The East Carolinian, April 11, 1995






�A
TUESU
April 11,1995
Vol 69, No. 89 .
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pases
Around the State
(AP) - Alternating between
stoicism and tears, the widows of
three Special Forces soldiers killed
when their helicopter was shot
down by friendly fire accepted
Purple Hearts honoring their hus-
bands Friday at Fort Bragg. The
award, issued for wounds suffered
in combat, were presented during
a 30-minute ceremony marked by
wailing bagpipes and calls to re-
member the sacrifices of those who
have died.
(AP) - An air traffic control-
lers group has taken out a half-page
ad in a Charlotte newspaper in re-
sponse to federal investigators' con-
clusions that controllers were
partly to blame for the crash of a
USAir jet last July. On Tuesday, the
National Transportation Safety
Board released the findings of its
investigation into the crash of
USAir Flight 1016 after it aborted
a landing attempt at Charlotte-Dou-
glas International Airport on July
2. The NTSB concluded that the
pilot and copilot erred in trying to
land in a storm, though it noted
they had inadequate weather infor-
mation. A sudden downburst of
wind battered the DC-9, with 57
people aboard, and 37 died when
the crew was unable to recover.
Around the Country
(AP) - Boston student Gina
Grant seemed to be the perfect can-
didate for Harvard University: an
IQ of 150, honor society member,
tennis team co-captain, tutor of
underprivileged kids.
Now Harvard has taken back
its offer of early admission, after
learning that Grant bludgeoned her
mother to death with a lead crys-
tal candlestick five years ago. The
university would not comment on
Grant's case, acknowledging only
that an early admission offer had
been rescinded.
(AP) - An appetite for power
and prestige helped drive a pioneer-
ing transplant surgeon to illegally
market an the experimental drug
antilymphocite globulin, or ALG,
while hiding serious adverse reac-
tions to the anti-rejection drug. The
drug contributed to nine deaths in
Minneapolis, a prosecutor says.
Around the World
(AP) - The concrete sarcopha-
gus encasing the wrecked reactor
at Chernobyl is deteriorating,
threatening another release of ra-
dioactivity. Ukraine, which is seek-
ing billions in Western aid to clean
up the reactor that exploded in
1986, warns that water dripping
into the ruins could set off another
uncontrolled reaction and spread
radiation over a wide area of Eu-
rope.
(AP) - As French government
officials fight the invasion of En-
glish words like "airbag" and "soft-
ware a new survey reports they
may be losing their army. Nearly
71 percent of French speakers wel-
come the entry of foreign words
into their language, according to a
survey published Friday in the
newspaper Le Figaro.
Another Payne-ful New coach
athletic departure named today
Pirate basketball
coach heads west
to Oregon State
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
wmmm: � . : �? -
As expected, ECU men's basket-
ball coach Eddie Payne was named
the new leader of the Oregon State
University men's program on Friday
afternoon.
"I'd like to say that the thing that
attracted me to this position was the
philosophy, character and the
principlesin the athletic department
from Athletic Director Dutch
Baughman and from Dr. Burn as the
President of the University Payne
said.
He will take over a Beaver pro-
gram that finished just 9-18 last sea-
son, but was a PAC-10 powerhouse
during the 1980s.
Payne will become the fifth head
coach in 66 years at OSU after lead-
ing ECU to their first back-to-back win-
ning seasons since 1971.
"I am so sorry to see Eddie have
us Dr. Henry VanSant, ECU interim
director of athletics said. "He has cer-
tainly left the program in much bet-
ter shape than when he came here.
We. the Pirate athletic family, are all
very appreciative of the job Eddie did
with our basketball program
Payne will join former CAA-rival
and UNC-Wilmington head coach
Kevin Eastman in the PAC-10 confer-
ence. Eastman took the Washington
State Cougars through three rounds
of the NIT last season.
"I wish you'd take him back
Eastman quipped. "Two days before
he went out to Oregon State, I called
him because I heard that he was in-
volved, but in terms of us sitting down
and the nitty-gritty of it, I think
Eddie's perceptive and smart enough
to figure a lot of this stuff out on his
own
Even though he is switching from
the CAA to the PAC-10, Payne, accord-
ing to Coach Eastman shouldn't have
many problems adjusting.
"In coaching, there's no differ-
ence - there are pretty good coaches
in the Colonial Eastman said. "The
Pirates
on the
Street
Are you
going to
summer
school?
Jeremy Hoffman, freshman
"No, because I don't live
here
William Gardner, freshman
"No, the weather is too
nice to be inside
Jesse Gwen, freshman
"Yes, I'm trying to graduate
in three years
Kia Samuels, junior
"Yes, I'm trying to graduate
in time
intensity of the recruiting picks up
drastically, and I think that that is the
biggest difference in the two levels.
There's a couple teams that play slow,
a couple that play fast
The main difference, Eastman
said, will come from outside the game.
"The intensity and scrutiny of the
media will be a change he said.
"There's constant demands every
single day, and if Corvallis Oregon
State is anything like here - Wash-
ington State basketball is big, big, big,
all over the state - it's important for
us to get out quite a bit at functions
for the boosters. We didn't do that as
much at UNC-W. I think Eddie did
more of that at ECU
With Eastman and Payne in PAC-
10 head coaching positions, the four
Northwestern-located conference uni-
versities are led by men well known
throughout the Carolinas. Eastman
coached at Belmont Abbey before mov-
ing on to Wilmington, while
Washington's Bob Bender played and
coached at Duke. Oregon head coach
Jerry Green coached at UNC-Asheville
and was born in South Carolina.
Payne met with OSU officials and
players on Thursday in Corvallis.
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
ECU has scheduled a 10 a.m.
press conference this morning where,
according to numerous sources, they
will name Pirate assistant men's bas-
ketball coach Joe Dooley as the new
head coach at the university. Upon his
hiring, Dooley will replace Eddie
Payne, who left to fill the vacant head
coaching position at Oregon State
University. Also, Dooley will become
the youngest active Division I head
coach.
"I think it's a good move because
all the players right now feel comfort-
able with him being the head coach
because he's committed to the pro-
gram an ECU athlete said. "It doesn't
feel like such a big change as hiring
someone from the outside
"He sounded really positive and
everything OSU sophomore Jelani
Boline told the Associated Press. "He
basically wanted to get us recommit-
ted to the program
"I wish him, and his family, the
best of luck in the future VanSant
Dooley has been an assistant
coach for the Pirates for four seasons
after working as an assistant at South
Carolina. He played four seasons of
collegiate basketball at George Wash-
ington University. As an ECU assis-
tant coach. Dooley specialized in the
development of guaids while working
heavily in recruiting and scheduling.
"It seems like Dooley will do a
great job at ECU JMU assistant bas-
ketball coach Chuck Dreisell said. "I
am very happy fur him. I'm glad they
gave an assistant an opportunity at
the job
At press time, both ECU interim
Director of Athletics Henry VanSant
and Pirate assistant basketball coach
Martin McGillan said they could not
confirm the hire of Coach Dooley.
TEC Staff Writer Brian Paiz con-
tributed to the gathering of informa-
tion and composition of this article.
said. "I am sure he will do well at Or-
egon State
Payne has compiled a 159-109
record as a head coach in stints at East
Carolina and Belmont Abbey,
See PAYNE page 12
Bioomin' Beau
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Flowers are in bloom all across campus, spreading spring fever (and hay fever)
throughout the state. Have you stopped to smell the flowers lately?
Eppes property bid denied
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
The old saying, 'you can't always
get what you want' has proven to be
true with ECU's failure to secure the
purchase of CM. Eppes Middle
School.
With the $31.8 million bond ref-
erendum failure on March 14, the Pitt
County School System has found it
now lacks funds to build a replace-
ment for the school, said Barry
Gaskins, public information director
for the Pitt County School System.
"The school board has been all
along, supportive of their ECU's ef-
forts to purchase the school Gaskins
said. "Without the bond revenue, the
gap of money in building a new facil-
ity is too great
A new building would cost the
school system and Pitt county an es-
timated $12 million,
ECU's bid for the
property totaled $6
million and the
deed to the Wahl-
Coates Elementary
School property,
said Thorn
Robinson, county
manager.
He said that
the property would
have been sold to
ECU if at all pos-
sible, but new facili-
ties will not be avail-
able for future use.
"If you're going to sell the school,
you're going to have to have a place
to put those kids Gaskins said.
"If you're going to
sell the school,
you're going to
have to have a
place to put those
kids
� Barry Gaskins
Public Information
Director
School and county officials
toured the property last night to in-
vestigate areas for
renovations and to
find out what kind
of upgrades the
building will need.
Gaskins said.
"I think it's
just on hold
Robinson said.
"With the county
not passing the
bond issue the
school has a capac-
ity of 1100 and
there are about
500 students there
now
ECU first offered to purchase the
See EPPES page 4
Barefoot gets opening actpage O
Pig-Out� where were the students?page O
Cheerleaders score highpage d
&iec&4�
Tuesday
Cloudy
High 66
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Wednesday
Raining
d
3
High 64
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NV
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
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4
!
Tuesday, April 11,1995
The East Carolinian
Outstanding
acuity
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Marriage and Family Therapy Program has an award winning di-
rector.
Dr. David Dosser recently won the North Carolina Association for Mar-
riage and Family Therapy's (NCAMFT) Champion of the Year Award. The award
is one of several Dosser has received since he moved here from North Dakota
in 1988.
"I was very happy when I found out there was a position here and that
there was a real strong commitment here to starting a marriage and family
program and getting it accredited and having a high quality program Dosser
said.
The Marriage and Family Therapy Program is a graduate program and
the only accredited program in North Carolina. The program received accredi-
tation in 1992.
"Each year it just seems that we are attracting better and better students
to our program Dosser said
He enjoys teaching and providing supervision to the students in the pro-
gram, as well as being a family therapist and administrator. During his free
time, Dosser served as chairman of a legislative committee which passed a
licensing law that went into effect January 1- The law requires licensing for
therapists who practice in North Carolina.
"Prior to that since 1979, the state had regulated marriage and family
therapy by a voluntary certification law Dosser said literally anybody in
the state could claim to be a marriage and family therapist and provide service
to people
Dosser said his legislative investigation uncovered several cases of fami-
lies being damaged by unlicensed therapists.
"What we were trying to address was a safeguard for families so they
could be assured that if they sought the services of a family therapist that that
person would have adequate training and adequate experience Dosser said.
Dosser ha a wife and two children, and spends as much time as he can
with them. He also enjoys practicing Karate and attending ECU athletic events
in his free time, something he doesn't have much of.
"If you're going to work with families, you have to work at night because
that's when the families are available Dosser said. "All of our students do
that, and all of our faculty
Dosser works with several area agencies and providers, and is involved
with a grant program for the Pitt Edgecombe Nash Public Academic Liaison
(PEN-PAL) project The project is a combined effort between several ECU pro-
grams and schools, and works with children with "serious emotional distur-
bances
"I think families are terribly important" Dosser said. "We work with the
individual in the context of the family, and the family in the context of the
community
He said the program helps families build on their strengths and watching
the results can be very exciting and challenging.
"The best thing about my job is the opportunity to work with CDFR
Child Development and Family Relations faculty and the wonderful graduate
students that we've had Dosser said.
Conference makes teaching fun
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
Local teachers, librarians and writ-
ers were reciting poetry and acting like
animals at the Comfort Inn in Greenville
last Friday. It was all part of ECU's 19th
Annual Children's Literature Confer-
ence. This year's focus was making po-
etry fun for children and the presenta-
tions were given by a theatrical group
called Poetry Alive and Karla Kuskin.
author of over 50 children's books.
"(Poetry Alive showed us how to
get our kids interested by using voices
and gestures and playing the different
parts said Temple Howell. a teacher
at School Street School in Goldsboro,
N.C.
ECU holds the children's literature
conference every year to bring educa-
tors together and give them new ways
to make reading fun and educational
for their students. Poetry poses an es-
pecially difficult problem because, ac-
cording to Kuskin, most people do not
have pleasant associations with the read-
ing of poetry.
"Too much emphasis has been
placed on form and dusty language, and
not enough on the music of poetry
Kuskin said.
In her presentation. Kuskin ex-
plained how she began her career in
children's literature by designing a
children's book for a senior design class
at the Yale School of Design. Having
always enjoyed writing and poetry, she
made up verses to accompany the illus-
trations and the result was a popular
children's book called Roar and More.
Writing for children requires an
understanding of one's audience, ac-
cording to Kuskin.
"The very young, they're new in
the neighborhood, they're paying atten-
tion to everything Kuskin said, ad-
dressing the educators present "That's
my audience and that's your audience
During her speech, Kuskin shared
some of her work and some of her in-
sight on what peaks a child's interest
"I have discovered that when you
are anywhere from about 6 to 9 years
old and you hear the word 'underwear
you fall on the floor Kuskin said. "And
I will do anything for a laugh
During an interview with TEC,
Kuskin offered some advice to those
wishing to introduce children to poetry.
"You have to read something you
like and read it well Kuskin said. "A
poem is not generally something that
should be read cold. Pick things that
make you laugh or that you like the
sound of the words
The author also offered some ad-
vice for would-be writer's of children's
literature.
"Remember Kuskin said. "Think
back to books you loved as a child.
People with strong memories and con-
nections to their own childhoods make
the best writers. And write for a child,
whether it is the child you were or one
that you are attached to
The Poetry Alive presentation and
Mrs. Kuskin's speech generated a great
deal of interest and enthusiasm from
the audience, who asked a lot of ques-
tions and siood in line to have their
copies of Kuskin's books autographed
"They were great presentations
said Donna Collins, another teacher
from the School Street School. "They
really made poetry come alive. I know
it's something my kids will really enjoy.Z
Technology on display
Conference
teaches new
technology
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Teachers and academics from
around the state participated in the
annual Technology and Teaching Con-
ference held last week at the Ramada
Inn and Hilton Inn.
"We started out six years ago and
had 72 participants and this year you
have 850 said Jim Pressley. associ-
ate professor in the school of educa-
tion. "I think from that you can see
there is a real need in the region and
in the state for information on tech-
nology in the classroom.
"People are hungry for itthey
really feel a need to leam about it and
consequentially we feel like we have
See TECH page 4
? ?TAKE A RIDE ON THE WILD SIDE
Attention ECU Students
Don't have it car? Need a ride to Church?
The First Pentecostal Holiness Church would like to offer you free transportation.
Sunday Morning 11:00am Sunday Evening 7:00pm Wednesday Nights 7:00pm
CALL 756-3315
(Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm)
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for cashier, waiistaff, and cooks.
Please apply within M - F between 2 - 4
No phone calls please
504 S.W. Greenvi
Opening Night
Tonight
at Grainger Stadium
7:00 pm
Kinston Indians
vs. the Salem Avalanche
Call
(800) 334-5467
for tickets
WN5
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday, April 11
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Pick Up Free Passes at
Mendenhall Info Desk &
ECU Student Store
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
(u U Isl 19 l!i
KNOW THE CODE
ALytYS THE LOWEST PRICE FOR k COLLECT CALL-
AT&T
Man, I am SO relieved I forgot to reserve a room for next
year. I called University Housing Services to explain my
situation and those kind folks told me I could have a
SECOND CHANCE! All I have to do is drop by 214 Whichard
Building on Monday, April 17 or Tuesday, April 18 between
8:30 AM and 4:30 PM. They will have the paperwork I need to
fill in - all I have to do is bring $100. Wow I am so lucky. I
can live on campus and not be stuck with the hassles of living
in an apartment. If you forgot to reserve a room for next
year, you can do the same thing! If you don't believe that they
will give you a second chance, just call them at 328-6450.
flTJ
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
University Housing And Campus Dining Services





Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
High school students walk for highway safety
all snonsors for Strides tor Safetv. Lin the three miles to raise the awareness the safety belts the least
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
Buckling
tasks we can d i mh
all spa
former 1980s New England of highway safety, said Gra
ill player and now the Gray said seat belts reduce the
tthletes chance of death by 45 percent and the
,tN.C. Stati i present on Sat- risk of a serious injury by 50 percent
f State's football play- "Nationwide. 259.000 high school
Stridesfoi Safety ers and cheerleaders, said Carlottie teenagers are killed each yeai in cai
Cra S; ' itor for the Youth accidents and 276,000 people die e
I idav, such Invo ement Offic
lation to
ety 1 'rogram.
pants arrived around 11
three mile walk
to the Raleigh
C0URTSIDE
ana se
ale
it belt
strides tor
iome-
BREAKFAST:
k (SAI
BKEAKASIUfiSESIIQfclSi
� 0Z�ovKeHa.cCe "Statuette
� ez&�t4t States,
Thompson said Strides foi Safety
will hopefully make all realize the nei d
for highway safety and the seat belt,
even teenagers.
It is the time ol year for parties.
proms and graduations said Thomp-
son. Strides for Safety was held at a
ery war or are seriousl injured in the good time because many more people
-All participants were asked to back seat, said Gray "Sadly, oi all the will be aware of bow important high-
thai �! ey will be sobei drivers, teenagers are the ones U list way salety is.
moti irists for the entire year said Gray.
The pledge cards were also used tor a
1 before the day
ended at 3 p.m "
Students from such counties as
Nash, Anson, Wayne. Duplin.
n Guilford and Onslow walked
tB
NO MATTER WiiAi TH1 i ETTER
��?c�5 eO
Cool kid
"pieltcA 7ta�t
'cutca
TX-V- ��
Served From
3-10:30
t
YOU ARE INVITED
o Learn More About Sorority I ife
SORORITY CONVOCATION!
APRIL 11 4:00-6:00 I'M
MENDENHA1 I SOCIA1 ROOM
(located in the b isei lent)
WE A I 1. C
O TOG! 1 HER!
I
"�t.

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CAREER.
MORE SCHOOL

t, �

�. ���-�
-s
I
We can't tell you what
direction to take, but we can
sure help you get there.
it
i i v � J,
mrfvm
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
This pirate fan enjoyed Saturday's carnival activities
during the 12th annual PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out.
No news writers'
meeting this week. See
Tammy for assignments
between 4 and 6 p.m.
Tuesday afternoon.
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r
Tuesday, April 11,1995
The East Carolinian
L �jVjII from page 2
had a really successful three days
The conference, sponsored by the
ECU Schooi of Education and Sprint
Carolina Telephone, ran last Thursday
and Friday at the two hotels as well as
various locations across the ECU cam-
pus. A pre-conference was held last
Wednesday.
The conference was designed to
provide teachers an opportunity to
meet with other teachers and learn
what they are doing with technology
in the classroom and out in the field.
This year marked the sixth year in
which the conference was held and
over 850 people attended the three day
event
At the pre-conference held on
Wednesday. David Thornburg. a com-
puter expert and consultant with Presi-
dent Clinton and Vice-President Gore,
was the featured speaker. Additional
sessions were held featuring presenta-
tions by David Warwick on the
Internet, and Mark Parrish presented
three sessions on the information high-
way. A presentation on Learning Net.
a Sprint-sponsored network between
Roberson High School in Edgecomb
County and Riverview High School in
Hertford County, was given by the prin-
cipals of the two schools.
The conference feature 60 presen-
tations on various areas regarding
teaching and technology. Topics in-
cluded copywriting, CD-ROM, e-mail.
Eastnet and the Internet. Twenty-two
labs were set up on campus featuring
virtual reality, physics in the classroom,
academic computing and an electronic
classroom.
Pressley believes the conference
was a success and was pleased with
the turnout and enthusiasm the con-
ference produced.
Jii .r 1 from page 1
property in 1989. Ongoing negotia-
tions continually delayed the sale until
estimated replacement costs exceeded
the amount of money ECU offered for
the property. ECU is still interested
in the property, but will seek other
areas for expansion before re-examin-
ing the issue.
"Were not looking at any specific
piece of property now said Vice
Chancellor for Business Affairs Rich-
ard Brown. "We're looking at all sur
rounding properties
Brown said the failure to pur-
chase CM. Eppes is not a major set-
back for ECU.
"We're tied up in a few other
things so this isn't something we're
approaching immediately Brown
said. "Ultimately. ECU will acquire
that property at a time that's more
advantageous for the school system
the property will continue to de-
cline in value
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Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility service in
advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuble time and possibly money.
The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service
may be put in their name. Just pick up a "Request
for Utility Service" application from room 211 in the
Off-Campus Housing Office, Whichard Building or
at Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the application
(which must be notartized) and mail it to GUC, P.O.
Box 1847, Greenville, N.C. 27835-1847, art:
Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your
parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your
name, a deposit will be required. Deposits are as
follows: with electric or wout electric or
gas space heating gas space heating
Electric only $100 $75
Electric & Water $100
Electric, Water & Gas $110
Electric & Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance.
Be sure to include your name, where service wil be required,
when service is to be cut on and a phone number where we
may reach you prior to your arrival at the service address.
Oreeriville
Utilities
HeNrJriX FilS
Roundtable on Higher Learning
April 26,1995
A special presentation of John Singleton's Higher Learning will be shown from 2:00 - 4:00 PM.
Following will be a panel discussion on some of the issues faced in the movie.
yooy �hy rv
LOLI OATES- ACOUSTIC WfflfAN DG�
Wednesday, April 12 � 1:30 - 3:00 PM � In Front offVlendenhall
Co-Sponsored By ECU Dining Services and kflAMARK
Cultural Awareness Committee, ECU Native American Organization,
& Women's Studies Present:
Stacey Kabat
Tuesday, April 18 � 8:00 PM � Hendrix Tkeatre
Speaking on Domestic Violence
Sharon Burch
Saturday, April 22 � 2:30 - 4:00 PM
Pow Wow at tke Bottom of College Hul
�YOOft .
APRIL 20,1995

11:OOAM-7:OOPM
BANDS
WIDESPREAD PANIC
DAC
FULL STOP
THE REFLECTORS
CARNIVAL CAMES
VIDEO BUTTONS
SUMO WRESTL1NC
TRAMPOLINE THING
VELCRO OLYMPICS
BOUNCY BOXINC
POLE JOUST
,�r�Sfc?'ft
we're M9re Tbsrn barefoot!
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.





Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Thanks to the
barbecue and
rides, the Pigskin
Pig-Out was a
success, but
where were the
students?
Perhaps if more
publicity had
been geared
toward students,
they would have
shown. When
away game
ticket sales start,
the athletic
department is
begging for
student support.
So, where was
that
encouragement
last week?
Greenville can tell spring has arrived when every car in
sight is coated in pollen, students are frolicking in the grass in
their swimsuits and "First Down - Pirates" is heard echoing
through the sky. Spring may not be the true beginning of
Pirate football, but for football enthusiasts, the spring scrim-
mage game is nearly as important as any season matchup.
In most respects, the 12th annual Pirate Pigskin Pig-Out
Party proved to be a success. Thousands of Pirate fans en-
tered the Emerald City to partake in carnival activities, golf,
barbecue cooking contests and Pirate football at its best
Although the rides, games and barbecue were enjoyed by
all, two key components to Pirate athletics were missing - the
band and the students. Over the last year, the ECU Marching
Pirates have sparked enthusiasm in both Dowdy-Ficklen and
in Williams Arena. This group of talented students brings pride
to the university through the fight song and the alma mater.
Anyone who met the football team at the Kinston airport after
their defeat over Memphis remembers how great it felt to be a
Pirate amidst the hoopla of the band and the cheers of the
crowd. While some students may complain over the band's
noise in the arena, that same noise is sorely missed during
football games.
Although the scrimmage matchup between the Pirate of-
fense and defense tended to get boring as no true touchdowns
could be gained by the defense, some crowd participation could
have enlivened the stadium and drummed up more anticipa-
tion for the upcoming season. A few rounds of the fight song,
and the crowd would have been standing on the bleachers,
rather than appearing to be a group of sunbathers more con-
cerned over bronzing their skin.
The second crucial element to Pirate athletics, which
seemed to be missing at the Pigskin Pig-out was student par-
ticipation. At TEC, we feel that the students were purposely
shunned from this event. While the event is geared toward the
family, wouldn't students help generate more revenue? Granted,
students were admitted into the game for free, but someone
had to buy the barbecue. Were students deliberately left out
of this event? In normal situations, the press is hounded for
publicity, but in the case of the Pigskin Pig-Out, TEC had to
seek out information on the event
Pirate athletic administrators see the need to begin sell-
ing tickets immediately for the season opener at Tennessee
and have encouraged TEC to promote the sell to students, but
where was this support last week when the Pig-out was being
planned? Had more students taken part in the Pig-out more
response would surely come for the Tennessee matchup. In-
stead students were taking road trips to the beach, the Ma-
rine Corps Air Show or home in search of some entertain-
ment. If only they had known it was right in front of them in
the Emerald City
Poor grammar equals ignorance
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
�"
Printed on
100
recycled
paper
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Jack Skinner, Photographer
Randall Ronell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Asst Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Steven Llenert, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel.Secretary
Patrick Irelan Photographer
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Xers: Wake up, get a clue
PssL Hey, just between you and
me, OUR GENERATION IS WACKED.
Now I realize that this is a topic
that can be debated into the ground
�and every generation appears to be
"wacked but I really think that our
generation is taking some pretty harsh
criticisms and it is our responsibility
to defend ourselves.
I would like to attempt to point a
few indisputable facts that will validate
my claim. It goes without saying how-
ever, that a lot of you will disagree,
agree, or simply shrug and continue
reading this edition of The East Caro-
linian.
I feel strongly about this "crisis"
and 1 hope that you will at least at-
tempt to think about this article. I am
not trying to make wacky claims that
the sky is falling or that we are doomed.
I am not angry at the world nor a
left or right winged fanatic. I am not
in search of supreme justice or do I
intend to seek the answers to the prob-
lems of the world. I am simply speak-
ing about reality.
Teenage pregnancy. Crack. AIDS.
Dropouts. Health care. Environmental
issues. American leadership. Social
security. Racial tensions. These are just
a few of the issues that we are going
to be Ijving with until our final day.
We all know this. But are we re-
ally paying attention to it? Or are we
just blowing it off until later, until it
actually affects us? These issues are
generating tremendous intensify and
until we realize just how much of it
will inipact our lives, we are headed
for troubled times.
Fact AIDS is everywhere. You
will know somebody who will die from
AIDS.
Fact There is a new renaissance
with racial tensions. The '60s only in-
troduced the issue. It's only the begin-
ning.
Frank Hurley
Opinion Columnist
Generation Aers
need to become
active in politics
to ward off
constant criticism
: �
Fact Teenage pregnancy costs
the U.S. $14 billion a year.
Fact The U.S. government spends
more money on horse racing than pub-
lic libraries.
Fact OJ Simpson was the top
headline in the news in 1994.
Fact: Thousands of citizens in
Rwanda die every week.
Fact An undergraduate degree
means squat
Fact: At its current rate, social
security will not exist in 50 years.
I hear so many people complain
about politics. When I ask them if they
vote they simply say, "Like it will make
a difference We cannot afford to
think that way. We live in the world.
We are a part of the wealthiest most
powerful nation on the planet and we
don't really care.
We have been accused of being a
generation not of war. A generation not
of artistic impression. Oh sure, there
was the Gulf War, but that happened
so fast and not too many people died.
And yes, there is Rap, and Techno and
Kurt Cobain, but are those things re-
ally significant attributes to the world?
Now Vietnam, that was a war, and
Ervis, he is the father of rock and roll
You kids today what a mess
Hmmm. We are a generation
not
Think about this. It's Friday
night You get out of the hot shower.
You can't find a damn thing to wear
As you rummage through your lighted !
closet you can't really decide what CD �
to listen to. You're a little warm so
you turn up the AC You finally get
dressed. You hop in your car, zip
around Greenville, run in and out of
bars, go home, watch a movie on HBO,
jump in bed, only to wake up the next
morning and plan to do it again.
Sounds harmless. Not all of you ;
do exactly that, but I do think that all
of you have cozy beds, electricity and
running water. What's my point? My
point is that we take everything for
granted. It is the American way. We
cannot imagine life any other way. We
can imagine it with more money, a big-
ger house, nicer clothes, faster cars
The fact of the matter is that we
are being frowned upon by the older,
wiser eyes of the world, and we are
left feeling responsible, without hope,
even guilty.
I see kids today who are in el-
ementary school smoking cigarettes,
pot and crack. Talking about having
great sex, and joining gangs that tote
hand guns and anger. Pro-lifers are .
taking lives, gays are slamming the
closet doors shut because it's safer
that way. Politicians are drinking and
driving and cheating and stealing and
Tying-and silently suffering. t;
The media survive on the misfor- T;
tunes of others. College students work :
their asses off and constantly worry
about life after graduation. Plastic sur-
geons and tanning beds are making ;
fortunes while computers are taking -
over the world.
This is life for us now. This is re- ;
ality. This is our generation.
Internet ignores political correctness
Whether majoring in English,
business, physical education or any
other subject every student should
take an elective writing course. While
a CEO may not need to have a work-
ing knowledge of Elizabethan poetry
to run her company successfully, and
a gym teacher probably won't need a
masters of calculus to manage a class
of eighth-graders, everyone needs to
be able to communicate effectively in
the written form. A CEO who sends
out poorly organized and grammati-
cally incorrect business letters does
not inspire a lot of confidence in her
ability to run a company, just as a P.E.
instructor will have a hard time get-
ting a job with a resume full of in-
complete sentences and misspelled
words.
And it is not only in the business
world that people need to be able to
write well. If you are the kind of per-
son who feels strongly about issues
and might want to fire off a letter to a
business that treated you badly, or in
response to a newspaper article that
particularly offended you or touched
you, you need to be able to present
your arguments in a clear and articu-
late manner to get your point across.
There is no point in writing such a
letter if those who read it can not
understand what you are complaining
about or praising. Not only does it fail
to meet your goal of telling someone
how you feel, it makes you appear
unintelligent. You could be a gifted
pianist or an award-winning scientist
Andi Powell Phillips
Opinion Columnist
What validity
does a critical
letter hold when
it is full of
grammatical
errors?
but if you send out a letter that be-
gins with something like, "In my opin-
ion I don't think the city councilman
are right, they already get to much of
our money already the person read-
ing said letter is going to assume you
either aren't very bright or were ex-
tremely agitated and irrational when
you wrote it Either way they prob-
ably won't give your letter much con-
sideration. The quote above actually
came from a newspaper in my home-
town. The letter was written in re-
sponse to an article which had some-
thing to do with a city council debate
over how to spend some government-
allocated funds. The article is a little
hazy in my mind, but I remember the
letter so clearly because not only was
it full of grammatical errors, it made
no sense in relation to the article the
writer intended to criticize.
The best way to gain skill and
confidence in writing is to practice
and get feedback from people who
write well. You can do both of these
things and get elective credit simply
by taking a writing course. Non-fic-
tion writing is the best choice for
these purposes because the papers
required are generally short and based
bn personal experience and opinion,
so there is no research to be done and
you don't have to have a highly devel-
oped imagination. You have the op-
portunity to present your paper be-
fore the class and have your instruc-
tor and classmates critique your style.
In my experience, this has been very
positive and my classmates have been
very supportive. The critique sessions
are designed to help build you up, not
to tear you down and embarrass you.
And what you get in return for your
hard work is the ability to express
yourself in a way that can influence
public opinion, land that job you're
after or simply get your point across.
I would like to add one last thing
about writing letters to businesses and
persons that you do not know. Try to
be sure of the gender of the person
you are addressing. If you are not sure
of the person's gender because they
have a gender-neutral name (such as
Andi, which, by the way, is a feminine
form of Andy) try to avoid using words
like he and she or him and her. It's
not a big deal, I know, but it's kind of
like having your name misspelled
repeatedly-it's just a little irritating.
By now I guess everyone is well
aware that the information highway is
newly paved and blazing through our
neighborhoods. However, many may
not have considered some of the dan-
gers of traveling on this still largely
unregulated byway. Though there are
no roadside signs to lead you on your
way, there are a number of laws that
exist in cyberspace. Crossing these
newly drawn lines can result in more
than a slap on the wrist In fact if you
don't watch what you say, you might
just find yourself behind bars. Yes
friends, censorship has found its way
into the Information Age. Rest assured,
when you're typing away on your PC,
Big Brother is watching.
On college campuses all across the
country, more and more students are
finding their way on-line. I find the
resources available to a person by way
of their computer's modem no less
than mind boggling. The technology
that exists today can allow anyone to
sit in the comfort of their own home
and chat with someone on another
continent while eating doughnuts in
their pajamas. I guess the anonymity
of chatting on the Net is what makes
it so exciting. However some believe
that this leads people to say things that
would not be tolerated in any other
modern setting. They feel the invis-
ibility that the Net offers users makes
for the crossing of ethical lines. In their
minds what takes place in cyberspace
is something of a '90s Jeckle and Hyde.
They picture m 1 mannered individu-
als taking on a code name and a pass-
Calvin Arrington
Opinion Columnist
The threat of
being judged
is no longer an
issue when
surfing the
Net.
word, and suddenly transforming into
a hellish beasts that know not good
from evil.
The first time I ventured on-line,
I'll have to admit I was a little shocked.
My own personal visions of cybergeeks
rambling on in computer jargon were
shattered. It came as a great surprise
to see just what people are willing to
talk about It seemed as though noth-
ing was off limits. Even though there
were racial and sexual slurs I could
have definitely done without I found
the unadulterated honesty of it all ex-
citing. Finally, I had discovered a fo-
rum where people actually say what
they are thinking, and political correct-
ness never rears its ugly head.
It seems that many people today
are taking quite a different attitude
concerning this matter however. They
feel that those who speak their minds
freely in cyberspace should face se-
vere punishment if their conversations I;
do not meet everyone's moral standard.
I recently found an example of mis on
the front page of a national paper. A �.
20-year-old student from Michigan was :
jailed by FBI agents after he took part
in what he called a "college gross-out I;
contest" Because of a story this young :
man wrote and sent out over the j
Internet he now faces five years in -
prison. His writing included the rape "
and murder of a young woman with !
the same name as a girl with whom !
he had once attended school. Because
of this, the young man was labeled a j
potential rapist and thrown behind bars ;
for communicating threats. Let me get J
this straight if writing about violence I
and murder are signs of a criminal �
mind, why is Steven King not on death j
row? By the same token, where are �
the short stories written by Charles ;
Manson prior to being arrested.
All in all, I really don't understand
what the fuss is about Chatting on
the Net is perhaps the last place where
people aren't afraid to speak their
minds thanks to the safety of being
anonymous. Sure everything they say
may not be appropriate for the kiddies,
but that's no excuse to stop it Per-
haps some sort of ratings system to
distinguish different nodes would be a
more appropriate way of dealing with
the situation than throwing people in
jail. Maybe we should all just realize
that we have a right to speak our
minds. If we come across something
we don't like or offends us, we also
have the right to turn away.
a
tDIat one teafcs becomes part pf tobat one sees ant) feels'
' � . ' � Ralph Ellison, author, 1986
mm
mnm am.� - �





I
Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
Bands duke it out
at Mendenhall
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
While the second floor of
Mendenhall consisted of wall to wall eld-
erly folks who bargained for nothing
more than another relaxing "Travel Ad-
venture" movie, the building's founda-
tion shook with the Second Annual
Battle of the Bands. Originally scheduled
for an outdoor setup on the mall last
Thursday night impending thunder-
storms forced th� musical competition
into a stuffy social room across the hall
from WZMB's office. There would only
be one band left standing after the com-
petition, and each of the five bands
wanted to be the single winner. The vic-
torious group's work will pay off; along
with two other opening acts, the winner
will warm the crowd at Barefoot on the
Mali for eagerly anticipated headliner
Widespread Panic.
Post Metal Syndrome, a trio, opened
the event at 8p.m. The next band was
Stul, who ripped the crowd to shreds as
the bald lead vocalist jumped off stage
to be more up close and personal with
onlookers. The audience arranged them-
selves in a horseshoe shape around the
walls; the entire middle of the floor was
completely clear, aside from two empty
chairs and a stage lighting unit For the
most part the members of all bands stood
in place and played for the less than en-
thusiastic group of people.
The most people at the event at one
time, was 45. However, if all the people
who stood outside smoking cigarettes
would have come in, there would've been
twice as many people inside. Perhaps this
is the reason why none of the bands were
overly energetic on-stage, except Stul who
probably practice alone with the same
raw energy as when they play to a live
crowd. While Stul was on, they had the
largest crowd compared to the other four
bands.
The third act was Greenbone Dance,
whose sound is similar to Ned's Atomic
Dustbin. This quartet brought more of
an alternative sound than the two previ-
ous harder acts. Their sound had a Eu-
ropean edge that was explosive and driv-
ing they sounded more like an imported
See BANDS page 8
, Photo by BRANDON WADDELL
The Reflectors, winners of the 1995 ECU Battle of the Bands, look happy after rockingthe
crowd in the bowels of Mendenhall. Next week, they will be opening Barefoot on the Mall.
Meisner's drama attracts many
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
Walking down the hall in the the-
ater arts building is an adventure.
Sometimes you hear singing.
Sometimes the angry rantings of a
drunken man fill the halls. Sometimes
you hear a lovers' quarrel, and some-
times they're not quarreling. And
while you rarely hear the same thing
twice, it's almost guaranteed that what
you hear is a few Meisner students
doing what they do best - acting.
Sanford Meisner is the man be-
hind this latest school of acting. More
personal than the other methods de-
vised by Konstantin Stanislavski and
Lee Strasberg, his method focuses on
creating a sense of reality in an actor's
performance. Much emphasis is placed

EDGY FOLK
Photo courtesy ECU Student Union
Loli Oates, a folk singer with an edge, will be performing her sharp acoustic set at the
Wright Place tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 p.m. as part of the ECU Noon Day Tunes series.
on working with and responding to
the acting partner. Meisner believes
that "acting is in the doing" and there-
fore stresses actual completion of cer-
tain tasks in his technique rather than
pantomiming them.
ECU is one of only a few schools
in North Carolina that has . Meisner
training program for
actors. In order to be
accepted to the pro-
gram, which, when
completed, will earn
students a B.F.A. in
Professional Acting,
students must go
through an interview
process. Among the
criteria for accep-
tance are active par-
ticipation in the de-
partment and indi-
vidual compatibility
with the program's
goals, although
those are by no
means the only fac-
tors. A panel of the-
ater department, in-
cluding John Shearin, the department
chairman and Don Biehn, a Meisner
instructor interview each of the pro-
spective students. Only a small hand-
ful of students are chosen.
This year, the interviews were
held on March 24. Out of over 30 ap-
plicants, only 12 students were cho-
sen to participate. Over the next two
years, these 12 students will take four
Meisner classes together, one each
semester.
Because so much of the program
is focused on work with a partner, the
Meisner students come to know their
classmates well. They rehearse to-
gether both in and out of class. "I
know that in two years this class will
either be like a family or will hate each
other I guess that's the same thing
said Candace Doemer with a laugh.
The students are encouraged to
use personal experiences to generate
feelings and emotions so that their
acting is grounded in reality. This type
of acting is exhausting both physically
and mentally for the actor. Why, then,
would anyone want to go through two
years of this rig-
I felt like my foot "��SL,
was in the door '��' wafin thf
door with my act-
with my acting the m&the �y �
way it was. But
since I've been
accepted into the
Meisner program,
I feel like I'm in
the house sitting
by the fireplace
But since I've
been accepted
into the Meisner
program, 1 feel
like I'm in the
house sitting by
the fireplace
said Doemer.
"The pur-
pose of my going
to school at ECU
was to get into
the Meisner pro-
Candace Doerner gram"said Mark
Lennon.
Unfortunately, no one was able
to say exactly what the Meisner pro-
gram is. "I know you do repetition
exercises, and you have to have ac-
tivities to do in your scenes said
Lennon. "I hope to leam to im-
prove. But 1 don't know-what to ex-
pect
One thing that Meisner students
can expect is to be successful, espe-
cially in the wake of ECU's most fa-
mous example, Sandra Bullock. Bul-
lock has starred in Love Potion No.
9, Speed and is in the new release
While You Were Sleeping, which will
be previewed at Hendrix Theatre to-
night. While a tough act to follow,
Bullock will serve as inspiration to
the ECU Meisner Class of 1995. Just
remember - we'll be watching you.
i, iwwMwwgawMW����ar
CD. Reviews
�-?�:i .j ,1: �rr :
Bayete and Jabu
Khanyile
MMalo-We
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
During the years of Apartheid,
South African musicians were kept in
isolation. Now after the historical multi-
racial elections and the victory of Presi-
dent Nelson Mandela, the whole climate
has changed. Jabu Khanyile, the leader
and singer of Bayete, believes that the
new South Africa needs new music -
music that reflects that there are now
no barriers between his country and the
rest of the world. Bayete's new CD,
MMalo-We, is a reflection of that change
and a combination of many musical styles
from around the globe.
This CD is a subtle, easygoing re-
lease in which local South Africin town-
ship styles are mixed with echoes of West
African rhythms along with reggae, toast-
ing, dub, R&B and Western pop and soul.
The result is not some academic ecr-
cise in mixing different styles, but an al-
bum of cool, rhythmic soulful pop that
is still distinctly South African.
The songs vary in rhythmic styles.
There is no drummer, only a program-
mable drum machine that keeps the beat
going, which is fairly disappointing con-
sidering this is music based on rhythm
and comes from a continent that I'm sure
has thousands of talented drummers. Yet
at the same time this is pop, not authen-
tic tribal dancing.
Some of Jabu's early influences were
the laid-back soul of Johnny Nash and
See BAYETE page 8
Various Artists
Star Maps 2 Blocks
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Star Maps 2 Blocks, a new com-
pilation disc from Capricorn Records,
gives the listener a taste of the many
different styles of music floating
around out there today.
Cake, the first band featured on
; . � � �� LJiMwak�'i� � '�
this compilation, seems to be a rather
eclectic bunch. They incorporate many-
different ideas into their music and use
more than just your standard rock and
roll instruments. The trumpet line is
really cool in their song on Star Maps
2 Blocks, "Jolene which is off of their
new album Motorcade of Generosity.
This band is definitely one that should
be checked out They are something
new and different. They incorporate
good harmonies and do not rely too
much on distortion, just the way I like
it
"Omaha Stylee" is an interesting
song given to us by the band 311. It
starts out in a very hard core manner
and then skips into a great chorus. The
vocals on this number really impressed
me because they sounded like they
were a match made in heaven. In other
words, he rambled while the music
rumbled. "Omaha Stylee" is an
unreleased bonus track, so you won't
be able to find it anywhere else.
Hayride left a good impression.
Their song "Jibber" has a really smooth
bassline and buried vocals. The drums
were clean and steady with some great
fills. My only problem with this song
was that the bass was too loud. It cov-
ered everything else. Their album
Bucket
"A Drop in the Bucket" is just
what it claims to be: a very tiny
drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opin-
ion. Take it as you will.
This is the first in a special
two-part "Drop in the Bucket"Part
two will run in next Thursday's
East Carolinian.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Smelly Old Cat is definitely one you
should check out if you find that you
like this song.
There was also a band that made
me think of the word generic, and that
was Sordid Humor. Their track called
the "Hat Song which is off their al-
bum Light Music For Dying People,
was decent, but it made me think of
every band out there trying to get big.
I will say that musically, the chorus was
good, but the lyrics were seriously lack-
ing. "Hey man What's that on your
head? It's a rat It's dead Hey
man What's that on your head?
It's a hat It's red
Widespread Panic also makes an
apperance on this album, and after
hearing "Raise the Roof off their al-
bum Ain 't Life Grand, I hold a great
deal more respect for them than I once
did. The music was really slow and
pretty, and the use of acoustic guitar
made the song sound as if it had a lot
more feeling put into it. The vocals
sound haunting over the music and
give the song almost an eerie quality.
As we all know by now, Widespread
will be here soon to headline Barefoot
and this would be an excellent song
See STAR page 7
PT. Bamum once said, "No-
body ever went broke underestimat-
ing the intelligence of the Ameri-
can people The ever-eloquent Mr.
Barnum sure hit the nail on the
head with that one. While I might
question the morality of his exploi-
tation of America's general lack of
intellect, 1 can't argue with the re-
ality of the statement In fact most
of the drops we've dripped into the
bucket this year have focused on
one form of stupidity or another.
We (being myself and my
mighty army of opinionated zom-
bie writers) have regaled you with
frothy ravings on such topics as
America embracing evil, the ex-
treme lameness of the downtown
scene and the dangerous waters of
television advertising. We wouldn't
shut up about the death of alter-
native music last semester, and we
seem to have been exploring vari-
ous problems of love since
Valentine's Day.
But what all our various com-
plaints boil down to, the root of all
the evils we've expounded upon in
this column from day one, is stu-
pidity. Base stupidity. It's every-
where.
Every time I tum on the TV
and find myself being assaulted by
an episode of Full House or Saved
by the Bell or that Erkle show or
anything from the latest batch of
no-brainer video crap, I cringe at
the stupidity being displayed so
blatantly on the screen.
But stupidity doesn't simply
lurk in our entertainment; a walk
downtown on any "party night" will
prove that Why do we find it so
much fun to go to a place where
someone might jump us for bump-
ing into them in a crowded room?
It's crowded, you jerks! Of course
people are going to bump into you!
These guys usually just want to
start a fight, which is some bizarre
ape-language power thing that, to
me, points to an underevolved
brain.
No, wait Not even jungle go-
rillas act that stupid! It must be the
beer talking. Our national obses-
sion with alcohol, or rather our
obsession with cheap, watery, evil-
smelling beer, is another form of
American stupidity. But
somebody's getting rich off this
one: every gulp you take of that
sweet sweet beer is another buck
See BUCKET page 8

wmmmmmmg&B





1
Tuesday, April 11, 1995
f7e fast Carolinian
Goober tells it all in new Mayberry memoirs
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - As
George Lindsey tells it he met Bob Den-
ver on the set of Love American Style
and the two actors became friends.
Lindsey, who played gas-pumping
Goober on The Andy Griffith Show, and
Denver, star of Gilligan's Island, obvi-
ously had some things in common. Both
were successful and both were forever
typecast as clowns. Things turned nasty
at Denver's home: The new friends be
gan fighting over who was the better
actor. Goober vs. Gilligan, to the finish.
A tendency to scrap permeates
much of Lindsey's life as related in his
new memoir, Goober in a Nutshell
Lindsey, Griffith and other cast
members partied in distinctly un-
Mayberry fashion when the cameras were
off. according to Lindsey. He tells of join-
ing Griffith, Jack Dodson (Howard
Sprague) and Ken Berry (Mayberry
RFD) in drinking a quart of whiskey
apiece, donning aviator caps with goggles
and taking a white limo to see country
singer Merle Haggard perform.
The man forever known as Goober
is eager to reflect on an acting career
that began with classical training and
veered onto a dirt road leading to The
Andy Griffith Show.
Typecasting as a rube takes its toll
and left Lindsey with a chip on his shoul-
der that took years to knock off. For
years, Lindsey. 66. resisted and resented
it Now he's embraced Goober, but some-
times it still grates. �Sometimes 1 say that
Goober killed George Lindsey Lindsey
said. "And I think of all the roles I have
in me The Andy Griffith Show was a
home run, ainng over 10 years count-
ing the spinoff Mayberry RFD.
Lindsey is the first Griffith cast
member to write a memoir. He turned
out "Goober in a Nutshell" (Avon Books)
with the help of Mayberry fanatics Ken
Beck and Jim Clark. The requisite
Mayberry anecdotes are there.
The book reveals that Lindsev, a
native of Jasper, Ala is a graduate of
the American Theater Wing of New York
University. He played the lead role of
Putcayasin in a production of Gogol's
"Marriage" for the class graduation play.
Lindsey says cast members "lived
in fear" of Griffith on the set "Most of
us were deathly afraid of Andy Lindsey
writes. "We were all scared to make a
move. If Andy thought something was
funny, then it was funny to us. He liter-
ally controlled every aspect of the show.
So we were always trying to please him,
or at least I was
SENIORS
YOU ARE GOING TO BE CALLED UPON TO ESTABLISH
A NEW TRADITION
AT
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
SENIOR CHALLENGE PHONATHON
APRIL 10-13
d lAlx from page 6
for them to play.
R.L. Davis and CeDell Bumside
put their blues abilirites to the test with
their songs "Old Black Mattie" and
"Rock R.L. Davis' "Old Black Mattie"
is a standard blues song that is a real
toe tapper. It was kind of hard to un-
derstand what he was singing about
and it was also a little repetitive, but it
was enjoyable. Bumside seems to be a
blues junkie. His song "Rock" began
with two people who actually sounded
like they knew what they were doing
with their instruments and two other
people that sounded like little kids ex-
perimenting with their parents' guitars
Now that you're going to
graduate school, how
do you plan to pay for it?
Ask us.
Highlighting Your Moments in Sport
Register for the newest Intramural Sport
Co Cart Races
Held at Greenville Fun Park.
Register in 204 Christenbury
Gym by Tuesday, April 18.
Races take place Wednesday, April 19
from 7:00 - 10:00p.m.
All racers will have the chance to compete in:
One Qualifying Lap
Two Heat Races
Championship Races
A nominal fee will te charged to participate.
yA Donna at ECL' Recreational Services at 328-6387 for more details.

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accompanying them. The song then
burst into this really cool guitar solo,
and Bumside put in his gravelly vo-
cals. Other than the intro, this song
has to be one of the coolest blues songs
that I have heard in a while. These two
guys should definitely be checked out
Everything was also pretty impres-
sive. Their song "Dame tu Corazon"
oil Labrador had a style to it that re-
minded me a little of Cake, but I liked
them just the same. They made great
use of the trumpet and various other
percussion instruments. The lead
singer's voice was really clear, and it
was easy to understand what he was
singing about The whole time I lis-
tened to this song, I couldn't help imag-
ining a whole bunch of people danc-
ing in a conga line. It was cool.
The last song on the compilation
was quite a disappointment Vigilanties
of Love's "Last to Know which is from
their album Welcome to Struggleville,
was boring and repetitive. But there
were some good things about it their
acoustic lead-in, their use of the organ
and some really incredible drum fills.
Despite all of these good quantities,
the repetition was just too much. Try
a little harder next time guys.
In all, Star Maps 2 Blocks was
pretty good for a compilation CD.
However, with thes compilations, you
run the risk of only liking one song
by a band and hating all of the rest
Record companies have to try to ca-
ter to the tastes of all their custom-
ers. So if you like one of these bands
already, it would be better to go out
and by their whole album instead of
this. But if you like a little blues and
a lot of rock and roll, this might be
the disc for you.
-� The
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I
8
Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
BUCKET
from page 6
in the corporate pocket. I'm surprised
the whole town isn't deafened by the
thunderous ka-ching of a million cash
registers on an average night in down-
town Greenville.
Granted, we all have our addic-
tions. My own potentially-unhealthy
caffeine addiction puts me in a glass
house on this subject. Likewise, we
all need to relax with some no-brainer
fun every so often. I love a good mon-
ster movie, and I don't even want to
talk about how many hours I've spent
glued to Dark Shadows reruns on the
Sci-Fi Channel.
But our society seems bent on
having little else but no-brainer fun.
As is often the case, we are working
at an extreme; the population can't
find a happy medium. When we're
offered the lowest common denomi-
nator, we take it. It's easier that way.
People seem to have this notion
that thinking is work; you certainly
can't enjoy it To me. saying that think
ing isn't fun is like saying that sex is
boring: if you don't like it, you prob-
ably haven't been doing it right. If you
think I'm joking or if you think I'm
wrong, you need to exercise the old
medulla oblongata a little.
The thing that distresses me
about America's love affair with stu-
pidity, though, is the danger it places
us all in. If we're continually bom-
barded with the lowest common de-
nominator, then the highest common
denominator goes down. More plainly,
if we wallow in stupidity, we get stu-
pid.
To close, here's another thing P.T.
Barnum said: "There's a sucker born
every minute Think on that one for
a while, because I'll be picking up
there next week.
BAYETE from page 6
the definitive reggae of Jimmy Cliff. Jabu's
sound is a kind of combination with gen-
tly stirring songs like Ten Times Love
on which his relaxed vocals ride confi-
dently over the slinky rhythmic backing.
There are subtle changes of direction as
he shifts from balladry' to rapid fire rap
or Zulu chanting. Almost every track is
a mixture of different influences and dif-
ferent languages: he constantly switches
from Zulu to English.
As far as lyrics go. it's hard to make
heads or tales of what is being said. With
the constant shifting of languages and
Jabu's accent, even the English lyrics
sound like some foreign language. It's
all part of Jabu's musical unity campaign,
summed up by his rousing Zulu-rap an-
them "Africa Unite This is a strong
reggaecalypso tune with five backup
singers laying down some smooth har-
mony topped with Jabu's unintelligible
Zulu rap, a very rousing and exotic tune.
Overall this is a strong release, but
I think the addition of real drumming
and homs would have added a much-
; ieeded traditional flavor to the CD, but
this is not to say that he is doing com-
mercial hype. Other than that this is a
great release. It's world-class pop with a
whole mass of influences from around
the world, but the roots of the music are
still in the townships of Africa. If you are
into reggae or just looking for something
a little outside of the norm, this would
be a good one to pick up.
Parkviezv I Kingston Place
is now
KINGSTON
O N I O M
N
LJ M
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New and newly renovated 1 and 2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo units, large and small, furnished or unfurnished,
with washers and dryers, free cable and water.
Pool, clubhouse & more. ECU bus service.
KINGSTON
RENTALS CO.
758-7575
BANDS from page 6
band than locals.
Fourth on the playbill. Fallen An-
gel hit the stage. Everything started off
well for this band, but during the sec-
ond song, a short circuit sound shot
through the enormous speaker setup
causing fans to cover their ears. This
band had an early '80s hard rock feel to
it though the vocals were occasionally
drowned out by the guitars.
As speculation grew about who
would win. The Reflectors hit the stage
at a little after 10 p.m. This band had a
distinctive feel, characterized by lead
vocalist Kelly Smith's strong, deep voice.
This band and Stul seemed to heve the
best sound setup at the event. The Re-
flectors also set themselves apart by a
distinctive vocal harmony between
Smith and backing vocalist Jay Thigpen.
�Mf WUR LB.
to receive up to
$500
College Graduate Rebate
on selected new cars
Rebate available up lo 6 ramrfo
prior to graduation.
Call Gectfeor details
M3SS-3333
East Carolina
Auto & Truck Center
LincolnMercur � ChryskiPlvroouth Dodge
MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE, NC
355-3333
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�o
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COLLEGE CREDIT
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IN ALL DISCIPLINES
FOR EXAMPLE:
Accounting 201 -A
Art 205A
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English 355-A
Fine Arts 362
General Studies 341 -A
History 377-A
JourComm. 335-A
Math II4-A
Music 318-A
Political Science I I I -A
Psychology 333-A
Religious Studies 371-E
Sociology 376-A
Theatre i25-A
The final song of the Reflectors' set had
a bluesy fee! that showcased the band's
musical diversity.
The bands were rated by six judges
who gave them a score in each of seven
categories on a scale of one to 10. The
judges were a combination of
undergrads. graduate students and even
a professor from the School of Music.
The band with the highest cumulative
score gets the nod to open Barefoot
After a short intermission. Bobby
Getchell, the event's MC. stepped to-
ward the microphone to make the win-
ning announcement. Though there
could be only one winner, all the mem-
bers of all the bands anxiously crowded
the door praying for victory. A few folks
cheered, but most lowered their heads
as Stul won second place and the Re-
flectors were announced as victorious.
Following the announcement. Reflec-
tor lead guitarist and backing vocalist
Jay Thigpen said. "We couldn't be hap-
pier and can't wait until Barefoot
Principles of Financial Accounting
Photography I
Managerial Finance
Laughter and Comedy
Film Criticism
God and Politics
The Rise of Adolf Hitler
Writing for Electronic Media
Elementary Statistics
History of jazz
Amencan Government
Abnormal Behavior
Religion in Cinema and Literature
Sociology of Sport
Acting for Non-Majors
REGISTRATION JUNE 5
FOR MORE INFORMATION,
OR A COMPLETE LIST OF COURSES,
CALL THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
1-800-334-8448 OR 910-584-2370
The faculty and staff of THE HONORS PROGRAM of
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY congratulate the 1994-95 seniors
who are GRADUATES OF THE HONORS PROGRAM:
GENERAL EDUCATION HONORS
Kathleen Barron
Brian Bartelt
Laura Barwick
Andora Bass
Henrik Bjarheim
James Casey
Mehryn Galardi
Scarlette Gardner
Ashley Hinkle
Anthony Greg Jones
Karen E. Jones
Sara Leggett
Jonathan O'Neal
Katina Phillips
Carrie Plank
Krusheska Quiros
Kimberly Rice
Marissa Roach
Mary Anna Smith
Gary Snyder
Eric Britt Strickland
William Scott Stroud
Andrea Thomas
Julie Wegender
Vicki Woolridge
Tammy Upchurch
UNIVERSITY HONORS
Brian Bartelt
Henrik Bjarheim
James Casey
Mehryn Galardi
Jonathan O'Neal
Eric Britt Strickland
Easter Quiz
Question:
What do Santa
Claus, the Easter
Bunny, and the
Resurrection
of Jesus of
Nazareth all have
in common?
Answer: Many people perceive all three to be myths (symbolic in nature and meaning but of little or no
historical significance), however this perception is only two-thirds correct.
The resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth is one of the best attested historical events of antiquity.
Here on campus there are many who share the joy of knowing that Jesus Christ provides intellectually and
spiritually satisfying answers to life's most important questions. We sincerely invite your questions.
i
li I rM IS?
WtIiSP
m' ,3wm
Dr. .lohnathan Bascom
(icograph
328-6624
Mr. Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor for Business AlTairs
328-6975
Dr. Janice K. Daugherty
FamiK Medicine
K16-2059
Mr. Perry Knnis
Materials Managcmcnl
32S-6434
Dr. Rick Hebert
Managcmcnl
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Dr. .letter) W. Jarvis
Music
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Dr. Irvin �. Lawrence
Anatonn and Cell Biologs
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Dr. Brian K. Mennecke
Decision Sciences
328-6599
Dr. Darrell Ross
Criminal Justice
328-4203
Dr. Dan Sprau
Family Medicine
XI d-2070
For more information about the
making available to everyone who
Dr. Paul Bolin
Ncphrology
816-2545
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Marketing
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Decision Sciences
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Dr. r red P. Schadler
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Dr. Ronald Sprecher
Finance
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historical reliability of the resurrection
asks ,m article bv the noted author and
Dr. John Bradley
Decision Sciences
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Dr. Skip O'ummings
Famils Medicine
816-2607
Dr. Brent Dennis
Social Work
328-4195
Dr. Carl Haisch
Surge r
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Mr. Jeff Jagodzinski
Athletic Dcpt (Football)
32X-4577
Dr. Dana E. King
FamiK Medicine
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Mr. Doug Martin
Athletic Dcpt (Football)
s-457X
Dr. Richard Rawl
Famil Medicine
X25-0355
Dr. Perry D. Smith
Voice
328-6247
Dr. Stanley R. Stansell
Finance
328-6636
of Jesus Christ, we are
lecturer Josh McDowell.
You can request this article from any of the above faculty or staff members,
or call Shane Deike at 752-898� (email your request to mndeikctu'ecuvml)
li you are a faculty is slalV member who would like- to parttupaU: in this ad m the future
please contact John Hnullo .11 328-6801





Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
Cheerleaders place 14th
at national competition
A rising star
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Although not considered a sport
by some, and not funded by some uni-
versities, the Universal Cheerleading
and Dance Associations National
Championships were held at MGM
Studios on the Disney World Complex
in Orlando, Florida last weekend. The
ECU cheerleading squad finished 14th
in the nation, while the ECU Pure
Cold Dancers placed 11th.
The University of Kentucky was
crowned national champions in the
Division IA cheerleading level. In Di-
vision I, Morehead State won their
tifth consecutive national title. Mis-
sissippi College won at the Division
II level, while Fairmont State took the
All-Girl's division title.
In the dance competition, the
University of Louisville claimed their
first national title in Division I A, while
Wright State won the Dance Open
Division.
ECU'S Pure Gold Dancers failed
to improve on their national ranking
eighth entering the competition, and
were knocked down to 11th follow-
ing the tourney. They did, however,
have one of the most unique routines
in the competition as they came out
with boxing gloves on and towels
wrapped around their necks.
The UCA National Competition
is the "NCAA Tournament" of
cheerleading and dance. It's like a
college football bowl game, with a big-
time atmosphere.
Traditional powerhouse squads
like Texas, Kentucky and Alabama -
learns that have all cheerleaders on
lull paid scholarships, have personal
trainers and a complete entourage of
fans- were there. Then there was
ECU, a first-time performer, with no
experience in national competitions.
Sometimes, it showed.
On Friday, all of the squads re-
hearsed during scheduled times at
MGM Studios. ECU head coach
Heather Zophy's worst fears came to
be realized: her squad looked intimi-
dated during their rehearsal.
The team walked into the prac-
tice facility prior to their rehearsal and
witnessed the larger and more well-
known squads perform their routines
to perfection. After seeing her squad
falter during the practice session,
Zophy told them to keep their heads
from a team meeting after returning
to their hotel.
After the meeting, ECU had an-
other short practice in which they
again practiced their routine. Coach
Zophy was pleased with the perfor-
mance. The squad regrouped and their
Tuesday. April. 11
Softball vs. Campbell
DH), 3 p.m.
Thursday. April. 13
Baseball vs.
DH), 6 p.m.
Towson State
rldav. April 14
Softball @ Frost Cutlery,
Chattanooga, TN
Women's Tennis @ CAA
Championships, W&M,
Williamsburg, VA
Saturday. April 15
Baseball vs. James
Vladison (DH), 2 p.m.
Softball @ Frost Cutlery
Journey, Chattanooga, TN
Women's Tennis @ CAA
Championships, W&M,
Williamsburg, VA
Mens Track @ CAA
Championships, Fairfax,
VA
Womens Track @ CAA
Championships, Fairfax,
VA
Sunday. April 16
Baseball vs. James
vladison, 2 p.m.
Softball @ Frost Cutlery,
Chattanooga, TN
Aomens Tennis @ CAA
Championships,
Williamsburg, VA
Compiled by EMB
confidence level rose again.
On Saturday, the squad once
again had a rehearsal, and this time
ECU looked completely different, like
a much improved squad. ECU com-
peted on Saturday night, and the but-
terflies started kick in.
Finally, it was ECU's turn in the
national spotlight, and senior captain
Jeff Paine gathered his squad into a
huddle just before they were going to
perform one of the most important
routines of their cheerleading career.
The school's performance was impres-
sive for a squad that was the rookie
of the competition. After the perfor-
mance, all heads were high, and a sigh
of relief was breathed by many.
Photo by BRIAN PAIZ
The ECU cheerleaders and Pure Gold Dancers competed in
their respective national tourneys. The dancers placed 11th.
s
SPORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
(SID) - ECU defending champion
Josh Dickinson shot a final round 75
to finish 2nd at the 1995 Colonial Ath-
letic Association Championships held
here at the Kiln Creek Country Club
in Newport News, Virginia.
The junior from Kinston carded a
222 weekend total, finishing six shots
behind Steve Jamroz of Richmond. In
team competition, the Pirates were un-
successful n claiming their unprec-
edented sixth CAA title, finishing in a
tie for second place behind Richmond.
The Spiders, who set a blistering pace
in the opening round, never looked
back, shooting a sizzling 909 weekend
total to claim the title.
ECU's only other top ten finisher
was walk-on senior Teague Tripp who
posted a 231 (78-73-80) weekend total
to finish tied for a career high 10th
place. Rounding out the rest of the Pi-
rate starting five was Dave Coates and
Gary Carpenter who finished tied in
17th place.
East Carolina will take a one week
layoff before traveling to Charleston,
S.C. to resume play at the Palmetto
Intercollegiate.
The ECU women's track team
made a significant mark at the Duke
Invitational on Friday, April 7, and Sat-
urday, April 8. Three Lay Pirates quali-
. fied for the ECAC Outdoor Champion-
ships and three school records were
broken.
ECU's Amanda Johnson placed
fourth in the long jump with a leap of
18.45 feet. The Lady Pirates 4X100m
relay team placed third with a time of
47.26, their fastest time of the season.
East Carolina's Carla Powell
placed fifth in the 100m with a per-
sonal best time of 11.96. This time
qualified her for the ECACs.
ECU freshman Saundra Teel
broke a school record and qualified for
the ECACs in the 100HH with a time
of 14.79. Teel placed seventh in the
event
The Lady Pirates placed eighth in
the distance medley relay with a school
record time of 12:14.55.
Darlene Vick placed 12th in the
Discus and qualified for the ECACs
with a throw of 136 "feet
Cameron Bader placed 14th in the
400IH with a time of 1:03.67. With this
time, Bader broke her own school
record.
ECU Head Coach Choo Justice
was pleased with the team's perfor-
mance.
"It was a huge meet with a lot of
good teams participating said Justice.
"We are making progress and our times
keep coming down. Now we need to
prepare for next week's CAA meet
The ECU women's tennis team
wrapped up it's regular season this
weekend by taking a win over Ameri-
can University 5-1.
The Pirates were led by junior
Chelsea Earnhardt, who posted a 6-3,
6-0 win at No. 2 singles. Thiid-seeded
Rachel Cohen was an easy winner, by
the 6-1, 6-1 score. Cohen finishes the
regular season with a team-high 15
wins.
See SID page 12
File Photo
Rising ECU sophomore quarterback Dan Gonzalez threw two touchdown passes during
the annual PurpleGold spring scrimmage. He was 10 of 19 on the day for 122 yards.
Layton has big
senior season
Hurler has given
up just four hits per
contest for ECU
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
In a year that has questioned the
stability and maturity of the Pirate's
pitching staff, one pitcher has shown
Coach Overton and the rest of the
team that he can be relied, on both
as a starter and a reliever.
Senior Billy Layton has become
an integral part in the Pirates' attack
against the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion (CAA). The Apex, NC native has
given ECU a solid fourth man in the
rotation, and he has the numbers to
prove it.
In his first six starts, Layton has
given up an average of just four hits
a game, and 1.50 earned runs per
game.
"Normally, whoever (the batter)
is, I will go right at them Layton
said. "If they hit it, then they hit it. I
throw a lot of fastballs and
curveballs
As Layton embarks on his last
season in a Pirate uniform, he can
reflect on some of the people that
have assisted him during his emer-
gence as one of ECU's top pitchers.
"Howard Whitfield and Tom
White mostly helped me Layton
said. "Johnny Beck and Lyle
Hartgrove helped me more with
pickoff moves and stuff
With help from these former Pi-
rates in the pros, Layton may have
the knowledge and tools to to make
it to the big leagues. After a strong
outing against Richmond, throwing
six solid innings and giving up no
runs, Layton captured the win and
may have proved that his final sea-
son will be his best season, although
he faced a minor setback during the
contest.
"I did alright until I hurt my
Billy Layton
arm Layton said. "In one inning I
threw a curveball, and I felt a pain in
my forearm. I tried to throw one more
pitch and it hurt too much. The train-
ers said it was a muscle strain
Coming out of high school,
Layton was impressed with the win-
ning tradition that Coach Overton
has established, and has felt that the
Pirate tradition needed to be upheld.
"We have a winning season
Layton said of his goals this season.
"I need to get healthy and stay
healthy
Referring to Nolan Ryan and
Pete Rose as his favorite athletes,
Layton thinks of himself of a hustling
ball player.
"I like Pete Rose because he was
always a hard worker he said.
A gutsy pitcher on the mound
may be the key to success for a young
ECU team that in years past has had
tremendous seasons, but has faced
injuries, slumps and the youth fac-
tor in 1995. Billy Layton brings the
desire, determination and arm
strength onto the field each game,
and is out to make 1995 his best sea-
son yet.
ECU Isshin-RYU kicks off
(RS) - Can you break a board
with your own bare hand? At East
Carolina's Isshin-RYU Karate Club
there are many mem-
bers who can break
both a board and a
cement block with
their bare hand.
Isshin-RYU is an
Okinawa system that
incorporates two ma-
jor karate systems
Shuri-Te and Naha-
Te.
Together they
make up Isshin-RYU
which means "the
one heart way
T.D. Gribble is the instructor
for the Isshin-RYU Karate Club.
T.D. has been in martial arts for 16
years and in Isshin-RYU for 11 of
those years. On March 14, T.D. re-
ceived his fourth-degree black belt.
He is one of the youngest certified
instructors of the American
Okinawan Karate Association
(AOKA).
Gribble
teaches as a
second-genera-
tion instructor,
whereas his
teacher,
Donald Bohan,
studied directly
from the
founder of the
system. Gribble
has competed
in national
Students are also
taught practical
applications or
one-step sparring
that consists of
locks and holds.
tournaments
where he placed second in weap-
ons Kata.
The Isshin-RYU Club on cam-
pus consists of about 20 members.
They compete in traditional karate
tournaments that are geared toward
self-defense and practical applica-
tions. Practices usually begin with
warm-ups, stretches, and sometimes
body conditioning, which toughens
the body for actual combat.
Students are also taught prac-
tical applications or one-step spar-
ring that consists of locks and
holds. Kumite, which is freestyle'
sparring, is also practiced.
The fee to participate in the
Isshin-RYU Club is $6 a semester,
and you will also need to purchase
your own gi uniform when you are
ready. In addition, you must pay
for your tests. A member of Isshin-
RYU will progress at their own
pace.
The club meets in Room 108
Christenbury Gym Mondays and
Wednesdays from 9 p.m. to 10:30
p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Feel free to drop by and talk
with the instructor and club mem-
bers to find out more about Isshin-
RYU Karate club.
aizs
erspective
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
I would like to meet the person
who says cheerleading is not a sport.
When I first started to cover the
cheerleading squad a couple of
months ago, my cheerleading knowl-
edge was minimal. Of course I had
picked up on some of the "game" of
cheerleading, since my roomate is a
JV cheerleader, and after every prac-
tice he would fill my brain with
cheerleading lingo. I was constantly
meeting and getting to know the
entire squad.
I'm not going to lie, I was skep-
tical about cheerleading at first.
When I pictured a cheerleader. I al-
ways thought of a stereotypical
cheerleader. You remember - the
one who smiled pretty for the crowd
and socialized the rest of the time.
But let me tell you, college
cheerleading is a whole different ball
game.
I've spent the last month with
the squad as they prepared for the
national competition. Coach
Heather Zophy practiced her squad
everyday. They practiced at the
Greenville Athletic Club, Aycock
Middle School and Williams Arena.
Their practices at William Arena
were late at night, starting at 11 p.m.
and ending aroud 1 a.m. They
continously went over and over their
routine, trying to perfect it for na-
tionals.
For seniors David Coates. Tracy
Fowler, Wes Furr, Jeff Paine, Chris
Penhollow and Adam Perry, this was
their last chance to compete in a
Pirate uniform. All of them had been
through the growing process of Pi-
rate cheerleading, watching the
squad getting better each and ev-
ery year.
Before they were going to per-
form Paine, a senior captain, gath-
ered his squad into a huddle. Paine
looked like a general leading his
troops into battle. A symbolic mea-
sure of sorts.
Of course, there was frustration
at times. Like when everyone was
tired, and just could not concentrate
during their routine, but they stuck
together as a team unit, through Jeff
Paine's bad shoulder that needed
rest, through freshman Amy
Teague's bruised and battered arms.
This squad had all the qualities
of a championship team. Hard work
dedication and the love of the sport.
I once again salute the seniors.
Tracey, Jeff, Wes, David, Adam and
Chris have all helped make this last
month that I have been with the
squad an enjoyable experience.
Friendships were made, and this
entire squad is a very special one.
East Carolina University should
be proud to have this group as a
representative of the school. So, to
the person who said that
cheerleading was not sport. I give
as my evidence - the 1994-95 ECU
Pirate Cheerleaders, the 14th-best
squad in the nation.





r
��
10
Tuesday, AprH 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
Corliss takes AU
act to pro ranks
(AP) - A bruised and tired
Corliss Williamson, who led Arkan-
sas to the last two NCAA title games
and the 1994 national champion-
ship, is headed for the NBA.
With his parents' blessing,
Williamson said Friday he would
pursue his academic degree later
and play professional basketball next
season.
The 6-foot-7 junior forward, who
averaged 19.7 points as the Razor-
backs went 32-7 last season, had said
after Monday's championship game
loss to UCLA that he planned to stay
in school. He changed his mind
Thursday.
"My emotions took over and
made me say that Williamson ex-
plained. "I didn't end my college ca-
reer the way I wanted to. I wanted
to go out on top with a victory. Un-
fortunately it didn't work out that
way
Coach Nolan Richardson said
junior forward Scotty Thurman also
was considering leaving, but hadn't
reached a decision.
"I've visited with Scotty. There
is nothing concrete Richardson
said.
Williamson's father said the
consistent pounding his son took
inside played a role in the decision.
"He got beat up so bad this year
down low and never got the call
Jerry Williamson said. "I remember
Shaquille O'Neal, who played at
LSU. Everyone said because he's big
those fouls don't hurt.
"We got to see the battle scars
and the bruises around (Corliss')
head and neck. He's hurting. If you
are going to get hit like that, get paid
to get hit
Often double- or triple-teamed,
See AU page 11
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11
Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
ELBO
SPRING
BIKINI
CONTEST!
sS&t
Tuesday
April 11th 1995
Doors Open at 9pm!
PRIZES
1st $150.
2ncl $75.
3rd $50.
Entrants call 758-4591 or
come by the elbo to register.
THURS. LADIES IN FREI
.75 BOTTLE BEERS
$1.00HIBALLSj�
.25 DRAFT
FRI. 1 CENT DRAFT
$2.00 MEMBERS
$3.00 GUEST
We need an
Assistant Sports
Editor for the
summer. We also
need writers.
Call 328-6366
and ask for Dave.
AU
I SP0BTSW0B1D1
ARTHRITIS
Dollars
p ported
from page 10
Williamson made 55 percent of his
shots and 67 percent of his free
throws.
Arkansas won 65 of 77 consecu-
tive games Williamson started. The
Razorbacks' fortunes often hinged
on how well Williamson performed.
Five of his worst games came in Ar-
kansas" seven losses this season.
On Monday, he made just three
of 16 shots - his worst performance
of the season - and finished with 12
points. Arkansas lost 89-78.
As a sophomore, Williamson av-
eraged 20.4 points, and the Razor
backs won the national champion-
ship with a 76-72 victory over Duke.
"Winning the national champi-
onship was the greatest thing to ever
happen to me Williamson said. "I'll
look back at this year, even though
we didn't win, it says a lot for this
team. It might the most favorite
memory, even tough it doesn't look
like it right now
In his three seasons with the Ra-
zorbacks, Williamson scored in
double figures in 83 of 91 games. He
was a second-team All-America selec-
tion after both his sophomore and
junior years.
"Everyone was looking for me
to have mixed emotions about it, but
this is something that Corliss has
worked for since he was 11 years
old said his mother, Bettye. "He
always told me he was going to play
professional basketball. I laughed and
said, 'Sure
"Today it's become a reality. I'm
happy for him because this is his
dream that has come true
Williamson is a communications
major from Russellville. Richardson
said he, too, backed the decision.
"We go to school to get better
educated. We are supposed to get bet-
ter jobs Richardson said. "I can't
think of any better job than where
he's going right now
April 17,1995 (6:30-8:30) �
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m m-
. i�i ii
i

12
Tuesday, April 11,1995
The East Carolinian
-i.
!F
SID
from page 9
The Lady Pirates also got wins by
Hollyn Gordon, Lisa Hadelman and Elke
Garten at numbers 46, respectively. The
Pirates finished the regular season with
a 14-5 record. 3-2 in the CAA. ECU will
be participating in the CAA tournament
this weekend in Williamsburg, Va.
After some early season disappoint-
mer.U, the ECU men's track team fi-
nally has something to smile about af-
ter this weekend's record-setting perfor-
mance at the Duke Invitational in
Durham, N.C.
The weekend was highlighted by
the 4 X 400 relay team that took a con-
vincing first place, breaking the meet
record with a time of 3:07.36. The fin-
ish was the best for the team of Lewis
Harris, Keith Barker, Brian Johnson and
Dwight Henry so far this season and
continues to move them forward in their
goal of qualifying for the NCAA Cham-
pionships.
The Pirates were a big question
mark going into the race, after last
week's "DNF" in Tempe, Arizona when
lead-off leg Lewis Harris was unable to
race. However, Harris answered
everyone's questions by running the
first 14 mile in 47 seconds. That was
Lewis' first 14 since January, so 47 is
not bad for his first time back said head
coach Bill Carson.
In the second leg, junior Keith
Barker established a lead for ECU that
would never be relinquished. "Keith ran
a beautiful race said Carson. "He ran
a 46.10 and just buried the field com-
ing out of the comer
Sophomore Brian Johnson main-
tained the lead for the Pirates before
handing off to anchor Dwight Henry
,who put the race away in spite strong
(opposition from Todd Long, an All-
America performer for Oklahoma.
"I knew in practice we were ready
said Carsoa "They were awfully de-
pressed last week, so this helps
The Pirates will try to continue to
improve this weekend at the CAA Cham-
pionships in Fairfax, Virginia.
Florida State was crowned cham-
pions of the Tar Heel Invitational this
weekend. The Semmoles finished the
three-day tournament with a frO record.
East Carolina was the runner-up with a
1-3 record.
Members of the All-Tournament
Team are Jami Bendle, Jolin Eckman,
Sharotyn Strickland (ECU); Angie Beech
(Campbell); Renee Espinoza, Cindy
Lawton, Misty Molin, Laurie Shepard
(Florida State); and Lorin Slade (North
Carolina).
In ECU'S first game of the day, the
Lady Pirates had a 3-2 lead over FSU
until the Seminoles scored one run in
the bottom of the seventh to send the
game into extra innings before losing.
Sharon Lamm took the loss for the Lady
Pirates. She is 0-1 from the mound.
ECU was defeated by UNC 2-1. The
Tar Heels had two runs off six hits and
no errors. ECU was slowed by two er-
rors but recorded eight hits. Jami Bendle
was ECU'S losing pitcher.
TheLach irates will face Campbell
at home on April 11. A double header
�is scheduled for 3 p.m.
t- �
� ECU swept a double-header from
JAilliam & Mary Saturday. The Pirates
J22-11,5-6 CAA) won the first game 11-
3 and took the nightcap 5-2.
I In the first game, ECU was led by
Jason Head with four RBIs. including a
three-run triple in a six-run second in-
ning. Three Pirates, Lamont Edwards,
Travis Meyer and Randy Rigsby, finished
with three hits apiece in the first game
as ECU finished with 18 hits. On the
pitching side. ECU's Patrick Dunham
(40) pitched a complete-game five-hit-
ter, allowing one earned run with six
strikeouts.
The Tribe's Will Malerich (3-5) took
the loss giving up 10 runs in 4 and 13
innings.
In the second game, ECU's Chad
Puckett and Josh Constable each had
two hits. The Pirates took a 2-0 lead in
the second before William & Mary
evened the score at 2-2 on a two-run
single by Ron Bush.
ECU took the lead for good in the
third on Derek Lindsay's RBI single and
added single runs in the fourth on
Puckett's double and Meyer's squeeze
bunt in the seventh.
Jason Elmore (3-0) won for the Pi-
rates with Bob Wharton getting his first
save of the season. Aaron Abraham (3-
1) took the loss for the Tribe (15-18,0-
11 CAA).
William & Mary topped ECU on
Sunday 9-7.
m
P-Pmil!�j,&l�.Wi; MdJ;
! hTHJENTREASURES
i THRIrTSHOP
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while you wait
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J
S5S!SSSSSMSS0FS3S
jPAYNE from page 1
where he earned coach of the year
' honors two times. He took the Pirates
! to the NCAA Tournament in 1993 af-
ter winning the CAA conference tour-
nament
"I think sometimes coaches and
fans get caught up with things, like a
facility, an arena, etc Television and
all that kind of stuff, that's all well
and good, but the most important
thing are those young people Payne
said. "They are the ones that are the
true barometer of success in any pro-
gram. I want them to know, in every-
thing they say and do, that they are
important"
He was also an assistant at South
Carolina, East Carolina, Virginia Tech
and Truett McConnell Junior College,
but views coaching at Oregon State
as his most overwhelming coaching
opportunity.
"It's a big-time challenge Payne
said, "but it's a great opportunity for
them as players to rekindle and retire
something here at Oregon State. I
hope that we will create a real pas-
sion for the competitive arena. For
finding out how good they can be-
come - not just as players, but as
people and students. That's what
makes life interesting
College Life:
A Few Things To Know
KNOW' wHicK �ff-c�mp;u'
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KNOn rue cope?
IT AWAM COSTS If JX TUA l-yec-COUKT.
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with your wallet as well. So if you want a great low price on a collect call,
just dial 1 800-CALL-ATT It always costs less than 1-800-COLLECT Always.
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� 1995 AT&T
. s.
r





13
Tuesday, April 11,1995
The East Carolinian
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area. Must bfc 18 yrs old; have own
phone and transportation. We are an
established agency, check out your yel-
low pages.
ATTENTION LADIES: We are looking
for Ladies that are interested in work-
ing a flexible schedule and making a
good salary. Call 758-2737 4pm-until.
Executive Dating & Escort Agency.
PART TIME STUDENT MANAGER:
EXCELLENT PAY Needed on campus
evenings and Saturdays. Must have abil-
ity to work independently with minimal
supervision. Prefer some retail experi-
ence. Apply in person: ECU Student
Stores. Wright Building.
PHOTOGRAPHERS NEEDED Recre-
ational Services is taking applications
for photographers for 1995-96. Black
and white film developing and printing
required. Evidence of actionsports pho-
tography experience required at inter-
view. Complete application form in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium. Work prima-
rily in afternoon and evening hours.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT! Tired of
"McSummerjobs?" Earm $3,000-6.000
per month in fisheries! Great park
resprt jobs too! Room and board! Trans-
portation! Male of Female! Call (919)
490-8629. extensions A95.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK. Make
up to $2,000-$4,000mo. teaching ba-
sic conversational English in Japan, Tai-
wan, or S. Korea. No teaching back-
ground or Asian languages required. For
information call: (206) 632-1146 ext.
J53624
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Students Needed! Fishing Industry.
Earn up to $3,000-$6.000 per month.
Room and Board! Transportation! Male
or Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 545-4155 ext A53623
ANDY'S CHEESTEAKS at the Plaza is
acceptiong applicants for both day and
night hours (part-time) to begin around
May 1st. No phone calls please.
1
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
Motivated individuals needed
for security position at a plant
in Greenville. Earn $6.50 per
hr. FTPT. Flexible schedule good
benefits for full-time employees
to include tuition assistance.
Apply in person to:
Employment Security Commission
3101 BismarkSt. Greenville.NC

&a
��
Summer Job Opportunity
Spend the summer working outdoors!
Crop Scouts are needed to work in
the Pitt Edgecombe Nash County
area from June through August to
collect accurate data To be used in
farm management. Must be able to
work independently, physically fit,
reliable, ana have own transportation.
Science andor farming background is a
plus, but not necessary. Siary starts
at $5.25 and mileage is reimbursed.
Send a handwritten letter stating
your interest and qualifications to
Will Connell, Rt. 4 Box 291-MM,
Greenville, NC 27834 by April 20th.
QMPPWEW00D
Summer Camp Staff
COUNSELORS. INSTRUCTORS, t
OTHER POSITIONS for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed
8 week youth summer recreational
sports camp. Over 25 activities,
including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, horseback, art
Cool Mountain Climate, good pay
and great fun! Non-smokers.
For applicationbqpchure:
704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn
up to $2,000month working on Cruise
ships or Land-Tour companies. World
Travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.) Seasonal and full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468
ext C53625
LIFEGUARDS: Spring. Summer.
Greenville, Goldsboro, Smithfield,
Tarboro. Call Bob 758-1088
BEGINNING IN MAY dependable
babysitter needed to care for child in
our home, 2-3 days a week. Experience,
local references, own transportation re-
quired. Must be a non-smoker. 752-8710.
STUDENTS: Looking for part-time
work with flexible hours? ECU is look-
ing for a few good Pirates to contact
alumni for the Annual Fund program.
$5.00 per hour plus bonus. Contact the
TeleFund Office at 328-4215.
FULL & PART-TIME HELP WANTED
at University Discount Apparel (across
the street from Krispy Kreme and
Hardee's) Flexible hours! Apply in per-
son Tuesday through Friday from 3:00
pm to 5:00 pm only No Phone Calls
Accepted!
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S YOUNG
MEN'S STORE are accepting applica-
tions for additional summr season sales
associates. Flexible scheduling options
including evening and weekend hours.
Salary plus merchandise discount for
your new springsummer wardrobe. Ap-
plications accepted each Mondy and
Thursday. l-3pm, Brody's, The Plaza.
FEMALE MODELS NEEDED for swim
suit calander. No modeling experience
necessary. Call Photography (919)321-
8057 Ask for Mike or leave message.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING Seasonal
& full-time employment available at Na-
tional Parks, Forests & Wildlife Pre-
serves. Benefitsbonuses! Call: 1-206-
5454804 ext. N53622
TO TEND LARGE YARD AND GAR-
DEN. One daywk. Folkland area. 752-
4317 after 9 pm
LOOKINC FOR INTERESTED STU-
DENT to work part-time for a National
Catalog Retailer. Job entails distribution
of promotional materials on campus. Job
requires 5 hrs. per week commitment
(you set the hours). Good money and
perks! Only serious calls please. 1-800-
788-3365.
SIM LOOKING NX A WAG TO
flb fito fib flto
MMMOttQASffiKI
For Sale
MCAT study materials for sale. Call 830-
4877
DUPLEX FOR SALE - 2108A E. 3rd
Street 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, fireplace,
dishwasher, ice maker, new Maytag
wahserdryer, range, 950 sq. feet refrig-
erator, only 2 12 years old. Call Hart at
758-3977.
FOR SALE: Subaru XT 1988. sporty,
clean, runs good, sunroof, lots of options.
104k Asking $2100 321-1634
MOVING SALE 27" TV. Full size bar. 2
chairs, desk and dresser (both with a hutch
and an end table.) Best offers 757-3868
MOUNTAIN BIKE - Univega, 4.5 pound
frame, AMP suspension fork, full LXXT
Components, custom hand built wheels,
many extras, incredible condition, sacri-
fice $750 negoitable Call (919)328-8167
90 BLACK LAB PUPPIES. 5 weeks old.
Asking $20.00 a piece. Call 757-3318
TWO (2) COLLEGIATE LOFT BEDS.
$80 each. Used one year- extra parts.
Moving to apartment Also dorm size re-
frigerator - $75.00 Call week days 328-
7759. weekends (919)442-9636.
11 WEEK OLD, BLACK, MALE, PART
CHOW PUPPY. Very friendly, playful,
loves other animals. Dewormed and some
shots. Debbie 757-3623
FOR SALE - Cellular flip-phone w x-tra
battery, leather case, battery charger &
cigarette adapter. 150.00. Call 756-7357
KAWASAKI 650-SX JET SKI: excellent
condition, low hours ss impeller, ride plate
$2500 obo 752-6646 (Jeff)
FOR SALE: Kenmore heavy duty washer
and dryer. $75 each.Good condition. 757-
3868
FOR SALE: 1995 GT Tempest Bought
in January. Still looks brand new. Zoom
stem, toe clips, seat leash, and a new rack
that holds 3 bikes. Paid over $600, ask-
ing $425 (negotiable) Call Adam or Scott
at 328-8856
DIAMOND BACK, OUTLOOK MOUN-
TAIN BIKE, 18 inch frame, excellent con-
dition, $140.00 758-1932
MOTORCYCLE HELMETSCUBA
EQUIPMENT - Shoei Rainey X8 Red-sil-
ver-black-white for $250 (neg.) Paid $525.
Top of the line Sheerwood BC, Regula-
tor, tank, and wetsuits. Call Stan at 752-
0859 for prices.
CANNONDALE MOUNTAIN BIKE Al
most new Aluminum Bar Ends, Seat
Leash. Two bottle cages. Excellent Condi-
tion. $400 Call 83O0906 and leave mes-
sage.
1990 SUBARU LEGACY Excellent car,
All power options, Front wheel drive, Re-
tails for $7300 Must sell - $6000 Call 830-
0906 leave message
CAMCORDER: sears model 934.537, 6
zoom, 2 batteries, battery charger, carry-
ing case, and triped $450.00 Call 328-7759
(weekdays) or 442-9636 (weekends).
IBM COMPUTER 486 - Investor model,
soft ware included. Call 758-6820
'82 YAMAHA 650 SECA. Very good con-
dition. Shaft drive, quality extras, origi-
nal owner. $1250. Paul 816-3129 (day)
756-8344 (evening)
PAASCHE AIRBRUSH H set Never
used, still in box one can airbrush propel-
lant included. All parts and instructions.
Call 752-9219
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE with
option to renew lease from May - August
Two bedroom, less than a mile from cam-
pus. For more information call Michelle
or Emily at 752-9160
LOOK ATTENTION STUDENTS: Larg
est selection of campus rentals available
May 1st and August 1st Duplexes, Houses,
Apartments Call HOMELOCATORS 752-
1375
WESLEY COMMONS 1 & 2 Bedrooms:
Free cable, water, sewer, walking distance
to campus. SummerYearly leases. Pitt
Property Management 758-1921
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: non-
smoker, to share a newly renovated 3 bed-
room house. Close to campus. $250
Months plus SSO-utilities. Give us a call.
Claudia or Christine 758-5024.
APARTMENT FOR SUMMER SUB
LEASE-Wilson Acres Location. Perfect for
Summer School. 3 Bedroom, water, sewer
and basic cable included. Call Kurt at 830-
5552
PAY NO DEPOSIT AND SIGN NO
LEASE! 2 bedroom new apartment Con-
temporary, ceiling fans, deck, dishwasher,
etc Water and sewage paid. Move in Mid-
May (negotiable) Call 75&8647816-2519.
APARTMENT FOR RENT IN
WYNDHAM CIRCLE. 2 bedroom on first
floor. Available in May. Call 830-0786
SUBLEASE: 1 Bedroom Apartment in
Kingston Place, Available May to August
New Apartments, Washer Dryer and
Cable included. Pool. Contact Kelli at 752-
8041.
TOWNHOUSE 2 Bedroom, 1 12 Bath,
available July 1. All appliances, washer
dryer hook-ups, extended patio, attic stor-
age. Call Mike (919)5244695.
BRAND NEW APARTMENT FOR
RENT-Take over lease. Great for Summer
School. Avaliable May! Pay $180.00 for
1st month's rent 360.00 there after. Call
321-5779
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL? Need a
place to stay? Call 757-8709. Female
Roommate needed, non-smoker
prefferably. $220month plus 12 utility,
phone, cable. Ringgold Towers. S
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share the expenses of 2-Bed-
room aprtment with wd. Other expenses
are 12 deposit and utilities. On ECU Bus
Route Call Monica - 75&6513.
TW' PEOPLE NEEDED to sublease
bedroom in a three bedroom townhouse
beginning May 1st Rent $131.25 each plus
14 utilities. Two blocks from campus.
Call 758-8521.
Personals
SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER YOU. We
look out for students better than any other
credit card. Call 1-800-CITIBANK to ap-
ply. NOTE: we won't hit on your dates.
ATTRACTIVE AND POETIC FEMALE
seeks likeminded male for friendship and
possible relationship. Send letters and
pictures to V.G.S. - 116 Fletcher PI
Greenville.NC 27834
GAMES, WIDESPREAD, PANIC, give
aways, dag, food and much more. 16th
Annual BAREFOOT ON THE MALL.
Come kick your shoes off with Student
Union. April 20th 1 lam-6pm
PLEASE HELP -1 need tickets for Jimmy
Buffet Sat 503. 1 have friends coming
into town and need extra tickets. Call
Brandon 355-8277
DATES
GUYS & GALS
-900-726-0033 EXT.2550
$2.99 per min.
Must be 18 yrs.
HUGE 5 BEDROOM HOUSE 1 Block
from campus 2 Blocks from downtown. 2
full baths: ample parking, lots of great
extras. Available May 5. $1100 permonth
1 year lease deposit Pet ok. Call 752-
6833
ROOMMATE NEEDED: TAR RIVER
ESTATES-2Bedroom Townhouse, your
own room, 13 utilities, washer & dryer.
For summer months. Available May 1st
Call ErikaJuiie 757-8723
CHEAP! Take over my lease May 1- Aug.
31. 1 Bedroom apartment 1 block from
campus downtown. 295month electric-
ity included in rent. Call 758-5419leave
a message.
FOR RENT: 4 or 5 bedroom house, 2
full baths, large 1 acre lot fenced in with
built in patio and brick barbeque grill,
perfect for students. $700.00 month. Call
321-2030.
NEEDED: 2 NS roommates to share 3Br,
2 12 bath townhouse at Twin Oaks. W
D hook up, partly furnished, pool, ECU
bus service, and private room. Available
May 1. $200 per mnth 13 utilities. Call
Jenny at 7524839.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 2 bedroom apt
$192.50, close to campus, washerdryer
hookup, brand new apt! Call 758-2363
leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED '95 Male Room-
mate needed for the Fall 1995, willing to
live anywhere within (1-3) miles of cam-
pus, leave message 758-2363.
LOFT APARTMENT available May 1st -
2 Bdrm, room for 3 people. Across the
street from art building. Great view, Great
Location. 350.00 month. 413-0014
2 BEDROOM APT. 205 E. 9th St No
pets. $350.00 monthly. Available May 6th
1995. Across from New Student Center.
Call 7564151
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublease 2 Br.
Apt May 1- Aug. with option to renew
lease. 190.00month includes water
cable. 752-7721
FULLY FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM, 2
Bathrooms for students (easily
accomodates 4) attending Summer school
sessions. In nice neighborhood, 4 miles
from campus. $800 monthly. Utilities fur-
nished. Call 756-5799 and ask for Kim.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to take
over lease June 1. 2 bed, 2 baths. Cable,
water included. Pool, Clubhouse, ECU bus
service available. $22512 utilities
deposit
Call Wendy or Emily at 757-0793
AVAILABLE NOW! AFFORDABLE! One
bedroom Apartment. Brand new, quiet
neighboorhood beside Lowes. Want
someone to assume lease. Please call any-
time, leave message. 355-7699 $295.00
APARTMENT AVAILABLE FOR SUB-
LEASE for May, June, and July. 2 Bed-
room, fully furnished apartment located
at Ringgold Towrs. Ask for Emily or
Strphanie. 830-8903.
ATHLETIC, PRE-MED SOPHOMORE
needs male roommate to share 2-bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres by July includes
weight room, basketball court swimming
poollaundry. 752-3122
SUMMER DISCOUNT FOR
TOWNHOUSE at Twin Oaks attractive 3
bedrooms, 2 12 baths, available about
May 8th. $590 per month, reduced to $520
monthly for the summer. No pets allowed
-12 month lease required. Call Will Mar-
tin 752-2851.
ROOMMATE NEEDED MAY 1 in 2 bed-
room apartment at Kings Row. 112 miles
from campus. 190 deposit and 190 rent ?
12 utilities. Call 551-7632
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Share
2 Bdrm. duplex, $175month, 12 utili-
ties, great location. Please call Elaina 355-
9582
FEMALE NEEDED to share 2 bedroom
apt with one other female beginning in
the fall. Location Rent is undecided and
Negotiable. Call Angela 752-8070
TAR RIVER ESTATES - Roommate
needed immediately. $100 deposit $172
rent 14 utilitiesphone. Located on
river. Call Kevin, 7584701
BEST DEAL! Ringgold Towers Apt for
sub-lease May-August 1 Bedroom, 1 bath,
furnished. $300month. Call Yaqoob 758-
3635.
WANTED TO RENT: Law Firm needs
one fully furnished apartment from July
1 - Aug 5. Contact Bert Speicher 355-3030.
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
LT. or Tommy Williams
756-78157S8-7436
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Services Offered
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. AH students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let up help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53624
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo-
bile Music Productions is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of an Disc Jockey service in the area.
Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates
booking fast. Call early 7584644 ask for
Lee.
NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP SERVICE
We can help you find money for college.
Students-do not give your credit card or
bank account to anyone over the phone
claiming to sell you a "guaranteed pro-
gram Get the true facts on scholarships
& grants. $39.00 for a Student Profile.
No gimmicks. Call today for a free bro-
chure. (800)3244395.
YOGA Classes
�s orWil s IS
I Hhi Nivw.nuk'
M
FACULTYPROFESSIONALS: High
standards? No time to meet high-caliber
people? If you're a sincere single ready
for a long-term relationship with someone
of similar values and interests, let us help.
Now in our 5th year. (We're matchmak-
ers, not an escort service.) Introduction
LTD. 321-1172
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of information in U.S. �
msubjects
Order Catalog Todiy wi:n vim MC or COD
EM 800-351-0222
lii'il'yy or (310) 477-8226
Or. rush S2 00 lo Research Information
� 1U:?K1OT) fat .1206 AJjR Angeles CA90025
Greek Personals
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, Kappa Alpha, and
Phi Tau present The Fist Annual Reading
Day Eve Party - Doug Clark and Hot Nuts
and Liquid Pleasure. April 24.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE RHO
CLASS OF SIGMA NU including Kevin
Adams. Jeff Polaski, Bill Robertson, J.
Gibbs, Mike Flanney, Marc Nance, Brian
Huff, Dave White, and Kyle Foss on their
recent initiation into the brotherhood. We
hope you guys enjoyed your pilgramidge
to Nationals, and hope you reep the ben-
efits of Greek life. "My Friend"
PHI SIGMA PI CONGRATS to all new
brothers: Ngan Kim, David Steimle, Cara
Sumners, Michael Dail, Jeff McGrath, and
Beth Phillips. Also a special thanks to this
past Exec Council you did a great job.
Thanks for the memories.
ALPHA DELTA PHI we had a great time
i aursday night and want to Thank ya'll
for a awesome pre-downtown - Let's.try
and get together again soon! Love The
Brothers of Sigma Nu.
Our classifieds can help
you compute success.
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Display Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication. However, no
refunds will be given.
For more information, call ECU - 6366
MNMMN
MHHMHH





r�i
m �! n � Mr
14
Tuesday, April 11, 1995
The East Carolinian
- in
RECIPIENTS OF PERKINS OR
NURSING STUDENT LOANS
(Formerly the National Direct Student Loans).
.As a recipient of a Perkins or Nursing Stu-
dent Loan, you are reminded of your respon-
sibility to attend an Exit Interview IF YOU
MEET ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CONDI-
TIONS: GRADUATING IN MAY 1995. DROP-
PING BELOW HALF-TIME STATUS OR
OTHERWISE NOT RETURNING TO EAST
CAROLINA UNIVERSITY FOR FALL SE-
MESTER. 1995. In the Exit Interview, you
will be given important information regard-
ing your repayment schedule, provisions for
loan cancellation and other required infor-
mation needed to keep your account in good
standing. Participation in the Exit Interview
will assure the release of your academic
records. There are two meetings scheduled -
Tuesday. April 18. 1995 at 3:00pm and
Wednesday. April 19.1995 at 3:00pm in R oom
1010, General Classroom Building.lf it is not
possible for you to attenc either meeting,
please contact the Student Loans Office (328-
6816 or 135 Ragsdalel to ar range a personal
interview. Sherry A. Speight Director of Stu-
dent Loans
"JAM-A-THON 95"
Needs one more group of performers who
can play and sing songs from the late (id's
and early 70's on April 22 from 2-5pm at
Carolina East Mall to play for any amount of
time, to raise funds fro Disabled .American
Veterans. For more information call R ob at
7564916
WZMB
WZMB is giving away a S100 shopping spree
to East Carolina Mall during one of the morn-
ing shows (6am to 10am). Listen for details.
The WZMB "DEAD SHOW" will broadcast
live at "BAREFOOT ON THE MALL" from
1 lam until noon on April 2i)th. There will be
a WZMB payroll meeting April 24th at
5:00pm.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
On Tuesday. April 11. 1995. J. Scott Truax.
Attorney Practitioner in Residence at the
Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law at
Campbell University, will be visiting our cam-
pus. He will be speaking wit h students who
are planning to attend law school and with
faculty who guide those students in the se-
lection of undergraduate courses. Mr. Truax
will meet with interested faculty from 1.30 to
2:30pm in 218-A Ragsdale: from 2:30 to
4:Oopm he will meet with students in 235
Raw
RESUME WRITING WORKSHOP
A workshop on writing a professional resume
lor employment will be held in the Career
Services Center. 701 E. Fifth St on Wed April
12 at 3:00pm and Mon. April 17 at 4:00pm.
Seniors who will soon enter the job market
or students seeking internships or cimjp ex-
periences are invited to attend. The Program
will include information on the content tor-
mat and reproduction of the resume.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP
Learn how to prepare, package and present
your product - Yourself - in an employment
interview. This workshop covers dealing wit h
difficult or inappropi iate questions, what the
employer looks for. and to follow-up for posi-
tive results. Sponsored by Career Services,
the workshop is scheduled for Tue. April 11
and Tue. April 25 at 3:00pm in The Career
Services Center. 7ol E. Fifth Street
STATLAB
Research Consulting
328-6438
Austin 215

Call For Our Hours!
We Can Help With:
Creating an Experiment
Designing Questionnaires
Entering Data into a Computer
Using a Statistical Package
- Running an Analysis
Writing Results
Interpreting Results
N
PRINCIPLES W'SODND RETIRE ME NT INVESTING
??��5!2
PAIN.
�SSS
X'tt"

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yets
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11 l


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For fast reliel from the nagging ache oi taxes, we
recommend TIAA-CREF SRAs SRAs arc- tax-
deferred annuities designed i� help huiUi additional
assets�mone that can help make the difference
between living and living � ell alter your working years
are over
Contributions to oui SRAs are deducted rrom
your salary on a pre tax basis That lowers your
current taxable income, so you start saving on taxes
rieht away. What's more, any earnings on your SRAs
are also tax-deferred until you receive them as income.
As the nation's largest retirement system, we oiler
a wide ranee oi allocation choices � trom TIAA's
traditional annuity, with its guarantees ol principal
and interest, to the seven diversified investment
at counts ot CREF's variable annuity What's more,
our expenses are vcrv low, which means more ot
your money goes toward improving your nature
I inancial health.
To hnd out more, call our planning specialists at
1 800 842-2888, We II send you a complete SRA
information kit. plus a free slide-calculator that shows
That can make a big difference in how painful your tax you how much SRAs can lower your taxes
lull is evei
Call today�it couldn t hurt.
Ensuring the future
For those who shape it.
;� . I ��� Lippei nalyti 5.
UpixT-Du j 1004 (Quarterly) CREF
CREF Individual and Institutional Services In For more complete mtormation. including charges and 1
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BRAND NEW LUXURY FOUR BEDROOM APARTMENTS
POOL TABLES : EN
BASKETBALL
TENNIS
VOLLEYBALL
Lots of Extras: We pride ourselves on making our residents as comfortable as possible with our
I . , CAfcOUMA UHlVEflSJTV
CW�r SII
-i-a 7 $M
1526 Charles Boulevard
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone:(919)321-7613
Fax:(919)321-7614
Office Hours:
Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 4pm
ill! 1
73&ft r
V �-k;fcg
The Place to Play at ECU!
4 Bedroom Flat
Each with Private Vanity
ACTIVITIES
Enjoy a game of tennis or basketball on our light-
ed courts.
Swim or relax in our sparkling pool.
Dig into our sand volleyball courts.
Work out in our full-featured fitness area
(includes" Stair-master, Ufeeycle, Weight Training
Machines).
Imite your friends and neighbors over for a pool-
side barbeque.
Catch your favorite programs oh our Big screen
TV or sltoot a game of pool at our clubhouse.
Don t miss our planned social events!
Jipp
4 Bedroom Townhouse
With 3 Full Baths
PRICES STARTING AT $250. "FUN FOR FALL1995
Continental Breakfast Even
Friday Morning
� Resident Advisory Board
Community Advisors
Valet dry cleaning sen ice
available
' On site notary public
' Copy machine available for
1 Valet housekeeping service
available
' Roommate matching servic
FulIv equipped kitchen with
microwave anil ice maker
' Full size WasherDryer in each
apartment at no additional
charge
On site professional management
On ECU Bus Line
' UPSFederal Express package
acceptance at office if you are
not home
Stamps can be purchased u
Players Club office
� 24 hour maintenance
' Price, quality, location, and Venice
is our speciality





Title
The East Carolinian, April 11, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 11, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1072
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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