The East Carolinian, April 13, 1995







April 13,1995
Vol 69, No. 90
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
Proposed tax cuts may cost jobs, classes
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
North Carolina's proposed tax
cuts may cause serious changes
ss ECT's campus.
Governor Jim Hunt's proposed
� �ill decrease the entire UNC
stem budget by almost $48 mil-
lion in the next two years, said Vice
Chancellor of Business Affairs Ri-
chard Brown. East Carolina stands
to lose approximately S2.8 million
in funding, which would result in a
reduction in staff and faculty posi-
tions.
"It's part of a plan to reduce
taxes in the state of North Caro-
lina, and even though the state is
in the best economic times it's ever
been in and the projected surplus
at the end of this year is approxi-
mately SI billion, the intent is still
to reduce spending Brown said.
A projected 23 to 25 staff po-
sitions will be lost, as wei! as an
estimated 46 faculty positions.
Brown said.
"Us certainly more than 'tight-
ening the belt there's a provision
in the house proposal to give us
back half the value of the salaries
of those faculty positions we're go-
ing to lose to supplementthe sala-
ries of faculty who will teach addi-
tional sections, but there are some
significant flaws in the logic ot
their proposal Brown said. "The
real impact on students will be com-
plications in getting the classes and
the schedules they need to gradu-
ate on time
The office of planning and in-
stitutional research
the proposed cuts
may have on ECU.
Director Robert Th-
ompson said there
is no direct connec-
tion between the
proposed cuts and
the university, but
that future services
may be hard to
come by.
"Right now
those cuts would
come very heavily
in faculty posi-
tions, that's not by
choice. that's
where the house
version has them
earmarked, so what
would occur is that
studies effects ficult to get courses in some pro-
grams Thomp-
"The real impact
on students will
be complications
in getting the
classes and the
schedules thev
need to graduate
on time
son said. Pro-
grams might
take longer to go
th
mii
thev
it would be dit-
would cut a cer-
tain number of
clerical positions
and we are at the
bottom of the
state in terms of
clerical support
to our students
Thompson
doubts ECU will
face a worst case
scenario, and
does not feel the
taxpayer rebates
are worth the re-
duction L'NC schools would face.
"My daughter goes here and a it
S50 rebate I'd much rather not p
get the rebate and have the servi
as a parent, because quite honest
those service are worth more than
S50 Thompson said.
The extent of tax cuts ECU
will face is pending on how the pro- p
posais come out of the North Caro- u
Una Senate. A decision should be a;
made within the next two months
concerning ECU'S future funding.
All of this is tentative, it still
lepi
See TAXES p;j
� Richard Broun
Vice Chancellor of
Business Affairs
ECU player repor
Skipp-ing town
j
Remodeling almost complete
Resid
ence
hall:
ready for
students this fall
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
These days most students are
thinking about making it through fi-
nals and getting a break from school.
not what residence hall they will stay
in during the fall. However, future
Slay and l'mstead residents may be
xception.
These two dorms have been
closed lor renovations for the last
three years.
"They were gutted out from the
uiside said Emanuele Amaro. direc-
tor of university housing services.
"Basically, the only things that re-
mained were the walls
L'mstead will have two female
floors or, the first and third floors
and one male floor on the second.
Slay will have two male floors and
one female floor.
Amaro said that many students
applied for the halls during housing
Hgn-up two weeks ago.
"We only have less than 50 beds
left Amaro said.
Though students were not able
to actually look in the residence halls
because most construction will not
Dave Pond and Brian Paiz
The East Carolinian
On Tuesday morning, rising jun-
ior Pirate shooting guard Skipp
Schaefbauer asked for his release
from his basketball scholarship at
East Carolina University, numerous
sources told TEC.
"Everything is up in the air right
now said Joe Schaefbauer. Skipp's
father, in a telephone interview.
"Nothing has been definitely de-
cided
Schaefbauer, a former "Mr. Bas-
ketball" in his home state of Minne-
sota, had a stellar freshman season
for ECU and was named to the All-
Academic Team during Eddie Payne's
If S �
cides to p!v.
to sit 0
rules. S
looking
Wisconsin and S
State (in
Schaefbaue
cently became
for Oregon S
former E
took .� I
will not he
Schaefbaue t
the 1993-94 CA '�
in which he av i
shot 43.9
point line, an EG
Schaefbauer is a native i
Minnesota.
Women's coach to
be named today
Brian Paiz
Sports Writer
�x
madt
Dono' a
at ODU as
primary duty
ordinator. Doi -
at ODU, finishing I
Lady Monarch
Donovai
Naismith Nal
She is a three tilTK
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Slay Residence Hall is almost ready after its three year face-lift. Students planning to live
on campus next year were recently signed-up to live in Slay or Umstead next fall.
be finished until the summer, stu-
dents were able to view layouts of
the halls and individual rooms before
signing up.
Amaro said renovation ideas for
the halls came from a collaborative
effort.
"When 1 got here three years
ago. there was a committee that was
established Amaro said. "On that
See SLAY page 5
A In a.m. press conference has
been scheduled this morning to name
a new ECU head women's basketball
coach. Sources say that Old Domin-
ion assistant coach Anne Donovan v. ill
be named to replace Rosie Thompson.
who resigned last month. Donovan the United S
met with Lady Monarch players tones in both 1
Wednesday and told them she had Donovan's .
decided to take Hie position at ECU. Lady Monarcl
A call to the Hilton Inn in record.
Greenville on Wednesday night con-
firmed that Donovan is a registered inducted
guest, and that the reservation was Hall ot V.
Panhellenic council celebrates awards of excellence
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The Panhellenic Council, which is
eming body of all ECU sorori-
ties, has a iot to celebrate lately.
R r the first time in five years, so-
rority rush will be held during the fall
semester, rather than during the sum-
mer. In addition, communications be-
.wen itself and the Interfraternity Coun-
cil (IFC), the governing body of ECU'S
'7 fraternities, have improved, and the
council has just received four awards for
its progress and hard work.
During the weekend of March 30-
April the executive board, comprised
i if Maureen McKenna - Panhellenic Piesi-
K-iit. Janet Stubbs - Rush Chair. Ryan
Thomas - Vice President Angie Nix-Trea-
ner, Ronda Sortino- Secretary. Sarah
Rho Chi Director, Rene Srnalhwod
Assistant Vice President Lucy Goodwin
Assistant Rush Director and Nicole
Her - Public Relations, was in At-
lanta for the 40th annual Southeastern
Panhellenic Conference Awards (SEPC).
The Panhellenic applied for eight
out of the 11 possible awards and it won
four of them.
One award received is the Certifi-
cate of Excellence in Scholarship, which
is given based on the overall Greek
women's grade point average. Another
award is the Certificate of Excellence in
Service Learning, which is given to the
school that demon-
strates a thorough un-
derstanding and growth
as a result of working
with philanthropies.
The Certificate tor
Outstanding Service
Programming recog-
nizes the council that
has the best record for
all its service programs.
Some of ECU's pro-
grams include Opera-
tion Sunshine and
Meals on Wheels.
"We are proud of this award because
we work hard with all our programs
said Panhellenic President Maureen
McKenna.
The fourth award that was given to
ECU was the Certificate of Overall Ex-
cellence. According t. award applicatii n
forms, this award was designed to recog-
nize those councils that have showed the
ability to maintain excellence to succeed
and to continue to grow.
"We have done real well said
Panhellenic Advisor and Assistant Dean
of Students lura Sweet "We try to of-
fer students well-
rounded pro-
grams and I think
that's why we al-
ways do so well
Sweet said
that over the
years. ECU has
repeatedly taken
home awards
from the confer-
ence.
Schools that
are eligible for the
c o n f e r e n c e
awards are those
that have six to In sorority chapters and
are within the following states: Virginia,
North Carolina. South Carolina. Geor-
gia. Florida, Louisiana. Mississippi. Ala-
bama. Tennessee and Kentucky.
"We try to offer
students well-
rounded
programs and I
think that's why
we do so well"
� Laura Sweet
Panhellenic Advisor
"We enjoyed the awards confer-
ence because we got a lot of feedback
and we learned a lot from the other
schools that were there McKenna said.
"And since we're moving our rush, that's
very important"
In addition to the awards ceremony.
executive members also attended work-
shops that relate to the specific positions
they hold.
"One of the most important work-
shops we attended was the one that dealt
with Panhellenic IFC relations
McKenna said.
Both the IFC and Panhelienic say
they are focusing their efforts on
strengthening its communication and
working relationship.
"Our next goal is to win the award
for the most outstanding Panhellenic in
the Southeast and in the nation
McKenna said.
The last time ECU won the national
award was in 1993
"ECU is represented very well, and
ECU students consistently standout and
that makes you proud Sweet said. 'And
that happens every time we go down to
Atlanta and that makes me proud
Photo Col
(L-R)Maureen McKenna, Sarah Ohne
Ryan Thomas and Lucy Goodwin.
t�ete
IvL&Cd
Hypnotic suggestions for your lazy daypage
Stress relief and rain neededpage
8
t&u4ie
Q&A with Coach Dooleypage
12
Thursday
Rainy and humid
Weekend
Windy
High 76
Low 51
High 72
Low 48
�tectt xe�ul&i
Angie Nix defeated Penn
Crawford for the position ot
Student Government Associatio
Secretary.





Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
Parking stickers on sale
Suicide - A medical student died from a drug overdose.
April 5
Weapon discharge - A BB pellet gun was being discharged from
Scott Hall into room 380 of Aycock Hall. No injuries were received, the
case is under investigation.
April 6
Damage to property � An RA in Fletcher Hall reported two subjects
were stopped outside Fletcher Hall regarding the kicking out of an air
conditioner in the computer room. A non-student was arrested and banned
from campus.
Larceny - A staff member reported that a non-student tried to re-
move a magazine from Joyner Library. The suspect was banned from cam-
pus.
April 8
Ignition of a smoke bomb � A smoke bomb was ignited in the south-
west stairwell of Garrett Hall, and caused tire alarms to activate.
April 9
Trespassing - A non-student was arrested after refusing to leave the
basketball court at Belk Hall. Officers were attempting to clear a large
number of non-students from the court after an affray occurred near the
location. The suspect was also banned from campus.
Disturbance - An officer reported a confrontation with approximately
40 irate individuals on the basketball court at Belk Hall. The subjects
were angry over non-students being asked to leave the court. Due to the
problems experienced, officers requested and received authorization to
remove the goals from the backboards on the courts at Belk Hall.
April 11
Urinating in public � A non-student was banned from campus and
issued a state citation for urinating in public in the Fifth and Reade Streets
parking lot.
Graffiti � Two non-student were banned from campus after admit-
ting they had spray painted the wall on the east side of the Power Plant.
Assist rescue - A student was transported to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital by Greenville rescue after she passed out from intoxication on a
breezeway in Belk Hall.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Why pay fines
when you can be
legal
Marguerite Benjamin
Staff Writer
Let's face it, you can't keep
parking your car without a permit
and sweating bullets wondering
whether you're going to have a pink
slip on your windshield when you
get back to your car. Parking per-
mits may seem expensive, but they
may be the best option.
For those who planned to reg-
ister early for parking permits, reg-
istration forms should have arrived
in the mail within the past two
weeks. Some of the f rms were re-
turned to Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices due to incorrect addresses.
"We encourage students to go
ahead and register for their park-
ing permits said Pat Gertz, direc-
tor of ECU Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices, "because permit regulations
are in effect and enforced from the
beginning of the first day of class
each semester and summer ses-
sion
"Of the (applications) we have
processed, we have received a lot
back already, and all you have to
do is come by the Parking and Traf-
fic Services office and give us your
name. If we don't have one on file
for you, we can begin to process
one
The primary fees for parking
permits for residents, students liv-
ing in the residence halls who have
earned 32 or more credit hours;
freshmen, students in the residence
halls who have earned 31 or less
credit hours: commuters, student
living off campus with 32 or more
credit hours; and medical commut-
ers, students living off campus and
attending classes at the school of
Medicine, are currently S96.
&
NOTICE
There mill
be No
Transit
Seruice
Friday afternoon (April 21) after 12:30 pm.
Please see following schedule for
continuation of service.
Limited parking decals may utilize
regular commuter lots after 11:00 am
"on Friday, April 21 ONLY!
ECU Transit Exam
Week Schedule
Monday, April 24 - Regular Service
Tuesday, April 25 - Reading Day -
No daytime service
Pirate Ride and
Freshman Shuttle only.
Wednesday, April 26 - Friday, April 28 -
Regular Service
Monday, May 1
- Wednesday, May 3 -
Regular Service-All
Transit Services will
nd at 5:00 pm on
Wednesday, May 3.
Limited permits, for students
living off campus and having 31 or
less ;redit hours, and motorcycle
pe its are S42 and $15 respec-
tively. Commuter permits are only
valid on campus before 1 a.m.
"Some commuter students and
staff with two vehicles to register
may want to apply for a hang tag
rather than by two separate park-
ing stickers Gertz said. "This year
the hang tag method is offered as
an option according to preference.
because last year this method did
not work for everyone. Some stu
dents complained that the tag
would not stay up when placed in-
side car windows
"The way the hang tag works
is instead of buying two stickers
one can alternate the tag back and
forth when he or she) -changes ve-
hicles. Still, the hang tag costs the
same as buying a second permit, so
it's entirely up to the individual
Gertz said.
Students are encouraged to
complete and return the Vehicle
Registration Application by Friday,
July 28 in order to receive a permit
prior to the start of classes. Those
applying are advised that all out-
standing parking citations in the
applicant's name must be cleared
or the application will not be pro-
cessed.
The Parking and Traffic Services
office is located next to the
McDonald's on E. 10th Street.
Thanks Easter Bunnyi
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Photo by JACK SKINNER Sisters of the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority hosted an Easter egg- hunt complete with cookies, cake and punch for children from Greenville's Little Willie Center on May 10th.
Notice: Due to a computer conversion, the cashier's office
will be unable to accept summer school payments today, or
from April 17th through the 19th. The university apologizes
for any inconvenience you may encounter.
Man, I am SO relieved I forgot to reserve a room for next
year. I called University Housing Services to explain my
situation and those kind folks told me I could have a
SECOND CHANCE! All 1 have to do is drop hy 214 Whichard
Building on Monday, April 17 or Tuesday, April 18 between
8:30 AM and 4:30 PM. They will have the paperwork I need to
fill in all I have to do is bring $100. Wow I am so lucky. I
can live on campus and not be stuck with the hassles of living
In an apartment. If you forgot to reserve a room for next
year, you can do the same tiling! If you don't believe that they
will give you a second chance, just call them at 328-6450.
Gu"
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
University Housing And Campus Dining Services
Ep





Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
Airplane crash
WALHALLA, S.C. (API - The
small airplane that crashed last
weekend into Lake Keowee in
Oconee County will finally he pulled
out of the water this weekend.
Divers are scheduled to remove
the plane Saturday. Sergeant Jerry
Moss of the Oconee Sheriff's Depart-
ment said. The wreckage is sub-
merged in 40 feet of water.
Pilot James Cargile of Asheville.
N.C said he was blinded by sunlight
�?�; -rP0 'iff- ,�&�
after making a sharp turn. The plane
hit a power line and went into the
lake nose tirst. he said.
Cargile was injured, while his
wife Lisa, the plane's only passen-
ger, drowned after her feet appar-
ently became caught in safety belt
harness.
Moss said National Transport a
tion Safety Board officials want to
he present when the wreckage is re-
moved from the lake.
- iis. o
Scholar chooses
ECU for study
IF NOT N0WWHEN?
SORORITY RUSH SEPT. 7-12
P IN 204 WHICHARD
SIQN
CALL 3284235
��� j'�'�� � K-sfc-ca.
Fullbright scholar
learns underwater
archeology
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
ECU'S Maritime History and
Nautical Archaeology program has
its first visiting Kulbright scholar.
Luiz Cunha, a native of Brazil and
that country's only underwater ar-
chaeologist, has come to ECU for
exposure to the I'nited State's more
developed underwater archaeology
Held.
"This field is very new in Bra-
zil, even in the world Cunha said.
"Not many people are involved yet.
But the United States and France
are very developed
The field of underwater archae-
ology may be relatively new to Bra-
zil, but Cunha has been involved
in it for most of his life.
it started as a hobby Cunha
said. "I don't know at what point it
became something to do profession-
ally
Underwater archaeology did
become Cunha's profession, how-
ever. He holds the position of sec-
tion chief of conservation and res-
toration as well as interim section
chief of cataloging and research at
the Naval Oceanographic Museum
in Rio de Janeiro.
Currently on leave of absence.
See ECU page 5
Deaths from pneumonia
and influenza on the rise
(AP) - A program to improve
America's health is making progress
against the killer diseases but is fal-
tering in caring for the poor, reduc-
ing teenage pregnancy and persuad-
ing couch potatoes to start exercis-
ing.
At the halfway point in a de-
cade-long campaign called Healthy
People 20(10, federal officials said
Tuesday the project is showing
mixed results and may require in-
creased efforts to achieve goals set
in 1990.
"We have a good news but not
good enough said Dr. J. Michael
McCinnis of the U.S. Public Health
service, which is coordinating the
national program.
McCinnis said that deaths from
heart disease, cancer and stroke are
all moving down at a pace that will
achieve the target values by 2000.
But the rates of obesity, teen preg-
nancy, homicides and pneumonia
and influenza deaths are actually
worse than five years ago.
Also getting worse, McCinnis
said at a news conference, are efforts
to provide disease preventive medi-
cal care for the poor.
"We are failing to close the gap
between the rich and poor in health
care McCinnis said.
Financial barriers to preventive
services existed in 16 states at the
beginning of the program and now
exist in 17 states, the report said.
Additionally, he said. 15 percent
of Americans are not covered by
health insurance. Among blacks, he
said 21 percent are not covered and
among Hispanics 32 percent.
Healthy People 2000 is an ef-
See DEATH page 4
IL
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
MuliM-lnh
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "lixotie" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11 pin-1 an
CASH PRIZE
"Gan&oufitt need to call A- regain tn kIvbiux,
Mum jrnv- hv K (HI
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dcmcers wanted$
BULLET
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.(X) OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278 ,
EAST CAROLINA MOTOR SPEEDWAY
KOBEKSOIMVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
(38 Mile Hih Banked Asphalt Tri-Oval)
Hwy 64
795-3968
Gates Open 4pm
Racing - 7:30pm
Present Student
ID for
$2 Discount off
Admission Price
Coolers Allowed
- No Glass Containers
'Where Racing Is Alive In '95"
ROCKY MOUNT
Only 18 Mites From ECU
It's Gettingf-On Friday!
At Champagne's!
Porit Miss the Hot Tan
Contest & Retro Night
It's the hottest Friday night in eastern
North Carolina with 6ome of the most
beautiful ladies in the area competing to
become Miee Hawaiian Tropic. Flue, at
Retro Night, we'll play the hottest sounds
ofthe70'6,eO'B&90'6!
Doors open at 9 pm.
Over $1000 in caeh prizee & two contest nightly.
Preliminary rounds Fri April 7th, 14th & 21st
� Finale � Friday, April 26th
� Winner competes in Miss Hawaiian Tropic Contest
�at the Emerald Isle Beach Music Festival.
� Drink Specials Include:
Margaritas - $1.75
Slue Hawaiiane - $1.75
Domestic Beer - $1.75
� Ladies can enter the night of the event. Anyone is
eligible. Complete rules and regulations available at
Champagne's.
Greenville's only club
with the OFFICIAL
� Hawaiian tropic contest.
fyeynfflt LJtmtpagne'i
INN 207 SW Greenville Blvd. � Greenville. NC 27834 � 365-5000
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ANNOUNCES ITS ANNUAL
FIRE SRLEU
IT'S OUR SIZZLIN' SUMMER SALE
AND EVERYTHING MUST GO!
WE'VE GOT POSITIONS AVAILABLE
AND THEY MUST MOVE
OUR WAREHOUSE CANT HOLD
THEM ANY LONGER
YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM:
NEWS EDITOR
ASST SPORTS EDITOR
ASST LIFESTYLE EDITOR
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
SPORTS WRITERS
NEWS WRITERS
'CRAZY GREGORY9 SEZ:
"YOW! THESE ITEMS ARE SO HOT,
MY BISCUITS IS BURNIN
AND THEY'RE PRICED TO MOVE,
MOVE, MOVE
CUSTOMERS MUST HAVE A 2.0 GPA AND BE REGISTERED FOR SUMMER SEMESTERS TO
BE PAID. APPLICANTS MUST MEET FACTORY STANDARDS BEFORE CONTRACT CAN BE
COMPLETED. APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING.
PROOF OF ID. IS REQUIRED. THIS OFFER IS AVAILABLE ONLY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST AND
MAY BE DISCONTINUED AT ANY TIME. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. DELAWARE
RESIDENTS ADD 9 SALES TAX.
-
r
-
MIHIII iijiunii ii null) IIJII ja IIIIIIJII
n�Will i � J '� . in�





4
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
Dole discusses agenda
(AP) - Moving to shore up his
conservative credentials, Bob Dole
called for voluntary school prayer
Tuesday and criticized Hollywood
for promoting "casual violence and
even more casual sex
"We began as a
people seeking religious
freedom and have
evolved into a nation
whose government often
seems the enemy of reli-
gion the Republican
presidential front-runner
said as he campaigned in
Ohio and Iowa.
"The moral code we
nurture in our churches
and synagogues is under
attack from our govern-
ment
Dole's overture to
conservatives include
tough talk on welfare re-
form and a promise to
nhase out federal funding
for the arts and humani-
ties, longtime targets of
the Christian right. And
he accused President
Clinton of contributing
to the nations' moral de-
cline by abdicating lead-
ership in the war on drugs.
Dole's courting of social con-
servatives: pledging not to raise in-
come taxes if elected president next
year.
Taken together, the remarks
underscored Dole's principle goal
on his weeklong campaign an-
nouncement tour: to cement his
Wading into the school prayer
debate. Dole said "if students can
discuss sports and music or drama
at school, they should also be al-
lowed to voluntarily - pray
Some Republicans support a
constitu-
tional
a m end-
ment al-
lowing
school
prayer:
Dole voted
in favor of
such an
amend-
ment in
1984.
H i s
preference,
however, is
legislation
allowing
students to
pray and
lead peers
in prayer:
school offi-
cials could
not lead or
dictate
prayers.
Dole has not introduced such leg-
islation and told reporters there
was virtually no chance such a bill
could clear the Senate next year.
In taking aim at Hollywood.
Dole sounded much like former
Vice President Dan Quayle. who's
decision to sit out the 1996 race is
one reason the Christian conserva-
"Our music,
movies and
advertising
regularly push
limits of decency,
bonbarding our
children with
destructive
messages of
casual violence
and even more
casual sex
� Bob Dole
tive vote is not seeing as commit-
ted to any one candidate.
"Every parent knows the great-
est chalknge to family values is the
way our popular culture ridicules
them Dole said.
"Our music, movies and adver-
tising regularly push limits of de-
cency, bombarding our children
with destructive messages of casual
violence and even more casual sex
Dole said censorship is not the
answer because, 'We have more to
fear than to gain from putting
Washington in charge of culture
Instead, he said families and
communities needed to take the
mission up themselves. "Shame is
a powerful tool Dole said. "We
should use it Let's put the heat
on the entertainment industry
Because of his 1988 campaign
and this year's aggressive organiz-
ing, Dole has made inroads with
Christian Coalition activists in
Iowa, which opens the GOP nomi-
nating season in February. It was
clear from Tuesday's emphasis that
he hopes to spread the success else-
where.
"This campaign recognizes
that close to a majority of Republi-
can primary voters are interested
in these issues said Dole cam-
paign manager Scott Reed.
Texas Senator Phil Gramm be-
gan the race as the favorite of most
state Christian coalition leaders.
But he has since alienated some by
saying he would not make abortion
a litmus test for major appoint-
ments.
position as the front-runner by
strengthening hi support among JT" � �" �JZ "5
the conservative factions ascendant
in GOP politics. I
To rivals, these might be
viewed as concessions to shore up
weaknesses. But the Senate major- �
ity leader rejected that character- I
ization during a conversation with
reporters in his campaign plane.
He said he signed the tax I
pledge, after refusing to do so in
his failed 1988 campaign, because I
this year's version allowed for the
closing of loopholes.
As for his comments on values. �
Dole said that he had a proven con-1
servative record on social issues,
but it had received little attention
in the context of his Senate career.
None-the-less, in dropping his
unusual reluctance to discuss so-1
cial issues. Dole highlighted the im-
portance of religious conservative I
voters, and the competition among
GOP contenders for their support.
He made values the centerpiece of
speeches at the Ohio state house
and then later at the Ohio state fair-
grounds.
L
DISCOVER
The Greatest Shrimp Around ul
FOSDICK'S
XS90 SEAFOOD
$003 S. Kvnos Street
Be-zeii
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility service in
advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuble time �� and possibly money.
The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service
may be put in their name. Just pick up a "Request
for Utility Service" application from room 211 in the
Off-Campus Housing Office, Whichard Building or
at Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the application
(which must be notarized) and mail it to GUC, P.O.
Box 1847, Greenville, N.C. 27835-1847, att:
Customer Service.
'Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your
parents' power company.
C i r e e n v i 11 e
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your
name, a deposit will be required. Deposits are as
follows: with electric or wout electric or
gas space heating gas space heating
Electric only $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric. Water & Gas $110 $85
Electrics Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance.
Be sure to include your name, where service will be required,
when service is to be cut on and a phone number where we
may reach you prior to your arrival at the service address.
V U til it ies
DEATH
from page 3
fort by the PUS. state health depart
ments. professional organizations
and voluntary organizations to sys-
tematically promote healthful hab-
its and god medical care
The program has three primary
goals: Increase the span of healthy
life for Americans: reduce the dif-
ferences in health trends among
various American populations: and
provide access to disease prevention
services to all Americans.
The program set 300 specific
goals, with baseline measurements
at the start and target measure-
ments for 2000. Data not available
for some goals come from state and
federal health reports, and on such
issues as smoking and drinking,
from questionnaires.
A progress report on the project
is in be published Wednesday in the
Journal of American Medical Asso-
ciation.
Among the improvements:
- deaths from all causes: 42b l
per 100.00(1 at the start: 394.7 now.
and 341.5 target goals.
Heart attack deaths: 135 per
loo.ihi .a start. 1 14 now. and target
of Ion per loo.nun. Also, improved
controls of high blood pressure and
a lowering of blood cholesterol lev-
els
� Stroke deaths: 30.4 per
100.000: 26.4 now. and target of 20.
Cancer deaths: 134 p-e r
1 nil.noil; 133 now, and target of 13d.
� Life expectancy for Americans
at a record 75.8 years. The average
number of years free of health prob-
lems remains at 64
Charting
your
future?
Spring is here
'fU" lib
You'll find lots
of options in our
classifieds.
File Photo
Spring weather brought many students and pets out to
enjoy some fun in the sun lastweekend. Frisbee anyone?
$600 A WEEK POTENTIAL
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Summer is the busy season in the
moving industry and we need your
help to handle the load North
American Van Lines is now accept-
ing applications from college students
and staff for its Summer Fleet
Driver Progra-i.
TRAINING � Free
MOTELMEALS WHILE IN
TRAINING - Free
POTENTIAL EARNINGS (AVERAGE)
- $600 A WEEK
We will teach you ho.v to safely
Ofs.idtea serrtractor trailer and how
to load: unload household goods
cargo We pa for your motel and
meals while in training. Once you
receive you' Commercial Driver's
License, you have the piential of
earning an approximate average of
S600 a week.
To qualify, you must be at least 21
years old. meet North American Van
Lire- qualifications and be available
for training the end of April or early
May. We promise you an adventure
you'll never forger'
Call 1-600-348-2147. Dept. U-29.
northAmerican.
Seniors!
Bring your Purple Pirate Passes
.c A s T.
95
GO
-� SENIORS
-1
'Nt.

with vou to
Barefoot on the Mall
April 20�starting at 11:00 a.m.
The last Senior-Only activity
AlumAid
X A s r.
i'95z
�y
TO
"Vr O
s� SENIORS
-7
S
'Hn-
?
(Contents include:an ECU keyring, luggage tag, window decal. and much more)
500 available on a first come basis
Sponsored by the Alumni Associaton and the ECU Ambassadors
?
0
PEER
A LISTENING EAR.
AN UNDERSTANDING HEART
ARE THE KEYS TO BECOMING
PEER MENTOR
The peer mentoring relationship is designed to foster a network of support for African-American
"First Year Students" a) Last Carolina University. Members serve as peer support personnel for
first year students and share program goals and responsibilities aimed at ensuring the retention
of African-Americans.
MENTORING
The Office of Minorit) Student .Allans is seeking students interested in serving as Peer Mentors
for first year students during loos 19 academic year.
INTERESTED?
Then call 328 6495 or pick up an application at the Office of Minorit) Student Affairs,
Whichard 204






t
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
&mmm!MnsmKmmmammBmammsmmtmmm
a Wants You
C The following positions
H are currently open for
� summer and fall
i-H semesters:
News Editor
Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Asst. Sports Editor
Staff Illustrator
Sports Writers
News Writers
� � � M � I
� � ������
11N
ft
All applicants must have a
2.0 GPAand be registered
for summer classes to
receive payment
Apply at the Student
Publications Building.
ECU
from page 1
Looking for that Right Shoe
for that Right Night?
JfJ SI U"Loi u
We offer sizes 5-11
Accessories & Handbags also.
Mon - Sat 10- 6
Pelletier Harbor Shops Morehead City N.C. (919)726-7882
Arlington VUlage Shops 355-3069
Q HO earn transferable
COLLEGE CREDIT
DURING SUMMER SCHOOL
JUNE 5-JULY 12
ATELON
COLLEGE
CONVENIENT LOCATION
FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING
MORE THAN 100 COURSES OFFERED
IN ALL DISCIPLINES
FOR EXAMPLE:
Accounting 20 i-A
Art 205A
Bus. Admin. 343-A
English 355-A
Fine Arts 362
General Studies 341 -A
History 377-A
JourComm. 335-A
Math I 14-A
Music 318-A
Political Science 111 -A
Psychology 333-A
Religious Studies 371 -E
' Sociology 376-A
Theatre 125-A
Principles of Financial Accounting
Photography I
Managenal Finance
Laughter and Comedy
Film Criticism
God and Politics
The Rise of Adolf Hitler
Writing for Electronic Media
Elementary Statistics
History of Jazz
American Government
Abnormal Behavior
Religion in Cinema and Literature
Sociology of Sport
Acting for Non-Majors
REGISTRATION JUNE 5
FOR MORE INFORMATION,
OR A COMPLETE LIST OF COURSES,
CALL THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
1-800-334-8448 OR 9 ' 0-534-2370
Cunha is studying conservation as
well as ship construction and mari-
time material culture at ECU.
"I am working on Civil War
shipwrecks under the supervision
of the professors and doctors here
Cunha said. "Together with that
I'm trying to write a manual of
underwater archaeology for Bra-
zil
The Maritime History and Nau-
tical Archeology Program has wel-
comed Cunha, and believes he has
much to offer the program.
"We are delighted to have Luiz
with us this year said Dr. Timo-
thy Runyan, directer of the pro-
I MM �i MMMBMI
gram. "His range of experience cov-
ering the 5,000 mile Brazilian
coastline is extraordinary. It is flat-
tering that he chose East Carolina
University
According to Cunha, education
in the conservation of shipwrecks
is needed in his country because
many of the divers on shipwrecks
there are simply stripping the ships
of anything valuable and ignoring
the historical significance of what
they have found.
Cunha is hoping to return to
ECU after his Fulbright Scholar-
ship has ended, to receive his
master's degree.
����nMMHHHMHHMMMHnn
� ���
"A degree from the U.S. will
give me credibility as an underwa-
ter archaeologist Cunha said.
"We're very different from treasure
hunters. They have a very bad repu-
tation for taking only the jewelry
arid valuables and leaving artifacts
behind
According to Phil McGuinn.
former vice president of the Mari-
time Studies Association, ECU is
gaining a lot from Cunha's visit.
"Luiz is unique McGuinn said.
"His position in Brazil allows him
to bring a conservator's background
to our program. It's really exciting
the different perspective he brings.
It is adding to our educaUpn
Not only is Cunha'corTffibuting
personally to the Maritime History
Program, but also the significance
of his position here is contributing '
to the status of the program.
"For ECU, Luiz and the
Fulbright Scholarship represent the
recognition that our maritime pro-
gram is becoming international
McGuinrT"said.
Runyan said Cunha's choice to
join the program is a great credit to
the unversity.
"Luiz has blended in wonder- '
fully with the faculty and student
body Runyan said.
5LA I from page 1
committee, we had resident coordi-
nators. We had some of the staff from
the old department of residence edu-
cation. We had two RAs and two stu-
dents on the committee that talked
with the architect and kind of gave
him their thoughts on everything
One of the main requests from
students was moveable furniture.
"Nothing is built in Amaro said.
"They have wardrobes and dressers
that are moveable, desks that are
moveable, beds that are bunkable and
unbunkable. One of the questions
that was raised by the architect was
do we want standard built-in furni-
ture?
"The students that were on the
initial committee basically told us 'no
- that's not what we want. We want
the flexibility of change
The hall floors and rooms are
carpeted, and both halls are also air-
conditioned. Students will be able to
control air and heat from their own
rooms. The halls have elevators and
follow the American Disabilities Act
(ADA) guidelines for physically chal-
lenged individuals. Also, each floor
will have a lounge with a television.
On the first floor ot each build-
ing, students will have a mailroom
and a single laundry room for the
entire building.
Amaro said that for the first time
a residence hall, Umstead, will have
a full computer lab with an lab assis-
tant.
"We're moving away from the
small computer rooms we have in all
the buildings because they are out-
dated already Amaro said. "They've
been in for five years and all of the
system has to be updated. One of the
things that we found from our resi-
dents is they really want to have
sobebody here to help them. So, we
are actually going to put in a full com-
puter lab
j "We are going to have 15 IBMs,
15 Macs and printers here and a sta-
tion for someone that will be here
while this lab is opened to help stu-
dents
The lab will possible be opened
until 2 a.m. and since an assistant
will be present while the lab is
opened, students will not have to deal
with codes to open the lab door.
Also, the community service
desk for Cotton, Fleming and Jarvis
will be moved from Fletcher to the
balsement of Umstead.
" In the basement, we will build
thje community service desk for the
area Amaro said. "Right now, the
stiidents in Cotton, Fleming and
Jarvis use the Fletcher community
service desk. We're moving that one
� to this one. So. this community ser- ��
vice desk will take care of Slay.
Umstead, Cotton. Fleming and Jarvis,
the five buildings in this area
Amaro said that to aid the cam-
pus recycling effort, the halls will
have separate trash and recycling '
rooms on each floor. To cut down on
vandalism, bathroom stalls and sink
surfaces are graffiti-resistant.
The coordinator for the halls will
ha�e a full apartment on the first '
floor of Umstead. Amaro said this was
the first year that coordinators will
live in the halls. The coordinator will
have help from a graduate student
who will live in Slay. The
coordinator's office will be in Slay.
Amaro said that in the individual
rooms the university's new fiber op-
tic system will allow for such things
as computer as well as the cable plug-
ins.
1AJLCO from page 1
could be lost in equipment funding.
"We're very lean to begin with
in terms of funding to academic de-
partments, funding for equipment,
support staff Brown said. "This
budget hits us in places where we
are already deficient in terms of to-
tal budget.
It further aggravates it by re-
ducing faculty positions which we
can ill afford to lose at any time
Brown said that despite the
state's continued economic growth,
lawmakers are adamant about sav-
ing taxpayers money. He said the
university has no way of supple-
menting the lost revenues.
"What makes our situation pos-
sibly worse than other institutions,
we also are facing decreased fund-
ing due to a temporary reduction
in enrollment Brown said. "There
are just fewer college aged and
qualified students coming out of
the high schools in North Carolina
at the moment, even though the
predictions are that will increase
over the next five years, but only
by a small percentage
Although the bill proposes a
steady V aon increase over the
next few years, Brown does not
1
believe tuition should be raised.
! "Certainly our in-state tuition
rate is very low and heavily subsi-
dized with tax dollars Brown said.
"The current proposal calls for a
three percent increase for in-state
and out-of-state tuition I hear no
other discussion about raising tu-
ition and that should be our last
alternative
Brown believes cutting school
revenues will hurt North Carolina's
Job market, and may cause negative
effects in the long run.
"Hopefully, the Senate will see
that these cuts have a detrimen-
tal effect on the economy of the
state and will reduce the cuts to a
more reasonable level Brown
said.
State employees may also be '
getting a raw deal. During the re-
cession, university employees were
given little to no salary increases. -
"This budget proposed by the j
governor incorporates only a two
percent salary increase, which "
serves to worsen moral and ignore
the contribution of a great many
hard working state employees dur- �
ing a time when the rest of the
state is prospering Brown said. '
fit EA6T CAROLINIAN
WANT6 YtfUl
�tbii
We are currently accepting applications
for News Editor, Assistant News Editor.
We are seeking dependable news writers
for both summer sessions and next fall. If
you think you have what it takes, come
see us on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building (across from

Highlighting Your Moments in Sport
Register for the newest Intramural Sport
Co Cart Races
Held at Greenville Fun Park.
Register in 204 Christenbury
Gym by TuesdayApril 18,
Races take place Wednesday, April 19
from 7:00 - 10:00pm.
All racers will have the chance to compete in:
One Qualifying Lap
Two Heat Races
Championship Races
A nominal fee will be charged 10 participate.
Cal Donna at EOJ Recreaional Services at 328-6387 for more details.
Football tickets for the Sept. 2
season's opener in Tennessee
will go on sale Monday, April 24
at 8:15 a.m. at the ECU athletic
. ticket office. Tickets cost $22,
and students may purchase two
with a valid student ID. Payment
will reserve seats until actual
: :
: :
AaA
Kingston
Place
WE STILL HAVE A FEW
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR 1995-96
SCHOOL YEAR
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSDISHESSILVERWARE
DISHWASHERSPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE � CLUBHOUSE
LAUNDROMAT � SWIMMING POOL
& LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
!i
t!
-V
r





Thursday, April 13,1995 The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Rain and stress
relief are in high
demand around
our community.
So we're
suggesting the
First Annual Help
Your Neighbor
Breathe and
Avoid Ulcers
Week. Brilliant
plan, we know.
We do what we
can to help you
all out.
It's the end of the semester, everyone is stressed, grumpy
and over-worked (underpaid is needless to say). Papers are
due, tests are piling up, projects are in limbo and printers
seem to know when deadlines are close at hand.
What everyone needs to do is calm down. Yes, there's a
lot of work that needs to be done in a short span of time,
but grumpiness and stress headaches never helped progress
or efficiency.
Perhaps the best remedy to such a hectic schedule is
simply to take time out. We know, that sounds crazy. "But
I have blah blah blah due tomorrow some of vou are
screeching. So do we, friends. But just how high will the
quality of your work be if you're racing at break-neck speed
to get it done? Probably not many 'A's, if you know what
we mean.
What we're suggesting is a campus-wide "Help Your
Neighbor Breathe and Avoid Ulcers" Week. We encourage
everyone to participate. Simply walk up to someone who
looks about to topple over the edge of sanity, place your
open hand firmly upon his or her forehead, and say � calmly,
serenely and confidently - "My friend, you need a breather.
I feel a family of ulcers moving your way, and I cannot
standsitwalk idly by and witness such horror
Chances are, the person will be so stupified by (maybe
even a little fearful of) your actions that he or she will
immediately forget all worries. He or she will stumble off
in a haze of concern for your well-being, and forget tljjeir
own problems. Isn't this a great plan?
We encourage administrators to participate in our spe-
cial day, as well. After all, you guys don't want a bunch of
hapless, nutso students running around campus, right?; So
help ease our pain! Build a parking deck! OK, we'll let that
one slide.
So relax, get through the rest of the semester, then
take a deep breath and get ready to do it all over again.
You are all going to be here for summer school, right?
And while y'all are slapping each other on the fore-
head, do a little rain dance. We need some downpours,
now!
Our Constitution: not always
the best medicine
It is regarded as the supreme law
of the land. It is the Constitution of
the United States Of America. We look
to it as guidance as to how we enforce
justice and conduct ourselves. Now
it is being sought out for another
purpose. Congress now seeks to ap-
ply it to another use; a cure for gov-
ernment ills.
The latest attempt to force pub-
lic opinion into consensus is the bal-
anced budget amendment. It is a mis-
take to do something good like bal-
ancing the budget in a bad way by
using the Constitution to do it. Ac-
cording to constitutional scholar Rob-
ert Goldwin of the American Enter-
prise Institute "The first principle of
a conservative should be: don't muck
with the Constitution If this theory
is true, then we have a lot of Republi-
cans in Congress who are not conser-
vatives. (Please keep in mind this is
in no way, shape, or form an expres-
sion of political affiliation.)
The balanced budget amendment
is not the only time there has been
an attempt to use the constitution as
means of settling some of American's
hottest political subjects. There are
several other near misses that come
to mind. Can we say School prayer,
Chris Arlie
Opinion Columist
The idea of
using the
Constitution to
manipulate
economics is
absurd.
equal rights and anti-abortion amend-
ment?
Our forefathers set up barriers
like requiring two-thirds of Congress
to approve then ratification by three-
fourths of the states. There was a
reason for these barriers. Quite sim-
ply, the founding fathers did not want
the Constitution to be used as a dis-
pute settler.
The arguments against this
amendment range from farmers wor-
rying about their subsidies to elderly
worrying about their cost of living
adjustments being trimmed.
The fact of the matter is that until
the 1960s Americans didn't have a
problem balancing the budget. Ac-
cording to the University of Virginia's
political scientist James Savage,
Americans always believed that a bal-
anced budget was a way of checking
against political corruption. Now
there is a novel idea; preventing po-
litical pork barreling.
The budget really isn't that hard
to balance. The deficit equals out to
be about 2 12 to three percent of
the GNP. The truth of the matter is
that America is not going to starve if
farmers lose there subsidies, America
will not go bankrupt if taxes go up a
little, and the elderly aren't going to
be tossed out into the streets if the
cost of living allocations are trimmed
a hair.
The idea of using the constitu-
tion as a way of manipulating econom-
ics is absurd. Economic reform would
be better used as a test as to how good
our government is and what it should
and should not do.
The Constitution wasn't intended
to be used as means for settling dis-
putes, or mandating public opinion
and that my friends is why its is re-
spected rather than scrutinized.
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens. General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Printed on
100
recycled
paper
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langiey, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Jack Skinner, Photographer
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Steven Lienert, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel.Secretary
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian,
Publications Building ECU, Greenville. NC 27858 4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Pulped and feathered on friday night
"I just want to see Uma Thurman
get stuck with that huge (expktive)
needle, man
This was one of the many strands
of conversation that drifted up from
the dimlv lit rows behind me in
Hendrix theater this past Friday
evening. It was eight o'clock, my girl-
friend, one of her four house mates
and I were seated on the second row
from the front. The theater was al-
ready packed, and yet people still kept
flowing in through the twin entrances
at the rear.
A troupe of a dozen wobbly-
stepped girls ambled down to the very
front, and, finding no empty seats left,
sat down on the floor. Isolated howls
and screeches were beginning to
break out more frequently and with
less isolation. I hunched around in my
seat and peered at the squirming au-
dience behind me.
"What are you looking at?" my
girlfriend Liz asked me.
I shrugged. "Don't know. They
really let the woodpeckers out for this
one
She iooked as me blankly and
asked what I meant. 1 shrugged again.
It was too late to discuss it. for the
house lights had fallen and the famil-
iar intro music to Pulp Fiction had
queued up on the big screen, to much
fanfare from the crowd. I looked
about, half-expecting the majority of
the people to get up and dance.
There are two general types of
people in the average movie audience:
simply, those who have seen the film
before and those who haven't. You can
usually tell which is which by their
reactions to what's going on in the
Brian Wright
Opinion Columnist
Going native
with the
woodpecker.
picture. The ones who've seen it be-
fore are the easiest to spot-they're the
ones who are always loudly giving the
whole thing away.
On this night, however, everyone
in the crowd was the same, making
the same noises of fright and disgust,
staring with sometimes-rapt, some-
times-reluctant attention at the
screen. A girl sitting to my right spent
nearly the entire two and a half hours
with her hand practically welded over
her eyes.
This reaction was nothing spec-
tacularly new. When I first saw the
movie at the midnight madness the-
ater in Raleigh, there were girls who
were actually clutching at their boy-
friends and weeping, and some of
these stoic guys even had to get up
and go get another beer to deal with
the shock and discomfort.
You'd either have to be a moron
or recently stepped off a spaceship not
to know at least some of the key
events in Fiction . I'm sure that there
are some out there with a more sensi-
tive viewing constitution, so why do
they put themselves through it? It
made me think again about the wood-
peckers.
Woodpeckers, of course, are of a
smallish bird variety with bright plum-
age that ferrets out its meals from logs
and trees by repeatedly hitting its
head against said buffet 'locations.
Some of the more stupid individuals
of the species have been know (and
heard) to hunt for their dinner inside
aluminum flagpole. Anyone who's
heard the high-speed tapping would
wonder why the bird doesn't just stop
after the first, initial, disappointing
effects.
It has the promise of something
good and memorable and tasty, and
it's not going to pack it in and call it
quits before it gets what it came for.
People, being slightly more advanced
than an animal that stubbornly beats
its head into solid objects for a liv-
ing, need the "I-Survived" T-shirt
badge of courage that is only gotten
when you've suffered through some-
thing you've loathed from start te
finish, and which you know you
would probably be repulsed by be
fore you'd even set foot in the build-
ing.
Not everyone was burnt out on
the shock and horror by the time it
was all over, though. Many of the
males exiting the theater had a dis-
tinctive Travoltaesque swagger in
their step, and lines from the film
were being quoted left and right.
Woodpeckers hang onto the humor,
and leave the horror for bragging
about over drinks.
Bible bangers: crackpots?
One of the most influential
groups today is the religious right
political machine. Well, what I have
to say may surprise some of you, but
many of you may know this fact: The
religious right movement has fallen
off the deep end.
I am a Catholic, not the most
devout one in the world, but a
Catholic nonetheless. Religion was
something that was take very seri-
ously in our community.
However, individuals such as
Pat Robertson are making many dis-
tance themselves from the religious
right movement.
I have a relationship with God.
and he is not a vengeful, hateful
God. Unfortunately from time to
time, you see a few of these crack-
pots, with bible in hand, yelling at
you. "You're going straight to Hell
some will clamor.
I used to see these individuals
on campus from time to time, and I
would shake my head in disbelief.
Is this sort of thing condoned by
anyone. I would ask myself? Well.
to my surprise, one popular face in
the Religious political movement re-
minds me of some of those "crack-
pots
Thanks to a circulation by
MHHNH
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
I have a
relationship with
God, and he is
not a vengeful,
hateful God.
People for the American Way, I
came across some interesting quotes
from Mr. Robertson. On the subject
of reproductive freedom, he stated:
"What Planned Parenthood is
doing is absolutely contrary to ev-
erything Christian. It is teaching
kids to fornicate teaching people to
have adultery, teaching people to get
involved in every kind of bestiality,
homosexuality, lesbianism - every-
thing that the Bible condemns "
He has some very interesting
views on homosexuality as well:
'When lawlessness is abroad in the
land, the same thing will happen
here that happened in Nazi Ger:
many. Many of those people involved
in Adolph Hitler were Satanists,
many were homosexuals � the two
things seem to go together
Finally, let's see what he has to
say about women- "The feminist
agenda is not about equal rights for
women.
It is about a socialist, anti-fam-
ily political movement that encour-
ages women to leave their husbands,
kill their children, practice witch-
craft, destroy capitalism and become
lesbians
Yes, ladies and gentleman,
these are things he actually said on
The 700 Club and in fundraising
literature. If I was a Republican, I
would be ashamed that an indi-
vidual as twisted as Robertson is
associated with my party.
The religious right could deter-
mine the election this year, people.
If you are appalled by this sort or
thing, then let it be known. Get in:
volved! It is my sincere hope that
the religious right movement
doesn't condone the ravings of a
deranged individual like Robertson.
However, their silence is trou-
bling me. Makes you wonderT
doesn't it?
m
Letters to the Editor
�MHKT-�

��� V ��
tkt
To the Editors:
I feel that some things should
be clarified for your readers con-
cerning Chris Arline's editorial,
"Lawsuits are not the Solution
Par for the course for conservative
rhetoric, it is greatly mis- and unin-
formed in a calculated manner to
further misinform in an effort to
persuade. The history of the case
involving the Arizona grandmother
reaches far deeper that the absurd
idea that a U.S. court would frivo-
lously award a person two million
dollars.
Four facts, which Chris Arline
conveniently forgets, inform this
case. They show the award given
was indeed justified and in no way
frivolous. One: The Arizona plain-
tiff requested only $800 in damages
for the five weeks she spend in the
hospital recovering from the initial
third-degree burns and second from
the skin grafts to her pubic area,
labia and anus (a procedure that is
more painful than the actual
burns). Two: The $800 requested
was only that part of her expenses
that she could not pay. Three: The
flippant way in which the jurors
and the judge themselves sy that
McDonald's handled the suit ulti-
mately swayed the jury in favor of
the plaintiff. Four: The temperature
which McDonald's serves its coffee
will burn the skin to third-degree
in 3.5 seconds after contact.
Jurors admitted that when they
began the case they felt that it was
ridiculous to be there. However,
when jurors found out that
McDonald's had received 700 com-
plaints in the past year about the
temperature of their coffee and
chose to do nothing about it (even
after having been previously sued
for $30,000 over coffee), they
started to see that McDonald's was
acting in an irresponsible manner.
Republicans are using only cer-
tain facts from a case to persuade
Americans to hop on their wagon.
What Arline also failed to tell you
is that the wagon would also put a
limitation on how long you have to
sue for damages. What about those
people that were exposed to radia-
tion testing without consent or
were misinformed about it. In their
case, the government fessed-up
thirty years after. Conservatives
would limit the time to ten years.
The award.s they were given would
not exist because their time would
have run out to sue.
The Coffee case showed that
courts in America are in no need
of reform regarding torts. The Ari-
zona award, which remember was
responsibly reduced by the judge,
was given to punish McDonald's for
not listening to the overwhelming
complaints of its own patrons. Had
McDonald's given serious attention
to the matter and displayed any
amount of concern for the victim,
I'm certain the award would have
been much lower or not given at
all. But McDonald's didn't do what
thev should have. The courts did.
I
John David Bullard
Graduate Student
English
�?�-






Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
NICK O'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
CWUC4
Are you a talented, fabulous, but so-far-
unpublished young comic artist?
Are you a glutton for punishment?
Do you have more to say than "The
Phantom?"
Do you need a little extra mad money?
If so, we could use you. We need a Staff
Illustrator and regular cartoonists for summer
and fall semesters. Come to the Student
Publications Building. Fill out an application
and, after April 20, Madame Stephanie will be
available to tell your fortune and future with
Pirate Comics. While you're waiting to hear,
prepare a strip of your idea. Use ink and be
neat. Sloppy work won't see the light of day.
BYANDYFARKAS
C4PT;N, IT SEEMS w� H;E A
PROoULrt, A PASZnCxR Sf�M5 To
Htiti. m HfAP STtOK l fsl � iSut.
MOPPETS
BY DAVID HISLE
Today is Melrose Day! We decided we're sick of seeing the Melrose bunch t'al
into potholes when we could see them coming a mile away. So today's horoscopes
are dedicated to the cast of "Melrose Place Enjoy!
irflsscoifcuygs
BY PAUL HAGWOOD
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WfTHATTlt '
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& N�T T.ME��B
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Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 15)
KJmberly Shaw
Alright, climb off the cross. I mean, how much of a
victim can you be when you steal babies, run over
doctors and incite gay bashings? And now you're plot-
ting more nastiness. You were just born bad, you wear
a wig to hide a foxhole in your head and no one trusts
you. Stay low for a bit longer, mellow out and try some
spackle for that blemish.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Jane AndrewSMaWcni
The Pisces is perfect tor. yqu because you are just
a'floundering. Relatives andlovers haven't done you
right and you only have yourself to blame. BORINGI
If you were any more disposable, your sign would be
a Bic lighter. Flaunt your backbone more often; vamp
it up There's little difference between being solid
ground to stand on and a door mat.
Aries (Mar 21- April 19)
Jo Beth Reynolds
Aptly, you just keep ramming your head on the wall of
good intention. You do what you can, make the same
mistakes we all do, achieve at times, fail at others.
But, look where it's gotten you. Calamity galore. Jo is
showing promise by getting it on with Dan Cortese,
but the rest of you? C'mon; off your duff and forward
in new directions!
Taurus (April 20- May 20)
Billy Campbell
Bull. You're surrounded by it. Bad girl posturing
abounds and you are the scratching post when they
get catty. Initiative displayed gets gold stars, but
where's the ambition? Don't stand so firm. Everything
around you is in flux; loosen up and tame the tide.
Gemini (May 21- June 21)
Jake Hanson
The Other in your life is running around without su-
pervision. Consequently, there is no one to catch them
with their hands in the cookie jar. Naivete may be cute
in some guys, but you trust Sydney, you trust your
brother, and both have given you the Big Screw-olla.
Open your eyes. And chase Amanda some more. With
all the cookie jars you've been into on "Melrose
Amanda was more than just the flavor of the month.
Cancer (June 22- July 22)
Amanda Woodward
You're recovering (of course), you're scheming again
(of course), and you have loose ends a go-go. Fix
Michael's little red wagon, backhand Alison and start
working with Sydney on Mancini's advertising. Ac-
quaintances could become allies and the sooner you
get the boardroom in order, you can start rebuilding
.the bedroom.
Leo (July 23- Aug. 22)
Sydney Andrews
You took on a lot of responsibility and new money has gone
to your head. A little swing in the step is okay, but you have
people who want to settle old accounts after you. Extreme
tact is necessary from here on. Smiles and whiskey wouldn't
hurt either. Think before you speak and you may make it.
Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)
Matthew Fielding . .
You are so pure and good, you don't fit in with the crowd.
You aren't a good influence, you're a wallflower who plays
goalie for the sundry miserabJes that fall out of their social
orbit. You are square, not dependable. Predictable, not re-
liable. God, smoke or go into white slavery or something
Or just marry Jane and go raise loaves of whitebread. Ick!
23-
Oct.
23)
Libra (Sept.
Jesse Hanson
Not bad. You slide into town, win the trust of most every-
one and start planting stakes. You're smoother than a baby's
butt, but we have yet to see if you'll act like an ass if you
don't get your way. Just don't get cheeky.
But shave; there's too much hair in these parts.
5corpo Oct. 24- Nov. 21)
Michael Mancini
Some things can't change. You can play chameleon and
change you're colors to look more attractive, but you still
got scaly skin. Water doesn't just slide off your back, it runs
screaming to the gutters because it's scared of you. You're
as crazy as a soup sandwich, but fun to watch. People are
eyeing you but will always stay at irm's length.
Sagittarius (Nov. 21- Dec. 21)
Peter Burns
You've been out of commission for awhile, biding your time
while dealing with obligations. Friends miss you and en-
emies have yet to stop looking over their shoulder. You left
an impression even though you were around for a short
time. When you finish business, come roaring back with
Hell riding shotgun and go do that voodoo that you do so
well.
Capricorn (Dec. 22- Jan. 19)
Alison
It's about to end, so get ready. You've been on the busi-
ness end of the reins for too long and someone's coming
to relieve you. You both think they're hurting you. but it's a
kindness. Obligations subside and you will have more time
to clean up several little messes. It'll sting the pride, but
you'll heal.





8
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
4ttde
Kick off your shoes
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
This year's Barefoot on the Mall
is going to rock! There are so many
attractions, both new and old. that all
day entertainment will be provided.
Please remember though that Bare-
foot is an ECT sponsored event for
ECU students. Barefoot takes place
on April 20 this year, and the attrac-
tions will begin at 11 a.m. and end at
4 p.m. The bands will begin at noon
and end at 7 p.m.
One of the new attractions this
year is called the Trampoline Thing.
As we gather from its name, a tram-
poline is involved, but with a twist.
Instead of just jumping on the thing,
you are attached to it by two bungee
chords. The harder you jump, the
higher you will go. This is something
that should definitely be checked out.
Feeling a little frustrated with the
ones you love? Well, Barefoot offers
two attractions that will not only be
fun. but are a great way of relieving
all of that stress that comes with col-
lege life. Bouncy Boxing, which was a
great success last year, is a giant air
mattress boxing ring where you and
perhaps a friend get to duke it out
with foam boxing gloves. The Gladia-
tor Joust, which is similar to the joust-
ing event on American Gladiators.
lets you and another try your best to
be the gladiators you always wanted
A tale of an Easter past, pre-
sented today to send all our loyal
readers off on this Easter holiday
with a warm feeling in their hearts.
Or perhaps that's the chilli, tg touch
of cold dread.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
I knew my cHldhood was over
as soon as I saw the chocolate
Garfield on the kitchen table Eas-
ter morning. No bunny; No hollow
rabbit made of bad chocolate? No
ears to bite off? How the hell do you
vivisect a flat chocolate Garfield?
"Happy Easter Mom said. She
was standing at the oven, frying eggs
and looking entirely too happy for
someone who had just squashed the
last bit of my innocence flat.
"Happy Easter I replied, still
dazed. I wiped some sleep out of my
eyes and looked again. Garfield was
still there. I came home for this?
Blinking I looked at the table one
last time. Garfield grinned back at
me. I hate Garfield.
"Still sleepy?" Mom asked. Ap-
parently, she had noticed my blank
stare.
"Uh I said. Not the snappiest
of responses, but the best I could
muster. I collapsed into my chair, in
which I had eaten breakfast for the
better part of my life. It seemed
small.
"Well. I told you not to stay out
so late last night. You'd better wake
up. Your daddy got called in to work
this mornin. so it's just you and me
today
How could she do this? No
bunny? It was always a bunny. Some
years it was one of those creme-col-
ored bunnies, the ones without any
recognizable flavor, but it was still a
bunny. The bunny was sacred. Or so
I thought. Wait. What was that she
said about Dad?
"Uh?" My vocal chords hadn't
quite reconnected themselves to my
higher brain functions.
Lord! Get up and get yourself
some coffee, boy. I said that your
daddy's got to work today, so you
and me have to take your grandpar-
See EASTER page 9
to be. Of course, the first to fall loses.
The Velcro Olympics will defi-
nitely be a sight tor everyone to be
hold. Two people put on velcro suits
and run through an obstacle course
full of the opposite type of velcro they
are wearing. The first one who gets
through the course first wins. It
should look like two ants getting
stuck in a vat full of honey. Be sure
to "stick around" and participate in
that if possible.
Of course there has been a big
stir about the bands playing at Bare-
foot. In case you have been in Antarc-
tica for the past few weeks, the bands
playing are The Reflectors (winners
of the Battle of the Bands competi-
tion). Full Stop. Dag and headlining
will be Widespread Panic. These bands
will be a treat to almost any music
lover, so don't miss out on this.
There are some things that you
should and should not bnng to Bare-
foot on the Mall. A definite must-have
is a valid ECU student ID. Without this
you will not be eligible to win any of
the Student Union giveaways, and you
won't be able to get youi copy of Trea-
sure Chest- the video yearbook. Your
See BARE page 10
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
This exhibition match of bouncy boxing took place last month, but should only whet the
combatants' appetites for more at this year's Barefoot on the Mall, next Thursday.
Talking hypnosis with Mike Mesmer Eyes
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
I must admit. I walked into Mike
Mesmer Eyes' Attic show last Wednes-
day a bit skeptical. I had heard the ru-
mors and speculation of how this versa-
tile hypnotist could work magic on his
helpless victims by transforming his sub-
jects into cartoon characters and send
them into a deep sleep at will. I heaid
how he could manipulate them into do-
ing whatever he willed of them, making
them love and hate him. hug him and
try to punch him.
I didn't believe what I had heard.
I fully expected to walk into a pre-
show interview with Mesmer Eyes (who
claims he has adopted his stage name as
his legal moniker) expecting to find a
pompous ass who would try to "mesmer-
ize me1 with a lot of double talk and
innuendo about his great "powers I ex-
pected to run into a flake that would try
to impress, insult and
then scare me. 1 fully
expected that I would
laugh at this fool and
would have to write
an insulting hack
piece, tearing him to
shreds.
So. I was wrong
twice last Wednesday.
Mesmer Eyes'
show was. in a word,
amazing. I don't think
I've ever laughed so
hard in my life. Not
only does the man
have an apparently
amazing talent, his
sense of comic timing isn't so bad either.
"My show at the
Attic is rude.
Everything has a
sexual
connotation, and
it's just rude;
there's no other
way to describe ii
� Mesmer Eves
According to Mesmer Eyes, whom I round
to be extremely generous and accessible,
he decided on his current profession at
an early age.
"I was inter-
ested in magic as a
kid he said. "So
eventually I picked
up a few books on
hypnotism and be-
came fascinated by
it. I guess at this
point I was around
Id years old. So I
started hypnotizing
people, but I didn't
know how to wake
them up. I panicked,
and it took me about
six months to be
able to do it again,
hallenge got me into it"
Mesmer Eyes said that stories of
people being captivated against their will
are simply that, stories. I le said that one
of the prerequisites to being hypnotized
is a willingness to be and that his subject's
faith in him is essential.
"(As a hypnotist) the main thing
'( iu've got to do is win the people's trust"
said Mesmer Eyes. "If they don't trust
you they aren't going to relax and do
what is necessary. 1 think that people do
business with people they like and can
(mly be I lyprH irjzed by someone who they
(eel will look after them. If you were go-
ing in to buy a car. you probably wouldn't
it you didn't like the car salesman: you'd
probably go somewhere else. I've built a
reputation fur what I do. and people
know that i take care of them. They may
be a little embarrassed, but they enjoy it
See EYES page 10
CD, Reviews
And that
Dave makes it big
Photo by Steve Andrews
The Dave Matthews Band, seen here rocking Cameron Stadium at Duke, will be coming
to Wilmington this weekend. The band has become such a huge success, however, that
the show has been moved from Saturday to Sunday. It seems that Matthews and
company have been invited to play on this week's episode of Saturday Night Live.
Rasta Rafiki
Cousins
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
Aye, who says reggae music only
come from Jamaica mon? Who says
white boys can't groove de irie beat?
The biracial group Rasta Rafiki don't
limit themselves to being simply an-
other reggae hand. They combine their
own West Virginian influences with
psychedelic originality to form the style
of music that turned Boh Mai ley from
another musician to martyr for millions
ol his adoring fans.
Rasta Rafiki breaks all cultural
and musical stereotypes associated
with reggae music in their second re-
lease. ('ousins. The Morgantown. W Va.
hand "strives to produce music that is
equally appealing to Uie mind as well
as the body"
Cousins is uplifting and truly
made me feel good as the island beat
and steel drums blared from my ste-
reo. In particular, the band displays
excellent musicianship on their Span-
ish-sounding folkv track. "The Gap
Their music is one that made me move
as well as think: it has a certain spiri-
tuality to it that is undescribable. Their
sound is a combination of rock and
world beats that has a live feel. it. One
reason why it sounds so live is because
most tile tracks on the disc were
digitally recorded live with no overdubs
in their stomping grounds in
Morgantown. In fact, only three songs
on the release. "Rollercoaster "Apa-
thy" and the saxy-sdunding "Irie Dub"
sound like true reggae.
The sextet explains that their high
popularity in their hometown is not
due to their successful record sales, but
to their live shows. "We get people who
really don't like reggae, but by the end
oi the show, they've really turned our
way stated guitarist Tom Batchelor.
It their live shows receive that
im'vh positive attention, this is a band
1 have to see in live performance, be-
cause I really enjoyed this disc. And if
you have been looking for something
different to teed to your CD player, pick
up ('ousins mon.
7Hou4e r.e.(tceui
La
Reiser and Quaid say 'Bye Bye' to romance
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Divorce has always provided an
enticing subject for filmmakers. The
strong feelings of frustration associated
with the end of a relationship provide
the emotional punch that Hollywood
loves to include in dramatic films.
Kramer is. Kramer is one of the most
successful dramatic treatments of a
couple's divorce and the effect that di-
vorce has on a child. Rut divorce has
also been given a light touch, never
more comically than in the films of
Woody Allen, specifically Manhattan
and Hannah and Her Sisters.
A new film directed by Sam
Weissman called Bye Bye Lore
struggles in vain to explore the comic
yet poignantly painful side of divorce
The tilm views divorce through the eyes
ol three divorced males (Matthew
Modine. Randy Quaid and Paul Reiser)
The three male leads are close friends
who comfort and support each other
as each struggles to regain a lite after
marriage.
Each male has his own particular
way of dealing with his situation.
Module's character flirts prolifically. He
lies to his girlfriends the way he lied
to his wife. Because of the constant
searching for his next conquest, he is
never satisfied with a relationship.
Much like a drug addiction, the more
conquests the character attains the
more empty he feels. By the end of the
tilm. the womanizer learns to become
more ol a companion to members of
the opposite sex by viewing them more
as people than sex objects.
Randy Quaid's character is a big.
surly grump. The relationship with his
ex-wife is marked by continual sarcasm.
Near the finale, his anger boils over
and gets directed at a radio talk Inns
host (Rob Reiner trying desperately to
be funny) who continually belittles
those couples who divorce, even
though the hypocrite has been mar-
ried four times himself. Quaid's char-
acter invades the radio studio intend-
ing to do physical harm hut winds up
softening enough to talk to callers who
have problems.
Paul Reiser's character represents
the moodiest of the three friends. He
still pines after his wife and cannot
bring himself to date, even after three
years of being alone. His character can-
not find a way to communicate with
his daughter, and he consequently
sulks most of the film. Eventually this
moody divorcee finds a way to bridge
the communication gap between him
and his daughter as well as finding a
way to love again.
The moderately happy ending of
Bye Bye Lore, with each friend begin-
ning to deal with his particular prob-
lem, concludes the film in a pleasant
manner Unfortunately, nothing in the
body ol the tilm gives the viewei
enough information about each char-
acter to make the happy ending a sat-
isfactory one.
Hue Bye fore begins with the Fri-
day ritual of child exchange. The Fri-
day meeting takes place at Mel onald's.
which nominally serves as neutral ter-
ritory. The neutral ground becon es a
battleground as each ex-wife delivers
the children to their res; ective father
tor the weekend. The film chronicles
the events that occur during a two day
weekend. The minor catastrophes, like
Modine's character having three differ-
ent women drop by at the same time
lor supper, provide mild amusement,
but the sum is much less than the in-
dividual parts.
(inly a hilarious sequence involv-
ing Jeneane Garafalo stands out. Sin
plays a woman set up foi a blind date
with Quaid's character. Between get
ting a hau hall stuck in her throat ana
being unable to decide what to .at
she makes an Italian dinnei a ri
affair. She enlivens an otherwise dull
film
i hough Bye Bye Lore wants to
center on divorce, a distracting sub-
plot between two McDonald's work-
ers lone a teenager, the other a se-
nior citizen) occupies a significant
amount of film time. This relationship
develops into a father-son type ar-
rangemc nl md detracts from the film,
even though the bond proves heart-
warming. I'he distraction caused by
this relationship is indicative of film-
makers trying desperately to tug at
the viewer's heart with a very heavy-
handed approach.
Bye Bye Love tries to delicately
tackle a few of the difficult issues oi
divorce Ml it ultimately does is pro-
vide a lew fleeting moments of laugh
ter interspersed with a lot of unac-
countable angst It has too many char-
acters and too little heart.
(Mi a ale "i "in- to 10, Bye Bye
Lore rates a five.





Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
EASTER
�����. � ��
from page 8
ents to Easter dinner without im
"Oh At least that was a word. 1
rose to pour myself a steaming cup of
liquid awareness. My trusty old Star
Wars mug looked bad, but it was still
serviceable. When 1 got it as a child.
Mom wondered why I wanted the cup
with the bad guys on it. Though I didn't
tell her. it was because the bad guvs
dress cooler. Evil gives you good fash-
ion sense.
Now, however, the colors were fad-
ing. Darth V'ader and Boba Fett aren't
nearly so imposing in shades of gray.
I took a sip of the coffee and jump-
started my synapses. Finally, the con-
versation to this point came into focus.
Dad. Work. Alone. Grandparents. This
could be bad
"So. boy. you got yourself a girl
down there in Greenville?" My grandfa-
ther (Pa to my grandmother's Ma) is
STUDENTSTEACHERS
Earn $$ This Summer! ineed dependable transportation)
Monitoring Cotton Fields MAIL RESUME TO: MCSI
May to Sept. P.O. Box 370
5.75 per hour Cove City, NC 28523
C25 per mile Or Fax: (919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM
Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
always blunt and to the point.
It was a few hours later, and we
were sitting in the Golden Corral
steakhouse for Easter dinner.
This restaurant business was a new
innovation. Normally, we gathered at Ma
and Pa's house for a huge family spread
and Ma's coconut bunny rabbit cake.
But with my brother living in Char-
lotte and my cousins in need of the ex-
tra cash that pulling a holiday shift at
the tractor plant could get them, our
family was reduced to four this year.
Without the whole group, we were
off to the restaurant without any bunny
rabbit cake. No bunnies. It was becom-
ing a motif
"I say. have you got a girl, boy?"
Pa's question broke me out of my trance.
"Uh 1 replied. Back to ape lan-
guage.
"Oh. he was seein a little girl down
there Mom interjected on my behalf.
"But she moved away
The consensus around the table
was that this was too bad. and much
sympathy was heaped upon my shoul-
ders. I nodded and smiled sadly.
"Thanks I murmured at some point.
"So you ain't got another girl yet?"
Pa again. Damn, what was going on?
"Ah, well. no. I. well. I have been
friendly with somebody, but. well, ah
That was it. They smelled blood.
"Really? First thing I've heard
about it. What's her name? Where's she
from? Is she nice? What's she look like?
How old is she? What's she do? How
long you been seein her? You bein good?
Not too good. I hope. I want me some
great-grandchildren. Why don't you get
off the stick and get married?"
"Whoa Mom again. "He's still in
school, y'all. He don't want to be get-
ting married no time soon. Do you?"
"No I blurted out. Overload. 1
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began eyeing the exits. "Ahem. I'm too
busy taking classes and teaching to
worry about marriage. No. I'm just tak-
ing it one day at a time Cliches are
better than nothing.
"Well, how you like teachin?" Ma
this time.
"Oh. I like it all right. I've got some
smart students this semester. Got some
dumb ones. too. but they're coming
along I told her the same thing at
Christmas.
"So what you do for fun down
there, boy. if you ain't got a little girl to
mess around with?" Pa really needed
to get off my case.
"Uhm Well. I hang out with my
friends, mostly. We go to movies and
stuff I dance.
"Dancing to me. though, is jump-
JThe
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ing around uncontrollably with a bunch
of other out of control people to vent
frustrations about how messed up the
world is. 1 don't beliet in the institu-
tion of marriage I don't believe in insti-
tutions in general. In fact. I don't be-
lieve in much of anything
"Yeah. 1 used to dance. That's a
good way to meet girls
"Oh hush up. James Ma to the
rescue. "You got plenty of time. Mark.
Don't you go rushin off into nothin
It's not that I don't love my family;
if I didn't, their old-fashioned ways and
casual southern racism would drive me
much farther away than the Emerald
City. It's just that they have this bad
habit of prying once they get the slight-
est inkling of anything interesting.
I don't mind sharing my private life
with them to a certain extent, but after
a few holidays filled with constant grill-
ing about the pedigree of whatever girl-
friend I had mentioned in passing I de-
cided that it just wasn't worth the ag-
gravation.
Besides, I don't think they could
handle knowing too much about my life.
It's too alien to their way of thinking.
I like the concept of grandparents,
the loving elderly people who lavish you
with affection and teach you how to fish.
It's the reality that I have problems with.
How do you grow up in their eyes with-
out disappointing them somehow? And
how do you cope once you have disap-
' pointed them and they begin to stick
you into adult holes that don't fit?
I just smile and nod. Anything to
avoid hurting them.
After Mom and I got home. I sat
on my old bed and stared for a while at
my flat chocolate Garfield. Maybe he
wasn't so bad. After all, he reminded
me a little of Easter itself: a two-dimen-
sional sellout with a food fetish.
I hated him. too. and taking him
apart piece by piece was going to be
fun. I opened the package and took a
bite off his big toe. Bad chocolate. Bland
and artificial and all the things that
chocolate should not be. Perfectly bad.
The kind of atrocity that makes me ap-
preciate the real thing all the more.
SHWWf0JMSNMUlilM J H u !(�� im lipw






10
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
EYES from page 8
and want to come back and do it again,
and that's the sign of a gxxJ hypnotist"
Apparently he is one, because he
had a great deal of control over the sub-
jects on his stage on April 5. When he
emerged onto the stage to swirling lights,
adorned in laser-light glasses, I was afraid
that this would become a cheesy repre-
sentation of hypnotism shows of old. But
with a startling explosion and a hearty
laugh from Mesmer Eyes, the introduc-
tion was a thumbing-at-the-nose of those
older days.
The first 20 minutes of the show
were almost instructional in manner, but
necessary for Mesmer Eyes to put his
subjects under. After calling around 30
participants to the stage, Mesmer Eyes
began hypnotizing them with the aid of
deep breathing exercises, swirling lights
and vocal effects. Soon, the majority of
those on stage were under a hypnotic
sleep. Mesmer Eyes selected 12 of those
as the entertainment for the evening and
then the fun began.
With the 12 subjects on stage look-
ing as if they each had consumed 15
shots of tequila, Mesmer Eyes began a
two-hour romp through their subcon-
scious that had the Attic audience roll-
ing He brought out "magic peepholes"
that made the onstage crew believe the
audience was completely naked. He
brought out a large plastic crap and
planted it on the front of the stage, mak-
ing one of the subjects believe he was
responsible.
One female subject was made to
believe that she was the Road Runner
and would run around the stage at his
command. Another would come up and
hug him every time he asked the audi-
ence if they were having fun. The audi-
ence loved it and Mesmer Lyes held their
attention for the entire show, something
that some traditional comedians have
trouble with.
According to the performer, the
Attic is a uriique venue into itself.
"(The Attic show) is sex, more sex
and even more sex Mesmer Eyes said,
laughing "My show at the Attic is rude.
Everything has a sexual connotation, and
it's just rude; there's no other way to
describe it I think that what brings
people back to see me is that they can't
believe the shit that 1 do. It blows their
mind. If s definitely sexual, but it's not
offensive. You get guys out there who
have lost certain parts of their bodies or
think they've been touched by the girl
next to them, but it's not anything hurt-
ful or disrepectful
Mesmer Eyes said that he had not
adapted his shows from other hypnotism
acts and had made a conscious attempt
to be unique from other stage shows that
he called "boring" and "unimaginitive
He said that his use of lights and musi-
cal effects may help separate his shows
from others, but he said a big part of his
show was the ability to tap into the fo-
cused concentration of his subjects.
"It seems to me that there is a mis-
conception that if you have a simple mind
you are easier to hypnotize. Actually,
quite the opposite is true, if you have a
higher intelligence you can stay focused
longer and have a better chance of be-
ing hypnotized. It's absolutely true that
if you don't want to be hypnotized you
can't be. If you're going to driving school
and you don't want to leam, you won't
So when people get on stage and say
'you won't hypnotize me they're abso-
lutely right"
Mesmer Eyes said that he felt very
fortunate to be embraced by the
Greenville community and very grateful
to the 200 or so patrons who waited in
the cold to see the show.
"I'm really humbled by the people
who come out in the weather to see the
show. When it rains or the wind is blow-
ing it really amazes me that people will
wait I walked out at 7:30 tonight and
there was a girl in line. 1 asked her what
she was doing because the door doesn't
open until 9, and she said that she wanted
the best seat in the house. To me, that
blows my mind. Those things make me
feel great"
Newman Catholic
Student Center
SUNDAY MASS
11:30 AM
1 & 8:30 PM
(757-1991)
953 E. TOth St.
(2nd house from Fletcher music Bldg.)
Help Wanted
The Rebel 96
The Rebel, ECU'S Arts and Literary magazine, is seeking qualified persons
to fill the following jobs (stipend positions) for the next academic period.
BAR� from page 8
meal card will not be an adequate sub-
stitute for your ID. Because of the large
crowd expected, and in order to pro-
mote safety, please leave your pets at
home. No alcohol is allowed. Also, if
you ride a bike please lock it up on
one of the many bike racks that will
be placed around the mall. There will
be porta-potties and trash cans around,
so please pick up after yourselves.
Barefoot is an event that we look
forward to every year, and a great deal
of time is put into its planning and
execution. This year's Barefoot on the
Mall is bigger than any our school has
had before, so play it safe, and have a
great time.
Managing Editor:
Art Director:
Works with the Editor to oversee the content of the magazine
and helps to ensure that operations run in a smooth and
efficient manner. The successful candidate wili possess journal
and Apple Macintosh experience.
Works with the Editor to create the "look" of the magazine,
including artwork for the cover and to complement inside text.
This position requires typographic proficiency with definite
production experience and demands vast knowledge of Mac-
based graphics applications including: QuarkXPress, Adobe
Illustrator & Photoshop, along with many others.
Application deadlines for both positions are 1 May 1995 by 5 pm. Applications can be picked up
at the Media Board office on the second floor of the Student Publication Building. For more
information contact The Media Board at 328-6009 or John Bullard at 328-6388.
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(
11
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
SOU It
THURSDAY, APRIL 20,1995
BANDS
THE REFLECTORS
(12:00 1:Q?)

FULL STOP
(1:30 -20O)
DAC
(3:00 - 4:00)
WIDESPREAD PANIC
(4:30 - 6:45)
CARNIVAL C AMES
(11:00-4:00)
VELCRO OLYMPICS
vnM BOUNCY BOXING
M SUMO WRESTLING
TRAMPOLIN E THIN6
VIDEO BUTTONS
i1&

GLADIATOR JOUST
CREATIONFEST!
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL
THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE
AT 328-6004.
OTHER ORGANIZATIONS REPRESENTED AT BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
Ambassadors
America Chemical Society Student Affiliates
AFhOTC
Aquatic Sciences Gtub
Aycofc Hall Council
Biology Graduate Student Association
Ceramics Guild
Counselor Education Association
Craftsmen East
English Graduate Student Organization
Men's and Women's Frisbee
GAIA - An Environmental Awareness Ciub
Gamma Sigma Sigma
Sigma Gamma Epsiion - Geology Dept.
Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Metfs Lacrosse
The Liquid Enterprise
National Pan helienic Counci I
ECU Native American Organization
Painting Guild
Phi Sigma Pi
Pre-Professional Health Alliance
REAL - Student Volunteers tor REAL
Recreational Services
Sculpture Guild
School of Art Graduate Alliance
Sigma Nu Fraternity
Sigma Pi Fraternity
ECU Sociology Society
Students for Christ
Student Union Marketing Committee
Student Union Visual Arts Committee
Ultimate Frisbee
ECU Video Yearbook
Wesley Foundation Methodist Student Center
WZMB
Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority
NO COOLERS OR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES � BIKE RACKS WILL BE AVAILABLE IN THE PERIMETER � NO PETS






i
12
Thursday, April 13,1995 The East Carolinian
New coach talks hoops
JOE DOOLEY
nouncement of his hiring.
TEC: Are you glad that the selec-
tion process is over?
JD: Very much so. I am ready to
get back to work. I am going back out
on Friday and start recruiting.
TEC: How important was it for
you to keep Coach McGillian and
Coach Hill on the staff?
JD: It was very important. Mar-
tin (McGillian) has been here for four
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Joe Dooley
On Tuesday. Joe Dooley became
the 19th head basketball coach in East
Carolina University's history, and be-
came the youngest Division I head
coach in the nation, at 29 years of
age. Dooley replaces Eddie Payne.
who left last week to take the head
coaching position at Oregon St. Uni-
versity.
For the last four seasons, Dooley
was Coach Payne's top assistant at
ECU. Dooley worked heavily with re-
cruiting and scheduling, and also with
the development of Pirate guards.
which includes 1995 All-Rookie per-
former Tony Parham.
Dooley played his college basket-
ball at George Washington University.
He has been a counselor at the Five
Star Basketball Camp as well as Richie
Adubato's Basketball Camp and the
University of North Carolina Basket-
ball Camp. He was married in June of
1993 to his wife Tanya. Coach Dooley
sat down with TEC and spoke with
him Tuesday, shortly after the an-
(I
Thursday. April. 13
Baseball vs. Towson State
(DH), 6 p.m.
Friday. April 14
Softball @ Frost Cutlery,
Chattanooga, TN
Women's Tennis @ CAA
Championships, W&M,
Williamsburg, VA
Saturday. April 15
Baseball vs. James
Madison (DH), 2 p.m.
Softball @ Frost Cutlery
Tourney, Chattanooga, TN
Women's Tennis @ CAA
Championships, W&M,
Williamsburg, VA
Mens Track @ CAA
Championships, Fairfax,
VA
Womens Track @ CAA
Championships, Fairfax,
VA
Sunday. April 16
Baseball vs. James
Madison, 2 p.m.
Softball @ Frost Cutlery,
Chattanooga, TN
Womens Tennis @ CAA
Championships,
Williamsburg, VA
Tuesday. April 18
years. 1 feel very confident with him.
Coach Hill has adapted to ECU very-
well.
TEC: What were your feelings
about the head coaching position
when Coach Payne resigned?
JD: I felt that I least wanted the
opportunity to be head coach. I guess
my second option was to join Coach
Payne at Oregon State. I am very-
See DOOLEY page 15
Personal
Full Name: Joseph Gerard Dooley, III
Birthdate: January 29, 1966
Family: Wife, Tayna
Athletic Experience
� St. Benedict's Prep School
3 yr. starter. Team Captain
� New Jersey A.A. U. Championship Team
State champs (k8384)
� George Washington University ('85- '88)
4 yr. player. 2 yr. starter, Team Captain 88
� University of South Carolina
Asst. coach from 1988-91
� East Carolina University
Asst. coach from 1991 -95
� East Carolina University
Head Coach (April 11, 1995-present)
64 SEASONS OF PIRATE COACHES
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Odds and Ends
� Dooley is the youngest
Division I hoops coach at
ase 29.
� In high school, Dooley
was named 3rd-team All-
State in New Jersey, and
named as one of the top
10 point guards in the
East.
Baseball vs. Campbell, 2
p.m.
Softball vs. North Carolina
(DH), 3 p.m.
M. Tennis vs. Barton
College, 2:30 p.m.
Compiled by EMB
Irates ranked number one in country
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
The latest Ultimate Players'
Assosciation's (UPA) collegiate ulti-
mate frisbee rankings have been re-
leased, and the East Carolina Irates
men's squad, undefeated this season
at 13-0. is rated 1 in the nation. The
Helios, ECU's women's team, cur-
rently stands 13th in the country,
holding a 7-6 record.
According to Eric Simon, who
calculates and distributes the UPA
Top 25 weekly, each team is given
rating points for each contest, which
are averaged together to rank the col-
legiate programs.
"It's a complicated mathemati-
cal formula that we've developed over
the last couple of years Simon said.
"It's based on the strength of your
opponents, and how well you do
against them. Teams that are close
to you in the PR you'll earn more
points for beating them than teams
that are say, 400 points below you -
you should be able to handle them
easily
In the Collegiate Men's Top 25.
returning National Champion East
Carolina has an astonishing 1663
UPA Power Rating.
"We lost five starters off the
championship team from last sea-
son said Irate team member Steve
Lienert. "Even though those players
left, other players stepped up to fill
their space and play just as well. It's
all part of the program
In-state ,ival UNC-Wilmington
(16-3) is ranked second in the coun-
try with a 1500 P.R, but two of their
losses have come against the Irates.
N.C. State (13-2) placed eighth in this
week's poll, while Wesleyan (6-4) and
Duke University (4-2) came in at 21st
and 24th positions, respectively.
"The Irates are a complete
team Simon said. "There is a rea-
son that they are ranked 1 and are
the defending champions. They are
a very fast team, they play tenacious
defense and have a good long game.
That's a pretty rare combination
Simon had to go back to last sea-
son to focus on Irate weaknesses.
"They seemed to rely more
heavily on the long game than other
teams he said. "There only other
weakness is psychological, they are
not used to being behind and if a
team got up on them early, it might
Photo Courtesy of HOLLY MARTIN
ECU Helios team member Leslie Petty passes off while being closely guarded by a UPenn
player. The Helios are currently ranked 13 in the nation, and have a 7-6 record.
Carolina school, placing third in the to 13th position this week. switch-
April 4 poll with a 1388 P.R. Four �"8 P'aces with Oregon.
California programs placed in the top They're not very deep .imon
seven of the women's rankings. ECU
brings an 942 P.R. into next week's
competition, but slipped from 12th
be a little tough for them. I don't
know if they handle adversity real
well, but on the other hand they are
hardly ever in that situation
On the women's side. UNC-
Wilmington is the highest-ranked
said. "I can't remember the names
of their players, but they seem to rely
pretty heavily on their top couple
Hoopin' it up
Rugby wins 5th
championship
Mike Myers
Staff Writer
���������
�HOMMMI
Pie Photo
Now that springtime weather has returned (and gone away, and returned, and gone
away) the courts on College Hill has been the site of many friendly pickup games.
Rats? Bats? Rugby! On April 8th
the ECU rugby team took its 5th con-
secutive state championship in Char-
lotte. NC. The men of the ECU rugby
team took the title with three crush-
ing wins on Saturday, their total
points on the day were well over one
hundred.
ECU's first victory of the day was
against Western Carolina in a 58-0
pummeling. ECU put points on the
board only 19 seconds into the match
when Mike Shunk scrambled 45
meters and hit a pop-kick that Mike
Myers finished off for the try and con-
version. ECU was up 26-0 at the half
and waltzed through the second half
with similar ease.
UNC-Charlotte (UNCC) gave ECU
a slightly better match in the second
contest of the day. ECU lead 24-0 at
the half. UNC-C mounted an unsuc-
cessful counter attack in the second
half with a try and a penalty kick. The
final score was 36-10.
In the final match of the day for
the state title, North Carolina State
(NCSU) struck first with a penalty
kick from 30 meters out. NCSU's at-
tempts proved worthless as ECU set
winger Mike Cullingan loose, blazing
up the touch line and scoring on four
separate occasions. The 43-6 victory
places the ECU rugby team unques-
tionably as the number one collegiate
rugby team in the state of North Caro-
lina for 1995. ECU retires the trophy
this year at Pantana Bob's.
Some impressive individual scor-
ing highlighted the day for ECU. Scor-
ing standouts were Rick Snow with
32 points. Mike Myers with 26 points
and Jordan Ashburn with 15. Coach
Larry Babits said that he was. . .
impressed with his team's perfor-
mance after such a long and frustrat-
See RUGBY page 15
Race revving up
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
.
Race fans and mountain lovers take
heed; the 50th annual Coors Light
Yokahama Chimney Rock Hillclimb is
ready to ignite. This year's race, held
April 28-30. will be the grand finale in
Chimney Rock, and had already at-
tracted its capacity of drivers. 120, by
the middle of March. It is expected to
be one of the most exciting Hillclimbs
ever held.
Several of the drivers who are en-
tering this year's competition are veter-
ans of the event Five of these men have
won the race and been crowned 'King
oi the Hill John Finger, one past cham-
pion, is the winningest driver in the
Hillclimbs history, amassing 12 victo-
ries. Another past victor, Mike Green,
will be driving Buddy Baker's 1991 Win-
ston Cup car through the hairpin turns
of the race and the defending champion
Jerry' Kieft of Ashland, OH will return
to defend his crown.
The 1.8-mile course attracts driv-
ers from all over the country, and some
bring their families to the event. The
Hillclimb is the only event of its kind in
the South and will feature the best in
over six classes of racecars. The event
was stretched over three days starting
in 1985 to accommodate the demand
of the drivers.
"Paddock space is critical at Chim-
ney Rock Park said Dean Furr, the
chairman of the event "That's why we
expanded to a three day event in 1985-
so that more drivers could experience
the thrill of running up the mountain.
Outstanding NFL career
could come to close in S.F.
See RACE page 15
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
For an outstanding quarterback
that has spanned a career of over
16 years, an historic saga in the Na-
tional Football League will report-
edly come to a close.
'Super Joe' as he has been of-
ten known, will hold a press confer-
ence in San Francisco next Tuesday
where he is expected to announce
his retirement. Montana, who all but
owns the San Francisco 49ers'
record books and has made four vic-
torious Super Bowl appearances,
has chose his old stomping ground
of San Francisco to make his offi-
cial announcement.
An extraordinary athlete from
the University of Notre Dame, Mon-
tana has had a track record for bril-
liant comebacks and last-minute tri-
umphs.
Montana's first professional
quest began during the 1981 Cham-
pionship Playoffs against the Dallas
Cowboys. "The Drive" as it is known
today, was capped off when Dwight
Clark leaped over a Cowboy defen-
sive back snagging the pass (and the
victory) from Montana in the back
of the end zone while was eluding
enormous pressure from Ed "Too
Tall" Jones.
Montana has had few other
brushes with glory. In his second Su-
per Bowl appearance against Cincin-
nati. Montana and the 49ers had a
difficult job in handling a potent
Bengals team.
However, in the final minute of
play (spanning 80 yards). Montana
stole the spotlight from an awesome
Boomer Esiason-led team. In the fi-
nal seconds and in double coverage
on another future hall-of-famer Jerry
Rice, Montana checked off on Rice
and looked to John Taylor in the
back left corner of the endzone.
Montana has two Super Bowl
See MONTANA page 15
H"BWP ' '
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� Ki-
13
Thursday, April 13, 1995
77e �asf Carolinian
HAIRS
.
-4;
'Prem
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
500 OFF
Banana
Split
coupon expires 41595
Limit 1 per customer.
Not Valid with any other purchase
fe
k
ECU's SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
f
(SID) - In Lady Pirate Softball,
The Lady Pirates recorded their
fifth sweep Tuesday afternoon
when they defeated Campbell 3-2
and 5-4. ECU is now 36-15 overall,
while Campbell falls to 32-20.
??TAKE A RIDE ON THE WILD SIDE
Attention ECU Students
Don't have a car? Need a ride to Church?
The First Pentecostal Holiness Church would like to offer you free transportation.
Sunday Morning 11:00am Sunday Evening 7:00pm Wednesday Nights 7:00pm
CALL 756-3315
(Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm)
In the first half of the double-
header, ECU took and early lead in
the second when second baseman
Jolin Eckman was batted home by
Amy Swaim's single. Heather Smith
doubled in the seventh and later
scored the game winning run when
Tonya Oxendine singled. Smith also
recorded an RBI and a stolen base.
Also for the Lady Pirates, Rhonda
Rost tripled. Jami Bendle was
ECU'S winning pitcher, striking out
three CU Camels and holding them
College Life:
A Few Ihings To Know
KNOW- Wh�"cK tfff-campux
beoksfort wH buy back your
(4ed J5" fexHookf -f-or toort than ZS4 tnch.
tClVOVV: VtticU "30-iy�inM�y-or-it'j-f ree�
pizza place always Takes exactly fiWrntfttes.
KNOWhuh vl9r .
warfCr-eatin5 laundromfl
Machines "to avoid.
KNOW the cope:
IT MWhYS C05TS LESS TWAA Soo-cOUECT.
Hey on college campuses those "in the know" are the ones who rule.
And it's not just about being smart in the classroom, it's about being wise
with your wallet as well. So if you want a great low price on a collect call,
just dial 1 800-CALL-ATT It always costs less than 1-800-COLLECT Always.
There are lots of tricky things for you to learn at college, but here's
something that's easy: KNOW THE CODE, and save the person on the
other end some serious money "fou'll be glad you did
u in
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ABET. Your Time Voice
u
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AT&T
C 1995 AT&T
3?
to three hits.
For Campbell, Denelle Hicks
and Karen Yehle each scored one
run. Robin Marshall doubled in the
third to bat in Hicks. Misty Bow-
man earned an RBI when she
singled home Yehle. From the
mound, Tina Echerer pitched for
the loss. She allowed three runs off
eight ECU hits.
In the second game,
Campbell's Stacy Wilson singled
and was brought home by'desig-
nated hitter Amy Alter's single.
Alter was 3-4 at the plate. Denelle
Hicks, Lindsey Bierbaum and Tina
Echerer scored runs for the Lady
Camels. Bierbaum was CU's losing
pitcher, giving up nine hits and
striking out four batters.
First baseman Joey Clark
scored twice off singles for ECU.
She also stole a base. Jolin Eckman,
Shar61yn Strickland and Tonya
Oxendine recorded ECU's other
runs. Eckman was 2-3 at the plate
with a stolen base and an RBI.
Teryn Ford earned the win for ECU.
She allowed eight hits and walked
three.
The Lady Pirates' next compe-
tition will be in Chattanooga, TN
where they will participate in the
Frost Cutlery Tournament. The
tournament will last for three days.
Joe Dooley, assistant men's bas-
ketball coach at East Carolina Uni-
versity for the past four seasons,
has been promoted to head coach
of the Pirate basketball program,
school officials announced Tuesday.
Dooley replaces Eddie Payne,
who recently left ECU to become
the men's basketball coach at Or-
egon State University.
Dooley, who turned 29 on Janu-
ary 29, becomes the youngest head
coach in NCAA Division I men's
basketball.
For the last four seasons.
Dooley has served as Payne's top
assistant at East Carolina. Before
coming to ECU, Dooley and Payne
served on the same staff at South
Carolina, as assistants to George
Felton for three seasons.
"After talking with basketball
people around the country, I felt
better and better about Joe Dooley
leading our basketball program
said Dr. Henry VanSant, Interim
Director of Athletics at East Caro-
lina University. "I am a firm believer
in promoting people from within
who do good work, and Joe has
done an excellent job in our bas-
ketball program
As an assistant at ECU, Dooley
worked heavily with recruiting anJ
scheduling and with the developr
ment of the Pirate guards, includ-
ing CAA All-Rookie performer Tony
Parham in 1995.
Since arriving at ECU, alonj
with Payne, the Pirates went t$
their first NCAA Tournament in 2
years, and posted back-to-back win-
ning seasons for the first time in
25 years. Last season, ECU finished
with an 18-11 record, its highest
win total since 1974-75, when the
Pirates went 19-9.
"I am very excited to stay at
East Carolina as head basketball
coach said Dooley. "I was very for-
tunate to come here in 1991 with
Coach Payne and learn from him
and be a part of such a great Uni-
versity. I look forward to helping
continue to build the ECU baskelj-
ball program
During Dooley's tenure a�
South Carolina, the West Orangcj,
N.J. native assisted Gamecock
coach George Felton with opponent
scouting, daily practice session in-
struction, video analysis, recruit-
ing, game preparation and monitor-
ing of conditioning and academics).
Dooley has also been a coun-
selor at the Five Star Basketbalj
Camp as well as Richie Adubato'fc
Camp and the University of Nortlk
Carolina Basketball Camp.
Dooley earned his bachelor of
arts degree in Speech Communica
tions from George Washington Uni-
versity in 1988. He played four sea-
sons for the Colonials, the last two
as a starter. He also served as team
captain during his senior season.
Dooley graduated from StL
Benedict's School in West Orange,
N.J. in 1984 before heading to
George Washington. As a member
of the New Jersey State A.A.Uj.
Championship team, he compete
for the national champioriship it)
1983-84.
See SID page 14
J-





gpr
14
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
�� -���� �a�
SID from page 13
Dooley and his wife. Tanya.
were married in June of 1993.
In Pirate football, the Purple
team defeated the Gold team. 28-
14. Saturday afternoon at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium in the annual East
Carolina University spring football
game.
The squad was split into offen-
sive (purple) and defensive (gold)
units. The offense received points
under traditional means, while the
defense scored six points for a
touchdown, three points for a turn-
over, two points for a safety, two
points for holding the offense to
three-downs-and-out and one point
for holding the offense without
scoring.
The majority of the first unit
did not play in the game, including
quarterback Marcus Crandall and
running back Jerris McPhail.
"This was one of the best
springs that we have had said of-
fensive coordinator Todd Berry.
"With so many .starters returning,
we were able to get things done
quicker. We were able to solidify
starting units and get backups
some much-needed repetitions"
The offense scored four touch-
downs - all through the air.
Redshirt freshman, and game offen-
sive MVP Ernest Tinnen had two
touchdown passes, one for 35 yards
to Larry Shannon and one for 16
yards to Travis Newkirk. The
Burlington, N.C. native completed
7 of 9 passes for 105 yards.
Rising sophomore Dan
Gonzalez threw two touchdown
passes - 6 yards to Brad Salin and
13 yards to Daryl Jones. Gonzalez
finished the afternoon with 10
completions in 19 attempts for 122
yards.
The defense held the offense
without scoring five.times and
forced three turnovers. Freshman
linebacker Andrew Barrett and jun-
ior defensive end Jeff Griffin recov-
ered fumbles and redshirt freshman
Brian Bentley had an interception.
The defensive MVP was
redshirt freshman Kelvin Suggs.
��

who recorded 8 total tackles, in-
cluding 4 solos and 4 assists.
"We have a lot of experience
back on the defensive unit said
defensive coordinator Paul Jette.
"We were able to fill a few needs
during the spring. I feel confidant
that we can have just as good a
defensive unit in 1995 that we had
last year
Other statistical leaders in-
cluded redshirt freshman running
back Scott Harley. who rushed for
83 yards on seven attempts and
Jones, who had 59 yards rushing
on seven attempts. Perez Mattison
and Sean Richardson caught three
passes each.
The spring game drew 6.016
fans to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
The game is part of the 12th an-
nual Great PurpleGold Pigskin
Pig-Out. held at East Carolina Uni-
versity.
The Pirates open the 1995 sea-
son on Sept. 2 at Tennessee.
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.�





� �
2T
15
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
MONTANA from page 12
MVP awards and plenty of reasons
to retire. His attempt to make a tri-
umphant comeback after sustaining
thumb and back injuries, com-
pounded with elbow surgery which
sidelined him for most all of the
1992 season, ended as Montana and
RUGBY from page 12
ing road trip The team was unable to
find a hotel for three hours upon reach-
ing Charlotte and ended up sleeping on
the field.
ECU continues its schedule on
the Kansas City Chiefs fell victims
to Dan Marino and the Dolphins last
December.
A great quarterback who
brought many highlights to the grid-
iron. Montana has unfortunately ex-
hausted his abilities (39 years old).
April 29 with its annual alumni match.
All are invited to attend the match which
kicks off at 1pm. For more information
about the match or ECU rugby call
coach Larry Babits at 756-1971.
but will be a great addition to the
prestigious Pro Football Hall of
Fame in Canton. Ohio.
For a man who shares the glory
of four Super Bowl rings with Terry
Bradshaw, we may see Montana's
professional football capacities used
on Fox - but then would there be a
future in coaching for Montana?
Onlv time will tell.
fvrWj-E from page 12
We have to fit the event within the
park's normal operating hours, so
we've got to limit the number of cars
running to make sure that everyone
gets a reasonable amount of track
time
The race is sanctioned by the
SCAA, the governing body in stockcar
racing, and is a solo event. According
to Michael Griffin, an employee in the
promotions office for the race, many
drivers will be sad to see the course
shut down this year.
"Chimney Rock is implementing
a master-plan over the next two years
to add a visitors center to the area
he said. "With the space required for
that, there just won't be any space left
for the course. A lot of drivers will be
crying their eyes out; they're going to
be so sad to see it go
According to Griffin, the sponsors
of the race are hoping to get national
press coverage on Good Morning
America as well as other media out-
lets and encourages anyone who is in-
terested to come out for a good time.
Chimney Rock is located on High-
way 64 74-A. about 25 miles southeast
of Asheville.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209-B S.Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
. 8:00-4:00
DOOLEY from page 12
happy to be the head coach at ECU.
TEC: How do you feel about be-
ing the youngest Division I head coach
in the nation?
JD: I really don't think about it. I
did not have a time frame on trying
to be a head coach. 1 will continue to
learn each and every day.
TEC: Will you differ from Coach
Payne's basketball philosophy?
JD: it will be similar, but it won't
be exactly the same. Coach Payne's
philosophy has been successful, but
you will see some different things.
TEC: What are your feelings on
recruiting players, since the NCAA
signing period is near?
JD: You can't even imagine how-
important recruiting is. We need two
very good players. So far we have only
lost one recruit to the coaching
change.
TEC: What are your feelings on
a new athletic director comir to
ECU?
JD: It doesn't bother me. 1 believe
I am adaptable. I think the university
felt that 1 could work with th new ath-
letic director.
TEC: How do you see the future
! SPOBTSWOBLDl
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Dollars
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April 17,1995 (6:30-8:30)
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104 E. Red Banks Road
"OFF GREENVILLE BLVD"
FOR MORE INFO 756-6000 OR 757-0769
Kingston
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Don't pass this upBlG Savings!
of ECU basketball?
JD: I am not a type of visionary. I
will try to improve the program a little
each and every day. As far as the con-
ference aspect. 1 believe the additon
of Virginia Commonwealth to the CAA
changes the complexion of the entire
conference.
What they're saying about new
ECU Head Basketball Coach Joe
Dooley:
Jeff Capel. Old Dominion I'ni-
versity Head Basketball Coach:
"I am sure he will do a fine job.
He's a good, young coach
Bobby Cremins, Georgia Tech
University Head Basketball Coach:
"1 think Joe Dooley is an excel-
lent choice. He is a great recruiter and
a great young man
George Felton, Assistant Coach,
St. Johns University:
"He really cares about the stu-
dent-athlete. 1 am really glad that ECU
is giving him the opprtunity
Chris Knoche, American Univer-
sity Head Basketball Coach:
"Joe has certainly paid his dues.
His experience belies his age. He will
continue to do a great job at ECU
Charlie Woolum, College of Wil-
liam and Mary Head Basketball
Coach:
"I'm glad to see that Joe got the
job. 1 am sure he will do a fine job
Jerry Wainwright, UNCW Head
Basketball Coach:
I've followed Joe's career for a lot
of years. He is an outstanding young
man. 1 believe he is very capable of
continuing the success that ECU has
experienced
Mike Hopkins. Coastal Carolina
University Head Coach:
"I beleieve Coach Dooley will do
a great job. He is a great choice. After
working with him at ECU. I know he
is ready.
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New and newly renovated 1 and 2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo units, large and small, furnished or unfurnished,
with washers and dryers, free cable and water.
Pool, clubhouse & more. ECU bus service.
KINGSTON
RENTALS CO.
758-7575





pr
16
Thursday, April 13, 1995 The East Carolinian
m
Help Wanted
For Rent
J
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
apt. 1 2 block from art building. 3 blocks
from downtown2 blocks from super-
market laundramat. Rent includes utili-
ties, phone cable. Available immediately
757-1947
LOOK ATTENTION STUDENTS: Larg-
est selection of campus rentals available
May 1st and August 1st Duplexes. Houses.
Apartments Call HOMELOCATORS 752-
1375
WESLEY COMMONS 1 & 2 Bedrooms:
Free cable, water, sewer, walking distance
to campus. Summer Yearly leases. Pitt
Property Management 758-1921
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: non
smoker, to share a newly renovated 3 bed-
room house. Close to campus. $250
Months plus $80-utilities. Give us a call.
Claudia or Christine 758-5024.
PAY NO DEPOSIT AND SIGN NO
LEASE! 2 bedroom new apartment. Con-
temporary, ceiling fans. deck, dishwasher,
etc. Water and sewage paid. Move in Mid-
May (negotiable) Call 758-8647816-2519.
APARTMENT FOR RENT IN
WYNDHAM CIRCLE. 2 bedroom on first
floor. Available in May. Call 830-0786
SUBLEASE: 1 Bedroom Apartment in
Kingston Place. Available May to August
New Apartments. WasherDryer and
Cable included, Pool. Contact Kelli at 752-
8041.
TOWNHOUSE-2 Bedroom. 1 12 Bath,
available July 1. All appliances, washer
dryer hook-ups, extended patio, attic stor-
age. Call Mike (919)524-4695.
BRAND NEW APARTMENT FOR
RENT-Take over lease. Great for.Summer
School. Available May! Pay $180.00 for
1st months rent. 360.00 there after. Call
321-5779
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL? Need a
place to stay? Call 757-8709. Female
Roommate needed. non-smoker
prefferably. $220month plus 12 utility,
phone, cable. Ringgold Towers.
TWO PEOPLE NEEDED to sublease
bedroom in a three bedroom townhouse
beginning May 1st Rent $131.25 each plus
14 utilities. Two blocks from campus.
Call 758-8521.
HUGE 5 BEDROOM HOUSE 1 Block
from campus 2 Blocks from downtown. 2
full baths; ample parking, lots of great
extras. Available May 5. $1100 permonth
1 year lease deposit. Pet ok. Call 752-
6833
ROOMMATE NEEDED: TAR RIVER
ESTATES-2Bedroom Townhouse, your
own room, 13 utilities, washer & dryer.
For summer months. Available May 1st
Call ErikaJulie 757-8723
FOR RENT: 4 or 5 bedroom house, 2
full baths, large 1 acre lot fenced in with
built in patio and brick barbeque grill,
perfect for students. $700.00 month. Call
321-2030.
NEEDED: 2 NS roommates to share 3Br,
2 12 bath townhouse at Twin Oaks. W
D hook up, partly furnished, pool, ECU
bus service, and private room. Available
May 1. $200 per mnth13 utilities. Call
Jenny at 7524839.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 2 bedroom apt
$192.50. close to campus, washerdryer
hookup, brand new apt! Call 758-2363
leave message.
2 BEDROOM APT. 205 E. 9th St No
pets. $350.00 monthly. Available May 6th
1995. Across from New Student Center.
Call 756-0151
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublease 2 Br.
Apt. May 1- Aug. with option to renew
lease. 190.00month includes water
cable. 752-7721
FULLY FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM, 2
Bathrooms for students (easily
accomodates 4) attending Summer school
sessions. In nice neighborhood, 4 miles
from campus. $800 monthly. Utilities fur-
nished. Call 756-5799 and ask for Kim.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to take
over lease June 1. 2 bed, 2 baths. Cable,
water included. Pool. Clubhouse, ECU bus
service available. $225 12 utilities
deposit.
Call Wendy or Emily at 757-0793
AVAILABLE NOW! AFFORDABLE! One
bedroom Apartment. Brand new, quiet
neighboorhood beside Lowes. Want
someone to assume lease. Please call an y-
time. leave message. 355-7699 $295.00
APARTMENT AVAILABLE FOR SUB-
LEASE for May, June, and July. 2 Bed-
room, fully furnished apartment located
at Ringgold Towrs. Ask for Emily or
Stephanie. 830-8903.
ATHLETIC, PRE-MED SOPHOMORE
needs male roommate to share 2-bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres by July includes
weight room, basketball court swimming
pool laundry. 752-3122
SUMMER DISCOUNT FOR
TOWNHOUSE at Twin Oaks attractive 3
bedrooms. 2 12 baths, available about
May 8th. $590 per month, reduced to $520
monthly for the summer. No pets allowed
- 12 month lease required. Call Will Mar-
tin 752-2851.
ROOMMATE NEEDED MAY 1 in 2 bed
room apartment at Kings Row. 1 12 miles
from campus. 190 deposit and 190 r ent ?
12 utilities. Call 551-7632
FEMALE NEEDED to share 2 bedroom
apt with one other female beginning in
the fall. LocationRent is undecided and
Negotiable. Call Angela 752-8070
TAR RIVER ESTATES - Roommate
needed immediately. $100 deposit $172
rent, 14 utilities phone. Located on
river. Call Kevin, 758-6701
BEST DEAL! Ringgold Towers Apt. for
sub-lease May-August 1 Bedroom, 1 bath,
furnished. $300month. Call Yaqoob 758-
3635.
,���
AVAILABLE IN MAY- 3 Bdrm, 2 full bath
Duplex in Wyndham Circle. Summer sub-
lease w option to rent in Fall. Call 758-
9828.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE IN MAY.
New. upstairs, two bedroom with deck in
quiet location. Near Firetower Road and
Arlington Boulevard at Rosemont-$350.
Call 321-8799.
SUMMER RENT AT A STEAL! Female
roommate to share house off 10th Street.
$175 mo13 utl. cable w, d in eluded
May-August option to renew. Furnished.
Diane 752-1166 leave mesg.
2 RESPONSIBLE FEMALES: House for
Sublease Mid May-July. 3 bedroom, fur-
nished. 1 bathroom, washer'dryer, cen-
tra air conditioning. Block from campus.
Call kathy or Robyn at 752-3472
FEMALE NEEDED to share a 2 Bedroom
apt $170month 12 utilities by end
of May. Call Jeannie 756-7532 after 5 pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 3 bedroom in
Tar River Apts 13 rent. 13 utilities,
free cable, free water. Must be mature, as
well as clean & tidy. Male or Female. Call
Amy at 756-9324 and leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED MAY
1 to share 2 bedroom Wyndham Ct Apart-
ment. $190.0012 utilities. May rent
month to month. Call 758-1475.
FIFTH STREET APARTMENTS Room-
mate needed for the Summer (May-Mid-
Aug.). Great location downtown above
Subway. Call Bod or Todd @ 752-2965.
RENT SPACES AVAILABLE for the Sum-
mer. $160 a month and $25.00 for AC.
call Ryan at 757-0127 for more info.
STAYING FOR THE SUMMER? R OOM
MATE NEEDED to share an apartment
at Cannon Court Pay 13 rent and utili-
ties. Call Katie at 7618 or Kris at 7732.
PRIVATE ROOM IN HOUSE FOR
RENT. 104 N. Summit St. on 1st & Sum-
mit Streets. 7 blks. from classes. $225
mth. utilities. Nice Place. Quiet Envi-
ronment Call Eric 758-2294.
FEMALE WANTED MAY 1ST to share 2
bedroom furnished apt. $192.50half
utilities. Non-smoker. Call Crystal 758-
8548
TO SUBLEASE: $380.00Month in
Wesley Commons. 2 bedroom very nice.
Available May 1st. Great price, great loca-
tion, great landlord. Please call Blythe,
Shannon or Kim at 752-2518. You can't
beat this deal!
S1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202 298-8952.
SUMMER POSITIONS
AVAILABLE:Cain Career Experience and
Save $4,000.00. Please call 1-800-251-4000
ext. 1576. Leave Name. School Now At-
tending and Phone Number.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED: Earn
SlOOO's Weekly working at home mailing
our circulars. Free details. Send SASE:
R&B Distributors. Box 20354, Greenville
NC 27858
IF YOUR JOB SUCKS CALL ME. Ill take
6 hard working students. Gain manage-
ment experience. $470week. Call 1-800-
242-3958 ext 2761.
RESORT JOBS - Theme Parks. Hotel &
Spas, Mountain. Outdoor Resorts, more!
Earn to $12, hr.tips. For more informa-
tion, call (206) 632-0150 ext. R53621
ATTENTION LADIES Earn a 1.000 plus
a week escorting in the Greenville area.
Must be 18 yrs old: have own phone and
transportation. We are an established
agency, check out your yellow pages.
PART TIME STUDENT MANAGER:
EXCELLENT PAY Needed on campus
evenings and Saturdays. Must have abil-
ity to work independently with minimal
supervision. Prefer some retail experience.
Apply in person: ECU Student Stores,
Wright Building.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT! Tired of
"McSummerjobs?" Earm $3,000-6.000 per
month in fisheries! Great parkresprtjobs
too! Room and board! Transportation!
Male of Female! Call (919) 490-8629, ex-
tensions A95.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK. Make
up to $2.000-$4.000mo. teaching basic
conversational English in Japan. Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For information
call: (206) 632-1146 ext J53624
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Students Needed! Fishing Industry. Earn
up to $3,000-$6,000 per month. Room
and Board! Transportation! Male or Fe-
male. No experience necessary. Call (206)
545-4155 ext A53623
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
ships or Land-Tour companies. World
Travel (Hawaii. Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.) Seasonal and full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53625
LIFEGUARDS: Spring. Summer.
Greenville, Goldsboro, Smithfield. Tarboro.
Call Bob 758-1088
FULL & PART-TIME HELP WANTED
at University Discount Apparel (across the
street from Krispy Kreme and Hardee's)
Flexible hours! Apply in person Tuesday
through Friday from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
only No Phone Calls Accepted!
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S YOUNG
MEN'S STORE are accepting applicat ions
for additional summr season sales associ-
ates. Flexible scheduling options includ-
ing evening and weekend hours. Salary
plus merchandise discount for your new
spring summer wardrobe. Applications
accepted each Mondy and Thursday. 1-
3pm. Brody's, The Plaza.
FEMALE MODELS NEEDED lor swim
suit calander. No modeling experience
necessary. Call Photography (919)321-
8057 Ask for Mike or leave message.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING Seasonal
& full-time employment available at Na-
tional Parks. Forests & Wildlife Preserves.
Benefits bonuses! Call: 1-206-545-4804
ext. N53622
TO TEND LARGE YARD AND GAR
DEN. One day wk. Folkland area. 752-
4317 after 9 pm
LOOKING FOR INTERESTED STU-
DENT to work part-time for a National
Catalog Retailer. Job entails distribution
of promotional materials on campus. Job
requires 5 hrs. per week commitment (you
set the hours). Good money and perks!
Only serious calls please. 1-800-788-3365.
ANDY'S CHEESTEAKS at the Plaza is
acveptiong applicants for both day and
night hours (parttime) to begin around
May 1st. No phone calls please.
NEED INTERNS OR EMPLOYEES to
work in Emerald Isle this summer on in
teractive multimedia for kids. Must be
proficient with Macintosh. Need skills in
graphic arts and or AY softward. Could
lead to year-round employment. Call 919-
354-5972 and leave message: will be in-
terviewing last week of April.
EARN MONEY AT HOME, stuffing en
velopes. Rush SASE to ML Associates.
7209 East Harris Blvd. "321 Charlotte.
NC 28227
lOvertonV
Seasonal-Packaging & Shipping
openings available Personnel needed
to fill customer orders .and prepare
packages for shipment. Students
seeking full lime work lor Spring and
Summer are encouraged to apply.
Moii-Iti hours Sam-dpm.
Applications will be taken from
� ')- I am id 2-4pm. lon-Thru.
. AppK ul the
. (Helton's Corporate Center offices.
Ill RedliutksRd (irecnville.NC27X34
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for cashier, waitstaff, and cooks.
Please apply within M - F between 2 - 4
No phone calls please
504 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
J
Computer and technical
Writing for summer grant to
Mart early May 1995.
Background in HTML
andor 'toolbook or Compel
preferred. Background in
CIS helpful. Pay dependent
upoin skill level, $5-510 per
hour. Decision Sciences
Department, GCB 3410,
phone (919)328-6893.
CAMP PIXEW00D
Summer Camp Staff
COUNSELORS, INSTRUCTORS, &
OTHER POSITIONS I Item
: : , "a: . I a ' I 1 e .i
- .� eh � � ����: . � eer. ional �
Bp � ratqp. Over 25 activities.
Ling water ski, heated
pool Lenarbeback art
. Mountain Climate, good pay
and nreat fun! Non-smokers.
Fcr app-iicat ionbrochure:
7C4-692-6239 cr Camp Pinewood,
Henderssr. . - I . C 28792.
B2
STUDENTS: Looking for part-time work
with flexible hours? ECU is looking for a
few good Pirates to contact alumni for the
Annual Fund program. $5.00 per hour
plus bonus. Contact the TeleFund Office
at 3284215.
wmmmmm: rj
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
Motivated individuals needed
for security position at a plant
in Greenville. Earn $6.50 per
hr. FTPT. flexible schedule good
benefits for full-time employees
to include tuition assistance.
Apply in person to:
Employment Security Commission
3101 BismarkSt. Greenville.NC
4
a
Summer Job Opportunity
Spend-the summer working outdoors!
Crop Scouts are needed to work in
the Pitt Edgecombe Nash County
area from June through August to
collect accurate data to be used in
farm management. Must be able to
work independently, physically fit,
reliable, and have own transportation.
Science andor tanning background is a
plus, but not necessary. Salary starts
at $5.25 and mileage is reimbursed.
Send a handwritten letter stating
your interest and qualifications to
Will Connell. Rt. 4 Box 291-MM.
Greenville, NC 27834 by April 20th.
LIVE IN LUXURY - 2 rooms available, 2
miles from campus, fully furnished house
with back deck, basketball court, air con-
ditioning, cable, washer and dryer, and
fully stocked kitchen. Must be neat and
responsible. $200 per month. Call 752-
2116. Available May 1st
2 BEDROOMS AVAILABLE from May
till end of June or 1st Summer Session
(negotiable). Females. Non-smokers pre-
ferred. $225.00 one time rent and 13
utilities! Call 328-8566 soon!
ROOM FOR RENT: furnished. 1 12
miles from campus. Non-smoking female
only. Call Charlotte 756-3251 after 4:30
pm.
TO TAKE OVER MY LEASE MAY 1-
JULY 31 - Female roommate needed to
share a two bedroom apartment. $180.00
rent included cable & water. 12 utilities
and phone. Near campus wit h bus service.
Call 752-8669 or leave message.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I.T. or Tommy Williams
756-781 5758-7436
�r
tm
m.
Services Offered
mmmmmmmmmmm
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let up help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53624
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo-
bile Music Productions is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of an Disc Jockey service in the area.
Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates
booking fast. Call early 7584644 ask for
Lee.
DATES
GUYS 6l GALS
1-900-726-0033 EXT.25501
$2.99 per min.
Must be 18 yrs.
NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP SERVICE
We can help you find money for college.
Students-do not give your credit card or
bank account to anyone over the phone
claiming to sell you a "guaranteed pro-
gram Get the true facts on scholarships
& grants. $39.00 for a Student Profile.
No gimmicks. Call today for a free bro-
chure. (800)3244395.
TYPING REASONABLE RATE -
Quick & Professional, Term Papers, The-
sis, other services. Call Glenda: 752-
9959(Days); 527-9133(Eves)
N�J CASHm
We Buy CDS;
Cuiettti, and Lp �
Well p�y up to $8 eaak fcr
CDC
Having trouble finding where to drop
off Classifieds and Announcements?
Well look no morel
Forms for Classifieds and
Announcements can be picked up in
Mendenhall and dropped off in the
Student Pubs building.
JESUS has risen
You are invited to worship our
risen Savior with us. Hollywood
Presbyterian Church. 5 mi. south of
Pitt Plaza on Hwy. 43 S just before
D.H. Conley on left. Sunday
School, 9:45: Worship. 10:45 am.
swumwAPumo
unB SjhB 5Sb 55b
nKBOWWOURQASSUKU!
Joyner
Library
Mendenhall
We are
here
Student Pubs
Building,
2nd floor





3f
17
LPflLwL
Thursday, April 13, 1995 7??e �ast Carolinian
$:
Travel
rrw Personals
D
Wanted
For Sale
PUPPIES AVAILABLE in 6 weeks. Lab
Shepard mix. Born March 7th. If interested
call Greg 757-7777.
FOR SALE: Subaru XT 1988. sporty,
clean, runs good, sunroof, lots of options.
104k Asking $2100 321-1634
MOUNTAIN BIKE - Univega, 4.5 pound
frame. AMP suspension fork, full LXXT
Components, custom hand built wheels,
many extras, incredible condition, sacri-
fice $750 negoitable Call (919)328-8167
90 BLACK LAB PUPPIES. 5 weeks old.
Asking $20.00 a piece. Call 757-3318
TWO (2) COLLEGIATE LOFT BEDS
$80 each. Used one year- extra parts.
Moving to apartment. Also dorm size re-
frigerator - $75.00 Call week days 328-
7759, weekends (919H42-9636.
FOR SALE - Cellular flip-phone w x-tra
battery, leather case, battery charger &
cigarette adapter. 150.00. Call 756-7357
DIAMOND BACK, OUTLOOK MOUNTAIN
BIKE, 18 inch frame, excellent condition.
$140.00 758-1932
MOTORCYCLE HELMETSCUBA
EQUIPMENT - Shoei Rainey X8 Red-sil-
ver-black-white for $250 (neg.) Paid $525.
Top of the line Sheerwood BC. Regula-
tor, tank, and wetsuits. Call Stan at 752-
0859 for prices.
CANNONDALE MOUNTAIN BIKE Al-
most new Aluminum Bar Ends, Seat
Leash, Two bottle cages, Excellent Condi-
tion. $400 Call 8304)906 and leave mes-
sage.
1990 SUBARU LEGACY Excellent car,
All power options. Front wheel drive. Re-
tails for $7300 Must sell - $6000 Call 830-
0906 leave message
CAMCORDER: sears model 934.537, 6
zoom, 2 batteries, battery charger, carry-
ing case, and triped-$450.00 Call 328-7759
(weekdays) or 442-9636 (weekends).
IBM COMPUTER 486 - Investor model,
soft ware included. Call 758-6820
��-
'82 YAMAHA 650 SEC A. Very good con-
dition. Shaft drive, quality extras, origi-
nal owner. $1250. Paul 816-3129 (day)
756-8344 (evening)
SMITH-CORONA PWPD350 word pro-
cessor w remote monitor, daisywheel
printer. ASC II and spreadsheet capabil-
ity, stores files on standard 3.5" disc, un-
der warranty and recently "tuned-up
extra accessories. $200 obo. 758-7207, Lv.
msg.
IBM THINKPAD laptop computer $1,100:
Motorola Pager $50. Call Eric at 355-0005
FOR SALE - 2 chairs, in tables. 1 couch,
and 1 otto mean, matching set, western
style, $150 obo. Leave message.
DO EUROPE
$229 ANYTIME! dbl height
If you're a little flexible, we can
help you beat the airline's prices.
' NO HIDDEN CHARGES "
CHEAP FARES WORLDWIDE
AIRHTTCH 800-326-2009
airtiitch@netcom.com
fik
ATTRACTIVE AND POETIC FEMALE
seeks likeminded male for friendship and
possible relationship. Send letters and
pictures to V.C.S. - 116 Fletcher PI
Greenville. NC 27834
ECU GRADUATE, SWM, 24.6.0 feet, 180
lbs. starting professional career in
Greenville, would like to meet easygoing
SWF 18-26 with charater and values, for
dining out. beach, quiet times. Call 830-
2620 after 6 pm.
HEY, SiiS! Thanks for helping w my pa-
per. Good luck at Peasant's on April 2oth!

PLEASE HELP -1 need tickets for Jimmy
Buffet. Sat. 5 03. I have friends coming
into town and need extra tickets. Call
Brandon 355-8277
WANTED: bed (any size) or sleeper sofa
dresser, dorm fridge. Call Allieleave
message (910)577-3365.
FOR SALE- 2 white lofts, fits in apart-
ments or dorms. Call Myra or Meagan for
details. 830-6238
2 LOVESEAT COUCHES $50 & $40
Triple Dresser w hutch S75. Microwave
stand cutting board $20. wingback chair
$10. Clark W. 816-2689 H. 758-2941.
FURNITURE � sofa, love seat, chair, cof-
fee table, and 2 end tables. Kitchen table
w 4 chairs. Queen size bed. mat ress. and
box spring. Dresser w mirror, chest, and
night stand. Three rooms of furniture
$1000. Call Doug at 758-3831
Greek Personals
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, Kappa Alpha, and
Phi Tau present The Fist Annual Reading
Day Eve Party - Doug Clark and Hot Nuts
and Liquid Pleasure. April 24.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON would like to con-
gratulate Greg & Steve for being named
the new Sigma sailor boys. Their yard
looks great!
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU would
like to wish everyone a happy and safe
Easter weekend.
CONGRATULATIONS to the sisters at
Pi Delta on their winning Softball season
so far. Good luck in the playoffs and keep
up the homeruns Jennifer and Renee"
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
PI DELTA thanks Kerri and Ashley on a
great Semi-Formal. Congratulations to
Jennifer Crawford on her engagement and
also to Lynne Zengilowski on her admit-
tance to OT!
ALPHA SIG: Thanks for the pajama so-
cial. We'll have to get together again soon!
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta!
TKE INFORMANTS - Viva la Red front!
Thanks Crazy Agent Hearld and all the
rest for a night never to be forgotten! Love,
the Chi Omega Assailants.
ALPHA PHI - Even though it was crazy
only one got hurt, so what, nowadays, goes
under a skirt? It started at two. and after
a feastie, you hit the dance floor and got
kindz bezatie. So call me again and lets
give it a whirl, because you know you're
my favorite girls! Love. Scott
SIGMA NU wants to Thank brothers Mike
Murphy and Bert Winfrey for planning and
executing a most sucessful semi-formal.
Everyone had a great time.
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL; Thank you so
much for the plaque that was presented
to us this past weekend. Your interest in
Sigma Nu is greatly appreciated.
THANK YOU, to the Sisters of Chi-0 for
the house warming gift and also to your
represenatives who came out to our house
dedication this past weekend. Thank vou
also to Theta Chi. who sent represenatives
to our dedication. Your interest is greatly
appreciated. Thanks from the Brothers of
Sigma Nu.
We Also Buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
TV's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shop
STUDENT SWAP SHOP DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
' Display Classifieds
, $5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication. However, no
refunds will be given.
Announcements
Any organization may use the
Announcements section of The
East Carolinian to list activities
and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due
to the limited amount of space,
The East Carolinian cannot
guarantee the publication of
announcements.
?All ads must be pre-paid
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more information, call ECU-6366.
Thursday, April 13,1995 The East Carolinian
ECU CAMPUS DINING
SERVICES CARES ABOUT THE
ENVIRONMENT!
That's why CDS is planning to start a re-
cycling program. YOU can take part in the
planning of the recycling program, and
YOU can share your questions and com-
ments about Campus Dining, if y ou come
to the next Student Foodservice Advisory
Committee meeting on Wednesday, April
19, 1995 at 4:00 PM in MSC room 14.
Refreshments will be provided. ALL ARE
WELCOME!
YOUR BLOOD MATTERS
Bloodmobile at ECU Mendenhall Student
Center on Monday. April 24. 1995 from
12:00 Noon - 6:00 p.m. Sponsored by the
Army ROTC.
LEADERSHIP SEMINAR
ACTIVITY
A leadership seminar activity will be held
on Tuesday, April 18 from 6:45pm to
9:00pm in the Banquet Room of Willis
Building, ECU. The topic will be Effec-
tive Leadership Qualities. Refreshments
will immediately follow. For more infor-
mation call Tim at 919-827-3216.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
Seniors and graduate students graduat-
ing in MaySummer 1995 who wish to
register with the Career Services Office
are invited to attend an Orientation meet-
ing on Tue. April 18 or April 25 at 3:00
pm. at the Career Services Center, 701 E.
Fifth Street. The program will include an
overview of services available to help pro-
spective graduates find employment, as
well as procedures for registering with
Career Services and establishing a creden-
tials file.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Test & Performance Anxiety: 4. 19. 3pm-
4pm. Counseling Center. Call 328-6661 lo
register.
HELP SAVE THE
ENVIRONMENT
Help save the environment on April 21
with Recreational Services Tar River
Clean-Up. Intersted individuals will need
to register in 204 Christenbury before
April 18. For additional information call
Recreational Services at 328-6387.
"JAM-A-THON 95"
Needs one more group of performers who
can play and sing songs from the late 60's
and early 70s on April 22 from 2-5pm at
Carolina East Mall to play for any amount
of time, to raise funds fro Disabled Ameri-
can Veterans. For more information call
Rob at 7564916
WZMB
WZMB is giving away a $100 shopping
spree to East Carolina Mall dur ing one of
the morning shows 6am to lOaml. Lis-
ten for details. The WZMB "DEAD SHOW"
will broadcast live at "BAREFOOT ON
THE MALL" from 11am until noon on
April 20th. There will be a WZMB payroll
meeting April 24th at 5:00pm.
VICE PRESIDENT OF NATION'S
BANK TO SPEAK AT ECU
The Graduate Business Association is
bringing Robert A. Flatford. III. V. P. of
Nation's Bank to campus on Thursday.
April 13, from 5:0(pm-6:00pm in room
1028 of the General Classroom Building.
He will speak on t he banking indus try and
career opportunities. All undergraduate
and graduate business students welcome.
Please call ext. 6377 to reserve a seat.
Reception will follow - please dress appro-
priately.
JONES HALL COUNCIL
Come down and join the fun on April 25th
for Exam Jam 1995! Free food, games and
prizes for all! Bottom of the Hill from 4-
7pm on Reading Day. April 25.1995. Spon-
sored by Jones Hall Council and 93.3
WDLX.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
April 11 through April 18. Events held at
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall and Free unless
otherwise noted:
WED APRIL 12-SCHOO L OF MEDICINE
NOON-HOUR CONCERT SERIES. Pro-
gram to be announced!Brody Auditorium.
12:30pm). SYMPHONIC WIND EN-
SEMBLE AND CONCERT BAND, Scott
Carter and Christopher Knighten. Conduc-
tors (Wright Auditorium. 8:00pm). THURS
APRIL 13-PREM1ERE PERFOR-
MANCES OF WORKS BY ECU COMPOS-
ERS, Mark Taggart. Director (8:00pm)
MON APRIL 17-CRADUATE RECITAL.
Alan Forrest, euphonium (7:00pm) SE-
NIOR RECITAL. Holly Maxson. Flute, and
Chad Roberts, guitar (9:00pm) TUES
APRIL 18-ECU SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA AND COMBINED CHORUSES, Rob-
ert Hause. Condutor. Featuring Mozart
Requiem and student winners of the Con-
certo Competition (Wright Auditorium.
8:00pm). For additional information, call
ECU 6851 or the 24-hour hotline at ECU
4370
RECIPIENTS OF PERKINS OR
NURSING STUDENT LOANS
(Formerly the National Direct Student
Loans). As a recipient of a Perkins or
Nursing Student Loan, you are reminded
of your responsibility to attend an Exit
Interview IF YOU MEET ONE OF THE
FOLLOWING CONDITIONS: GRADUAT-
ING IN MAY 1995, DROPPING BELOW
HALF-TIME STATUS OR OTHERWISE
NOT RETURNING TO EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY FOR FALL SEMESTER,
1995. In the Exit Interview, you will be
given important information regarding
your repayment schedule, provisions for
loan cancellation and other required in-
formation needed to keep your account
in good standing. Participation in the Exit
Interview will assure the release of your
academic records. There are two meetings
scheduled - Tuesday, April 18, 1995 at
3:00pm and Wednesday. April 19,1995 at
3:00pm in Room 1010. General Classroom
Building.lf it is not possible for you to at-
tend either meeting, please contact the
Student Loans Office (328-6816 or 135
Ragsdale) to arrange a personal interview.
Sherry A. Speight. Director of Student
Loans
The East Carolinian is seeking qualified students to serve as advertising
representatives for the ipaper during the summer term, with the possi-
bility of continuing on the ad staff this fall.
Each position pays commission on ad sales as well as deserved bonuses
for outstafding performance and offers unequaled on-the-job training in
communications.marketing, persuasion, creativity and dealing with people.
Currently 3 spots are left on the summer staff. If you're interested,
contact The East Carolinian at 525-6366 or drop by our office on the
second floor of the Student Publications building near Joyner Library.
- ii &
mtmemammm

-M- JL.J 1-1.1





18
Thursday, April 13, 1995
The East Carolinian
NOW THAT JANE DIALS 1-800-COLLECT INSTEAD OF ZERO,
THE GANG DOESN'T MIND WHEN SHE PADS HER BOWLING SCORE.
1-800-COLLECT
SaveThe PeopleYou Call UpTo 44.
& �





Title
The East Carolinian, April 13, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 13, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1073
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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