The East Carolinian, July 19, 1995






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July 19,1995
Vol 70, No. 01
The East Carolinian
Circulation 5,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pases
1
iii-Vi'
Around the State
(AP) - Complaints from com-
mercial fishermen about being ha-
rassed by federal scientists and
bureaucrats are worse in North
Carolina than elsewhere, a law-
maker said Monday.
Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska,
said testimony at a Senate field
hearing Monday indicated that the
rift between fishermen and regula-
tors in North Carolina may be so
wide that neither side understands
the problem of preserving fish so
everyone can have them.
(AP) � In a westernmost cor-
ner of North Carolina known as
Murphy is a Christian theme park
where salvation is free and the
readin' is easy.
The Ten Commandments lay
splayed across a mountainside in
white concrete letters 5 feet high
and 4 feet wide.
A giant staircase climbs toward
heaven, lined with 29 monuments
inscribed with Bible verses.
Atop a 75-foot tower, an elec-
tric star of Bethlehem glows in the
night.
Then there's a 150-foot cross,
a stone replica of Golgotha, a bap-
tismal pool, gospel theater and com-
bination lunch countergift shop.
Around the Country
(AP) - The rising number of
heat wave victims is overwhelming
the resources of the county morgue
and city funeral homes in Chicago.
The city's death toll rose to
199 today, with around 100 bodies
at the morgue and about 350 in
funeral homes still to be examined.
Cook County Medical Exam-
iner Edmund Donoghue estimated
65 percent of the latest deaths
would eventually be classified as
heat-related, partly because heat
needs only to be a contributing fac-
tor, not a direct cause of death,
under the county's guidelines.
(AP) - Never mind that five
astronauts were circling Earth
aboard space shuttle Discovery, and
that one of their windows was
gouged by a micrometeorite.
NASA's last shuttle crew, just
back from Russia's space station Mir,
stole the show in Cape Canaveral,
Fla. Tuesday with pictures and de-
scriptions of the dramatic docking
as well the more mundane aspects
of long-term space travel.
Although an avid newspaper
reader, American astronaut Norman
Thagard said there was nothing in
particular that he felt he missed in
terms of news during his nearly four
months aloft a U.S. space endurance
record.
Around the World
(AP) - When a fireball lit the
evening sky and explosions rocked
Rio De Janeiro, Brazilians were sure
there had been a disaster.
But on Monday, fear turned to
relief at the surprising absence of
serious injuries in Sunday's explo-
sions at the navy's biggest arms de-
pot
Of the 40 military personnel at
the island depot, all escaped un-
scathed or with minor injuries, the
navy said. No civilians were hurt
Rec center contractor broke
New contractor to
complete project,
delays expected
Tambra Zion
News Editor
Lott Constructors Incorporated,
the contractor hired to build ECU'S
$17.9 million recreation center, is out-
of-business.
"We are actively going out-of-busi-
ness said Betty Rohde, a field office
manager for Lott. "There's just been
a lot of bad decisions and a couple of
lawsuits and some bad owners
Rohde has been working in the
Houston headquarters for the com-
pany while their insurer, Aetna, is tak-
ing over.
"Aetna has had other contractors
looking at the IECU contract Rohde
said. "Aetna is in control of Lott. but
we still expect to be able to complete
that project
Glen Mims, superintendent for
the recreation center construction
site, would not comment on the take-
over, saying only, "There's going to
be some personnel swapping
Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs Richard Brown said it is doubt-
ful anyone will lose his or her job in
the transition.
"Anybody who's working for Lott
will be hired by the new contractor
Brown said.
He said ECU may incur delays in
the project's completion.
"It will probably mean some rela-
tively small delays in the project as
the surety, Aetna, brings in a new
general contractor Brown said. "The
surety is required to make that hap-
pen hiring a new contractor
He is unsure when a new contrac-
tor will take over, but said facility ser-
vice employees are working on that
now. Director of Facilities Planning.
Design and Construction Bruce Flye
Jr was unavailable for comment.
"The responsibility for having
the center) completed falls with the
surety bond holder said Assistant
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs Dr.
Ceorge Harrel. He was unable to com-
ment any further on the subject.
"We reported to the board (of
trustees) meeting that we expect a
delay until sometime in the first quar-
ter of '96 based on what we can see
happening. We hope we are proved
wrong Brown said.
He said ECU will not lose any
money on the project.
"All state projects require that
the contractors submit performance
bonds so that if something like this
does happen, the state of North Caro-
lina is protected
The Lott branch responsible for
the Greenville project is out of
McLane, Virginia.
Brown said Lott was chosen to
build the recreation center through a
comptetitive bid.
"Many of these large contractors
work all over the country Brown
said.
He said Lott is also working
projects at UNC-Charlotte and Chapel
Hill, two of ECU's sister schools in
the university system.
The recreation center's plans in-
clude six basketball courts, volleyball,
badminton, handball and racquetball
courts, as well as an 11,000-square-
foot weight training and fitness cen-
Photo by KEN CLARK
More than a year into the project, Lott Constructors Inc. is
suffering financial burdens and will not finish the center.
ter. three multi-purpose rooms for
aerobics, dance and martial arts. An
outdoor adventure program area will
be built, indoor and outdoor swim-
ming pools and a juice and snack bat
Recreation services will move their
administrative offices into the build-
ing once it is completed.
Mims said his projected date of
completion has not been delayed, and
plans to have the center finished by
Nov. 15.
Investigation
ECU policies prohibit
sexual harassment
EEO office takes
harrasment
charges seriously
Wendy Rountree
Assistant News Editor
MMMHMM
Photo by KEN CLARK
ECU Officer Virgil K. Legget investigates the theft of a
portable CD player outside Mendenhall Student Center.
School of Medicine
channels to community
Cable channel set
to broadcast to
patients in August
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Medicine is
going on the air.
The school is planning to present
a medical channel on public access
cable television beginning on August
1 this year.
"This is not the type of public
access channel where someone will
walk in and put on a program said
Charles Kesler, assistant director of
the center for health sciences commu-
nication. "This will be scheduled medi-
cal programming
Dr. Dalynn Badenhop, director of
the cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation
program, and assistant professor at
the medical school, said that to begin
with, the channel will provide general
medical programming applying to gen-
eral populations.
"All patients who go through our
rehabilitation program are exposed
to programs on educational topics to
prevent further problems from devel-
oping Badenhop said. "Some of
these educational topics do not apply
to the general population, but a num-
ber of them do indeed, from a preven-
tative medicine standpoint, apply to
the average citizen. We are going to
identify two to four of those educa-
tional presentations that we can be-
gin to present over this cable chan-
nel
Badenhop offered two examples
of presentations that will appear on
the Institutional Channel.
"One topic we will present that
does apply to the population of North
Carolina is proper guidelines for ex-
ercising in the heat he said. "Another
is reading food labels. Our dietitian
gives a presentation to all of our car-
diac patients on identifying sources
of fat and cholesterol in their diets,
which could also be helpful to the
average person concerned about their
diet
In the future, in addition to pro-
viding general medical programming,
doctors may be able to use the chan-
nel to provide specific programming
to monitor individual cardiac patients
at home, Kesler said.
"There may be a select group who
have heart or lung disease for whom
See MED page 3
Consistent lewd remarks, jokes
or overt sexual propositions can be
considered sexual harassment in a
court of law, and ECU has a policy to
deal with the problem.
Dr. Mary Ann Rose, assistant to
the chancellor and Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) Officer, said the
policy on sexual harassment has been
in place for more than 10 years.
"We've had a policy prohibiting
sexual harassment since 1981 Rose
said. "Now, the language of the policy
was revised about three to four years
ago
The main change was to have the
policy state exactly what actions are
considered sexual harassment.
"There are two kinds of sexual
harassment Rose said. "One is where
there is an actual offer of exchange,
'Let me tell you how you can get an
"A" in this class just a straight out
offer. That is one type. But, the courts
have held that to be sexually harassed
does not have to be that. Instead,
there is no outright offer of an ex-
change, but there is what the courts
call a hostile environment, and that
means jokes, lewd comments and
�i
sexually-oriented gestures.
"The courts have held like if there
is joking and lewd comments, it can-
not be just one joke. It has to be so
severe as to make the environment
very intimidating to the victim. There
have been cases where a pervasive
pattern of sexually gross remarks,
gestures, jokes have been present,
so there is never an offer of a sexual
exchange. But there doesn't have to
be
Rose said the hostile environ-
ment-type of
sexual harassment
is the more com-
mon. With this
type, the victim is
more likely to have
witnesses present.
The typical
scenario most
people think
about in sexual
harassment is a
man harassing a
woman. However.
Rose said sexual
harassment can
also involve a woman harassing a man,
a man harassing another man or a
woman harassing another woman.
"The courts don't make a distinc-
tion Rose said. "We would treat it
as sexual harassment. It doesn't mat-
ter if it is a man who is the victim or
a woman who is the victim. It's most
frequently the woman who is the vic-
tim, though, in the cases we've got-
ten
Students who have sexual harass-
ment complaints against any employee
of the university can speak with Rose
in her office in 104 Spilman building.
Rose said the procedure is simple and
all complaints are looked into.
"It's not real complicated Rose
said. "I think people sometimes think
it's shrouded in secrecy
Basically, the student goes to the
EEO office and talks ever the com-
plaint with Rose. Rose then decides
whether or not the complaint is a vio-
lation of the
university's
sexual harass-
ment policy. If it
is not, Rose ei-
ther tells the stu-
dent how to
handle the situa-
tion, or, if she
cannot, she tells
them where to go
to receive help.
However, if she
identifies the
complaint as a
violation, Rose
listens to the student's side of the
story then goes and listens to the
employee's side of the story. Occasion-
ally, the stories are the same, and
there is no investigation.
'That does happen Rose said,
it really is usually that the person
thought that the other person was
romantically interested in him, and
We've had a
policy prohibiting
sexual harassment
since 1981
� Dr. Mary Ann Rose
Equal Employment
Opportunity Officer
See PROTECT page 3
Nature
This hawk guards his
prey, one of ECU'S
many squirrels, as
onlookers pass by. Do
they teach this in
biology class?
Photo by KEN CLARK
f
Barn serves up home cooking, TEC grubspage O
Should Susan Smith be fried?page t-
UT players let their fingers do the walkingpage J
Wednesday
Sunny
High 90
Low 70
0?ec�Ut
Thursday
Partly cloudy
r f
High 92
Low 75
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Buildingjacross from Joyner
�-�





MBMHHMWMMI
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
students patrol campus Dean named to school of music
Jennifer Hunt
Staff Writer
Looking for a job to help curb
the bills of college life? ECU Student
Patrol may be just what you're look-
ing for - if you're willing to wear a
uniform and work nights.
Students involved with the patrol
are non-confrontational and avoid any
fight situations. Even if they are wit-
nesses to a crime
in progress, they
are required to call
an officer for help.
Director of Crime
Prevention Al
Fonville said the
Student Patrol "is
very productive. I
feel that they are
the eyes and ears
in a lot of situa-
tions
There has
been a shortage of
student patrol
lately, due in part
to the summer sea-
son.
"There are 13 students working
on the patrol this summer, and dur-
ing the semester there is an average
of 25 said Walter F. Meyer, patrol
officer.
Student Patrol are standing out
on their own now, thanks to new uni-
forms. The old uniforms were simi-
lar to police officer uniforms, light
blue-collared shirts with a badge and
dark pants. Now the students wear
tan shorts and blue T-shirts with the
university name, symbol and Student
Patrol Unit embroidered on the front
Fonville said the change in uni-
forms will prevent any confusion be-
tween the student patrol and police
officers. Student Patrol duties con-
sist of security of the residence halls,
student escorts across campus at
night and providing security at spe-
cial events (football and basketball
games).
"It is not an aggressive job, we
are there for the students on cam
pus, to protect them and offer them
a safe environment said Brian
Gibbs. student patrol employee.
Gibbs is a junior majoring in So-
ciology, with a focus in law and soci-
ety. Gibbs is planning a career in
law enforcement and said he feels it
has provided him with experience he
will need in the future.
"I would recommend it to any-
one. You get to meet people from all
around, and it is a great learning ex-
perience Gibbs
said.
Becoming
an employee of
the ECU Police
Department be-
gins with stu-
dents filling out
detailed applica-
tions available at
the ECU Police
department at
609 East 10th
Str.
The applica-
tion asks for gen-
eral informatron
and then specific
questions. For example: "Have you
ever usedsold marijuana and "Have
you ever plead guilty to or been con-
victed of any crime?" Then the appli-
cant will be called for an interview.
A background check will be run
on applicants to determine any crimi-
nal history. There will also be a check
on the applicant's driving history,
because the Student Patrol are autho-
rized to drive state-owned vehicles.
During the interview, the applicant is
asked for information about them-
selves and why they are interested in
being on the student patrol.
No experience is necessary for
the position: all training is given when
the students are hired. Each student
is required to attend three nights of
training. The training includes famil-
iarity with the campus, 10 codes on
the radio and professionalism in us-
ing equipment.
For more information contact
Amy Lynch, student patrol director at
328-6787.
"It is not an
aggressive job, we
are there for the
students on
campus, to protect
them and offer
them a safe
environment
� Brian Gibbs, student
patrol employee
Brad Foley
Jennifer Hunt
Staff Writer
torate of Musical Arts from the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Because Foley has been at ECU
for 16 years, the transition into his
new position should be smooth.
"I am confident that with his
many years of administrative experi-
ence, Dr. Foley will build upon the rich
traditions of the ECU School of Mu-
sic and lead it toward distinctive ac-
complishment of its planned goals and
objectives said Tinsley Yarbrough,
interim vice chancellor for academic
affairs. "I look forward to working
with him
The new dean has a broad role.
"I perceive the dean as being the
person who initiates ideas, gets people
thinking and motivates people to do
their jobs well Foley said.
Most students in the school know
Foley through his work as assistant
dean. He said he wants them to real-
ize that he is striving to make the
school better for their benefit
"I want students to know I have
this goal in mind he said.
Foley said the quality of the
School of Music at ECU is unsurpassed
in this region, and the goal is to make
it the best in the state.
"There are so many great faculty
and students here that it is exciting to
have a chance to work with them at
this level he said.
Foley said the School of Music will
also continue to heavily promote the
arts, dance and theatrical programs.
Foley has presented over 300 solo
and chamber music performances since
coming to ECU, including perfor-
mances this year at the convention of
the National Association of College
Wind and Percussion Instructors at
Saint Xavier College in Chicago, and
with the Mailarme Chamber Players in
Durham.
He has held positions as regional
director and treasurer of the North
American Saxophone Alliance and was
acting editor of the organization's jour-
nal, The Saxophone Symposium. Sev-
eral articles by Foley have been pub-
lished in North Carolina Music Edu-
cator, journal of the North Carolina
Music Educators Association. He re-
corded Brad Foley in Concert, a 1984
release of the Educational Music Ser-
vice.
Foley has also been involved in the
cultural and community life of Pitt
County. He served as president of the
Greenville Choral Society and Interna-
tional festival, as well as performing
with Greenville's Sunday in the Park
concerts. He has been a member of the
executive boards of the Friends of ECU
School of Music and the School of
Music Alumni Professional Society.
The School of Music is changing
its tune.
Brad Foley. formerly assistant
dean ECU's School of Music, has been
promoted to dean.
Foley served as assistant dean of
the School of Music from 1985 until
his appointment as dean on June 1.
He served as acting dean for a period
in 1991. and has been a professor of
saxophone and chamber music since
joining the faculty in 1979.
Music played a major role in
Foley's younger years.
"I always seemed to be interested
in music. I started playing saxophone
when I was 12 years old Fc' y said.
Foley attended Ball State Univer-
sity in Indiana. While in college, he
experimented with other woodwind in-
struments, including the clarinet,
oboe and bassoon. He pursued his
Master's of Music at the University of
Michigan, with the goal of teaching
at a small college where he would be
able to teach several instruments. His
first teaching position was at Stephen
F. Austin University in Texas, where
he taught saxophone, oboe and bas-
soon for two years. Foley continued
his education and now holds a Doc-
ARTISTS
WE NEED ARTISTSt
ARTISTS
That's right! The East
Carolinian is looking for bold
new talent to become the
great new'comic artists of the future. (Well we
all start somewhere) So if you have original
material and are ready to start meeting deadlines
this fall, then we are looking for you. All comics
should be inked panels in a 8"x 13" format (two
rows). All work should be final (no sketches).
Then bring the whole pile of work to the East
Carolinian Office (across from the library), and
tell em' Paul sent ya! What are you waiting for?
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The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
��������������i
� ��
Hey you guys
news writers' meeting
today at 4 p.m. sharp,
not dull.
R. Cherry Stokes
Attorney at Law
General Practice
Family Law-Traffic Offenses-Divorce-Criminal
Drunk Driving-LandlordTennant
FREE INITIAL BRIEF CONSULTATION
113 W. 3RD ST. 758-2200
MED from page 1
we would develop programming very
specific to them Badenhop said.
"What we want to do is improve pub-
lic health through all of the available
technology
Efforts would be made to protect
patient confidentiality.
"Programming directed at specific
cardiac patients would be scrambled,
of course, to protect doctorpatient
confidentiality Kesler said. "The pa-
tient intended to receive the signal
would have a descrambling device of
some kind
Kesler said he believes there are
a number of future possibilities for the
channel to become more interactive
with its viewers.
"There could be a call-in show of
some kind where people could direct
PROTECT from page 1
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Rent includes
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�Living Room Ceiling Fan
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located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
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752-0277 Equal Housing Opportunity
health questions to a doctor without
having to go into the doctor's office
he said. "Another possibility is that the
channel could become an extension
of the on-campus infirmary, so that stu-
dents could take advantage of the in-
firmary services from their dorm
rooms
The costs for starting the chan-
nel are virtually non-existent, Kesler
said.
"Right now there is not really any
funding, no specific budget for putting
it all together, because it is public ac-
cess he said. "The cable company is
dropping the cable lead into the Brody
building and a great deal of the neces-
sary equipment is already in place
through the telecommunications depart-
ment Additional pieces of equipment
will be added as they are necessary and,
I would imagine, some kind of budget
will have to be worked out at that time
Kesler said the institutional chan-
nel project came about due to the rene-
gotiation of Multimedia Cablevision's
contract with the city of Greenville, and
that part of the contract gave the city
six hours of access to the channel ev-
ery month.
Katie Veilleux. of Greenville's pub-
lic information office, said in an earlier
interview that the city wanted those six
hours because they would be able to
access the high-tech capabilities of cable.
"We did not necessarily want to
provide programming during those six
hours per month, but wanted to have
access to the information highway and
the interactive network she said.
"Right now, there is not a lot of tele-
conferencing taking place, but in the
future, government may choose to use
it as a way to do business. We want to
lay a foundation for a good and cost-
effective way to do business
Veilleux also said that city officials
are pleased to have the medical school
providing programming to the commu-
nity.
"We think the programming the
medical school will provide will benefit
all of the citizens Veilleux said. "We
feel the medical school is the best
equipped facility to originate program-
ming on an access channel
here is a student saying, "Oh, my gosh,
what am 1 going to do here?' The pro-
fessor is thinking that she liked him.
That does happen. Then I don't do an
investigation. 1 just deal with that"
An investigation begins when stu-
dent and employee stories conflict.
Then Rose asks the student who she
has told about the incident and tries
to find witnesses to the incident Also,
the employee's colleagues could be
interviewed if they are potential wit-
nesses.
Finally, Rose weighs the informa-
tion and "takes the action that is in-
dicated
Actions range from warnings to
termination.
"If the evidence says yes this is a
valid complaint then we might warn
the offender, we might penalize the
person, we might terminate the per-
son - there are a range of things we
might do Rose said. "Our procedures
are fair. They do tend to bring forth
the truth. They are fair to both par-
ties, the accused and the accuser.
There is fairness built into them, I feel,
and I've done this for a while
Rose said the EEO office is a
buffer between the student and the
accused faculty member. The student
does not have to deal with the situa-
tion any more unless it escalates into
a court trial.
All records of sexual harassment
cases are considered confidential, and
Rose said she urges all nersons, while
involved in an investigation, to use
discretion and not speak about the
incident.
"We do try to protect people's
confidentiality, people's reputations
Rose said. "We don't talk about it,
except to the extent we have to. We
talk to the attorneys. We talk to the
people involved, but these are person-
nel actions. These are protected by
state laws, so we're not able to dis-
cuss it"
While Rose deals with student
employee harassment problems, Dr.
Ronald Speier, dean of students,
handles studentstudent harassment
problems.
"First of all, we wouldn't have
,
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sexual harassment from one student
to another student Speier said. "We
have a student code of conduct that
says there are certain behaviors that
you shouldn't conduct"
The student code of conduct is
located in The Clue Book. Speier said
if a student sexually harasses another
student he or she can be held account-
able for violating one of the code's
rules, such as rule D, which states.
"Harassing, abusing or threatening
another by means other than the use
or threatened use of physical force
Other types of harassment could be
abusive, vulgar language, in person
or on the phone.
"The dean of students concerns
himself or herself, the associate dean,
with student misconduct typically stu-
dent misconduct directed at another
student That's typically what we get
involved in
If a student abusively speaks back
to a professor and is disruptive in class,
then the student is in violation of the
code and the dean of students handles
the situation. However, if the faculty
member is abusive of harasses a stu-
dent the dean of students' office does
not get involved.
Speier said if that happens, he
makes way for another administrative
official to deal with the problem and
advises the student where to go for
assistance.
Speier said the policy is needed
to set limitations and boundaries be-
tween faculty and students so the uni-
versity can run smoothly.
"It's sort of like why we have speed
limits and why we have other rules and
regulations, for example, academic in-
tegrity because these things happen
Speier said. "And, because these things
happen, the victim needs to have a
policy or procedure to follow to have
redress of the grievance.
"Our policies are out there to pro-
tect the people who don't do these
kinds of behaviors also. In other words,
to provide structure in our environ-
ment so that people know that they
are here for a certain purpose - to get
a degree or to get a good education. If
these kinds of things happen to them,
there is somebody out there. There are
professional people that have training
in this area to respond to these kinds
of conflicts, so they can be resolved.
Then they can get on with what they're
here for
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Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
I
Our View
Solution is the answer to a problem, not silence.
Assistant Police Chief John Taylor's resignation a few
weeks ago caused quite a stir among local media; most chan-
nels had to grasp at straws or rely on shaky sources to get
their stories, because no one at ECU was talking.
Granted, what two adults do on their own time is their
own business, but rumor has it that the police department
got hot enough to make an erotic home video. Taylor's res-
ignation followed an investigation of the matter. What kind
of investigation, how long did it take, how much money
was spent? What's the conclusion? We don't know because
nobody would tell us.
We don't want any gory details to embarrass anyone,
we just want to know the truth. The situation was undoubt-
edly embarrassing for the university, but that's no reason
to keep everything in the closet. How many skeletons does
ECU have stored away after years of dodging the media on
events administrators didn't see as appropriate anyway?
The public has a right to know about the ECU Police
department incident because Taylor broke a university policy
which states that students and employees should not be
involved in amorous relations. Whether or not that policy is
justified has nothing to do with the fact that a prominent uni-
versity employee broke it and no one wants to admit it
The big question is was this affair one of consensual
adults or was this female coerced into risque activity for
fear of losing her job?
We don't know because the matter was quickly swept
under the large blanket frequently referred to as person-
nel. That's their way of putting a hermetic seal on the
matter for good. The Equal Employment Opportunity of-
fice, as well as six other campus offices, directed all in-
quiries to Assistant University Attorney Greg Hassler. Any-
one could have heard the smile on the man's face as he
continued to give the same answer to each and every ques-
tion asked of him. Basically, no comment.
If John Taylor is guilty of any wrongdoing, justice
should be served and the university itself should make
efforts to let the public know about it. The silence gener-
ated from this incident will undouotedly deter anyone in
a similar situation from standing for their own rights. Who
is going to take action against harassment or coercion if
they think nothing will be done about it? We have a right
to know when someone's rights have been violated, espe-
cially when the violator is a police officer we have grown
up to trust.
If Taylor is innocent, why did he leave with so many
unanswered questions? No one, except the media, has said
Taylor had been involved in any wrongdoing, so why'd
you pack your bags so fast, John? Hassler's press release
stated Taylor resigned following an investigation, but no
accusations were made.
How are we supposed to learn the truth when the uni-
versity continually keeps its mouth shut? Probably they'd
rather hear the awful rumors instead of actually admit-
ting something happened. Silence won't make anything go
away.
ECU administrators need to think about these recent
events long and hard and maybe start talking about them
instead of.trying to forget them.
When
something
happens in
your backyard,
you have a
right to know
about it. Why
hasn't ECU
mentioned the
incident that
occurred in the
Police
department?
There's scandal
in the air
where people
are supposed
to protect us.
We want some
answers, so
start talking.
Heat should be taken seriously
We're havin' a heat wave, but
there's no reggae music in the back-
ground, no palm trees swaying in the
tropical breeze, no fruity rum drinks
in coconut shells. People are dying all
over the country. In New York on
Saturday, a news anchor estimated
that 200 people per hour were being
rushed to the hospital with heat-re-
lated illnesses.
There is news footage from the
mid-West of cows dropping dead in the
fields. It is frightening the destruction
that is being caused by the raise in
temperature, but what is even scarier
is that many people don't seem to be
taking it seriously.
Of course, we are not seeing the
kind of devastating heat here in North
Carolina that they are in other parts
of the country, but nevertheless, the
temperatures here are also danger-
ously high, for people and animals. It
is necessary for all of us to be a little
more cautious right now, and use a
little common sense.
First of all, take care of your-
selves, pay attention to how you are
feeling. It doesn't take long to go from
light-headed to passed-out when
you're out in this heat, especially if
you're drinking alcohol (not that you
would be).
Andi Powell Phillips
Opinion Writer
Your dog is not
capable of
reasoning, yo
are cracking
the windows isn't
going to help.
But equally as important as tak-
ing care of yourselves, is taking care
of those who cannot take care of them-
selves. If you happen to know of any
elderly or ill people living alone, es-
pecially if they don't have air condi-
tioning, check in on them, make sure
they are all right. Let someone know
if they don't answer their door. You
may feel a little silly if they turn up
just fine and dandy, but that's better
than how you will feel if they needed
help and you didn't do anything.
And leave your pets at home
No matter how much they seem to
want to go with you to the grocery
store, say no Your dog is not capable
of reasoning, you are! Ask yourself
these questions: If 1 take my dog to
the grocery store and leave him in the
car in 95-degree weather, will it not
fry what little brain he has? And, con-
sidering that he drinks out of the toi-
let, bathes in his water dish, and pees
every time the doorbell rings now, can
he really afford to lose what little brain
he has?
I'm being funny (or trying to be,
anyway) but it is really very serious.
A pet closed up in a stiflinojy hot car
can die in the time it takes you to run
into the Stop-n-Shop for a Snapple
and a bag of BBQ chips. And crack-
ing the windows isn't going to help;
could you breathe in your car, in this
weather, even with the car windows
cracked? (And, by the way, the next
time I see someone leave an animal
in hot car, I'm going to lock them in
my trunk and drive around town for
a couple of hours!)
Basically, I'm just asking you to
take care to protect yourselves and
others in this nasty weather. We don't
want to lose anyone here. And if you
don't believe the heat is that serious,
just turn on the six o'clock news and
look at the devastation going on
around us. It is serious.
The East Carolinian
Stephanie Lassiter, Editor-in-Chief
Printed ob
i�r.
recycled
pzptfc
Tambra Zion, News Editor
Wendy Rountree, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Brian Paii, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Ken Clark, Photographer
Darryl Marsh, Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Xlali Yang, Systems Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Patrick Hinson, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be
addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, all (919) 328-6366.
An eye for a eye for Susan Smith
What is wrong with this picture?
Woman seat belts children into car.
woman pushes car along with children
into a lake. Woman admits to killing
both her children. There is a long
drawn out trail that the taxpayers
have to pay for.
We all know this is the story' of
South Carolina felon Susan Smith, a
heartless, screwed up, lying, cheating,
racist, cold-blooded killer of babies. I
ask you, why should there be a trial.
She admitted to killing both of her
beautiful, innocent, blond-haired baby
boys. She admitted to seat belting
both of her God given children into
their so-called child safety seats. She
admitted to pushing her car occupied
by both her beautiful babies down a
hill toward a lake. She admitted to
watching her eldest son struggle to
free himself from his seat with fear in
his eyes. She admitted to watching her
son scream out for his mother as the
car descend down the hill towards an
inevitable outcome.
I ask you again, why should there
be a trial? First, we had to declare her
competent to stand trial. She was com-
petent enough to push her innocent
babies into a lake, I believe she is com-
J.D. Heath
Opinion Columnist
Why should the
citizens have to
burden the cost
of trial that is
useless in the first
place?
petent enough to stand trial. Now we
have to shelter, clothe and feed this
murderer of babies before, and dur-
ing a definitely lengthy trial. All this
just to convict her of a hideous crime
she has already admitted to commit-
ting. What is the point?
The citizens of Union, South
Carolina were just informed that if the
trial is in fact a lengthy trial they wood
have to burden the cost in the form
of increased local taxes. Is this right?
Hell no! Why should the citizens of
that grief stricken town have to bur-
den the cost of a trial that is useless
in the first place?
People exclaim that she has the
constitutional right to trial by jury.
She has a right to an impartial and
unbiased jury. That means that there
can be no citizens from the town of
Union. That a.so means that there
can be no mothers admitted to the
jury, no fathers, no grand parents.
Who is left? There is not one person
in this country who can be impartial
to such a haneous crime. Susan Smith
doesn't deserve jack after what she
did.
After she is convicted and the
expense of housing her is paid, the
taxpayers will then have to pay to have
her put to death in a humane way.
Does she deserve to die in a humane
way? No Way! Did her children die in
a humane way? No! She doesn't de-
serve any sympathy at all.
I feel that the deputies that es-
corted Smith to the Union County
Courthouse should have done the
whole country a favor by uncuffing
her and throwing her to the ar gry
mob which had formed outside the
building. That is the only fitting end
to a killer of babies.
The children of the corn live
On Sunday night I was starting to
get desperate for an idea for the next
issue's column, so I did the one thing
that never fails-I whistled up my friend
Casey and we went out looking for one.
Casey is my ideal choice for chauf-
feurs anytime, partly because he has the
innate ability to lead me right to the next
potential story like a bug to a porch light
but also because he owns a newly restored
'57 Chevy convertible which is his pride,
joy, and reason for Irving.
It was midnight still early yet so we
decided to put in some driving time be-
fore investigating the downtown bar cir-
cuit (another old reliable).
As things sometimes go, nothing was
happening anywhere, and the downtown
scene was deader than Dillenger, so we let
our path wander out to the fringes of town,
to the long stretches of open road where
Casey could indulge his love of accelera-
tion without fear.
We'd been heading east for maybe
10 minutes when we saw the group of
hitchhikers by the side of the road.
There were four of them, all girls,
standing in a loose line on our side of the
highway, all of them with their thumbs
out They were dressed in the sloppy man-
ner that suggested that they had just
missed the grunge fad and had the sullen,
petulant look that clearly said that they
knew it too. The oldest one looked to be
about 1, the youngest 13 or 14.
Casey immediately began letting off
the accelerator and thumped on the right-
hand blinker to signal the hitchers that
we were pulling over. I immediately pressed
down on his knee with one hand to get
the car speeding up and thumped off the
blinker with my other hand to signal that
.Mill I.L
Brian Wright
Opinion Columnist
The trio robbed
him, attempted to
steal his car, and
the two 14-year-
olds stabbed him
to death.
we were not pulling over after all, sorry.
"Hey he exclaimed, more in protest than
surprise.
The car went back up to 65 and shot
past the rag-tag little band, none of which
looked too happy with us. One of them
even gave a signal of her own at our rap-
idly disappearing backs, and it was
definately not a wave.
"What'd you do that for, man?"
Casey was wanting to know.
I knew that Casey, for all his faults
due mostly to being an irresponsible lu-
natic pervert, could never say no to any-
one who needed help. His heart was in
the right place, but I just wanted to make
sure that it stayed there, and I told him
so.
When he asked what I meant I rum-
maged around in my bag and came up
with the Friday paper, and showed him
the article about the latest sign of the
times, the late Kulwarn Dhiman, of
Toronto, Canada.
Apparently. Mr. Dhiman, a janitor
who had both a wife and an infant son,
was driving to the local video store to rent
a tape when he was flagged down by three
schoolgirls, two 14-year-olds and one 15.
After he stopped, the trio robbed him, at-
tempted to steal his car, and the two 14-
year-olds stabbed him to death.
The two younger girls have been
charged with manslaughter, and now
Calgary prosecutors are trying to decide
whether to try them in a juvenile court,
where the maximum sentence for man-
slaughter runs at about three years, or to
try them as adults, where a conviction
could get them life in prison.
Casey gave a low whistle after I'd fin-
ished skimming the article for him in the
orange glow of the car's cigarette lighter.
He was quiet for a few miles, breaking his
straight-ahead stare only for the infrequent
glance into the rearview mirror. "But
come on, man he sudderuy insisted, "a
pack of kids? They might have really
needed help
Chance you have to take, I replied. I
vaguely remembered there being a ser-
vice station not far up the road, and in-
structed Casey to keep an eye peeled for
it so he could pull over and so I could call
the police.
If they need help, I told him, thaf s
;hat the cops are for. If they're just try-
ing to get to the beach, then they should
have waited until morning to start hitch-
ing. Casey still didn't appear completely
convinced. "Put what ever happened to
the 'Good Samaritan' thing, man?" he
asked as we turned into the gravel park-
ing lot and slowed to a halt
"He bled to death by the side of the
road up in Canada I told him, and got
out to use the pay phone.





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Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
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Down home cooking
awaits outside of town
TEC Reviewer will
walk a mile for
Barn barbecue
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Just off the beaten path, the Bar B
Que Bam is different from any other lo-
cal restaurant I know, because I've eaten
at virtually all of them (increased waist
diameter and frustration when I step on
my scales prove that). But the fact is, the
Bar B Que Bam serves up the best bar-
becue in Pitt County.
it's different from all other area res-
taurants in the sense that the Bam is
located about five miles outside of
Greenville; it not only tastes, but feels
like the country. The Bar B Que Bam is
located off West Fifth Street a few miles
past the Medical Center.
The Bar B Que Bam is bordered to
the right by acres and acnes of open fields,
urban civilization completely absent To
the left of the Bam, barbed wire fences
in three majestic horses. The wooden
rocking chairs on the front porch of the
place are reminiscent of Sunday dinner
at Grandma's. The pig decorated mail-
box and tiny gravel parking lot truly
complement the atmosphere.
Much as the name of the restau-
rant implies, the building is actually a
bam. Or at least it's a dead ringer for
one judging by outer appearances. The
special is, of course, barbecue. Several
different meal combinations give the con-
sumer the reigns of control.
Literally starving, I ordered myself
a small combination dinner. A couple
minutes later, the best-looking barbecue
and chicken dinner I've ever seen was
staring me in the face. Along with the
barbecue and chicken come barbecued
potatoes, cole slaw, unlimited homemade
hushpuppies and choice of either green
beans or baked beans.
This meal couldn't have been bet-
Looking strikingly similar to
serves up farm-hand-sized
Photo by KEN CLARK
a Hallmark postcard, the Bar B Que Barn
portions to loyal clientele.
ter. The barbecue and chicken melted in
my mouth, the fresh cole slaw and evenly
cooked potatoes were perfect and the
cashier probably got tired of seeing my
face at the counter for more hushpuppies
every 10 minutes. About halfway through
the small-sized meal (apparently they use
this term very loosely) I had to loosen
up the shrinking belt around my waist
I wouldn't consider any part of the
order to be "small" by any means, except
for the price. Any small dinner and a
bottomless iced tea or soda costs about
$5.1 would have loved to try one of the
homemade desserts available, but I was
so stuffed that I couldn't have possibly
eaten another bite.
The Bar B Que Bam has few em-
ployees on the payroll, but the manage-
ment certainly hired the right ones. Cus-
tomer satisfaction is their top priority.
Their approach to service is old-fash
ioned. Not only was I greeted with a smile,
but they also seemed to be genuinely glad
to have me visiting their restaurant Once
during the meal, the owner even made a
special trip to my table and
asked, "Is everything
okay? Can I get anything
else for you today?"
Whenever I'm in the
mood for minced pig and
excellent service, I'll drive
off the beaten path; right
past Parker's and "B's"
Barbecue to The Bar B
Que Bam.
Overall, I couldn't rec-
ommend a better way to
spend an afternoon than
one spent at the Bar B
Que Bam. Both the food
and the atmosphere are
top-notch and the Bam
doesn't skimp on portions,
either. A small dinner is
plenty of grub for anyone.
Needless to say, I haven't
even seen a large one.
Homoerotic novel wins praise
Ronda Cranford
Staff Writer
Are you ready for some confusion?
Think you've got political correctness
all figured out? Well, get ready for a
kick in the head. Darieck Scott's Trai-
tor to the Race makes you take a new
look at things.
Kenneth and Evan are lovers.
They live together in New York and
they're both good looking actors.
The fact that these men love each
other is clear, but it's also clear that
racial tension exists in their relation-
ship. Kenneth is black; Evan is
white.
Both men have auditioned for
roles on a soap opera. Since Evan's
blonde, blue-eyed looks are more
marketable than Kenneth's, he gets
called back to audition for the
show's leading heartthrob. Kenneth
gets called back for an audition as
an orderly. Evan's career depends
on his heterosexual image, so he
has to keep his relationship with
Kenneth a secret which is uncom-
fortable.
Kenneth feels cut off from the
rest of the black community be-
cause he's gay and harbors guilt
about the fact that he's dating a
white man. Navigating this relation-
ship is difficult for them both; they
have to manage the roles they play
in the outside world without compro-
mising the roles they play in their pri-
vate lives.
At the center of this story is
Kenneth's cousin Hammet We don't
see much of this character alive. In the
first chapter he's out cruising the
boardwalk, looking for men, when he
becomes the unfortunate witness to
the gang rape of a prostitute. The white
perpetrators of this crime rape him as
well, before they beat him to death.
This incident begins the conflict
in the story. Kenneth sees the murder
of his cousin as an act of gay bashing,
so he nd some friends get involved in
a gay rights demonstration in
Hammet's name. This is an act of hy-
pocrisy, since Kenneth didn't have the
Photo Courtesy of Dutton Press
time of day for his cousin before his
death. Kenneth describes himself as a
"Postmodern Intellectual of Color
and as one of those he's too good to
associate with the less sophisticated
Hammet In this way, he has stereo-
typed himself - made himself into
something which limits his ability to
be himself. Because Hammet was killed
by white men, Evan feels as if he were
somehow involved in the crime. He too
has lost his sense of who he is in his
relationship with Kenneth and begins
to see himself as a "white man a ste-
reotype.
Scott portrays these characters
brilliantly. He walks around inside their
heads cataloguing thoughts with total
precision. Both Kenneth and Evan are
absorbing, real people. The quirky
way Kenneth uses his free time '
to project himself into the minds
of people he sees reflects his per-
sonality as someone who has lived
his life on the outside of things.
Evan's way of looking at the
world reveals a man who is more
connected to his family and com-
munity. Evan's way of looking at
the world reveals a man who is
more connected to his family and
community. The way he associates
so many things he sees around
him with old science fiction mov-
ies is both funny and reveals his
tendency to be an escapist
Traitor to the Race attempts
to show us that in many ways, we
have replaced bad old stereotypes
with bad new ones. Stereotypes
have no place within the confines
of a personal, intimate relation-
ship, but outside pressure is al-
ways there. Everyone needs to
belong to a larger group and
larger groups require that one
must live up to one's own expec-
tations. These expectations can be lim-
iting to individuals. Getting outside of
it all, getting down to who you really
are and what you really need, is not easy.
This book is like that green salsa
that some restaurants serve. Some
people love it but others are overpow-
ered by it. If steamy, homoerotic scenes
and racial issues bother you, maybe
you'd better order breadsticks instead.
Frigid Memories
File Photo
This week temperatures soar into the 90s as summer school gradually comes to a close.
In these dog days of summer, it's hard to recall "Jack Frost nipping at your nose It's
even more difficult to remember such a peaceful winter scene of downtown Greenville.
Pocahontas lacks
explorer's spirit
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Perhaps America has not yet
been around long enough as a coun-
try to have developed its own unique
set of captivating fairy tales; perhaps
the Disney animation department has
been overworked by
releasing a new car-
toon almost every
year for a decade;
perhaps the cre-
ative forces behind
Pocahontas were
just not in a cre-
ative mood. Most
likely a combina-
tion of all three fac-
tors combined to
make Disney's new-
est full-length ani-
mated feature,
Pocahontas, the
most disappointing
cartoon released
from the studios in nearly a decade.
Disney's animation crew has
been on a down hill slide ever since
creating Beauty and the Beast, the
film many (including this
critic)consider the greatest animated
achievement of all time. Aladdin was
enjoyable (and lots of fun) but for-
gettable. The Lion King had the
power of myth to drive it along with
the snarling sarcasm of Jeremy Irons
but had flat songs and a rather dull
story for adults. Pocahontas has ab-
solutely nothing for adults, unin-
spired songs and voices more fit for
Saturday morning cartoons than a
feature-length film.
Pocahontas expands on the his-
torical facts of the Powhatan Indian
named
� '��' Pocahontas
who saved Cap-
tain John
Smith's life. In
the hands of
Disney,
Pocahontas be-
comes a larger-
than-life tale
with easily
identifiable vil-
lains and he-
roes - so iden-
tifiable that
both good and
bad characters
are bland.
Disney is beginning to borrow
from itself a bit too liberally. The be-
ginning of Pocahontas looks strik-
ingly similar to the beginning of The
Little Mermaid, complete with sail-
ors and song. The willow tree in
Pocahontas looks just like willow in
the scene for the song "Kiss the Girl"
See DISNEY page 7
Pocahontas has
absolutely
nothing for adults,
has uninspired
songs and
Saturday morning
cartoon voices.
CD. Reviews
The ChinadoU
Tango
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Whether it's good or bad, it's al-
ways nice to hear something original.
The Chinadoll's new disc Tango is just
that; original in concept but not quite
as good as it could be.
Tango is the second full-length
release from The ChinadoU, a band
composed of two people that go by
Timothy and Robin. They said they
wanted a band that looked like
Spandau Ballet and sounded like the
Velvet Underground. Well, I don't
know what they look like, but they
sure don't sound like the Velvet Un-
derground.
They sound like a lot of the
techno bands that are out today. The
Lords of Acid, My Life with the Thrill
Kill Cult, and even New Order come
to mind. However, they are nowhere
near as good as New Order. But that
is just the music, which is probably
the least interesting aspect of the disc.
The lyrics to the songs, the de-
sign of the sounds and the theme of
strange love that runs throughout is
what makes Tango good. It's sort of
like really good poetry (or at least in-
teresting poetry) read over synthesiz-
ers and drum machines. The members
of the band describe this album as
"emotional impressionism" and
"heroin I think guerrilla love and sex
poetry that will end up in the bargain
bin of dance mix rejects is a better
description.
Some of the songs are like short
little poems read over soundscapes.
like the opening song, "Creation The
female member of the group, Robin,
reads a poem with a voice heavy laden
in sexuality in this opening song. "I
am in love, and I make love she says,
"Exclusively to my godThe god of
creation
The first 10 tracks on the disc
deal exclusively with sex and love and
the perversion thereof, a theme seems
to emerge that puts sex on a dirty
pedestal and places love in the gar-
bage heap of the greatest lies ever
told.
"Happy Birthday" is one track
that does both. It opens with a nasty
sounding phone sex voice and jumps
See TANGO page 7
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just whut it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Recent debate in the Sen-
ate, spearheaded by conserva-
tive presidential hopeful Bob
Dole, has focused on increased
levels of sex and violence on
television. Dole's argument
places blame for any number of
social ills on the good old boob
tube.
Here we go again.
Remember second lady Tip-
per Gore's crusade against rock
'n' roll back in the '80s? Re-
member the 10 million attacks
on pornography that have been
rallied in our lifetime? Remem-
ber when Ozzy Osborne and
Judas Priest were accused of
driving troubled suburban
teens to suicide with their ri-
diculous heavy metal posing?
Remember Ice-T's "Cop Killer?"
Seems like we've been
around this block before,
doesn't it? In our ever-more-des-
perate search for The Source of
All Evil in the Universe, we
seem to have spent the last 10
years lost somewhere in the
entertainment industry.
Granted, television doesn't
have entirely dean hands in our
society. Ink has been spilled in
this very column on how TV's
"give-the-people-what-they-
want-and-nothing-else-at-all"
mentality has aid:d in the
dumbing down of America.
But that's why this current
attack worries me. Dole isn't at-
tacking the vacuum-packed fluff
that over-populates the tube.
No. he's all for that. In his at-
tacks on sex and violence. Dole
is leveling his sights at shows
that actually (gasp!) challenge
the viewer. He's attacking many
critically-acclaimed series that
deal with pressing issues such
as ER or, closer to Dole's point,
the provocative NYPD Blue.
That's right. All of
America's woes can be traced
back to Dennis Franz's bare ass.
Okay, that was a cheap
shot. But Dole makes it so
easy
Anyway, back to my point.
Dole is making that same old
tired argument Tipper used so
ineffectually against rock 10
years ago. If our society is suf-
fering from sexual and violent
crime, then the sex and violence
in our entertainment must be
causing the problem.
But I think he's putting the
cart betore the horse. TV sim-
ply answers demands from its
audience in programming deci-
See DROP page 7





Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
Vilnius
Attractions
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement-
Wednesday, July 19
"Arsenic & Old Lace"
at McGinnis Theatre
comedy)
2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Comedy Zone
featuring Don Reese
at the Attic
The Melanie Sparks Band
at Peasant's Cafe
rock)
Band of Oz
at Champagne's in the Hilton
beach music)
Thursday, July 20
"Arsenic & Old Lace"
at McGinnis Theatre
(comedy)
8 p.m.
One Step Beyond
at the Attic
Friday, July 21
"Arsenic & Old Lace"
at McGinnis Theatre
(comedy)
8 p.m.
In Like Flynn
at Peasant's Cafe
Gibb Droll
and Agents of Good Roots
at the Attic
(guitar rock)
Saturday, July 22
"Arsenic & Old Lace"
at McGinnis Theatre
(comedy)
2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Cold Sweat
at the Attic
(funk)
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event that you'u
like listed in our Coming Attractions
column? If so, please send us information
(a schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville. NC 27858
CROSSWORD
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11 Stray5 Goddess ot the rainbow
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15. Cereal grass8 A compartment on a ship between
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18. Correspond9. Wethe champions
21. Precise14. Serviceable
24. Inclined17 Render naked
25 Humble request tor help18. Petals
26 Declare invalid19. Strong liquor flavored with juniper
28. A person with a record of failingberries
29. Thrills20 Backed out on an agreement
31. Face (slang)22 After B
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r rw-w-rr-r w w-rr r r m r r w rrrwf r . 9 0
Today is Wednesday, July 19, the
200th day of 1995. Them are 165 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 19, 1848, a pioneer
women's rights convention called by
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia
C. Mott convened in Seneca Falls, N.Y.
On this date:
In 1553.15-year-old Lady Jane Grey
was deposed as Queen of England af-
ter claiming the crown for nine days.
King Henry VIII's daughter Mary was
proclaimed Queen.
In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war
began.
In 1941. British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill launched his "V for
Victory" campaign in Europe.
In 1943, allied air forces raided
Rome during World War II.
In 1969. Apollo 11 and its astro-
nauts, Neil Armstrong. Edwin "Buzz"
Aldrin and Michael Collins, went into
orbit around the moon.
In 1975, the Apollo and Soyuz
space capsules that were linked in orbit
for two days separated.
In 1979. the Nicaraguan capital at
Managua fell to Sandinista guerrillas,
two days after President Anastasio
Somoza had tied the country.
In 1980, the Moscow Summer
Olympics began, minus dozens of na-
tions who were boycotting the games
because of the Soviet military interven-
tion in Afghanistan.
In 1984. U.S. Rep. Ceraldine A
Ferraro, D-N.Y won the Democratic
nomination for vice president by accla-
mation at the party's convention in San
Francisco.
Ten years ago: Christa McAuliffe
of New Hampshire was chosen out of
more than 11,000 applicants to be the
first schoolteacher to ride aboard the
space shuttle (McAuliffe and six other
crew members were killed when the
Challenger exploded in mid-flight the
following January).
Five years ago: Baseball's all-time
hits leader Pete Rose was sentenced in
Cincinnati to five months in prison for
tax evasion.
One year ago: A bomb ripped apart
a Panama commuter plane, killing 21,
including 12 Jews, a day after a car bomb
destroyed a Jewish community center
in Buenos Aires, Argentina, killing 95
people. Funeral services were held for
North Korean dictator Kim II Sung, who
had died July 8 at age 82.
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The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
DROP
from page 5
sions. That's what t he Nielson rat-
ings are all about. The Nielsons es-
timate the number of homes tun-
ing in to a given show. A series that
does poorly in the Nielsons won't
be long for this world. The Nielsons
rule TV. If that's the case, the au-
dience must have demanded to see
more sex and violence.
Let's face it. Human beings like
sex and violence. It's easy to like
them; they're bred into us as the
two most fundamental aspects of
survival in the wild. If you don't
have sex. your species won't last
very long. If you don't commit acts
of violence to defend yourself, the
predators are going to quite liter-
ally have you for lunch.
Ultimately, TV is a quick fix for
most Americans, as much as any
drug. We watch TV to relax: we
want it to give us pleasure, and we
don't want to work for it, thanks.
So the same instincts that drive
people to watch insipid no-brainer
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fluff (the stuff Dole likes) are also
what drive us to watch the racier
shows (the stuff Dole doesn't like).
In Dole's defense. I think it can
he a two-way street. Yes. the audi
ence demands sex and violence, but
it that's all they get it can make
them demand even more. That can
change attitudes and lead to more
sexual and violent crime.
But that's all the more reason
to defend XYPD Blue. It gives us
our nudie shots, but it also makes
us think. Sexual relations are never
as simple as two bodies colliding,
and good drama like this show rec-
ognizes that fact. This kind of
thoughtful coverage doesn't lend
itself to the attitudes that lead to
crime.
Of course. I'd be willing to bet
that future presidential candidate
Dole doesn't really care in the first
place. Next year is an election year,
and Dole needs an issue that will
generate lots of media attention,
but that won't requne him to do
anything. Tough issues like unem
ployment or the federal budget
would only get him in trouble. But
TV makes a good scapegoat.
- - yKijCLIP&SAVE
DISNEY from page 5
in The Little Mermaid. When
Pocahontas dives off a cliff she looks
like the young hoy in The Rescuers
Down Under. Once again Disney lias
used a heroine without a mother, just
like Ariel. Belle and Jasmine.
Cartoons must admittedly bor-
row somewhat from the past but
Pocahontas lakes tar too many lib-
erties in borrowing and because of
it cannot generate any interesting
characters with a lite of their own.
One annoying device used by the
animators to try to enliwn the oth-
erwise soggy script is multi-colored
leaves blown all around Pocahontas.
In many scenes colored symbols blow
around her as well as leaves. 1 he ef-
fect is trying to ineffectually convey
(one can only assume) magic. The
rainbow of leaves and symbols look
lake and contrived. Pocahontas could
he in an MTV video instead of 17th
century Virginia.
The voices are flat. Owen
C.leiberman made this comment
about John Smith in Entertainment
Weekly. "He's voiced by Mel Gibson.
who, unaccountably sounds like Rob
l.owe doing Mel Gibson That effec-
tively parallels my thoughts about
Gibson's performance.
Neither Russell Means, as
Pocahontas' father nor David Odgen
Steirs (who was Cogswoth in Beauty
and the Beast), as the villainous Gov-
ernor Ratcliffe, breathe life into their
characters.
The songs do nothing to redeem
the characters. The lyrics tell little
about the character and the melodies
are as bad as Muzak. Worse than the
songs in The I.ion King, the songs
in Pocahontas are forgotten imme-
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diately after the final note.
In one sense 1 guess the film is
successful; the uninspired animation
is perfectly suited for the bland voices
and even blander songs.
Children may enjoy Pocahontas
for its dashing hero and sprightly
heroine. They will also like a raccoon
and a hummingbird that play with
Pocahontas.
Adults may not only find the film
dull, they may also be angered by its
content. The Disneyfication of his-
tory, where the indians and white
settlers live happily every after, is
nearly as offensive as the historical
theme park the company wanted to
build in Virginia.
With the steady decline in the
quality of Disney's animated features
I almost dread seeing what will come
next. I cannot imagine it could be
much worse than Pocahontas. but
you never know (after all they did
make Robin Hood).
On a scale of one to ten.
Pocahontas rates a five.
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into a cheesy sounding porno film
music loop. Timothy reads "Love is
stress, tensionlove is the salt in the
ulcer Love is the loudest silence, the
contempt that is heard When words
are left unspoken Behind all that is
a very exaggerated woman's voice that
seems to be in the middle of some
really good sex or either she is really
good at faking it. This song is sup-
posed to be perverted and that idea
comes across loud and clear.
The last six tracks on this 16-
track CD veer away from the love
theme and go into poetry and social
criticism. My personal favorite is "Up-
per Middle Class White Rage where
the angst is made to order: "Genera-
tion x. reality bites, lolli-pop-pop-pop-
palooza! Oh isn't he the greatest?
He's the latest In upper middle class
white rage Daddy drinks his alco-
hol, mother is drunk with religion
But nothing numbs me like the MTV
and their Upper middle class white
rage
There is one track that is just a
poetry reading. "Where Birds Come
From is a reading of about five or six
short poems with some weird sounds
in the background. The poet even com-
ments on the poems after he reads
them, usually condemning them.
The Chinadoll is basically a per-
forming art troop that got their hands
on some synthesizers and wrote some
poetry about failed love and sex. The
music is bad. but I think they really
meant for it to sound that way: the lyr-
ics are the focus of the album. With-
out the words it would be really bad
dance music or a porno soundtrack.
Overall, this is a good disc just because
it is so different: they break out of the
mold.
It was once said that the tango is
a sad thought that can be danced. That
definition also applies to The
Chinadoll's Tango.

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�r� - �
HiWWMMI
8
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
Ptfutfe
"Plate
UT players suspended
Athletic Dept.
hands down
penalties after
phone scandal
Tyrone Hines
Brian Paiz
Assistant Sports Editor
Six University of Tennessee Vol-
unteer football players have been sus-
pended for the opening game against
East Carolina on September 2.
Chester Ford, Tyrone Hines,
Andy McCullough, Jason Parker, Ja-
son Smith, and Leland Taylor were
all involved in unauthorized calls
made on the University of Tennessee's
phone system. Overall, 31 students,
which included football and basketball
players, were handed down penalties.
Parker and Taylor were suspended for
the 1995 season, and they both were
stripped of their grant-in-aids by Head
Coach Phil Fulmer. The other Volun-
teer football players each lost a $850
grant-in-aid and two game tickets for
the season and were suspended for
the regular season home opener
against ECU. The remaining UT ath-
letes had their grant-in-aids taken
away and 16 players will have to per-
form 100 hours of community service.
"We will not stand by and allow
the university's good name to be tar-
nished by the actions of some of our
athletes Fulmer said. "Our athletes
know they enjoy a rare privilege in
being allowed to represent the Uni-
versity of Tennessee in sports compe-
tition. It is our position that in return,
athletes must be held to a high stan-
dard of responsibility
UT Athletic Director Doug Dickey
said that the investigation into the
unauthorized use of the University's
telephone access code is continuing
and that further penalties will be as-
sessed if developments warrant
The absence of Jason Parker on
the '95 Volunteer football squad could
have the most impact Parker, a 6 foot
198 pound senior free safely, had in-
tercepted nine passes in his career. He
was rated one of the top defensive
backs in the nation by many pre-sea-
Advisers get active
in Pirate athletics
Pam Overton
Craig Perrott
Staff Writer
From a one person job, to a
trend-setting program, academic ad-
vising at East Carolina University
has grown into a system for produc-
ing the true student athlete.
Twelve years ago. Pam Overton
was the sole
"Their rules and
regulations are
governed by the
institution first of
all, and then
secondly by the
NCAA
� Pam Overton
f
counselor in
the academic
advising office
at ECU. Now
she is the As-
sistant Ath-
letic Director
for Student
Development,
a program
which in-
cludes not
only academic
advising, but
other support
services as
well.
'The academic advising pro-
gram was established here for ad-
vising student athletes because stu-
dent athletes come under different
academic regulations than the nor-
mal student body Overon said.
"Their rules and regulations are
governed by the institution first of
all, and then secondly by the NCAA.
So when they have that double role,
it takes an awful lot of just paper-
work to keep up with the things
that they have to do added
Overton.
The academic advising pro-
gram is a part of the Student De-
velopment Program, which is de-
signed to enhance the experience
of the student-athlete in the univer-
sity setting. The primary goals are
(1) to promote academic excellence
and support the efforts of every
student-athlete to earn a degree, (2)
to support the development of ath-
letic potential with a commitment
to sportsmanship and teamwork,
(3) to enhance personal develop-
ment by emphasizing the qualities
of leadership, (4) to establish a com-
mitment of service to others as a
foundation for a balanced lifestyle
and (5) foster the development of
meaningful career.
The role of the academic advis-
ers is not only to make sure ath-
letes are taking courses that count
for a degree, and that they are mak-
ing satisfactory progress towards a
degree, but while doing so they are
meeting the guidelines of the uni-
versity and the NCAA.
There is a staff of three full-
time counselors, other than
Overton, and one part-time coun-
selor. They work together to meet
the needs of the student-athlete,
first as a student,
and secondly as an
athlete.
Other aca-
demic support ser-
vices are also avail-
able. There is a Tu-
torial Program
available to stu-
dents upon request
that may be con-
ducted individually
or in groups. Tu-
tors are graduate
students and out-
standing under-
graduate students
who are recruited
from all departments and are se-
lected on the basis of faculty rec-
ommendation and knowledge of
subject area.
There's the Athletes for Edu-
cation Speaker's Bureau, where
athletes go out and speak in the
public school system on the virtues
of staying in school and being a
"good student in hopes that the
youngsters will attempt to give
themselves the same opportunity to
attend college. Athletes also talk
to community groups about the
See ECU page 9
son college football publications, and
was a strong candidate for first team
All-SEC consideration.
Another big loss is Tyrone Hines,
who will just miss the opening con-
test against the Pirates. Hines, a three
year starter at linebacker for the Vol-
unteers, had 67 tackles as a junior,
and is considered one of the hardest
hitters in the SEC.
ECU offensive coordinator Todd
Berry feels that there is going to be
some impact on UT with the loss of
these players, but he warns not to
underestimate the Volunteers.
"There will probably be some
impact" said Berry. "Obviously, any-
time you lose players it changes your
offensive and defensive schemes, but
I used to coach at UT, and their drop
off between first and second team is
not that much
Photo Courtesy of UT SID
Jason Parker was expected to be the starting free safety for
UT this season, but due to his involvement in unauthorized
phone calls, he was dismissed from the team.
Former Pirate pitcher makes
it to the "show" after long wait
Christopher
starring in relief
role for Tigers
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
You can't keep a good man down.
After shuffling around the minor
leagues for 11 years, former ECU
hurler Mike Christopher has found a
permanent home in the bullpen of
historic Tiger Stadium.
"I was at Triple-A with Toledo and
had 21 saves before I got called up
Christopher said. "I'd made the Triple-
A All Star team and was getting ready
to go play that, but fortunately
enough, I got called up to the big
leagues
So far, things couldn't be better.
Christopher earned victories in his
first two outings, and has compiled a
3.86 earned run average to date.
Basically it was 11 years in the
minors until now he said. "I hope
that getting off to this good start I
can stick with Detroit for a while
Upon calling him up to the ma-
jor league level from the Tigers' Triple-
A affiliate in Toledo, Ohio, Detroit
manager Sparky Anderson told the
former Pirate that he would become
the set-up man for closer Mike
Henneman.
Anderson went on
to say that Chris-
topher would be
given the opportu-
nity to save games
if Henneman
pitched the night
before.
"They don't
like to pitch Mike
back-to-back days,
so Sparky said
that I'd have a
chance to close
some games
Christopher said.
"The majority of
my job is going to be to set him up
and come in the game in middle re-
lief during the sixth, seventh or eighth
innings
Beyond the added pressures of a
major-league call-up, Christopher had
to deal with the stigma of being a
"They don't like to
pitch Mike back-
to-back days, so
Sparky said that
I'd have a chance
to close some
games
� Mike Christopher
spring training replacement player.
"Some of the veteran guys gave
me the cold shoulder the first couple
of days he said, "but each day - es-
pecially since 1 got off to that good
start, they know that I'm there to help
the team and just
trying to fit right
in with them
After two
seasons a ECU
under head coach
Gary Overton,
Christopher was
the New York
Yankees' seventh
selection in the
June 1985 draft,
and reached the
club's Triple-A af-
filiate (Colum-
bus) in 1989.
"When he
came to ECU, he
was a tall, gangly young man ECU
head baseball coach Gary Overton
said. "We knew that if his body devel-
oped and his velocity increased, there
was no question that he was a pro
See TIGERS page 9
NFL gearing up for training camp
�i
(AP)- Quarterback Kerry
Collins' $23 million contract with the
Carolina Panthers had an immediate
impact in Cincinnati, where the
Bengals are trying to sign No. 1 draft
choice Ki-Jana Carter.
Both former Penn State players
are represented by agent Leigh
Steinberg.
"We're still talking, so I guess
that's a good sign said Katie
Blackburn, the Bengals' secretary-
treasurer said of the Carter negotia-
tions. "I thought we were getting
pretty close, then Collins signed.
Then we had to redo
a little bit"
The Bengals
had been talking
about a $6 million
signing bonus for
Carter. Then Collins,
picked No. 5, got $7
million and sud-
denly, things
changed.
On Monday,
Collins worked out
in full pads and
struggled against the
Panthers' array of
veteran defensive backs.
"Pretty easy. He's making me
look good with a bad knee said
strong safety Bubba McDowell, who
is just back after reconstructive knee
surgery but put on a dominating dis-
play against Collins, who seemed
slow and was tipping off his passes.
"He's got a lot to learn. He was
looking at them all the way
McDowell said. "But he's going to
get better with time. There's no
doubt about that. He's got talent
And h's got a fancy contract, a
deal that almost certainly was noted
by wide receiver Michael Westbrook,
who was picked just ahead of Collins
at No. 4. Westbrook was missing from
Washington's voluntary mini-camp
on Monday and could be a signing
problem for the Redskins.
"Every day he misses, it sets him
back said coach Norv Turner,
whose quarterback plans were frus-
trated last year when Heath Shuler
held out for 13 days before signing a
club-record, $19.25 million contract.
"I don't think it's comparable to the
quarterback position, but when he
gets here, he's
going to have
to make up
ground
Westbrook
is reportedly
seeking a
four-year, $6.5
million deal.
Mean-
while, the
New York Jets
satisfied Penn
State another
first-rounder,
tight end Kyle
Brady.
Brady, the ninth player selected
in last spring's draft, agreed to a four-
year $5.1 million contract that made
him the highest paid rookie tight end
in NFL history.
According to agents Mike and
Mark Clouser, Brady will get salaries
of $445,000, $525,000, $630,000 and
$735,000 and becomes the seventh
highest paidf tight end in the NFL.
Quarterback Kordell Stewart,
picked by Pittsburgh in the second
round, settled for somewhat less in
I thought we
were getting
pretty close, then
Collins signed.
Then we had to
redo a little bit
� Katie Blackburn
Bengals secretary- treasurer
another four-year deal.
Stewart agreed to a $1.85 mil-
lion contract that includes a
$530,000 signing bonus and annual
salaries of $240,000, $300,000,
$360,000 and $420,000.
Tight end Christian Fauria,
picked by Seattle from Colorado,
reached a three-year deal with Seattle
that will reportedly pay him $1.47
million. The Seahawks remain in ne-
gotiations with their first-round pick,
Ohio State Joey Galloway, who was
the eighth overall selection.
The Dallas Cowboys call their
mini camp "Quarterback School"
and No. 1 passer Troy Aikman thinks
this is the place for success to start.
"I think training camp deter-
mines the tempo for the whole sea-
son he said. "I think if you perform
well, if positive things happen and
you feel you can believe in the play-
ers around you, then I think a team
becomes tremendously confident.
"Right now, I like the attitude
of this football team, and I like our
chances this season
Coach Barry Switzer and his
staff decided to push back the start
of training camp about a week later
than normal in a measure to protect
players from contact for as long as
possible.
Switzer said he knows his vet-
eran stars are prepared.
"I've seen the commitment of
Michael Irvin and other players he
said. "Michael has been over here
running with his pads on to prepare
himself to practice in the heat.
"Emmitt (Smith) looks like he
is in tremendous condition. His
weight is down. I think those things
are tremendous indicators
Steve Logan and his staff can
breath a little easier now that her-
alded wide receiver Troy Smith from
Greenville Rose has passed the SAT
on his final try and is eligible for
competition as a freshman.
Smith, a 6-foot-3, 180-pound
Super Prep and Blue-Chip Illus-
trated AU-American; shattered sev-
eral regional receiving records dur-
ing his three year career at Rose.
He caught 134 passes for 2,088
yards and 27 touchdowns for Head
Coach Lonnie Baker, and was re-
cruited heavily by Notre Dame,
Texas and South Carolina.
Notre Dame head coach Lou
Holtz reportedly did not back off
on recruiting Smith even after he
made his verbal commitment to
ECU.
"He is what I call a difference-
maker recruiting coordinator said
Ken Treadway said. "With his speed
and ability to jump and catch the
football it significantly improves our
depth and talent at an already
loaded receiver positioa"
Head coach Steve Logan envi-
sioned on signing date back in Feb-
ruary a goal line situation with two
big athletes lined up outside, Smith
and 6-foot6 Larry Shannon.
"Initially, we will use him like
we did with Larry this year, using
him on fade routes and let him use
his athletic ability Logan said.
"With both of them lined up oppo-
site each other, teams won't be able
to double up on Larry
Smith recently competed with
other North Carolina basketball
stars in the East-West Shrine Games,
and has not ruled out playing shoot-
ing guard for new coach Joe Dooley
Another late signee is Roxboro
Person wide receiver Lamont
Chappell, who has also qualified
academically. Chappell is a lanky 6-
foot-1, 170 pound player with 4.5
speed who caught 80 passes for
1262 yards and 16 touchdowns, plus
three punt returns for scores. He
was on the receiving end of passes
from North Carolina State signee
Jamie Bamett, the Durham Herald
Sun Area Player of the Year.
Chappell took visits to North
Carolina and North Carolina State
and was recruited by Florida. All
three schools backed off and pur-
sued other prospects after it became
apparent that Chappell's scores
would not qualify him on signing
date.
"I am really glad I am going to
be playing for ECU Chappell said.
"They throw the ball a lot and it is
definitely my style of offense
Smith and Chappell should
help make up for the loss of Allen
Williams a two year letterwinner at
receiver from Rock Hill, SC who
caught five touchdowns last season.
Williams left school following the
spring semester because of academ-
ics and personal reasons.
On the defensive side of the
football the Pirates are hurting es-
pecially in the front four with the
losses of Jermaine Smith and
Roberto Santiago.
Santiago, a Woot-2,300 pound
nose guard (2 technique in Pirate
defensive terminology) from
Hackensack. NJ played a lot as a
backup to standout senior John
Krawczyk last season and was ex-
pected to start this year. He at-
tended ECU summer school but left
shortly after first session and with-
drew from school. Santiago was
recruited by Syracuse and West Vir-
ginia after making All-State his se-
See NOTES page 9
is





MmmmmmmmUm
mmmmmmmmmmim
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
i
NOTES from page 8
ECU
from page 8
nior year.
Smith, a 6-foot-3, 235 pound out-
side linebacker, (Leo) was expected to
take the place of Carolina Panthers free
agent rookie Willie Brookins. The NE
Oklahoma A&M All-American Junior
College transfer will be transferring to
NAIA perennial power Central State
(Ohio) where he will be immediately eli-
gible upon arrival.
Smith who made 13 sacks in four
spring scrimmages was one of the best
all-around athletes on the team with a
457 40 yard dash time and a 415 pound
bench press.
Central State coaches envision
Smith taking the place of departed NFL
first round draft choice Hugh Douglass
who was the second pick by the New
York Jets in this spring's draft
"We base our defense on speed and
with the way he can run and hit we defi-
nitely will play him at that position
Central State assistant Shawn Harding
said. "We intend to feature him and let
him go after the quarterback. We are
still in the process of getting him accepted
to school but he should bt elijfble from
what I can tell from looking jt his tran-
script and we are glad to have him at
Central. He is a big-time player
Another departure from the Pirate
defense is defensive back Nelson Bonilla
who transferred a year ago from Wake
Forest Bonilla. a very physical cover man
was expected to challenge for playing
time in the ECU secondary but left school
following the spring semester.
With these losses in the defensive
line JUCO transfers Stacey Whitehead.
(W, 295) from New Bern via East Cen-
tral CC (Miss.), and Terell Williams (6-3,
285) from West LA CC will have to step
up and contribute immediately in the
interior of the Pirate front seven. Both
come highly touted with Whitehead post-
ing 17 sacks and earning M-Mississippi
junior college honors and Williams be-
ing recruited by several Pac-10 schools
and played both ways last season. He
played with Southern Cal All-American
Keyshawn Johnson while at West LA
"Both of those guys will have to play
well right away because of our lack of
depth in the middle said defensive line
coach Cliff Yoshida. "They should be
able to do the job for us
BASEBALL THIS WEEKEND
July 21-24
Vs. the Salem Avalanche
Saturday is Replica Jersey Night
BASEBALL NEXT WEEKEND 3
July 25-27 Vs. the Lynchburg Hillcats
July 27 is 16 oz. Mug Night
It's Also WDLX Thirsty Thursday
75 cents 12 oz. bevarages
All Games At 7
Remember, ECU Students
Always Get In For $2
CALL (800) 334-5467
� �qlCCLiP&SAVEl
3X5 or 4X6 PRINTS
35mm color prints
only. NO LIMIT!
r�
You Save $2.00 on processing ANY Color C-4135mm Film.
4X6 Prints. Can NOT be combined with other discounts.
Greenville (3 store!)
importance of education in their lives,
as well as techniques they employ for
athletic and academic success.
Also, since student-athletes are
involved in a training regimen year-
round, they usually don't have the
opportunity to explore careers. This
is where the Career Network comes
in. Students are aided in career de-
velopment, resumes and thinking
about life after college.
Each athletic team has their own
academic support services as well. For
example, the football team has study
hall every morning at 7:30.
Seminars in academic skills de-
velopment are open to all student-ath-
letes who wish to attend. Topics in-
clude: time management, strengthen-
ing memory, note taking, chapter
mapping, and test taking. Guest lec-
turers who have expertise in these
areas assist with the seminars.
Finally, there is the Student-Ath-
lete Advisory Council, which is to stu-
dent-athletes what SGA is to the gen-
eral student body. Two members of
each athletic team meet with Overton
twice a month for leadership training
and to address the issues the athletes
want to be made known to the ath-
letic administration. It is a segment
of the Student Development Program
that is rewarding to students and fac-
ulty alike, and one of which Pam
Overton is extremely proud.
"We've had one for eight years,
so it's been a model program and it
is now mandated by the NCAA that
you have one on your campus.
Theyfthe students) are extremely in-
volved in the running of the program,
and I think it's been a good experi-
ence for them, and also very valuable
for us
This full range of services com-
bine to form a total support system
for those wishing to achieve both aca-
demic and athletic success at East
Carolina.
Parkviezv Kingston Place
is now
KINGSTON
CONDOMINIUMS
New Look - New Management
New and newly renovated 1 and2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo units, large and small, furnished or unfurnished,
with washers and dryers, free cable and water.
Pool, clubhouse & more. ECU bus service.
KINGSTON
RENTALS CO.
758-7575
Rosemont
SELF-STORAGE
Call (919) 353-1395
for Leasing Information
�-���

"Greenville's"
JQHLX
Exotie
IVighlc-lub
3uLLET
Al "rToacU oi Cass
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-lam
CASH PRIZE
�Conifstants need u call & tepstei in advance.
Mu&tan-ivi'bv, h.00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
June 30th
Daytona Bad Boys
Male Revue
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
1 Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
ilMcdonald
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
11 CjrJblvJ) from page 8
prospect"
The righthander switched to an
Albuquerque Dukes' uniform for the
next two seasons, and was rewarded
with his first big-league call-up to
Tommy Lasorda's Dodgers after a 7-2
campaign in 1991.
"Lasorda and Sparky are two of the
best managers ever Christopher said.
"Sparky's third on the all-time win list
so that speaks for itself. It's great to play
under guys like that"
In 1992, Christopher received two
call-ups from the Cleveland Indians, and
compiled a 2.08 ERA during his sec-
ond stint under manager Mike Hargrove.
However, it was back to Triple-A
for the majority of the 1993 season, and
a change of uniforms was soon to fol-
low. Last season, Christopher joined the
Toledo Mud Hens, where he led the
squad with 63 appearances and 11
saves.
"Mike is a power pitcher with an
exceptional slider Overton said. "He's
a very tough competitor and won some
big ball games for us
After playing for the Tigers in
spring training this season, all it took
was a spectacular first-half to earn the
righthander his fourth major-league
invitation and a second-half spot in the
Tigers' bullpen.
"Right now, we are three games
behind Boston Christopher said. If we
can continue to play good defense and
pitch well - we've got the heavy hit-
ters, no question about that hopefully
we'll track down Boston and give them
a run for it
"There's a lot of excitement in De-
troit right now, especially with the man-
agement going with youth. Its just a
great atmosphere
EAST
CAROLINA
COIN &
PAWN
IS1l(
in n (,(
Hours
9-6 M-F
9-5 SAT
�VCR'S
'DIAMONDS
�GUNS
�TELEVISION
�STEREOS
�GOLD & PAWN
BUILION
�JEWELRY
�GUITARS
�COINS
�CAMERAS
A! Transactions Strictly Corifidential
752-0322
Comer of 10th & Dickinson
MasterCard
FACT
Every year, Americans
discard 16 billion
plastic diapers, two
billion disposable;
razors and 1.6 bittion
ballpoint pens.
TIP:
Use durable alterna-
tives such as cloth
diaper, razors that use
replaceable blades (or
even electric razors)
and pens with refills.
This Green Tip is sponsored by:
Heron Bay
Trading Co.
"Greenville's Exclusive
Nature Store"
in The Plaza
321-6380
.





- bit ii"T ivmmamm
4im ii iJ'isj
10
Wednesday, July 19, 1995
The East Carolinian
� v&Mzc&
rgsoCouUrl
PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
BY: PAUL HAGWOOD BLOOD OF THE LAMB
BY CHAISSON AND BRETTTHE
J f�i y
fl31i Of4 ? VtfAI. NlGKY, 1 isw 4ooiIadrea�, 1 aooo mcars DWM J Lws s�yesmo�
GSh1
Fyourje AU.SKNEE��Roles"
TABHlSAB-H, 8JT HO UMK IS Boi�E.
J S, MS OOa, SEEM To HAvC �.H
iJiTrSWon BE -0 - �1SSEI l-
MAdlTM'S UteT EAH5, l OdLBREd.



For Rent
n
Help Wanted
LIFEGUARD'S. SUMMER. CALL BOB,
758-1088
BABYSITTER NEEDED! Three year old
boy and his parents want help from a non-
smoking reliable person. Own transporta-
tion required, first aidCPR knowledge
preferred. Call 752-9243.
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S. Evans St.
Experienced wait staff needed. No phone
calls please. Apply in person between
2:00pm and 6:00pm.
HOME BUSINESS: A GROUNDFLOOR
OPPORTUNITY for Pycnogenol Distribu-
tors Call to see how you can become a
distributor with no investment or buy at
wholesale from an industry leader in
health supplements. Call Bill Moore @
9464629.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE: to students who are inter-
ested in becoming PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS to students in wheel-
chairs. READERS, AND TUTORS. Past
experience is desired but not required. For
an application, contact: Office for Disabil-
ity Support Systems, Brewster A-116 or
A-114. Telephone (919) 328799.
STUDENTS NEED A JOB? ROADWAY
PACKAGE SYSTEM is looking for PACK-
AGE HANDLERS to load Vans and Un-
load Trailers for the AM shift, hours
4:00am to 8:00am. $6.00hour, tuition
assistance available after 30 days. Future
career opportunities in operations and
management possible. Applicat ions can be
filled out at 104 United Drive, Greenville,
752-1803.
"STUDENT WANTED" PART-TIME
Auto detail & cleanup person needed.
Prefer student seeking long ter m employ-
ment Hours 12:00-5:00 or 1:00-6:00. $5.00
per hour start Must be dependable & have
D. L. Apply in Person only. Jarman Auto
Sales, Inc. Greenville Blvd.
WANTED! PART TIME DISTRIBU-
TORS IMMEDIATELY. Be the First to
Profit from the HOTTEST product on the
market "DEBIT CARDS Now Avail-
able! Call Today(919) 736-9151, 1-800-
644-0901.
$1750 WEEKLY possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 301-306-1207.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING Seansonal
& Full-time employment available at Na-
tional Parks, Forests & Wildlife Preservies.
Benefitsbonuses! Call: 1-206-545-4804
ext. N53623.
HELP NEEDED IMMEDIATELY NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY will train.
Must be 18 years old. Playmates Massage,
Snow Hill, NC (919) 747-7686.
RESORT JOBS - Theme Parks, Hotel &
Spas, MountainOutdoor Resorts. more!
Earn to $12hr. tips. For more informa-
tion, call (206)632-0150 ext R53622
HELP WANTED - Apply Thursday 0720
9:00am - 12:00pm Washpub 2511 East
10th Street.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
Travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.) Seasonal and Ful1 time employment
available. No experience nesessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53626.
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I. or Tommy Williams
7.6 ?Sl5758436
Roommate Matching Service
Brought to you by
"At No Extra Charge To You-
Call or come by Ic if t us help you find that
PERFECT rooror 0;e you've been looking for.
(919)321-7613
I526CliartesBlvd
Greenville NC 278:
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED - 4 bedroom
house - with washer & dryer -1 block from
campus. $175 per mont h 14 bills. Male
or Female, Smoker or Non-Smoker 758-
5585.
2 RMS FOR RENT - 3 blks from campus.
Avail Aug Rent $175 plus deposit Call
after 5p.m. 757-3939
BEST PLACE in town to live needs BEST
ROOMMATE in town to join us. Must be
CREATIVE, musical, responsible. 3 bdrm
house has AC, cathedral ceiling, fireplace,
party patio, loft and music room. It's close
to campus & lots of fun. Help us have
more! Call us at 758-7993.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 3
Bdrm, 2 12 bath, spacious Apt Available
August 1, $155month 13 Utilities. Call
Joanna at 757-0037.
ROOMMATE WANTED: for two bedroom
and bath. Rent: $175 a month plus 12
utilities. Laundry room in complex. Must
be neat and non-smoker. Call Patrick at
752-9928.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 3
bedroom apartment in July or August in
Wilson Acres. 205$ rent 13 utilities.
Prefer nonsmoker who is fairly clean. 757-
2891.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to share
brand new 4BR, 3 full bath apartment
home. $250 per month plus 14 utilities,
Swimming pool, aerobics, exercise center,
clubhouse, lighted tennis courts and lots
of extras including continental breakfast
each friday morning. Call 321-7613.
NEED A COOL PLACE TO LIVE? 2BR,
1 Full bath apartment close to campus
available for sublease. $200 per month
each. Please call 830-2750. Leave a mes-
sage.
1 BR, 3 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS,
washerdryer hook-ups, spacious Front
room, walk-in closet $315mo. Call L arry,
757-2873.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male to share
brand new 4 br. 3 full bath apartment
$250 per month plus 14 utilities. Swim-
ming pool, tennis, volleyball, weight room
and more. Call 321-7613.
1 OR 2 FEMALES NEEDED T O SHARE
3 bedroom house with garage, 2 bath, one
block from campus. Outgoing & Studious.
$210 mth.13 utitilies. Call Jena: 758-
6649 anytime.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - - MALE OR
FEMALE to share 3 bdr. Apt. Two female
smokers seek down-to-earth, laidback
roommate. $165mo. 13 Utilities &
Cable. Washer & Dryer incl. Aug 1st - May
lease. No pets. Please call Ellen or Kristina
321-0655.
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near Campus. No
Pets. $700 per month. Available August
7th. (919)726-6841.
Services Offered
For Sale
NEED HELP ON GETTING THOSE
PAPERS TYPED? Call G. S. Typing Ser-
vices. Affordable Rates. Call Today -
758-7653.
FOR SALE: Full-size Washer and Dryer.
Excellent Condition. $200 or best offer.
Call 321-4827.
386 COMPUADD COMPUTER $250,
Queen Size Waterbed $100, Couch $100.
3 Chairs $15 ea Fischer Stereo $100,
Mountain Bike $50. Call 752-8767.
MMmmmmmMmmmsm
AVON PRODUCTS FOR SAlE - Contact
Independent Avon Representive at 756-
9033 for Complete List of Product Line.
GUITARS - 2 box - 2 composit back - 1
cutaway accelecwo EQ prices $135 to
$475 will TAKE TRADES. Please call (919)
637-6550.
SMALL-TIME MOVER, HAVE VAN
WILL MOVE STUDENTS WITHIN
GREENVILLE AREA. $30 per haul, you
load. Please call to make appointment
Raymond L. Brown, Letter Perfect Signs,
756-5520.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53625.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
$ CASH $
We Also Buy
gold
silver
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
STOP! MOST INEXPENSIVE "NEW"
DUPLEX IN GREENVILLE! $51,900
includes all appliances, washer & dryer! 2
bedrooms. 2 full baths, open white
kitchenliving room wcathedtral ceiling.
2005B Summerhaven. (919) 851-1153.
Rent till closing. Immediate Occupancy!
ONE OWNER - 1993 RED MERCURY
TRACER FOR SALE: only 16,700 miles.
Excellent Condition. Call for more info
752-8612
94' MONGOOSE IBOC, Aluminum
Frame, Magnesium Rock Shox, Excellent
Condition. $600 o.b.o. Salamon �4'
Intergral Ski Boot Retail $585.00. Sell for
$250.00, Size 9-10.757-2684 ask for Keith.
PLANE TICKET ONE WAY RALEIGH
TO DENVER $70. Can be rewrtten for
small fee. Call 752-3074.
cvecUte&cUuf
Personals
CAREER SERVICES PROGRAMS
The following programs sponsored by
Career Services are open to any interested
students, especially Seniors and graduat e
students who will graduate during the
summer and December, 1995. The pro-
grams wili be held in the Career Services
Center, 701 E. Fifth Street.
RESUME WRITING - Monday July 24 at
4:00pm:
JOB SEARCH STRATEGIES Wednes
day July 19 at 5:00pm and Thursday July
27 at 3:00pm
ORIENTATION TO CAREER SER-
VICES - Thursday July 20: Wednesday July
26, 4:00pm
This is an overview of services to seniors
and graduate students that covers regis-
tration procedures, information on partici-
pating in campus interviews, and estab-
lishing a credentials file.
FRISBEE GOLF
All Frisbee Golfers are invited to play in
the Frisbee Golf Singles Tournament July
19 & 20 at 3pm on the Frisbee Golf
Course. For more information call Recre-
ational Services at 328-6387
FITNESS FLING
Come to the Fitness Fling for a free
aerobics class, healthy snacks and prizes
during the Friday Fitness Fling July 21 at
4pm in the Garrett Residence Hall. For
more information call Recreational Ser-
vices at 328387.
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
WANTED: FEMALE COMPANION. IN-
TERESTS: Art Music, WZMB, Writing,
Poetry, Dreams, Nothing, Conceptual
Thinker, Star Trek, Computers, Programs
& Games, Cool happy person who loves
life and wants to share. Call Raymond at
Letter Perfect 756-5520
SUMMER TRAVELS
If you are planning international summer
travel, don't forget to stop by the Interna-
tional Programs office on 306 E. 9th
Street for your International Student Iden-
tity Card! This card provides discounts on
travel and includes insurance benefits.
Also available are youth hostel cards for
travel within the US and internationally.
Come by or call 328769 for more infor-
mation!
VIDEO YEARBOOK
Have you seen it? Are you in it? Have you
picked up your FREE copy? ECU's pre-
mier edition of our video yearbook- The
Treasure Chest! To get your free tape,
bring your student ID by the Media Board
Office, or The East Carolinian, 2nd floor,
Student Publications Building(across from
Joyner Library). Hurr y while supplies last
The Price Is
Right!
Our classifieds are only $2
for 25 words with a valid
student I. D.
We knead an copyeditor two
fix hour mixtakes .
Lequirements:
� ECU student
� 2.0 GPA or better
� Available Sun. & Tues. afternoons (in Fail)
Call Stephanie Lassiter at 328-6366.





The East Carolinian
your college years
c4ue
Circulation 5,000
East Carolina University
Summer 1995
Greenville, N C
20 pases
IvtAide
Mlk
You need to know where to park, you need to know
what to bring, you need to know what's going on,
how to get there and when to go. So start flippin
through these pages, because they are FILLED
with vital imformation. Welcome to ECU,
kids
page
t6iauy& acactetUc�
College is not without its challenges, and
academics is certainly one of them. For a guide to
doing the best you can, and what is available
around campus, turn to these pages. We help you q
with the emotional stress, as wellpage J
S J)
jj
Now, once you've mastered the campus, know all
there is to know about getting that four-oh, you
need to know how to relax. But don't call for a ride
home! ECU and the Greenville community have
more to offer than you can shake a saber at. For a �
the best advice on how to relax, turn topage I O

tfiau$4 at�tetic4
You simply cannot be a Pirate without being a
Pirate sports fan. Find out who the new faces are
in the Athletics department, and find out what
they want to say to YOU Then get your parents' j q
credit card numbers ready and GET THOSE page I Q
TICKETS!





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'Barefoot
on the
Mall

The annual welcoming
of spring held on the
Mall, sponsored by
University Unions. The
annual welcoming of
spring held on the
Mall, sponsored by
University Unions.
The East
an
Maureen A. Rich,
Guest Editor
Stephanie Lasstter,
Editor
Tambra Zlon, News
Editor
Wendy Rountree,
Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle
Editor
Brandon Waddell,
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports
Editor
Brian Paiz, Assistant
Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff
Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout
Manager
Jack Skinner,
Photographer
Darryl Marsh, Creative
Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation
Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy
Editor
Miles Layton Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media
Adviser
Janet Respess, Media
Accountant
Deborah Danlel.Secretary
Serving the ECU community since
1925, The East Carolinian publishes
12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion ot the Editorial
Board. The East Carolinian
welcomes letters to the editor,
limited to 250 words, which may be
edited for decency or brevity. The
East Carolinian reserves the right to
edit or reject letters for publication.
All letters must be signed. Letters
should be addressed to Opinion
Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27S5&4353. For
Information, call (919) 328 6366
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Hirst ear
xperience
Lends a helping hand
BUI Woodward
Asit. Orientation Director
Orientation isn't just for summer
anymore. The Office of Orientation
and the First-Year Experience will
continue to build on information and
issues that were introduced to the
students in their two and 12 day
summer orientation session.
These programs will fall under
the First-Year Experience component
of the office's responsibilities.
What will the First-Year Experi-
ence be like? Just like the name im-
plies, the programs offered under this
title will be geared toward a student's
first year of school
and what he or
she might experi-
ence.
The Office of
Orientation and
the First-Year Ex-
perience has been
working with
other depart-
ments on campus
to address issues
of growth and de-
velopment the stu-
dents will encoun-
ter throughout
their first year.
There are five ar-
eas that will be
emphasized
through the First-
Year Experience.
They are academic achievement,
health and well-being, leadership, re-
lationships and life philosophy.
The focus of the academic
achievement component will be as-
sisting students with their academic
goals and pursuits such as deciding
on a major, and succeeding in the
classes they have chosen.
The health and well-being area
will help students make healthy de-
cisions about their emotional and
physical development. Nutrition, ex-
ercise and the lowering of stress are
focuses.
The activities and programs un-
der the area of leadership will help
students uncover and further develop
their leadership abilities. Students
will also find out how to become in-
volved in co-curricular activities on
campus.
One issue addressed in the rela-
tionships area will be understanding
the importance of establishing a tol-
erance and appreciation of the diver-
sity of student here at ECU and in
the "real world" that students will
encounter upon graduation. This
area will also foster the students'
abilities to engage in healthy relation-
ships with others.
A life philosophy is something
that everyone develops throughout
his or her life. This aspect of the First-
Year Experience will assist students
in developing goals, values and be-
liefs that will guide their futures.
Through a development of a life phi-
losophy, the students will not only
learn how to become a positive con-
tributor to the ECU campus, but also
to the future community they will call
home.
Students
will need to
watch for infor-
mation about
the dates, times
and locations of
these programs
once they get to
campus so they
don't miss op-
portunities to
help them suc-
ceed during
their years at
ECU.
Another
program that
was created
within the de-
partment of Uni-
versity Housing
Services goes all year in Aycock Resi-
dence Hall. Two floors have been
reserved specifically for students who
have requested to live in an environ-
ment made up exclusively of first-year
students.
The staff on those floors will pro-
vide programs geared toward the
needs and interests of students who
are new to the university setting. Pro-
grams offered will complement those
that assist students' development in
the five First-Year Experience com-
ponents.
The students who live on these
floors will become part of a commu-
nity and learning environment that
will help them succeed in their first
year of college and beyond.
Efforts by Orientation and the
First-Year Experience, as well as
other offices in the Division of Stu-
dent Life, have been tremendous, and
the programs that will be available
will be both exciting and informative.
The focus of the
academic
achievement
component will be
assisting students
with their
academic goals
and pursuits such
as deciding on a
major
Preview '95 gets
students on the
right foot
Michael Penland
Asst. Orientation Director
What's new with Preview '95?
It's everything we've had before and
more. The point is that all new pro-
grams during Ori-
entation are de-
signed to make
any student's pre-
view experience
enjoyable and in-
formative.
There are
many new initia-
tives in Orienta-
tion programming, such as the mini-
drama performances on important is-
sues like diversity, substance abuse,
sexually transmitted diseases and
sexual assault.
There will also be a traditions
celebration expressing school pride
and paarticipation. The cheerleaders,
Marching Pirates and Athletic depart-
ment have teamed up with Orienta-
tion to introduce ECU's tradition of
school spirit.
Also, a new staff which incorpo-
ECU is a
university to be
proud of
rates trained faculty as Orientation
assistants has been recruited. Yes, I
did mention that faculty will be par-
ticipating in many of the programs
going on this summer. These new ef-
forts will provide a way for experi-
enced students and teachers to edu-
cate new stu-
dents about real
issues so they
can make in-
formed deci-
sions.
Being new
anywhere can be
tough, so the fac-
ulty Orientation
position is also intended to bridge
that gap of mystery between profes-
sors and freshmen. It's a way of get-
ting lines of communication open
early, so when a student needs help
they know it's really there.
Preview '95 is staff, faculty, stu-
dents and administration working to-
gether to provide an environment
that reflects the best of what ECU
will have to offer in the coming years.
ECU is a university to be proud of
and that pride starts from day one!
r:n-sz
t
i viVi'ii's
I Sl I KM P.
Office at the Chancellor
103 Spilman
May 29, 1995
919-328-6212
To the Class of 1999 and Parents:
I am pleased to welcome you to East Carolina
University. This is surely an exciting moment in your
life as you begin your orientation to the university. Be
assured that the faculty and staff are committed to
making your transition to university life as pleasant as
possible. During the orientation period you undoubtedly
will have questions. Please know that we welcome your
questions and will do everything possible to answer them.
East Carolina is engaged in one of the greatest
building programs in its history. You will be among the
first students to enjoy the benefits of the state-of-the-
art Joyner Library addition, the Student Recreation
Center, the newly renovated Slay and Umstead Residence
Halls, and the campus-wide fiber-optic network.
Todd Dining Hall and Williams Arena in Minges Coliseum
are new additions to our campus and will add greatly to
your enjoyment of campus life. We have over $135 million
worth of projects which are recently completed, under
construction, or in the design phase.
We are busy this summer planning for your arrival in
August. There is an air of excitement as we anticipate
your arrival and the full slate of campus activities
which will greet you. You should plan to be challenged
academically and nurtured in the development of the full
range of your talents and skills. East Carolina
University is a great place; we're pleased that you have
decided to be a part of us.
Sincerely,
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
RREra
Finding a Job with The East Carolinian is
easier than you think. Just stop by and
pick up an application from our secretary.
We are located on the second floor of the
Student Publications building.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would like to Welcome
All New Students And Parents and Invite You
to Join Us In Worship
When You Come to ECU
Fall Semester Campus Mass Schedule
Sunday at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the
Newman Catholic Center
All Orientation Guests are Welcome to Visit
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplin and Campus Minister

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Bj
Parking
Marguerite Benjamin
Staff Writer
on
Campus
If you're lucky enough to have a
car, then you're lucky enough to
have what we call the special
ECU Parking Migraine � patent
pending. Find out where you can
park, where your parents can
parky and how much a ticket will
set you back.
Okay, new students, there is good
news and bad news. Let's start with
the bad news.
While, overall, first-time students
coming to ECU in the fall will be im-
pressed by our wonderful campus dur-
ing orientation, those who have be-
come accustomed to free parking at
previous places of residence are in for
some culture shock.
"Prices for parking permits are
going to be the same in the fall as
they were in Spring said Pat Gertz,
director of ECU Parking and Traffic
Services. For those who do not know,
those prices were as follows:
The cost of parking permits for
residents (students living in residence
halls) who have earned 32 or more
credit hours, freshmen, students living
in the residence halls who have earned
31 or less credit hours; and medical
commuters are currently $96.
Limited permits for students liv-
ing off campus and having less than
31 or less credit hours and motorcycle
permits are $42 and $15 respectively.
Students are to be advised that com-
muter permits are invalid on campus
after 1 a.m.
"What we will do is give students
a registration brochure so they can
register early for their parking per-
mits Gertz said.
During Orientation, students will
be given a complete packet of infor-
mation including a parking map and a
parking guide containing more regu-
lations about parking along with the
fines associated with students who re-
ceive tickets for illegal parking. (And,
yes, the Department of Parking and
Traffic Services does tow.)
After all of that here's the good
news. The department has made it
easier for students to move into resi-
dence halls in August Parking close
to the residence halls while moving in
is not only convenient it is a neces-
sity. (Ask any returning student and
any veteran parent)
There will be several lots and park-
ing spaces near the residence halls des-
ignated as loading zones with a 30-
minute time limit There will be on-duty
personnel to provide information and
help keep congestion down to a mini-
mum.
"Students will find this arrange-
ment helpful, since so many students
will be moving in at once Gertz said.
"Students are advised to first unload
their vehicles, then move the vehicles
to one of the fringe areas designated
for parking during move-in. Afterwards
they can unpack and set up their rooms.
"We will give every new student
complete details in the form of bro-
chures and pamphlets so we can be sure
no one is left in the dark about parking
procedures
The Parking and Traffic office is
located next to the McDonald's on E.
10th Street
20
21
EMERGENCY RD.
UniversityMedical Center
of Eastern CarolinaPitt County
1. Bnxi Medical Sciences10. Hospital Admissions
Bulletin111. Emergencv Department
2. Health Sciences Librarv12. Intensive Care
and Administration13. Radiologv
V Biotechnologv Building14. Bed Towers
4. Leo VV Jenkins15. Surgerv
Cancer Center16. Teaching Addition
5. Familv Practice Center17. Neonatal Intensive Care
6. Alumni. Development,IS. Birthing Center
Information �I1. Rehabilitation Center
Publications Building20. Mental Health Center
7. Magnetic Resonance21 Gaskins-Leslie Center
Imaging22. Psvchiatrv
8. Lite,Seiences Building23. Helipad
9. Clinical Pathology
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
HvfsS1
L
PIRATES WALK
Handicap Accessibility Legend
LJ Completely Accessible
J Partially Accessible
E� Inaccessible
Note: Sla and Lmsiead Residence Halls smII be com-pieleK accessible in fall ts94.
�ir Handicap Parking .Area
� Curb Cuts
Parking
? Visitor Parking
TOFARMV1LLE.
WILSON. AND
RALEIGH
Department Listing
Austin Building 13
Admissions. Undergraduate 2b
Aim-American Culiural Center. Ledonia S Wrighi 39
Allied Health Sciences. School ol 57
Alumni A'iairs M
Anthropologv 5
An School ol 62
AiV cv: S. icnes. College of 2S
Athletic Tickci Office 54
BBcV I Center far Leadership Development 2-fc
helk Building 57
Biochemistry (Brodv Medical Sciences Building i I
Biology I" '
Bk'Mon House 60
Bookstore. Carnpas 2n
Brcwstei Building 5
Career Services 66
Central Pruning ami Duplicuiing 4"
Counseling Cenier 20
(shier. I niversilv s2
Centei ui Applied Technology 60
Central Supply 46
Chancellor's Office 32
Chancelloi's House 61
Clirisienbury Memorial Gymnasium 14
C IS iGarreti House. 50
( ommunications ll)
Computer Science I:
Provided by ECU Publications
Continuing Education 65
Cooperative Education 28
Croalan Building 3
Ciedit Union. ECU 23
Dance 16
Dowdy Studenl Stores 20
Economics 5
Education. School of 12
English 2 8
English Department Annex 35
Ervvm Hall 65
Family Therapy Clinic 42
Fickien Stadium 51
Financial Aid. Studenl 45
Flanagan Building 34
Flanagan Sylvan Amphitheater 75
Flelchet Music Cenier 4
Francis Speight Auditorium 62
French 28
Oarage 2M
General Classroom Building 2s
General College 5
Geography 5
Geology 27
German 28
Graduate School 5
Graham Building 2"
Gray An Gallerv 62
Handicapped Studeni Services 5
Harrington Field 56
Health ic Physical Education 54
Health Serv ices. Studenl 38
Hearing Impaired Students 5
Healing Plan! 3(1
Hendnx Theatre 64
History 5
Honors Program 37
Housing. University 26
Howard House 25
How ell Science Complex 17
Human Environmental Sciences. School of 2
Human Resources Building 42
Industry k Technology. School of 22
Internationa House 7(1
Irons Building 59
Jenkins Fine Ans Cenier 62
Jones Dining Hall 6
Journalism IV
loynei Library 48
Ledonia S. Wright Aim-American Cultural Cenier 39
Leisure Studies 54
Maintenance Warehouse 36
Mamie Jenkins Building 6
Maritime History tEllei House I 7I
Mathematics 13
McCnnnis Auditorium 15
Mendenhall Studenl Cenier 64
Messick Theatre Arts Center 16
Minges Coliseum 54
Minority Studeni .Affairs 26
Music. School of 4
News Bureau 25
Nursing. School 1
Parking and Traffic Ser ices 69
Philosophy 5
Physical Plant Office 24
Physics 7
Pirate Club Building 52
Planning 5
Political Science 5
Psychology 22
Public Safety 49
Ragsdale Hall 19
Raw I Annex 2 s
Raw I Building 22
Regional Development Institute (
Registrai 26
Residence Halls
Avcock "
Belk 9
Clement 4
Coilen 33
Fleming 37
Fletcher "2
Garrett 67
Greene 68
Jarvis 44
Jones 6
Scott 8
Slav 40 (effective fall MM
Tyler 10
Umstead 41 (effective M WHi
White 73
Scales Field House 53
Small Buslnes &l Tech. Development Cenier 60
Sociology 5
Spanish 28
Speech and Hearing Building 58
Speighi Building 12
Spilman Building 32
Sports Medicine Building 55
Studeni Cenier 64
Student Stores. Dowdy 20
Studeni Recreation Cenier (Fulure Sue i 76
Taylor- Slaughter .Alumni Center 31
Theatre Ans 16
Todd Dining Hall (Future Suel 11
WTnchard Building 26
Wilhs Building 60
Wright Annex 20
V� right Auditorium 21
'
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Tailgating

Mot just a back-of-the-
car picnic with the
family anymore. This
sport involves serious
school spirit, coolers
full of goodies, grills,
frisbees and the
occassional car.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPE C I A L ISSUE
The Spot Djnjng
Facilities
Todd Dining Hall
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Open Monday-Friday, the Spot
specializes in pizza, fried chicken
and a variety of deli sandwiches.
The Wright
Place
Mendenhall
Photo by JACK SKINNER
The newest addition to campus, Todd Dining
Hall, offers hot meals seven days a week. Its
setting among the woods of the Hill offers a
peaceful mood for everyday eating. Also available
in Todd is Sweetheart's Lunchtime Fine Dining.
The Croatan
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Mendenhall Dining Hall is open seven days a
week, serving hot meals all-you-can-eat style. Get
there early for weekend morning brunch.
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Not only does the Wright Place
offer delicious quick bites between
classes, it's a great place to
socialize in your spare time.
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Convenientto Brewster, home of many freshmen
courses, the Croatan is ideal for breakfast, a bit
between classes or a full meal when time permits.
The Croatan specializes in fried chicken, baked
potatoes and Chinese stir-fry.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
LT. or Tommy Williams
756-7815J58-7436
Don't Get Stressed
Out with Being A
N
STUDENT- RUN CAMPUS N E W S P A
The East
Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news
and information about campus issues events
and activities, as well as a forum for discuss-
ing issues and ideas.
P E R
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT
MEDIA
The Student Counseling Center provides assistance to
students needing help coping with the normal stresses ot
college life, The professional staff of counselors and psy-
chologists provides short term individual counseling,
educational workshops and assistance regarding choic-
es of a major and or future careers. Problems involving
relationships, mild depression or anxiety, conflicts with
parents, low self-esteem, difficulties with time manage-
ment, procrastination and study skills, are examples of
the kind of issues dealt with at the Student Counseling
Center. Students may make an appointment by
phone or in person,
tafe
The Mental Health Services provides treatment to stu-
dents experiencing more serious psychological problems
resulting in significant impairment of their daily function-
ing. The professional staff includes psychologists and
psychiatrists, Available services entail both individual
psychotherapy and the prescription of psychiatric med-
ication when appropriate, Problems involving acute
depression, suicidal thoughts, feelings of panic, unusual
mood swings, excessive sleep or insomnia, marked diffi-
culties with attention and concentration or behaviors
over which a student has little or no control are exam-
ples of the kinds of issues treated through the Mental
Health Services, As with the Counseling Center, appoint-
ments may be made by phone or in person,
ALL SERVICES PROVIDED ARE STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL.
FOR AODIMONAL INFORMATION. CALL 328-6009
Student
Counseling
Center
Wright
Building,
2nd Floor.
328-6661
Mental
Health
Center
Wright
Building,
2nd Floor.
328-6795
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPEC
I�1
IMPCCTANT
PHCNE NUMBERS
EMERGENCY 328-6150
(CAMPUS POLICEFIRERESCUE)
I A L ISSUE
NON-EMERGENCY
STUDENT HEALTH CENTER
APPOINTMENTS
STUDENT LOCATOR
COUNSELING CENTER
JOYNER LIBRARY
MUSIC LIBRARY
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
� Freshman Seminar Course
� General College Information
� Adviser Information
� Tutoring Information
� Academic Support Information
CASHIER S OFFICE
DEAN OF STUDENTS
HOUSING
OFFICE OF MINORITY AFFAIRS
TRAFFIC SERVICES
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
(SGA)
REGISTRAR S OFFICE
328-6787
328-6841
328-6317
328-4736
328-6661
328-4285
328-6250
816-3551
321-6001
328-6886
328-6824
328-6840
328-6495
328-6294
328-4726
328-6747
Construction
continues
Sidewalks
are being
replaced at
the bottom
of College
Hill Driv,
and new
walkways
will provide
access to
Tenth Street
and
Christenbury
Gym. This is
scheduled
to be
completed
by July.
Photo by JACK
SKINNER
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Joyner Library additions should be completed by January
'96, and the result will be twice as much library.
Renovations will be finished mid-1997.
Photo by JACK SKINNER
The Student Recreation Center should be completed by
March of '96 . The list of niceties is too extravagant to
put in one sentence, but we graduating seniors are
JEALOUS!
Tit TU2MS
Late
Night"
This is when the
festivities continue
past 2 a.m they just
nove on to someone's
home or apartment
instead of a bar or
club.





Tit TE-E-M


The Crow
Known by elders as
the Croatan, this
dining facility is
located behind
Fletcher and Brewster.
Check out the
chicken. Yum!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Don't forget your toothbrush
Brandon Waddell
Asshtant Lifestyle Editor
Going off to college is the first
time most people have ever been
away from home for an extended
period of time. It's a stressful situ-
ation, but one that will make you a
stronger person. There is so much
to learn, so many people to meet,
so many friends to be made.
Since most new folks will be liv-
ing in the residence halls, there are
many things of which to he aware.
Each freshman will live in a double
occupancy room with with two
twin-sized beds, two desks, dresser
space for two and window cover-
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ings. A telephone and cable outlet
are also provided in each room.
ECU recently installed cable televi-
sion service in all residence hall
rooms, but you need to bring your
own TV and coaxial cable to enjoy
this service.
Many things are fine to bring:
stereos, computers, radios, desk
lamps are all okay. However, there
are several things that cannot be
brought into the residence halls.
Large capacity microwaves, re-
frigerators larger than five cubic
feet, freezers, heaters, air condition-
ing units, candles and incense, wa-
ter beds, weight-lifting equipment
and fireworks are all considered
contraband by residence hall man-
agement.
If you're trying to cut down on
the sheer bulk of objects when
you're moving, contact your room-
mate over the summer. Coordinate
each of your moving efforts so you
won't duplicate items and end up
with two of some things and none
of another.
To assist newcomers into the
residence halls. Resident Advisors
(RAs) are assigned to all the resi-
dence halls to help or give advice.
These RAs are seasoned ECU vet-
erans who can show you the ropes,
lend an ear or make sure you're
aware of some rules you may con-
sider breaking.
It won't take long before dis-
covering that the language of col-
lege is as diverse as the students.
Academically, be aware of a few
words and what they mean. The
following Campus Glossary could
save you some headaches.
"Professor" means some-
one with a PhD. Call these people
"Doctor
A "Lecturer" is someone
with a Master's degree or the
equivelent. Often, they're working
on a PhD. but have not completed
it.
A "T.A has a Bachelor's
degree and is currently working n
a Master's. Many freshman classes
and lab classes are taught by T.A.s.
"Syllabus" - a guide given
on the first day of class which the
instructor explains their
attendence policy, grading scale
and what they expect from each
student.
"Downtown" - downtown
Greenville on Fifth street. A string
of establishments from Milano's
Pizza to Cubbies restaurant. This
is where ECU students spend a vast
majority of their spare time.
"Rush" - a week-long
event used to make students aware
of all the fraternities and sororities
on campus.
"Greek" a generic term for
members of all service and social fra-
ternities aild sororities.
"Pledge" - a new greek
member on probation who is not
considered to be a brother or sister.
"G.C - short for the Gen-
eral Classroom Building, located
next to the Geology building. Many
of your general college classes will
be taken here.
There are few places that have
such a culturally diverse population
and language as ECU and Greenville.
There is no all-encompassing hand-
book to life here, but the ECU expe-
rience is one that you'll never for-
get.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
ECU offers spiritual guidance for everyone
). Miles Layton
Staff Writer
Religion plays a major role in cam-
pus life for many ECU students, and
freshmen are no exception. Greenville
is home to a number of religious orga-
nizations that play as much as they
preach. Most of these organizations
have houses or offices within walking
distance of campus.
Every denomination, from Episco-
palian to Islam, is geared toward
friendly discussion and fellowship to
top off worship.
The information given here is
what could be collected from the last
remnants of these groups that are still
in town. Like many other college stu-
dents, the members of these organiza-
tions simply are not here in the sum-
mer, and were unavailable for com-
ment
WELCOME
FRESHMEN
Old-fashioned
Homemade
Ice Cream,
Yogurt &
Sorbet
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
BUYON&Sf"bNE
FREE
1 Item Blend-In
Coupon expires Sept. 31,1995
The Newman Catholic Student
Center located on 10th street a block
over from College Hill Drive is headed
up by Father Paul Vaeth. A Mass is
held at 5:30 p.m. everyWednesday, fol-
lowed by a fellowship meal at 6:15 p.m.
Mass is also celebrated every Sunday
at 11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
The Newman Center boasts of re-
treats to the beach and ski trips
coupled with religious education.
There are first
communion and
confirmation pro-
grams along with
Bible study groups
for those who
want to learn
more. Everyone is
welcome to stop
by between 8 a.m.
and 11 p.m.
Father Paul
welcomes every-
one to the
Newman Catholic
Student Center.
"It's a great place
for people, food,
fun and worship
he said. For fur-
ther information
call Father Paul at
757-1991.
Located on
Fifth Street across
from Garett Resi-
dence Hall, the Wesley Foundation is
led by Reverend Dan Earnhardt The
Reverend Mary Graham leads the Pres-
byterian groups on campus, also
through the Wesley Center.
Though the Wesley Center does
not hold any worship services, fellow-
ship discussions and dinners are held
every week. The student groups have
traveled to Mexico with mission work
and to Jerusalem on retreats. Rever-
end Earnhardt said the Wesley center
has an important role in spiritual
growth.
"Our educational task is assist-
ing people in their faith who are grow-
ing from Christmas plays and picnics
to a religious maturity which meets
crisis head on and shapes decisions
Rev. Earnhardt said. For more infor-
mation contact Rev. Earnhardt at 758-
2030.
The Baptist
Student Union is
located on Fifth
street across from
the Delta Sigma
Phi house and be-
side Wendy's. For
more information
contact Reverend
Bob Clyde at 752-
4646.
Episcopa-
lians can contact
Reverend Tom
Cure at 401 East
Fourth Street. Ev-
ery Wednesday at
5:30 p.m Mass is
followed by a fel-
lowship dinner.
Rev. Cure said dis-
cussion is lively
and encourages
everyone to at-
tend. For further
information the
Episcopal Center can be contacted at
752-3482.
The Lutheran Student Ministries
is an active group headed by adviser
Lynda Werdal. It is run out of the Our
Reedemer Lutheran Church at the cor-
ner of Elm and Greenville Boulevard.
Services are at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m
on Sundays. The student group meets
for fellowship and meals at 6 p.m. ev-
ery Sunday.
"Our educational
task is assisting
people in their
faith who are
growing from
Christmas plays
and picnics to a
religious maturity
which meets crisis
head on and
shapes deisions
� Rev. Earnhardt
Wesley Center
The group has taken retreats to
the North Carolina mountains and the
beach. Werdal said she has iniated the
Adopt-a-Pirate program. This is a sup-
port group where a local family invites
students to meals and fellowship for
the ups and downs of the college ex-
perience. For more information, con-
tact Lynda Werdal at 756-2377.
There are several large interde-
nominational groups on campus which
focus on various aspects of Christian-
ity. Campus Christian Fellowship meets
at 7 p.m. every Wednesday at 200 East
Eighth Street They focus on fellow-
ship, discipleship, and studying God's
word. For more information contact
campus minister Danny Robertson at
752-7199.
The Navigators is a worldwide or-
ganization which emphasizes a oneon-
one personal relationship with God.
Campus minister Kenny Jenkins said
the Navigators are friends that meet
introduce and help in discovering the
Christian faith. For more information
call 757-0533.
Campus Crusade is interdenomina-
tional group with a focus on evange-
lism. They conduct Bible studies all over
campus and meet every Thursday at 8
p.m. in room 1032 of the General Class-
room Building. They attend different
conferences and retreats like Daytona
Beach at Spring Break. Contact group
president Shane Dieke at 752-8989 for
more information.
The Apostolic student association's
president is Philip Money. For more in-
formation call 830-6038.
There are two mosques in town for
anyone interested in Islam. For more
information call 355-2880 and speak
with Saeed Dar.
For more information on Hillel. the
Jewish group, contact adviser Debbie
O'Neil at 32&6041 or in room 2150 of
the General Classroom building.
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JOIN THE ENTERTAINMENT,
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Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
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Pocketbooks
Purses
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Unknown terms for
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LSUJJJJiSj IJlOiiyjl tillJijJU
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Home is where you hang your slang
Maureen Rich
Guest Editor
Is a dorm by any other name still
a dorm? Members of ECU's Residence
Hall Association (RHA) are convinced
it is not For several years, the RHA
has urged students, faculty and staff
to stop saying 'dorm' and start say-
ing 'residence hall and even recently
fined Chancellor Eakin for using the
forbidden word.
"The use of the word 'dorm' is
no longer an acceptable term for on-
campus housing said Michelle Reece,
RHA president, in a Jan. 10 memo to
The East Carolinian. Residence
Halls' or 'Halls' for short has a more
positive meaning behind it The dif-
ference between the meanings of the
two words is related to community
According to one administrator,
the RHA waged this battle to convert
vocabulary use as many as 30 years
ago in an attempt to improve the resi-
dence hall image. But students aren't
interested in correct or incorrect
terms.
"I think it's stupid said
Stephanie Fritz, who has lived in resi-
dence halls for two years. "I use
'dorm
Fritz said she doesn't like living
in the "dorms and sees the commu-
nity theme as a hindrance. "There's
no privacy she said. "People are al-
ways coming in your room, so it's
pretty hard to study and the bath-
rooms are pretty gross
Not everyone was as direct
"I never really thought about it"
said freshman Tony Parham. "I call it
a dorm, my cousins always called it a
dorm I see it as a community al-
ready, so I don't think it matters what
you call it"
Reece said that often the word
'dorm' brings negative connotations,
especially when people connect it with
an institution, or a military base.
"I guess it's just more or less try-
ing to change stereotypes that have
been formed Reece said. "The 'd'
word has always been a pet peeve of
mine We're trying to erase the nega-
tive impressions and make on-cam-
pus living a more positive experi-
ence
Reece referred to a dictionary
where dorm is defined, among things,
as being part of an institution.
The American Heritage Dictio-
nary defines dormitory as "a room
providing sleeping quarters for a num-
ber of persons, a building for hous-
ing a number of persons, as at a school
or resort, a residential community
whose inhabitants commute to a
nearby metropolis for employment
and recreation
Reece said the nationwide resi-
dence hall organizations strictly en-
force the rule against using the 'd'
word. A fine of 25 cents is imposed
on offenders, which at ECU included
Chancellor Eakin.
"We fined the chancellor last
LEARN.
We've made it a lot easier.
Your biygest concern as a student shoulJ be yMr studies - not the cost of a clieckin"
account East Carolina Bank ruts taken arc of that expense tor uu.
With our University Club Checking ;iccount, any full-time student is eligible for a
checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking at any automatic teller machine
with no ATM fee charged, no-fee traveler's checks and a tree order of' 50 checks.
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Member FDIC
year Reece said, "and he dutifully
paid it"
"I don't know how much I owed
by the time I finished there Eakin
said with a smile.
Some students said the practice
of fining is alive and well in ECU resi-
dence halls.
"That sort of thing got blown out
of proportion Reece said. "We don't
necessarily fine students - it's now
more or less a joke
Reece said in hall meetings the
rule may be enforced, but not ran-
domly in the halls. "It's up to each
hall she said. "I don't go and say you
have to fine a person Reece said
what money is collected goes toward
an end-of-the-year party for those who
worked hard all year in the residence
halls.
So what do students think of this
strategy to reshape the image of the
looming buildings around campus?
"OK, let's spend our time doing
something completely worthless said
senior Meredith Bell, a veteran of on-
campus living who now lives off-cam-
pus. "That's crazy. 'Dorm' is all it
ever was to me, and that's all it will
ever be to me
The RHA insists there is a strong
difference between the two terms,
however.
"Dorms are places where stu-
dents just eat and sleep Reece wrote
in her memo. "University Housing
offers students an opportunity to live
in a community-like setting where
they can build lasting relationships
throughout their college experience
One student's answering machine
�reefing told its own story of life in a
esidence hall.
"I'm either sleeping, studying,
ating or just out" the recording said.
So leave a message
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
STUDENT-BUN CAMPUS RADIO STATION
WZMB
91.3 FM
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety
of music including alternative, jazz, metal,
rap and more, plus news, sports and call-in
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EAST CAIOIINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT
MEDIA
Al Matthews said he believes the RHA
is on the right track to improving stu-
dents' images of campus housing.
"I think it's a good issue he said.
"By insisting that people recognize
that the two are different, that's cer-
tainly going to be beneficial to stu-
dents, and especially to the students
that live in the residence halls.
"I'm very supportive of the RHA's
endeavors and goals to try and make
living on campus a better experience
Cte(32�U
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CruhUit) ihruLiij'n iizmlzinlzz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Don't stress out! Help IS available
jDLLonavy
dru&s
Illustration by John Paul Tate
Dr. Al Smith
Counseling Center
Attending college for the first time
can be a frightening and threatening
experience for students. For most en-
tering freshmen, college represents a
new and formidable experience as they
leave the familiar environments of
home and high school.
The unfamiliarity of this experi-
ence challenges the individual's per-
sonal security, need for acceptance and
need for comfort Adjustment difficul-
ties exist not only because of the un-
certainty regarding students' new and
unfamiliar environment, but also be-
cause they doubt whether they will be
able to meet the expectations of par-
ents, friends and the university, in ad-
dition to the expectations they have
for themselves.
For those students who wish to
get a head start on preparing for col-
lege, there are three necessary survival
skills to leam: time management, study
skills and stress management
First, entering college students
need to leam how to manage their own
time. Time management is a system by
which students become selective in de-
termining their priorities and planning
the amount to time necessary to ac-
complish what they believe is impor-
tant
How freshmen leam to use the 24
hours a day and 168 hours a week will
determine the degree to their personal
and academic success. Simply stated,
learning to manage time is learning self-
management
In addition to time management
a second major development task for
students is learning how to study.
Learning how to study effectively has
a major influence on a student's aca-
demic performance and personal life
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outside of the classroom.
Essentially, study skills can be di-
vided into four basic areas: preparation,
basic skills, learning process and test
taking. In preparing to study, students
must leam how to overcome procrasti-
nation and to develop more realistic
attitudes about studying. Further,
study skills include learning how to
read a textbook, how to participate in
class and ways to improve note taking.
Finally, students must develop a
sense of comfort with the learning pro-
cess and how to take tests. These skills
ultimately call on students to become
more proactive in their learning Ulti-
mately, learning how to study includes
getting ready to study, reading and
hearing information, learning informa-
tion and giving the information back
to the professor through a test or term
paper.
A third important survival skill
involves learning to manage a variety
of sources of stress. Stress has been
defined by many as a reaction caused
by intense exertion, strain and effort
Typically, stress for college students is
brought on by the continual adjust-
ments and demands of the academic
and social environment
The more students are called upon
to adjust to challenging situations, the
more stress they may experience. Feel-
ings of stress will be a normal part of
their life and may increase wilh addi-
tional responsibility. Coping with this
new academic and social stress is es-
sential for college survival. Most indi-
viduals tend to cope in ways that are
unique to them.
No matter which particular ap-
proach a student chooses, it is impor-
tant that they approach their stressors
proactively (as opposed to avoiding
them). This is important since effec-
tively dealing with stress enhances your
health, general well being and produc-
Tit TEJ2M5
"Minges
Maniacs"
The brand-new name
for the die-hard fans
who inhabit the
Student Section of
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum for
men's and women's
basketball games.
School spirit like this
can only exist at ECU!
WELCOME FRESHMEN
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tivity. Not confronting stress can only
lead to a variety of other problems.
In addition to learning the nec-
essary survival skills, many students
also may need to leam to cope with a
variety of adjustment difficulties. The
most difficult time of this adjustment
period will typically occur between the
first four to eight weeks of entering
school.
Common adjustment difficulties
can include roommate difficulties,
academic stress, threats to one's self-
esteem, homesickness and a general
lack of comfortroutine in their new
environment To overcome these feel-
ings most students take short week-
end visits home or take advantage of
the support of close friends at college.
For some students, however, they
may need more professional help with
their problems. The university pro-
vides a counseling center that offers
individual and group counseling, as
well as workshops and outreach pro-
gramming to help students adjust to
college and improve upon their per-
sonal development
The locus of the Counseling Cen-
ter (located in 316 Wright Building)
is to help students manage personal-
emotional, social, academic and voca-
tional concerns. For more informa-
tion, please fell free to contact the
Counseling Center at 328-6661.
ATTENTION FRESHMANIIII
COME JOIN US AT
We Want to Make Your Transaction to College Life a Blast"
We Have Alot of Activities Such as Beach Retreats. Concerts.
Parlies. Recreation. Bible Studies, lac.
For the Fall Semester we are Meeting in
General ClassRoom Building, Room 1017,
7:00pm Thursday Nights
For More Information Call Eddie and
Kathryn Hilliard at (919)321-6262
y
. � � � �





5
�Jt- uiiiiwMiiiiiiiiiiiM himwi

10
Tit TEJM

State

A term considered
offensive and
derogatory, as in
"Your neck is so red,
you must've
transferred from
State
if
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� Head Covers
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� Umbrellas
GORDON'S
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
MonSat 9-7
Cruhhisj ihruutjh iiZiAilainlzz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Research your way to academic success
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Fletcher's Music Library offers peace and solitude for last-
minute studiers.
Chris Brantley
Staff Writer
ECU freshmen can lookdrward to
four (or more) years of term papers and
research as well as hours of setting in front
of computers.
ECU students can make use of the
many resources that the university has
provided. These resources are centered
mainly around Joyner Library.
Joyner offers open-access to an ex-
tensive microfilms collection, where stu-
dents can view periodicals on microfiche
and roll microfilm as well as take a look t
college catalogs.
Through the Proquest terminals in
Joyner, students may view (and print free
of cost) entire pages of magazine articles
using the provided CDs. Proquest contains
general topics and specified topics in So-
cial Sciences and Business. The printing
feature proves to be a very useful tool in
gathering research material.
Infotrac is a newspaper index with
articles available from The New York
Times, The Los Angeles Times, Christian
Science Magazine, Wall Street Journal
and the Washington Fbst. It allows ac-
cess to similar research material as
Proquest, but in many cases, merely gives
article titles on a topic and a short ab-
stract of the article concerned.
Joyner also holds an abundance of
reference material and the ability to ob-
tain material from other libraries through
the interlibrary loan system. It is advised
that students allow two to three weeks
when attempting to get material through
this system.
Two more sources of research infor-
mation in Joyner are Government Docu-
ments and Special Collections. Govern-
ment Documents may be accessed
through the Library's Marquis System.
"Special Collections is a separate
entity of the Library that was formed to
support graduate and undergraduate re-
search said Gene Williams, university
archivist "The collection has five center-
pieces including: the manuscript collec-
tion, the university archives, the North
Carolina collection, the university rare
book collection and the private collection
of a Lenoir County physician he said.
Several improvements are in the
works for Joyner Library and should be
completed in the near future.
"The addition to the Library will
nearly double its capacity and allow sec-
uons such as special collections to move
to new quarters and eventually download
into the Marquis system Williams said.
"Special Collections also hope, to migrate
to better software he said.
In addition to these improvements,
the Marquis system is in the process of
being upgraded after being bought out
by Horizon. An enhanced version sHould
be ready for students in the fall. New stu-
dents wishing to find out more about our
library should enroll in Library Science
1000.
In addition to Joyner, the Health
Sciences Library and the Fletcher Music
Library are available for students who
need information in these fields.
Articles and periodicals can be
found on the CDROM database through
IPROCTOR BARBER SHOP
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The East Carolinian
Distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday, The East Carolinian
serves the campus as the major
source of information about activi-
ties and events as well as a forum
for discussion of issues and ideas.
This student-run paper provides
numerous opportunities, including
communications, business and
management experiences where
students can apply what they learn
in the classroom.
TEC Ncwsr
3Zo636d
328-2000
WZM8
WZMB is ECU's student-run
FM radio station that offers a vari-
ety of alternative music including
rock, jazz, rap and heavy metal.
The station also offers news and
sports reports and call-in type par-
ticipatory shows at 91.3 on the dial.
Various opportunities, including
both on- and off-air experiences,
are available in this hands-on envi-
ronment, allowing students to pre-
pare for a future career
WZMB Studio fp�p51
Request LlneJ@�l:$20&913
offer t
rience
lifetime.
sessions
Sessions is a magazine that
servesas the voice of the campus
minority population.
Published four times a year, its
pages carry stories, artwork and
poetry that address the concerns
and problems of the various ethnic
and religious groups represented
on this multi-cultural campus.
Various opportunities to write,
design and illustrate are available
between the magazine's covers.
Expressions328-6927
The Re!
The Rebel is EdCr literary arts
magazine published annually each
Spring. The featured artistic and lit-
erary pieces are selected by a panel
of judges from entries submitted by
the ECU community. An annual art
display showcases those selections.
Staff members can get various
types of experience from adminis-
tering the contest to arranging the
annual art show to producing the
magazine.
The Rebel328-6502
ECU Student Media
Join us for the experience!
the Library Net-
work on-line cata-
log. Students may
log on to the
Internet on the
main menu of the
Library Network. ECU students must ob-
tain a password and user-id at the input
output window in the lobby of the Aus-
tin Building to access the information
superhighway.
ECU has a page under netscape.
Mainframe access is available in various
computer labs throughout campus.
These include the Allied Health Lab in
Belk. Human Environmental Sciences
Lab, Industry' and Technology Lab in
Rawl 309. Minges Lab in Minges 304-A.
the Nursing Lab, KIM lab in Brewster
second floor, Psychology Lab in Rawl
135, ROTC Lab in the Wright Annex and
the general labs on the second floor of
the Austin Building.
These computer facilities can be
used for word processing as well during
the designated hours of operation.
The residence halls are a convenient
location of study for students living on
campus. Most of these have computer
resource rooms in the lobbies or on each
floor. V( rd processing can be done here
as well as in the writing centers on the
second floor of the General Classroom
Building and on trie third floor of Joyner.
Upon the completion of the instal-
lation of ECU's new fiber optic cable,
residence halls will have terminals with
the capdbility to access the Internet
In addition to all of this, students
may use the 24-hour study halls in
Mendenhall Student Center During exam
periods.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Bucket
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Freshmen get teased a lot
It's nothing personal, you under-
stand. .All of us upperclassmen were fresh-
men once and we received our fair share
of teasing, too. We're just sort of passing
the buck. Yes. that sucks, but you have to
remember that you do look kind of pitiful
to us.
No matter how weil you've been pre-
pared by your orientation session, they
can't teach you everything. As you try to
feel your way blindly through the bewil-
dering experience of campus life, you're
bound to make some bonehead mistakes,
and we're bound to laugh at you.
But I'll let you in on a secret We all
made bonehead mistakes, too. My fresh-
man year, for example, was a parade of
stupidity. Besides the usual freshman er-
rors, like getting lost on campus and buy-
ing books for the wrong classes, I almost
wrecked my academic career.
Having grown up in a stereotypically
boring small rural town, the lure of the
college social life was overwhelming.
Swiftly and systematically abandoning
study in favor of fun, I became that ulti-
mate college horror story you hear from
preachers, parents and Jesse Helms. I was
"corrupted" by the big city.
It started small. 1 had this econom-
ics class that I found sort of boring. The
main lecture was taught by this guy who
looked like Jack Nicholson but had none
of his charm. In and of itself, that wasn't
so bad. There were about 50 other people
in the room, and we could all just anony-
mously take notes.
But I also had to attend an econ lab,
which was taught by San Sub Lee, the
killer TA. By all accounts, San was a nice
guy, and he certainly knew the subject
matter. But he had this really heavy Ko-
rean accent and my Eastern North Caro-
lina backwater ears couldn't understand
a word he said.
So I stopped going to lab. Then I
stopped going to the main lecture, too.
Not surprisingly, I didn't do very well on
the next test and wrote the class off.
It was all downhill from there. Once
I let one class go, another followed, and
another, until I was attending only two
classes. This left me with loads of free
time, which 1 used to further my social
life. I started hanging out with a bunch of
STUDENT. BUN MINOBITr MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up four times during the Fall and Spring
terms for discussion of the problems and issues
facing the various ethnic and religious groups
represented on ECU's multi-cultural campus.
EAST CAIOUNA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT
MEDIA
comic book freaks and punk rockers, lead-
ing a bizarre dual life in two of the most
outcast sub-cultures on campus. I devel-
oped unpopular political beliefs and a taste
for weird comics, loud music and strange
clothing.
Then there were the girls. I learned
how to meet girls that year, girls who were
as eager for new experiences as myself.
Nature took its course, again and again.
I was experimenting at nearly every
opportunity. 1 won't go into any details
here, but let's just say that I once had a
conversation with a lamp post and leave
it at that When I look back. I'm amazed
at how lucky I was to have come out of it
all addiction- and disease-free.
I didn't escape completely unscathed,
however. I ended my freshman year in
college on academic probation, and with
only a semester's worth of credit to my
name. To say that my parents weren't
pleased is an understatement To say that
my dad threatened to pull me out of
school, kick me out of the house, and leave
me to find work at a gas station some-
where is entirely accurate.
So, I cleaned up my act I started
going to class. I started studying. I re-
strained my rampages to weekends. Oh
sure, I still liked (and still do like) 'veird
comics, loud music and strange clothing.
My political affiliation remained just as
unpopular as ever. I didn't go back to be-
ing the same person 1 had been in high
school. I became a better, different per-
son.
But 1 was talking about tEasing fresh-
men, wasn't I? Well, hey, what can 1 say?
It happens. Just try to laugh and shrug it
off. It's usually only meant in fun. And
besides, the person laughing at your mis-
ery probably screwed up way worse than
you.
Maureen Rich
Guest Editor
Everyone has heard the joke that
attending ECU is the best five or six
years of your life, but only graduates
can explain why. I managed to get out
of ECU in four years, but not without a
lot of strife. Don't expect to get out any
other way, and don't expect to get sym-
pathy from anyone but your parents for
that strife, because it happens every-
where.
ECU has a unique personality that
each of you will discover in your own
way. I know I didn't discover it until the
day I became actively involved in its ex-
istence. When I was a freshman, I
thought ECU was a huge school and 1
was just a number. I wanted to transfer
to a smaller school, or even another
school just as big - at least then I'd
have a new number. What changed my
mind was this newspaper.
I know, get out the violins. I'm not
trying to sell subscriptions, though. I'm
talking about becoming involved. As a
freshman and for most of my sophomore
year I thought the student newspaper
was an ominous, shadowy building on
top of a steep hill. I thought the writers
were trained, educated experts who
would laugh at me if I even dared to set
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foot in the door.
Can you hear that laughter right
now? Those are the past and present
staff members of The East Carolinian
cracking up at such notions. In fact
when I finally gathered the courage to
set foot in the hallowed offices here,
(Yes, I typed my application. What a
dork, I know.) I discovered a lot of nor-
mal people and a lot of strange people.
Trust me, you'll find them wherever you
go.
The point to this story is that I met
kids just as uneducated, untrained and
naive as I was (am?). I also found out
that this organization exists primarily
to teach students. The hard way.
So I got involved and worked up
here until I graduated several weeks
ago. And now I have more on my re-
sume than the Friendly's on Cape Cod,
the kitchen store in Worcester, MA, and
all that babysitting. I gained something
else, too.
I found out that I didn't have to be
a number. I interviewed administrators,
professors, local businesspeople, ath-
letes the list goes on. How many stu-
dents get to know the chancellor? How
many people get to have the head foot-
ball coach call them at home? (OK, that
was under unpleasant circumstances,
but still!)
My point is that becoming involved
opens up so many possibilities. You be-
come a name and a face, and you get
the chance to leave a mark at the uni-
versity. Yours may not be a huge, indel-
ible mark, but it could be enough to
make you feel like you didn't spend five
or six years at a college just to say you
passed math on the first try. (Now that
would be a legacy!)
I found myself feeling incredibly
loyal to ECU, because it became my
school. I could walk across campus and
know that I wasn't just a vegetable hang-
ing around using up valuable parking
space. Getting involved doesn't mean
running for Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) president anyway.
Getting involved is as easy as get-
ting to know the people and adminis-
trators in your department Play an in-
tramural sport. Start swimming up at
Minges every morning, and talk to the
people there. By becoming a part of this
university, you will feel more like the
university has become a part of you. I
gained new respect for the school, the
campus and the people who run it all
day long. I listened to how much they
love this school, and eventually that
same admiration rubbed off, and ex-
panded into loyalty, trust and commit-
ment
Sure, you're going to get ticked off
at the school every now and then. Ev-
eryone knows bureaucracy sucks, and
all that But if you get involved as early
as you can (like from day one), then
you'll get through those times where
all you want to do is transfer to Albu-
querque. Don't give up after just one
year, or even two. No experience is a
bad one if you've learned something.
Won't I make a great parent?
11
DEflNlN
Tit TLRM$
a
Squirrels

The seemingly cute
and innocent furry
rulers of this campus
who want your food,
your backpack andor
your wallet no matter
the cost. Chancellor
Eakin was caught
tunneling funds to
these Contra Squirrels
last year
Also see: roommate.
Student Stores
Your on-campus store:
centrally located in the Wright Annex, on the Student Plaza, beside Wright Auditorium.
There's more in store for you!
ECU Student Stores is the one-stop shop for USED and new textbooks,
reference books, study guides, coursepaks, school supplies, art supplies,
room accessories, ECU apparel, computers and computer supplies, and
much, much more!
We're not just a bookstore, we specialize in SERVICE:
Check cashing
Fast re-orders
Film developing
Gift wrapping Specialty printed items
Official class rings Typewriter rental
Special order books Vending Services
School of Medicine Students: check out our Medical Bookstore in the Brody Building!
ECU owned and operated: more than just books your dollars support student scholars!
Hours;
Monday � Thursday: 8 am - 8 pm
Friday: 8 am - 5 pm
Saturdays: 11 am - 5 pm
Plus, extended hours for hotnesame Saturdays!
Summer Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am � 5 pm
Wus extended hours (or special events!
Student
Stores
$5 off every $75
purchase!
EAST
AKtll I ISA
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CAROLINA
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H�"� M�����mi
' m 'y, fc'i
12
TJi TILRJM6

Major"
The focus of your
studies here at ECU.
An English major
recieves his degree in
English. If you don't
have one, find one.
Graduation just ain't
happenin' 'till you do.
Cruizhii) ihruusj'n iizmlzinizz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Freshman year means GET CRACKING!
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Career Services is for upperclassmen, right? Guess again, friends. You need to start NOW
to make sure your exit from these hallowed halls is as graceful and painless as possible.
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
Already thinking about future
career possibilities and opportuni-
ties? No? Well, it is time to start.
Even incoming freshmen need to
be giving some thought to what they
want to do with their lives and what
they want to do for a living. Fortu-
nately, there is are services available
to all ECU students to help with the
decision-making process.
Career Services is located on the
corner of Fifth and Jarvis Streets and
is there to assist ECU students with
career planning and placement. Al-
though a great deal of their services
and programs are directed at gradu-
ating seniors, they also have many
resources to offer those just begin-
ning or halfway through their college
careers, in helping them choose and
prepare for a career
"The hardest
part, instead of
looking for a job,
is doing the inter-
nal soul-searching
to discover what
kind of knowl-
edge and skills
and interests you
have and how
that will apply to
your career
choice said Jeff
Henley, assistant
director of career
services.
Henley recommends that stu-
dents begin preparing as early as pos-
sible. This does not mean that every
student should know exactly what
they want to do as they enter col-
lege, but that they shou'd be taking
an interest in finding out what types
of careers are available that incorpo-
rate the areas in
which they have
an interest.
'if I could
give the incom-
ing freshmen
three pieces of
advice, they
would be that
they start to de-
fine their knowl-
edge, their inter-
ests, their skills
and their abilities,
become meaning-
fully involved in
campus events and activities and
"The hardest part,
instead of looking
for a job, is doing
the internal soul-
searching
� Jeff Henely
Assistant director of
Career Services
apply themselves in class Henley
said.
These are the things employers
are looking for according to Henley.
"Employers have saidl they are
looking for people who have worked
part-time, either on campus or off,
or been in a leadership position in
an organization such as an honor so-
ciety or a fraternity or a sorority
Henley said. "And they are looking
for people who have gotten involved
in a volunteer programs or events. I
strongly encourage students to get
out there and try some of these
things to help them discover what
they enjoy doing
Among the resources available
to students, there are two interactive
computer programs called S1G1 and
Discover, that contain lists of possible
careers that can be accessed by sev-
eral means including major course
of study, and interests, position list-
ings, employer information and much
more.
Career Services also offers an
ECU homepage on the Internet that
can be used anywhere a student can
get access to the Internet, an em-
ployer information room which has
information on status . stocks,
growth potential and more, a re-
source room which houses more in-
formation on what career options
are available in a. given major.
The advantage of using these
services and choosing a career is
that when students reach their se-
nior year, they will have clear goals
in their employment search and
once again, Career Services can
help. The department keeps student
fiies on computer and when they are
made aware of a position available
at a company, they can access all
student files with compatible skills
and interests, send those resumes
out to the company for consider-
ation and set-up interviews.
In addition. Career Services of-
fers workshops in resume writing,
interviewing and a number of other
areas to help the student prepare for
the hunt.
According to Marilyn Davis, all
a student needs to do to take ad-
vantage of career services is walk
in the front door of their building
and stop in her office (first door on
the right.)
"A lot of students come in look-
ing confused, not exactly sure what
they want or what we offer Davis
said. "We can talk to them, answer
any specific questions they might
have, take them back and show them
how to use the SIGI to look-up ma-
jors and browse through employer
files, and we can assign them career
counselors and whatever else they
might need
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L
.E A ST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
tjooks are required
round these parts
The Student
Stores and UBE
know just how to
help locate 'em
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Being a new student at ECU
can be both exciting and confusing.
And when all the moving and un-
packing is over, buying your text-
books should be the next item on
your agenda. It may seem like an
overwhelming task, but there are
two bookstores in Greenville that
serve ECU students and they have
everything you need to make the
job an easy one.
The ECU Student Store is lo-
cated in the Wright Building in the
middle of campus, while the Uni-
versity Book Exchange (UBE) is lo-
cated just across from campus, in
the heart of downtown. Both are
easily accessible to students.
Both stores carry all the school
necessities; school supplies, art sup-
plies, Greek merchandise, novelties,
study aids and, of course, text-
books. However similar the stores
are, they are also quite different
from each other.
The Student Store is part of
the university system and follows
North Carolina mandates as to
what it can and cannot sell. UBE is
a privately owned and operated
business, and has more leeway with
its merchandise. Since both stores
are in the same business, a lot of
their merchandise is of the same
type and quality.
"We are here to serve the uni-
versity community: students, fac-
ulty, staff and families thereof, "
said Michael Coston, director of
retail services for the Student
Store.
"Our goal is to be the best pos-
sible store for the students said
UBE owner Don Edwards.
Through The Student Stores,
Photo by JACK SKINNER
The Student Stores is located across from the Wright
Place, so students and parents can shop off their food.
students can purchase computers
Eastern Carolina's Professional
Baseball Team Welcomes You
to ECU!
The Kinston Indians are the Class A Carolina
League affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. The
team plays at Grainger Stadium in Kinston, just
25 minutes away. ECU students are admitted for
$2 at every game! .
Call (800) 334-5467 NNSBpN
for information and Mini
a free schedule
Good Luck and We Look Forward to Seeing You at the Ballpark!
Photo by IACK SKINNER
University Book Exchange (UBE) is
located on Cotanche Street, and offers
a variety of necessary ECU paraphernalia.
at reduced prices
and choose from a
large selection of
software. The Stu-
dent Stores also
cash checks for
students and has
a copy machine in
the front of the
store.
UBE offers a
large variety of
apparel to choose
from and has a
custom framing
shop for all your
framing needs. It
has an extensive
greeting card se-
lection as well as
complete line of
photo supplies.
Both stores
offer extended
hours during
book rush and
helpful hints
when purchasing
your books. First,
shop early.
"Used books save you 25 per-
cent over the cost of new books and
have the same resale value
Edwards said.
The Student Stores suggest
that you begin buying your books
"once you have a confirmed class
schedule Coston said, while UBE
suggests buying your books right
after your classes begin. In the
event that you buy the wrong book,
both stores have a refund period
during the first two weeks of
school, but check for dates at the
time of purchase.
It is also recommended that
you put your name in your books,
after you are sure that you have the
right ones, to ward off the chance
of theft. In the event that your
books are stolen, notify both stores
immediately.
When the semester is winding
down and finals approach, you
should start thinking about selling
your books back. It is recom-
mended that you sell them as soon
as you finish your exams. Both
stores have a computerized
buyback system Lo save you time,
but don't wait too long to sell be-
cause the shelves might become
overstocked.
"We have very friendly people
that work here and we are always
ready to assist students Coston
said.
"Our employees for the most
part are ECU graduates or current
students who understand the wants
and needs of students and make
ever effort to be the best store in
Greenville Edwards said.
So whichever store you choose
to buy your school needs from,
know that there are many friendly
people waiting to help you, and
ready to assist you in whatever you
might need.
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your apartment or
residence hall room,
life, food and possibly
significant other.
Steve Briley's
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14
TJJ�. TEJ�M6
'Homecoming"
A week-long event to
boost school spirit, the
finale of which is the
big homecoming
football game and the
crowning of
Homecoming royalty.
Ctuizini) ihruuijh uzuilniiuzz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Guidance exists beyond Orientation
Maureen Rich
Quest Editor
Orientation is over, a few friends
have been made, and now you're
thinking about packing your bags. But
what happens once you've reached
campus? Who will be there for the
three million questions you think of
each day of your first semester?
Don Joyner. That's who.
Joyner teaches the Freshman
Seminar (COAD 1000, formerly EDL'C
1000), which is a tvo-hour a week
class.
"The class talks about the nuts
and bolts - the philosophies - of the
college experience Joyner said. "I
teach that college is more than just
about the classroom, but that ulti-
mately the classroom is most impor-
tant
Joyner, an pillar of ECU for al-
most 16 years, can't help but be ani-
mated as he describes the course.
"You gotta know how much I love
it" he said. "I have the greatest fun,
and the evaluations are extremely
high. I tell the students, 'This is real.
This is the system. If you don't under-
stand the system, you can't be suc-
cessful
The class may sound like fun and
games, but it has its academic require-
ments. A mid-term and final exam are
mandatory but an oral report is op-
tional. Joyner tries to make the class
as embarrassment-free as possible.
"I hate that he said. "1 try to be
the kind of person I tried to meet
when I was in school - someone who
really cared if I made it Joyner lets
students decide for themselves if they
will present an oral report, and so far
has a 100 percent
success rate. "Ev-
eryone always does
it. They say, 'This
isn't so bad be-
cause they're
around friends
While the
course has existed
for seven years.
Joyner has been
unable to convince
the university to
give graduation
credit for the
course. Despite
that obstacle, he
has never had a
problem filling the class. Joyner said
research has shown that tne students
who take the course are in the higher
percentage of their graduating class.
"Mr. Joyner really gives students
the feeling that
the university
cares about their
success said
Dena Price, an
'89 graduate of
ECU and a vet-
eran of the
Freshman Semi-
nar, which she
learned about
from an enthusi-
astic friend.
"The class
sets up a net-
work to really
know people on
campus she
said. "It's unlike other classes because
you really get to know the people in
"I try to be the
kind of person I
tried to meet
someone who
really cared if I
made it
� Don Joyner
Freshman Seminar teacher
it
The course focuses on several
main areas: a student's competence, the
development of an identity, accepting
diversity and appreciating it and man-
aging emotions such as love and an-
ger.
"We assist with the transition from
high school to college Joyner said.
"In high school, parents and teachers
have more influence on getting work
done and succeeding. Once students
reach college, they're on their own to
make it"
The course also focuses on time
management and study skills by intro-
ducing students to research and study
availabilities on campus. The students
are shown the Writing Center on cam-
pus, and while there is little time to
delve into specifics, Joyner said the stu-
dents at least learn "that the people
working over there are nice, and want
to help
"We talk about how important it
is to understand and develop values
and ethics, we talk about plagiarism
and cheating, and the implications even
if you don't get caught he said.
The Freshman Seminar is offered
in every UNC system school except
Chapel Hill, ;nd at many it is a required
course. This fall five sections are open,
with a total 125 seats available. Regis-
tration is on a first-come, first-serve
basis.
The Freshman Course is open to
freshmen only in the fall semester, but
during the spring upperclassmen are
allowed to enroll. Last year, the course
was a requirement for students on aca-
demic probation, and their grades im-
proved by as much as 56 percent
"I hit 'em hard on study skills
Joyner said. "They're doing well now,
and they're jff probation
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Summer Hours
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ty&lCg. ?�CteU TtSSDSt
ROBERT CAUSEY, MGR
Student Leadership Development Programs
gives you a
to make new friends � to get involved on campus
to be more successful � to grow as a leader
to gain valuable career-related experience
�������
� � � � �
��������
W9Z&
Its never too early to pleat for success.
Take advantage of these golden opportunities:
Emerging Leaders Series: Learn new leadership skills and polish current ones.
Enjoy learning more about yourself, developing skills, and having fun.
Co-Curricillar Transcript: Keep a record of all your leadership experiences at ECU.
Stand out from the crowd when applying for employment, graduate schools, and scholarships
start your transcript this fall!
For more information on these and other programs, contact Student Leadership
Development Programs, 109 Mendenhall Student Center, or call (919) 328-4796.
t
L
Start building your future now!





H� - � � i mi i m
It
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
oney
roblemS
Brandon Waddell
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Unless your father is a million-
aire or you somehow manage to win
big playing McDonald's Monopoly,
the chances of being broke at least
the majority of your time in
Greenville are almost absolute.
After you've been in town a few
weeks, you'll notice the horde of
people who swarm the downtown
area virtually every night of the
week spending money. Though
profitable for downtown merchants,
it is relatively easy for younger stu-
dents to become enthralled in the
excitement and spend the entire
month's budget in a single week-
end.
One of the first tasks for many
incoming freshmen is obtaining a
personal checking account. Super-
ficially, this sounds like an easy as-
signment: but there is much more
at stake than meets the eye.
"Students, especially freshmen,
tend to have trouble budgeting
their money said Barry Allen, a
branch manager at United Carolina
Bank. 'In most cases, it is the first
time they are managing their own
money. The most important factor
I can stress is the importance of
keeping accurate records so prob-
lems such as NSFs Non-Sufficient
Funds or bounced checks and
trouble with the Credit Bureau do
not occur
When looking for a bank to
open an account, keep this in mind:
Every bank you visit wants your
business, so don't go inside their
building uninformed. One sugges-
tion emphatically stressed by all
consulted bank representatives is
to go to the bank with a list of ques-
tions.
Some questions to be ad-
dressed include the following:
� Is there a flat monthly fee for
the checking account?
� Is there a limit on the num-
ber of checks written monthly?
� Does the account come with
an ATM card?
� If so, are the bank's ATM ma-
chines close to campus?
� Is there a "1-800" number to
call for 24 hour account informa-
tion?
� Is over-draft protection avail-
able on the account?
Out-of-state students who open
a local checking account may need
to be more informed than their in-
state counterparts. At United Caro-
lina Bank, for instance, when an
out-of-state check is processed into
a checking account, it takes four
to five business days from the check
being deposited to showing in the
appropriate account.
However, only some banks fol-
low this procedure. Wachovia gives
student accounts immediate credit
for checks up to $500, but those
checks must be from the student's
parent.
Another financial concern of vi-
tal student interest is credit cards.
Most credit card companies charge
18 percent annual percentage rate;
the most they can legally charge in
North Carolina.
"Throw the application pack-
age in the trash as soon as it comes
through the mail said Stacey W.
Best, a Wachovia representative.
"Students will quickly notice that
every credit card company wants to
give them immediate credit, but
those on tight budgets tend to get
into trouble quick. One major mis-
take with the Credit Bureau will be
on record for seven years
But banking and credit aren't
the only financial pitfalls awaiting
college freshmen, nor are they the
most dangerous.
Many ECU student funds are
blown on Extra Value Meals, Roast
Beef Combos, and Dave's Classic
Combos. Three dollars here, four
dollars there - it's amazing how
fast it adds up. If you're purchas-
ing a meal plan, use it. There are
several dining facilities scattered
across campus from which to
choose.
To drive or not to drive: Is that
the question? You won't be at ECU
long before you discover the park-
ing woes of faculty members and
students alike. From a monetary
standpoint, there is one, singular
choice: not to drive.
, ECU is currently in pursuit of
creating a "pedestrian only" cam-
pus.
With this in mind, parking lots
The,
CoMectt
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
I
Spend the 752 7303
Funniest Night
of your life!
209 E. 5th St.
Greenville
Coupon good for one free
admission with orientation i.d.
Suspended concert nights
I
N.C.s
Legendary
Rock'n'Roll
nightclub
now in its
23rd year
Cut out Attic logo - Good for one FREE membership
1 TUESDAYS
I 70s80s
1 Dance
i Night
$1.00 Bottle Beer
� Ladies FREE until 11pm
Coupon good for one free
I admission with orientation i.d.
Suspended concert nights
TUESDAY
70's&
80's retro
dance
night
$ 1 bottle beer
Ladies free until 11
Only $2 admission
for Members
WEDNESDAY
Only $4
admission
for members
� The,
CoMedY
nationally
known comedians
THURSDAY
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College
Night
Only $5 admission I
tor Members
LIVE BANDS $1.00
Bottles, 32 oz Draft
& Memberships
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LIVE Bands
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Admission for
Members
SATURDAY
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LIVE Bands
Only $5.00
Admission for
Members
Admission prices may vary due to performer's contracts
PERFORMERS WHO HAVE
GRACED OUR STAGE
HOOT1E AND THE BLOWFISH, DAVE MATTHEWS BAND, THE BLACK
CROWES, PURPLE SCHOOL BUS, PHISH, WIDESPREAD PANIC, GREAT
WHITE, DRMN 'N' CRYIN, BLACKFOOT, EVERYTHING, MERL
SAUNDERS, FULL STOP, GREG ALLMAN, JUPITER COYOTE, THE NIGHT
HAWKS, GIBB DROLL, SEX POLICE, YELLOWMAN, BLOODLINE,
TOMMY CHONG, CRAVIN' MELON, SEX LOVE AND MONEY,
AQUARIUM RESCUE UNIT, MILO Z, BLUE OYSTER CULT, ROLLY GRAY
AND SUNFIRE, INDEGSION, CARROT TOP, BREAKFAST CLUB, THE
POINTER SISTERS, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, SIDEWINDER,
MOTHER NATURE, THE AMATEURS, EGYPT, FROM GOOD HOMES, THE
BACK DOORS, ONE STEP BEYOND, BRUCE FRYE AND THE LONELY
RIDER BAND, MIKE MESEMER'EYES DILLON FENCE, THE MADHATTER,
MOTHER'S FINEST, JEFF FOXWORTHY, THE PRODUCERS, NEIL SCHON,
CRY OF LOVE, BOB NELSON, DAVID GRISMAN, FIREFALL, TIM
WIESBURG, DIXIE DREGS, EDWIN McCAIN BAND, THE RAMONES,
GEORGIA SATELLITES, THE HOOTERS, NANTUCKET, JUDE COLE, WET
NILUE, COL. BRUCE HAMPTON, COLD SWEAT, BLAKE CLARK, THE
REMBRANTS, NICOLETTE CARSON, SEA LEVEL, FOLLOW FOR NOW,
JOHNNY QUEST, FISHBONE, THE CONNELLS, 24-7 SPYZ, PINKARD
ANDBOWDEN
AND THE LIST GOES ON
are shrinking and parking sticker
prices will only get more expensive
as each semester passes.
Another thing to keep in mind
is tickets. Many people who do
drive to campus have been blessed
with at least a few parking tickets.
If these tickets are not paid, the stu-
dent cannot register for classes un-
til they have a clean record with
ECU Public Safety.
Most activities, extracurricular
and otherwise, are easily within
walking distance from any dorm,
however, so driving is not an abso-
lute necessity.
And don't forget to save money
for text books. You have to take
classes, too, after all.
Freshmen face plenty of chal-
lenges at ECU without having to
worry about money, and following
these tips could help you avoid the
biggest traps set in your path.
Some Tough
Decisions
Heather Zophy
Health Educator, Student
Health Services
aBMHHMMMMMMMMMMMMMi
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs) are estimated to infect one
out of every four college students.
This ratio (1:4) con-
tinues to drop (1:5 in
1993,1:6 in 1990) as
more and more stu-
dents are engaging
in sexual relations.
Sexually trans-
mitted diseases do
not discriminate
against anyone. It
doesn't matter a
person's gender,
color, religious pref-
erence, sexual prefer-
ence or socioeco-
nomic status.
There are some
characteristics that
may put individuals
at risk, though.
Women are generally
more likely to con-
tract an STD than
men. In most cases
STDs are contracted by the part-
ner "receiving" the intercourse. Fe-
males using oral contraceptives
(birth control pills) place them-
selves at an even greater risk due
to the hormonal changes that alter
the pH in the vagina.
Another characteristic that fol-
lows the trends of STDs is prior in-
fection. Studies show that those
individuals who have had previous
infections generally place them-
selves at risk for contracting other
sexually transmitted diseases, in-
cluding HIV (human immunodefi-
ciency virus).
Typically, sexually transmitted
diseases show symptoms (blisters or
open sores for herpes, cloudy vagi-
nal or penile discharge for gonor-
rhea, etc.); however, many STDs will
show symptoms with some people
and not with others. For example,
with clamydia and gonorrhea infec-
tion, approximately 80 percent of
women and 20 percent of men will
not show symptoms.
Another thing to consider is
the incubation periods that can
occur with sexually transmitted dis-
eases. Some infections may not
show up for weeks, months, or
years after the initial exposure.
The Human Papilloma Virus
(HPV) which causes genital warts
and HIV are two common examples
of diseases which may have a de-
layed reaction. If you are or decide
to become sexually active, testing
for STDs is essential.
Anytime you engage in risky
behavior, you place yourself at risk
for contracting an infection.
Testing for any type of STD
(clamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, HPV,
STDs
don)-
discrinn�na.
15
PLfiNiNc;
"Pee-Dee
the Pirate

Our beloved school
mascot. Pee-Dee
makes personal
appearances at
sporting events and
various ECU related
activities around the
world! He's quite real,
just like the Easter
Bunny. Except he
doesn't leave candy.
Maybe that should
change
Illustration by JOHN PAUL TATE
syphilis, bacterial vaginosis. Hepa-
titis B, etc.) with the exception of
HIV can be done at the Student
Health Center at a reduced cost
(328-6317 for an appointment).
HIV testing can be done for
free at the Pitt County Health De-
partment (413-1300).
There are some things individu-
als can do to prevent the spread of
STDs. Abstaining from all types of
intercourse (oral, anal, vaginal) is
the only way to be 100 percent sure
that you will not get an infection.
For those who are going to engage
in sexual activity, latex condoms
are going to provide the best pro-
tection.
Condoms must be in date,
stored in a dry, cool environment;
contain Nonoxynol-9, be made of
latex and manufactured in America
or Japan to be the most effective.
The condom must also be put
on. used, and taken off correctly to
ensure any type of protection.
Condoms can be bought through
vending machines in the residence
halls on campus and at the Student
Health Center at the pharmacy (12
for $2. 00 - no prescription
needed). If you decide to become
sexually active, decide to protect
yourself from STDs.
For more information, contact
Heather Zophy, Health Educator at
328-6794.





"t ir� it
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' �' I "i �
16
Tit TLRJvp
"Transit
Bus"
The primary means of
transportation at ECU
in the wake of
construction and
shrinking parking
areas. The bus is your
friend.
CfuizhiD ziifouijh Ism Mimii&ud
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSU
Entertainment
abounds
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
An entertainment Mecca
Greenville is not there's no coliseum
or even a large enough population to
bring in the big names. If you are re-
ally looking for some variety in music
and movies, the best place to find it
around here would be in the stores
and theaters that dot the landscape
in walking distance of ECU.
There are three independent
music stores in
town: East Coast
Music and Video.
Quicksilver and
CD Alley. All three are located within
walking distance of campus with
Quicksilver and CD Alley downtown
on Fifth Street, and East Coast music
over on 12th street. All three of these
stores buy and sell used CDs. he
an extensive selection of music T-
shirts. and will make special orders.
Quicksilver Records caters a little
less to the popular music that can be
found in the chain stores. It has a huge
variety of music posters, carries many
popular and underground magazines,
and has a large sticker selection.
CD Alley, located
downtown, has one of
the largest used CD
selections 1 have seen
anywhere. Its selec-
tion of underground
music (or alternative,
or whatever you call
it) is more than
enough to satisfy the most obscure
tastes. If you're looking for that band
that no one has ever heard of. this is
the place to go.
East Coast Music and Video has
all the popular music, but with a lot
of the more specialized music in stock
as well. Their jazz selection is exten-
sive, including both old and new jazz,
and they also have a large classical
section.
East Coast is also fa-
mous for its movie selec-
tion. Along with main-
stream Hollywood fare,
it carries many under-
ground movies that you
won't see anywhere
else. The foreign film sec-
tion is second to none in the city,
and the collection of Japanese anima-
tion is large and uncensored.
Greenville also has the inevitable
Blockbuster Video. Video Views, and
Pick-a-Flick, among others. These
stores carry the expected mainstream
films, and are located in places you
need a car to visit.
Downtown Greenville is in easy
walking distance, though, and it hosts
the Park Theatre, the city's only "dol-
lar theater" (admission is actually
$1.50, but let's not split hairs; it's
cheap). The Park gets
films on second
run: that is. mov-
ies that ran in
the full-price
theaters four to
six months ear-
lier.
On campus.
Hendrix Theatre runs films on week-
ends, and admission is free to stu-
dents. The films here are also sec-
ond run. but at these prices, who can
complain? Last semester. Hendrix
screened such blockbusters as Pulp
Fiction and Forrest Gump, along
with such critically-acclaimed films
as Ed Wood.
It doesn't seem like Greenville
has enough people to support all
these places, but they thrive none-
theless. If you want to be entertained,
these are the places you need to be.
Out and About
Downtown
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
So, it's Saturday night and
you've got nothing to do. You could
spend the evening getting some
work done or playing a little
Parcheesi with your pals. Or, you
could join the majority of the ECU
campus in downtown Greenville.
Conveniently located within
easy walking distance from campus,
downtown is the legendary place
that earned ECU its "party school"
reputation. Most of the town's bars
are there, and nearly all of the fa-
vorite student hangouts.
What follows is an overview of
the downtown experience for you
- the incoming ECU freshman. All
establishments listed welcome ev-
eryone 18 and older, but remember
to bring an ID; downtown bounc-
ers don't like underage drinkers.
The Attic: The biggest venue
for live music in town. 10 years ago,
REM hit the Attic stage on a regu-
lar basis. Last year it was Hootie
and the Blowfish and Dave
Matthews. Not every band you'll
see here will become huge national
stars, but you might enjoy them
anyway.
Peasant's Cafe: Every college
town has its Deadheads, and this
is where ours hang out. If you're
granola-crunchy, wear tie-dies and
are into Native American outer-
wear, this is the place for you.
Peasant's features live music on
weekends, and sometimes strays
from its low-key regulars to bring
in cool weirdos like the Frank Spen-
cer Quartet.
O'Rockefeller's: This former
clam bar is now home to
Greenville's punka;alternative
scene. Look up "smoky dive" in the
dictionary, and you'll find O'Rocks.
If you're into slam dancing, weird
haircuts and loud rock n' roll, seek
out O'Rocks. Another venue for live
music, O'Rocks typically books lo-
cal bands. Occasionally, however, it
pulls in regionally-known acts such
as Picasso Trigger and the
Antiseen. whose shows at O'Rocks
are local legends. Possibly the best-
behaved crowd in town.
Sports PadSharkey's: Two,
two, two bars in one! Sports Pad
boasts three bars and pool tables
as far as the eye can see. Sharkey's,
which shares building space, is
more laid-back. It has seats and the
occasional acoustic guitar player on
weekends.
The Elbo: For reasons known
only to the gods, the Elbo is where
most partying ECU freshmen hang
out. generally, the Elbo plays Top
40 dance music. Tuesday night is
freshman night; Thursday night is
rave night. It's known as "a good
place to meet people
Kelly's: Another dance club,
this one with a vaguely Irish motif,
it's just like the Elbo. except the
customers are a little older.
Wrong Way Corrigan's: A
blues-rock bar with couitoi table
booths, Corrigan's caters to a
slightly-older crowd than many of
the downtown clubs.
The Cellar: Located beneath
the Attic, the Cellar offers three
rooms with three different types of
music. One room is country, an-
other dance, and the third, rock.
The atmosphere is like the Elbo and
Kelly's, but with a twist.
Happy's Pool Room: The name
says it all. A great place to soak in
some "local color
The Percolator Coffeehouse:
Greenville's very own hip coffee
joint! The Percolator offers an al-
ternative to the beer-swilling may-
hem of the other downtown bars.
Its atmosphere is laid-back despite
the frightening amounts of caffeine
being consumed by the patro s. On
a typical trip to the Percolator
you'll meet poets, professors,
punks, frat boys, Deadheads, art-
ists, intellectuals and just plain
folks who like a good cup of Java.
Alfredo'sAlfredo's II:
Alfredo's is a tiny little pizza joint
with a really good juke box. You can
barely get in the door after 2 a.m.
Alfredo's II, right next door, is a
small bar that attracts an odd as-
sortment of students, it's usually
packed to capacity.
BW3: A buffalo wings restau-
rant that doubles as a bar at night.
BW3 offers comfortable seats and
a trivia game that can be played oh
any of the TV sets scattered around
the room.
Well, that's about it for the
downtown bar scene. Expect to
come home from most of these
places tired, sweaty and reeking of
cigarette smoke. If that's your cup
of tea, pick a likely environment
and dive in.
Moo-ve it
on over to a
job at
The East
Carolinian
this fall.
Call ECU-6366
for more
information!
STUDENT IITERASY ARTS MAGAZINE
Rebel
Pick us up annually in the Spring to view a
showcase of literary and artistic creations by
ECU students, faculty and staff which were
selected by a panel of judges in a campus-
wide literary and art competition.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT
MEDIA
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL
328-6009
Downtown Greenville - Across from Chico's
Your Complete College Store
Largest selection of used textbooks in town
Complete line of art supplies
School supplies
ECU sportswear
Film processing
Greeting cards
Cliffs Notes
Posters
Study aids
Novelties
Calculators
Complete line of photo supplies
Custom framing at University Frame Shop
Greek merchandise
Also located in UBE:
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
and-
Art Gallery
Graphics
DISCOUNT IIIMlt
r'
I-
h
516 S. Cotanche
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)758-2616
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z
Any Calculator
in Stock
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Greenville, NC 27858
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H
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in Stock
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H
516 S. Cotanche
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)758-2616
$1.00 off
Any Portal Poster
(Includes Big-As-Life)
r-
Offer Does Not Apply to Sale Items
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Coupon Expires 7-J1-95
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516 S. Cotanche
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)758-2616
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d
Any ECU
T-Shirt
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Cannot be used with any other discount
Graphics
516 S. Cotanche
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)758-2616
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H
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Mon - Fri 9am to 6pm
Sat. 10 am to 1pm
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i





�'�"� . I. -
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Find fun in the Emerald City sun
Tambra Zion
News Editor
aHMMBMaMBMRHMMi
Instead of sitting in your resi-
dence hall sweating like a pig in the
immense summer heat, do it outside
at one of Greenville's 19 parks.
Greenville's recreation and parks
department has something to offer
everyone as far as outdoor (and even
indoor) activities go. Here's a brief
rundown of where to find what
The Aquatics and Fitness Cen-
ter is located on Staton Road (you'll
learn where that is eventually). Since
you probably already know where the
Plaza Mall is. I'll give you a hint. Fol-
low Charles Boulevard past the sta-
dium and past the mall and past the
movie theater and you'll eventually
run into it on your right. This center
sports an Olympic size indoor swim-
ming pool (just in case you were
thinking of getting a late start for
the '96 Olympic games), aerobic, ex-
ercise and weight rooms, as well as a
gymnasium, locker rooms and nurs-
ery facilities for those of you who
have gotten an early start on moth-
erhood.
The Community Building, lo-
cated on Fourth and Greene Streets,
offers arts and craft programs for
those who may or may not be artisti-
cally inclined. It's also air conditioned
so you can go there to escape the
tremendous heat you'd otherwise be
facing in your room.
You'll probably find Elm Street
Park first. It's the closest park to
campus and can easily be found on,
you guessed it, Elm Street. This 8.4
acre lot hosts six lighted tennis
courts, two little league fields, not
one but two playgrounds, three pic-
nic shelters, and a Kiwanas shelter.
If you ever become close friends with
a Kiwanas (whatever that may be)
they might let you share the deck,
picnic table and indoor grill under
their shelter. The Elm Street Park
would not be complete without men-
tioning the Elm Street Gym which
can be found directly across the
street from the six tennis courts men-
tioned earlier.
Evans Park is located on Arling-
ton Boulevard. Arlington boulevard
is across from the Plaza Mall and
home to Boulevard Bagel (a shop the
TEC Highly recommends). This park
is 25 acres and has restrooms, a defi-
nite plus! As far as recreation goes,
however, Evans Park has two lighted
softball fields and not much else.
There are concession stands, but
hours vary.
The Thomas Foreman Park was
probably named after a really great
guy who has left Greenville for a bet-
ter place. You can find this place at
the corner of W. Fifth and Nash
Streets. Foreman's Park has a play-
ground, two lighted tennis courts,
two picnic shelters, a footballplay-
ing field and is home to the CM.
Eppes Center and Gymnasium.
Greenville Terrace Park is a
tiny little place found off of Greenville
Boulevard (if you don't know where
Greenville Boulevard is you're in
trouble). The Terrace Park has all the
essentials: a small playing field, pic-
nic shelter and restrooms.
Green Springs Park sounds like
the place to be. This park spans al-
most 26 acres and can be found right
on Fifth Street The park has picnic
areas with grills for individuals and
families, an exercise trail complete
with workout stations, and pedes-
trian bridge that crosses over Green
Mill Run Creek.
Guy Smith Park is a little far-
ther out than the rest on the corner
of Chestnut Street and Memorial
Drive. This 12 acre lot hosts two
lighted ballfields and one unlighted
ballfield. The Guy Smith Park has a
city swimming pool and bathhouse.
Hillsdale Park is on Sunset Av-
enue and home to one small shelter,
one small playing field and a basket-
ball goal.
The Jaycee Park can be found
right next to the recreation and
parks department on Cedar Lane, off
of 14th Street. This lot is almost 12
acres large with four lighted tennis
courts, a library, an auditorium, a
lighted soccer field, playground and
picnic table. This park has a radical
skateboard ramp for those of you
who haven't kicked the habit, and
two outdoor basketball courts.
The Peppermint Park is a nice
little spot on 14th Street with a play-
ground and a picnic sheltei.
The River Birch Tennis Center
is open seven days a week and has
12 tennis courts (four of which are
lighted). The center is located on Ar-
lington Boulevard and reservations
are accepted, that might mean you
need to go out and buy one of those
really cute, really expensive tennis
outfits (probably not though).
The River Park North is tre-
mendous in every sense of the word.
It can be found on Mumford Road
(I don't even know where that is af-
ter three years of being here) and is
home to five lakes, a mile of front-
age on the Tar River, Fishing, pedal
boat docks and rental shed, picnic
shelters and tables and a nature cen-
ter. The park also offers organized
group camping, a nature trail and
those ever-important restrooms
(which you may not need where
there's a nature trail to be found).
South Greenville is a nine acres
lot on Howell Street. It has a com-
munity shelter, gymnasium, play-
ground and lighted little league
field, enough said.
6.
7.
S.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
IS.
19.
20.
J.iycce Park
Peppermint Pork
Elm SI. Park & Gym
Green Spring Park
Riucr Park North
Woodlawn Playground
Town Common
Community Building
Greenfield Terrace
Thomas N. Foreman
Moycwood Park
Swimming Pool
Guy Smilh X9
South Greenville
Hillsdale Playground
Evans Park
West Meadowbrook
Aquatics & Fitness C:r.
Westhavcn Park
Teen Center
17
The Teen Center(because most
of you still are) is on East 14th
Street and hosts teen activities plus
a sand volleyball court.
The Town Commons is one of
those need to know words. EVERY-
BODY knows where the town com-
mons are, but here's a refresher,
First Street. The park has an out-
door theater, boat ramps, paved
walks and benches and plenty of
green grass.
Westhaven Park is located at
the end of Cedarhurst Drive. This
1.5 acre beauty has an open play
field, playground equipment and a
picnic area.
West Meadowbrook's 33 acres
can be found on Legion Drive. The
park has, strangely enough the
things a park should have - a pic-
nic shelter, play equipment, practice
GRuJMlif RECREATION
W.T PARKS DEPARTMENT
P. C. KB 7207
GRZENVUIE. NC 27635
fields (including soccer and foot-
ball), a lighted softball field and
restrooms.
Woodlawn Park wraps up the
list. At less than an acre, this tiny
spot can't hold more than the play-
ground equipment and picnic table
you'll find there. Look for it on
Woodlawn Avenue.
Now just because this stuff
looks fun, that doesn't mean it's al-
ways free. There aren't any admis-
sions charged for going into the
parks but recreational facilities may
be a different story. You shoula call
to find out more information on
hours, activities and rates. The
Greenville recreation and parks de-
partment also offers several other
programs you might be interested
in. Call 830-4567 and ask for Debra
to find out more.
DEfiNiNc;
TJ-t TU2M$
"Residence
HallDorm"
On campus housing.
Don't call it a dorm
(they get very testy).
You'll make lots of
friends and probably
want to kill each of
them at certain times.
You'll love every
minute, though!
S3

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ASA XQ AZ IIA
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rv East Carolina University W
V 1995 Rush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied with a check for $15, noa-ttfuudablc,
made payable to C.C.U. Panhcllcnic Association. Rush dates arc September 7-
12, 1995. Rush Orientation will be on September 7, 1995 from 5:00 p.m
6:00 p.m. You must also .supply eight (8) photos of yourself at the start of
rush. Registration deadline is Septcrmbcr t, 1995.

Sorority Rushce Data
' '?� 'C
-Ssv.
IF NOT NOWWHEN?
SORORITY RUSH SEPT.
P IN 204 WHICHARD
Last name first
High School GPA:
Middle Social Security Number
. flame
Off Campus Address (if applicable).
.Phone
SIQN
Is There A Sorority Affiliate In Your Family? (YN) Please circle.
RelationshipsnameSorority.
CALL 3284235
?' O
Relationships
High School Acivitics
larr
.Sorority.
Orientation Sept. 7
Orientation is in Mendenhall
Rush dates : Sept. 7-12
Other Colleges Attended: flame.
Previous Coilegkite Activities
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Hobbies:

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XQ AZ AAn Aon 1
Ati GO TOQ
PAttHatEMIC ASSOCIATION lW'ORMATIOri RELEASE fORM
In compliance with Die Tamil Educational Rijjlis and Privacy Act of 1974. i hereby grant the Dean of Students at East Carolina
University the tight to release the needed academic Information tor sorority ptedgag and initiation to fanhcliciile or the
appropriate sorority when necessary. My termination from rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
Student Signature.
Date.
N
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- 0





� -MiiMMHpM
-
18
PEflNllNcT
Tilt TtEM6

The Circle
Location of the ECU
fountain and site of
many promotional
photos, romantic
interludes and
fraternity pranks.
a
Ctuhini) i'nruiiijh uihl'dilcz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Hamrick excited about new year
bAb 1 LAKULliNA UNIVERSITY gggjg
Ward Sports Medicine Bu.lding � Greenville. NC 2"858-4i5? � Phone 919 3284S30 � FAX 919;328-452S
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
The pieces of the puzzle have all
fallen into place.
On April 25, Mike Hamrick was
named Director of Athletics at ECU,
filling the final and most significant
Pirate Athletics vacancy after a mass
departmental exodus which left the
program searching for new men's and
women's basketball coaches, as well
as assistant football and basketball
coaches and a shooting guard on the
men's hoops squad.
I think that there is a tremen-
dous amount of opportunity (at
ECU Hamrick said. "I really believe
that better days are ahead for ECU
athletics
The 37-year-old Hamrick re-
places Dave Hart, Jr who left ECU
to fill the same position at Florida
State University in March. Hamrick
served as the Athletic Director at the
Unviersity of Arkansas-Little Rock
from 1990-95, coordinating and man-
aging all aspects of their 16-sport Di-
Mike Hamrick
vision-l athletics program.
Most notably, Hamrick, while at
UALR, placed the Trojans into the
Sun Belt Conference, after they had
been previously turned away twice.
ECU currently finds itself an orphan
in the world of collegiate athletic
conferencing, an enigma still that
ranks high on ECU'S list of priori-
ties.
Before going to UALR, Hamrick
was an Assistant Athletics Director
at Illinois State University from 1984-
90.
"I think that we had a tremen-
dous amount of success at Illinois
State and at Arkansas-Little Rock
Hamrick said. "I've had experience
taking programs from one level to the
next, and I hope that that experience
will help me as I come into to
Greenville to try to improve the East
Carolina program
The West Virginia native gradu-
ated from Marshall University in
1980 with a B.A. in Education, and
was a two-year starter at linebacker
for the Thundering Herd. He received
his Master's degree in Sports Admin-
June 1, 1995
Dear New Students:
Some of the nost exciting tines spent on a college campus are
surrounding athlet.c events. At ECU, this is definitely true.
Over the previous four years memorable ECU athletic moments include
exciting victories, national television broadcasts, bowl games,
NCAA tournament appearances and full stadiuns and arenas with
electric atmospheres.
You as a student will want to make sure you are included in all
these exciting moments. There is nothing like making as much noise
as possible in a full Dowdy-Ficklen stadium for the ECU team
entrance and yelling first downPirates after ECU first downs.
During the winter, you will want to be surrounding the court,
standing as part of the Minges Maniacs, in noisy Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum creating the one of toughest home court atmospheres
to be found.
We encourage you to support all your fellow student-athletes on
campus. From the Lady Pirate volleyball and softball teams to the
Pirate baseball and swim teams, their are 18 men's and women's
intercollegiate teams that you can support throughout the year.
Each one offering exciting moments for you to experience.
Lastly, being a true Pirate means pride, enthusiasm, class and
loyalty toward your university. As a member of the newest class of
ECU students, each of you are now in a position to carry on these
traditions. Wear you purple and gold with pride, show visible
enthusiasm at games, display your loyalty by learning the alma
mater and singing it at every game, and exemplify class
(sportsmanship) in your actions at all athletic events.
Welcome to the ECU family. We look forward to seeing you this fall.
One of our traditional cheers says it bestHey, Hey, EC You Look
So Good To Me!
Experience the Excitement of the Spirit of the East! Go Pirates!
Sincerely,
Mike Hamrick
Director of Athletics
ta.t Cirol.rs fcnlvwiliy k � WlffiiOTI In mini mi of The 'Juvtnity �t North n�olnu. M Equl nppninillll)IHlll�lm Acncn Eraplovtr
istration from Ohio University a year
later. He has a wife and three chil-
dren.
For the second straight year.
ECU has earned special mention by
the College Football Association in
its yearly survey of graduation rates
for football players.
Along with ECU, 16 other
schools received honorable mentions
for having graduation rates of 70 per-
cent or higher. The CFA average is
58.6 percent.
"1 told the people at ECU when
I interviewed for the job that I
couldn't promise them anything but
I would work hard, our program
would have integrity and that our
student-athletes would graduate
Hamrick said. "I can promise you that
will happen
Lucky f rosh get recreation ctr.
without headache
Maureen McKenna
Recreational Services
MMHHHMHnnnMI
ECU students are anxiously
awaiting the opening of the new
Student Recreation Center (SRC).
After 10 years of planning, the new
SRC is scheduled to open its doors
in the spring of 1996.
The building will provide un-
limited opportunities for ECU stu-
dents to exercise and enjoy new
leisure programs offered through
Recreational Services.
According to Director of Rec-
reational Services Nancy Mize, the
building will be open from 6 a.m.
until midnight seven days a week.
With the added activity space. Rec-
reational Services will be expand-
ing its healthy lifestyle programs,
and begin instructional program-
ming options.
Personal weight trainers will
assist students in customizing their
daily workouts. Recreational Ser-
vices is also hoping to expand sum-
mer camps for children, adapted
recreation programs, adventure
camps, rock climbing, club sports
and aquatics.
The new Student rec center
will offer everything you could po;
sibly want in a health club. The
Sports Forum, a six-court, multi-
purpose sports arena, will house
basketball, volleyball, badminton
and special events.
There will be a 10,000-square
foot weight training room and a car-
diovascular fitness center with com-
puterized bicycles, rowing ma-
chines, stairclimbers and treadmills.
The weight room will also have se-
lected weight machines and a vari-
ety of free weights.
Above the extensive fitness
center will be three 2,000-square
foot aerobic exercise studios with
mirrored walls and a state-of-the-art
stereo equipment system.
Opposite the fitness and
weight training facilities, a beauti-
fully-constructed three-pool Natato-
rium will provide lap swimming,
water polo, free play and aquatics
participants
ample hours of
fun. Highlight-
ing the natato-
rium area is an
outdoor 20' x
40' pool sur-
rounded by a
large sunbath-
ing area and
deck.
The SRC
will also house
a suspended
15-mile three-
lane track
above the SPORTS Forum, com-
plete with pace clocks and direc-
tional signs. In addition, an outdoor
adventure recreational center, an
indoor climbing wall, seven racquet-
ball courts and one squash court
will be available for student use.
The SRC will also have a fit-
ness assessment center to provide
computerized information related
to cardiovascular endurance, mus-
cular strength,
flexibility and
body composi-
tion.
To com-
plete the pic-
ture; the recre-
ation complex
will also have a
classroom
meeting room,
locker rooms,
showers, towel
service,a juice
barhealthy
snack area and
staff administrative offices.
With the doors opening for
more recreational fun, student em-
ployment opportunities will also in-
crease. Recreational Services will
hire an additional 120 employees
to meet the needs of the new cen-
ter. Added on to the total number
of Recreational Services employees,
there will be 200-250 students em-
ployed upon completion of the
SRC.
Rec Services is also in the pro-
cess of setting up an alumni mem-
bership program. They have formed
three ad-hoc committees discussing
programming, policyprocedures
and membership issues. The com-
mittees proposals must first go to
the Rec Services Advisory Council
and then to Dr. Matthews.
Keep an eye out for the open-
ing of your new 150,000-square foot
Student Recreation Center. It will
have everything you could hope for
in a health club - and more!
Carolina Heart, P.A.
Eric B. Carlson, M.D.
15 pleased to announce
the association of
Michael A. Ponder, M.D.
For the Practice of Cardiology
at 804 Johns Hopkins Drive
University Medical Park
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
(919)757-1000
Hours by Appointment
STUDENT-PRODUCED VIDEO I U I I O O K
Treasure
Chest
Pick us up in the Spring beginning at Barefoot on
the Mall for a visual review of the academic year
filmed, edited and produced by students.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT
MEDIA
�M
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL
"r.V
328-6009





-I
Cujjjjjjj ihruuij'n iiiijJite
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
Women's coach inducted in Hall
Anne Donovan
Brian Paiz
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU'S athletics department
has faced many obstacles this year,
especially in trying to replace
coaches who have moved on.
New ECU women's basketball
coach Anne Donovan joined six
other basketball greats when she
was inducted into the National
Basketball Hall of Fame in Spring-
field, MA, last semester.
Donovan, a three-time Olym-
pian, joined former L.A. Lakers
great Kareem Abdul Jabbar. long-
time Soviet National team coach
Aleksandr Gomelsky, Minneapolis
Lakers' coach John Kundla and for-
ward Vern Mikkelsen, former USC
great Cheryl Miller, and the late
referee Earl Strom in the 1995
Hall of Fame class.
Donovan, who was hired on
April 13 to take over the Lady Pi-
rate program, ended her playing
career at Old Dominion University
as the Lady Monarchs all time lead-
ing scorer, rebounder and shot
blocker.
"1 think her being inducted
into the Hall of Fame is very posi-
tive said new ECU athletic direc-
tor Mike Hamrick. "Her credentials
are outstanding as a player and as
an assistant coach
Donovan holds the NCAA
record for career blocks with 801,
and in 1983, was named the
Naismith National Player of the
year. Donovan competed for the
United States in the Olympic
Games in 1980, 1984 and 1988.
leading the USA to gold medal vic-
tories in both 1984 and 1988.
After Donovan graduated from
ODU, she played professionally in
Japan for five years and in Italy
for one year. Donovan now serves
on the Board of Directors for USA
Basketball, as well as the Programs
Committees for the women's
teams. Donovan was elected to the
Athletes Advisory Committee for
the 1996 Olympic Games in At-
lanta.
"I looked to Kareem all the
time to develop my own game
said Donovan, who joined Abdul
Jabbar on the same day in the Hall
of Fame.
"Donovan) revolutionized the
big girl's spot said ftllow in-
ductee Cheryl Miller, who played
with Donovan on the 1984 Olym-
pic Team. "She could run the floor
like a forward and had a very, very
soft touch from 15 to 17 feet from
the basket.
"You would never see it com-
ing, but the next thing you knew,
the trainer would be picking you
up off the floor
One thing Donovan can look
forward to next season at ECU is
the signing of 6-foot-l center Beth
Jaynes from Pfafftown, NC. James
averaged 18.7 points and 12 re-
bounds a game last season as a
senior at North Forsyth High
School. She was named the Metro
4-A Player-of-the-Year as a senior
and was a three time all-conference
selection.
"I am happy that Beth will be
joining the Lady Pirate program
Donovan said. "We are looking for-
ward to her contributing to the
ECU program. She had an excel-
lent high school career, and we
look forward to her building on
that here at ECU
Jaynes is the first signee for
the Lady Pirates, who have two
scholarships still available.
Donovan also has to fill two assis-
tant coaching positions.
DEJriNihJc;
TJJt TC-E.M6

Graduation
Something you'll do
In five or six years
from now, If you're
like most of us.
Remember: You must
have a major to pass
'Go' and collect your
diploma. Start
thinking about it,
anyway!

Men's hoops receive kudos, awards
(SID) - Incoming freshmen can
get excited about next year's basket-
ball season right now, knowing that
outstanding achievers will return to
dazzle them in their freshman year.
Anton Gill, ECU's leading scorer
during the 1994-5 season, was named
tire Most Outstanding Player for the
Pirates at ECU's annual men's basket-
ball banquet, held on April 25 at the
Hilton Inn in Greenville.
Gill, a senior center from Roch-
ester, N.Y averaged 16.8 points and
7.1 rebounds last season, earning First
Team All-Colonial Athletic Association
honors.
Freshman point guard Tony
Parham was named Newcomer of the
Year. The Washington, D.C. native
averaged 9.1 points, 2.7 rebounds and
3.3 assists per game.
Senior forward Chuckie
Robinson was named the Most Im-
proved Player. The Charleston, S.C.
native averaged 15.2 points and a
team-best 7.3 rebounds per game last
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Greenville. NC
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season. As a junior in 1993-4,
Robinson averaged 7.0 points and 5.6
points per game.
Sophomore forward Tim Basham
was named Top Defender and sopho-
more guard Skipp Schaefbauer, who
transferred to Illinois State following
the season, was given the Top Assist
an Top Free Throw Percentage
Awards.
Junior forward Tomekia
Blackmon and junior guard Danielle
Charlesworth were named co-MVPs
for the 1994-5 ECU women's basket-
ball team at the annual Lady Pirate
basketball awards banquet held on
April 19 in Greenville.
Blackmon led ECU in scoring
(16.1 ppg) and rebounding (6.7 rpg)
this season, and was a second-team
All-CAA selection. She ranked second
in the league against CAA teams in
scoring and field goal percentage, and
was ninth in rebounding.
Charlesworth was ECU's second-
leading scorer (10.5) and led the team
in assists (3.4 apg) and steals (2.4 spg).
She ranked second in the league in
steals, fourth in free throw percent-
age, fifth in assists and ninth in three-
point field goal percentage and three-
pointers per game.
Blackmon was also the recipient
.of the team's rebounding award while
Charlesworth as awarded for having
the team's best free throw percentage
(.776).
Other players awarded include
Shay Hayes (Best Defensive Player)
and freshman center Jessica Moore
(Most Improved Player).
For the second straight year,
sophomore Justine Allpress was the
recipient of the Scholar-Athlete
Award, and freshman walk-ons
Cachelle Curtis and Takesha Holly
received the team's Coaches' Award.
Blackmon, Charlesworth and
Hayes received Team Captain Awards
at the banquet in addition to their
other honors.
Blackmon, Belinda Cagle,
LaTesha Sutton and Angela James
received three-year letterman awards,
while Charlesworth, Hayes, Allpress
and Tracey Kelley received two-year
awards. Moore, along with Darlene
Boone and Jenn Westfort received
first-year letters.
Ensure Your Success at EC U
with a
Safety-Net Mentor!
Freshmen! The Safety-Net Mentor Program will match you with an
experienced ECU student who knows the ropes and shares your interests.
Your mentor will help you move in, find your way around, and give you the
inside scoop on how to get involved on campus.
To be matched with a mentor,
Simply complete the Student Actvities
Inventory during Orientation, and fill in the
mentor bubble.
That's all you need to do!
In August, you will receive a welcome letter
from tour mentor.
Don't go it alone!
Get involved in the Safety-Net Mentor Program!
Coordinated by Omicron Delta Kappa, Undergraduate Studies, and the First Year Experience
�- For more information call 328-4796
"��jimij.LHi.iii.
rr





20
Tilt TLEJV6
Cfiiizhii) ihruuijb nihljiiicz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSU
Nothing
to do?

The Hill

Located off of 10th
Street and site of the
new Todd Dining Hall,
the hill hosts pep
rallies, pig pickin's,
car shows and five
residence halls.
Brian Paiz
Assistant Sports Editor
"Hey, Hey, EC - you look so good
to me
Welcome to ECU, where every-
one bleeds purple and gold, and where
athletic competition plays a major role
in the student body.
This year has been an interest-
ing year for Pirate athletics. Let's start
at the beginning, when Athletic Di-
rector Dave Hart left ECU to become
the new AD at Florida St University.
Mike Hamrick, former AD at the
University of Arkansas -Little Rock,
was named ECU'S new athletic direc-
tor on April 25. The mass exiting in
the athletic department continued
when Men's Head Basketball Coach
Eddie Payne, and Women's Basketball
Coach Rosie Thompson both resigned.
Joe Dooley and Anne Donovan
were named
to replace
both coaches,
giving the
basketball
programs at
ECU a whole
new look for
next year. On
the improve-
ment front,
Williams
Arena at
Minges Coli-
seum was
completed, giving ECU one of the nic-
est facilities in the nation.
So get ready for Pirate athletics,
where Greenville is the only place you
can hear, "FIRST DOWN PI-
RATES
Women's Basketball
A young team
for coach Rosie Th-
ompson entered the
year with high
hopes on improving
from last season,
The Lady Pirates
finished 8-19 overall
and 3-11 in the
CAA, losing to even-
tual CAA runnerup
James Madison in
the first round of
the tournament In
March Coach Rosie Thompson re-
signed, and in late April Basketball
Hall of Fame Inductee Anne Donovan
was named head coach.
Baseball
The '95 squad for Head Coach
Gary Overton eneded the season on
a sour note, losing
in the first round of
the CAA tourna-
ment, Coach
Overton however
did reach the 300-
win milestone plac-
ing him in an elite
group in the
NCAA's. ECU squad
was very young this
year, and Pirate
fans are looking for-
ward to next year,
hoping ECU can
return to the NCAA tournament.
Women's Soccer
The 1994-95 campaign was the
inaugural season for Lady Pirate Soc-
cer. Coach Scooty Carey's squad
posted a 2-15 record overall and 1-5
in the CAA. ECU defeated UNC-
Wilmington 3-2 and Barton College
8-0. Junior Robyn Depasquale earned
second team All-Colonial Athletic As-
sociation honors. The Baltimore, Md
native netted four goals and dished
out four assists. The Lady Pirates re-
turn afl but three players from last
year's squad.
Women's Track
Head Coach
Charlie 'Choo" Jus-
ix- tice and his Lady
SnwSB Pirates, continued
�3 a' t0 improve
throughout the
season. Freshman
Saundra Teel broke
the school record
in the 100-meter
hurdles with a time
of 14.75. Jennifer
Kalanick qualified
for the ECAC Out-
door Championships.
Men's Track
The 1995 mens track team
claimed the IC4A championship in the
4 x 100 relay led by Lewis Harris,
Brian Johnson Dwight Henry and
Keith Barker.which qualified them for
the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field
Championships in Knoxville. Head
Coach Bill Carson's team returned
to the NCAA's after just a one year
absence.The Pirates were eighth na-
tionally in the 4 x 100 relays with a
time of 39.63.
Softball
The Lady Pirate softball team
earned their third consecutive bid to
the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Con-
ference Division I softball
champioships. Coach Sue Manahan's
squaad fell short in hte opening round
losing to Rutgers and the host Provi-
dence College. ECU finished the sea-
son at 42-22, which marked the third
time in the last four seasons that the
Lady Pirate softabll team has reached
the 40-plus win plateau. Manahan
earned her 400th coaching win when
ECU swept a doubleheader from Geor-
gia Southern on
March 12. Next
season ECU will
compete in the
Big South con-
ference.
Volleyball
The Lady Pi-
rate volleyball
team finished
their season at
16-17 and 1-4 in
the CAA, earning
their best record since the 1989 sea-
son under first year head coach Gail
Guttenburg. Senior Staci Winters
earned her consecutive selection to
the All-CAA second team.
Men's Soccer
The 1994 ECU men's soccer team
posted their best record ever in the
Colonial Athletic Association at 1-6-1
and was 5-14 overall. Junior's Drew
Racine and Marc Mullin were named
to the second team All-CAA squad.
Coach Scooty Carey's team witnessed
a rebuilding year, I
and should im-
prove in '95.
Swimming
and Diving
The Lady Pi-
rate swim team
captured their
first CAA Cham-
pionship title.
ECU head coach
Rick Kobe was
named the
Women's Coach
of the Year for the second straight
season. ECU women's swim team also
placed third at the ECAC's, which was
the best finish in school history. The
1994-95 campaign was the most
succesful team in Pirate swimming
history. ECU broke 14 records, nine
varsity and five freshman. The men
finished 6-5 overall and 2-3 in the
CAA.
Men's Ten-
nis
The 1995
ECU men's ten-
nis team finished
10-12 overall an
1-5 in the CAA
for head coach
Bill Moore . Se-
nior Jaime Holt
earned a 17-7
record which
gave him a 57-21
overall record in
his four years in Greenville. Fresh-
man Josh Campbell finished the '95
campaign at 14-8.
Women's Tennis
The Lady Pirate Tennis squad
had their best season in school his-
tory finishing 16-6 overall and 3-2 in
the CAA. Four single records were
broken in the '95 campaign. Fresh-
man Rachel Cohen broke three team
records, while sophomore Hollyn Gar-
den finished 13-8 and Elke Garten
ended the season with a 15-6 overall
record. Five starters return to next
year's team.
Men's Golf
The Pirates
ended their season
an a down note fin-
ishing in last place
at the Wofford in-
vitational. Coach
Hal Morrison's
squad did however
place second in the
Colonial Athletic
Associaton Cham-
pionships.
Cheerleading
The Pirate cheerleading squad
placed 14th in the nation in the Uni-
versal Cheerleading Association Na-
tional Championships in Orlando
Florida. Chris Penhollow was re-
cently named the new head coach.
Football
Walking
'in Memphis
was the theme
for the 1994
edition of ECU
football. The
Pirates fin-
ished at 7-4
during the
regular sea-
son, earning
them a trip to the Liberty Bowl on
New Year's Eve. Senior running back
Junior Smith continued his torrid
pace as he passed Carlester Crumpler
as the leading rusher in ECU football
history. The season ended on a down
note however, as The University of
Illinois beat the Pirates 30-0 in front
of a national television audience on
ESPN. ECU does return a strong
nucleus for the '95 season, and head
Coach Steve Logan and his troops will
get a big test early as they travel to
the University of Tenneessee on Sept.
3, for a showndown with the Volun-
teers.
Basketball
"It's what's inside that counts
was the motto for the 1994-95 ECU
men's basketball program. The Pirates
opened their season with their first
eight games on
the road, as Will-
iams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
was getting pre-
pared for its
opening on Jan.
6 with East Ten-
nessee State.
Coach Eddie
Payne's squad
finished the sea-
son at 18-12 and
7-7 in the CAA,
earning their best record since 1972.
Senior Anton Gill was named first
team All-CAA and freshman guard
Tony Parham was named to the All
Rookie Team. In early April, Payne left
the ECU program to take the head
coaching position at Oregon State Uni-
versity. Assistant coach Joe Dooley
was promoted to head coach, making
him the youngest Division 1 head
coach in the NCAA.
Price Is
Right
Whether you are
trying to sell that
old cluncker, or
find a job to pay
for your new
apartment try our
classifieds. Our
classifieds are only
$2 for 25 words
with a valid
student I.D.
Illustration by JOHN PAUL TATE
LEARN.
We've made it a lot easier.
Your biggest concern as a stuJent should be �ur studies - not the cost or a checking
account. East Carolina Bank has taken care of that expense tor you.
With our University Club Checking account, any tull-time student is eligible tor a
checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking at any automanc teller machine
with no ATM tee charged, no-tee traveler's checks and a tree order ot 50 checks
Ifyou maintain a SI OC minimum balance in rhe account, there are no service charges.
We also don't limit your checlcwritmg or ATM withdrawals.
Make lite easier. Try University Club Checking.
The
East Carolina Bank
Oirner ot Arlington BoulevarJ & Red Banks Road
(919) 355-8200
'Minimum habnte inquired nSlOCc average balance ot JWC It balance requirement nn
met. trs aueunJ are $5 pei month andIS pet deht
Member FDIC
Are Here, Too
COMICS AND SP0RTSCARDS
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11 New Comics 10 Off
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�Price Guides and Publicc
MEMOES ,
HERH
(919)757-0948
116 Fifth St.
Greenville, NC 7
C





gft

ECU Athletics A-Z
By Sports Editor Dave Pond
If you can't be an ECU athlete, then be an athletic supporter. Here's a quick A-B-C'&of
how to be a true Purple Pirate throughout next season's football season.
A � Athletic Department Ticket Office. Here, along with Mendenhall Student Center, is where you can pick up your free ticket for every home
football game starting a few days prior to the game.
D � Busted. Public Safety got you for underage drinking. If you're 21, remember to carry your ID as you frolic through the tailgating fieldsjf
you're under 21, it can get risky. Besides, they'll make you reluctantly pour out your cup in front of them. That's more painful than
getting a ticket
C � Coach Steve Logan. Took a 2-9 squad and turned them into last season's 7-5 Liberty Bowl competitors in Memphis, Tennessee.
J Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. Home football stadium for your ECU Pirates. They're going to expand in a couple seasons, so fill the stands so they
have a reason.
� � "Experience the Excitement �1995 ECU football team motto. The Sept. 16 home opener with Central Michigan won't be as exciting if we
kick off with an 0-2 record.
I � First Down � Pirates! (You'll learn)
(j- You can bring Grills to cook while tailgating � but let's not burn the woods down, OK?
il � Half-price ticket. When you get your freebie, you are allowed to purchase one for nine bucks for a friend, grandma, or even your pet chimp.
Wait a minute � animals aren't allowed to roam Dowdy-Ficklen (Unless it's a seeing-eye monkey.)
1 The University of Illinois. Whipped the Pirates badly in the aforementioned Liberty Bowl, but will host the Pirates in a rematch on
4 September 23.
J jerris McPhail. Must step up play to help ease the graduation of ECU's all-time leading rusher Junior Smith in the Pirate backfield.
� Kegstands in the tailgating area before all the football games. Kegs aren't allowed anymore. Games will start at two, so you might not want to
make this buffet your breakfast of champions. (Editor's note: Parents, please use the Armed Forces "don't ask, don't tell policy Thanks.)
L � Liberty Bowl. We lost 31-0. Nuff said.
M Mike" linebacker BJ. Crane. Fun to watch play, even more fun to interview after a Pirate victory. The senior ranked second on last year's
squad with 79 tackles.
IV � Not a good idea to play frisbee golf during tailgating. Leave the discs at home Saturday, but bring them back Sunday to play through the
endless piles of trash left on the fields. Better yet, clean up your trash on Saturday so there is no problem.
O � Only a certain amount of half-price tickets are available for each game, so line up early. Once they're gone, they're gone.
P � Porta-potties, good idea. Bushes and trees and behind your car, bad idea. Getting ticketing for public urination isn't a great way to start your
college career. Although the lines may be long, it'll be worth the wait.
y A new Homecoming Queen and King will be crowned during halftime of the Oct. 21 ECU-Temple matchup.
�m
R � Road trip! September 2 against Tennessee. Grab a few people on your hall that you don't really know yet and head to Knoxville.
S � Student gates. These are specially-marked to reduce the amount of time to get in and out of the stadium. You won't be able to get in the
J other ones, so don't bother trying. Once you get in, you can.sit wherever you want on the student side.
( T � Tailgating takes place everywhere, but the two fields near the intersection of Charles and Greenville Blvds. are the major congregation sites.
The Frisbee Golf course is on the left hand side, while freshman parking is on the right, so you might want to move your car somewhere else
before the crowd gets there.
X � Underneath the stadium stands, the faithful Pirate fan will find restrooms, snack bars and souvenirs. Use the stairs, though, don't go the
back way. That whole gravity thing comes into effect when you're on the top row of the stadium and try to climb down, even if you are
b sober
J V � Vivarin. With, a weekend of tailgating, football and nightlife, Monday morning's 8 a.m. test will come along much quicker than you think.
W � "Wine and cheese" fans. Typical of a UNC or Duke game. You know them � they're the ones who show up an hour into the game and leave
forty-five minutes early. Don't do it here, ECU's thrown together some electrifying starts and finishes over the years, and you might miss
another one.
X � Xylophones! Xylophones! Xylophones! ECU's fine marching band performs at every home game.
Y � Your folks want tickets for the big ECU-Tulsa matchup on November 11. Drop by the Athletic Ticket Office, and they'll be glad to hook you
up with seats. Or, if you don't want to worry about your parents paying you back, tell them to call 1-800-DIAL-ECU and do it.
Z � Although you may just think you're sleepy, don't try catching any Z's in the middle of the stadium or tailgating areas. People passing out all
over campus is not a major drawing point. Wait till you stumble back to your cramped residence hall room.
if
��






22
Tit TEJ�M6
"The Wave"
A synchronized group
activity that takes
place at football
games. As seen on
TV!
L
Cujjjjjy iijuuyh aiiiiaiizj
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE . iZZ
Still nothing to do? Keep reading!
Jeannette Roth
Recreational Services
ECU Recreational Services of-
fers a multitude of fun. competitive
and leisure-oriented programs that
will enhance the healthy lifestyle of
each student on campus. With the
opening of the 150.000 square foot
Student Recreation Center planned
for next spring, ECU students will
have even more opportunities to get
involved in campus life Intramural
sports, club sports, drop-in recreation
opportunities, lifestyle enhancement
programs, fitness classes. Natural
Life special events and adventure
equipment rentals, trips and work-
shops are just a portion of what Rec-
reational Services has to offer.
Club Sport Program
The clubs sport program is de-
signed for recreational activity, in-
structional opportunities and com-
petitive play. The clubs are developed
and organized by stu-
dents, with adminis-
trative assistance pro-
vided buy Rec Ser-
vices. Any time there
is sufficient interest,
new clubs may be
considered for club
recognition. Club
sport opportunities
include: CrewRow-
ing, Dart, Disc Golf,
Equestrian, Fencing,
Frisbee Disc Coif. Gojo Shorin Ka-
rate, Kayaking, Lacrosse, Rugby
Men's and Women's Soccer, Tae
Kwon Do, Ultimate Frisbee, Volley-
ball, Water Skiing and Weight Lift-
ing.
Natural Life Special Events
Natural Life special events high-
light each month by offering unique
leisure activities designed for the
zaniness in all of us. Natural Life
events provide non-alcoholic social al-
ternatives
and are
team, indi-
vidual and
co-recre-
ational in
theme. Non-
skilled ac-
tion within a
one-to-two
hour time
frame on
Thursday,
Friday and
Saturday evenings provide 1 great
night out for ECU. Students can look
forward to a hearty helping of wacky
fun throughout the year that includes
the King and Queen of the Halls com-
petitions, Scavenger Hunts, Bike-n-
Blade Rodeos, Pirate Double Dare,
Cliffhanger at the Tower, Fiesta
Night, Buffett Bingo and Cruise Pool
Parties.
Intramural Sports
The Intramural Sports program
is designed to provide competitive
and recreational sport experiences
for participants of all skill levels and
abilities. Over 40 activities are offered
throughout the year ranging from
the conventional and traditional to
the unique and intriguing. A sepa-
rate men's and women's division is
available for all team sports and most
individualdual activities. Partici-
pants are encouraged to for their own
teams with friends, residence hall
members, classmates, etc. prior to
registration. Sports such as Softball,
flag football and innertube water
polo offer co-recreational opportuni-
ties specifically designed to provide
fun. relaxation and socialization.
Adventure Programs
The adventure program provides
students an opportunity to enjoy our
natural surroundings via the use of
equipment and information specific
to outdoor activities and by partici-
pation in various adventure trips.
Local trips, such as windsurfing,
kayaking and horseback
riding, as well as adven-
ture trips, such as climb-
ing, hanggliding and
snow skiing are sched-
uled each semester. Edu-
cational workshops rela-
tive to climbing, back-
packing and kayaking
are offered in an effort
to increase interest in
outdoor activities and to
provide a basis of knowl-
edge necessary to enhance the en-
joyment of personal outdoor adven-
tures.
Climbing Tower
High adventure and climbing
can be found
through the ECU
Climbing Tower.
The tower pro-
vides climbing
workshops and
drop-in hours for
recreational
thrills. It is ideal
for fitness en-
hancement, climb-
ing skills develop-
ment, confidence
building and fun. Qualifies supervi-
sors will be working to maintain a
safe and enjoyable experience for all
participants.
Ropes Challenge Course
The ECU ropes challenge course
is composed of initiative games and
a ropes course. The activity sites are
constructed with the use of ropes,
cables, beams, ladders and platforms
in trees, from a few feet to 50 feet
above the ground. The specific activi-
ties present challenges with con-
trolled risk. The course is an effec-
GO
PIRATES!
This is just one
example of
exuberance found at
ECU football games.
Bring the family �
they'll have tons of
fun, and you won't
have to sit with them!
FILE PHOTO
ASAP
IPHOTO C A U I N A
I Bell's Fork Square � Greenville. NC
(919)321-8888
r liotography C ourscs
I wo.
I hree Hour Sessions
$25.00
10 Off
All Used Pnoto Equipment Witn Student ID
Includes DarRroom 1
jff.r" j Tfrrfln
pjipment
tive tool in helping student leaders,
University departments, public
school groups and agencies, and busi-
nessindustry enterprises become ef-
fective leaders and teams as well as
develop personal inner and group re-
sources.
Fitness
Programs
The Rec
Services
Lifestyle En-
hancement
Programs and
Fitness
Classes pro-
vide a variety
of opportuni-
ties that edu
cate, motivate
and vitalize individual fitness pur-
suits. Non-credit classes are offered
during the fall, spring and summer
sessions. Aerobic class choices in-
clude low impact, interval, hi regu-
lar aerobics, funk, toning, aqua fit-
ness, basic STEP, hi and Power
STEP (Sports Training Exercise Pro-
gram). Free assessment of body com-
position, cardiovascular fitness, mus-
cular strength and endurance, flex-
ibility, blood pressure and
anthropometric measurements are
available by appointment through the
Fitness Assessment Center, located
in 112 Christenbury Gym. In addi-
tion, instructional classes in swim-
ming, self-defense, weight manage-
ment and nutrition will be offered to
the ECU community. For individuals
interested in self-directed programs,
the 100 Fit Club, Club Ped and a
Swim Club will enhance or provide a
great start to any fitness routine.
Drop-in Recreation
Recreational facilities are sched-
uled during specific times to provide
opportunities for self-directed
"Drop-In" participation. A valid ECU
identification card must be provided
for entrance to all facilities and for
the use of services. In addition, the
facilities are available for reserved
File Photo
If classes are driving you up the wall, join the climbing crew
at Rec Services. This is just one activity on their list.
use for fun or practice based on
their availability. Guest passes are
available for weekend use only dur-
ing tr i fall and spring semesters and
are available for weekday use dur-
ing the summer months.
Student Employment
Each year over one hundred stu-
dents are employed on a part-time
basis by Recreational Services. The
department works cooperatively
with the Office of Financial Aid uti-
lizing the two basic employment
programs on campus: the college
Work Study program and the Stu-
dent Self-help program. Additionally,
interns and practicum students from
related academic programs are en-
couraged to apply. 204 Christenbury
Gym houses a complete listing of job
vacancies.
w�0r
f A X "
f r
eccYCxe
MS
530 Cotanche St.
(919) 757-0713
" o5fT
Any Pair of TEVA
Sandals
Not Good On Sales Items
Exp. 63095
215 Arlington Blvd
756-3301
530 Cotanche St
757-3616
"flO.OO OFF"H"$10l)0 OFF"
II
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Exp. 63095
' "���'





00 i ni �
���- � ' - -��
L
Ctutehi!) ijjuuyij uiijJaticj
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ORIENTATION SPECIAL ISSUE
n� limit
Are you considering
a job with TEC? If so,
then take a look at
some of our
� -�
positions
News Editor
Assistant News Editor
Lifestyle Editor
Assistant Lifestyle Editor Manager
Sports Editor
Assistant Sports Editor
Staff Illustrator
Assistant Layout Manager
Photographer
Creative Director
Assistant Creative Director
Circulation Manager
Copy Editor
For more
information
call ECU-
6366.
If the Shoe Fits
Wear it Out!
BEFORE
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
AFTER
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
� INTRAMURAL SPORTS
� FITNESS PROGRAMS
�CLUB SPORTS
� ADVENTURE TRIPS
� NATURAL LIFE EVENTS
� SWIMMING
� WEIGHT TRAINING
� GYMNASIUM FREE PLAY
� EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
� CLIMBING PROGRAMS
� AEROBIC CLASSES
� ADAPTIVE PROGRAMS
� LIFESTYLE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMS
� JOB OPPORTUNITIES
BY THIS TIME NEXT YEAR,
YOU'LL HAVE EXPERIENCED
THE TOP STUDENT
RECREATION CENTER IN
NORTH CAROLINA. RIGHT
HERE ON OUR CAMPUS.

XI
S&
ECU STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
OPENING 1996
FOR MORE DETAILS. STOP BY 204 CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM OR CALL 328-6387
College is a journey,
and this journey
requires some serious
road maps. The
Academic Support
Center was designed
to help you if you are
experiencing
academic difficulties,
or to just plain help if
you need advice or
assistance. The center
offers workshops and
tutorials to help your
academic career.
23
PEflNlNc;
Tit. TO2M

TEC

These initials stand
for The East
Carolinian, which is
ECU'S only student-
run newspaper on
campus. With a
circulation of 12,000
every Tuesday and
Thursday during the
school year, TEC
offers students the
opportunity of a
lifetime. For
information, call
ECU-6366.
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NEW LUXURY 4 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
EXCELLENT LOCATION NEAR CAMPUS
�FULLY EQUIPPED FITNESS CENTER
�POOL, TENNIS, SAND VOLLEYBALL,
BASKETBALL AND LOTS MORE
�LARGE CLUBHOUSE WITH MEDIA
ROOM AND GIANT SCREEN TV
�ROOMATE MATCfflNG SERVICE
�PRE-TAILGATE PARTIES
�PLANNED SOCIAL EVENTS
OPEN HOUSE 9A.M. - 6P.M. DAILY
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 19, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 19, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1085
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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