendenhall.
The Plaza Mall
321-1585
f
Serious About
Working Out?
at East Carolina $owl 700 mnus Koad
. , . (919)355-5510
We want to wecome bock all
ECU students by offering a new
Student Collegiate
Bowling League
Tuesdays @ 4:00 p.m.
$5 per person (shoes included; 3 people per learn) , pSHEjs5fiI KII.D.
rEcu night
on the lanes
l Mondays J
I 8:30-12 m�nigh
$1.79 per game j
SEE OUR AD ON PACE 36 OF THIS ISSUE FOR INFORMATION ABOUT A FREE BOWLING PARTY
Special
Fall
Rates For
Students
We Honor Any
Competitor's
Price Or
Coupon On
Qym
Membership
Stairmasters
Lifecycles
Treadmills
7-Wolff Tanning
Beds
Aerobics
� 5 Days Weekly
� High & Low Impact
� Step Classes
AbsToning
� Circuit Training
FULL LINE
OF YORK
FREE
WEIGHTS
AND
NAUTILUS
INCLUDING
OVER 6,500
LBS.
OF DUMBELLS
OVER 9,500
LBS. OF FREE
WEIGHTS
We are looking for ambitious, hardworking individuals for
the following position for the year 95-96:
Advertising Director (1)
Advertising Representative (2)
Illustrator (1)
If you want to gain some valuable expereince while in
scholol plus earn some extra cash, please come by the
Expressions office to fill out an Application. Applications
will be taken untill August 31st.
Expressions is Located on the 2nd floor across from the
East Carolinian in the Publication Bldg.
and our Phone is 328-6927
r
409 S. Evans St.
752-3880
(Across from The Elbo Room)
r-
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Entire Week FREE
August 21-27
Free Workout � Free Tanning
WSFL Live Remote Friday August 25
Prizes Given Away!
Come Join Today
J
Ominous Seapods
sat






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Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
rot �7yio k
" James Alward Van Fleet has
been named director of International
Programs and special assistant to the
vfce chancellor for academic affairs.
Hfe was formerly director of the Cen-
ter for International Studies and Pro-
grams at the University of Toledo. Van
fleet will hold a faculty appointment
in the department of political science
afid has printed 29 articles in various
journals. He received his bachelor's
degree from the University of
Scranton and his master's and doc-
torate from Syracuse University.
Sports Writers
Needed
Would you like to
write for The East
Carolinian? If so
then make sure
you meet tbe
following
requirements:
� ECU student
� 2.0 GPA
Then stop by our
office and fill out
an application.
The East Caxolinain is
located In front of Joyner
'library, on the second floor
of the Student Publication
Building.
in

Cynthia E. Johnson, associate
professor for the department of child
development and family relations, has
been named chair of the department.
She has previously worked at North
Carolina State and North Carolina
Central universities. She has pub-
lished several works, received her
bachelor's from North Carolina Cen-
tral, her master's from ECU and her
doctorate from Ohio State University.
Thomas L. Feldbush has been
named vice chancellor for research and
dean of the graduate school, he was
formerly an associate dean for research
at Northwestern University's Medical
School. He has also been appointed as
a professor of microbiology. Feldbush
is the first person to hold the newly
created position of vice chancellor for
research. He has previously worked at
the University of Missouri-Columbia and
Harry S. Truman VA Hospital, as well
as the University of Iowa and Rutgers
University. Feldbush received his
bachelor's degree from Mount Union
College in Ohio, and his Master's and
doctorate degrees from Ohio State
University. Feldbush is the author of
more than 50 scientific papers.
The Printmaking Guild of the
School of Art presents
Mendenhall Student Center
Mendeiih.all Gallery
East Carolina University
August 27 - September 30
This show is in coordination
with Marcia Sanders,
BFA in Printmaking, of
Underpressure Studio.
L
underpressure

True
��?
False
?
Entrance Exam
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Division of UBE
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New Store Hours
(beg. Aug. 20)
"Are you being served?"
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
Ready For A Miracle? Take A Leap of Faith!
Wednesday Night Sanity Break From Campus!
�5:30pm Student Eucharist Campus Minister:
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Overton
YOUR COMPLETE SPORTS STORE
FRIDAY HOURS
9:00 AM TO 8:00 PM
ffi 2 DAYS ONLY o
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AUGUST 25� AND 26
SATURDAY HOURS
9:00 AM TO 7:00 PM
ATHLETIC FOOTWARE
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
50 TO 70 OFF
REGULAR RETAIL PRICE
Reebok
adidas
new balance i
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SHORTS TEES SWEATS
50 TO 75 OFF
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SHIRTS JACKETS TANKS
SANDALS
50 OFF
REGULAR RETAIL
MERRELL LA PAZ 59.95 NOW $30.00
NIKE WASATCH 64.95 NOW $32.00
T-SHIRTS
BY FAMOUS MAKERS
7.��,
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ASSORTED COLORS AND SIZES
RUSSELL ATHLETIC
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$9.95 EACH

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9.95
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BY RUSSELL ATHLETIC AND CHAMPION
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3
50 OFF
AS LOW
AS
$5.00
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CLOSE-OUT COLORS AND STYLES ONLY - SIZES VARY
ASSORTED STYLES AND COLORS - SIZES VARY
MLB NCAA NFL NBA NHL
Columbia
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IN-LINE SKATES
FROM BAUER
F-4 FITNESS SKATE F-4 FITNESS SKATE
REGULAR 149.95 REGULAR 189.95
now 4995 now 79�95
1994 STYLES ONLY - SIZES LIMITED - NO RETURNS I
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3 PACKS
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ONE RACK OF CLOSEOUT STYLES
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ONE AND TWO PIECE STYLES AVAILABLE
SIZES AND STYLES VARY
WATERS PORTS
WET-SUITS AND VESTS
SPRING SUITS - REG. 79.95 TO 99.95 SALE $49.95
FULL SUITS - REG. 99.95 TO 149.95 SALE $69.95
BAREFOOT SUITS - reg. 179.95 to 249.95 SALE140.00
NEO-VESTS - REG. 99.95 TO 149.95 SALE $75.00
BASEBALLSOFTBALL GLOVES
50 OFF
RAWUNGS
WILSON
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ZETT MIZUNO
BATTING GLOVES
3
00
ONLY W� EACH
ASSORTED STYLES AND SIZES
PERSONAL COOLERS
FROM RUBBERMAID
24 QT. COOLER reg. 19.95 SALE14.95
SALE $9.95
SALE $6.95
FISHING
10QT. COOLER REG. 12.95
5 QT. COOLER reg. 9.95
RAWLINGS RLS
INEXXROUTDOOR
BASKETBALL
"5 $12.95
SALE
MIKASA
SUMMER CLASSIC VOLLEYBALL
REG. 19.95
SALE
9.95
POWER AB BOARDS
ENDORSED BY FABIO
64.95 SALE
$19.95
54557
GOLF ACCESSORIES
GRAPHITE PUTTERS 1 1 PIECE SET
DRIVERS
$49.95 $9.95 159.95
REG. 149.95 REG. 24.95 REG 249.95
� ALL STAR FISHING RODS
REG. PRICE 69.95 TO 119.95
� CASTAWAY FISHING RODS
REG. PRICE 79.95 TO 104.95
25 OFF
25OFF
� TEAM DAIWA FISHING RODS 20 OFF
REG. PRICE 79,95 TO 99.95
� PINNACLE FISHING RODS & REELS 25 OFF
REG PRICE 39.95 TO 69.95
� SALTWATER ROD & REEL COMBOS 25 OFF
BY MASTER & SILSTAR REG. 39.95
� FISHING LOGO CAPS SALE $7.�� EACH
REGUIAR 12.95
STORE HOURS
MONDAY - FRIDAY
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SATURDAYS
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111 RED BANKS RD. GREEMVILLE
919-355-57383
tSALE APPUES TO TENT SALE MERCHANDISE
ONLY - NO SPECIAL ORDERS OR RETURNS.
SALE PRICES NOT GOOD ON PREVIOUSLY
PURCHASED ITEMS.
-





. m ilni. il
8
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
f?e fast Carolinian
Upperclassmen lend a hand
Miriam Brooks
Staff Writer
Incoming freshmen were wel-
comed to campus this week by 500
juniors and seniors who volun-
teered to show them the ropes
through ECU's new Safety Net
Mentor Program.
The Safety
Net Mentor Pro-
gram is a newly de-
veloped plan de-
signed to help
freshmen adjust to
campus life during
the first six weeks
of school.
Dean of Un-
dergraduate Stud-
ies Dorothy Muiler
said these first
weeks are often
the most difficult
transitional period
for freshmen. Of
the 2,500 incom-
ing freshmen who were given the
opportunity to participate in this
program, 800 have chosen to be
mentees.
The National Leadership
Honor Society Omicron Delta
Kappa, undergraduate studies and
Freshmen Year Experience teamed
together to make the program a
reality.
Freshmen were randomly
matched with juniors and seniors.
The original plan was to pair fresh-
men with mentors based on simi-
lar interests, however there are only
500 mentors for 800 freshmen so a
number of mentors will have more
than one mentee.
The program's purpose is to
provide freshmen with role models
who encourage academic success,
Muiler said. In
addition, men-
tors will help
freshmen ad-
just to their
first taste of
life at ECU.
Depending on
the interests of
the mentee,
mentors will
also give them
an introduc-
tion to the va-
riety of cam-
pus activities,
organizations
and programs
ECU has to offer.
"We are asking the mentors to
contact the mentees in early August
and to send them a letter welcom-
ing them to campus said Lisa
Shibley, director of Student Lead-
ership Development. "In the first
few days, the mentors are expected
to check on freshmen to see how
they are getting settled in, and pos-
sibly show them where their classes
"Nationally, I
think there is a
concern about
retention and
graduation rates"
� Dorothy Muiler, deaji of
undergraduate studies
might be or go to the bookstore and
help them figure out how to pick
out books
Mentors should stay in touch
with mentees for the first few weeks
of school in order to answer any
questions the mentee may have or
refer them to appropriate re-
sources. Mentors underwent a
training program designed to pre-
pare them to guide freshmen and
ensure that all information given
to the newcomers is correct.
Muiler emphasized that while
academics is a top priority of the
program, getting students involved
in non-academic university activi-
ties is important as well.
"The idea is that if you are not
only participating in the academic
program, but also belong to an or-
ganization or engage in some rec-
reational activity, it helps you with
your identity at this institution and
gives you more direction Muiler
said.
The impetus for this program
came from a variety of sources.
"Nationally, I think there is a
concern about retention and gradu-
ation rates Muiler said. "There is
also a need to get students to fo-
cus early on so that they don't get
behind
In addition, students them-
selves have voiced the opinion that
there should have been more sup-
port available to them when they
entered the university as freshmen.
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We've made it a lot easier
Your biggest concern as a student should be your studies � not the cost of a checking
account. East Carolina Bank has taken care of that expense for you.
With our University Club Checking account, any full-time student is eligible for a
checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking at any automatic teller machine at
no extra charge, no-fee traveler's checks and a free order of 50 checks.
If you maintain a $100 minimum balance in the account, there are no service charges
We also don't limit your checkwriting or ATM withdrawals.
Make life easier. Try University Club Checking.
The
East Carolina Bank
Red Banks Road Office
1001 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC 27858
919-355-8200
University Medical Center Office
2400 Stantonsburg Road
Greenville, NC 27834
919-752-6609
' Minimum balance required is i 100 or average balance of $300. If balance requirement is not
met, tees assessed are. $5 per month and $.35 per debit.
Member FDIC
Several ECU graduates are climb-
ing the corporate ladder for BB&T, a
banking corporation based in North
Carolina.
W. Pete Edmundson is a business
services officer for Goldsboro and
Wayne County, and was recently pro-
moted to vice president Edmundson
graduated from ECU in 1984 and
holds an MBA and a bachelor's de-
gree in business administration.
Cathy K. Kauffman holds and
MBA and bachelor's degree in busi-
ness administration from the univer-
sity and is a current member of the
ECU Commerce Club. She was pro-
moted to vice president for BB&T's
Wilson branch in July, and is the com-
munity reinvestment market manager
in the CRAcommunity development
department.
Ted E. Whitehurst was promoted
to assistant vice president in Tarboro
late in July. He graduated from ECU
with a bachelor's degree in finance
and was a member of Gamma Beta
Phi.
Confucius sap:
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'





jL
wmmmmmtmatmmmemmmmmm
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
Tattooing &
Body Piercing"
(919)756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
516-A- Hwy 264-A Greenville, NC
History made with
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AUGUST 24
W Crwnrille
rf&ty7J��stfpolmvetherest.
W.INN 207SWGREE
' CRECNVIILt BlVD � 355-5000
Stephanie Lassiter
Editor-in-Chief
ECU is making history this year
since it reached the Shared Visions
goal, added the millionth volume to
the Joyner Library collection and has
now named a single professor the re-
cipient of three distinguished awards.
Dr. Lester A. Zeager, an associ-
ate professor of economics, was rec-
ognized yesterday by winning two of
the university's top awards, as well as
one of the highest awards bestowed
by the University of North Carolina
Board of Governors.
"How wonderful that one profes-
sor would be honored in three sepa-
rate occasions said Chancellor Rich-
ard R. Eakin. "That is a real tribute
to his fine performance and something
that is virtually unheard of
Zeager, who began his teaching
stint at ECU in 1986, was awarded the
ECU Alumni Teaching Excellence
Award and a College of Arts and Sci-
ences College Research Award. He was
further awarded the Board of Gover-
nors Award for Excellence in Teach-
ing.
"To have won one award in an
honor; to have won two awards on the
same day is almost unheard of; but to
have won three awards .on the same
day is unparalleled in tne history of
East Carolina University said Dr.
Carolyn Hampton, associate dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences.
Zeager, who received his Ph.D. in
1987 from the University of Pitts-
burgh, credits his success to the pres-
ence of others who demonstrate teach-
ing excellence like Dr. Marjorie
Baldwin, who also won the Alumni
Teaching Excellence Award.
Zeager's interests include labor
economics, development economics,
public finance, poverty comparisons,
labor migration and work disabilities.
He regularly publishes in refereed
journals.
"The comments of referees send
me to new sources he said. "Often 1
have an initial fear about learning
something new - and this is some-
thing students face when confronted
with something new. 1 show them by
example that if I can do it, they can
do it, too
Zeager focuses his teaching con-
tent on preparing his students for life
after school.
"Everyone here - faculty, staff,
students - has benefited from this
unique and gifted teacher and
scholar Hampton said.
ECU administrator
honored for teaching
Looking For
A Place To
Live??
Pay il Vef4it
Stephanie Lassiter
Editor in-Chief
Tinsley Yarbrough
OvUHy tAt tati i "71U and TVome ' 'faineant,
SculfUuned $d xiU and lanKi.
Tanning Package Prices
5 visits - $15
10 visits - $25
20 visits - $45
107 Eastbrook Drive 758-7570
Nexxus � Paul MM � Bidlage
There must be a great love for
teaching when one steps down from
an administrative position to get back
into the classroom. If the faculty and
students of ECU didn't recognize his
dedication to his students, they will
now that Dr. Tinsley Eugene
Yarbrough has been named the East
Carolina University Arts and Sciences
Distinguished Professor.
Yarbrough, a political science
professor, who is currently serving as
interim vice chancellor for academic
affairs, was presented the award yes-
terday during the College of Arts and
Sciences Fall Convocation. Dr. W.
Keats Sparrow, dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences, said the award
is "well deserved
"He's a gifted teacher, an ener-
getic and caretul researcher, a highly
capable writer and a dedicated servant
of the university and his profession
Sparrow said.
Sparrow said the award recog-
nizes a full professor in the College
of Arts and Sciences who has shown
remarkable commitment to academ-
ics, "demonstrated by outstanding
teaching and advising, research and
creative productivity and professional
service
A plaque in the office of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences will bear
Yarbrough's name along with that of
Dr. Stan Riggs of the geology depart-
ment, the first recipient of the award.
A public lecture will be given in
Yarbrough's honor on Oct 23, fol-
lowed by a reception hosted by the
College Office and Phi Beta Kappa.
See HONOR page 13
Why Just Eat Lunch When You Can "Po" It?
The place to "do lunch" at East Carolina University is Sweetheart's,
Campus Dining's table service restaurant on College HilL
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Located in Todd Dining Hall's private dining room.
Open every day classes are held Monday - Friday fcom 11:30AM-2:00PM
Declining balance, cash, and checks accepted.
Providing Adult & Pediatric Care � Women's Health �X-Rays and Lab � Physicals
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Now
Open
4





10
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Police move into '90s
Joseph Horst
Guest Writer
In the past ve,u the East Caro
lina Police Department has taken
Steps to make itsell one of the top
university police departments in the
state. Ranging from a state-of-the-art
compute) aided dispatch system to
new equipment in patrol vehicles,
ECU police have made the jump into
the new information age.
According to Teresa Crocker.
chief of police, possibly the biggest ad-
dition to the department was the
implementation o( the CAD 911 sys-
tem CAD stands foi Computer Aided
Dispatch, a system that allows dis-
patchers aeeess to more up-to-date
information, an on line callback sys
tern and instructions for officers re-
lating to specific calls. Ciockei said
that CAD was donated to the depart-
ment by Visions Software in
Wilmington, whose two administra
tors are ECU graduates.
"I have known botli
tor several years and this
donation was a major
contribution to our de-
partment and ECU
Crocker said. The
CAD 911 interface al-
lows us to take informa-
tion from the 911 call
and. with the stroke ot
a key. put that informa-
tion directly into the
CA11
Along with CAD
911. all dispatchers have
recently been trained in
a nationally certified
class to become Emer
gency Medical Dispatchers. With this
training, dispatchers can uc Rive out
potentially life-saving information to
emergency callers.
"We are not only tlu sole agency
in Pitt
County
with this
specialized
training,
but also
the only
c a m p u s
a � e n c y
state-wide
C r o c k e i
said.
With a
system o(
cards with
step-by step
i n s t r u c
tions rang-
ing from
king to childbirth, dispatchers can
V I
The Ea.st Carolinian is looking for sports
writers, news writers, ad representives,
opinion columnists, and artists. If you are
intrested stop by our offices to fill out an
application or call us at ECU-6366.
"We are not only
the sole agency in
Pitt County with
this specialized
training, but the
only campus
agency state-
wide
� Teresa Crocket
chief of police
See POLICE page 13
New systems save time
Jon Beckert
Staff Writer
The ECU Police Department has
a new edge in their service to cam-
pus.
The most significant part ot this
edge is the police department's new
enhanced 911 system Installed four
weeks ago by ECU Telecommunica-
tions, the new system has been fully
online tor over thiee weeks.
Mary Patterson. a
telecommunicator with ECU Police.
recalls how the old system worked.
"We always had access to the
county's 911 database, but with the
liber optics change that just went on
a tew weeks ago. we became the an-
swering point tor 9 1 Patterson said.
Previously, when you dialed 911. it
went through the Pitt County com
munications, which is at the court
house, and there was some delay while
they tried to screen the call, and find
out what area the call was from, and
who they needed to route it to. and
then they call the agency that was
supposed to receive the call, and
you're wasting minutes. Also, you can
lose the person during the transfer.
See 911 page 12
Do Your Part for a
Better Environment
SAVE ENERGY
Protecting die environmt nt and conserving our natural
resources hentits us all Efficient use of energy in our every day lives
can make a real deference The key is to change energy-wasting
habits into energy-saving ones Every one can do their part
Tor some Ion -cost, no-cost em rgy saving tips. lliU Gl"s
Energy Services Office at 551-1523
Greenville
Utilities
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One and Two bedroom units available
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Washer Dryer hookups � Basic Cable � Water and Sewer
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MINORITY MAGAZINE
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Pick us up four times during the
Fall and spring terms for discus-
sion of the problems and issues
facing ECU's minorities.
LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
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Pick us up annually in the Spring
to view a showcase of campus
literary and artistic creations.
ANNUAL VIDEO YEARBOOK
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Pick us up in the Spring beginning
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visual review of the past year.
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
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Pick us up Tuesdays and Thurs-
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The East Carolinian
TTCTTTTTi iW
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
11
Old halls get a new look
Joann Reed
Staff Writer
After two years of extensive reno-
vations. Slay and Umstead residence
halls are open for business this fall.
The renovation of the two dorms,
funded solely by the university hous-
ing department, cost a little over $6
million to complete, and another
$700,000 was spent buying furniture for
the buildings.
According to Manny Amaro, direc-
tor of ECU's housing department, both
Slay and Umstead residence halls were
badly in need of renovation. That
coupled with the presence of asbestos
in both dorms, caused the housing de-
partment to choose those buildings for
renovation.
"We basically gutted both buildings
and totally rebuilt the insides Amaro
said. "All asbestos was removed from
both dorms before demolition on the
buildings even started
Both Slay and Umstead are double
occupancy, coed dorms. All rooms have
individually controlled air-conditioning
units.
"These air-conditioning units,
along with room furniture that is not
bolted to the floor, give the residence
more control over their living environ-
ment Amaro said. "They will be able
to rearrange their rooms and keep them
at whatever temperature they like.
Along with the new furnishings,
Umstead has a fully equipped, staffed
computer lab for the residents of the
two dorms.
"The computer lab has 8 Mac's, 8
IBM's, and will be fully staffed so that
students can get help if they have any
problems with anything or need any
questions answered Amaro said.
In addition to the renovations on
Slay and Umstead, university housing
has been busy making improvements
all over campus. They have remodeled
and plan to open all three community
service desks on campus.
"These desks provide a center
where students can do room changes,
get keys if they are locked out and re-
ceive packages without having to come
all the way to the housing office Amaro
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said.
According to Amaro, university
housing would like to recognize the
three neighborhoods on campus. The
college hill committee will be repre-
sented by the service desk in Aycock.
West campus has its community service
desk in Fletcher, and central campus,
including Slay and Umstead. has a ser-
vice desk in Cotten.
Dining serves
healthy food
Amy Roberts
Staff Writer
ECU Dining Services is starting the
new school year focused on nutrition and
improvements for students.
New programs will include a new
19 meal plan that will work the same
wav as the 9 and 14 meal plans.
Along with the new plan is a new
increased equivalency plan, for students
with meal plans who want to use a meal
when eating at places such as The Wright
Place, Croatan or The Spot Each of
these places will offer a variety of value
meals that the student can choose from.
Meals have been priced specifically to
meet the $2 breakfast equivalent and the
$3 lunch equivalent
Over at Todd and Mendenhall din-
ing halls, students can look forward to
new weekly specials.
"Specials will include items not
found on the regular menu that will not
be repeated during the semester said
Frank Salamon, director of Dining Ser-
vices.
Special programs such as premium
night and candlelight dining will con-
tinue, along with a new buffet style night
Dining Services Registered Dietitian
Laura Hartung will continue the Treat
Yourself Right Program by offering work-
shops on food preparation and tech-
niques. Foods with the Treat Yourself
Right label meet American Heart Asso-
ciation Guidelines for healthy eating.
"Our goal is to see Treat Yourself
Right items available in all locations at
all times Salamon said.
Last year, Dining Services had an
exciting change with the opening of Todd
Dining Hall. Their next big project is the
expansion of the Wright Place. Construc-
tion will begin at the end of the spring
semester. Seating will be increased and
the serving area will be modified for more
convenience, Salamon said.
Dining Services is interested in stu-
dent feedback
"We encourage students as often
as possible to let us know how we are
doing Salamon said.
Students should feel free to talk to
the managers and fill out the comment
cards.
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��"
��Sr.
12
Tuesday, August 22,1995
The East Carolinian
Jobs only a phone call away
Catrese G.
Staff Writer
Richardson
In the new era of government cut-
backs, college students may find them-
selves without sufficient spending cash.
In fact, most students will have to be
plunged into the job market
Luckily, at ECU, there are many
avenues students may explore in order
to find employment
"Begin doing some career plan-
ning as early as possible in your col-
lege career said Margie Swartout,
assistant director of Career Services.
She also recommends that students get
involved in school activities and keep
academic performance at an acceptable
level.
The Cooperative Education Pro-
gram could be the ideal way for many
students to find the perfect job oppor-
tunity. The co-op program is offered
by the university, and it places students
in certain areas of employment using
the student's major as a guide.
If a student wishes to acquire a
position through coop, he or she must
first attend one of many co-op semi-
nars offered throughout the regular
school year and during the summer.
911
from page 10
"Now when you dial 911, it comes
directly to the police department, if
you're on campus
Patterson said this is an en-
hanced 911 system, with several at-
tractive features built into it Two of
these features are ANI (automatic
number identifier) and ALI (automatic
location identifier).
"Now when a person calls 911, it
automatically displays the location
and the phone number they're call-
ing from Patterson said. "Before,
that didn't happen, and you had to
screen the call to find where they
were
The new system works well with
CAD (Computer Aided Dispatching),
a computer system that was installed
on June 12 by Visions Software staff.
CAD is a system of databases provid-
ing a wide range of information, from
medical histories of callers, to the lo-
cations of hazardous waste materials
around campus. Patterson gave an
example of how the enhanced 911 and
CAD are used in conjunction.
"If we got a call at a certain num-
ber, you're able to interface and bring
in that 911 call on the computer
Patterson said. "If we have medical
information on someone at that loca-
tion, it will flash on the screen an "M"
for medical, and we can pull up what
it is, like if this is a diabetic, or they're
allergic to certain medicines. We can
then give that information to the re-
sponders
The entire system is manned by
Patterson and four other full-time
telecommunicators, as well as one
part-time telecommunicator. During
the summer, they answer an average
of 53 calls a day. In the fall, that num-
ber is expected to jump to 200.
Patterson said they also have an
additional edge - all of the
telecommunicators became Emer-
gency Medical Dispatch certified early
in May. According to Patterson, they
are the only EMD certified communi-
cations department in Pitt County.
Patterson explained what this means.
"If you called me, and you said
that a person had stopped breathing,
I can talk you through CPR, or
whatever's necessary � delivering a
baby, any number of medical emergen-
cies Patterson said. "We car. now
give you the instructions of what to
do with that person on the phone,
where before, that person would lay
there not breathing until rescue got
there
One aspect of the new system
remains incomplete, the CAD medical
database. Patterson said that all stu-
dents and faculty should provide any
useful medical information that they
can to the police department.
"It's real important for students
to know that if they're hearing im-
paired, diabetic or have any other
medical conditions, allergies, that it's
likely we might have a rescue call with
them Patterson said. "We really need
their medical information in order to
be able to serve them better. It's vol-
untary, it's not released to the pub-
lic
People wishing to provide medi-
cal information can direct it to Mary
Patterson through campus mail. Any
questions regarding this can be di-
rected to Mary Patterson at 328-6787.
The seminar allows the person seek-
ing employment to become more in-
formed about how co-op works and
how he or she should go about find-
ing employment After the student has
found an interesting position, a coop
coordinator will help the student for-
mally apply for the position. A formal
resume is needed and an interview may
be required.
There are three types of co-op
employment students will have to
choose from according to his or her
personal preference. Alternating is the
first choice. If a student chooses alter-
nating, the student will be a fuil-time
student for one semester and the next,
he or she will work at his assigned
position full-time.
Parallel is the second choice and
it allows the student to go to school
full-time and work part-time at his or
her assigned job. The last choice is
summer only in which the student only
works during the summer.
If there are no positions available
for a student in the Greenville area, he
or she may be placed in another
county, a neighboring state or clear
across the country. Salaries can range
anywhere from minimum wage to a
whopping $18 per hour.
Career Services, located on the
comer of Jarvis and Fifth street, could
Pair Electronics
107 Trade St. 756-2291
Patclt Cables Available For
Data Network lit Your Dorm
Room Available At
Electronics
(Beside Golden Corral)
also help students find jobs, especially
seniors. Career Services sponsors work-
shops on information such as inteview
skills and effective resume writing. The
program also sponsors three career
days each year where students may talk
with potential employers.
To go even further, Career Ser-
vices puts seniors in touch with em-
ployers and sets up interviews for the
students on campus.
Seniors should register for Career
Services as early as possible during
their senior year. Students register by
attending a Career Services orienta-
tion, the first three of which will be
held on Aug. 24 at 4 p.m. and 5:15
p.m and Aug. 25 at 4 p.m. The orien-
tation ceremonies will be held in the
Jenkins Auditorium.
If neither co-op nor Career Ser-
vices is the answer for the student he
or she can still check out the job op-
portunities boards in Brewster and the
Financial Aid office. Most of the jobs
listed on the boards are jobs that can
be found on campus. Newspapers nury
also be a successful route to finding
employment
Parkviezu Kingston Place
is now
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�?-
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
13
POLICE from page 10
eliminate those vital seconds between
life and death before rescue vehicles
arrive on the scene.
Another effort to improve the
safety of officers and the students they
deal with resulted in the purchase of
equipment to prevent the transmis-
sion of blood-borne pathogens. New
security cages, screens and plastic
seats in most of the patrol vehicles
provide the most visible signs of this
new effort.
"We have spent thousands of
dollars getting equipment that is cru-
cial in officer safety Crocker said.
"Without this equipment, we could
face stiff fines if found in violation
According to Crocker, another
major step toward providing better
service to the campus has occurred
with the increase of hours spent in
working events for different groups
on campus and training.
"This increase is important be-
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
CTiiriiriiT cniri1
:ial
:ial
pIAL
:ial
diuutm siftCIAL
STUDENT SPECIAL
ATRIANGLE
cause it tells people that we're here
not only 12 hours a day, 40 hours a
week Crocker said. "It shows we're
doing other things as well
According to statistics provided
by the department, officers have spent
3,682 hours in training, 3.639 hours
working special events and have pro-
vided 57 Crime Prevention programs
to the residence halls in the past year.
With the advent of the fall semes-
ter, students will also see an increase
in the amount of bicycle officers on
patrol. Since last spring, four new bi-
cycles have been purchased and two
new bicycle officers will be added
when current vacancies are filled.
"The bicycle patrol allows stu-
dents easy access to an officer Lt.
Johnny Umphlet said. "Officers are
able to interact with students on a
more frequent basis
Bicycle officers also work sepa-
rate shift hours from officers in ve-
hicles which allow them to be on cam-
pus during peak times of the day and
night.
"hough the department has ac-
cc ipiished much this past year, it is
looking towards the future as well.
Crocker said the officer liaison pro-
gram that was started last year has
progressed and expanded to provide
better services. This will be most ap-
parent in the Operation ID program
and bicycle registration that will oc-
cur during move-in to the residence
halls.
"Our goal is to register 8,000 bi-
cycles and I.D. at least 50 percent of
property in the residence halls
Crocker said.
One last major goal in the future
will be the renovation of the existing
Police Department building, which
will affect the upgrading of the tele-
communications division. Crocker said
that with the move of the division to
another part of the building, individu-
als will have easier access and the di-
vision itself will become more cus-
tomer-oriented.
"I want to bring telecommunica-
tions into the "90s Crocker said.
"Before, we were somewhere in the
'50s
The ECU police have made, and
continue to make, large and small
steps to improve life for the students
on campus. Following the new slogan
of Business Affairs, "Whatever it
Takes ECU police strive to provide
greater protection and enhance the
quality of life for all people on cam-
pus.
WANTED:
Advertising
Representives
The East Carolinian is caking
applications for advertising
representatives. The job
involves selling ads to local
businesses. Applicants must
have a 2.0 gpa, and be an
ECU student. Stop by the
Student Pubs. bldg. for an
application.
a Minimum opening deposit of100.
a Checking with no minimum balance
for a low monthly fee of $4.
� Unlimited free withdrawals at Triangle
Bank ATMs in Greenville.
� Use other Triangle Bank ATMs across
North Carolina at no charge.
a Write 10 checks each month
at no charge.
a Order special checks
featuring the East
Carolina Pirate.
Keep tabs on your account with Voiceunk.
The 800 that allows you to check
your balance, confirm deposits and
review checks that have cleared
the bank.
a Apply for a Triangle Bank VISA�
CheckCard and use it as an ATM card.
Purchases will come directly from
your Triangle Bank
ATRIANGLE 2Sfchecking
felkBANK
2310 Charles Street, Greenville, NC 27858 � (919) 756-7344 � FAX (919) 756-1608
Greenville ATMs � Triangle Bank, 2310 Charles Street � Plaza Mall
" On the Student Government Bus Line Member FDIC usNoai
HONOR from page 9
Association of Pitt County. Once back
in the classroom, Yarbrough will open
his doors to visitors and colleagues,
as well as serving as a mentor to other
faculty and giving periodical U ctures.
"I am so pleased to Ieam that Dr.
Yarbrough will be honored in this
way said Dr. Richard R. Eakin. chan-
cellor. "He represents the finest quali-
ties that one could possibly have as a
faculty member. He is a challenging
and productive teacher. He is a
scholar of not only national but inter-
national note, and he is committed to
the advancement of the university in
a variety of service dimensions'
Yarbrough. who came to ECU in
1967and became a professor in 1976.
served as chair of the political science
department for five years. His col-
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leagues have described him as "bril-
liant and inspiring" and "the foremost
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His specialties lie in U.S. Legis-
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Yarbrough dedicated much of his
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He serves as a reviewer for profes-
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I hiiiNii nf niifci
14
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
As You Besiti the New Year, Check Out the Student Stores for all your Academic Needs!
We're everythins you could want
in a college bookstore
and more!
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You'll find a complete selection of new and used text-
books, art supplies, computers, school supplies, room
decor, and official ECU apparel.
If you need it for a class, we have it, or we'll get it
hasstocHco
$34 W1U10M
frfCflcfetf
tor
b�okrush
Extra resfecrs
open durins
peak pc�ods
Helpful,
Co�wteou$
staff
Open Extended Hours for Fall Book Rush
Tuesday, Ausust 22: 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
DON'T MISS THE NEW YEAR'S EVE SALE, Tuesday: 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Ausust 23: 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Regular Hours begin August Q3:
Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday: 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Cash, check, Visa, Discover & MasterCard accepted.
ECU Student Stores; Wright Building: 328-6731
Medical Bookstore: Brody Building: 816-3450
We're more than just booksyour dollars support student scholars!
Don't miss our
New Year's Eve Sale
Tuesday, Ausust 22
5 pm to 8 pm
WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN!
Panasonic CD Player
Sony AMFM Walkman
Sony AMFMCassette Player
Visit our booth at the "Happy New
Year" celebration at Mendenhall
Student Center, 4pm to 7 pm,
Tuesday, August 22nd. Pick up your
entry form to register for GREAT
door prizes. Drop off
your entry inside
the store in the
Wright Building.
Drawing will be
held at 7:30 p.m
and you need
not be present to win!
W
Student Stores
$5off
j every $75 I
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� Coupon not necessary. Offer expires 92395. �
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: Computer Books �
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J
15
Tuesday, Ausust 22,1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
While you're
home sleeping
or downtown
partying, the
staff of The
East
Carolinian is
hard at work
producing a
paper full of
the latest in
news,
ifestyles,
sports and
commentary.
Pick us up!
We're
available
every Tuesday
and Thursday.
By the students and for the students - The East Carolin-
ian.
The student paper celebrates its 70th year of publication
this fall, and thanks to students, we're still going strong. We
give thanks to not only the students who read TEC, but to the
students who spend endless hours running it.
We stay late and rise early to make sure this publication is
the best it can be, and yes, we make mistakes - that goes along
with the learning experience we gain by working for the news-
paper. We have exams and parties to attend just like anyone
else, but TEC gives us an extra identity with campus. We al-
ways look forward to seeing new faces and you never know,
you could be next
TEC News always aims to get the scoop (sometimes suc-
ceeding and other times not). The news section features every-
thing from the latest hard news to students faculty profiles
and the never-ending construction projects. If anything inter-
esting happens, we'll tell you. And if YOU see anything hap-
pening that students should know about please call us any-
time (we have voice-mail).
Lifestyles is so cool, it might as well be an ice cube. The
Lifestyles section can tell you anything from what the local
sound sounds like, to what free movies are playing at Hendrix
Theater. Not only do they write restaurant, CD and book re-
views, Lifestyles gives you the extra twist you may need to
stay hip with college life.
The sports department is currently in transition, but will
always be a favorite to any Pirate fan. Our football tabloid is
better than others because our writers are students, just like
our athletes. You'll find our Sports' writers on the gridiron,
the track, the diamond, the Frisbee golf field or anywhere else
athletics may be occurring. Look for the tabloid in TEC before
any home football game.
Once upon a time, someone suggested doing away with
Pirate Comics - we think not Local artists pour their hearts
into these sillies and will continue to do so every Thursday.
Our comics are sure to make eyes roll if nothing else, and
some will certainly be sucked in by the complex and mysteri-
ous storylines. Don't miss any editions or you may not be able
to catch up.
Advertising holds the place together, along with our secre-
tary Deborah. Our ad reps worked through the sweltering heat
for weeks in order to find the great deals our Back-to-School
issue offers. TECs ad department is currently under construc-
tion (like the rest of our building), and now boasts beepers in
addition to their new fiber optic phone system.
Without our production manager, there would be no TEC.
She takes everything we give her and fits it all together like a
great big puzzle.
Don't forget to check out our classifieds and announce-
ments section. If you need a roommate, have something to sell
or want to send your sweetie a personal, TEC Classifieds is
the place to advertise. We're not free, but we're cheap.
Enough patting ourselves on the back, TEC employees will
continue to work for students for the next 70 years and hope-
fully, longer. We don't try to compete with other publications
because we don't need to. The students are our audience and
as long as we're in print we'll cater to you - that's our job.
If you'd like to learn more about TEC give us a call at 328-
6366 or stop by the Student Publications building (acrbss from
Joyner Library). We are always in the need of more employees
(we pay). And hey - how else can you get a chance to meet the
chancellor?
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
To all new students, welcome. I
hope you find ECU to be an enjoy-
able place to further your education.
Many projects are currently under-
way to enhance our fine university
aad the rewards of this hard work
are becoming more visible with each
passing day. The soon to be com-
pleted Student Recreation Center
and expansions of Joyner Library
and Ficklen Stadium will undoubt-
edly have a great deal of positive
impact
One of the most exciting recent
accomplishments is the commitment
of ECU, NCSU and UNC-Chapel Hill
to engage in an ongoing football se-
ries. We can also look forward to
recognition for research performed
at the soon to be construction heart
and cancer research center at Uni-
versity Medical Center. As a gradu-
ate student, I have had ample op-
portunity to notice that all of these
accomplishments and many more
have something in common, Sena-
tor Ed Warren.
Senator Warren has continually
fought against tuition increases and
has striven to gain and retain much
threatened university funding. Since
the current legislative climate has
proven very detrimental to all 16
campuses in the North Carolina uni-
versity system, it remains even more
imperative that ECU maintain zeal-
ous representation in the North
Carolina legislature. Senator Warren
has served as a long-standing driv-
ing force for the advancement of
ECU in every realm. From funding
for new academic facilities that en-
hance the academic reputation of
ECU to being an ardent supporter
of the athletic program creating ever
widening national exposure, Sena-
tor Warren deserves a salute as a
champion of progress for ECU.
Scarlette Gardner
Graduate Student
Business Administration
1995 Senior Class Secretary
Treasurer
�OFfio
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Printed on
100
recycled
papei
Tambra Zion, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Darryl Marsh, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Ken Clark, Photographer
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Jason Allen, Copy Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information call (919)
328-6366.
Party school image
no laughing matter
The chances are at least once you
have probably heard of East Carolina
being called the "party school I can't
tell you how many times I've told
friends from home or other places
where I was going to college only to
have them immediately smile and say
All right! ECU! Party
People obviously have this men-
tal picture in their minds of ECU be-
ing something like the baths of an-
cient Rome, where all of the students
here are either engaged in constant
pornographic debauchery or dancing
and stumbling through the streets,
day and night, in a drunken revelry.
Of all other schools in this state
and in the southeast, for that matter,
people have an image of ECU as just
being a party school, a place to go for
a few years to just blow off life and
waste your time in college in a
drunken, drug-induced haze. And you
know really that should make you very
mad. even the freshmen, because it is
a false image, and it hurts all of us,
each one of us. from graduating se-
niors and graduate students to the
incoming freshmen. All you have to
do is think about it for a second and
you'll understand why.
Walk around ECU's campus by
day and you see a bustling, busy uni-
versity like any other. Talk to ECU
students and you will hear from
people who are serious about what
they're doing, who are either looking
for some course or direction in life or
who are working very hard to excel
Patrick Hinson
Opinion Columnist
It's up to you
now. No one's
going to do
anything for you
around here.
here and get the things out of life that
they want. Talk to any professor here
and you will no doubt meet someone
who is genuinely interested in help-
ing you with your work, in listening
to your questions and your ideas, and
in helping you to find the direction
you're looking for.
One thing that I think is unique
about East Carolina is that this is a
big school that often feels like a small
one, because you can get to know your
faculty here and the other students
around you, and you can easily get in-
volved in many different things here,
both in the university and the commu-
nity. But you need to keep one thing
in mind: it's up to you now. No one's
going to do anything for you around
here. This is what college is all about
learning to take your life into your own
hands and do something with it You've
got the ball; it's time to run with it
This is a university that has been
working hard for many years to im-
prove itself, and you can see that ev-
ery day and in many ways. The party
school image is an anachronism, and
it's perpetuated by the same biased
idiots who write us up continuously in
The News and Observer and other
newspapers trying to make ECU sound
like a bunch of lurching Neanderthals
compared to the other colleges in
North Carolina.
All I'm saying is just look around.
Look at our students, our faculty, our
programs, departments and schools, at
our hospital and medical school, just
take a look at ECU in 1995 and decide
for yourself if the party thing is a myth
or not That's something that maybe
went on in the 70s and early '80s
people, but it's a thing of the past
Go to any other college in North
Carolina, or any college anywhere, for
that matter, and you'll see they all party
just as much, just as hard, and they
get in trouble about as often and for
the same things. We need to do away
with this crippling, false image of our
university. It's going to put you behind
other college graduates someday when
you're out of here and desperate for a
job. You don't want your interviewer
to laugh at you and say "All right! ECU!
Whooo and flash the surfer "hang
loose" sign at you while he gives your
job to some pompous preppie from
Chapel Hill. It may be funny now, but
it won't he later.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
This is a response to "An eye
for a eye for Susan Smith printed
July, 19, 1995. I believe in capitol
sic punishment. However, it is al-
most offensive to read an article in
which the main point is to question
the necessity of a trial. Heath's opin-
ion is that it would have been a good
thing, "a favor to throw Susan
Smith to a group of protesters hop-
ing that they would have taken care
of her. Is this a joke? Does J.D.
Heath expect people to rationalize
a lynch mob? Well, think again.
It is also comforting to know
that we (readers who are also adults)
are respected enough that sentences
like: "She admitted to seat belting
both of her God given children into
their so-called child safety seats are
used to explain facts. Don't forget
that we are not stupid zomhies. We
can tell that "God given" and so-
called" are used to sway the reader.
Have we also forgotten that people
who describe children as God given
are not supposed to support things
like blood thirsty murder marchers?
Of course there should be a
trial! I understand that a crime of
this nature can cause a lot of anger,
but I also understand that it is pretty
hard to be a naive as to think: 1)
that anyone appalled by this trag-
edy would condone leaving their
homes in an attempt to hunt Susan
Smith down and kill her, Would you
really?, 2) that the readers of this
opinion section would let go an ar-
gument as poorly constructed as
yours.
Patrick Ware
Junior
English
"Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from
giving us wordy evidence of the fact
� George Eliot, author, 1879.
.





16
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Seize the day � there
may be no tomorrow
Carpe Diem! Seize the day be-
cause the time is now. We are free
from horrendous third shift summer
jobs and parental restraint It is time
to sit back, grab a cold one and watch
Beavis and Butthead.
Let's look at Beavis and Butthead
though. They are clearly not college
material. All they do is sit in front of
the tube, eat junkfood and rot away.
If they can ever hold on to a job it
will be the same drudgery day after
day making their special fries at
Burger World living from paycheck to
paycheck with bodies sculpted by
Budweiser the Great
Despite an occasional sadistic,
nihilistic impulse, Beavis and
Butthead will never think great
thoughts. They will never appreciate
what a joy thinking is. Beavis and
Butthead are merely living on the
world not in it
Education is a privilege not a
right Not everybody is or should be
entitled to it Their must be a hunger
and a discipline to attain it Dr. Simon
or Dr. Detroit can not just give knowl-
edge to anyone who is not in class.
Those that search and conquer new
ideas should be entitled an education.
Those that don't should make room
for someone who wants that chal-
lenge.
At the university, we have a
chance to rise up out of the muck of
ignorance and poverty and create new
worlds for ourselves and others. With-
out a degree, contemplate working
with Beavis and Butthead and in 10
years hoping to run a Quickie Mart
or taco stand.
Once I held this university in ut-
ter contempt for its blatant stupidity,
f waged a total war against the sys-
J. Miles Layton
Opinion Columnist
To those that seize
the knowledge the
university offers, a
world of ideas is
there for the
taking.
tern. I lost my shot at an education.
For the past few years I have bagged
tons of groceries, waited on a million
tables and even worked as a third shift
furniture mover. All the while, I ex-
pected the world owed me something.
I thought I should be a foreman or
manager but was denied. Denied be-
cause I lived in the fantasy land that
a degree is a worthless piece of pa-
per.
It is not
A degree opens doors but it so
much more. To those that seize the
knowledge the university offers, a
world of ideas is there for the taking.
Ideas are powerful things because
nothing is more important than an
idea whose time has come. The time
is now. We live in a vastly different
world than we did 10 years ago. The
Berlin Wall is gone. There is a Repub-
lican Congress led by a renegade with
a few ideas of his own. Michael Jack-
son married Lisa Marie Presley and
the list goes on and on.
Armed with a piece of paper, an
ability to think and a powerful idea, a
college graduate is a formidable force.
Seize it for it is there for the taking.
Wage war against the real enemies of
the world, not financial aid. Dean
Speier, student government, the fac-
ulty or the Greeks.
While a degree does entitle cer-
tain privileges, it is worthless unless
it is backed up by something. People
that sit around watching MTV and
making the bare minimum to get di-
plomas are just as cheated. Not only
have they wasted thousands of dol-
lars, but their time as well. With the
time these couch potatoes spent in
college, they could have been using
those four years productively and be
assistant manager at a Quickie Mart
by now. Yes, even with a degree a per-
son can make special fries. I used to
wait tables with a lot of college gradu-
ates. A degree created without any
original thought or ability to commu-
nicate any idea is worthless. So seize
the knowledge.
This kind of degree loses its lus-
ter because so many are being pumped
out year by year by Chapel Hill, State
and other less noteworthy institutions.
In order for a degree to mean some-
thing, the person on that piece of pa-
per must be worth something. Each
person that gets a diploma sets an ex-
ample for the rest of the world. When
employers see an ECU graduate, they
must think sharp, hard working and
alert versus an animal house mental-
ity of fat dumb and stupid.
By the grace of God, I got a sec-
ond chance. Second chances are rarer
than a million dollar lottery ticket With
a fresh new year ahead, new opportu-
nities are at hand. A chance for a good
education is not something to be taken
lightly.
Reflections of the Dead
Where were you when one of
America's living legends and acid rock
icons died? Where were you when the
spirit of the 1960s all but ended for
thousands of Americans? Will you be
one of those thousand that will have
to get a job now because you can not
live the 'Jack Kerouac lifestyle' in pur-
suit of following the Grateful Dead?
Or will you just find solace in living
in a commune out West or perhaps
touring the United States with Phish,
the Dead's illegitmate offspring?
It was inevitable, wasn't it? How
much longer could the Dead tour any-
way? Jerry Garcia fought hard to keep
his weight and drug addictions at a
reasonable level, and at the same time
the band had been touring the world
as often as Garcia would light up a
joint in the early '60s. Wow, "What a
long strange trip it has been?"
Did you happen to see this weeks'
Newsweek (21 August 1995) where in
the clcanO opinion section (the very
last page) George F. Will, political
analyst and baseball freak, tried to
blame the Dead and the '60s cultural
revolution for the actions of two dead-
beat parents who neglected their chil-
dren so that they could pursue their
own endeavors? You have to be kid-
ding me, George?
Clearly these two people are truly
unfit and unhealthy for their children,
but to blame a society for the actions
of just two people is ludicrous. These
two people are cruel for neglecting
their children, but pinning the Dead
and a society where chaos and the
eternal search for happiness were the
dominant characteristics of a compli-
cated world is like blaming
Reaganomics for the Gulf War.
I remember just two short years
ago planning a trip to a Dead show in
Buffalo, NY with a group of friends.
(For those nostalgic Deadheads, it was
the tour where the Steve Miller Band
opened). We had a big plan of going
to the show to live the 'Deadhead
Experience We didn't have tickets.
We did not carry any illicit drugs. All
we had was a cooler full of frosty bev-
erages (fill in your favorite beer here),
and the willingness to live by the
Deadhead code: free. All we wanted
was to become 'tantalized' like the
Eric Bartels
Opnlon Columnist
The remaining
core members of
the Dead are left
contemplating
their own
futures.
Jead's dancing bear.
Unfortunately-our plans fell
threw another friend and I were un-
able to go because we had to work.
Ever since, we all planned on taking
our intended trip, but it seems that
fate took its course.
Likewise, Garcia and the Dead
toured the world with reckless aban-
don which started as early as 1965.
Their career epitomized a tumultuous
time in both rock n' roll and in life.
The whole '60s decade was marred by
revolution (Civil Rights and the anti-
Vietnam Peace Protests), disorder (the
Vietnam conflict, the assassination of
John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther
King, Jr.) and the yearning for free-
dom from an established (the draft
and the Vietnam conflict) society. The
Grateful Dead survived this era and
were fortunate enough to share their
music and their livelihood with oth-
ers.
By rocking into the '90s. the
Dead reached out to a newer, younger
audience. In the time of preserving
"peace, love and dope" at there con-
certs, Dead shows became a haven for
free-thinkers and those in search of
escape from the cruelties of the out-
side world. Not only did they open
their minds, they opened their mics.
Their mics? The Dead were one of the
only bands that would let you 'boot-
leg' their shows. How cool is that?
A saga that was created in the
minds of Garcia, Bob Weir and long-
time member Ron (Pigpen) McKeman.
who died in 1973 from liver compli-
cations, formed the Grateful Dead and
Everyone off the bus
named themselves after a British bal-
lad in which a human helps a ghost
find peace. After thriving for nearly
three decades, the remaining core
members of the Dead are left contem-
plating their own futures.
However, maybe it is time for the
Dead to be buried, besides their mu-
sic has touched several of today's pre-
mier bands. Just look at the Dead's
influence on bands like the school of
Phish (Phish), a Boston based band;
Rusted Root, (Pittsburgh natives);
Dave Matthews Band; Big Head Todd
& the Monsters or anyone that has
appeared on the H.O.R.D.E. (Horizons
Of Rock Developing Everywhere) tour.
Just listen to Dave Matthews Band's
violin playing, the drumbeats in some
of Rusted Root's songs, or even the
funky grooves that have made Phish
famous.
Have you ever stopped and won-
dered that the Grateful Dead may have
been one of America's earliest alter-
native bands? Not only because they
rarely had a chart topping single
("Touch of Grey" only went to num-
ber nine), but because they reached
audiences in different ways. They
didn't attack the popradio culture by
getting their music aired as frequently
as Hootie & the Blowfish or Live, but
they did tour.
"Truckin" all over the world and
all through the United States, the
Dead made their home not only on
Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco but
all over the world. The nostalgic
Volkswagen buses tie-dyed and
painted in psychedelic greens and reds
traveling all over the interstates of the
United States will remain an Ameri-
can phenomenon.
In hippie realms and for thou-
sands of Grateful Dead fans, August
9,1995 will be an unforgettable date,
similar to August 16, 1977 (the pass-
ing of the King). Unfortunately, for
those of us who missed the '60s and
the culture that engulfed over two
generations we may never have the
true experience that these generations
have witnessed and been a part of. The
mystique of the era with everyone liv-
ing in eternal bliss will always be
sought by those of us who yearn for
happiness and peace with our peers.
"Hey, man my friend Casey said
to me over drinks last week, "what
did the Deadhead say when he ran
out of pot?"
I didn't bother putting down my
bottle of beer before I smacked him
one in the ear - hard. He howled and
clutched at his boxed member as the
amber liquid soaked into his shirt
"What was that for?" he de-
manded, his eyes misting up.
I started to answer, then gritted
my teeth and went on popping him
over the head. It just felt so ugly and
futile trying to explain things to him,
as if the only way he would ever have
an open mind would be if his skull
was cracked open and his brain
plopped out onto the countertop
We were sequestered away in
Casey's tiny kitchen, watching the late
news, which was still brimming with
details on the life and death of Jerry
Garcia. Casey had been exponentially
upping the count on Dead jokes with
each beer, and my nerves had worn
painfully thin.
Actually, he looked more per-
plexed than offended by my assault
"This is about respect for the
dead, right?" he wanted to know, then
chuckled at his unintentional pun.
I waggled another bottle at him
to shut him up. What I couldn't con-
vey to Casey, and what a lot of people
don't seem to have realized yet is that
a lot more than just another member
of a popular band. When Garcia
checked out, that closed the book on
the '60s.
I had never liked the Grateful
Dead, and, from the interviews I read,
really disliked Garcia himself, but like
Brian Wright
Opinion Columnist
When Garcia
checked out,
that closed the
book on the
'60s.
him or not, most expected him to be
around forever, or at least for another
30 years or so.
We have framed the 1960s and
recognize them as a golden period of
revolutionary thoughts and deeds. For
a while, it seemed like the shine from
that decade would never go away.
Then, one by one, the personal-
ity icons of the '60s counterculture
began to fall by the roadside, some
into obscurity, some to the only
slightly kinder condition of death.
Warhol, Hendrix, Joplin, Morrison.
Hoffman-all gone, some suddenly,
some claimed by a predictable end
that anyone could see coming a mile
off.
Those that remain have been re-
duced to much the same status as the
idols from the '50s, shambling, soul-
less mockeries of their former glory,
all of whom seem destined to one day
end up on a commemorative plate on
the Home Shopping Network.
Loyal devotees insist that many of
the greats are still around, yet falter
when asked when was the last time
anything great was done.
Time Leary is still popular. Of
course he is. Any higher-consciousness
salesman with the tongue of a hipster
and the heart of a pimp who only man-
ages to keep harvesting a new crop of
followers every 10 years by giving the
green light on unlimited psychedelic
drug use will always be hanging on
thousands of dorm room walls.
Even a musical giant like Bob
Dylan is viewed like some odd curios-
ity from an antique shop. Sadly, no
one's listened to anything he's had to
say since some time around 1978 and
has long since been swept into the
nostalgia bin.
As for others such as Peter, Paul;
and Mary, Crosby, Stills, and Nash and
Santana, they're still alive only in the
loosest sejise of the word.
But then there was the Dead, the
eternal passengers on Ken Kesey's day-
glo bus, migrating back and forth
across the country, with a trail of fans
following in their wake like goslings. I
felt certain that the Dead would be
around until the end of time, still tour-
ing long after their bodies had given
up the ghost but then there's never
enough money for you to pay off the
reality check when it comes.
I only hope we don't 20 or 30
years down the road, choose to find a
new god, a new time to glorify, and
move on to the next available decade,
the 70s, because that means that even-
tually, the decade to sit upon the
throne will be the '80s, and our na-
tional anthem will be replaced by a
Huey Lewis song.
Welcome to camp ECU
Welcome campers! For all fresh-
man, transfer students, and newcom-
ers to Greenville this article will act
as your survival guide for the next few
weeks. The information was collected
painstakingly by veterans of ECU life.
Camp rules and regulations: The
first thing to know about living among
the ECU faithful is that almost every-
thing you must do will require an
undetermined number of signatures.
These signatures will be required from
four to six people, three of which will
be out of the country or most certainly
unattainable by any means of commu-
nication.
Because of this, all of your en-
deavors will likely take 12 hours
longer than initially planned, so pack
a lunch. If you attempt to speed this,
or any process up, you could extend
your stay here for one to two years
and there's a good possibility that
you'll miss the sing along at the end
of the year.
Transportation onCamp
grounds: If you have a car, give it
away. This may sound strange, but
once the first parking ticket is writ-
ten, and the first 45 minute wait in
the parking lot has occurred, there
will be no confusion about this par-
ticular suggestion. The best advice
that this counselor has for the brave
few who decide to keep their car
would be to refrain from parking any-
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
If you have a
car, give it
away. Refrain
from parking
anywhere in the
city limits.
where in the city limits.
A parking sticker, obtainable
from the camp traffic office on 10th
Street, will only provide a false sense
of security for the ECU camper. You
will get a ticket. You will leam to ig-
nore signs. You will feel the power
of the camp traffic office when at-
tempting to complete any of the tasks
discussed in the first section. Oh yes,
you will have your records tagged.
Do not fear, simply sell your car and
you can avoid this common camp
problem.
Camp activities: Camp ECU has
many extracurricular activities that
can be beneficial to the general camp
experience, but there are some things
to know. When attending sporting
events make sure to leam the proper
clapping rhythms to the camp songs
before entering any camp facility. It
is a little known fact that improper
clapping in a public place can result
in social out cast
Do not follow the trend of camp-
ers past by driving circles around
downtown until you see someone
that you know. This activity has
caused moral problems for some of
the older campers and it has been
suggested that I include this helpful
tip.
If anyone invites you to attend
a facility named after a body part,
run away. Find a safe house some-
where, call a camp security officer,
find someone who you can sing the
camp song with.
Lastly, if you are a camper that
likes big hats and big belt buckles,
which many of our campers do. make
sure and restrain yourself from ex-
hibiting these articles at the fore
mentioned sporting events. Trust me,
your counselor, your friend.
We here at Camp ECU wish only
the best for the new members of our
community. It is the hope of the
counselors that you will heed these
little suggestions and find your stay
here as wonderful as we attempt to
make it. There will be basket weav-
ing in Mendenhall and lunch in Todd
dining hall all year long.
Opinion Columnists
Got an opinion? Let's hear it!
We need columnists.
Requirements:
� ECU student
2.0 GPA or better
Call Stephanie Lasslter at 328-9557.






�.��������.II
17
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
OLAS

1

Help
Wanted
For Sale
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Help Wanted
wamm
o-Ulvrv wot �&oor4&
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815J58-7436
3)tfrtnclUrU
Open 24 hrs. 1-800-987-6204
Now Hiring
WANTED! PART-TIME DISTRIBU-
TORS IMMEDIATELY. Be the First to
Profit from the HOTTEST product on the
market "DEBIT CARDS Now Avail-
able! Call Today(919) 736-9151. 1-800-
644-0901.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
TLC ESCORTS is seeking ladies for danc-
ing, modeling, and escorting. $1000
weekly. Flexible hours. Discreet & confi-
dential. Health Insurance available. Call
9am-2am 758-2881.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to National
Mailers PO Box 774. Olathe, KS 66051.
Immediate response.
NCASHtff
We Bar CDS,
� CmmUIumj moA Lp�
Well pay tip to $5 eaaL for
CD.
� � I
Gumby's
Drivers Wanted Earn �
SbO S'lOOPer Nigh!
ike Your Own Schedule I'de-
r College Stuck:
Call 321-4862
LOOK ATTENTION STUDENTS: LARG-
EST selection of campus rentals available:
Duplexes, Houses, Apartments CALL
HOMELOCATORS 752-1375.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share house. $225 mth 12 utilities.
Must love animals. Horse board also avail-
able on premises. Call 758-7414.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED - Fur-
nished Bedroom with Private Bath - ECU
Bus Route - Washer-Dryer Priveleges, Lei-
sure atmosphere Call 321-1848.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY: 2 rooms in
new house 2 miles from campus. Very
spacious. Fully furnished house with back
deck and basketball court $200 a month
includes phone & water. 752-2116
ROOMMATE WANTED: male or female,
2 br. 112 bath townhouse. Rent $205 ?
12 utilities, smoker or non-smoker. Call
Christie at 757-0482 anytime.
I
A Help
ii Wanted
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE: to students who are inter-
ested in becoming PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS to students in wheel-
chairs, READERS, AND TUTORS. Past
experience is desired but not required. For
an application, contact: Office for Disabil-
ity Support Systems, Brewster A-l 16 or
A-114, Telephone (919) 326799.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DEVELOP-
MENT, DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS,
is now accepting applications for tutors.
A minimum 2.5 GPA is required. Please
call 328-4550 for more information.
MALE DIVERS NEEDED ECU SWIM
TEAM needs Guys Who Like to Flip and
Twist A chance to be a Varsity Athlete!
Contact Coach Rose at Minges Pool
A.SAP.
Gumby's
Attention Ladies
Earn $5.00 Hour
Whille Excercising
Putting Up Flyers 321-4862
GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS DEPARTMENT: FALL SOCCER
COACHES: The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting for 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches for the
fall girls and boys soccer programs. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 5-16,
in soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00pm until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This program will run
from September to mid-November. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James at 830-
4567 or Michael Daly at 8304550.
SITTER WANTED: For 3 year old. 2-5
hours per week. Experience preferred.
References, CPR and transportation re-
quired. 321-4954.
CHILD CARE - Need responsible person
with own transportation for after school
care 2-6 week days. Please call 830-0750
and leave message.
BABYSITTERS NEEDED: Community
Bible Study, A Women's Interdenomina-
tional Bible Study, Meeting at Oakmont
Baptist Church. Thursday Mornings, 9am
to 11:30am, needs several young women
to work in our nursery area to provide
patient, loving care to our youngest par-
ticipants. Church nursery experience pre-
ferred, references requested. Must provide
own transportation amd be able to mak e
commitment through December 7. Call
Mrs. Baker, Class Coordinator at 355-8368.
THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH is
currently hiring for a Nursery Attendant
in the toddler and crib nurseries during
the Sunday Services from 9am to 12
noon. Also hiring two substitutes. Look-
ing for dependable and n urturing individu-
als. Child care experience as well as CPR
Certification a plus. Must be able to work
during some Holiday periods. Please call
321-0299.
SPRING BREAK '96 SELL TRIPS,
EARN CASH & GO FREE Student
Travel Services is now hiring campus rep-
resentatives. Lowest rates to Jamaica,
Cancun, Daytona and Panama City Beach.
Call 1-800-6484849.
HELP WANTED - Part-time position avail-
able with Surgical Practice. Must have
good typing and telephone communica-
tion skills. Flexible hours. Please call Vicky
at 7584300.
PART TIME STUDENT NEEDED to help
with lifting furniture and input ing com-
puter inventory. Must have computer ex-
perience. Call 931-6904 and leave message.

HELP WANTED: NEEDED: someone
experienced in outside painting as well as
yardwork. Pays $5.00 per hour - work on
your own time. Call 756-2496 in t he after-
noons up until 6:30pm.
PART-TIME SALES POSITION: ME
LANCE CONTEMPORARY WOMEN'S
CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES BOU-
TIQUE. Located at the Lynndale
Shoppes(next to Staccato Cafe) Hours 10-
6:00 Mon-Sat Call 355-8771.
ERNIE'S FAMOUS SUBS: Full or part-
time help wanted. Apply in person any day
between 2:00pm & 4:00pm.
NOW HIRING: Waitresses, Waiters, Bak-
ery attendants. Cooks. Buffet attendants,
meat cutters, utility. Apply at Golden Cor-
ral, 504 SW Greenville Blvd.
CAMPUS SALES REP wanted for part-
time job. WORK AT YOUR CONVE-
NIENCE! T-Shirts. sweatshirts, huggers,
cups & Advertising specialities. Call 1-800-
758-5646 for information.
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Guard - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy Work. Flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210.
STUDENTS NEED A JOB? ROADWAY
PACKAGE SYSTEM is looking for PACK-
AGE HANDLERS to load Vans and Un-
load Trailers for the AM shift, hours
4:00am to 8:00am. $6.00hour, tuition
assistance available after 30 days. Future
career opportunities in operations and
management possible. Applicat ions can be
filled out at 104 United Drive, Greenville,
752-1803.
PRE-MED AND NURSING STUDENT S
wanted for growing ophthalmic practice.
Must be enthusiastic and a people person
We will train the right person. Hours are
Mon-Fri afternoon and early evenings.
Send resume to: Eastern Carolina Eye
Center: Att: Clinical Director, 2573
Stantonsburg Rd. Greenville, NC 27834.
$ Services
' Offered
I Jowiilo
GUITARS - I will buy yours, or I'll sell
you mine, or we can talk Trade, I sell
cheap! Call Eddie (919) 637-6550.
1992 GENERAL 14 X 70 $19,750. IM-
MACULATE CONDITION. Very comfort-
able. Special built. Many extras, ready to
move in. Located in nice mobile park in
Greenville. Ideal for students or family.
Suitable for NC Coast. Interested parties
call 919-778-8553 or 919-731-6075 for
more information.
FUTON FRAMES FROM $79. Black iron
frames from $129. Futon mattresses from
$69. Compare and save Bedroom Con-
cepts 756-3161.
NEED HELP ON GETTING THOSE
PAPERS TYPED? Call Glenda at G. S.
Typing Services. "Affordable Rates. Call
Today - 758-7653 and Evenings (919) 527-
9133.
NEED A PLACE TO HAVE A BIRTH-
DAY OR PRIVATE PARTY??? We have
everything you need to make yours a suc-
cess Call 7584591 or John at 7524715.
24hr. SPORTS HOTLINE: ScoresPoint
Spreads Trivia Games 1-900484-6000 Ext
7042 $2.99min. Must be 18 yrs. old
Procall Co. (602) 957-7240
WATERBEDS FROM $239. Compare and
save M-F 11 to 6 & Sat 10 to 2. Bed-
room Concepts 756-3161.
WINDSURFER Fanatic Lite Viper. 4
sails. 2 booms & other misc. items. Mint
Cond. $1,000.00 OBO Call 756-2719 or
756-9039
TWO BIKES FOR SALE: have flat tires
$50.00 each call 756-7167
INNERSPRING SLEEP SOFA with 2
matching chairs- GOOD CO NDITION. Ron
or Chris Robinson - 752-8585 or (even)
321-8480.
BRASS BED, QUEEN SIZE wDeluxe
orthopedic mattress set, in Factory Box ,
Never Used. Cost 750; 300.00 cash. (919)
637-2645.
DAY BED WHITE IRON AND BRASS.
2 orthopedic mattresses. POP UP
TRUNDLE, in Box Never Used. Cost 700;
325.00 cash. (919) 637-2645.
FOR SALE: Electric Range - $150. Bert's
6FT Surfboard $150, Large Dorm Sized
Refrigerator $75. 758-8975.
MOUNTAIN BIKE N1SHIKI ARROYO
S250.00 O.B.O. 754-2111 Ask for Scott
Advertising Deadlines
Fall and Spring
Friday at 4:00 p.m. for
Tuesday's issue
Tuesday at 4:00 p.m.
for Thursday's issue
Display Advertising
DC ads may be cancelled
before 10:00 a.m. the day
before publication. However,
no refunds will be given.
Terms are subject to change without
notice.
Circulation and Distribution
g FALL AND SPRING
s Tuesday and Thursday '
�? 12,000 copies per issue
IT
Office hours are
FALL AND SPRING
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
For more information, call ECU-6366
'5
Advertising Services
Line Classified Rate
(25 words or less)
Students $2.00
Non-students $3.00
Each additional word $.05
Display Classifieds
$5.50
All DC ads will not exceed
two column inches in width
or five column inches in
depth.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
A'
tue4dzcf
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
wishes to welcome all students to ECU
and invites you to worship with them.
Sunday Masses are at the Newman Cen-
ter, 953 E. 10th Street (2 houses from the
Fletcher Music Building). Time: ll;30am
and 8:30pm. For more information, please
call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olymics will be conducting a Soccer
Coaches Training School on Saturday,
September 23rd from 9am4pm for all in-
dividuals interested in volunteering to
coach soccer. We are also looking for vol-
unteer coaches in the following sports:
basketball skills, team basketball, swim-
ming, gymnastics, powerlifting,
rollerskating, and bowling. No experience
is necessary. For more information con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 830-4551.
STUDENT ATTORNEY GENERAL &
STUDENT PUBLIC DEFENDER
Applications are available today in the
Dean of Students office (209 Whichard).
These are stipend positions. Applications
are due August 30.
TAE KWON DO CLUB
We will be holding our first meeting and
demonstration on Wednesday Aug 30 at
8:00pm. Ask that old members attend a
meeting Thursday night. Aug 24 at 8:30.
Both will be held in kChr istenbury Gym.
Rm 112. Any questions, please contact
Terrance Evins, Club President at 353-
0926. All Student s and Faculty are invited
to come.
FOOTBALL PICK'EM ENTRY
FORM
Football enthusiasts can pick-up an NFL
ECU Football Pick'em Entry Form from
We Also Buy
gold
silver
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FR110-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CrTY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
204 Christenbury Gym on Monday, Au-
gust 28. Select the winning football teams
and you will be eligible for prizes. For more
information call Recreational Services at
328-6387
RECREATIONAL SERVICES CLUB
PED KICKOFF
Interested in joining a walking club and
winning prizes? Come to Recreational
Services Club Ped Kickoff August 28 at
5:30pm in Christenbury 102. During this
meeting you will bet your walking papers,
receive instruction on walking posture,
shoes and much, much more. For more
information call Recreational Services call
328-6387.
BUSCH GARDENS
The Natural Life Club will be going on a
day trip to Busch Gardens on Saturday.
September 23. The cost is only $28, which
includes your ticket and transportation.
Sign-up in Christenbury 204 before Sep-
tember 20 at 5pm. For more information
call Ernest Solar at 752-7530.
tue&dacf
NATURAL LIFE CLUB MEETING
The Natural Life Club will be having its
first club meeting on September 6 at 8pm
in Christenbury 102. We will be discuss-
ing ideas for upcoming Fall Activities.
REMINDER: There will be an Officer's
Meeting on August 29 at 7pm in
Christenbury 102.
VIDEO YEARBOOK
Have you seen it? Are you in it? Have you
picked up your FREE copy? ECU'S pre-
mier edition of our video yearbook- The
Treasure Chest! To get your free tape,
bring your student ID by the Media Board
Office, or The East Carolinian, 2nd floor.
Student Publications Building(across from
Joyner Library). Hurr y while supplies last





MMHiMfei � �
Mmmmmmmmm imHii in - mimmm�m
mOmtk mm, mnmm
- r
18
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
77?e fast Carolinian
ALUMNUS from page 3
elected.
"I am the only Gheen in the
phone book and I will always return
a phone call he said. "1 encourage
everyone to contact me to voice
their concerns, to register to vote
and get involved with our commu-
nity
After speaking to his own
graduating class about civic respon-
sibility, Gheen decided to act by be-
coming involved in the community.
"Our generation must begin to
act now if we truly hope to repair
the deterioration of our neighbor-
hoods and communities Gheen
said. "We can no longer afford to
defer action to others in hopes that
they' will set things straight. We
must take responsibility for the fu-
ture now
Gheen plans to lower taxes and
get tough on property crime. Dur-
ing holidays like Thanksgiving and
Christmas, property crime picks up
dramatically, according to the
Greenville Police Department.
Gheen said that his neighbor-
hood is particularly hard hit because
thieves know most residents are
away on break.
"The young people in my dis-
trict are the most vulnerable to vio-
lent crime and theft he said.
"Criminals know when they leave for
the holidays. Young people deserve
to be protected, and by increasing
our security, we can protect the
entire community.
"By enlisting our involvement,
we can capture or deter criminals
that come to our neighborhoods
looking for easy prey
If elected, Gheen hopes to put
more watch groups in effect.
People returning from down-
town late at night are often victims
of violent assault, according to the
Greenville Police Department.
Gheen plans to put a stop to that
"We cannot deter violent crime
in our community without equal po-
lice protection for the young
Gheen said. "We must establish safe
channels of communication that go
behind our current crime stoppers
hotline.
"If elected, I will personally
work with both the university and
the student population to enhance
communication and investigate vio-
lent crime he said. "We also need
better lighting in key areas and to
develop community watch programs
designed for students
Gheen hopes to change occu-
pancy ordinances that have con-
cerned many for quite a while. The
(ity forbids more than three unre-
lated people from living together.
Gheen believes many students live
in fear of eviction because of the or-
' dinance.
"I believe the landlords should
be able to lease four bedroom dwell-
ings to four renters for their mutual
protection in the agreement" Gheen
said. "I do not believe that anyone
should be evicted merely for living
four to a house.
"We have plenty of ordinances
that deal with parking, noise, lawn
care, etc that can keep our neigh-
borhoods attractive without evict-
ing. This current policy is discrimi-
natory against students and I feel it
would not withstand a court chal-
lenge
Gheen also wants to change the
noise ordinance to a higher thresh-
old if elected.
"The current noise ordinance
establishes a threshold of 60 deci-
bels, this is too low and allows the
police to disperse about any gather-
ing Gheen said. "We should raise
it slightly on weekends, and more
importantly, we should insist that
law enforcement officers actually
use the noise meters that the city
has purchased for them.
"There are many reports of po-
lice claiming that people have vio-
lated a noise ordinance when they
have failed to even bring a noise
meter. This is equivalent with accus-
ing a citizen of drunk driving while
failing to administer a sobriety test"
Next year the city will review
private property in terms of taxa-
tion. Gheen believes that because
the city has run a tax surplus over
the last several years, that it should
lower taxes.
"We just got hit with a dramatic
tuition increase and the last thing
we need is a rent hike Gheen said.
"Property tax increases are usually
passed down to renters
Gheen said he will push to make
campus a city council precinct. He
said students can be represented bet-
ter if they have their own represen-
tative.
"The students and young
people of this city total between 20-
25 thousand Gheen said. "It is un-
democratic to leave us out of city
government
"By dividing the campus into
three different districts, the city
commits political apartheid
Other universities across the
state boast former students in city
council.
"To my knowledge, two other
universities boast of a representative
on their city councils Gheen said.
"Now it's our turn to improve our
image abroad by showing that ECU
gets involved with the political pro-
cess and we vote
Gheen will run against Inez
Freidley of the ECU housing depart-
ment, Rev. Joseph Sturtz and
Mathew Koeber.
News writers needed
Would you like to write lor lie East
Carolinian! If so then drop by our offices
and fill out an application, or call Tammy
at ECU-6366.
Happy's Pool Hali
Open 7 days A week � M- Sat 9a-2a � Sun 12-12
Tuesi $1 Domestics
All Day & Night
Wedt Ladies Might
Ladies Play All Dau Free
Everudayt 32 oz. Bud draft $2.25
Jtm&-�
You'll find lots of options
in our classifieds.
8:40 Worship Service
i College Sunday School Classes
1 lam Worship Service
Kick-Off Luncheon
Join
IviAUZ&U Student
funedcotetcf dimity tU11 ttUcb S
fettmdUfi
510 S. Washington St.
752-3101
We Also Offer Adopt-A-Student
Program
Campus Commuter
Assembled Free
Ready To Ride only $199.95
Ttek � Cannondale � GT � Specialized � And More
Great Selection � Great Service � Great Prices
Extended Hours During Back To School
Check Out Our Extended Warranty
530 Cotanche St.
757-3616
215 Arlington Blvd
, 756-3301
Visit Our Outpost Trail Shop
Camping � Hiking � Climbing Clothing And Equipment
Inside Bicycle Post - Downtown
U-Bolt
Locks
$10.00 OFF
With This Coupon. Coupon Expires
10-31-95
"TXinVOp"
$24.95
With This Coupon. Coupon
Expires 10-31-95
Allen Car
Racks
With This Coupon. Coupon
I Expires 10-31-95
! TEVA Contour"
Sandals
While They Last
Not Good On Sales Items
Exp. 10-3195
Models RolierBlades &
Oxygen Inline Skates
With This Coupon. Coupon
Expires 10-31-95

i S
Presents
THE WELCOME BACK BASH
111'
mp �mm
Tlun-sikiwAiiiUisi 24ih 7pm l I pm Poolsiile
All I XI i Sliulcnls Welcome
"IihkL Iuik & Rock if Rolf"
tfreettvrfte 4 TUtet Pnetftytaou Student &muMUtitt
1526Charles Blvd.
Acims fmni Ficklcn Stadium
321-7613





19
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
irsCoutJrj
THE PROF
BY: PAUL HAGWOOD
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BY JOHN CARAVAN
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by Mark Brett
THE Crossword
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ACROSS
1 Evergreen trees
5 Old-fashioned
10 Animal fat
14 Cheese
15 Use cleverness
in escaping
16 Concerned with
17 Too
18 Boundary
19 Skirt length
20 Sent an answer
22 Material wealth
24 Chihuahua
25 Quiet
26 Lover's song
30 Despise
34 Having wings
35 Sunbather's
color
36 Certain chord
37 Topper
38 Lowers in
character
41 Eavesdropping
device
42 Venerate
44 �Aviv
45 � noire
46 Indicate
4fi Ran
50 Ceremonial
dinner
52 Golf word
53 Waiting period
56 Keep lovingly
60 Wrap
61 Diadem
63 Diva's song
64 Spew
O 1995 Tribune Madia Services. Inc.
All rights reserved.
65 Ancient
66 Man
67 Strike out
68 Adjust
69 Hem
DOWN
1 Terror
2 Not working
3 Grating sound
4 Burn slowly
5 Agent
6 Enthusiastic
7 Hat
8 Decree
9 Fine point
10 Like another
11 Distinct entity
12 Volcanic peak
13 Labor
21 Electrified
particle
JERRY GARCIA-
GRATEFUL DEAD
23 Schemes
25 Capitol Hill man
26 Dinner course
27 Eliminate a
vowel
28 Deadly gas
29 Smidgen
31 Lama land
32 Terre �
33 Put a border on
38 Prevent
39
40
43
45
47
49
51
53
Calendar abbr.
Trunk carrier?
Ribbon flower
Heavy curtain of
artillery fire
Magazine head
"Norma �"
Author Zola
Chilled
54 City in Alaska
55 Follow
56 American Indian
57 Angered
58 Carol
59 Dislike
62 Madison Ave.
output
Join th
ANSWERS
Scratch
and
Sniff
Holy Order of Comic Artist
Thats right! HOCA!
OK, So it doesn't make anv sense and what is the point?
HE POINT IS WE NEED ARTISTS That's righjjM;
East Carolinian is looking for a few brave souls EL-
to take on this awsome task, just look at these benifits!
1. Deadlines, Deadlines, Deadlines!
2. Ink Stained 1 lands!
3. A real Bonified Paycheck!
4. Deadlines!
5. Perhaps your own cult following!
So if you think you've got what it takes, 11 UN Rl AD BE10W!
Make sure all comics are drawn in a 8" x 13" space
Make sure all your work is inked inNO PENCIL)
Make sure you turn your work in at the Fast Carolinian
Make sure vou eat your vegetables
ARIES
March 21-April 20
If the pace seems hectic, take
heart�it should slow down in the
near future. Creative thinking will
also help ease the stress. You may
be able to find a shorter path from
point to point.
TAURUS
April 21-May 21
Gossiping this week has an
unintended effect, so it may be
wiser to refrain. A poor opinion
someone has already formed about
you will become set in stone this
week if you're not careful.
GEMINI
May 22-June 21
It's a good time to take matters
into your own hands and get
things settled�you'll be more
satisfied when the decision is
made, whatever it is. Manage
money carefully, because a big
purchase could be in the offing.
CANCER
June 22-July 22
Although taking a vacation this
week would be wonderful, it may
not be the responsible thing to do.
Refresh yourself with a few small
indulgences, like a hot bath, and
then plan a real trip for a more
convenient time.
LEO
July 23-August 23
A provocative encounter keeps you
guessing as the week progresses.
Subtle hints could further your
cause�just be sure that outsiders
aren't watching, or you may
attract more than your share of
attention.
VIRGO
August 24-September 22
A powerful person's act of
compassion is food for thought,
both for you and a close friend.
Take it to heart, because you may
have an opportunity to make
someone else's life easier in the
near future.
LIBRA
September 23-October 23
Maintaining a good frame of mind
may take up much of your energy.
It may be wiser to let tempers flare
and die of their own accord, rather
than trying to keep the seas calm
by force.
SCORPIO
October 24-November 22
Someone close to you may have an
attitude problem. If so. try to stay
out of their way. It's not in your
best interest to try to improve their
mood, since they may take it out
on you in a very unpleasant way.
SAGITTARIUS
November 23-December 21
The energetic approach yields great
results this week and keeps you
feeling great. A peaceful weekend
with a dear companion is advisable
as a way to maintain your good
mood and productivity.
CAPRICORN
December 22-January 20
Maintaining your self-respect
this week may be difficult, with
pressure coming from a dozen
different directions. Try to keep
your equanimity intact, and don't
sell yourself short�you can do it.
AQUARIUS
January 21-February 18
A creative solution to an old
problem earns you respect at work.
Be careful that you only take the
credit which is due you. however.
Take the opportunity to toot
another's horn if you can�it will
reflect well on you.
PISCES
February 19-March 20
Another person's mistakes may
appear to be your fault. Don't
worry, because the truth will come
out eventually. Meanwhile, take
the fallout with as much grace as
you can muster and try to avoid
pointing fingers.
For Entertainment Purposes Only










Q1
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Get ready for Fall
Bands, Bradys
and more visit
campus in the
coming months
Photo Courtesy of Random House
ECU goes Brady on Sept. 6, as Barry Williams
(Greg) arrives to speak on his career as a Brady.
Brandon WaddeJI
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Another new school year, another
opportunity to start over, another
chance to make good on all those
promises made to ourselves and oth-
ers. Many of us have such optimistic
thoughts running through our heads
as we charge fearlessly into the fall
semester.
As many student are returning
from an easy-going, vet productive
summer; the folks at the Student Ac
tivities office have been working hard
organizing different events and new
programs with eager anticipation of
the new school year.
The single biggest event at ECU
this semester will undoubtedly he
Homecoming. The week of activities,
the parade and the football game are
all traditions commonly associated
with Homecoming. But this Home-
coming. Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum will open its doors for ma-
jor music concerts periodically
through the year. The first of these
will he during Homecoming week.
Several bands such as Hootie &
the Blowfish have been invited, but
all have refused the offer to he the
first hand
to play
Williams
A r e n a .
The Will-
i a m s
venue has
approxi-
mately the
same seat-
ing capac-
ity as
Cameron
Indoor at
Duke, yet
no bands
contacted
by Stu-
dent Ac-
tivities
will take a
stab at be-
ing the
first.
Speak-
ing of Wil-
liams, ac-
tor Barry
Williams,
best-
known for
his role as
C r e g
Brady on
the '70s
era sitcom
The
Brady Bunch will be speaking on cam-
pus Sept. 6. Coincidentally, the big
screen version of The Brady Bunch
will be showing at Hendrix Theater
on the weekend immediately follow-
ing Barry Williams' lecture.
Continuing programs such as
Noon Hay Tunes and the An Evening
With series are going full steam into
the fall semester. Noon Day Tunes fea-
ture local musicians as well as nation-
ally-known folk and roots bands. Vic-
tor Hudson will start off the new sea-
son of Noon Day Tunes and local fa-
vorite Keller Williams is also sched-
uled to perform this semester.
The Second City is a traveling
impromptu comedy caravan that has
long been a stepping stone for cast
members of Saturday Night Live.
Many comedic favorites such as John
Belushi and Dan Ackroyd are prod-
ucts of The Second City. "It's their
55th Anniversay Tour and tickets will
he ottered to students dirt cheap. At
around S4 it's an event students can't
Reviews
Leftover Salmon
Ask the Fish
Jay Myers
Staff Writer
Wh
ented biui
Scent were I
r till
Buffet!
-tal
calist Sammy Hagar? If you don't
think this sounds like a night in
Hell, then you'll probably like Left-
over Salmon.
The band describes their mu-
sic as "a fusion of Cajun. funk, blue-
grass, reggae, zydeco, rock and
polka 100 percent Polyethnic
Cajun Slamgrass" and this is the
first tip-off that something just isn't
right with them. Much like "Sumo
High-Diving" or "Luge Bowling
this musical hybrid might be funny
in a 50 second beer commercial, but
not as a 67 minute album of live
music. It falls flat because these
styles really aren't made to work to-
gether.
It just so happens that the
band is a hybrid, too. It's a combi-
nation of two other Boulder. Colo-
rado hands: The Salmon Heads and
the Left Hand String Band (hence
the band name, leftover Salmon).
This mixture doesn't work either.
One band plays Cajun music, the
other plays bluegrass. and from
what I i an tell only the bluegrass
hand has any talent. In fact, of the
If) songs on the album, only three
are any good and those are the blue
See I.KIT page 30
afford to miss stated .1. Marshall, as-
sistant director of Student Activities.
This event as well as a performance
from comedian Chris Rock will be fea-
tured comedy in An Evening With
this year.
Student Activities also axed a few
programs this yeai Club 7:37 is an
example ol a program that did not
make the cut.
All these programs and activities
are paid tor by the students. Its im
portant for us to attend as many of
the campus activities as possible. Stu-
dent Activities won't know what types
of programs are popular it we Jon t
give some input be it negative or posi-
tive. It's our campus, it's our money,
but it's also our responsibility to sup-
port our programs.
Sunday
in the
Park
Children root around in
the grass at the
Greenville Town
Commons while the
band entertains their
elders at Sunday in the
Park.
Photo by KEN CLARK

f
'Tft&ttie 1R.eALeo(i
� �" ������������������� �;�
Costner drowns in Waterworld
Photo Courtesy of Universal Pictures Presents
An angry Mariner (Kevin Costner) rages in preparation for a savage attack on evil in
Waterworld. This still photo is about as exciting as Costner gets in the ultra-expensive film.
Our reviewer finds
the Waterworld
epic just plain silly
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
Waterworld. the 17" million
dollar Kevin Costner action picture.
has made a splash at t1 . box office
in its opening weeks. Though the
film will not be one of the big block-
busters of the summer (like Apollo
13 and Batman Forever) it will he a
nominally successful film.
But a critic must look beyond
the hype, the propaganda, the nega
tive press and the bloated budgets
to the film itself.
:npt dt
id of logic
rmance a
and a silly StOI v.
Kevin t. ostnei has dl the cha-
risma of a tuna m Waterworld.
Though his character aptly named
the Mariner, is written as an aloof
hero Costner cannot convincingly
portray this disinterested loner.
The story itself is full ol gaps
in logic. The setting for Waterworld
is five hundred years in the future
and only the bare essentials remain.
Dirt is a previous commodity and
the Manner (Costner) even recycles
his urine for drinl i. Yet
cigarettes abound, Costner's leading
ladv (Jeanne Tripplehorni has
shaved leg
he getting enough to eat though the
food source is only hinted at (think
big fish).
The Manner also has an under-
First, the negatives: Costner's water exploring vessel yet he would
need it
which allow him to breathe under
By the way, how could gills
appeal in one generation? The Man
ems to have no others like him
yet his mutation certainly gives him
a select i intage. The
scriptwritei lientiy break the
laws of evolution. In addition the
.hole search for dry land r
around the map tattooed on a little
girl's back (Tina Majorino) that con-
sists of a single arrow. I had trouble
understanding how such a map
would be useful to anyone.
The silliness ol the story hits
its peak near the end of the film
Though the action sequences look
fantastic, the ending will leave au-
diences scratching their heads in
wonder The film also bortows so
See WATER page 30
Money management made easy
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Unless your father is a million
aire or you somehow manage to win
big on the lottery, the chances of be-
ing broke at least the majority of your
time in Greenville are almost absolute.
Atter you've been in town a few
weeks, you'll notice the horde of
people who swarm the downtown area
virtually every night of the week
spending money. Though profitable
for downtown merchants, it is rela
lively easy for students to become
enthralled in the excitement and
spend the entire month's budget in a
single weekend.
One of the first tasks for many
students is obtaining a pei
ing account. Superficially, this sounds
like an easy assignment hut then is
much more at stake than meets the
eye.
"Student; illy freshmen,
tend to have trouble budgeting their
money said Barry Allen, a branch
manager at tinted Carolina Bank. "In
most tases. it is the lust time they
are managi . iwn money. The
most important factor I can stress is
the importance ol keeping accurate
records so problems such as NSFs
Non-Sufficient funds or bounced
checks and trouble with the Credit
Bureau do nut occui
When looking for a hank to open
.m account, keep Mas in mind
bant . ' youi bu
so don t go insidi their building un-
informed One suggestion emphati
ulted bank
it-i resenl
w 11! i
So;
include the following:
� Is there a flat month
the checking account?
� Is there a limit on the number
of checks written monthly?
� Does the u count -1 me with an
ATM card?
�If so. are the bank's ATM ma-
hines lose to campus?
� Is there a
call for 2 houi u ount information?
� Is over-draft, lilable
on the account?
Out-of state students who open a
local checking account may n
b more informed than their ii
terparts. Al :
Bank, for tiistan an out ot
5tat check is processed into a
�Mi ac i
1 limp ��: the Bucket" is
what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
1 like birthdays. The idea of
commemorating the anniversary
ol someone's birth puts our lives
in some kind of historical context
and gives us a sense of perspec-
tive.
In that vein. 1 like to see if
my friends share birthdays with
famous people. For instance, my
mother was horn on the same day
as Ronald Reagan, while my grl-
friend shares historical space with
actor Anthony Hopkins and Sir
William Cull (the Victorian-era
physician who many people think
was secretly Jack the Ripper).
Most of my friends have the same
birthday as somebody famous.
Not me. Not a single interest-
ing person who ever did anything
even remotely cool was born the
same day as me. When I was
younger, this kind of ticked me
off. I'm a Leo. for Cod's sake!
We're supposed to be leaders of
men. real take-charge types. But
nobody cool was ever born on
Auk. So much for astrology.
But as 1 got older. I did a little
digging and discovered some-
thing. Though nobody interesting
was ever born on my birthday,
some pretty interesting stuff did
happen. I; fact 1 found that 1 was
born on the anniversary of some
of the most heinous events in
modern American history.
On Aug. 9, 1945, America
dropped the second atomic bomb
on Nagasaki. Japan. The
Hiroshima bomb of three days
earlier had been sufficient to send
Japan scurrying to the negotiation
table. In fact, Japan's leaders were
about to surrender uncondition-
ally when the Nagasaki bomb
dropped. We knew the incredible
destruction the bomb was capable
of. hut we dropped it anyway. For
nvincingly good reason.
It that's not enough to tum
your stomach, on Aug. 9. 1969,
the Manson Family committed the
infamous Sharon Tate murders. In
the course "t this crime, a hahv
was lipped from its mother's
womb in one ol the most gro-
tesque displays ot violence in the
last .i' I years
i n a lighter note. Richard
Nixon resigned from the Presi-
on Vug 9. 1974. The scan
n wilding this action ruined
ins' faith in our po
litical system M own father
' oted since
now. .in ug 9.
Sec DROP page 30





t.
.
mrwrn
22
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Dance the night away
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
So, it's Saturday night and
you've got nothing to do. You could
spend the evening getting some
work done or playing a little
Parcheesi with your pals. Or, you
could join the majority of the ECU
campus in downtown Greenville.
Conveniently located within
easy walking distance from campus,
downtown is the legendary place
that earned ECU its "party school-
reputation. Most of the town's bars
are there, and nearly all of the fa-
vorite student hangouts.
What follows is an overview of
the downtown experience. All estab-
lishments listed welcome everyone
18 and over, but remember to bring
an ID; downtown bouncers don't like
underage drinkers. This piece might
seem to be for new students only,
but even downtown veterans might
want to keep reading. A few changes
have occurred over the summer that
may affect your weekends in the year
to come.
The Attic: The biggest venue
for live music in town. Ten years ago,
REM hit the Attic stage on a regu-
lar basis. Last year it was Hootie and
the Blowfish and Dave Matthews.
Not every band you'll see here will
become huge national stars, but you
might enjoy them anyway.
Peasant's Cafe: Every college
town has its Deadheads, and this is
where ours hang out. If you're
granola-crunchy, wear tie-dies and
are into Native American outer wear,
this is the place for you. Peasant's
features live music and sometimes
strays from its low-key regulars to
bring in cool weirdos like the King
Missile, who are scheduled to hit the
Peasant's stage in October.
O'Rockefeller's: RIP. That's
right, Greenville's home of alterna-
tive music has died an untimely
death. Rumors abound as to what's
replacing it, but the inside word
is that O'Rock's will soon be a
dance club.
Sports PadSplash
Sharkey's: Three, three, three
bars in one! Sports Pad is
your basic pool room. Splash
boasts seats and the occasional
live music performance in one
room, and pool tables as far as
the eye can see in the other.
Sharkey's features yet still more
pool tables and, of course, a bar.
The Elbo: For reasons known
only to the gods, the Elbo is where
most partying ECU freshmen hang
out. Generally, the Elbo plays Top
40 dance music. Tuesday night is
freshman nifent; Thursday night is
rave night. It's known as "a good
place to meet people
Kelly's: RIP. Yes, Kelly's has
also gone the way of all things. In
its place will be two new establish-
ments: The Underwater Raw Bar
and Graffiti's.
Wrong Way Corrigan's: A
blues-rock bar with comfortable
booths, Corrigan's caters to a
slightly older crowd than many of
the downtown clubs.
The Cellar: Located beneath
the Attic, the Cellar offers three
rooms with three different types of
music. One room is country, another
dance and the third, rock. The at-
mosphere is like the Elbo, but with
a twist (and fewer underagers).
Happy's Pool Room: The name
says it all. A great place to soak in
some "local color
The Percolator Coffeehouse:
Greenville's very own hip coffee joint
rolls on this fall. The Percolator of-
fers an alternative to the beer-swill-
ing may-
hem of the other
down-
town
bars.
Its
spite the frightening amounts
of caffeine being consumed by the
patrons. On a typical trip to the Per-
colator you'll meet poets, professors,
punks, frat boys. Deadheads, artists,
intellectuals and just plain folks who
like a good cup of Java.
Alfredo'sAlfredo's II:
Alfredo's is a tiny little pizza joint
with a really good juke box. You can
barely get in the door after 2 a.m.
Alfredo's II, next door, is a small bar
that attracts an odd assortment of
students. It's usually packed to ca-
pacity.
BW3: A buffalo wings restau-
rant that doubles as a bar at night,
BW3 offers comfortable seats and a
trivia game that can be played on
any of the TV sets scattered around
the room.
Well, that's about it for the
downtown bar scene. Expect to
come home from most of these
places tired, sweaty and reeking of
cigarrette smoke. If that's your cup
of tea, pick a likely environment and
dive in. If not there's always
Parcheesi.
Klein accused of kiddie porn
NEW YORK (AP) - Denounced by
some child welfare experts as kiddie
porn, Calvin Klein's latest jeans ads
seem to be about everything but jeans.
Taken by Steven Meisel, the pho-
tographer who shot Madonna's "Sex
the photos feature pubescent boys and
girls, some of them posing with a "Yo,
come hither look.
One boy isn't wearing jeans at all,
just underpants and a vest In other
cases, underwear peeks suggestively
from beneath jeans.
Although the ads are on television
and in magazines, their appearance on
150 New Yoik City buses ignited de-
bate about sex, youth and gender roles.
The Daily News quoted four child
welfare experts Friday condemning the
ads as something akin to soft-core por-
nography.
"He really scraped the bottom of
the barrel rape prevention specialist
Iona Siegel told The Associated Press.
"He's made kids sex objects and
put their pictures in a place where other
kids will see them, with the crotches
and belly buttons and hair and teeth
and those very sexy expressions
Such controversy seems to be
Qah-in Klein's M.O.
Earlier ads featured a welklevel-
oped Marky Mark, the rapper, in briefs,
and the not-so-developed Kate Moss in
provocative poses, including naked with
a large dog. Then there's Brooke
Shields, who will always be remembered
as the 15-year-old of "Nothing comes
between me and my Calvins
In New York, some people scrawled
"FEED ME" on posters featuring Moss'
waiflike body. And this week a group of
San Franciscans hung posters with the
words "Emaciation Stinks" printed over
a nude photo of her.
Klein's office issued a statement
that claimed the latest jeans ads were
inspired by "the strength of personal-
ity and self-knowledge of young people
today What these people show is that
they know how to act, how to control a
situation and how to respond in their
own way
The models were described as
"regular people not professional mod-
els, but Klein's company would not give
their ages.
In response to the uproar, NYC
Transit said the ads will be reviewed.
But Transit spokesman Tito Davila
added that court rulings have given tran-
sit system advertising First Amendment
protection.
He said the ads were approved by
a private agency, which is obliged to
follow guidelines barring "false, mislead-
ing or deceptive advertising, and obscen-
ity as defined by New York law (Trans-
lation: Just about anything goes.)
FREE PREGNANCY TE&T
while you wajj
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209-B S.Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
757-0003 Moigriday
STU DE NT I I TE I A RY ARTS MAGAZINE
Rebel
Pick us up annually in the Spring to view a showcase of
campus literary and artistic creations.
EAST C A R O I I N A UNIVERSITY
MEDIA
FOR ADOmONAl INFORMATION, (Ml32B-6009
STUDENT
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Tuesday, August 22
New Year's Party
at Mendenhall
Cravin' Melon
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Big Stoner Creek
at Peasant's Cafe
Wednesday, August 23
Noon Day Tunes:
Victor Hudson
outside Mendenhall
Comedy Zone:
The Fat Doctor
at the Attic
Moe
at Peasant's Cafe
Entertainers
at the Hilton
(beach music)
Thursday, August 24
Dillon Fence
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Agents of Good Roots
at Peasant's Cafe
Panama Steel Band
in the Hilton
Movie:
Legends of the Fall
at Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall
Friday, August 25
Chairmen of the Board
at the Attic
(beach music)
Ominous Seapods
at Peasant's Cafe
Movie:
Legends of the Fall
at Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall
Saturday, August 26
H.O.R.D.E. Festival featuring:
Blues Traveler
The Black Crowes
Ziggy Marley
and the Melody Makers
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
Breakfast Club
at the Attic
('80s retro)
Knocked Down Smilin'
at Peasant's Cafe
Movie:
Legends of the Fall
at Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall
Sunday, August 27
Jimmy V Celebrity Golf
Classic Benefit
Hootie & the Blowfish
Edwin McCain
at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
in Raleigh
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If
so, please send us information (a
schedule would be nice) at
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
Men's Hairstyling
222-D Cotanche St
758-3802
Clipper & Scissor
fxx� $7.00
Sl gl Comer of 3rd &
JcWaNcWst.
WS5
Cotanche
Ron Nichols
If It Dosen't Say
Jiffy Lube - It Just
Isn't Jiffy Lube
Every 3000 Miles
SERVING YOUR
NEIGHBORHOOD
FOR OVER
8YEARS
GREENVILLE � 126 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
756-2579 READY IN MINUTES �
NO APPOINTMENTS
r$T9T.99"i
(most cars)
Complete
Oil
Lube And
Fluid
Service
With Coupon Only � Not
Good With Any Gcher Offer �
Bottled & Synthetic Oil Extra
Offer Expires 10-2-95
I�
DISTINGU
MEMBER
LIVE
AND
LEARN.
We've made it a lot easier
Your biggest concern as a student should be your studies � not the cost of a checking
account. East Carolina Bank has taken care of that expense for you.
With our University Club Checking account, any full-time student is eligible for a
checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking at any automatic tefler machine at
no extra charge, no-fee traveler's checks and a free order of 50 checks.
If you maintain a $100 minimum balance in the account, there are no service charges.
We also don't limit your checkwriting or ATM withdrawals.
Make life easier. Try University Club Checking.
The
East Carolina Bank
Red Banks Road Office
1001 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC 27858
919-355-8200
University Medical Center Office
2400 Stantonsburg Road
Greenville, NC 27834
919-752-6609
'Minimum balance required is $1 CO or average balance of $300. If balance requirement is not
met, fees assessed are: $5 per month and $.35 per debit.
Member FDIC
m m





" :?-
,wmm�mm.mm-
77e fast Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
23
Summer review 1995
Brandon Wadded
AMsh tant Ufestyle Editor
Aimlessly walking around
campus on rst day back to
classes? Today most of us are
completely absorbed in trying to
figure out the perfect fall class
schedule; some students compla-
cently returning to the Emerald
City after a summer hiatus may
wonder about what memorable
events they missed.
It was summer, therefore
only a fraction of the student
body was even here. The live
music scene was an overwhelm-
ing hit; there was something for
everyone. Staccato's continued
its jazz gigs twice a month, pre-
senting the ECU Faculty Jazz
Band. They've has been so suc-
cessful that Staccato's requested
the band to play every Thursday
night this fail instead of every
other Thursday night
Local businessmen Lee
Crumpton and Paul Edwards pre-
sented the Home Grown Music
Festival during the second week-
end in June. The event drew a
huge crowd despite that fact that
so few students attended ECU's
first summer session. The Festi-
val consisted of nine bands play-
ing simultaneously at the Attic
and Peasant's both weekend
nights. With the closing of
0 Rock's, these two nightclubs
continue to be the only places
to see live music in the down-
town area.
Last month The Texas Two
Step hosted a hardcore hoedown
to benefit PICASO (Pitt County
AIDS Service Organization). Though
the underground music benefit had
plenty of good intentions, this day-
long music event simply didn't get off
the ground due to lack of support
from hardcore music enthusiasts.
North Carolina's own Edwin
McCain Band soothed a savage crowd
at the Attic If local music history tells
us anything, we've probably seen the
last of Edwin McCain as they and their
rootsy sound are likely play much
larger venues in the near future. The
band recorded its full length major
Pie Photo
On the Fourth of July, the Greenville nightlife was alive with fire
in the sky instead of the rowdy whoops of downtown resellers.
label debut in Los Angeles over the
summer, which included the song
"Solitude" (recorded with Darius
Rucker of Hootie & the Blowfish).
Should Edwin McCain have half the
success of Rucker's band, the next
time we'll see the Edwin McCain Band
will be at Walnut Creek.
Speaking of the Creek, the Ra-
leigh amphitheater's summer sched-
ule included acts such as Melissa
Etheridge, Live, Phish, Elton John,
Dave Matthews Band, Hootie & the
Blowfish and the Lollapalooza tour.
Many ECU students were seen pass-
ing each other back and forth on
Highway 264 as a flock of cars left
Greenville for Raleigh every night
Walnut Creek presented a show.
And, of course, Greenville put on
its annual Fourth of July fireworks
display to a thrilled audience at the
Town Commons.
The best part of the summer
scene is the fact that it's over. Now
that everyone is back, live music
should quickly improve with student
support
Bloody new novel satisfies
Ronda Cranford
Staff Writer
In the mood for a grisly tale?
Feel like curling up with an intelli-
gent, seductive old world serial
killer? You're in luck. Andrei
Codrescu's The Blood Countess is
just what you need.
Codrescu has done a wonderful
job of crafting a sympathetic char-
acter out of Countess Elizabeth
Bathory, a Hungarian noblewoman
who allegedly murdered young girls
and bathed in their blood as a rem-
edy for aging. What else was a girl
to do in those dark days before Estee
Lauder? She also had powerful
friends, one of whom was an alche-
mist devoted to the cause of mak-
ing her live forever. Failing that, he
endeavors to bring her back from
the dead in present times.
The story unfolds as Elizabeth's
descendant. Drake Bathory-
Kereshtur, confesses his sins and the
story behind them to a judge in New
York. Drake, who fled from Hungary
to escape the communists, was sent
back to his native land to report on
life there after the fall of commu
nism.
Because of his
royal blood, he is
sought out as a pos-
sible future king. In
spite of not wanting
to be drawn into the
politics of his home-
land, he gets swept
up in the political
drama taking place
there. He also plays a
critical role in resur-
recting his famous
and bloodthirsty an-
cestor.
Drake seems to
be drawn in by fate.
He is eventually ma-
nipulated to commit a
terrible crime, and
while we are deeply
disappointed in him
it's hard to lose faith
in his essential goodness. After all,
he does confess to the crime when
he could have easily gotten away
with it Good and evil characters are
hard to label in this book.
Between the chapters dealing
with Drake's confession, Codrescu-
paints a picture of the life of Eliza
b e t h
Bathory be-
ginning at
the age of
nine, when a
peasant up
rising forced
her and her
sisters to
flee their
castle and
hide in the
w o o d s'
nearby
Elizabeth
wanders
away from4
the group
and so is
spared when
her sisters
are found by
the rebel
peasants.
She watches as they are raped
and killed. We watch as she grows
up in a world full of political in-
See BLOOD page 29
She watches as
her sisters are
raped and killed.
We watch as she
grows up in a
world of political
intrigue, where
the advent of
Christianity has
undermined the
power of women.
Japan offers action alternative
Dale Williamson
Staff Writer
There is-light beyond the cin-
ematic horizon. To much delight,
Japanimation has become very
popular in America recently. As a
result, Japanese animated films are
becoming more and more accessible
here in the states, and they are of-
fering thirsty Americans an alter-
native to much of the dry-rotted
fluff Hollywood is dishing out.
One recent U.S. release in the
wonderful world of Japanimation is
Ninja Scroll, a tasty treat you can
only find on video. Centering on
the classic tale of good versus evil
and backed by fluid animation, this
film should find a secure home with
American audiences.
The story revolves around a
young Ninja-for-hire named Jubei
"in'iiqif
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aged, Yoda-like Ninja master in an
effort to stop the Devils of Kimone
from overtaking the established
clans of Japan. Along the way, these
two are joined by Kagero, a beauti-
ful woman warrior who suffers from
a rather frustrating condition: any-
one who makes love to her dies. As
one character states, "She is per-
fect in this amoral world
As opposed to much of the dis-
jointed movies out this summer,
this story is solid, focused and well-
paced. Writerdirector Yoshiaki
Kawajiri manages to fill his film
with many dazzling action se-
quences without sacrificing his
characters. Jubei is a reluctant hero
with a haunted past, but he is also
someone who is sympathetic
enough to see the good inherent
in Kagero.
Suffering from a desire to love
but being unable to do so. Kagero
exudes the strength and stubborn-
ness of a human being unwilling to
reveal her true emotions. In one of
the more disturbing scenes, Kagero
is nearly raped by a demon until
Jubei rescues her. However, the ;
woman warrior refuses to break
down in tears until her rescuer
leaves her alone. To reveal such
emotions would only reveal her
own weakness, and that is a weak-
ness she has trained to silence.
Both Jubei and Kagero are
stubborn characters, but the sexual
tension existing between the two
is intense. When Kagero discovers
that the only way to stop a poison
in Jubei's blood is for her to make
love to him, Kawajiri creates one
of the most romantic moments in
recent cinematic history.
See NINJA page 28
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r
24
Tuesday, Ausust 22,1995
The East Carolinian
Lollapalooza f95 surpasses prior outings
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
I I've been in the underground
too long.
. I had this revelation while walk-
ing the promenade at Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre during this year's
Lollapalooza Festival. The sun was
beating down hard and I was sur-
rounded by a sea of people who sud-
denly seemed very, very young.
- I saw guys dressed like the Crow
and girls in Tank Girl combat gear.
I,saw women wearing bikinis with
hiking boots and men in dresses.
Black kids, white kids, Asian kids,
couples younger than me with in-
fants strapped to their backs, Indian-
style. Goths, skins, punks, preps,
Hell's Angels, frat boys, Deadheads,
burn-outs and ravers. One million
tow-headed Bobby Bradys out to
enjoy a little subversive youth cul-
ature.
None of it fazed me.
I've seen it all before. Even the
Ifllew youth culture fad of dressing
H
�to look like you're 14 doesn't seem
very extreme compared to some of
Jfee excesses I've been privy to. So
Uhen I found myself immersed in
"this sea of people trying to be shock-
ing, I found myself feeling well,
t$ise somehow. I felt like some kind
jjjf Zen master, so at home with ab-
surdity that I just found it all amus-
rZ Satisfied that the youth culture
"Was getting along fine without me,
I settled in to enjoy the show.
�� The action started ac a little af-
Sfcer 2 p.m. with ska kings the Mighty
Mighty Bosstones. Considering the
popularity of ska in what's left of
;tte underground, it's way past time
"Collapalooza featured a little
skankin' music in its line-up.
l Ska is an odd mix of reggae, big
3&nd and punk styles, and the
Bosstones are generally hailed as
.the music's goodwill ambassadors.
t They put on a good show at Wal-
mit Creek, keeping the crowd mov-
ing with a barrage of
high-energy tunes.
From my vantage
point on the hill, I
could tell that about
half the audience
had no idea who
these guys were. But
by the third song,
most of those people
had picked up the
beat. That's impres-
sive crowd control,
considering that the
Bosstones generally
play nightclubs the
size of the Attic.
Another club
band making the
arena transition was
Jesus Lizard. Their
heavy, syrupy style
wasn't everyone's
cup of tea, but the
set was well-played
and, overall, impres-
sive.
Next up was
Moby, a techno-rave
act who replaced
Elastica, who had in
turn replaced the
pregnant Sinead
O'Connor. Moby's
set was surprisingly
entertaining, considering the repeti-
tive nature of rave music. Moby
made the obligatory attacks on Jesse
Helms that have become a
Lollapalooza standard, but he ham-
mered on it for so long that it be-
came tedious. When he lit into a
cover of "Sweet Home Alabama I
fled to the second stage.
Once there, I caught one of the
day's highlights, the Mike Watt set.
Formerly of underground legends
Firehose, Watt played his jazz-tinged
rock with the confidence of a vet-
eran.
Next on the main stage was
Beck, whose set was not nearly so
lethargic as I expected. The extra
energy paid off; Beck won over a lot
of the crowd.
BOOK
AREHOUSEI
jms e UmmU (V
QfMfrnH) NC 27IM
(MJSW7W
i0-90
OFF

Photo Courtesy of Mercury Records
Ska music ambassadors The Mighty Mighty Bosstones opened a
rousing afternoon of performances at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre.
Even more lethargic than Beck,
surprisingly, was Pavement. Nor-
mally a dynamic live band, Pavement
lulled the crowd on the hill into a
myopic stupor with a set that was
not only slow but sloppy. That said,
I must add that I really enjoyed the
Pavement set After a hot afternoon
filled with high-energy sets, we
needed a break, a chance to lie back
and rest up for the rest of the
evening.
It's a good thing we had that
break, too, because Cypress Hill as-
saulted the stage next. Their set was
bouncy, they made Walnut Creek se-
curity really nervous and the crowd
came to their feet. After they rolled
a giant bong on stage, I kind of got
the idea that these guys might like
1

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to smoke a little marijuana every
once in a while.
Next up was the most contro-
versial act on the tour, Hole. Say
what you will about Courtney Love's
personal life, or her bratty rock star
antics. That has no bearing on the
fact that Hole is a damn good rock
and roll band, and they put on a
good show at Walnut Creek.
There were no big surprises in
the set; Hole played a big block of
stuff from Live Through This and
played it well. There were no daz-
zling solos or enlightening varia-
tions on the songs, but Hole's a
punk band. They played up to their
ability, and that's all I really ex-
See LOLLA page 29
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��PBB





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22,1995
25
Sandra Bullock gets caught in a complex Net
Ike Shibley
Senior Writer
ECU grad Sandra Bullock won
audiences' hearts this spring with
her performance in While You Were
Sleeping. She was recently the sub-
ject of a Hard Copy story, has been
on the covers of many magazines,
and now has a brand new movie in
theaters called The Net.
Cox Floral Service, Inc.
Welcomes ECU Students & Personnel
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Fresh Variety of Flowers to Choose From
Can Send Your Flowers all over the
World Via F.T.D.
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117 W. 4th St.
Greenville, NC
758-2183
In The Net Bullock portrays
Angela Bennett, an introverted
computer systems analyst who un-
knowingly stumbles across a top
secret computer disc that has the
capability of accessing almost any-
computer system in the world.
As The Net opens, a high rank-
ing White House Cabinet member
commits suicide. It turns out that
the politician had been informed
that he had tested positive for HIV.
The information the politician re-
ceived was incorrect, however. The
data in the hospital had been
changed because someone knew
the outcome if the data were al-
tered.
Angela has a copy of the disc
mailed to her by a hacker friend.
Her friend's single-engine plane
crashes before he can ever talk to
Angela, thus leaving Angela in the
dark about the peril she may face.
BOB BABBOUB
HONDA


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Hondas
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We Make All Options Available
WELCOMES
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Students &
Faculty
Present Student I.D
to receive 10 Off
Ports and Service on
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3300 South
Memorial Dr.
Greenville, NC
27834
355-2500
September at
THE ELBO
Monday
Monday Night Football! (starts Sept. 11)
FREE Papa John's pizza plus hot dogs and other
snacks each week. grab your friends and bring
your four man team to play ntn's qb-1 for the
end of the season grand prize of 500.00 cash
plus the 10.00 whkly prize. you can also
register each monday for the carolina panther
Weekend! (tickets for 2 plus hotel accommoda-
tions!)
1.00 bottle beers and hi-balland many other
specials too!
Tuesday
Back by Popular Demand!
The Kdge Club Returns with ECU's
best Hi Knefgy dance night! The best
in the house euro techno, tribal and
Trash Disco. '�
1 Coors Light Draft Beer all night!
Try the all new E-phoria shot for 1.00!
-plus botilt beer and hi-ball specials too!
Wednesday
Classics Night
ECU'S favorite Fun Night for over 20 years!
the best chart topping hits from the 70's &
80's plus all your currant favorites tool
1 Coors Light Draft Beer all night!
1.25 Bottle Beers
2.50 Teas
& Five 75 shot flavors just for you!
September Special Events!
Sept. 7th fall BIKINI contest
Sept. 28th Sorority pledge of the year
Sept. 30th RAVE until dawn!
Thursday
Ladies'Night
Ladies' in FREE all night with all your
favorite drinks on special.
2.50 All 16oz. frozen cocktails
3.50 Frozen Pitchers of Margaritas
1.25 16oz. Sex on the beach
1.50 Ice Cream Shots
Light draft and bottle beer specials too.
Guys bring your ECU I.D. & get in for
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Rush Hour FREE Admission
for members and 2.00 for guests
til' 10:30pm, and 1.00 off til' 11pm
every Friday Night! We have a dif-
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Night, so come in early and start your
weekend off with the best in 70's, 80's
and 90's dance music!
3.00 Pitchers of Bud Light
(cups of draft are on special too!)
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Saturday
Saturday Night Fever
All the dance favorites from the
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1.50 16oz. Coors Light
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1.50 Buttery Nipple & ice cream
shots
draft Beer Specials plus Lots of prizes
everySat. Night!
Angela only slowly awakens to the
danger she is in. After a foiled at-
tempt on her life, Angela's records
are completely erased so that in the
eye.s of the state and country, she
no longer exists.
Angela elicits the aid of a
former boyfriend (Dennis Miller in
a pleasantly subdued role) upon re-
alizing the hopelessness of her situ-
ation. Angela spends the rest of the
film trying to elude the police while
trying to stop the owners of the
disc from killing her.
The Net is not nearly the show-
case for Bullock that While You
Were Sleeping was but it still al-
lows her to shine. Bullock in front
of a computer screen can seem as
captivating, even more so, than the
overblown chase scenes in the film.
Bullock again conveys the honest
integrity that is quickly becoming
her trademark. The audience can
relate to Angela because of
Bullock's sensible and honest por-
trayal.
Jeremy Northam has been re-
ceiving positive reviews for his role
as the killer assigned to eliminate
Angela. I, however, found his per-
formance rather staid. He never re-
ally exuded evil. I was not con-
vinced that he was falling for An-
gela early in the film. The audience
needed to believe that his infatua-
tion with Angela could impair his
judgment. Northam's character was
also too bland, but then so is the
entire film.
Irwin Winkler directed The Net
as if directing a regular episode of
Starsky and Hutch. The chase
scenes are amateurish and boring,
the bad guys have no development
(I could not even figure out what
they would do with the disc), and
the pace of the film is languid to
the point of boring. Winkler could
have made a much better film had.
he concentrated on Angela faking,
a fire alarm so she can obtain in-
formation from a computer. And
near the end she outwits the bad
guys with a disc containing a virus
But these scenes account for
only a small fraction of film time.
Too much time is wasted on
Angela's relationship with her
would-be killer and on scenes in-
volving the police. The ending of
the film, which takes place on a
catwalk, is especially derivative and
dull.
The Net will probably help
Bullock's career because she proves
again that she can carry a film.
Hopefully in the future she will also
be given quality scripts and qual-
ity directors to work with.
On a scale of one to ten, The
Net rates a five.
TWICE-WEEKLY CAMPUS NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and
information about campus issues and activities.
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wm.ammmm
26
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Time-Warner sued over controversial rap lyrics
NEW YORK (AP) - Already un-
der fire for its artists' violent and
sexually explicit lyrics, Time
Warner asked to review new mate-
rial by Tha Dogg Pound but was
rebuffed by the rappers, a music
Industry source said Friday.
Interscope Records head
Jimmy lovine - who has worked
tfrivia Qvd
Today's Topic:
TV Sitcom Names
1. What is the full
name of the Skip-
per on "Gilligan's
Island?"
2. Name the town in
which "Petticoat
Junction" is set.
3. Name the kids
from "Family Af-
fair
4. Name five sitcoms
starring McLean
Stevenson other
than
"MASH
5. What was the
name of
Meathead and
Gloria's baby on
"All in the Family?"
Answers on page 28
with Bruce Springsteen and U2 -
said this week he would not give
in to the Time Warner request.
"Asking to listen to our artists'
lyrics or music content prior to
completion would be disruptive and
counterproductive lovine told
The Wall Street Journal. "It would
also go against everything
Interscope has stood for since the
day of its conception
lovine was out of his Los An-
geles office Friday, and Interscope
officials would not comment fur-
ther. But the source, speaking on
condition of anonymity, confirmed
the story.
Will Tanous, director of media
relations for the Warner Music
Group, wouldn't comment.
Tha Dogg Pound is the latest
group of gangsta rappers from Dr.
Dre's stable of West Coast rappers,
which already includes the plati-
num-selling Snoop Doggy Dogg and
Warren G.
1
Snoop's album "Doggy Style
with its violent and misogynist lyr-
ics, became the first debut record
ever to enter the charts at No. 1. It
featured guest appearances by Tha
Dogg Pound, whose upcoming al-
bum is titled "Dogg Food
Word of Time Warner's efforts
to review Tha Dogg Pound's lyrics
left some in the rap industry won-
dering about its chilling effect on
other rappers.
"This is without precedent
said veteran rap publicist Bill Adler.
"It would be comical if it didn't
have such an impact. You can't tell
me that one of the chief reasons
for the decline of the West is rap
music
Time Warner is a 50 percent
owner of Interscope; the Los Ange-
les-based Interscope is trying to
buy back Warner's interest in the
company. lovine and department
store executive Ted Field turned
Interscope into a money-maker
since opening the label just five
years ago.
Interscope, in addition to han-
dling Dre's Death Row Records,
also represents jailed rapper Tupac
Shakur and alternative rockers
Nine Inch Nails. Both Shakur and
Nails' leader Trent Reznor have
come under attack for their explicit
lyrics.
Senate Majority Leader Bob
Dole and former Education Secre-
tary William J. Bennett are among
those pressuring Time Warner to
stop distributing such music.
The showdown between
Interscope Records and its major
label partner follows a pair of Cali-
fornia lawsuits filed against anti-rap
activist C. DeLores Tucker, head of
the National Congress of Black
Women, and Time Warner.
On Thursday, Death Row
Records sued Tucker, Time Warner
and two company executives for al-
legedly launching a smear cam-
paign against rap lyrics. Interscope
had filed a similar suit two days
earlier.
Natural life I �
s�Ar
35 of Americans do not drink alcohol. Of those who do
drink, 10 account for half of the alcohol consumed.
-NIRSA Natural High
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Regjsterin 117ChristenburyGym by September 1 for this adventure trip offeredSeptember8-10.
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The residence hall kickoff event of the year!
Call Recreational Services at 328-6387 or stop by room 204
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'�
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
27
Networks offer more than sitcom stupidity in fall
NEW YORK (AP) - On the evening
of Jan. 9. 1967, TV showed its colors
and they were all the same.
That night, two networks pre-
miered virtually identical - and similarly
awful - sitcoms: "Mr. Terrific" (CBS)
and "Captain Nice" (NBC). This sitcom-
synchronicity lasted seven 'months un-
til, on the night of Aug. 28. both series
bit the dust a half-hour apart
Even so, three decades later much
of TV's creative community is still aw-
fully me-tooistic. This is evident as the
networks begin rolling out 27 new
sitcoms for the 1995-96 season.
Granted, some people are trying
to travel off the beaten path. I was re-
minded of this a few days ago when I
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saw the pilot for "Emmett and Earl
one prospective series that manages to
break loose from sitcom copy-catism.
Not that "E&E" escapes the con-
ventions of the sitcom. Anything but It
draws on the classic sitcoms of the
1950s: their simplicity, sweetness, un-
apologetic silliness. It's about two work-
ing-class (though not always working)
joes who are trying to get ahead or,
barring that at least get by.
Free of cutting-edge humor, self-
conscious irony or breast jokes.
"Emmett and Earl" is not onry funny,
but for sheer originality probably
eclipses anything viewers can look for-
ward to this fall.
Which is to say, "Emmett and Earl"
won't be found on any network's lineup.
It was one of many pilots pitched to
CBS. CBS said no.
There may be life in "E&E" yet
HBO has displayed interest in picking
it up. For now, however, the TV audi-
ence faces another season of numbing
predictabiliby - maybe even more so
than in the recent past
One obvious reason is the smash
success last season of "Friends which
has spawned umpteen clones of en-
semble buddy sitcoms (only television
could tum friendship into a tiresome
trend).
Yet all is not lost On the schedule
are four new sitcoms that at the least
seem to have been created somewhere
other than on a petri dish.
In two instances, "seem" for now
is the operative word: No pilot episode
has been made available for "The
Bonnie Hunt Show" or "If Not For You
both on CBS.
Student Discounts Available Witn Valid Student ID
Call 1-800-830-4822
Attention Students
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But in both cases, the shows have
persuasive names attached.
"Bonnie" comes from David
Letterman's
Worldwide Pants
production com-
pany, which (as its
sidelined "Emmett
and Earl" amply
demonstrates) is
stubbornly insis-
tent on trying new
things.
'Bonnie
Hunt" also boasts
herself, an improv
comedienne who
starred in the de-
lightful sitcom
"The Building" a
couple of seasons
back.
This time
Hunt plays a cor-
respondent for a
Chicago TV sta-
tion, and all of her
"news" reports
will be improvised
with ordinary people on location.
Sounds risky - and promising. It pre-
mieres Friday, Sept 22.
Premiering Monday, Sept 18, "If
Not For You" is a romantic comedy star-
ring Elizabeth McGovern. That is all you
need to know, and this: Larry Levin is
the series' creator.
Free of cutting-
edge humor,
self-conscious
irony or breast
jokes, "Emmett
and Earl" is not
only funny, but for
sheer originality
probably eclipses
anything viewers
can look forward
to this fall.
No, you may have never heard of
him. But Levin has been behind some
of the freshest, funniest - albeit short-
est-lived - comedy
shows of recent
years. His latest
was the gently
madcap "Bakers-
field P.D of two
seasons ago.
In short any-
thing Le-in does
deserves a look.
There is more
tangible evidence
- their pilots - to
recommend an-
other pair of up-
coming sitcoms:
CBS's "Almost Per-
fect" and NBC's
"The Single Guy
Perhaps the
premise for "Al-
most Perfect"
sounds groaningly
contrived: SHE
writes for a TV cop
show. HE'S a cop.
How will they carve out time from their
demanding, sometimes conflicting work
lives for love?
What makes this ordinary idea,
well, almost perfect is its execution.
Stars Nancy Travis and Kevin Kilner are
See SIT page 29
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Message Service
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Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
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r "i i. � r ii � r-i y - ii.
wmmKmammmmm

28
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
NINJA from page 23
However, what will make audi-
ences take notice of Ninja Scroll
is the nonstop action. To achieve
their goal, our trio of heroes must
defeat the eight demons of Kimone,
and these demons must be seen to
be believed. We are introduced to
such nasty villains as a tattooed
woman whose snake tattoos come
to life, a quasimodo-like menace
with a beehive for a hunchback, and
a shadow demon who kills his vic-
tims with a clawed projectile.
On top of that, our reluctant
ninja hero has to face a classic chal-
lenge from a blind swordsman who
proves that sight is overrated when
it comes to sword fighting. Also
worth a mention is the climatic
battle between Jubei and the head
demon, which is more satisfying
than any other action sequence out
this summer.
Trivia Answers from page 26
The violence, a topic of concern
for many Japanimation films, is
graphic but never excessive.
Kawajiri creates a disturbing and
violent world effectively and pro-
vides his heroes with overwhelm-
ing obstacles to overcome. The end
result is a thoroughly quenching
ninety minutes of unrelenting ac-
tion.
If you're a fan of the action
genre and this year has been a bust
for you, then try an alternative to
what's playing at the local theater.
Instead of spending five bucks on
the latest brain candy from
Stallone, take a trip to the under-
ground and get a full meal from
such goodies as Ninja Scroll. It's
cheaper, more exciting, and (heaven
forbid) might be a totally new view-
ing experience. On a scale of one
to 10, Ninja Scroll rates a nine.
L Jonas Grumby. But you can call
him "Skipper just like Barbie's kid
sister.
2. Hooterviile. It's amazing the
name made it on the air in the '60s,
considering that the show's focus was
on three buxom southern belles who
liked to skinny-dip in the town's wa-
ter tower.
3. Buffy, Jody and Sissy. Extra
points if you remembered Uncle Bill,
Mr. French or Buffy's doll Mrs.
Beasley.
4. "The McLean Stevenson
Show in which McLean plays the
owner of a hardware store.
"In the Beginning with McLean
as a cranky old priest
"Hello, Larry" (the king of bad
sitcoms), featuring McLean as a talk
show host
"Condo with formerly rich
McLean moving (you guessed it) into
a condominium in a Mexican neigh-
borhood.
And, finally, "Dirty Dancing
with McLean as the hyper-protective
father of an oversexed teenage daugh-
ter.
All of McLean's shows went down
in flames just like the helicopter that
took his "MASH" character
(Henry Blake) to sitcom heaven.
5. Joey Stivic. The kid later grew
up to be an annoying sitcom brat on
the spin-off series "Gloria
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Sunday. August 27. 1995
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Monday & Tuesday
August 28 & 29 � 7:00Pm
Faith Assembly Of God
1503 Hooker Road � Greenville.
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Free Admission
For More Information Call
(919)756-7676
Faith
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College Class Sunday School 10:00 Am
Sunday Worship 11:00 Am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 Pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 Pm
Located Next To Walmart On Hooker Road

� �� �-






The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
29
We knead an copyeditor
two fix hour mixtakes .
Requirements: jt Z0
' Excellent grammar skills
� ECU student
� 2.0 GPA or better
� Available Sun. & T�esM
or Mon. and Wed. afternoons
Call Stephanie Lassiter at 328-6557.
VAL-U-STOP
2753 E. 10TH ST. BESIDE
COLONIAL HEIGHTS SHOP.
CENTER
CONVENIENCES
BUDWEISER MOLSON MOLSON ICE
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BLOOD from page 23
trigue, where the advent of Chris-
tianity has undermined the power
of women in society. Elizabeth
learns the ways of the old religion,
which glorifies the female and which
the Christians call witchcraft.
The larger theme at work in the
story seems to deal with oppression.
These royal characters, while they
hold positions of privilege, are nev-
ertheless oppressed themselves.
They are exploited because of their
stations. Elizabeth is born in a soci-
ety that thoroughly oppresses
women, and frustration with this op-
pression is partly what drives her to
commit such appalling crimes - she
persecutes others in search of a feel-
ing of power.
Drake grows up in a communist
society that hates aristocrats. He
grows up an outcast and this cre-
ates the weakness in him that leaves
room for evil to manipulate him later
on. All of this takes place against
the political backdrop of Eastern
Europe, where oppression and
bloody uprising have been going on
for centuries. The most deadly op-
pressors were once oppressed them-
selves.
The chdiacterization of these
complicated characters is brilliant.
Through them, Codrescu raises
some interesting questions about
the nature of evil. The events that
occur within the plot are graphic,
fantastic and grotesque, while re-
maining believable. The fact that the
novel is based on a real figure from
history adds to its disturbing qual-
ity. C tdrescu balances the tension
between the alternating Andrei
�m
ITS EASY TO EAT
av?tcio;
Piiiiii
DINING
With seven convenient campus locations, Campus Dining Services makes eating
on campus at East Carolina University easy. The Campus Dining meal card
makes that even easier!
For more info on how to get your card, call 328-4286, or stop by the Office of
Campus Dining Services in Todd Dining Hall.
)pnesc Stck House
Welcomes Students
back to Greenville with a 10 discount for all
Students with I.D.
Offer good thru Sept. 12, 1995
After a long day in claJej our Chefs make you laugh
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Countess chapters well - it's easy
to frustrate readers with this kind
of structure if both characters aren't
equally engaging. On the whole, The
Blood Countess is a giuesome and
absorbing read.
SIT
from page 27
irresistible not only to each other but to
the viewer. And the writing zings.
Carve out time for the premiere Sun-
day, Sept 17.
"The Single Guy" begins with an
even weaker proposition: a
thirtysomething bachelor whose married
friends keep fixing him up.
But as with "Almost" that objec-
tion is moot thanks to sharp writing and
a skilled, attractive and high-energy cast
of actors, led by Jonathan Silverman as
the fellow his friends want to see walk
down the aisle.
"The Single Guy" premieres Thurs-
day, Sept 21.
LjJRj�jA from page 24
pected.
Strong as the Live Through
This songs are, I was disappointed
that Courtney and company didn't
play anything from the first Hole
album. Pretty on the Inside. As a
lyricist (and a good one), Love may
feel removed from that material,
dealing as it does with coming-of-
age traumas and general depravity.
Still, this long-time Hole fan would
have loved to hear "Teenage Whore"
or "Star Belly live.
The best moment of the show for
me happened about mid-way
through, when Love took the stage
alone with her guitar and played
Nirvana's "Pennyroyal Tea Far from
being an exploitation of her dead
husband, Love's performance of this
song (about the problems that drove
Cobain to suicide) was heart-rending.
Not nearly so heart-rending, but
every bit as awe-inspiring, was Sonic

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m
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Mill!
Youth. People flocked from the
Amphitheatre during the first 10 min-
utes of this edgy set. Sonic Youth's
sound is not particularly user-
friendly: raw, sharp noise and struc-
tured feedback are definitely not ra-
dio iare.
It must be an acquired taste, be-
cause I tHink Sonic Youth easily put
on the best set of the day. leaving
every other band at the show in their
dust. Opening with "Sister from
their 1986 album of the same title.
Sonic Youth immediately pleased
their long-time fans and probably left
much of the crowd feeling perplexed.
The set roared on with a long
list of tracks from the band's long
career. Highlights included the
Sonic Youth anthem "Teen-Age
Riot" and Kim Gordon's aggressively
sensual performance of "Bull in the
Heather
But the real center of attention
for me was guitarist supreme
Thurston Moore. Not fitting the ste-
reotypical image of a guitar god,
Moore looks like everybody's kid
brother. But put a guitar in his
hands, and he turns into Jimi freak-
ing Hendrix.
Moore's performance held me
transfixed as the band soared off
into crazy noise fests like nothing
you'll hear from any other band in
existence. The final song sent me
and several of the people around me
into another dimension. As a friend
of mine said, it was a religious expe-
rience. I haven't been able to take
Sonic Youth out of my CD player
since.
If Thurston Moore isn't the best
living guitar player on Earth, I'd like
to know who is.
With a performance like that to
top the day off, I must say that
Lollapalooza '95 was a rousing suc-
cess. Easily the best show since the
first, this year was a vast improve-
ment over the increasingly disap-
. pointing shows of the last five years.
For the first time in two years,
I'm looking forward to next year's
Lollapalooza. It's a good feeling.
it.
fp -
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE, NC
The Best of All Request & Live Entertainment!
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mmmmmmm
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Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
WA1 IlK. from page 21 LEFT from page 21
heavily from other films that noth-
ing original is given to the audience
to savor. The film seems like a com-
pilation of other, better films.
But those negative aspects of
the film, which are definitely prob-
lems, still cannot detract from the
three main positive aspects: incred-
ible sets, great action scenes and a
magnificently evil villain.
The sets in Waterworld will
dazzle the eye. An atoll made of
trash, where an early confrontation
occurs, looks appropriately shabby
and lonely. The floating garbage
heap seems to be the only sign of
humanity for miles. The desolation
of the atoll looks so frighteningly
real that it alone can make one wary
of the future.
The Mariner's boat is another
spectacular eyecatcher. At the begin
ning of the film, the Mariner must �
speed away to avoid a group of pi-1
rates who call themselves Smokers, i
The sails unfurl in a wondrously
grand fashion, allowing the Mariner
to escape. The Smokers' home base.
an old oil tanker, also provides an
appropriately grungy set for the fi-
nal confrontation between the mari-
ner and the Smokers.
Waterworld is. at its heart, an
action film. Just like Mad Max (and
the sequels) and Aliens, the science
fiction aspects of the film get up-
staged by the climatic battles be-
tween good and evil. Chases be-
tween boats and wave runners,
fights between the Smokers and
their victims and fights between the
Mariner and just about everyone in
the film provide the punch in
Waterworld. Even the poor story
cannot detract from the action
scenes once they begin. The script
seems to be only a poor excuse to
fill the gaps between the action.
Dennis Hopper quite easily
steals the acting kudos in
Waterworld. 1 have long maintained
that a film with a credible villain,
one you love to hate, can get by on
that villain alone. Dennis Hopper, as
the Deacon, does the equivalent of
a perfect dive by making the Dea-
con so outrageously evil that the
audience cannot help but laugh at
him.
The Deacon is about to kill a
man when the man reminds the Dea
con that he promised not to kill him.
"Did I?" asks the Deacon, somewhat
confused. "Ah. maybe I did. I don't
know. Here he says as he hands
the gun to one of the Smokers to
kill the man instead.
At another point the Deacon
asks a 10-year old girl if she would
like to smoke. "Never too early to
start he sneers with a mellifluous
growl.
Waterworld will probably stay
afoat at the box office for a while
yet. Though not a great action film,
it manages to upstage many of the
other action films of the season, and
in doing so provides the viewer with
a nice summer diversion.
On a scale of one to ten,
Waterworld rates a six.
grass tunes. "Bend in the River
"Lonesome Road" and "Rocky Road
Blues
The major reason the rest of the
album can't succeed is the fault of
the abominable lead singer. Vince
Herman. He does a really good im-
personation of another Vince - Vince
Neil. This is not a good thing, by the
way. There's a reason you won't find
Motley Crue playing zydeco or blue
grass in this millennia or the next.
This Herman guy has a background
in improvisational acting, and he uses
this "talent" to ruin every possibility
this band and live album might have
had.
They need to fire Herman and
let the much more proficient har-
mony singer. Drew Emmit, take over.
He has a wonderful Wuegrass voice
that is reminiscent of a young Bill
Monroe, and he plays mandolin,
fiddle, flute and guitar.
Nevertheless, the choice of mu-
sical style on this album wastes
Kmmit's talents. In fact, the Leftover
Salmon's banjo player, Mark Vann.
is also a tremendously talented mu-
sician who is misused. He has won
top honors at the well-known Tellu-
ride Bluegrass Festival, but only on
a few numbers can you even hear his
playing through the morass of "cre-
ative live noodling" on this album.
The only reason I can find to ex-
plain why this band got together in
the first place is that they are trying
to capitalize on the new surge of
bands riding on the coattails of the
Grateful Dead, such as Widespread
Panic. Phish and so on. This is evi-
dent in the fact that their fans are
called "Salmonheads much like
"Spreadheads" or "Phishheads
However, they've got a lot of changes
to make before they can expect to
make any real money with that
crowd.
All in all, I can see why this
salmon was leftover and not finished.
It leaves an incredibly bad taste in
your mouth (and your ears don't feel
so great, either).
DROP
from page 21
Grateful Dead frontman Jerry Garcia
died.
Okay, maybe that's not so hei-
nous.
I've never been a very big fan of
the Dead, and so maybe I'm not the
best person to eulogize Garcia in print
But then again, maybe that detach-
ment makes me the perfect person.
No offense to the late Mr. Garcia or
his many fans, but all good things
must come to an end.
The Grateful Dead made a lot of
sweet music and definitely added
something irreplacable to the-rock
world. They spawned one of the big-
gest counter-cultures in the world and
encouraged such subversive practices
as the sale of bootleg live recordings
for their fans.
By all accounts, they were nice
people who just wanted a little peace
in the world. And that's a good thing.
But they hadn't cut a really good
album in years. Their musicianship
was as strong as ever, but some of the
creativity of their earlier years seemed
to have left them. It was time for the
Grateful Dead to rest.
So mourn Jerry Garcia. He was a
rr.an worth mourning. But just be
thankful that he didn't carry on until
he became a joke.
Now if only Keith Richards and
Mick Jagger could leam that lesson.
I'm not sure what all that has to
do with birthdays, except perhaps that
they get the better of us all eventu-
ally.
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Specializing In Orthopedic & Sports
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Location:
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Costwise providers for Blue Cross State Health Plan
For Appointment Call ECU-4135
ATTENTION Ail STUDENTS
- -
Invites You To Join Us As We
Kick Off the Semster
Thursday Night, August 24th at 7pm In the General
ClassroomBuilding Room 1017
Friday Night August 24th Pizza Party
(to be announced at meeting)
For More Information Call Eddie and
Kathryn Hilliard at (919)321-6262
Welcome Back ECU
At hi-lites, we're excited about being a part
of the Greenville community for over 7
years. The hi-lites staff extends a special
invitation for you to come shop with us.
hi-lites values are known in Greenville and
throughout Eastern North Carolina with
nearby stores in Washington, New Bern
and Kinston. We're certain you'll discover
that our prices-$7, $10, $12, $15-stand
for excellent value and quality everyday.
Remember hi-lites when you are looking
for the newest trends in fashion for all your
campus activities, hi-lites fits everyone's
lifestyle with Junior, Misses & Plus sizes.
Come see us whether you're shopping for
back to campus trends, your working ward-
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brand fashions are simply irresistible.
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Juniors, Misses,
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Regular Store Hours
I0am-8pm Mon-Sat
1pm-6pm Sunday
.� V





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Page 1 11,1)

ECU Athletics A-Z
If you can't be an ECU athlete, then be an athletic supporter. Here's a quick A-B-C'&of
how to be a true Purple Pirate throughout next season's football season.
z � Athletic Department Ticket Office. Here, along with Mendenhall Student Center, is where you can pick up your free ticket for every home
football game starting a few days prior to the game.
D � Busted. Public Safety got you for underage drinking. If you're 21, remember to carry your ID as you frolic through the tailgating fields. If
you're under 21, it can get risky. Besides, they'll make you reluctantly pour out your cup in front of them. That's more painful than
getting a ticket
L, � Coach Steve Logan. Took a 2-9 squad and turned them into last season's 7-5 Liberty Bowl competitors in Memphis, Tennessee.
U � Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. Home football stadiurriQor your ECU Pirates. They're going to expand in a couple seasons, so fill the stands they
have a reason.
L � "Experience the Excitement �1995 ECU football team motto. The Sept. 16 home opener with Central Michigan won't be as exciting if we
kick off with an 0-2 record.
i � First Down � Pirates! (You'll learn)
(jr � You can bring Grills to cook while tailgating � but let's not burn the woods down, OK?
11 � Half-price ticket. When you get your freebie, you are allowed to purchase one for nine bucks for a friend, grandma, or even your pet chimp
Wait a minute � animals aren't allowed to roam Dowdy-Ficklen (Unless it's a seeing-eye monkey.)
I � The University of Illinois. Whipped the Pirates badly in the aforementioned Liberty Bowl, but will host the Pirates in a rematch on
September 23.
J � Jerris McPhail. Must step up play to help ease the graduation of ECU's all-time leading rusher Junior Smith in the Pirate backfield.
ix. � Kegstands in the tailgating area before all the football games. Kegs aren't allowed anymore. Games will start at two, so you might not wafiJ to
make this buffet your breakfast of champions. Editor's note: Parents, please use the Armed Forces "don't ask, don't tell policy Thanks.)
Liberty Bowl. We lost 31-0. Nuff said.
Ill
IVi Mike" linebacker BJ. Crane. Fun to watch play, even more fun to interview after a Pirate victory. The senior ranked second on last year's
squad with 79 tackles.
IV � Not a good idea to play frisbee golf during tailgating. Leave the discs at home Saturday, but bring them back Sunday to play through the'
endless piles of trash left on the fields. Better yet, clean up your trash on Saturday so there is no problem.
L � Only a certain amount of half-price tickets are available for each game, so line up early. Once they're gone, they're gone.
I � Porta-potties, good idea. Bushes and trees and behind your car, bad idea. Getting ticketing for public urination isn't a great way to start your
college career. Although the lines may be long, it'll be worth the wait.
ifJ � A new Homecoming Queen and King will be crowned during halftime of the Oct. 21 ECU-Temple matchup.
I � Road trip! September 2 against Tennessee. Grab a few people on your hall that you don't really know yet and head to Knoxville.
i � Student gates. These are specially-marked to reduce the amount of time to get in and out of the stadium. You won't be able to get in the
other ones, so don't bother trying. Once you get in, you can sit wherever you want on the student side.
1 � Tailgating takes place everywhere, but the two fields near the intersection of Charles and Greenville Blvds. are the major congregation sites.
The Frisbee Golf course is on the left hand side, while freshman parking is on the right, so you might want to move your car somewhere else
before the crowd gets there.
Underneath the stadium stands, the faithful Pirate fan will find restrooms, snack bars and souvenirs. Use the stairs, though, don't go the
back way. That whole gravity thing comes into effect when you're on the top row of the stadium and try to climb down, even if you are
sober.
V � Vivarin. With a weekend of tailgating, football and nightlife, Monday morning's 8 a.m. test will come along much quicker than you think.
VV � "Wine and cheese" fans. Typical of a UNC or Duke game. You know them � they're the ones who show up an hour into the game and leave
forty-five minutes early. Don't do it here, ECU's thrown together some electrifying starts and finishes over the years, and you might miss
another one.
A. � Xylophones! Xylophones! Xylophones! ECU's fine marching band performs at every home game.
I � Your fdjks want tickets for the big ECU-Tulsa matchup on November 11. Drop by the Athletic Ticket Office, and they'll be glad to hook you
up with seats. Or, if you don't want to worry about your parents paying you back, tell them to call 1-800-DIAL-ECU and do it.
L-i � Although you may just think you're sleepy, don't try catching any Z's in the middle of the stadium or tailgating areas. People passing out all
over campus is not a major drawing point. Wait till you stumble back to your cramped residence hall room.
17
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OF� � -��






32
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
Chancellor looks ahead
to ECU's athletic future
Brian Paiz
Senior Writer
Photo by KEN CLARK
During summer practice. Head Coach Steve Logan prepares
the '95 squad for its challenging football season.
addition of the Univesity of North
Carolina and N.C. State to our
schedules. This will be great for ath-
letics in North Carolina. This will
provide us with new excitement. We
have never lacked for excitement at
ECU. Through the good years and
the bad, we have always had good
fan support. When 1 came here in
1987, we were winning about 2-3
games a year in football, and we still
had fan support. We have also had
wonderful success with our softball.
swimming and baseball programs,
plus basketball anf football . In the
futur we are poised to reach even
greater levels.
When you sit down and start
discussing East Carolina University
Athletics with ECU Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin, a smile comes to his face.
Chancellor Eakin, who will begin-
ning his ninth year aas Chancellor
at ECU, is not only a supporter of
ECU athletics, but Mr. Eakin is an
avid sports fan. He is the former
president of the College Football As-
sociation, and now serves on the
Presidents Council of the National
Collegiate Athletic Associaiton
(NCAA). He believes academics and
athletics are suppporting partners.
He attended Geneva College, and
was a member of the basketball
team. Chancellor Eakin has a vision
tor greatness in ECU athletics, and
TEC recently sat down and spoke
with him concerning some of the
issues that are in the forfrunt for
the upcoming school year.
FUTURE OF ECU ATHLETICS
"The future is very bright. We
have had wonderful news concern-
ing our football program with the
HIRING OF MIKE HAMRICK AS
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
"I guess the deciding factor
when hiring Mr. Hamrick as athleic
director, was that he has been in the
situation where you have to try
harder as was the case at the Univer-
sity of Arkansas-Little Rock. He was
instumental in getting them into a
conference. A very stong selling point
about Mike was the way he relates
to peoplr. He is very appropriate for
ECU and Eastern NC. Mr. Hamrick
is very experienced in a variety of uni-
versities, He has the spirit and dedi-
cation and that I'm going to succeed
attitude
CONFERENCE AFFILIATION
I believe the main objective for
ECU is to have all our athleic pro-
grams in various dimensions to im-
prove itself. We have come along way.
and we still have a ways to go. I thi
if we improve all aspects of our ath-
letic program, I think a natural con-
sequence of that will be conference
affiliation. I think if we imprve in all
aspect of our athletic program, then
we will be very desirable for a con-
ference. We will be working towards
the goal of conference affiliation each
and every day.
NEW BASKETBALL COACHES
I am tremendously excited about
both coaches. Each of them bring a
sort of enthusiasm. Given there
youthful ages and experiences, they
will be very helpul to us and the pro-
gram. Clearly, they are both great re-
cruiters. They both have a very win-
ning way They will be able to relate
not only to the athletes, but to their
parents.
They both have very high stan-
dards of performance, but also very
high standards for themselves. That
came out very clearly in my conver-
sations with each of them. I believe
we have two coaches that hvae the
prospect of being very successful. It
should be very exciting to watch East
Carolina basketball in the future.
STADIUM EXPANSION
"The stadium expansion is a
project that several of us have been
working on for a long time. One of
the difficulties we saw in the expan-
sion was how we were going to fi-
nance it. As a part of the Shared
Visions Campaign, which ws now in
the excess of $50 million . we have
pledges for the stadium construction
which is getting close to in excess of
$8 million dollars. Those pledges to-
ward that stadium construction is the
main ingredient which will allow us
to go forward. The stadium will cost
about $12 million dollars, and we still
have a little to do concerning the fi-
nancial package. When we are fin-
ished with the first phase of construc-
tion we should have an additional
8,000 seats. After all phases are com-
plete we will have a total seating ca-
pacity of 60,000 seats. It is a very
exciting addition to East Carolina
University.
Away schedule a major challenge
Dave Pond
Senior Writer
"Take me to another place, take
me to another land
Tennessee. Tennessee, Tennessee.
Well, at least Auburn's not on the
schedule too.
Seriously, ECU, if they invest in
a hearty supply of earplugs to drown
out the 94,000 Volunteer fans present
should be able to hang with Phillip
Fulraer's UT squad.
The Volunteer coaching staff
took a big hit when six football play-
ers were suspended for making unau-
thorized calls on the UT phone sys-
tem. In total, 31 Volunteer athletes
were reprimanded.
"Our athletes know they enjoy a
rare privilege in being allowed to rep-
resent the University of Tennessee
Kulmer said. "We will not stand by
and allow the university's good name
to be tarnished by the actions of some
of our athletes
Free safety Jason Parker and line-
backer Tyrone Hines lead the sus-
pended group, and their abscence
could have a significant impact on the
fame's outcome. Both were named to
numerous preseason All-Star rosters.
Peyton Manning returns under
center, where he stepped out of Heath
Shuler's shadow a season ago. Man-
ning threw for 1,141 yards and 11 TDs
in 1994 (61.8 completion percent).
All-time UT leading rusher James
Stewart has left for the NFL, but jun-
ior Jay Graham (4.5 yards per carry
in '94) should be able to step in eas-
ily. Junior Chester Ford should fill the
other vacancy in the Vols backfield.
Over the last year, UT attepted
to add defensive depth. They suc-
ceeded, but were then drilled with the
suspensions. They're still tough
though, with eight starters returning
from a season ago.
The Vols return game is solid with
Shawn Summers and Nilo Silvan, but
the kicking game is questionable. The
jury's out on freshman PK Jeff Hall
as well as punter Larry Binion, both
wearing UT uniforms for the first time
in 1995.
All in all, Tennessee is a solid
team that could contend for a major
bowl berth while maintaining a Top-
10 ranking throughout the 1995 sea-
son. Most of the suspended players
return for UT's second game against
Georgia, but Fulmer's squad best not
overlook the Pirates. It could be a wild
day in Neyland Stadium.
Oh where, oh where has my quar-
terback gone
That's the tune in Syracuse camp
as the Orangemen get ready for the
1995 season. With the departure of QB
Kevin Mason, three young SU QB
hopefuls are vying for the vacant posi-
tion. Sophmore Keith Downing saw
action in four games last season but
threw just two passes, both incomplete.
"I think Downing is obviously a
year older and, from a mental stand-
point, has probably got a bit of an
edge Pasqualoni said.
So. they'll have to run. Well,
tailback Kirby Dar Dar, (who regularly
posted career numbers versus the Pi-
rates) is gone too. The outlook looks
better here then at QB, though, as
Malcolm Thomas is being touted as the
best Syracuse back since Joe Morris.
Junior Terry Morris returns at fullback
where he will be again used primarily
as a blocker.
See AWAY page 39
Logan, team to focus on
"unfinished business"
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Some head coaches would be
satisfied by the season East
Carolina's football program had last
year. They might feel content to rest
on their laurels and enjoy the post-
season banquet circuit, basking in the
glory of leading a amazing turn-
around from 2-9 to 7-5 and a Liberty
Bowl appearance. Steve Logan, how-
ever is not your typical college coach.
Logan is at heart a teacher who
began his career in education. He is
one of those people who likes to get
things done right, the first time and
if that doesn't happen then you at-
tack the problem and work as hard
and smart as you can to make things
right.
The Pirates lost 30-0 to a pow-
erful Illinois squad that featured last
year's Butkus Award winner and the
nation's sack leader humiliating the
Pirates on New Year's Eve in front
of a national television audience.
Now it is time to make things
right and avenge this loss and prove
the Pirates are not a flash in the pan
a charge the football powers that be
placed on their heads after failing to
duplicate their Peach Bowl success.
Logan is on the fast track of col-
lege coaching and besides an inno-
vative offensive mind filled with trick
plays and misdirection he possesses
a competitive spirit that he has in-
stilled in this football team. After be-
ing snubbed by the Big East Confer-
ence and Conference USA for mem-
bership prior to the bowl game and
being shut out on national televison
you could say that Logan and his
team have a healthy chip on their
shoulders.
"Unfinished business is this
year's team motto Logan said. "It
comes from the fact that our goal is
t j go tc the Liberty Bowl and win it.
We got there season, but we didn't
win the game. We want to go back to
Memphis and change things around
End of the season results may
be all that Logan needs to change
on a talented Pirate squad that re-
turns 20 positional starters and their
long snapper and holder. Players
with star quality are present at ev-
ery spot on the depth chart and this
team should have no problem equal-
ing or surpassing their production
of a year ago when they ranked
among the nation's leaders in pass-
ing offense and 20th in total defense
allowing only 119 yards per game
rushing.
Several players have received
heavy praise by various publications.
Hard hitting inside linebacker Mark
Libiano, a returning Independent
Defensive Player of the Year has been
named by the Sporting News to re-
peat that honor and quarterback
Marcus Crandell has drawn praise
throughout the nation. Auburn head
coach Terry Bowden after witness-
ing the strong armed Crandell pick
his nationally celebrated defense
apart was very impressed with the
Pirate signal caller.
'That quarterback can play for
anybody in America and be a great
quarterback in any offensive system
Bowden said.
Despite all of this heady praise
and recognition the Pirates remain a
hungry team relishing in their under-
dog status. One look in the eyes of
Libiano will tell Pirate fans that this
is no motivational toy to this team.
They believe strongly in the fact that
they are unappreciated, underated
and have work left to do.
"That loss has given us a desire
that has carried us through the whole
orrseason Libiano said. "It has nade
us work even harder than beforeand
it gave us a sense of reality in thai we
need to show up for every game It
definitely left a sour taste in my m�uth
but I think we learned something
"We will never just show up or a
game like we did at the bowl. Dur
goal is to win every game and hat
comes from preparing hard eery
week
QBs, RBs prepare for
'95 season opener
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
This is the first in a series of
articles on the '95 outlook.
Quarterbacks: Marcus
CrandeII(6-foot, 205 pound) is the
catalyst of a Pirate offensive attack
that can score faster than it takes to
pass through his hometown of
Robersonville, NC. He broke 14
school records in 1994 finishing
eighth in total offense in NCAA sta-
tistics. He draws comparisions
weekly with such names as former
Peach Bowl hero Jeff Blake, starting
Cincinnati Bengals QB, Eric Zeier of
the Georgia Bulldogs and Cleveland
Browns, Major Harris of West Vir-
ginia. Tony Rice of Notre Dame, the
list goes on and on.
The comparisons to Blake are
what interests Pirate fans the most
who remember tha magic Blake cre-
ated doing the impossible and lead-
ing the Pirates to a number nine na-
tional ranking. Many feel that
Crandell has the arm and intelligence
to do the same, if not better. Head
coach Steve Logan shares their con-
fidence in him and believes the two
Pirate stars having coached both, fa-
vor comparably.
"I wouldn't trade our quarter-
back right now for anybody in the
country Logan said. "Marcus is a
very special person, not just a foot-
ball player. He has tremendous lead-
ership skills and natural athleticism.
He is the type of player to build our
offense around
Crandell who excels in the short
passing game and scrambles well
(sounds like Steve Young of the
49ers) is determined to improve on
the deep balls and by every indica-
tion he should.
"We were about three deep balls
away from beating Auburn Crandell
said. "That's stayed in the back of
my mind
Sophomore Dan Gonzalez, a
sturdy drop back style quarterback
from Neptune, NJ had the best spring
of any Pirate QB but has limited
game experience, playing the fourth
quarter against Cincinnati in a mop-
up assignment He has made steady
improvement since coming to
Greenville and should be ready to
play on a more regular basis than last
year. Gonzalez was recruited by
Maryland and Rutgers out of high
school.
The third quarterback is tal-
ented redshirt freshman. Ernest
Tinnen a left handed gunslinger from
Burlington Cummings. Tinnen holds
nearly every state record for passing
and is in the Top 10 in national all-
time passing yards with 10.834 with
102 touchdowns. He was named by
the Associated Press as their North
Photo Courtesy of EG SID
Jerris McPhail will have some big shoes fill this fall. He will
try to take the place of ECU'S all-time leading rusher.
Carolina Player of the Year as a se-
nior M?ny expect him to be the next
great Pirate QB as soon as he be-
comes more comfortable and consis-
tent in Steve Logan's structured of-
fense and Crandell graduates.
Running Backs: With all time
career rushing leader Junior Smith
gone to the CFL's Shreveport Pirates,
the tailback spot is all Jerris
McPhail's who has waited his turn
for seemingly forever. McPhail a 6-
foot 200 pound speedster from
Clinton, NC began his career at Wake
Forest but also played basketball at
Mount Olive College as a shooting
guard before transferring to ECU in
1992. After sitting out a year as
transfer, McPhail led the Pirates in
receiving as a wideout in 1993 be-
fore backing up Smith in 1994. rush-
ing for 326 yards and had a 20 yard
per catch average out of the backfield
with two of ECU's longest offensive
plays with a 67 yard reception against
Centra' Florida and took a screen
pass 62 yards down the sideline ver-
sus Southern Miss.
McPhail who runs a blazing 4.37
40 yard dash time also has a 37.5
inch vertical leap and has won the
school's intramural slam dunk cham-
pionships two years in a row. His
versatility and athleticism shouk
enable him to equal or better anior
Smith's production with a sightly
different playing style.
"Jerris is a different style c run-
ner because he is more of a sksher
than a squirmer like Junior Saith
Offensive coordinator Todd terry
said. "He is bigger, is a iittiemore
physical and posseses flat out 9eed,
so consequently it opens up some
avenues
These avenues should lead.o the
end zone a place McPhail hoes to
reach more often in 1995. McFiail is
already drawing attention frori NFL
scouts.
Vying for the backup spt are
three talented redshirt freshma who
will see their first game actia this
season. All three have outstading
credentials and strengths to their
game, each excelling in a dierent
phase.
Scott Harley (5-foot, Dinch.
210- pound) is a brusing bac from
Neptune, NJ who is the all-tins New
Jersey career rushing leader aid was
selected by USA TODAY as tie top
player in the Garden State a a se-
nior. He is a physical player wio can
break tackles and run over lireback-
ers and defensive backs. Harlej berth
See ECU page 39





The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
33
Purple and Gold ready to fill Dowdy-Ficklen
Dave Pond
Staff Writer
In his first season as the head coach
of the Central Michigan Chippewas in
94, Dick Flynn went 9-3. won the con-
ference championship and went to the
Las Vegas Bowl.
In his second season, he returns just
eight starters, mostly linemen and line-
backers.
"We lost so many great football play-
ers, the big question is Where do we
start? Flynn said. "We lost every starter
at the skill positions
Last season. CMU totalled over
5.000 yards of offense as a team. In '95.
just 280 yards return. All-American James
Pruitt (1,891 rushing yards, 2( rush TDs)
has graduated, as has QB Erik Timpf.
Junior QB Chad Darnell went 5-for-
5 for 60 yards in limited play last season,
and is in fierce competition with
sophmore Tim Crowley and redshirt frosh
Tony Lorenzatti for playing time.
Three players are in contention for
Pruitts vacated slot, including senior
Damon Tolbert. who rushed for 106
yards in 1994. Senior Chad Frazier, a
two-year letterman. takes over at fullback
for the Chippewas.
TE Steve Kelly has the honor of
telling people that he is CU's leading
receiver returning from last season. In
'94. he caught all of three passes. Se-
nior wideout Grant Elmquist caught a
pass as well, for six yards and a TD.
CMU returns both outside line-
backers from last year, juniors Greg
Spranger and Michael Hester, but
Hester already lost his position to Nate
Simington.
Junior Con' Gildersleeve returns as
well, while Shawn Alpers and Charlie
Bush will share time at the other inside
slot after playing as reserves last year.
Both safetys are back as well, but
new comerbacks must be found. Jason
Husband, a sophomore, and freshman
Shawn Williams look to fill the posi-
tions.
With an inexperienced D-line. op-
posing running backs should have a
field day against the Chippewas. Seniors
Mitch Panchula and Carl Barth will play
tackle and nose guard, respectively,
while sophs Steve Black and Travis
Allen are candidates for the other start-
ing tackle slot
"In reality, we probably don't have
the ability to put ponts on the board
like we have the last few years Flynn
said. "The defense has to perform bet-
ter to keep us in it
A dollar is
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Other Saturdays10:00 am
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516 S.COTANCHE STREET � DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE � 758-2616
CM! lost too much to be a serious
in 1995. but will reluc-
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thn
tantt
16.
West Virginia rode a 7-6 record to
the Cat quest Howl last season, where
they were pm nnptly shut down by South
Carolina.
Seventeen starters are back for
Don Nehlen's Mountaineers, who
started slowly (14) in '94 before catch-
ing fire to earn the bowl berth.
Quarterback Chad Johnston was a
big part of that comeback, and passed
for 1,623 yards and 14 TDs. All of the
touchdowns came during the last seven
games of the season.
Senior tailback Robert Walker re-
joins Johnston in the WVU backfield,
and h nes b i regain his 993 form, when
he rambled tor 1 .2f( i yards and 11 TDs.
Last year, he recorded only 617 rush-
ing yards - without a TD.
"Robert Walker has the speed of
the elite backs, but I'm not sure if he
works hard enough Nehlen said.
"Sometimes he doesn't work hard
enough to be up there with the elite
Senior Kantroy Barber will assume
the fullback role after gaining experi-
ence there in a reserve role in 1994.
All receivers, except wideout and
1994 team MVP Zach Abraham, are
back for the new season. Senior tight
end Loett Pumell is a great all-purpose
player, and caught two TD passes in the
Carquest Bowl. He had 481 receiving
yards during the regular season.
The offensive line will be Nehlen's
main concern for the upcoming season.
Three starters are back, but the group
was very inconsistent, forcing Nehlen
to take a longer look at some of his
younger players.
"On the offensive line, we have al-
most a whole unit of seniors, but I'm
not sure they are all going to be start-
ers Nehlen said. "I'm probably most
anxious to see some of our youngsters
on the line, the freshmen we redshirted
last season
Rush linebacker Canute Curtis re-
turns after gathering eight sacks last
season, as does comerback Aaron
Beasley. who led the nation last year
with 10 interceptions.
The D-Iine looks questionable, as
does the overly-agressive attitude on the
WVU secondary. The secondary .will
probaMy come up with some big plays
this year, but will also get bumed on
more than one occasion.
The Mountaineers, with all of their
quality returnees, should be able to hold
a Top-25 record during this season.
See PURPLE page 37
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34
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
�u
PHL
NOTES
PIRATES REMAIN HEALTHY
AND FOCUSED AFTER FIRST
SCRIMMAGE
With just two weeks remaining
before the season opener with Ten-
nessee, head football coach Steve
Logan still feels as if the Pirates need
to improve in order to win. In a post-
game meeting at Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium Saturday, Coach Logan stressed
the importance of winning all three
aspects of the game.
"There are three aspects of a
football game that you have to win
in order to win the game: Offense,
Defense, and the Kicking Game
Logan said. "We won one of those
areas (today). Our offense would have
put us in a position to win, but our
defense didn't take the ball away. We
would have lost that football game.
Our kicking game lost it for us
The offense proved successful at
Dowdy-Ficklen, scoring four touch-
downs while only allowing one turn-
over, an interception early in the
game. Sophomore Dan Gonzalez led
the Pirate offense in yardage, amass-
ing 173 yards and a touchdown, while
redshirt freshman Ernest Tinnen
threw for 151 yards and two touch-
downs.
"Danny and Ernest may be posi-
tioning themselves to where they can
finish a football game for us Logan
said. "Dan had all of nine snaps last
year and Ernest didn't have any, so
we'll have to see (how things will
go)
Another pleasant surprise for
the Pirates was the play of redshirt
flanker Mike Sellers. Sellers pulled
down six receptions for 108 yards
including a 63 yard grab from
Gonzalez early in the first half.
"I'm glad to see Mike coming
along Logan said. "He is very ath-
letic and tall and he gives us some
height on the perimeter
The Pirates will open their sea-
son against Tennessee at Neyland
Stadium in Knoxville on Saturday.
Spt. 2.
ECU NAMES WILLIAMS
HEAD COACH
East Carolina University Athletic
officials have announced that Kevin
Williams, who has been affiliated
with the Kinston (NC) Country Club
as Head Golf Professional and Direc-
tor of Golf Operations since 1987, has
been named ECU's Head Golf Coach.
Williams, inherits a tradition-
rich ECU gold program after the re-
tirement of Hal Morrison in June. In
the last nine seasons, the Pirates
have captured seven CAA titles in-
cluding five straight from 1990-1994.
Williams playing experience in-
cludes winning eight Pro-Ams and
qualifying for PGA Club Pro Cham-
pionships in 1989 and 1992.
Williams resides in Kinston with
his wife, Trude and children, Patrick
(9) and Anniken (1).
ECU SWIMMER SETS TWO
RECORDS IN PAN-PACIFIC
GAMES
Chris Bembenek. a member of
the East Carolina University Swim
team, set two individual national
records for Panama while competing
for the Republic of Panama national
team in the Pan-Pacific games held
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Bembenek, who has dual citizen-
ship, swam the 100 meter backstroke
in 59:73 and the 200 meter back-
stroke in 2:12:43. Both times set new
marks for Panama.
He also was a member of the
record-breaking 400 medley team
that set a new Panama mark of
3:57:43 and placed eight overall.
Bembenek. a rising junior from
Annapolis, Md hold the ECU school
record in the 100 and 200 backstroke
and is a former Maryland State back-
stroke champion.
WIBERG NAMED ECU MEN'S
SOCCER COACH
Will Wiberg, a 1982 East
CArolina University graduate, has
been named head coach of his alma
mater's men's soccer team.
Wiberg begins his first seasonas
a collegiate head coach and will draw
from his stint as assitant coach of the
women's soccer team at SUNY-Stony
Brook from 1988-1991. While at
SUNY-Stony Brook from 1988-91.
While at SUNY-Stony Brook, Wiberg
was also an instructor in the Depart-
ment of Physical Education and
served as an assistant Director of
Sports Information.
WALKER NAMED ECU VOL-
LEYBALL COACH
Kim Johnson Walker, who served
as head women's volleyball coach at
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
from 1986-1993, has been named to
the head caoaching position at East
Carolina University.
Walker begins her first coaching
position in a Division I program and
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-
-� ������ � in iwmn I�
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
35
Attention All Students
Looking For A Church?
Invite You to Attend
REEfs VILLE
an Sunday Morning at
ELUOWSHIP
GCF Provide:
� Family Atmosphere
� College Student Ministry
� Contemporary Praise Of
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lOAm
(corner of Evans and 14th St beside
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For More Inlormation Call
Eddie Hilliard 321-6262
Olympic sports preview
Craig Perrott
Staff Writer
mmaammmmmmmmmttmmmmsrt'iimifi
MEN'S SOCCER
While the football team will have
to wait a few more years to play UNC
and N.C. State, you can catch the
Pirates go up against the Tarheels
and the Wolfpack this fall on the soc-
cer field. Natural in-state rivals UNC-
Asheville and CAA foe UNC-
Wilmingtoi also dot the schedule.
The Pirate hooters are looking
to improve on last season's 4-14-1, 1-
6-1 CAA record, although it was the
most successful season the Pirates
have ever had in its 11) year associa-
tion with the elite soccer conference.
The future looks bright this sea-
son. Over 50 percent of last year's
point production came from either
freshmen or sophomores, so look for
a more experienced team this time
The ECU Popular Entertainment Commi
ttee Presents
out. Returning this year are seniors
Drew Racine and Marc Mullin. Both
were all-CAA selections last season.
Joining them will be junior goalie Jay
Davis. Kyle England, John Swaggert
and last year's scoring leader Chris
Pagget.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
The Lady Pirate soccer team is
gearing up for their second season
ever of intercollegiate competition
after being elevated from club to var-
sity status in December of 1993.
During their inaugural season
last year, the team compiled a 2-15
record, 1-5 in CAA action. The
women are ready to rebound off of
that mark and earn some respect in
'95.
All but three players are ex-
pected back this fall. Standouts
Jameison Pierce, Heather Seanor and
Eileen Moore will not return due to
$r- 4uation, but Robyn DePasquale
and Stacey Schott, the two leading
scorers last year, are expected back
to lead the Lady Pirates.
DePasquale, despite missing three
matches last year due to an ankle
injury, earned second-team All-Colo-
nial Athletic Association honors in
1994.
VOLLEYBALL
There are some big shoes to fill
this year for the ECU volleyball team.
The Lady Pirates have vacancies to '
fill at the middle hitter and setter
positions with the loss of 1994 sec-
ond team all-CAA selections Staci
Winters and Sarah Laurent.
Losing these key players may
make things difficult this year for
East Carolina, but an excellent re
cruiting class will help fill in the gaps
as well as pressure veteran players
to be more competitive in trying to'
keep their starting postitions.
New recruits slated to play this
year are: Dori Brain, who is expected
to replace Laurent at starting line-
up in the setter position; Nikia
Ebron, who will see action at outside
hitter for the Lady Pirates; Breigri
Hickman, who could see action at
middle hitter; Kristen Meininger, who
See SPORTS page 39
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MasterCard and Visa accepted.
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36
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
The East Carolinian
GOLD from page 34
At the end of "94 most teams fig-
ured out how to stop the SU freeze-
option game plan, but coach Paul
Pasqualoni has vowed to stay with it
For this reason, building a solid O-line
should be high on the Pasqualoni pri-
ority list
Marvin Harrison returns to lead
the receiving corps, along with Sir
Mawn Wilson, Jim Turner and Deon
Maddox. A season ago, Harrison shred-
ded opposing defenses for 761 yards
on just 36 receptions (21.1 yard aver-
age).
The defensive forecast looks bet-
ter. SU is strong at linebacker, with
Dulayne Morgan. Nate Helmsley and
Antwaune Ponds leading the way.
Helmsley missed 10 games last season
with a knee injury, but Dana Cottrell
filled in nicely during his abscence.
CB Kevin Abrams and SS Darrell
Parker return to the SU secondary, and
sophomore Donovin Darius should
step in at free safety. Competition is
wide open to fill the other comer posi-
Dar Dar will be sorely missed as a
kickoff return man on special teams.
Turner will replace him as the primary
returner, while Harrison will again
bring back punts (9.2 yard average in
'94).
Syracuse returns just 11 starters,
and many young players will have to
step up play if Orangemen football is
to return to national prominence in
1995.
Hey, these guys look familiar.
As most of us know ECU and Illi-
nois met in last year's St Jude's Liberty
Bowl in Memphis. End of story.
In '95, things should be different
11 starters (six offensive) return for Lou
Tepper's squad, including preseason Ail-
American Simeon Rice, who has regis-
tered 33 sacks in 35 games for the Mini.
Senior Johnny Johnson is back for
his final season as well, after compiling
a 137.6 efficiency rating last year with
19 TDs. Junior TB Ty Douthard (765
yards) also returns, along with
sophmore Robert Holcombe. They'll
give UI a solid backfield presence
throughout the season.
The offensive line, where just two
of five starters return, is the area of most
concern for the UI coaching staff. The
experience of junior center Chris
Koerwitz and senior OT Ken Blackman,
both 300-pounders, will be essential to
the success of the team's ground attack.
If Rice wasn't enough, Kevin Hardy,
another All-American linebacker, is back
for his senior season. Hardy was labeled
the team's Defensive Player of the Year
in 1994.
"Simeon should be the prime can-
didate for the Outland and Lombaidi
Trophies, and a strong defensive candi-
date for the Heisman Tepper said.
"Hardy may be the country's best
Butkus Award candidate. He's the most
complete player on our team
Dennis Stallings, Jarrett Hansen
and David James will also see playin?
time at the other two linebacker slots.
Senior safetys Antwoine Patton
and Tyrone Washington, who racked up
tackles in 1994, both return, and are
among the best in the Big Ten.
All-time UI scoring leader and
kicker Chris Richardson has left and
Brett Larsen and Bret Scheuplein bom
hope to get a leg up on the other and
inherit the position.
Marquis Mosefy and Damein Platt
will continue to be the special teams'
return men for Tepper's squad.
Illinois looks tough, even with the
hits they took from graduation. They
have an all-around balanced attack on
both sides of the ball, and should stay
in the National Top-25 throughout the
season.
Southern Miss QB Heath Graham
set two school records (completion
percentage and passing yards as a
freshman) last season, and returns to
do it again. However, he'll be battled
by highly-touted JUCO quarterback
Chris Windsor.
Whoever the quarterback will be,
he's going to need a nice set of lug-
gage.
SMU plays seven of their 11 games
on the road this season, which is po-
tentially damaging to any bowl hopes
that they have.
"It's not fair for a football team to
have to play seven games on the road
said SMU athletic director Bill
McLellan.
Also damaging is the recent drug
problems of star tailback Chris
Buckhalter, who totaled 814 rushing
yards lastyear. He'll have to be replaced
by Harold Shaw who is almost as good.
Grahams favorite target is junior
Ryan Pearson, who reeled in 37
receptiond for 436 yards. He'll be
jkoined in the receiving corps by
sophmores Eric Booth and Harold
Shaw.
Only two things could stop the
solid offensive attack - a more solid
defense and a meager offensive line.
SMU already has one strike against
them. Coach Jeff Bower returns just
two players up front both on the left
side of the line.
On defense, All-Everything tackle
Michael Tobias is gone, leaving a huge
hole up front He was regularly double
and triple-teamed in blocking schemes
during his college career. Junior
Quentin Jackson should step up after
amassing 43 tackles in 1994.
"We do have a number of people
coming back on both sides of the ball
Bower said, "but there are some areas
- our front lines - that are critical
The Golden Eagle linebackers are
some of the best in the region, if not
the country. Fourth-year starters Eu-
gene Harmon and Albert McRae head
up an aggresive group of stars-to-be -
the four member group totaled 300
tackles in 1994.
All four starters return in the sec-
ondary' as well, including free safety
L.T. Gulley (70 tackles in '94). Derrick
Hervey led the '94 team with five in-
terceptions.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, Ausust 22, 1995
PURPLE from page 33
Even though they return 10 often
sive starters, the Temple Owls have been
picked to finished last in the Big East
by almost every collegiate magazine in
the nation.
Coach Ron Dickerson continues to
rebuild a squad that went 2-9 a year
ago, but threw the ball well and had a
great turnover ratio.
Junior Henry Burris returns under
center, where he passed for 249.7 yards
per game in 1994. He's got his top three
receivers back in Troy Kersey. Marc
Baxter and Van Johnson.
The problem here is the running
game - which there isn't one. Temple
backs managed to run for a horrendous
77 yards per game last year, and they've
got the same running backs slated to
start in 1995. Oops! No running game
again, unless someone steps up big-time.
As if that wsn't enough for Burris
and Dickerson to worry about, super
tight end PJ. Cook has moved on as
well, leaving a huge void at the posi-
tion.
Just to show how bad the running
game is, the offensive line for the Owls
is super, senior O-guard John
Summerday. who Dickerson predicts
"will be a top-round draft choice" next
year, leads the crew.
The defense is improved as well.
but the line needs to pick up the pace.
Junior tackle Andy Phipps heads the
good but unpredictable bunch.
So. where's the improvement?
"We feel we have three of the top
linebackers in the nation in Lance
Johnstone. Alshermond Singleton and
Willie Brown Dickerson said.
Johnstone led the Owls with 114
tackles in '94. while Brown will don a
Temple uniform for the first time after
lettering three times at Alabama.
Three-year vet Robert McWilliams
leads an average secondary- He'll be
joined by Allan Jackson (two INTs. 10
pass deflections last year), and new-
safety starters Ted McDuffie and Orrin
Marshman.
"I know the kids believe now that
things are different Dickerson said.
"They've gron up and they're talented.
These kids are bound and determined
to win
As long as Dickerson doesn't ex-
pect too much, this should be a suc-
cessful year of rebuilding for the Owls.
They should win a few more games but
hover right around the .500 mark in
1995.
Ust season, the Memphis Tigers
were a game away from a home-field
advantage for the Liberty Bowl before
falling at home to ECU. This year, with a
new coach and 15 starters back, they
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37
look to return.
Rip Scherer came to Memphis fron
I-AA James Madision, and has brought
back fan interest to the football-crazei
city.
QB Joe Borich returns, but m iy not
start because he doesn't fit Scherer
offensive style. Sophomore Chad Reed
and two newcomers will get long look
in practice. The Borich-led offense aver
aged just 14.5 point per game in 1994
Quitman Spaulding returns at
tailback, and should start He's quick
mobile and a great athlete - the essen
tial qualities to win Scherer's heart
Senior Ryan Roskelly pulled in 44
catches for 602 yards last season while
averaging 11.7 yards per punt return
He'll be joined by wideouts Ernest keefer
and sophs Brian Powell and Chancey
Carr.
Three starters return to a solid O
line, and should give the Scherer offense
plenty of time to work its magic.
The Tiger defense ranked third in
the nation last season, and should find
above-average success in 1995. Tackles
Tony Williams and Brian Bamett lead
the front four. Bamett finished '94 with
76 tackles, sixth on the team.
Junior middle linebacker Jesse Allen
led the team with 128 tackles, and is
sandwiched in between Richard Hogans
and Dan Bonner, both big-play makers.
The secondary could be a problem.
Memphis lost two starters in Ken Irvin
and Barry Dillard, as well as their 122
tackles and five INTs. 6-foot-4 safety
Jerome Woods will have to lead an oth-
erwise-inexperienced group.
"We want to play as aggresive of-
fensively as we did defensively last sea-
son Scherer said. "The players want
to win so badly, and that gives us some-
thing to build on
Since Scherer is such an
unpredictabe coach, it's hard to predict
how far he can take the Tigers. They've
got some quality players, and it wouldn't
be suprising to see the Nov. 18 Tigers-
Pirates matchup as the key in the Lib-
erty Bowl berth once again.
The Golden Hurricane returns 43
lettermen. and lots of them are good.
Tulsa was just 3-8 last year, but lost four
games by a touchdown or less.
The two top quarterbacks, rushers
and receivers will all suit up in '95 in a
group of eight returning offensive start-
ers. They should find at least the same
degree of offensive success.
Sophmore John Fitzgerald com-
pleted 53.3 percent of his passes last
year in a reserve role. He threw for 1,409
yards and 5 TDs - and 14 INTs. Tad
Jones, now a junior, posted better num-
bers (5 TDs, 1 INT, 785 yards, 64.1 comp.
percent) in less time, but will most likely
be a third-stringer this year.
Solomon White returns at tailback,
where he battled through a midseason
ankle injury to become a 1,000-yard
rusher. He also cught 31 passes for 181
yards.
A solid offensive line should give
White and the Tulsa QB (whoever he
is) plenty of time to work. They are led
by enter David Milwee, whom coaches
feel is the best in the country.
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�-
38
Tuesday, August 22, 1995
Summer sports
scene full of action
The East Carolinian
Brad Nelson
Staff Writer
ECU's 1995 summer sports season
started out red-hot as the men's track
team made a return trip to the NCAA
Outdoor Track and Field Championships
after posting a time of 39.63 in the 4 x
100 Meter Relay race. The season-best
time came en route to claiming the IC4A
Championships in Fairfax, Va. ECU's time
was one of the top 12 in the country.
The Pirates finished eighth in the na-
tion in Knoxville, earning them AU-Ameri-
can Honors.
"We ran probably as good as we
could in that race said ECU head track
coach Bill Carson
ECU baseball came to an abrupt halt
on May 18 after back-to-back losses to
the University of Richmond and the Col-
lege of William and Mary in the CAA
Tournament held in Kinston. The losses
dropped the Pirates record to a disap-
pointing 29-26.
"Like any good club, we had to im-
prove and we never did said ECU head
coach Gary Overtoa "It was disappoint-
ing that we were no better at the end of
the season than we were at the begin-
ning
Now, however, Overton and his
squad are looking forward to contend-
ing for the 19 CAA title and returning
to the NCAA regionals once again. With
the experience of this season behind
them and forecasts of a healthy team
ahead, ECU's baseball future may once
again shine as bright as championship
seasons of the past
In football news, ECU's aUtime rush-
ing leader, Junior Smith, found a new
home in Cajun Country when he signed
with the Shreveport Pirates of the Cana-
dian Football League Smith left ECU as
the leading rusher in school history with
3,672 rushing yards.
"Junior has been real impressive
during camp running the ball and receiv-
ing" said Missy Setters, media relations
director for Shreveport
"I believe Junior Smith will have a
lot of success in Shreveport" said ECU
assistant football coach Jeff Treadway. "I
think that he will turn out to be an ex-
cellent professional football player
The Sporting News recognized jun-
ior quarterback Marcus Crandell and
senior linebacker Mark Libiano in their
pre-season poll. Crandell is ranked num-
ber 12 in the nation among quarterbacks,
trailing Notre Dame's Ron Powlus and
Duke's Spence Fisher. The 64bot 198
pound Crandell ranked eighth in the
nation last year in total offense averag-
ing 253 yards per game.
Libiano was also ranked number 12
in the nation among inside linebackers.
Libiano has led ECU in tackles the previ-
ous two seasons and had 135 tackles last
season. Miami's Ray Lewis topped the
list as best inside linebacker in the na-
tion.
In related football news, former Pi-
rate linebacker Willie Brookins worked
out for the Carolina Panthers in their
pre-season camp in Rock Hill, S.C. An-
other former Pirate to make it at the next
level is former ECU place-kicker Anthony
Brenner, who is now kicking for Arena
Football's division-leading Charlotte
Rage.
ECU's athletic department lost an-
other great asset as Charles Bloom, as-
sistant athletic director for media rela-
tions, accepted a position in the South-
eastern Conference (SEC). Bloom came
to ECU in 1988 to fill the sports infor-
mation director position, and was pro-
moted to assistant athletic director in
June 1994. During Bloom's tenure, the
Pirates competed in Peach and Liberty
Bowls, and the 1993 men's basketball
team made a trip to the NCAA Tourna-
ment
The biggest news to hit ECU this
summer was that of the rebirth of the
Pirate, Wolfpack and Tarheel football ri-
valry. The announcement came on the
heels of numerous meetings between
ECU Athletic Director Mike Hamrick,
NCSU Athletic Director Todd Turner and
UNC Athletic Director John Swofford.
SO
Film - "Crimson Tide" Hendrix Theatre (MSC) 8 PM
BowlingBilliardsTable Tennis Mendenhall Student Ctr. 7-10 PM
Weight RoomGym Workout Chrlstenbury Gym 11AM-9 PM
Swimming Chrlstenbury Pool 11:30 AM-6 PM
121
Film "Crimson Tide" Hendrix Theatre (MSC) 8 PM
Aerobics Drop InHWo Step Garrett Hall 3 PM
Aerobics Drop InAqua Fitness Chrlstenbury Pool 5:30 PM
BowlingBlillardsTable Tennis Mendenhall Student Ctr. 7-10:00 PM
Weight RoomGym Workout Chrlstenbury Gym 11 AM-9:00 PM
Swimming Chrlstenbury Pool 11:30 AM-6 PM
SSI
Aerobics Drop InFunk Garrett Hall 3 PM
Aerobics Drop InAqua Fitness Chrlstenbury Pool 5:30 PM
BowllngBllliardsTable Tennis Mendenhall Student Ctr. 7-10:00 PM
Weight RoomGym Workout Chrlstenbury Gym 11 AM-9 PM
Swimming Chrlstenbury Pool 11:30 AM-6 PM
Mendenhall Student Center Lawn
Merchants Fair 4-7 PM
Panama Steel Band 5-8:30 PM
Human Foosball 4-8 PM
Abo available: Frtebee Golf, Bdk Basketball, Scott Sand Volleyball (For more Info call 3284911)
2F
F
AUGUST 23
Noon Day Tunes (Victor Hudson) MSC Patio
1:30-3 PM
AUGUST 24-26
FHmLegends of the Fall"
Hendrix (MSC) 8 PM
ACTIVITIES CO-SPONSORED BY:
ECU University Unions, Student Union,
New Student Orientation, Student
Media, Recreation Services and the
Pitt-Greenville Chamber of Commerce
A
ALPHA
e
THETA
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KAPPA
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LAMBDA
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MU
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B T A E Z H � X E 2 H � X O Y f E A
BETA
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SIGMA
Sorority Rush Schedule fall 1995
CONVOCATION- Information Fair Tuesday, August 29,
4:00-6:00 pm Great Room in Mendenhall Student Center
Thursday, September 7,
Friday, September 8,
RUSH Orientation
4:00-6:00 pm Wright Auditorium
1st Round INTRODUCTION Day
4:00-I0:00pm �panics
1 4:00-4:30
2 4:45-5:13
3 5:30-6:00 �food will be provided
4 6:15-6:45
5 7:00-7:30
6 7:45-8:15
7 8:30-9:00
S 9:15-9:45
2nd Round HOUSE TOUR D.iv
10:00-4:00 pm 6 panic
1 10:00-10:45
2 11:00-11:45 �
3 12:00-12.45
4 � 1:00- 1:45
5 2:00- 2:45 �
6 3:00- 3:45
Rusliccs 10 computer tcnninals at 8:00 pm Saturday night
1995
1995
1995
Saturday, September 9, 1995
3rd Round SKIT Day
1200-4:00 pm 4 panics
1 12:00-12:45 �
2 1:00- 1:45 �
3 2:00- 2:45 �
4 3:00- 3:45
Sunday, September 10, 1995
Fall Formal Rush 1995
a
East Carolina University
September? -12
j:�.i -
Rushecs lo computer terminals at S 00 pm Sunday night
4th Round PREFERENCE Night
Monday, September 11, 1995
4:00-7.00 pm
t
2
3
BID Day
4:00-5:00 pm
3 panics
4:00-4:45 �
5:05- 5:50 �
6:10-6:55
Rushecs fill out pref cards at 7 00 pm
Tuesday, September 12, 1995
University Mall
SORORITY RUSH INFORMATION
' Sororities participating in Sept 7-Sept. 12 Rush
are:
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Xi Delta
Alpha Omicron Pi
Alpha Phi
Chi Omega
Ceita Zeta
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Zeta Tau Alpha
Sororities choosing to hold Rush either late
Septerr.jsi" or in the early Spring are:
Pi Delta
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sigma Gamma Rho
Delta Sigma Theta Zeta Phi Beta
Rush Week is simply the method sororities use
to meet students interested in joining. On Sept.7
there is a convocation meeting to give you the
basic sorority information; you will also meet
your Rush counselor who will help you through
the Rush process.
Rush Fee (non-refundable) should be sent in
with application in the amount of $15 made
payable to ECU Panhellenic Association.
Rush Registration will be accepted until Sept.1.
Mail to: ECU Panhellenic Association
204 Whichard Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Financial and Social Requirements:
Each sorority will review grades and cost during
rush. Sororities grade requirements begin at 2.0.
(Some sororities require higher GPA's). The
average cost is SS0-S80 per month during the
school year. There is also an additional pledge and
initiation fee.
Questions: Please contact Laura Sweet,
Panhellenic Advisor, at 328-4235 or
204 Whichard.
East Carolina University Rush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied by a check for $15, non-refundable, made payable to the ECU Panhellenic
Association. Rush dates are September 7 - September 12,1995. Tie established check-in times for students regis-
tered to go through rush has been set for September 7 between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. immediately following the con-
vocation session. Transfer and new-to-ECU freshmen must send a transcript with this applicatioa You must
also supply 8 photos of yourself at the beginning of rush (Only one pose is necessary.)
Sorority Rushee Data
LAST NAME FIRST
FATHER'S NAME:
MOTHER'S NAME:
HOME ADDRESS:
MIDDLE
SOCIAL SECURITY t
LASTrtRST fiKIDDLE
LASTFIRSTMIDDLE
STREET
ST
TTf
HOME PHONE:J
HIGH SCHOOL:
NAME
HIGH SCHOOL CPA:
LOCAL ADDRESS:
OFF-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
ON-CAMPUS ADDRSSS:
ROOM
CURRENT ACADEMIC STANDING:
HOURS:
DORM
GPA:
IS THERE A SORORITY AFFILIATE IN YOUR FAHILY7 (Y A N)
NAME: SORORITY:
RELATIONSHIP:
HIGH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
OTHER COLLEGES ATTENDED:
NAME:
SORORITY:
PREVIOUS COLLEGIATE ACTIVITIES:
HOB3IES:
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, I hereby grant the
Office Student Services at East Carolina University the right to releaae the needed academic
information for sorority pledging and initiation to Panhellenic or the appropriate sorority
when necessary. Hy termination from rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE
ALPHA
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KAPPA
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LAMBD.
M
MU
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NU
XI
Go Greek!
QBrAEZHTXOEZHNr'XOYTE
OMEGA
BETA GAMMA DELTA EPSILON ZETA
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�; II n 1 � I
�NHM
11 ic uujl sui sm nai i
luesaay, Ausust '22,1995
39
I
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
�-j- oJ: dJKi from page 35
953 E. 10TH ST. (2ND HOUSE FROM FLETCHER MUSIC BLDG.)
Mass Schedule:
Sun: 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM
Wed: 5:30 PM
All Masses are at the Center
Pkciie (?me cutd 1i4itfai mow utututtcott
Sad 757-37601757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
For More Information About These and otter Programmes, call or visit daily between 8:30am and 11 pm
will also see action at middle hitter;
Erin Lenker, who will get some play-
ing time at outside hitter for ECU;
and Kristin Warner, whose versatil-
ity will enable her to play at several
positions.
The Lady Pirates finished 16-17
overall, and fourth in the CAA last
season. The abundance of youth on
this year's team will have to step up
quick for ECU to do positive things
in '95.
WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY
Coach "Choo" Justice is very
optimistic about this season's cross
country team. As well he should be,
for he has a strong foundation to
build on from last year's outing.
Dava Rhodes(all-CAA), Tara
Rhodes and Cyndi Szymanski have
two years of eligibility remaining.
Sophomore standout performer
Emily Linnemier will also contribute
to this year's squad.
Leading the way in last years
strong freshman showing, Linnemeir
had three top 25 finishes and was
consistently the fourth finisher for
the Lady Pirates. Melanie House also
had a solid freshmen season last year
establishing a personal best at the
Greensboro Invitational with a time
of 20:52.
The team enjoyed its best per-
formance ever at the North Carolina
Championships in 1994. Rhodes led
the way with an eighth place finish,
earning her All-State honors for the
second straight year. She hopes to
three-peat this season.
The East Carolinian
Distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday, The East Carolinian
serves the campus as the major
source of information about activi-
ties and events as well as a forum
for discussion of issues and ideas.
This student-run paper provides
numerous opportunities, including
communications, business and
management experiences where
students can apply what they learn
in the classroom.
TEC Newsroom 328-6366
TEC Advertising 328-2000
�. v. v.y
WZMB
WZMB is ECU's student-run
FM radio station that offers a vari-
ety of alternative music including
rock, jazz, rap and heavy metal.
The station also offers news and
sports reports and call-in type par-
ticipatory shows at 91.3 on the dial.
Various opportunities, including
both on- and off-air experiences,
are available in this hands-on envi-
ronment, allowing students to pre-
pare for a future caxeerJlP
WZMB Studio
Request Line
� ����?
����
�:�;�: �;�� .M
e offer the
lifetime.
,���
Expressions
fressions is a magazine that
serves as the voice of the campus
minority population.
Published four times a year, its
pages carry stories, artwork and
poetry that address the concerns
and problems of the various ethnic
and religious groups represented
on this multi-cultural campus.
Various opportunities to write,
design and illustrate are available
between the magazine's covers.
Expressions328-6927
r
The RBHVT
The Rebel is EGWiily arts
magazine published annually each
Spring. The featured artistic and lit-
erary pieces are selected by a panel
of judges from entries submitted by
the ECU community. An annual art
display showcases those selections.
Staff members can get various
types of experience from adminis-
tering the contest to arranging the
annual art show to producing the
magazine.
The Rebel328-6502
ECU Student Media
I Join us or the experience!
MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY
The Pirates have a solid corps
of good runners this year, who wil
aid in building the cross country pro
gram at ECU.
Sean Connolly and Mark Mathis
will be sorely missed from this year
team. Juniors Larry Lewis, Paul
Gorman, and Jason Gibbs will havt
to turn it up a notch this fall as the
team's only leadership. There are no
seniors on this year's squad.
The Pirates did not field a full
team at the 94 District III Cham
pionships, despite excellent perfor
mances by Gorman and sophomore
Mike Marini. The team can only get
better this year as they attempt to
continue making strides in the CAA.
ECU
from page 32
presses 360 pounds and squats 650
a new record for tailbacks at ECU
The only drawbacks on Harley is hi;
speed (4.6) and lack of experience
catching the football.
Raymond Mabry from nearb
Vanceboro, NC is a Junior Smith
look alike in equipment (5-8 175
who has a slashing, jitterbug style
similar to Smith's. He had the best
spring of the three and is adept a!
catching the football and knows the
offense well. He is not the biggesi
player but is sturdy bench pressing
335 pounds and runs a 4.53 40 yard
dash.
Daryl Jones may be the best
combination of size and speec
among the backups. The 5-foot-l(
208 pound Rockledge Florida native
has outstanding size and good speed
and ability to catch the football. He
has great vision and cutback abil
ity. He had a slight case of fumbleitis
in spring ball and needs to run
tougher but may wind up being
McPhail's backup. Jones was highly
rated coming out of high school and
was a outstanding baseball player
and track and field performer.
Senior fullback Eric Blanton
and sophomore John Peacock are
competing for the blocking back
position left vacant by Damon Wil-
son. Both have shined in games
before, Blanton with a strong per-
formance against the Kentucky
Wildcats and Peacock against
Cincinatti a year ago.
Peacock led the state of Florida
in rushing his senior year at Cardi-
nal Mooney High School. He is a
very strong player who bench
presses 385 pounds and has good
hands.
Blanton, a walk on from upstate
New York is extremely physical and
is a shift open field runner. He is a
blue-collar worker who has im-
pressed the ECU coaches from the
moment he arrived in Greenville.
The two remain locked in a
struggle for the starting position in
fall camp.
FACT:
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plastic diapers, two
billion disposable
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This Green Tip is sponsored by:
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"Greenville's Exclusive
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in The Plaza �321-6380
BRING TIP IN FOR
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O 1995 Kevin A McLean. Tampa, FL
"� -� .
���





MiMriiWiiniiiiii.ftiii
� �!�� i nil mnnfrw
Home Of The
Original
'70S '80S
DANCE MADNESS
PARTY EVERY TUESDAY
Ladies FREE till 11pm
Only $1.00 Bottle Beer
N.C's
Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub now
in its
24th year In
downtown
Greenville
Every Wednesday
Tonight
Only $4
Adm.
Before 11 pm
Door Prizes
WRDU 106.1
WRDU Welcome Back ECU Party
CR4VIN
70s'S04j)anceJefoeJtanA
Wednesday 23
Ladies
Free
Admission
Till 11
Tuesday 29
The Return of The Original
'70s A '80s
7iste To.kc�. Harness
Every Tuesday
$2.00 Mm
For Nhmbon
All New Light
Show
$1.06 Bottle Beers
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with special guest
Mike Rivera
00 ECU 1.0. only $1.00 ADM 9:00 � 9:30
$1.50 HiBoils and $1.50 Toll Boys
$1.50
HiBalls
Wednesday 30
COMeflf
�'� Chip Flatow
special guest
Dan Carlson
�nly $4
Adm.
Members
$1.50 Tall
Boys
$1.50
HiBalls
Thursday 24
Gravey
$1.06 Bottle Beers Before 11pm
WSFL 106.5 Welcome Back ECU Party
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Dillon Fence
Atlantic Recording Artist
Just Back From European Tour
Friday 25
$1.50
HiBalls
$1.06
32 oz
Draft
Thursday 31
Capricorn Recording Mst
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WSFL
College Night
$1.00 32 oz. Draft
$1.00 Membership
$1.50 Bottle Beer
$1.50 HiBalls
Only $5
Adm.
Members
Beach Music's 1 Show
Only $3.00 Adm.
For 1st SO ECU I.Ds
Saturday 26
Coming In September
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CLASSIC ROCK
Attic's 24th Birthday Party
Fall Stop

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Title
The East Carolinian, August 22, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 22, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1087
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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